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THE MOST INTERESTING PEOPLE, PLACES & CULTURE IN AMERICA'S FARM-TO-FORK CAPITAL

COVER ARTIST David Fiveash Davy Fiveash is an artist originally from southern Georgia now living in Sacramento. His work introduces a fresh, contemporary look at the Vanitas, or the Dutch Still Life genre of painting which presents themes of the impermanence of life, and man’s vain attempts at self-gain and importance. Visit davidfiveash.com.

3104 O St. #120, Sac. CA 95816 (Mail Only)

info@insidepublications.com EDITOR Marybeth Bizjak mbbizjak@aol.com PRODUCTION M.J. McFarland DESIGN Cindy Fuller PHOTOGRAPHY Linda Smolek, Aniko Kiezel AD COORDINATOR Michele Mazzera, Julie Foster DISTRIBUTION Lauren Hastings lauren@insidepublications.com ACCOUNTING Jim Hastings, Daniel Nardinelli, Adrienne Kerins

916-443-5087 EDITORIAL POLICY Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Inside Publications. Inside Publications is delivered for free to more than 75,000 households in Sacramento. Printing and distribution costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. We spotlight selected advertisers, but all other stories are determined solely by our editorial staff and are not influenced by advertising. No portion may be reproduced mechanically or electronically without written permission of the publisher. All ad designs & editorial—©

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MAY 17 VOL. 22 • ISSUE 4 11 14 20 22 28 30 32 36 38 42 44 48 50 52 54 58 60 62 64 70 72 80

Publisher's Desk East Sac Life Meet Your Neighbor Inside City Hall City Beat Giving Back Well Heeled Inside Downtown Farm To Fork Sports Authority Fit Food Building Our Future Spirit Matters Shoptalk Home Insight Science In The Neighborhood Getting There The Matchmaker Artist Spotlight Garden Jabber To Do Restaurant Insider


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Work It Out OUR COMMUNITY SUFFERS WHEN LOCAL POLITICAL LEADERS CLASH

Interim police chief Brian Louie

I

n March, the city council approved retention bonuses for the city’s police officers. In recent years, police staffing levels have dropped as city officers left for better pay and work conditions elsewhere. Looming in the coming months are contract negotiations between the city and its police union. On March 22, The Sacramento Bee published an op-ed by Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones suggesting the council has established policies that do not support law enforcement, particularly interim police chief Brian Louie. Jones made some decent points that no doubt left the mayor and council peeved. But Jones, with decades of law enforcement experience, has the right to express his views. As the mother of a son in

CH By Cecily Hastings Publisher’s Desk

law enforcement, I can understand his position. Jones considers the city police department to be top-notch. His concern is that the council has developed policies that placate law enforcement detractors. Jones also called out the untenable position that Chief Louie is in as he seeks to have his position made permanent.

My hope is that Jones and Steinberg can forge a positive relationship based upon what they agree on. As an example, Jones pointed out that the city established a police commission in recent years, appointing members with little law enforcement experience or understanding.

Jones believes that even with retention bonus payments, the officer exodus will continue. In the process, innovation will falter and self-initiated, proactive police work will decline, leading to a mediocre Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones department and less safe communities. Not long after that op-ed appeared, “mean.” Steinberg and de Leon sat in the front row of the packed house and Jones hosted a town hall meeting asked questions and made statements with Thomas Homan, acting director that seemed designed to incite a of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Jones stated that crowd that was already ramped up his goal was to provide a public forum emotionally. Many people, including me, were turned away from the to allay deportation fears and dispel forum. I ended up watching it online. misinformation in the community. Jones and Steinberg actually agree Mayor Darrell Steinberg, on a number of things. Both favor a accompanied by state Senate path to legalization for undocumented president pro tem Kevin de Leon, immigrants who have not committed participated in a protest rally outside crimes. Both are sympathetic to the the immigration forum. Steinberg children of immigrants who were called Jones’ decision to host the meeting with Homan “cynical” and PUBLISHER page 13

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PUBLISHER FROM page 11 brought to the United States without documentation by their parents. And both agree that the nation’s immigration system is broken and needs comprehensive reform. At the meeting, Jones pledged that he would never allow his officers to be deputized by the federal government as de facto immigration officers. Homan told the audience that “we prioritize criminals� for deportation, focusing on those who are a threat to public safety, not people who abide by our laws. This point was clearly lost on the hyper-agitated audience, including on a skeptical Steinberg. Like just about everything else in our highly polarized nation right now, sadly there appears no middle ground on this subject. I know and respect Jones and believe what he says. With a member

of law enforcement in our family, we have a perspective that others may not be able to fully understand. It has been a very rough few years for those in blue, along with their families. I have no doubt that the mayor and council believe they are being supportive of law enforcement by approving the retention bonus plan. But they need to be careful as their actions in other areas regarding police department policy at times appear as trying to satisfy members of the vocal fringe who view law enforcement only as the enemy. They need to keep in mind that there is widespread support in our community for the officers— and their leaders—who carry out the difficult task of enforcing our laws. My hope is that Jones and Steinberg can forge a positive relationship based upon what they agree on, rather than simply reflecting the rigid left-right axis that

has sadly gripped just about every issue in our city, state and country. The men and women risking their lives every day to keep our streets and communities safe certainly deserve it. So do the residents of the poor and minority communities that have the most to lose when police officers pull back, sensing that local politicians don’t seem to have their backs. Note: Thank you to the many folks who wrote me in support of our city’s efforts to brand itself as America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital. I want to

clarify that Visit Sacramento decided, in conjunction with Councilmember Rick Jennings, to repaint the I-5 water-tower slogan. The agency also paid all the costs associated with the renaming. Artist Bob Miller sent me this rendering of what he thinks should be painted on the water tower. In my mind this is a terrific idea. Thanks Bob! Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidepublications.com. n

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It’s Done GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH UNVEILS ITS BIG BUILD

T

he Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation recently completed a $12.5 million construction project called The Build. The project features a 43,000-square-foot indoor/outdoor event space that includes an education building, expanded parking and a large courtyard known in Greek as a plateia. The new center also creates a permanent home for the Greek Festival, which returns to the church grounds in October after nearly 30 years at Sacramento Convention Center. On March 25, church and community members, including Mayor Darrell Steinberg, County Supervisor Phil Serna and Councilmember Jeff Harris, gathered for a ribbon cutting, rising of the flags, tour of the grounds and site blessing. The church is at 600 Alhambra Blvd.

Both the Greek and USA Flags were raised at the grand opening of the Greek Orthodox Church's new event and meeting space.

STOP AND PRUNE THE ROSES Friends of East Sacramento will hold a volunteer day in the McKinley Rose Garden on Saturday, April 29. The event kicks off at 8:30 a.m. with a volunteer appreciation breakfast in the garden. At 9 a.m., there will be deadheading training session for new volunteers.

SM By Serena Marzion East Sac Life

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Volunteers will help prune rosebushes in McKinley Rose Garden and trim and rake in the park. While some equipment and garden supplies will be provided, volunteers are asked to bring a pair of garden gloves, pruning shears and rakes if they have them. At 8:30 a.m., courtesy of East Sacramento Hardware, professional knife sharpener Stanley Spencer of Stanley’s Perfect Edge, will be at the garden to sharpen volunteers’ clippers. This will be done on a first-come, firstserved basis. Volunteers will meet at the benches in the rose garden. The rose garden EAST SAC LIFE page 16

Friends of East Sacramento will hold a volunteer work day in the McKinley Rose Garden.


OUR MISSION: Live. Work. Shop. Play. Together we can make East Sacramento the best place to do business in the city.

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Eyes of East Sac Owners Arlene Espiritu, O.D. and Susana Belmonte, O.D.

Heavenly Salt Spa owner Jose Mendoza with Rachelle Brendlin

SAVE THE DATE FOR JULY 22 FOR THE TASTE OF EAST SACRAMENTO WELCOME NEW MEMBERS: Jacquline Gage Realtor Compton’s Market Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church Clubhouse 56 Papailias & Associates Consulting

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The garden is a popular spot for weddings and other special events that generate revenues for the care of the garden. Friends of East Sacramento contracts out weekly lawn and garden care, but the weekly job of removing the spent blooms is done solely by volunteers. “It’s an easy job once you have about 15 minutes of training,” says Pitts. “And it has to be the most enjoyable volunteer job in town, being surrounded by such beauty and peacefulness.” Once volunteers are trained, they are asked to come a minimum of an hour a week to work on their own schedule. Online training is also available at FriendsofEastSacramento.org. If you are interested in volunteering on April 29 or would like more information on how to help on your own schedule, email friendsofeastsac@aol.com or call 452-8011.

FOOD TRUCKS COME TO LOCAL PARKS Food Truck Mania will be held in McKinley Park on Friday, May 12, from 5 to 8 p.m. Participating food trucks include Bacon Mania, Buckhorn Grill, Costa’s Finest Kettle Corn, Dog Town, Green Papaya, Gyro King, La Mex Taqueria, Rudy’s on the Roll, The Sweet Spot and Wandering Boba. Tahoe Park will host the event on Friday, May 26, from 5 to 8 p.m. Participating trucks include Bacon Mania, Buckhorn Grill, Chando’s Tacos, Costa’s Finest Kettle Corn, Cowtown Creamery, Flavor Face, Gameday Grill, Hefty Gyros, Local Kine Shave Ice, Smokin’ Hot Pizza and Wandering Boba. Both events will feature live music, a bounce house, a beer garden benefiting Front Street Animal Shelter and bicycle parking courtesy of Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates. Food Truck Mania happens rain or shine.

HOORAY FOR MAY

The Sacramento area chapter of Parents of Murdered Children recently held its third annual balloon release in memory of the victims of violence at the McKinley Rose Garden. POMC's services include emotional support and friendship to homicide survivors, court accompaniment, and monthly meetings. For more information call 879-4541 or visit: pomc.org/sacramento. EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 14 is at the corner of H and 33rd streets. R.S.V.P.s are requested, though drop-in help will also be appreciated. The Friends group is also looking for volunteers to work on their own schedule. “Last summer, we had about 30 dedicated deadheading volunteers who worked hard to

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remove the spent blooms each week. This kept the new blooms coming all summer long,” says Lyn Pitts, who oversees the care of the garden for the volunteer nonprofit. “But each year, we need more neighbors to help with this vital volunteer job.”

On Sunday, May 7, Sacramento Turn Verein German Language School will host Maifest, a family-friendly celebration of the arrival of spring. The event includes German maypole dancers, German music, picnic food, puppet shows, face painting, crafts, storytelling, an adult biergarten, Kaffee und Kuchen (coffee and cake) and Maibowle, a drink made with strawberries soaked in brandy. Maifest runs from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is free. Sacramento Turn Verein is at 3349 J St. For more information, go to sacramentoturnverein.com.

THEODORE JUDAH OPEN HOUSE Theodore Judah Elementary School will hold its annual open house on Thursday, May 25, at 5 p.m. There will be student musical performances and an art exhibition. Theodore Judah is at 3919 McKinley Blvd.

EAST SAC LIFE page 18


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EAST SAC LIFE FROM page 16

GARDEN TOUR FOR MOM David Lubin Elementary School will host the 19th annual East Sac Garden Tour on Mother’s Day weekend— Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May 14—from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. In addition to the tour of local gardens, a tea garden luncheon will be served at Sutter Lawn Tennis Club. There will be a boutique and a sweet shop at the school. Tour tickets are $20 in advance, $25 on the day of the event. Admission for children 12 and younger is free. Luncheon tickets are $15. For more information or to purchase tickets, go to davidlubingardentour.com. David Lubin Elementary School is at 3535 M St.

SAC HIGH REUNION On Saturday, June 24, Sacramento High School’s class of 1962 will hold its 55th reunion at Frasinetti Winery. The event starts at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $55. Mail checks to Kathleen Elbe at P.O. Box 564, Sloughhouse, 95683.

GARDENING EVENTS IN MCKINLEY PARK The Sacramento Cactus and Succulent Show and Sale will be held at Shepard Garden and Arts Center on Saturday, May 6, and Sunday, May 9, starting at 9 a.m. both days. On Saturday, May 13, the Sacramento Geranium Club will hold

its annual show and sale from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the center. On Saturday, May 20, and Sunday, May 21, the center will host the Satsuki Aikokai Bonsai Show. Sacramento Garden and Arts Center is at 3331 Park Way in McKinley Park.

ST. MARY SCHOOL TO HOLD SPRING FESTIVAL On Saturday, May 6, St. Mary School will celebrate 60 years with an outdoor event called Primavera. Samples of wine and beer from local wineries and microbreweries will be served, along with food from local restaurants. There will be live music. The event takes place in St. Mary School’s plaza from 6 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $40 in advance, $45 at the door. St. Mary School is at 1333 58th St. For tickets, go to saintmaryschool. com.

BONE MARROW DRIVE On Thursday, May 18, and Friday, May 19, Dignity Health Mercy General Hospital will hold a bone marrow registry drive in the hospital south lobby from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mercy General is at 4001 J St. For more information, go to dkms.org or email William Hodges at William.Hodges@dignityhealth.org.

SUMMER PROGRAMS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

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Sacramento State University: cyber security and coding. Cyber security students will see demonstrations of simulated cyber attacks and learn about hacker methods. Computer science professor Jun Dai will guide students with hands-on labs and show them how to protect their computers. Coding students will learn to think logically and break down a larger problem into smaller parts. The coding class runs July 10 through 14. Cyber security runs July 24 through 28.

To see the full roster of academies, go to cce.csus.edu/acads.

DEVINE RUMORS Did you hear that Devine Bakery & Gelateria on McKinley Boulevard is closing? Well, now it’s not. After a bit of a struggle through the winter months, owner Elizabeth McCleary was ready to shut the doors. When she posted a closing sign, there was an outcry from loyal customers, and business picked up. McCleary

Two new classes for high school students have been added to the Summer Academies roster at

Theodore Judah is having an open house.

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F

riends of East Sacramento is sponsoring the fifth annual McKinley Rose Garden photography contest. The contest is open to both amateur and professional photographers. The only rule is that photos must be taken by the end of May. “Our goal is to ask neighborhood talent to help us put together a portfolio of photographs to help market the rose garden on our nonprofit’s website to book wedding rentals,” says Cecily Hastings, the group’s co-founder. “We will also be featuring the winning photographs on our Facebook page.” “We are looking for some general overall shots of the garden showing the variety of beds,” she explains. “But we also are looking for close-up portraits of individual roses.” Email your high-resolution photo entries to friendsofeastsac@aol.com no later than May 31. Winners will be featured in this magazine and displayed in the lobby of Clunie Community Center. The nonprofit Friends of East Sacramento continues to offer its AdoptA-Garden fundraising program for people who donate a year’s worth of maintenance for a flower bed. No physical work in the garden is required. Plans cost $195 a year and include a custom garden marker. Discounted multiyear plans are also available. Donors can make donations in honor or memory of loved ones or to celebrate an event such as a wedding or anniversary. For more information, go to friendsofeastsac.org, email friendsofeastsac@aol.com or call 452-8011.

One of the the gardens that will be on the David Lubin tour this month.


decided to give the shop another chance, just in time for summer. Devine Bakery & Gelateria serves gelato, pastries, panini sandwiches, salads and espresso drinks made with Temple coffee. Devine is at 3610 McKinley Blvd.

FREE POLLINATOR GARDENING WORKSHOP East Sac Hardware will hold a free one-hour workshop on attracting pollinators on Saturday, May 20, at 10 a.m. Participants will learn about bees and other pollinators and their needs. Pollinator-friendly gardening practices and plant selection will also be covered. Seats are limited. To reserve a space, call 457-7558. East Sac Hardware is at 4800 Folsom Blvd.

BOCKBIERFEST AT TURN VEREIN Sacramento Turn Verein will hold its annual Bockbierfest on Saturday, May 6, from 3 p.m. to midnight. The annual event celebrates Bavarian Bockbier with German music, dancing, food and beer. Admission is $20. Sacramento Turn Verein is at 3349 J St. For tickets and more information, go to sacramentoturnverein.com.

CONCERT FOR A CAUSE On Saturday, May 6, the East Sac Baby Boomers will host a benefit concert at Harlow’s featuring Lydia Pense & Cold Blood. Proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society Road to Recovery Program. The East Sac Baby Boomers started as a group of neighbors meeting for lunch and has evolved into a nonprofit entity that raised $10,000 for the American Cancer Society in 2016. Its mission is to raise money for good causes and have fun doing it.

The Maifest at Sacramento Turn Verein celebrates the arrival of spring. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Harlow’s is at 2708 J St. For more information, go to eastsacbabyboomers.com.

SAVING THE ELM TREES The city of Sacramento and Sacramento Tree Foundation are enlisting volunteer “citizen scientists” to participate in the Save The Elm Program (STEP).

Dutch elm disease has been around since the 1990s with devastating effects. Many of the city’s large, stately elms have been lost, and many more are in danger of disappearing due to this contagious disease. To learn more about Dutch elm disease and how you can help, go to sactree.com/STEP. Serena Marzion can be reached at InsideEastSac@gmail.com. n

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Working Partnership A YOUNG COUPLE BUILDS A COMPANY FROM THE GROUND UP

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rica Cunningham was 19 when she bought her first home while working for a small real estate company in the Arden area. You could say she was a quick learner. At 20, Nathan Cunningham was passionate about building things and working on bikes and cars. Over the next 15 years, they married, had two children and built Indie Capital, LLC, a residential real estate development company that today specializes in infill projects. Their distinctive style, quality work and attention to detail have made them a tour de force in Sacramento’s residential neighborhoods around the perimeter of the Downtown grid. With an extensive portfolio of remodeled homes, historic restorations and new houses, the Cunningham business story reads like a primer on how to flip the right house at the right time and grow a successful company—all while balancing family life. They are now in the midst of their biggest endeavor yet: three residential infill projects that will provide 23 single-family homes. Eight will be built at 15th and D streets (Mansion Flats Modern) with prices starting at $569,000. Six homes at Second Avenue and 34th Street (Oak Park Creatives) are being presold at $469,000, and nine near Broadway and 9th Street (Broadway

JB By Jeanne Winnick Brennan Meet Your Neighbor

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Nathan and Erica Cunningham Redux) will range between $449,000 and $599,000. According to Erica, potential buyers familiar with their work have already expressed interest. “The response has been very encouraging,” she says. “Tons of professional couples tell us they want exactly what we’re building: a house that is low maintenance, energy efficient, with lots of room for entertaining in a location that’s within walking distance to everything.” So how did they do it? Simply put: sweat equity. A great working partnership with a division of duties also helps. In raising their

two young children, they split the calendar into roughly six-month stints. When Erica is working full time on marketing, research, land acquisition and permitting, Nate is front and center at home. When it is time to build, Nate swings into action, and Erica takes the lead managing the family. Indie Capital really started when Nate and Erica first met, and he helped her paint and landscape to flip her first house, a 1910 bungalow in Oak Park. Remodeling quickly became their passion, but they took careful steps to lay the foundation for their business remodeling one house at a time.

“In the beginning, it was just the two of us, but we did hire out the occasional plumbing/electrical job,” says Erica. “However, when a new bathtub was needed, it was Nate and I carrying it in from his 30-year-old Toyota pickup truck.” In 2004, Erica became a licensed real estate broker and left her job to start Indie Capital Real Estate. The couple continued to do light remodeling work on their own projects until Nate became licensed as a general contractor in 2006 and started Indie Capital Constructors. “With Nate, you get an experienced contractor who instinctively knows how things should come together,”


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says Erica. “He was the kid who would get caught building model airplanes in his bedroom by flashlight when he was supposed to be sleeping.” When HUD changed its guidelines and required investors to pay 10 percent down instead of 3 percent, the Cunninghams had to readjust their business model. They carefully hopscotched around Sacramento neighborhoods to find the right older homes. “We got the old-house bug and really got into restoration projects with architectural character and lots of details to research,” says Erica. “That experience shaped how we focus on detail work today.” The Cunninghams were rehabilitating about a dozen landmark properties when the recession hit. They faced a big decision: Should they go back to their 9-to-5 jobs, keep going when there was nothing to remodel, or try to build? Land was cheap; development was at a standstill. People couldn’t get loans. They had cultivated a solid

group of professionals who were available. They decided to take the risk and bought two vacant infill lots. Their profit wasn’t great, but they kept their loyal people busy and were able to ride out the recession. In 2012, the Cunninghams worked with local architect Stephen Henry of Henry + Associates to build a modern home on an obscure alley in Midtown. It sold within a week for about $500,000 and garnered a lot of interest. According to Cunningham, it was a turning point. “We are seeing lots of Bay Area people—young, first-time homeowners who are busy with their careers and want a new urban house where all the work is done,” says Erica. “We did this at the right time.” Nate offers candid advice on building a real estate development company. “Anyone looking to make a lot of money in a short amount of time will end up being disappointed,” he says. “Know your tolerance for risk, because that is at least 50 percent of this business.” n

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More With the Mayor HOMELESSNESS, THE RIVERFRONT AND TAX DOLLARS

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ast month in this space, I ran an interview with Mayor Darrell Steinberg in which he talked about his ideas for reforming local government and funding transportation needs, as well as his multiprong approach to building more housing in Sacramento. This month, the interview concludes with questions on the mayor’s aggressive plans to reduce homelessness, his grappling over what to do about the convention center and his thoughts on developing Sacramento’s riverfront. First, however, there’s a major update on the mayor’s ideas for addressing housing affordability in Sacramento. You may recall from last month that the mayor and the governor have sharply divergent views on the value of subsidies for new housing construction: The mayor views such subsidies favorably, while the governor considers them a very expensive way to build new housing and one likely to produce too few housing units to have much, if any, impact on the problem of affordable housing. The mayor recently convened a closed-door meeting of local leaders in the construction and real estate industries to discuss his idea for the city to subsidize the construction of affordable housing. According to my sources, the mayor laid out his plan

CP By Craig Powell Inside City Hall

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Mayor Darrell Steinberg to put a measure before city voters (presumably in 2018) that would authorize the city to sell housing bonds to subsidize affordable housing construction. Bond payments would likely be financed by either a hike in the local sales tax rate, a new parcel tax or a property tax hike. The bond

issuance and tax would require a two-thirds majority vote of city taxpayers—a tall order. Steinberg pressed the business leaders to pony up the cash needed to commission a public opinion poll to assess whether city voters have an appetite for such a measure. Steinberg is also expected

to float his housing bond idea at upcoming city council meetings. Another recent development that might also impact your local taxes is the recent blockbuster package of transportation tax hikes (gas taxes, vehicle registration fees, etc.) and transportation spending (local and state road repair and construction, as well as local transit funding) that sailed through the legislature and was signed into law by the governor. The package is expected to bring in $11 million a year for the repair of Sacramento’s roads, $10 million a year in additional funding for Regional Transit operations and about $28 million a year for county government’s road repair projects. It’s expected to cost the average car owner $120 a year in higher fees and taxes. In total, it should deliver nearly $60 million annually for road repair and transit funding to local governments in Sacramento County, which is more than half as much as the $110 million that would have been raised for local roads and transit had Measure B (the proposal to double the county’s transportation sales tax) been approved by voters in November. Measure B lost narrowly. But local taxing agencies are publicly (and misleadingly) characterizing this gusher of new local transportation funding as a mere pittance and aren’t slowing down their efforts to put before voters in 2018 another ballot measure to double the transportation sales tax. Meanwhile, the city council will almost certainly ask city voters in 2018 to extend the city’s one-halfpercent “temporary” Measure U sales CITY HALL page 24


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CITY HALL FROM page 22 tax hike that voters approved in 2012 and that is set to expire in 2019. In recent years, the council has rejected proposals by former city manager John Shirey that it set aside a portion of the $40 million that Measure U brings in annually to soften the impact on the city budget when the tax expires. The $64,000 question: How much appetite will city voters have for a tax hike to fund payments on city housing bonds when they’re likely to be asked to approve an extension of the Measure U sales tax hike and a doubling of the transportation sales tax? If all of the tax measures pass, will that exacerbate the exodus of poor, working-class and retired residents from increasingly highcost Sacramento? Further, will an increasing tax burden impair Sacramento’s ability to attract and retain businesses, grow the local economy and create new jobs that pay well? My interview with the mayor has been edited for length and clarity. Craig Powell: I know you’re in the middle of a major debate over whether homeless folks ought to move to the front of the line in getting Section 8 housing vouchers. Mayor Steinberg: Sacramento is the only place among large regions of the state that says specifically that homeless people don’t get any preference when it comes to vouchers. The current law in Sacramento requires the demonstration of a “rent burden” when it comes to

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qualifying for the voucher. People on the street, by definition, are not “rent burdened.” So it’s almost a de facto elimination of the people who, arguably, need the help the most. I know a lot of landlords are on the bubble on whether they wish to participate in the Section 8 voucher program because of existing federal regulations, which they’re not always happy with. How do you think private landlords will react to the idea that all of their future Section 8 tenants will not be people who are employed and earning incomes, but are people who are coming straight from the streets? Two things. The biggest criticism of my proposal has been “Well, you can’t just put people who’ve been homeless into apartments and expect that they’re going to succeed without any help or support.” And you know what the answer to that is? They’re right. But that’s not what Housing First is all about. It is housing combined with services and support. So we put together a services and case management budget. Our Budget & Audit Committee set aside $5 million of one-time money. Sutter Health came forward and said they’d put in $5 million and said they’d raise another $5 million. Then I got a call from one of Gov. Brown’s top health deputies who invited us to apply for a state grant that would match whatever we locally put up, publicly or privately, on a dollar-for-dollar basis.

So that’s double $15 million, or $30 million. We then had our team do a budget for what it would take to match the 1,600 people who would gain public voucher units with the services necessary to keep them in housing and help them reclaim their lives. Our staff concluded that it would cost about $14.5 million over two years, including not just the services but additional rental subsidies, in addition to the voucher amount, to induce landlords to participate in the program. But is the problem that there’s not enough subsidy for the landlord or is it the nature of the tenants that they’re concerned about? Both. So we provide enough subsidy but, in addition, we provide enough case management so that the landlord can be confident that the individual has a good chance of success. In addition to the $14.5 million to get 1,600 people off the streets, we’ll set aside another $4 million to prevent another group of people from entering homelessness, through rental subsidies, services, whatever it takes. So is any of that perfect? No. But it would be the most robust and comprehensive effort to actually reduce the numbers of [homeless] people. Everybody is dealing with the impact of this crisis. This is no longer just a downtown Sacramento issue. Is there moral hazard in what you’re doing? It appears that the most politically progressive cities, the ones putting the most

effort into services and support, are also the ones experiencing the largest increases in homelessness. So is the human principle at work that, as you make people more comfortable, you’ll have more of them come to you? Whereas, if they are less comfortable, you will have fewer come to you? Is that basic attribute of human nature at work on the question of whether we’re attracting more homeless by making services more plentiful and easily available? On the margins, I’m sure you can point to some anecdotes that are consistent with that theory, but I don’t buy it. First of all, we don’t have nearly enough permanent housing. And under that scenario, the problem is getting worse here. I know that there are the people who are treatment resistant. I’m not talking about people who are schizophrenic who aren’t capable of making logical decisions about such things. Depending on how you draw your boundaries, you can always argue that people come across the borders. To me, that can’t be an excuse for inaction, because the suffering is too great and the impact on our communities stares us in the face every day. You’ve done an extraordinary job of community outreach with stakeholders on what to CITY HALL page 26


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CITY HALL FROM page 24 do about the convention center. You’ve already held four of five public meetings on the issue. You have laid out three options. One would be to expand the convention center for a cost of $170 million to $190 million. The second would be to renovate the center at a cost that was originally estimated to cost about $95 million, but you’re now talking about $110 million. The third option would be to do

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nothing with the facility. Since the work would be financed by the city’s hotel taxes, what is the highest and best use of those tax dollars? Can hotel taxes be put to better use to attract more visitors than expanding or renovating the convention center would? You’ve raised some interesting alternative ideas, including one that’s been knocking about for years with no

discernable progress: developing Sacramento’s riverfront. I think we can do both. I think it’s important, at least for me as the new mayor, to take this from where we started. There was a live proposal before the city council a week before I took office to spend $170 million on a convention center renovation plan, which would have spent 100 percent of the city’s hotel tax borrowing capacity on a single asset. And I asked for a timeout so I’d have a chance to lead a stakeholder conversation to compare this option to other options and to determine what’s the best way to use these dollars to attract more visitors. I’ve become convinced that we need a convention center expansion/renovation. We do have some significant capacity issues. We don’t have nearly enough meeting space. And the way the expansion was done in the 1990s meant that there’s not nearly enough contiguous meeting space. We now have a new proposal that expands meeting space, makes

it more contiguous and allows for holding more than one convention at a time, and can be done for $110 million [plus interest]. Depending on interest rates and debt capacity, that gives us the ability to create what I call a Destination Sacramento fund. I would like the fund to be leveraged a minimum of 3 to 1 with private financing. If it were a $50 million fund and it was leveraged 3 to 1, that’s $150 million of public/ private investment. At that point, we can begin a community conversation around what’s next. In my view, despite the excitement around the Golden 1 Center, we lack sufficient amenities to draw more people here. And I start with the riverfront. I think we should examine targets of opportunity for increasing visitor amenities along the entire riverfront. Craig Powell is a retired attorney, businessman, community activist and president of Eye on Sacramento, a civic watchdog and policy group. He can be reached at craig@ eyeonsacramento.org or 718-3030. n


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Selling Sacramento BRINGING TOURISTS TO TOWN IS A TOUGH JOB

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elling Sacramento should be easy. The city has beautiful weather, gorgeous neighborhoods, sophisticated merchants and friendly people. But it turns out there’s nothing easy about marketing Sacramento. Sacramento’s convention and visitors bureau spends about $9.1 million each year to promote the city and encourage people to visit. That sounds like a lot of money, but it’s not enough to keep the region’s hotels and restaurants filled or the convention center fully booked. The bureau, which goes by the name Visit Sacramento, is a nonprofit organization. Unlike many nonprofits, Visit Sacramento doesn’t reach out and raise money to keep the doors open. It essentially has one benefactor: local government. The city and county of Sacramento collect hotel fees and pass the money along to Visit Sacramento under a tax model called the Sacramento Tourism Marketing District. Every hotel in the county—there are 108—pays from 1 to 3 percent of room revenues to the district. This amounts to about $6 million each year. The city throws in another $1.8 million from occupancy taxes. Altogether, government grants covered $8,951,213 of Visit

RG By R.E. Graswich City Beat

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Steve Hammond is the outgoing CEO of Visit Sacramento. Sacramento’s budget in 2015. Membership dues accounted for most of the rest. The organization is advised by a 29-member board of directors mostly made up of hotel

executives, as well as some city officials and business leaders. In my wanderings around town, I asked friends if they knew about Visit Sacramento or understood

how the convention and visitors bureau worked. Nobody had a precise understanding about the organization that for 85 years has been responsible for making Sacramento a tourist draw. I asked Steve Hammond, Visit Sacramento’s CEO, if he could help me prepare a primer for local readers who might be curious about how the tourist bureau sells the city. Hammond, who will retire in June, did not respond. But that’s OK. As luck would have it, I’ve done enough work with Hammond and his organization to be familiar with Visit Sacramento. Even better, since the organization is a nonprofit, I was able to check out its tax returns. I got hold of the bureau’s 2015 tax returns, which were filed by Hammond in February 2016. I know city documents claim its convention services bring in around 800,000 visitors per year, which would suggest Visit Sacramento spends $11.30 for every tourist. Not surprisingly, Visit Sacramento’s tax returns suggest the tourism game isn’t that simple. For starters, the bureau spends not quite half its budget—$4.3 million—on salaries and benefits for about 45 employees. As the boss, Hammond gets the biggest paycheck. Tax returns show his base pay at $250,907, plus a $78,507 bonus. With benefits, Hammond makes $375,539. If you think that’s good money for a person who runs a tourist bureau and oversees 45 people, you’re right. The city manager of Sacramento, Howard Chan, is paid $262,627 and has about 6,000 employees. One guy who works across L Street from the


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convention center, Gov. Jerry Brown, makes $173,987. The CEO isn’t the only well-paid executive at Visit Sacramento. Other executives also earn six figures. The organization’s board is searching for a new CEO, who should be named soon. Tax returns require nonprofits to explain their business. About its mission, Visit Sacramento says, “To strengthen the positive awareness of the City and County of Sacramento as a convention and visitors destination, to increase revenue and stimulate economic development and growth for the community.”

Selling Sacramento is a tough, competitive job. But somebody has to do it. Visit Sacramento’s tax returns don’t provide specific evidence of hitting those goals. As noted, almost all of the organization’s revenue comes from local government. After salaries and benefits, the biggest bunch of dollars is spent on trade shows, conventions and meetings ($1.6 million), event sponsorships ($1.5 million) and advertising ($663,432). Reduced to their forms and schedules, the tax returns show Visit Sacramento does four basic things: attend meetings, sponsor events, buy ads and keep 45 people employed.

Of course, that’s neither fair nor a complete picture. Visit Sacramento is essential in helping the city book large blocks of downtown hotel rooms for convention guests. Marketing efforts by Visit Sacramento help keep the convention center busy. The group also runs a volunteer organization to staff its own events. Mike Testa, COO and vice president of sales for Visit Sacramento, recently provided us with an impressive number of online links to media placements they have generated in print and on the web, along with numerous links to television spots at stations all over the country. He just returned from a trip to New York City that he says should generate even more media coverage in the future. Revenue from the Community Center Theater, Memorial Auditorium and convention center is estimated at $13.7 million in the city budget. Without hard work by Visit Sacramento, that number would likely decline. When I talked to Hammond last year, he told me that Visit Sacramento and the city were a partnership. Visit Sacramento handles the city’s tourism marketing campaigns and arranges accommodations for the biggest conventions. It tries to attract sporting events, which bring fans, athletes and parents who spend money. Sometimes, it gets movies and TV shows to film here. Selling Sacramento is a tough, competitive job. But somebody has to do it. R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com. n

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Pam Whitehead HELPING CANCER SURVIVORS TRIUMPH THROUGH EXERCISE

Pam Whitehead (holding the yellow sign) on Mount Tallac

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am Whitehead’s screensaver is a photo of eight people on a mountaintop, all grinning and holding signs that proclaim “I am triumph.” Those ear-to-ear smiles aren’t just because the climbers reached the top of Mount Tallac some 9,700-plus feet above sea level, but also because they’d achieved something far greater: beating cancer. Whitehead is the executive director and founder of Triumph Cancer

JL By Jessica Laskey Giving Back

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Foundation. It supports the work of Triumph Fitness, which she started to help adult cancer survivors regain their strength and stamina through exercise. After being diagnosed in 2000 with uterine cancer (caught early thanks to a pap smear), Whitehead realized that the struggle for survivors lay not in the physically, emotionally and often financially taxing cancer treatment itself, but in the misconception that after treatment, your life goes back to normal. “The more rigorous the cancer treatment, the more difficult it is on your body and the more difficult it is to recover,” Whitehead explains. “There was nothing out there when I started developing the Triumph

Fitness program to help survivors regain their strength and give them back their confidence. The common language at the time was ‘just rest and take it easy and then assimilate back into life.’ There was no notion of the benefits of exercise for survivors.” Whitehead discovered the power of exercise when she took up road biking to help raise funds for Livestrong (the cancer organization formerly known as the Lance Armstrong Foundation) after her diagnosis and radical hysterectomy. “The more I rode my bike, the more I felt I was regaining control of my life after treatment,” she says. “It was very empowering. I realized I had this opportunity to create something to help people recapture their lives.”

Whitehead set about creating a program for small groups of survivors to work out together under the guidance of professional instructors trained in cancer recovery. “It’s incredibly important that our instructors understand the issues that survivors face—they’re not dealing with the ‘normal’ population,” says Whitehead. “Survivors deal with a host of issues like neuropathy (pain, numbness or weakness in the hands and feet), lymphedema (swelling in the arms and legs) and the loss of muscle tissue, in addition to the general loss of confidence.” The program started in 2005 as a partnership with UC Davis. Through the 12-week program, twice-weekly


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d e l e e H

LOCAL ARTISAN CREATES HANDMADE SHOES FOR GLOBAL CLIENTS

JB By Jeanne Winnick Brennan

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armichael native Benjamin Schwartz has always had a natural eye for style. It was evident at age 12 when his father took him to a local tailor to purchase his first suit. The haberdasher was so impressed with his young client’s fascination with suit fabrics and styles, he sent him home with a professional trade catalog to encourage further

study. It worked. Now, 20 years later, Schwartz uses the world’s finest wool flannel and cashmere suiting fabrics in his own Sacramento shop, Benjamins, where he creates handcrafted shoes that have attracted an international following. A graduate of Del Campo High School and Sacramento State

University, Schwartz, who now lives in East Sacramento, originally steered his visual talents and innate sense of style into filmmaking and studied at Brooks Institute in Santa Barbara. While in college, he interned with the state of California film crew that documents official news and events of the governor and other state officials. “It may sound exciting to be filming in the middle of all the action,” says Schwartz, “but lugging 500 pounds of photo equipment around Sacramento on a hot summer day was a different reality. When I graduated, I opted for a position with the State Treasurer’s office and worked on affordable housing issues for seven years, which was rewarding but not particularly creative.” In 2015, he left his state job and opened Benjamins in the new Warehouse Artist Lofts on R Street. Schwartz can be found most days in his workshop—the nerve center for his global headquarters and his sole brick-and-mortar store. Orders for his shoes roll in from both his website (Benjamins-shoes.com) and local customers. At WAL, curious passersby can watch him create shoes by hand with beautiful and unusual fabrics. The process is from another era. Even his specialized hand tools—awls, knives and hammers—seem foreign. Schwartz is generous with his time and amiably conversant as he cuts, carves and stitches his custom orders. He fell into the custom shoe business while working in his spare time on a pilot for a TV show about custom-made men’s suits. “I met some shoe-company guys and explained my interest in footwear and textiles,” says Schwartz. “They gave me some shoe lasts and said, ‘Here, practice on these.’ So I got my mom’s sewing machine, a used pair of Vans, some scraps of Robert Talbott fine cloth, a master shoemaker’s manual, and I started experimenting.” The television pilot didn’t go forward, but Schwartz did. His shoe experiments brought him full circle from his childhood interest in suits and fabric to trending footwear. It took him more than two years NEIGHBOR page 34


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NEIGHBOR FROM page 32 to wade through Australian Tim Skyrme’s “Bespoke Shoemaking: A Comprehensive Guide to Handmade Footwear.” During that time, he formulated the idea that launched his business. “As I was learning the process, cutting soles, stitching uppers by hand and pattern making, I kept thinking about a classic, comfortable dress slipper on a sneaker sole,” says Schwartz. “With unique fabrics instead of leather, I wanted to create the ultimate in comfort with a welltailored, streetwear style—all in one shoe.” For the uppers, he uses exquisite fabrics Loro Piana cashmere from Milan, fine wool flannel from the legendary Fox Brothers in England and Ralph Lauren’s rugged outdoor polypropylene and upholstery fabric. Schwartz has a steady flow of customers who appreciate his unique shoes. There is a four-month lead time on all orders. Schwartz has grown his team to four people to help meet demand, and their goal is to produce about 40 pairs of shoes a month. Five clocks on their workshop wall—

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Sacramento, New York, London, Milan and Tokyo—keep them conscious of their global commitments. They are always on the lookout for new fabrics and technological advancements for increased durability. Another attractive feature of Benjamins footwear is an organic charcoal bamboo lining that kills odor-causing bacteria. All shoes are made to order for men and women in sizes from 5½ to 16, and they range in price from $185 to $350. A linen bag and cedar shoe trees are included with each order. Next on Schwartz’s style horizon: a new hiking boot and an English-cut shop jacket for men and women in unlined wool flannel or natural linen. “I wanted to create a quality, goodlooking, tailored shoe that is versatile, ahead of its time and feels like your favorite slipper,” says Schwartz. “We’ve done that, and now the jacket is a natural progression from our shoes. It’s classic, it’s inspired by traditional British workwear—and, importantly, it’s comfortable.” Benjamins Shoes is at 1104 R St. For more information, go to benjaminsshoes.com. n


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Dreams Come True COMPETITION BRINGS RETAIL STORES TO THE DOWNTOWN CORE

D

owntown Sacramento Partnership’s Calling All Dreamers contest has

been a boon for local would-be entrepreneurs. Each year, the winner receives more than $100,000 in free services and, $10,000 in startup cash. But even many competitors who don’t win end up starting their own businesses. In the four years since the contest began, it has changed downtown’s retail environment and created jobs. According to DSP, the competition has added 15 retail businesses to the downtown core. Those businesses account for more than 18,000 square feet of leased space and 57 part-time and 20 full-time jobs. Each year, 30 to 40 entrepreneurs apply for the program. The competition is open to people who want to start a retail business or who

Andy Paul is the owner of Andy’s Candy Apothecary.

have an existing retail business and want to expand or open a new concept in downtown Sacramento. This year’s finalists will be announced on May 18. The public will vote for their favorites until June 26. The public’s vote is taken into consideration by a group of judges who will announce the winner on July 10. Competing in Calling All Dreamers is a grueling process. Five of the

SC By Scot Crocker Inside Downtown

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contestants are chosen to go through

Candy Apothecary, The Allspicery

a three-month business development

and Oblivion Comics & Coffee. The

which sells new, vintage and

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independent comics along with

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key performance indicators. The

Sacramento.

in the DC Universe comic books,

winner is selected from the final five. “Our original intent with the

“I think we’ve done very well with

Last year’s winner was Oblivion,

caters to comic lovers and coffee

the businesses that won the contest

lovers alike. The business impressed

competition was to accelerate ground-

and with the finalists who worked

the judges and received more votes

floor retail in the downtown area,”

hard to forge a unique business

from the public than any other in the

says Valerie Mamone, DSP’s senior

model,” says Mamone. “We’ve had

competition’s history.

manager of business development.

people who didn’t win the competition

“We wanted to diversify the mix

but still opened a business because

business concept, financial feasibility,

and look for something other than

they had the opportunity to work with

marketing plan, management plan,

restaurants and set them up for

experts and business counselors for

value proposition and people behind

success.”

months to focus their business plan,

the concept. “From the submittal,

figure out marketing and understand

their plans will be refined by experts,

finances.”

but they have to show us some real

By most accounts, they’ve succeeded. Three of the first four winners are still going strong: Andy’s

Initially, judges look at the

thinking why their concept will


that he received as the competition winner. He continues to study business

work,” Mamone says. “And even if

would have opened my shop without

through podcasts and television.

this contest,” she says. “There was

“I love watching the TV show

so much support. As a winner, the

‘The Profit,’” he says. “It’s very

services were critical.”

educational. My kids love it, too. I’ll

Heather Wong runs the Allspicery.

Wong won in 2015 and opened her shop in April 2016. “I’m not sure I

Her advice to anyone thinking

watch it a second time and learn even

about entering the competition? “Go

more.”

for it.”

Paul and his wife, Camille Esch,

Business at Andy’s Candy

they win the $10,000, we want to see

spent hours building a business plan

Apothecary is steady. Paul and

entrepreneurs and innovation

other investment. We want them to

around a candy-store concept Paul

Esch are thinking about growing

in downtown Sacramento,” says

have skin in the game, too.”

had been thinking about. He wanted

the business through online sales

Jack Crawford, general partner at

to open a candy store selling unique

targeting business gifts. They may

Impact Venture Capital and a leader

says Andy Paul, owner of Andy’s

products that aren’t readily available.

also open a second store.

in Sacramento’s entrepreneurial

Candy Apothecary, who won the

“We’ve had our ups and downs,”

“I think the process was great,”

“There is a strong tailwind for

If not for the Calling All Dreamers

community. “The Calling All

competition in 2013. “It was hard

says Paul. “We had to react to the

contest, Heather Wong might never

Dreamers program is yet another

work and challenging.”

seasonality of the candy business and

have opened The Allspicery, which

valuable contributor in the evolution

Paul had been thinking about

how much to have on hand. We got

sells spices, spice blends and teas.

of our ecosystem. It’s exciting to see

opening a business for a few years.

slammed in our first Christmas. It

Wong left behind the pressures

“I wasn’t thinking about a storefront

was hard to keep up with demand.

of traveling around the country as

at all,” he says. “I was going for

Then we ran out of product on

a successful energy-sector corporate

something more tame.”

Valentine’s Day. But we see it coming

sales professional for a different

now and can orderly properly.”

kind of pressure as a first-time

But when he heard about Calling All Dreamers, he began to think big. “Many people think they may start

Paul gives a lot of credit to his

and even more exciting to roll up your sleeves and jump in.” For more information about Calling All Dreamers, go to downtownsac.org.

entrepreneur and storeowner. “I’ve

wife, who is very involved in shop

embraced the freedom in this job,”

a business someday,” he says. “This

design and merchandising. He also

she says. “It’s not an 8-to-5 job, but

competition will drive many to throw

appreciates the free legal, branding,

I’m the boss and I call the shots.”

their hat in the ring.”

advertising and construction help

Scot Crocker can be reached at scot@crockercrocker.com. n

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

37


Joany Titherington is the manager of Oak Park Farmers Market.

Hungry for Change FARMERS MARKET FILLS A NEED FOR FRESH FOOD IN OAK PARK

J

oany Titherington calls herself

to grain-free baked goods, cold-brew

was interested in finding fresh, local

most sought-after homes, was

a “local girl.” She’s also the

coffee and Australian-style hand pies.

food,” Titherington says. Despite

Titherington’s great-grandfather.

Titherington is passionate about

the evidence, she had to convince

“A lot of Oak Park was built by my family,” she says.

manager of Oak Park Farmers

Market, which takes place Saturdays

providing fresh food to the Oak Park

financial backers it was true. “They

in historic James McClatchy Park.

community. You have to go back in

said, ‘Those people don’t want that,’”

On May 6, the start of the market’s

time to fully appreciate this vibrant

she recalls. “I wanted to dispel the

comments people made when her

eighth season, close to 20 vendors will

farmers market, as well as the work

stigma that poor people don’t eat or

mother used government-issued food

be on hand, including some from Oak

Titherington and others in the

want healthy food.”

stamps. To get by, her family ate

Park, offering everything from fish

community put into creating it.

AK By Angela Knight Farm to Fork

38

IES MAY n 17

She still remembers the negative

The youngest of six children,

meals made with cheaper cuts of meat

Ten years ago, Titherington

she was raised by a single mother

and readily available ingredients like

was the president of Oak Park

who often worked long hours. Her

ham hocks and potatoes.

Neighborhood Association. The

grandmother was Mary Barden. She

community was struggling with

designed many houses and other

local food to Oak Park included

crime and neighborhood blight. Oak

buildings in the area, but her talent

a small urban farm stand and a

Park was a food desert. After the

for creating architecture was often

community garden, but a second

association polled folks to find out

described as a hobby, Titherington

survey produced another emphatic

what changes they wanted to see, one

says. Frank “Squeaky” Williams, the

answer was clear. “The community

builder behind some of Sacramento’s

Early efforts to provide fresh,

FARM page 41


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FARM FROM page 38 response: Oak Park residents wanted

from UC Davis’s RIVER program?

a farmers market. Titherington

You can learn ways to manage

was charged with setting it up. As

health conditions such as high blood

a consultant for NeighborWorks

pressure and diabetes while you shop

Sacramento, the organization that

for fresh food.

founded and currently sponsors Oak

The Word of the Week is a popular

Park’s farmers market, Titherington

program that teaches people about

checked out several local markets.

specialty crops, like kohlrabi and

She fell in love with the Davis

taro. The word is posted in advance

Farmers Market—the music, hot food

on the market’s Facebook page,

and community vibe—and used it as

along with recipes and nutrition

a model.

information. If you know the word, you could receive $5 to spend on fruit and vegetables; you have to get to the

Today, the farmers market is a one-stop shopping space and a social gathering spot for Oak Park.

market early because the vouchers go fast. “It drives people to experiment with things they don’t normally try,” Titherington says. She has a soft spot for children who visit the market and take part in “passport play,” involving puzzles, mazes and craft projects. “They’re actually teaching their parents” about making healthy food choices, she says. One little boy told her

But she struggled to find vendors that first year. Eight vendors were on hand on opening day, but 1,000 shoppers showed up. “What a wonderful experience that was,” she says. The market had $1,200 in EBT sales. (EBT—electronic benefit transfer—is a debit card that replaced the paper version of food stamps). Last season, EBT sales reached about $25,000. Today, the farmers market

English sweet peas tasted like candy and offered to share his bag of peas with her. She likes the immediate gratification that comes when people eat together. “It’s the glue that connects us all.” Oak Park Farmers Market takes place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays from May through October in James McClatchy Park at 3500 5th Ave.

is a one-stop shopping space, Titherington says, and a social gathering spot for Oak Park because

Angela Knight can be reached at knight@mcn.org. n

it is centrally located. She’s careful to share credit for this successful farmers market with a long list of people and organizations, including the Oak Park community. Every week, between 800 and 1,500 people show up. Some people are attracted to the market for the cooking demos, called Food for Thought, by local chefs including like Adam Pechal and Patrick Mulvaney. Others come for the free arts and crafts for kids or tai chi and yoga classes offered by Oak Park Healing Arts Center. What about a walk through the market with an undergraduate medical student

A book signing for “Inside Sacramento: The Most Interesting Neighborhood Places in America’s Farm-toFork Capital” will take place from 9 to 11 a.m. at Oak Park Farmers Market on Saturday, May 6. A portion of the proceeds from that day’s book sales will go to the Oak Park nonprofit NeighborWorks Sacramento.

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IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

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Cracks Showing IT’S NOT EASY TO BE A KINGS FAN

A

s the clock ran out on the Kings this spring, people rich or connected enough to have floor seats at Golden 1 Center might have seen something ominous when they walked the hallways beneath the concourse. The concrete is cracking. Not tiny cracks, but long, jagged cracks, lots of them. As anyone who lives near a sidewalk knows, just about all concrete cracks. But Golden 1 Center’s polished floors didn’t survive six months without fissures. The cracked concrete is probably due to the building’s settling and fast construction schedule. Concrete needs months to set up properly, but the Kings’ work crews didn’t have months to spare. They did a remarkable job getting the new arena up in two years. Instantly cracked concrete is one fate the owners must endure. Cracked floors are an appropriate metaphor for the team. The Kings are now selling season tickets for the fall campaign, which will memorialize their 33rd season in Sacramento. Ticket prices have never been higher and the team has never been worse. The ball club is cracked and broken, cluttered with depreciated assets. If the NBA ran a pick-and-pull scrap yard, the Kings would be the best customers.

RG By R.E. Graswich Sports Authority

42

IES MAY n 17

Kings game at Golden 1 This past season, the Kings gained immeasurable box office momentum from their new home. Aside from the cracked concrete, the building performed brilliantly. It was far more than just a backdrop for the show—it was the show. From the arena’s classic Sacramento neon sign collection and diverse food options, flavored with marquees from local restaurants, to the sparkling jumbo video screens, Golden 1 Center rewarded the community for its faith and support. The community responded by paying good money to watch some truly awful basketball.

I attended a Golden 1 game in late March against the Milwaukee Bucks. It was one of the worst I’ve ever witnessed. And that’s saying something, as I’ve attended around 700 Kings games since 1985 and traveled with them during the Bill Russell and Dick Motta years, when the Kings set league records for inept play. The Milwaukee game was reminiscent of those miserable campaigns. The Bucks encountered token defensive resistance. A perceptive observer could see the visitors laughing at the Kings, who weren’t trying to be funny—or trying

at all. Milwaukee laughed its way to a 116-98 victory after running off with a 19-point lead in the second quarter. Fans who paid to attend the Milwaukee game (and other games like it) were victims of a cynical phenomenon that haunts professional sports. It happens when teams make no real effort to win, but instead play to lose. They rest their stars, or seek to enhance their status in the upcoming draft, which rewards failure by letting the worst actors pick first. The Kings have deployed this strategy for three decades. It might be excusable if it worked. But it never works. This much is certain about the


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at the All-Star break, they abandoned their pride, relapsed into their worst habits and began the familiar descent to rock bottom. Not that they should have kept Cousinsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Kings were perpetually mediocre with him. But they should have traded him sooner, when his value was inflated. Kings guard Darren Collison admits itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not easy to play for a team that elects not to compete, but he tries to appreciate the larger goal, whatever that may be.

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Fit Food HE STARTED A COMPANY THAT MAKES EATING HEALTHY EASY

D

on Arnold hates the term “diet.” “A diet is so temporary,” he explains. “Instead, we should all shoot for healthy eating.” Arnold is the poster child for attainable, healthy eating habits. He is the founder of Fit Eats, a locally based business that cooks balanced, flavorful meals in a commercial kitchen on Kiefer Boulevard, and delivers them to your door or to retail storefronts in Midtown and Roseville. Arnold has made it his mission to get healthy food to the masses. Growing up in Cottonwood (near Redding) and attending Chico State, Arnold was always “big into health and fitness” and worked as a personal trainer in college. After working for health supplements giant GNC, Arnold decided to open his own chain of sports-nutrition stores to capitalize on his stay-fit philosophy. But a healthy meal service company in Texas piqued Arnold’s interest even more than supplements and led him to found Fit Eats in 2014. “The company in Texas had a good foundation, but the food was mediocre,” says Arnold, who loves to cook. “I liked the concept, but the menu never changed. For Fit Eats, I envisioned something similar but with a rotating menu and with delivery. The big thing now is instant gratification and convenience, so

JL By Jessica Laskey Meet Your Neighbor

44

IES MAY n 17

to create exciting dishes from all over the world in the perfect portions so you know exactly what you need to consume.” The meals proved so popular that Arnold and his team started scouting brick-and-mortar storefronts so customers could select meals in person instead of ordering online. The Midtown storefront on 16th and P streets opened in 2015, and the Roseville outpost followed a few months later. Expansion to the Bay Area is in the works.

“In business, you have to have to be innovative. You can’t stay stagnant. Every day is a learning experience.”

Don Arnold's company brings healthy food to Sacramentans. why not bring healthy meals right to people’s doors?” After securing a commercial kitchen, the 32-year-old got to work on recipes that would provide flexibility and interest while still

adhering to a healthy lineup of seasonal, local ingredients. “It’s not like Round Table Pizza,” Arnold says. “Healthy foods for the everyday person don’t have to be just brown rice and chicken. We wanted

“We have a huge variety of customers,” says Arnold, who lives in West Sacramento. “During tax season, we’ll have tax offices order in for all their employees. We have elderly customers or those who can’t drive to the store because of a disability who love the fact that the food comes right to their door, and the Bay Area is a very viable market. People with disposable income are our target market. You’re paying for the convenience factor of not having to go shopping or cook or clean up. You have to ask yourself, ‘What is my time worth?’”


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PRESENTED BY CITY OF SACRAMENTO

Meters Matter to The City

S

acramentans have witnessed Mother Nature’s water show offer up its most dramatic, full spectrum display of possibilities. Years of crackling, fire-breeding dryness followed by a sudden series of tropic-like deluges have cast water issues center stage, making it more clear than ever the power water has over our lives and landscape. The dramatics have taught us all something to be sure. For the City of Sacramento, Department of Utilities, it’s reinforced the need for care, conscientiousness and conservation around the City’s water infrastructure. To that end, city officials, engineers, water planners and countless crews are accelerating efforts to install water meters well ahead of the state mandate which calls for all California cities to be fully metered by 2025. But ahead of schedule, Sacramento’s stepped up efforts aimed to insure all residential and commercial city properties will be fully metered by 2020, according to Ian Pietz, program manager for the city’s Accelerated Water Meter Program. Construction crews have just broken ground on the final 40,000 properties to be metered. The process will take about three years and is underway now in portions of Elmhurst, Oak Park, Colonial Heights and Tahoe Park neighborhoods. So far, approximately 95,000 meters in the city have been installed. Pietz says one of the most important things to the city is for residents to know exactly what to expect when their meter is installed so there are no surprises. “The biggest issue we are trying to minimize is the impact on the customer so that when the contractor is out there customers are inconvenienced as little as possible.” he said. The city will be giving residents plenty of notice, at least five different types of notices in the form of letters in the mail to door hangers to knocks on the door by the construction crew. There is also an information phone line (916) 808-5870, a 24-hour construction inspector number residents will receive just prior to construction at their home, as well as online access

46

IES MAY n 17

Ian Pietz (center) and Rhea Salvador (right) of the City of Sacramento usher in construction crews via www.MetersMatter.org where residents can track construction plans to see when their street is slated to be metered. In addition, residents are invited to attend informational open houses in advance of the construction to learn more about the construction process. Residents will receive a postcard in the mail to inform them of the time and location of these open houses. “The open houses are a great way for the City to connect one-on-one with residents, prepare them for the construction that is coming and help them understand the importance of this project,” said Councilmember Eric Guerra. “I just hosted two open houses for the neighborhoods in my districtElmhurst and Tahoe Park/Colonial Heights/Oak Park- and received positive feedback on the City’s preparation and transparency around this effort.”

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT? - Meters Matter notices will be mailed in advance of construction. Additional notices will also be distributed by construction crews approximately one week and one day before construction is expected to start. - Crews will give residents a 4-hour time frame when water will be shut off to their home or business, but most work is done in about 30 minutes. - Crews may start as early 7 a.m. by staging the area near your home. They will not shut off your water until after 9 a.m., and only after knocking on your door to make sure you’re not running a load of wash. - Before work is to begin on your meter, the city will provide a 24-hour phone number for the construction inspector responsible for your property. Any

questions or special concerns can be directed here. - All landscaping associated with the digging will be replaced as it was. In the unlikely event any plants are destroyed, the city will replace them. - Digging can occur at various locations depending on where the water main and line to home exist. Crews may dig in the side yard, back yard, park strip between the street and sidewalk or behind the sidewalk. - Crews will make individual arrangements with businesses such as restaurants, spas and office complexes so that work is done at the most convenient time. Extended, after-hours arrangements are possible to minimize impact. - Traffic will be shut down only where necessary and in such a way as to leave at least one lane open for through traffic. - Some water mains and worn pipes may need to be replaced, but not all. This will take additional time in the areas where its deemed necessary. All crews will notify homeowners if more time is needed for water to be shut off. - Approximately three months after the meter is installed, customers will begin receiving a “comparative bill.” The comparative bill shows the flat rate amount due, as well as the actual water usage and what the metered bill would be. Customers will receive a comparative bill for 12 months, and then will be automatically rolled over to metered billing. Any time during the 12-month comparative billing period, customers can opt in to metered billing. Water meters are important to create overall water use awareness and conservation as well as helping establish fair billing practices so that customers pay for the water they use, said Rhea Salvador of the City of Sacramento. “Replacing worn out 100-year-old pipelines and water mains will also help the city continue to offer a reliable water source for years to come,” she said.


Water Main & Meter Construction in Sacramento Neighborhoods WHAT TO EXPECT DURING CONSTRUCTION During construction, you could experience: • Water shutdown for up to 4 hours • Temporary street parking restrictions • Sidewalk closures and traffic delays • Construction-related dust and noise

CONSTRUCTION TIMELINE Spring 2017 Tahoe Park – Colonial Heights – Oak Park – Elmhurst

Summer 2017 Land Park – North & South Sacramento – Valley Hi

Fall 2017 Richmond Grove – Meadowview – South Land Park – Golf Course Terrace – Fruitridge – Glen Elder – East Sacramento – Tradewinds – Midtown – Downtown – College Glen Some residences in these areas will have construction in 2018 & 2019. Visit the website for the latest details.

STAY UPDATED! www.MetersMatter.org watermeter@cityofsacramento.org facebook.com/SacramentoCityUtilities/ 916-808-5870

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Bank on It NEW DEVELOPMENT WILL BRING 12 CHEFS UNDER ONE ROOF

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ome historic landmarks have a way of blending in, incongruous as they sometimes are with their surroundings. Consider the neoclassical structure with its fluted columns on the northwest corner of J and 7th streets. For the past quartercentury, except for hosting the occasional event, the D.O. Mills Bank Building has kept a relatively low profile. But that will change sometime in late summer when it opens as The Bank, a three-story restaurant and bar with 12 different chefs and cuisines. Built in 1912, the historic building was named after Darius Ogden Mills of New York, who came to California during the Gold Rush and founded a bank in Sacramento. With an exterior as stolid and immovable as the Acropolis and an interior as gilded and detailed as the Palace of Versailles, The Bank

JV By Jordan Venema Building Our Future

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could prove one of Sacramento’s most aesthetically intriguing dining experiences. In 1992, the family of Alison Cameron Ulshoffer purchased the building, and Ulshoffer’s father used it for his private offices until he retired. The building continued to host proms and weddings in a space called the Sacramento Grand Ballroom. “These walls are full of history,” Ulshoffer says. “There have been millions of people through these doors.” When the city announced plans for the Golden 1 Center, Ulshoffer’s family decided to renovate and rebrand the building as a restaurant and gathering space, somewhat inspired by their travels. “We traveled a bit, and there is a square in

Marrakesh that my father is obsessed with,” says Ulshoffer. “It’s just this gathering spot, and the thought of people sitting in the square, the environment of coming together—my father loved that community feel.” As Yolo County residents for three generations, Ulshoffer’s family hopes to facilitate community in this unique space. “We really want it to be like a neighborhood bar in a beautiful setting,” she says. “So we’re designing it not to fight the building, because it’s phenomenal as it is. Every piece of marble that comes off the wall is saved, and

anything we find is put in our archive room. We’re preserving absolutely everything that we can.” Renovation of a 100-year-old building comes with challenges, from plumbing to electrical power, but preservation is a priority, says Ulshoffer. The result will be a threestory, 30,000-square-foot restaurant with a capacity of just over 1,000 people. According to Ulshoffer, The Bank won’t feel crowded. “We’ve put almost two years into planning,” she says, “and we want it to be a little bit of everything for everybody.” That means guests can sip champagne on the mezzanine, drink craft beer in the vaults below or enjoy one of many cuisines on the main floor. For some of The Bank’s 12 chefs, this will be their first brick-and-mortar restaurant. “We want people to come here and get things they can’t get anywhere else,” says Ulshoffer. “So if you feel like oysters or pizza or Italian, there is definitely diversity, and we’ve really gathered a group with exciting talent.” Diners will


Photos courtesy of Andy Duong. order at individual counters for each chef, and food will be brought to their tables. The Bank, Ulshoffer says, will be neither a food court nor a sports bar, and it won’t turn into a club afterhours. There will be TVs throughout the main and lower floors, and bars unique to each space. “We’re just really trying to cultivate something where everybody is welcome.” The mezzanine bar will specialize in craft cocktails, and the bar on the main floor “is going to have the most wells in town,” says Ulshoffer. A taproom with more than 70 beers on tap will occupy the lower floor, where the bank’s original vaults will be transformed into areas for dining and seating.

BUILDING page 51

Kim Scott of Mama Kim’s will become the first food vendor in The Bank. Photo courtesy of Chantel Elder.

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Perfect Day IT’S MORE THAN SUNSHINE AND SONG LYRICS

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o you ever have such good start to your day that you could describe it with the Mary Poppins phrase “practically perfect in every way”? In the years I served as a pediatric chaplain, those days were hard to find. However, I remember starting one such “practically perfect” day by finding a perfectly shaded spot in the hospital parking lot. Though there wasn’t a cloud in the sky, I was overwhelmed with such synchronicity, that my head filled with the syrupy lyrics of “Singin’ in the Rain.” When my day starts this well, I like to reward myself with a cup of hot chocolate. Sure enough, the perfect cup was served with a greeting as sweet as the chocolate itself: “Chaplain, is that a new tie? Very cool!” On the go with cocoa, I took a tooslow elevator to the pediatric floor for a visit with my 5-year-old friend, Opal. Dressed in street clothes, Opal was awaiting discharge orders. She greeted me with the largest smile ever pasted on such a small face. “Swing me! Swing me!” she said, seizing my fingers with a full-handed grip. As we swung, I caught a glimpse of two nurses giving us one of those “aren’t they perfectly cute!” smiles. Just then, Opal’s doctor arrived. I said my goodbyes to pediatrics and wandered off toward the pediatric

NB By Norris Burkes Spirit Matters

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intensive care unit (which we pronounce “pick-u”). Why can’t every day be as flawless as this one? I thought. The PICU would give me a new perspective on the “perfect day” when I met a 13-year-old boy named Alex. Alex’s mom explained to me how they’d recently learned on a not-soperfect Mother’s Day that their son’s cancer had returned. I motioned for her to step out of the room to say more as Alex slept. Just then, an alarm called her back to his bedside. I followed. The bloodoxygen indicator told us that Alex’s oxygen levels had fallen dangerously low. Mom was the wife of a military officer, and she found her voice by issuing an urgent motherly command: “Breathe, Alex. Breathe. Take a deep breath.” Her son followed the orders, and we watched his chest rise and fall a few times. The indicator showed Alex’s blood oxygen returning to normal levels, but this mom wasn’t taking anything for granted. “Take one more,” she urged through a deep inhale she hoped he would mimic. She placed an approving hand on Alex’s forehead and said, “There, that’s perfect. Just perfect.” Suddenly, the syrupy “Singin’ in the Rain” lyrics vanished from my head and were replaced with a new song: “Holy, Holy, Holy.” I knew I was standing in the presence of perfect and holy love, and my understanding of a perfect day was instantly transformed. Who was I kidding? There was no rain in my life that I could sing in. There had been only sunshine and a slow elevator to mar my morning. Here was a mom huddled under a

downpour of anguish, holding such a full heart of loving sunshine that it transformed all who witnessed it. I was humbled to be in the presence of such holy love. It was obvious now that a perfect day needn’t be defined by events that happen or don’t happen. Nope. “Perfect” is about knowing the kind of love this young man knew, love that was there for him, no matter what, to help him in the most basic things, to love him through the best and the worst parts of his life. While Alex lived only a few more months, he gave me new perspective on what makes a perfect day, a perspective I will always hold close to my heart. A perfect day is not what happens around you; it’s what happens within you. If you spend your days loving someone and being loved, then no matter how difficult the circumstances, the day will always be a perfect day. My prayer for this week is that we find opportunities to share such perfect and holy love.

Norris Burkes is a chaplain, syndicated columnist, national speaker and book author. He can be reached at norris@thechaplain.net. n


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One of the vaults will be reserved for private parties or conferences, she says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;which is perfect if you want to play poker with your buddies or watch a Kings game.â&#x20AC;? During the tour of one vault, Ulshofferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excitement was palpable when she saw a large concrete slab had been removed from the vaultâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wall to create an auxiliary entrance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holy moley. I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen that yet,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something new here every hour.â&#x20AC;? Ulshoffer admits the decision to open The Bank was a business opportunity made possible, in part, by the Golden1 Center. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also clear that she feels genuine excitement about what The Bank has to offer Sacramento. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stress enough that this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t about us,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about the community.â&#x20AC;? Jordan Venema can be reached at jordan.venema@gmail.com. n

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Heart of Glass SHE LEADS TOURS THAT CHANGE THE WAY YOU SEE THE WORLD

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hen Chelsea Glass opened her boutique travel agency, The Heart of Travel, last November, the name was more than just a clever riff on the oft-repeated phrase “the art of travel.” It perfectly captures what Glass loves about seeing the world. “The name embodies the experience I’m trying to create with my guided tours,” says Glass, who leads groups of intrepid travelers on intimate explorations of countries like Guatemala, Cuba, Mexico and Peru. “It’s not just a vacation. Hopefully, the trip they take with me has a bigger impact. It hits you deeper—in the heart.” An East Sac native, Glass was 19 when she flew to Guatemala by herself for the first time to volunteer in health care. (She didn’t know until she arrived that she was going to be working in an infant malnutrition ward.) She was eager to see more of the world and expand her language base from the Italian she’d studied in school to the Spanish she was rapidly acquiring out of necessity. After finishing her volunteer stint, she planned to go back for two months over the summer to further get to know Guatemala. Instead, she ended up staying for three years. “It just kind of snowballed,” Glass admits. “I got offered a job as a tour guide and I fell in love with meeting

JL By Jessica Laskey Shoptalk

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Cheri Malkasian is the owner of Summer Porch on J Street.

Chelsea Glass is the founder and owner of Heart of Travel. new people. It changed my perspective on the world.” This feeling of discovery and wonder is what Glass seeks to achieve with the five-day to two-week tours she offers through The Heart of

Travel. She prides herself on curating “authentic and ethical” experiences for her clients, including lodging, transportation inside the country, meals and entrance fees to activities and landmarks.

“I don’t want the tour to feel generic—we don’t travel on a big tour bus,” says Glass, who learned the complexities of coordinating travel while working for four years at Casa de Español, a Spanish language school in Sacramento. “I want people to feel like they’re traveling with a friend who happens to know a bunch of people in the country we’re visiting.” Glass calls on the many contacts she’s made over the years living and traveling in Latin America to connect her clients to the true essence of the environment. “When I take people to Mexico City, we have happy hour at my friends’ house and show them around the neighborhood so people can get an idea of what it would be like if they were to just pick up and move there,” Glass says. “In Guatemala, we live with an indigenous family on the lake.” This focus on an authentic experience also dovetails nicely with Glass’ interest in sustainable agriculture, which was her area of study before she moved abroad. (She’s about to earn her master’s degree in Spanish from Sacramento State.) “Developing nations are very dependent on the tourism industry, but that has its downsides,” Glass explains. “Dropping Westerners who aren’t informed of the cultural norms into small, indigenous communities can cause big problems. I want my presence and that of my clients to not have a negative impact on the culture or the economy, so we keep our tourism as sustainable as possible. In each country, I work directly with a local community for the best opportunity for cultural exchange and


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donations after a huge flood, and many of the clients I’d taken there donated because they felt connected to him and to the location. I love that travel created that possibility.” For more information about The Heart of Travel, go to theheartoftravel. org. Follow Chelsea Glass’ adventures on Instagram @heart_of_travel. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. n

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Meant To Be A TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY HOME GETS MODERN UPDATES

JF By Julie Foster Home Insight

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ometimes things happen right on schedule. In 2012, Laney and Cori Preheim were renting a house on Land Park Drive when a home down the street went up for sale. Laney was pregnant with the couple’s first child, and the couple questioned whether they could afford the property. Rather than be disappointed, they chose not to look at the house. But on Laney’s due date, they decided to take a peek. The 2,000-square-foot home’s nice layout, big front porch, ample lot and plenty of large windows all

contributed to the couple’s decision to make an offer. “The minute we walked in, we knew it was the right house,” Laney says. But they were unsuccessful; another offer had been accepted. Seven days past Laney’s due date, their daughter was born. Three days later, the real estate agent called. The first offer had fallen through. Did they want the house? This time they scored. The house has an unusual history. Originally built in Elk Grove in

1911, it was later moved to Land Park Drive, where it was one of the first homes in the area. Many of its original features remain, including the glass lights between the living and dining rooms, a wood-burning fireplace, wainscoting, coved ceilings and an oversized front door with beveled glass. But the house needed refreshing. “Older homes always have ‘a list,’ one that seems to never end,” Laney says. “If we wanted a turnkey, no-project house, we wouldn’t have chosen this one.”


ORIGINALLY BUILT IN ELK GROVE IN 1911, IT WAS LATER MOVED TO LAND PARK DRIVE.

Remodeling took place in stages. The living room and dining room received cosmetic upgrades, including paint. A new marble hearth and glassfronted doors on shelves spiffed up the living room. The wood floors were refinished and both bathrooms were redone. Last year, the couple remodeled the kitchen with help from Curtis Popp and Dustin Littrell, owners of Popp Littrell Architecture + Interiors. “They guided us every step of the way: obtaining permits, selecting finishes and helping us pick a general contractor,” says Laney. “This was our biggest project and the most money we were going to spend, so we really wanted to do it right.” The rehabbed kitchen gets high marks for style and familyfriendliness. White marble tops the counters. Mike Ward of River Park built the stunning custom cabinets. White cabinet panels camouflage the refrigerator and two freezers. “The white has been a game changer,” says Laney. “It makes everything feel clean and open.”

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THINK ABOUT INCORPORATING NEW MATERIALS WHILE STILL RETAINING THE HISTORIC FEEL OF THE HOME.

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A comfy corner window seat provides a spot for socializing during meal preparation. Transom windows above the farmhouse sink drench the room in sunlight. The light bounces off glazed backsplash tiles by Heath Ceramics of Sausalito. Previously, the only eating space in the kitchen was a small, dropped-ceiling area with an inconvenient booth. Now, it’s a spacious pantry with whimsical birdand-butterfly-patterned wallpaper. Though Laney chose a sophisticated neutral palette throughout the home, the wallpaper provides a pop of color that Cori appreciates. “Cori laughs at me, saying, ‘Why can’t we have some color in here?”’ Laney explains. “But I think it is very relaxing.”

Off the kitchen, a once-drafty laundry room was transformed into a bright, sunny laundry room with another delightful window seat. A new deck off the back door allows easy access to the backyard. The covered sand box lets kids play outside all year, while the outdoor shower refreshes on hot summer days. Neither cavelike nor drab, the reclaimed basement is well lit, useful and snug. A coat of epoxy brightens the floor. The couple painted the ceiling and added a wine rack. By repurposing an old door from upstairs and adding a wall, they created a utility closet for the new tankless water heater and HVAC. Reusing two of the original single-paned windows from the house, they built a custom

bookcase. Recycled kitchen drawers from the original cabinets evolved into a nifty cabinet for odds and ends. Two original windows were reworked so natural light illuminates the room. A tidy desk completes the scene. “I can come down here, close the door and work a bit,” Laney says. She advises hiring a general contractor or designer with an appreciation for the older components of a house. Also, think about incorporating new materials while retaining the historic feel of the home. “If you look around here, it’s definitely modern,” she says. “But it’s an older home, and that’s why we bought the house.” Laney notes it’s tempting to “open up” a house and take down multiple

walls. The couple took a different route, choosing light paint colors, lots of white woodwork, glass pocket doors in the kitchen and French doors between the dining room and the kitchen to let light travel through the house. “We found ways to keep it open feeling but still traditional. We love our home, and the minute I come in I feel good,” she says. “That’s what’s most important. You want to feel good in your own home, and we definitely feel good here.” If you know of a home you think should be featured in Inside Publications, contact Julie Foster at foster.julie91@yahoo.com. n

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Change of Seasons SUMMER-BLEND GASOLINE NOW ON THE MARKET

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his time of year, the price of gasoline typically rises. Part of the reason is supply and demand: Americans consume more gas for travel in warm weather. Another reason is regulatory, based on science: Summer-blend gasoline costs more. What is summer-blend gas, and why do we use it? First, some background. Gasoline is not a single pure thing like water. It’s a blend of different hydrocarbons derived from crude oil. Refineries adjust the blend and include nonhydrocarbon additives to meet desired specifications for the gas. For example, depending on the “recipe,” they can change the octane rating to produce the different grades of gasoline you see at the pump. Another property of gasoline they can change with the recipe is vapor pressure. Vapor pressure is a measure of how much of a liquid spontaneously evaporates into the air. In a closed container, you could measure how much the vapor rising from a liquid adds to the air pressure. A volatile liquid produces a lot of vapor and has a high vapor pressure. (Examples: rubbing alcohol, nail polish remover.) A liquid that doesn’t evaporate much has a low vapor pressure. (Example: cooking oil.) Intuitively, you know that vapor pressure rises with temperature. Hot liquids

AR By Dr. Amy Rogers Science in the Neighborhood

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evaporate faster than cold ones. If the temperature rises enough, a liquid will reach its boiling point—the point at which the vapor pressure is greater than the atmospheric pressure. For gasoline to ignite properly in your car’s engine, the vapor pressure (called Reid vapor pressure or RVP) must not be too low. On the other hand, if the Reid vapor pressure is too high, the gas will evaporate. Evaporated gasoline is a nasty air pollutant. It also costs the consumer money in lost product. Therefore, federal and state laws require refineries to adjust their gasoline blends to keep the RVP below a certain threshold. That regulatory threshold varies with the seasons. In winter, low temperatures naturally reduce the

vapor pressure of all liquids. That means refineries can blend their gasoline with components that have a greater tendency to evaporate. One such component is butane. Butane is volatile, but it’s also cheap and abundant. As long as it’s cold outside, supplementing with butane is an economical way to produce more gasoline as cheaply as possible. At warmer temperatures, winter blend is unacceptably volatile. On a 100-degree day, the butane component would escape into the air. A different blend, one with a lower vapor pressure, is needed to minimize evaporation of the gasoline in summer. Therefore, in early spring, refineries reset their facilities to produce summer-blend gas. Summer blend is less volatile than winter

blend. It’s also a little more expensive, because refineries cannot blend in cheap butane as a supplement. For Sacramento residents, the higher cost at the pump comes with one minor and one major benefit. Summer blend is slightly more energy dense—according to AAA, 1.7 percent more. This translates into slightly better gas mileage for summer travel. But the big reason to switch to summer blend is air quality. From May to October, the Sacramento region is prone to periods of unhealthy smog and elevated ozone levels. In fact, we are in a “severe nonattainment area,” meaning that ozone levels can badly exceed a federal eight-hour standard. Along with Los Angeles, Bakersfield and Fresno, Sacramento is in the top 10 most


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Out of Balance FUNDING FOR TRANSPORTATION NEEDS REALIGNMENT

P

oliticians frequently tout a balanced transportation system. Such talk often occurs when new taxes are being considered. It may include a variation on the theme—namely, a call for “balanced investments” in transportation. Those notions were certainly floated during the formulation of California’s recently approved legislation to raise gas taxes and vehicle registration fees. You can bet the word “balanced” will come up again when a successor to last November’s defeated Measure B sales tax for transportation in Sacramento County is considered for 2018 or 2020. What is a balanced transportation system? Is having a balanced system a worthy goal? If it is, is a balanced investment of new tax dollars the best way to get to a balanced system? Voters should think about these questions the next time they go to the polls with a chance to make a decision on how tax dollars are spent. State legislators and city officials should think about them all the time. There is no standard definition of a balanced transportation system. Ideally, transportation systems should meet the mobility needs of all citizens, including the young, old, poor and disabled. Transportation should be both efficient and cost effective, getting people where they

S W By Walt SeLfert Getting There

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want to go quickly, conveniently and inexpensively. Generally, when people talk about a balanced system, it seems they mean multimodal transportation: a system that gives people a choice on how they get around. For a long time, the main travel modes have been walking, biking, taking public transit or driving. More lately, there’s using a ride-hailing service such as Uber or Lyft, the latest version of private transit. Do we have a balanced transportation system now? Are you kidding? To our detriment, transportation in the United States is incredibly autocentric and auto dependent. Most trips are made by car. In most cars, only the driver’s seat is occupied. Aside from a few

exceptions, cities have spotty transit service that is infrequent, slow and available only at limited times.

Walking and biking get a pittance, far less than their share of trips. In most places, there are significant barriers to walking and biking because of how we design our cities and because of all that automobile traffic. Sprawl, gated communities, big-box stores and single-use zoning

make trip distances too long to walk or bike. Many people are intimidated by the thought of bicycling or walking near fast, heavy traffic or fear having their kids cross a wide, busy street. Is having a balanced transportation system a good idea? About one in nine adults does not have a driver’s license. Further, some people with a license don’t own a car or have stopped driving because of age or disability. Children under 16 can’t drive. All told, about a third of the population needs to get around by some other means than driving themselves. For all those people, other transportation options are essential. In addition, auto dependence has many other consequences. An unbalanced system means high oil consumption, depleting a limited resource. It also means environmental damage and less physical activity, contributing to the obesity and diabetes epidemics and increasing health care costs. A system focused on automobility is costly for governments to build and maintain. Car ownership is expensive for individuals, who get saddled with taxes, depreciation, gas, parking, insurance and repairs. Having a multimodal system is both necessary and desirable. Not everyone drives, and walking, biking and transit are far better for the environment and public health. They cost less, too. Will a balanced investment in transportation result in a balanced transportation system? If you are using a balance scale and one side is heavily weighted, do you put more weight on the side that has already bottomed out? No, you add weight only to the light side. The American transportation system is severely


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unbalanced. Bringing it into balance doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean balanced investments; it means unbalanced investments in the overlooked modes that have been shortchanged for so long.

The priority has been motoristsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; convenience, not the safety of walkers, bicyclists or motorists themselves. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have equitable funding for each method of travel; we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had it for a century. According to a household travel survey, about 75 percent of trips in California are made in a vehicle. About 20 percent of trips are made by walking or biking. Another 4 percent are made by transit. Yet the lionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s share of

transportation funding goes to building new roads and maintaining old roads. Walking and biking get a pittance, far less than their share of trips. The new California transportation tax legislation allocates about 2 percent of the funding to walking and biking, even though walking and biking account for 10 times as many trips. To add insult to literal injury (and death), cyclists and walkers are disproportionately the victims in traffic crashes. We simply havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t made safety the top priority in transportation. The priority has been motoristsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; convenience, not the safety of walkers, bicyclists or motorists themselves. We need a transportation system that truly is balanced, equitable, safe, efficient, cost effective and fairly funded. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that now. If we persist in budgeting transportation as weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done in the past, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never get there. Walt Seifert is a bicyclist, driver and transportation writer. He can be reached at bikeguy@surewest.net. n

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The Matchmaker SHE CONNECTS FOREIGN STUDENTS WITH LOCAL HOST FAMILIES

T

ahoe Park resident Lindsay Zimmerman is a local coordinator for CCI Greenheart,

a nonprofit that connects Americans with international students through cultural exchange programs. Here, Zimmerman describes what it takes to coordinate visitors from all over the world and place them with host families in the greater Sacramento area. What got you interested in working with CCI Greenheart? I had always traveled abroad for much of my life. I lived in Spain as a college student and taught English in Japan in 2008. When I got married and moved from Arizona to California, I wanted to keep my international connections. I decided to bring the world to me and Googled “working with exchange students.” I found CCI Greenheart and got an interview with

Lindsay Zimmerman with exchange students Adomas Gatelis from Lithuania, Leonardo Venturino from Italy, and Lori Tibbett.

Lori Tibbett (the executive regional director of the western region, who

family members back home. We

and at least one in-person visit per

Curtis Park, and Adam, a junior from

lives in Curtis Park). I feel really

monitor the students as required

semester.

Lithuania living with a family with

lucky that it’s turned out to be such a

by the Department of State. There

great organization.

are new requirements every year for how best to keep kids and families

You’ve been a local coordinator

safe, so we get recertified through

teens in East Sacramento.) Placing What’s the hardest part of the job? My biggest challenge is finding a

students early is helpful, so it’s first come, first served. Once we’ve fully vetted the family and international

for seven years. What does that

the Department of State every year.

family willing to take on a student

student and everything is in place

entail?

CCI Greenheart receives applications

for a 10-month academic year and

(shots, records, testing, etc.), we

from kids all over the world at their

then finding them space at a school.

supply the information to the school,

Chicago headquarters. Then, they

McClatchy is one of the schools

and whoever gets the spot first gets to

send those applications out to their

with the most exchange students

come.

field offices to match applicants with

because of its HISP (Humanities

We’re the middlemen between the students, the host families and

JL By Jessica Laskey Meet Your Neighbor

62

IES MAY n 17

local families. Once we place a student and International Studies) program,

What are the benefits of

with a host family, we do an initial

but it’s a tricky process to place

participating in a foreign

home visit, then a second home visit

students there because the school is

exchange program?

about a month after the student

so impacted. (Two of Zimmerman’s

arrives. And we have an email, in-

charges are attending McClatchy

travel, but it’s hard when you’re high-

person or phone visit once a month

this year: Leo, a senior from Italy

school age. Many of our participants

living with an empty-nester family in

are leaders in their home countries,

Lots of people have a desire to


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so this is a way to follow through with

the host families and the students

that. It’s also a great way to work on

to make sure we’re operating on

their English. Learning in immersion

neutral ground to work out problems

is so much more beneficial when

with both sides. There are so many

learning a language. And it gives

factors to consider—we’re just the

them a new cultural experience. Our

matchmakers, after all. Eighty

organization is one of the only ones

percent of the time it works. The

that require students to volunteer

other times, we need to be conflict-

eight hours each semester. We want

resolution managers.

a little more than students coming

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here and hanging out with friends.

excited. Do issues ever arise? The visiting student is a permanent “guest” but must be treated like a member of the family, so it takes flexibility on both sides. It’s like a marriage between the student and the family. Conflicts can arise from cultural differences, personality differences—an outgoing family versus a shy student, sibling rivalry. So we try to think of these things when we’re placing the students. We also have separate contact with

Hosting can be more complicated challenging with the kiddos, but it also means they can FaceTime their

May 7, 2017, at 4:00 p.m.

Performing Arts Center at Sacramento City College 3835 Freeport Blvd.

C E RT

host families way ahead of time and stay more connected to their home

3011 J Street Alley

Spain, I called my mom from a pay

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first, but once they do it, they get very

Our organization is one of the only ones that require students to volunteer eight hours each semester.

FOR THE

The students may drag their feet at

SPRI

It gives them a deeper experience.

is changing. I mean, when I was in phone on an international calling card! For more information about the exchange programs offered by CCI Greenheart, visit cci-exchange.com or email Lindsay Zimmerman at lindsayzimmerman123@yahoo.com. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. n

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IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

63


T

Letting Go THIS ARTIST PAINTS LIKE SHE LIVES

he title of Jennifer Keller’s art class at University Art—Let Go & Layer—is something of a metaphor for how she approaches both art and life. She subscribes to the theory of “intuitive painting,” which is as much about putting paint to canvas as it is about exploring one’s innate creativity. “The intuitive painting technique is all about trusting your inner guidance as it comes up and not having a preconceived idea of how you want things to turn out,” Keller explains. “It can be a very healing technique to use, because as you build layer by layer, some really interesting insights can come up during the course of the painting experience.” Keller has expressed herself through visual art for most of her life. She comes from a long line of teachers and creative types, and her parents met in art school. Her dad taught ceramics his whole career; her mom is a ceramicist who creates plates pressed with vintage lace. After earning an art degree with a focus on museum and gallery practices at Humboldt State, the Sacramento native went to work at a vintage photography gallery in San Francisco’s Ghirardelli Square. “Lot of tourists, lots of pictures of the Golden Gate Bridge,” Keller says. Back in Sacramento, she worked at the now-defunct Solomon Dubnick Gallery and as a volunteer for the KVIE Art Auction. Keller now helps other artists with their framing and supply needs at University Art while keeping up with her own creative output and teaching others along the way. “I’ve tried a lot of different mediums over the years,” says Keller, ARTIST page 66

JL By Jessica Laskey Artist Spotlight

64

IES MAY n 17


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IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

65


ARTIST FROM page 64 who specializes in bright, intricately layered acrylic artwork that is organic and otherworldly. “I focused on photography and drawing in college, and I’ve also worked with found objects. But I discovered that acrylic paint suits me best. It’s fast, you don’t need as long an attention span and it really lends itself to the intuitive painting style because it dries quickly, so it layers really well. Once I figured that out, I was hooked.” Keller also collects vintage objects, which she sells on the website Chairish in her online shop, Harmony Rogue Interiors. She opened a brick-and-mortar store two years ago but closed it one year later. “I realized that I missed working with co-workers and the public and being inspired by other people’s energy,” Keller explains. She also experimented with a service called Creative Care Packages, in which participants would receive

66

IES MAY n 17

a surprise bundle of art supplies and found objects in the mail each month to challenge themselves to think outside the proverbial box, but the idea never quite got off the ground. “I’ve always enjoyed seeking out interesting things. There’s a sense of adventure going picking for cool, styled items,” Keller says. “We have a society now that creates too many throwaway items that break, which just becomes landfill. There’s a holistic side to vintage decor. You’re appreciating the craftsmanship of an item and the fact that it’s still functional, whether in your home or when used in art.” This ability to see the beauty in everyday objects is no accident: Keller tries to maintain a sense of wonder and awareness in everything she does, which she’s found can facilitate creativity. “The first online art course I ever created is all about overcoming

artist’s block,” she says. “I always thought I had to come up with something completely unique, to pull an idea out of thin air for it to be good. But that’s not the case—that’s not how inspiration works. You have to go out and be inspired and set up your life and space and time to be able to facilitate creating. Everything is a metaphor for living a more inspired

and intuitive life. By being mindful, you can cultivate positivity in your life. It’s an inner journey as much as a creative one.” To see Jennifer Keller’s artwork or subscribe to her newsletter, go to jenniferlaurelkeller.com.Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@ gmail.com. n

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Neighborhood Real Estate Sales Sales Closed February 12 - March 20, 2017 95608

6730 LAKEVIEW DR 5448 EDGERLY WAY 2800 LA COLINA WAY 6469 MILES LN 6220 CAMEO CT 4701 CAMERON RANCH DR 5818 WOODLEIGH DR 3319 HUNTER LN 6850 LANDIS AVE 5919 ELLERSLEE DR 5931 HELVA LN 6133 RANGER WAY 2210 MARIE WAY 6900 LISA MARIE WAY 4720 ANNE WAY 4920 FOSTER WAY 5412 BENTLEY WAY 3215 ROOT AVE 4182 SCRANTON CIR 2828 GARFIELD AVE 4872 THOUSAND OAKS CT 1141 JACOB LN 6631 MARKLEY WAY 4952 SAN MARQUE CIR 5109 WALNUT GARDEN CT 5217 WILLOW PARK CT 5285 GLANCY DR 5213 ARDEN WAY 2533 WINSFORD LN 4950 CYPRESS AVE 6053 NORTHCREST CIR 3036 ROOT AVE 4448 HACKBERRY LN 6234 SILVERTON WAY 4537 BARRETT RD 7016 GRANT AVE 5354 AGATE WAY 4775 HIXON CIR 4004 EASTWOOD VILLAGE LN 6041 HOLETON RD 5208 LINDA LOU DR 4506 LONGHORN ST 6243 GENA CT 5726 WOODLEIGH DR 4831 DONNIE LYN WAY 5525 WHITFIELD WAY 2536 LANDWOOD WAY 4707 MELVIN DR 6206 MEADOWVISTA DR 2040 SANTA LUCIA WAY 4935 FAIR OAKS BLVD 4751 FAIR OAKS BLVD 6977 LINCOLN CREEK CIR

95815

140 GLOBE AVE 1112 LOCHBRAE RD 2075 EDGEWATER RD

$642,000 $250,000 $320,000 $335,000 $425,000 $480,000 $273,000 $389,900 $695,000 $275,000 $299,000 $340,000 $217,500 $483,500 $530,000 $310,000 $580,000 $290,000 $320,000 $329,500 $404,000 $670,000 $245,000 $330,000 $380,000 $540,000 $320,000 $340,000 $400,000 $453,600 $338,000 $680,000 $370,000 $455,000 $470,000 $484,000 $310,000 $404,000 $299,900 $450,000 $337,000 $375,000 $229,000 $275,000 $400,000 $475,000 $243,400 $355,000 $360,000 $375,000 $720,000 $515,000 $540,000 $320,000 $221,000 $107,000

95816

925 33RD $485,000 2504 P STREET $440,000 231 39TH ST $595,000 1472 33RD ST $380,100 2305 CAPITOL AVE $633,500 3501 FORNEY WAY $599,044 3182 MCKINLEY VILLAGE WAY $695,000 569 35TH ST $1,644,000 2400 S ST $405,500 1223 33RD ST $486,000 2619 R ST $425,000 2513 RICE ALLEY $549,000 3212 DULLANTY WAY $559,990

95817

3516 4TH AVE 5424 U ST

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IES MAY n 17

$392,000 $385,000

4233 U ST 5433 V ST 4345 4TH AVE 3440 41ST 3441 38TH ST 3224 11TH AVE 3427 33RD 5935 2ND AVE 2817 42ND ST 2200 58TH ST 3233 11TH AVE 5008 U ST 3891 12TH AVE 4020 4TH AVE 3708 4TH AVE 3887 12TH AVE 3232 11TH AVE 4126 7TH AVE 3138 W ST

95818

1757 BIDWELL WAY 2008 VIZCAYA WALK 2544 SAN FERNANDO WAY 2674 27TH ST 2640 9TH AVE 727 SWANSTON DR 669 5TH AVE 951 6TH AVE 3506 24TH ST 2912 26TH ST 2409 27TH ST 622 FREMONT 642 PERKINS WAY 1010 VALLEJO WAY 1393 7TH AVE 2815 SANTA BUENA WAY 2665 SAN FERNANDO WAY 933 MCCLATCHY WAY 1000 VALLEJO WAY 1880 9TH AVE 2009 26TH ST 1370 VALLEJO WAY 574 JONES WAY 700 MCCLATCHY WAY 2782 MARTY WAY 2774 MUIR WAY 2601 27TH ST 1817 MARKHAM WAY 1203 WELLER WAY 2017 CASTRO WAY 2772 13TH ST 2787 SAN LUIS CT 3685 CROCKER 2401 COLEMAN WAY 3177 CROCKER DR

95819

1200 42ND ST 1716 41ST ST 1542 54TH ST 1328 58TH ST 841 46TH ST 1717 51ST ST 1512 54TH ST 86 PRIMROSE WAY 1473 51ST 5333 S ST 717 SAN MIGUEL WAY 1701 40TH ST 4508 T ST 1317 52ND ST 5031 MODDISON AVE 5865 CAMELLIA AVE 86 43RD ST 5705 SHEPARD AVE 4601 J ST 1350 41ST ST

$542,000 $380,000 $250,000 $260,000 $215,000 $329,000 $320,000 $375,000 $266,000 $323,000 $300,000 $412,000 $225,000 $237,500 $255,000 $255,000 $337,000 $220,000 $392,300 $585,000 $799,500 $210,000 $352,000 $455,000 $612,500 $465,000 $412,000 $539,000 $625,000 $329,000 $436,000 $498,000 $519,000 $650,000 $419,900 $295,000 $450,000 $469,999 $875,000 $406,000 $599,999 $425,000 $415,000 $529,700 $439,000 $385,000 $562,000 $899,950 $495,000 $564,000 $361,000 $535,105 $619,000 $686,032 $1,362,000 $570,000 $432,500 $599,000 $795,000 $380,000 $429,000 $550,000 $459,900 $460,000 $640,000 $779,000 $418,700 $468,000 $515,000 $710,000 $493,500 $495,000 $605,000 $1,630,000

4519 C ST 1641 41ST ST 1560 48TH ST 900 ELDORADO WAY

95820

4026 WASHINGTON AVE 4408 42ND ST 4901 EMERSON TER 4844 10TH AVE 4406 36 4300 E NICHOLS AVE 3330 21ST AVE 4910 LIPPITT LN 5717 8TH AVE 3419 21ST AVE 5303 13TH AVE 4929 48TH ST 5311 64TH ST 3875 14TH AVE 3303 20TH AVE 4501 28TH AVE 3200 53RD ST 2711 23RD AVE 4500 28TH AVE 4946 48TH ST 4062 FOTOS CT 5411 EMERSON RD 4755 16TH AVE 4907 13TH AVE 5400 57TH ST 2901 23RD 4127 57TH ST 6908 MCQUILLAN CIR 3825 JEFFREY AVE 5211 ESMERALDA 4417 MELLO CT 4911 48TH ST 5168 CABOT CIR 3925 SIERRA VISTA 4725 BAKER AVE 4612 44TH ST 3725 E PACIFIC AVE 2561 PHYLLIS AVE 4740 71ST ST 5000 76TH ST 5345 13TH AVE 4541 8TH AVE 4517 10 TH AVE 4350 52ND ST 4920 WHITTIER 4455 49TH ST 4310 CABRILLO WAY 5024 12TH AVE 4504 PARKER AVE

95821

2331 CARLSBAD AVE 3348 LEATHA WAY 3410 WEST COUNTRY CLUB LN 4142 WHEAT ST 3900 TERRA VISTA WAY 2651 WATSON ST 4252 MASON LN 3230 FIELDCREST DR 3632 EASTERN AVE 2600 ETHAN WAY 4137 BERESFORD WAY 3624 MULHOLLAND WAY 3066 VALKYRIE WAY 2233 EDISON AVE 2480 VALLEY RD 3432 DEL MESA CT 3231 FREDERICK WAY 3115 COWAN CIR 3808 WHITNEY AVE 2833 EDISON AVE 3408 CONCETTA WAY

$640,000 $760,000 $514,000 $899,000 $138,500 $155,000 $230,000 $310,000 $215,000 $270,000 $221,000 $280,000 $385,000 $220,000 $255,000 $158,300 $260,000 $144,000 $185,000 $221,000 $325,000 $112,875 $205,000 $220,000 $370,000 $188,000 $325,000 $259,000 $260,000 $210,000 $283,000 $305,000 $340,000 $260,000 $165,000 $185,000 $193,000 $240,000 $165,000 $215,000 $424,500 $139,000 $200,000 $230,000 $337,500 $220,000 $200,000 $250,000 $143,000 $188,000 $295,000 $360,000 $106,000 $280,000 $415,000 $540,000 $388,000 $280,000 $280,000 $875,000 $925,000 $349,900 $261,900 $312,500 $369,900 $445,000 $165,000 $233,000 $500,000 $253,500 $579,000 $289,000 $196,000 $375,000

3088 BERTIS DR 3309 CLUB LANE 3541 ARDMORE RD 4508 ROBERTSON AVE 4019 NORRIS AVE 2720 IDLEWOOD LN 3500 MULHOLLAND WAY 3133 BECERRA WAY 4600 GEORGIAN AVE 2825 IONE ST

95822

1706 POTRERO WAY 2184 MATSON DR 2230 CASA LINDA DR 8 LOMA VERDE CT 6830 21ST ST 7006 TAMOSHANTER WAY 2167 SARAZEN AVE 1513 STERLING ST 5100 EUCLID AVE 5630 CAPSTAN WAY 5601 MILNER WAY 1440 WACKER WAY 1881 NIANTIC WAY 4651 LARSON WAY 1524 DICKSON ST 5310 GILGUNN WAY 7297 MILFORD ST 2432 YREKA AVE 7563 COSGROVE WAY 2141 BERG AVE 7501 GEORGICA WAY 1100 GLENN HOLLY WAY 7472 BALFOUR WAY 2527 48 AVE 7474 19TH ST 6931 MIDDLECOFF WAY 7572 19TH ST 913 PIEDMONT DR 1140 CHARGENE WAY 1461 OREGON DR 7559 MEADOWAIR WAY 5673 JACKS LN 23 LUNDY CT 7102 21ST ST 1501 LONDON ST 1512 ZELDA WAY 7550 21ST ST 6513 WOODBINE 1501 WAKEFIELD WAY 5310 DANA WAY 4721 22ND ST 1479 MCALLISTER AVE 1501 SHERWOOD AVE 6884 23RD ST 1432 MATHEWS WAY 3818 WEST LAND PARK DR 1811 60TH AVE 7407 FLORES WAY 7461 19TH ST 5645 NORMAN WAY 7305 BENBOW ST 1901 WAKEFIELD WAY 1242 NEVIS COURT 2716 WOOD VIOLET WAY 2156 AMANDA WAY 2150 AARON WAY 2354 50TH AVE 2236 IRVIN WAY 1450 TRADEWINDS AVE 1064 WOODSHIRE WAY 2941 TRENTWOOD WAY 2301 53RD AVE 1701 FRUITRIDGE RD 7068 WILSHIRE CIR

$269,000 $450,000 $319,000 $339,950 $355,000 $550,000 $340,900 $590,000 $330,000 $422,000 $319,200 $210,000 $284,000 $269,999 $308,000 $245,000 $268,000 $307,000 $333,000 $376,000 $198,000 $210,000 $257,000 $375,000 $220,000 $750,000 $224,000 $228,000 $239,000 $240,000 $255,000 $397,500 $205,000 $148,000 $190,000 $220,000 $230,000 $735,000 $398,950 $356,000 $235,000 $242,500 $321,400 $200,000 $215,000 $225,000 $203,000 $235,000 $265,000 $370,000 $395,000 $207,000 $799,900 $240,000 $240,000 $1,205,000 $217,000 $220,000 $235,000 $277,000 $220,000 $280,000 $399,500 $199,000 $202,500 $265,000 $245,000 $300,000 $360,000 $390,000 $261,500 $262,000 $299,000 $315,000

95825

1900 TERRACE DR 741 BLACKMER CIR 741 FULTON AVE 2009 ROBERT 2377 HERNANDO RD 3000 EL PRADO WAY 2212 BYRON RD 2124 UNIVERSITY PARK DR

95831

1253 56TH AVE 23 TRIUMPH CT #LOT5 47 PINIOS RIVER CT 446 MARINER POINT WAY 909 SUNWIND WAY 1242 58TH AVE 1269 SILVER OAK WAY 936 SUNWIND WAY 7752 ROBERTS RIVER WAY 18 WATERSHORE CIR 7672 DEL OAK WAY 431 BLUE DOLPHIN WAY 1072 L ALOUTTE WAY 6131 S LAND PARK DR 500 COOL WIND WAY 7392 WILLOW LAKE WAY 7488 RIO MONDEGO DR 15 PARK VISTA CIR 1175 GRAND RIVER DR 11 RIO VIALE CT 7512 POCKET RD 358 RIVER ISLE WAY 5 PEBBLE RIVER CIR 8042 LINDA ISLE LN 7726 RIO ESTRADA WAY 7476 SPICEWOOD DR 39 RAMBLEOAK CIR 1236 NORFOLK WAY 868 FLORIN RD

95864

2732 VIA VILLAGIO 4400 ULYSSES DR 2430 VERNA WAY 4416 THOR WAY 3712 LAGUNA WAY 4401 VICO WAY 3601 TOLENAS CT 3720 LYNWOOD WAY 4611 COTTAGE WAY 2890 HURLEY WAY 3731 ESPERANZA DR 2840 BERKSHIRE WAY 1160 SHADOWGLEN RD 3349 MAYFAIR DR 1604 LA SIERRA DR 2827 SEVILLA LN 3908 LA VERNE WAY 4428 SURITA 1130 JONAS AVE 3300 WEMBERLEY DR 3116 MAYFAIR DR 1720 DAPHNE AVE 330 ROSS WAY 2690 HUNTINGTON RD 1433 WATT AVE 1733 MERCURY WAY 1413 ROWENA WAY 1120 MORSE AVE 4000 CRONDALL DR 3145 BAKULA WAY 3228 WINDSOR DR 1809 VESTA WAY 1210 ARROYO GRANDE DR 4021 LAS PASAS WAY 3316 WEMBERLEY DR

$274,500 $515,000 $679,780 $215,000 $250,000 $335,000 $349,500 $385,000 $430,000 $689,777 $890,000 $345,000 $415,000 $525,000 $365,000 $434,888 $435,000 $474,500 $664,900 $335,000 $500,800 $565,000 $300,000 $353,000 $441,500 $340,000 $469,000 $420,000 $423,000 $425,000 $470,000 $385,000 $735,000 $306,000 $406,000 $770,000 $412,000 $361,000 $350,000 $336,500 $340,000 $406,000 $525,000 $652,600 $319,950 $349,900 $192,500 $470,000 $235,000 $239,000 $259,950 $465,000 $605,000 $357,500 $575,000 $225,000 $260,000 $262,000 $383,000 $679,000 $2,775,000 $200,000 $390,000 $279,000 $210,000 $900,000 $250,000 $266,500 $310,000 $798,000 $815,000 $220,000


Represented Buyer. Exquisite 1913 Prairie/Egyptian Revival Midtown mansion on Poverty Ridge designed by Sacramento City Hall architect Rudolph Herold. 10 foot ceilings, hardwood floors and charming original details abound throughout Petite Land Park charmer perfectly located on a tree this magnificent and lined street just steps from a vibrant assortment of historic property! restaurants and entertainment. $395,000

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Remodeled vintage Midtown Represented Buyer. This fourplex on full lot with off street incredibly rare Midtown property parking and twelve foot ceilings on has it all and is on a full lot with commercial and residential space. second story. $895,000

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Represented Buyer. Adorable vintage Midtown high water bungalow just down the street from the new Natural Foods Co-Op. $395,000

Represented Buyer. Storybook Govan Corridor Squeaky Williams duplex in the heart of Land Park. Beautiful vintage details throughout. $579,000

Represented Buyer. Exquisite 2002 built triplex located in Midtown on Southside Park’s north side on a full lot. $750,000

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Photo courtesy of Steve Harriman

Still a City of Trees ONLY YOU CAN MAKE AN URBAN FOREST

W

hether or not the water tower south of town proudly proclaims us to be a city of trees, Sacramento’s urban forest is still one of our defining characteristics. Its shade makes life worth living during searing summer heat waves. The poet Joyce Kilmer famously wrote, “only God can make a tree,” but it’s up to us to plant and maintain trees on our properties as a gift to our family, community and future generations. We can’t take our precious tree canopy for granted. We

AC By Anita Clevenger Garden Jabber

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all need to play our part. Every time I hear a chain saw in my neighborhood, I worry that another mature tree is being removed or topped (the practice of stubbing back branches, stimulating an ugly thicket of weakly attached branches). I’ve lived in East Sacramento for nearly 40 years, and I remember dozens of large shade trees that have been disfigured by improper pruning or lost altogether. It takes decades for another one to fill its space. Too often, people don’t replant any tree at all, or replace a majestic sycamore, gingko or oak tree with a much smaller tree. Neighbors have told me that big trees are more effort than they are worth and that they are glad to be free from dealing with their leaves or worrying about maintaining them. How much effort does a tree take, anyway? By choosing the right size

and type of tree, you can minimize future care requirements. A young tree needs to be properly planted, staked, mulched, watered and trained so that it develops a good structure. A mature tree continues to need periodic deep watering and regular inspections to look for dead or hanging branches or signs of disease or insect infestation. If you spot a problem, hire a qualified tree service to help resolve it. City arborist Kevin Hocker says he doesn’t understand why people don’t maintain their trees. “You maintain your car,” he says. “Why not take care of your trees as well?” Local governments maintain some control over what is done to privately owned trees. Special protection is given to native oaks and other varieties, but any big tree may require

a permit before pruning or removal commences. While trees are indeed a bit of trouble, the consensus is that their benefits are much greater. Trees are beautiful and make neighborhoods more attractive and livable. Many studies document their environmental and economic benefits, too. They clean the air, filter and replenish groundwater, lower air temperature, sequester carbon and provide habitat. A carefully placed shade tree will reduce your utility bills. Trees give our children places to climb and swing. Mature trees can increase your property value and make your house easier to sell. Hocker says that trees also produce “quantifiable health benefits.” In Japan, studies have shown that “forest bathing,” going out among trees on a regular basis, has


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both physical and psychological benefits. Trees exude airborne oils to protect themselves from insects and germs. Inhaling them improves human immune system response. On its website, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation cites studies that found spending just five minutes among trees can reduce stress, lower blood pressure, improve mood, increase ability to focus (even in children with ADHD), accelerate recovery from surgery or illness, increase energy level and improve sleep. Much as I advocate for trees, I have removed a few badly placed ones over the years. Most recently, SMUD removed a supposedly dwarf, fruitless purple leaf plum that grew into the utility lines and produced a heavy crop of sour fruits that attracted rodents and made a mess in our yard. I miss its beautiful dark-red leaves and intensely fragrant pale-pink spring flowers, and I plan to start over with the right variety. We need to plant our new plum tree close to where the old one grew. We must first deal with the stump and

underground roots. We aren’t willing to wait for the stump to decay, so my husband has been doggedly chopping at it. If we have it ground out, we’ll need to remove the wood chips and sawdust and replace them with soil before planting. We’ll make sure that we can dig a big enough planting hole, which guidelines say should be three times as wide as the root ball. SMUD customers may qualify for free shade trees under the Sacramento Tree Foundation’s Sacramento Shade program. We’re going to have to purchase our new plum tree, but the benefits are worth it. After all, my yard is part of our precious urban forest. Anita Clevenger is a Lifetime Sacramento County UC D Master Gardener. For answers to gardening questions, call the Master Gardeners office at 876-5338, visit their website at sacmg.ucanr.edu or come to their next open garden at Fair Oaks Horticulture Center on Saturday, May 13, from 9 a.m. to noon. The center is at 11579 Fair Oaks Blvd. For information on tree care, go to sactree.org. n

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Don't miss the vocal ensemble Vox Musica's last performance of the season.

TO DO

THIS MONTH'S CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT HIGHLIGHTS

“Voices in Harmony: Music From Appalachia”

jL By Jessica Laskey

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Vox Musica Sunday, May 21, at 5 p.m. Beatnik Studios, 723 S St. voxmusica.net All-female vocal ensemble Vox Musica closes its season with a combination of bluegrass songs and folk melodies from Appalachia, including music from The Wailin’ Jennys, Gillian Welch and Alison Krauss, accompanied by the Davisbased bluegrass ensemble The Narrow Gauge String Band. Local breweries will serve craft beers before the concert.


“Snap Shots II” The Sacramento Ballet Through May 14 E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts, 2420 N St. sacballet.org “Snap Shots II” delves into the archives of co-artistic director Ron Cunningham’s storehouse of masterful choreography, with sketches from “The Great Gatsby,” “Romeo and Juliet” and “The Donner Party.”

Jewish Heritage Festival Celebrating Israel The Jewish Federation Sunday, May 7, from 1–5 p.m. Scottish Rite Masonic Center, 6151 H St. jewishsac.org Come party with The Jewish Federation of the Sacramento Region at this annual festival celebrating Israel. This family-friendly event will include food, crafts and more.

Sacramento Ballet is presenting Snap Shots II through May 14. Photo courtesy of Keith Sutter.

“Songs I’ll Never Get To Sing” Jessica Laskey and Friends Friday, May 26, and Saturday, May 27, at 7 p.m. William J. Geery Theater, 2130 L St. theatergalatea.com Yours truly (Jessica Laskey) will perform a cabaret of Broadway classics with a twist with fellow singers Jennifer Kirkham Smith, Natalie Jones, Analise Langford, Orlana Van Zandt and Jessica Futrell accompanied by Sam Schieber. The show will feature songs from musicals “The Producers,” “The Book of Mormon,” “Man of La Mancha,” “My Fair Lady” and more in ways you’ve never heard them sung before.

Have Choral, Will Travel “European Masterworks” Sacramento Choral Society and Orchestra Saturday, May 6 at 8 p.m. Community Center Theater, 1301 L Street 808-5181, sacramentochoral.com Get a sneak peek of the programming set for the SCSO’s June 2017 international tour to Latvia, Estonia and Finland at this musical preview concert featuring Mendelssohn’s “Psalm 42,” Rossini’s “Stabat Mater,” solos by singers Marina Harris, Layna Chianakas, Kirk Dougherty, Chester Pidduck, Malcolm McKenzie and Shawn Spiess and a guest appeareance by the Sacramento State University Chorus.

Concert Celebrating Women Reconciliation Singers Voices of Peace Friday, May 19, and Saturday, May 20, at 7:30 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran Church, 1701 L St. rsvpchoir.org The RSVP vocal ensemble will present a concert featuring female composers and arrangers in a variety of musical styles (jazz, gospel and classical) to benefit Saint John’s Program for Real Change. Saxophonist Keith Bohm will perform at Crocker Art Museum.

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Sunday Dinner for Two Every Sunday evening Hawks Public House, 1525 Alhambra Blvd. hawkspublichouse.com Get your week started right with good food and a bottle of wine. Hawks Public House now offers Sunday Dinner for Two, a special fixed-price menu by chef Dane Blom (formerly of Grange): Caesar salad, garlic bread and chef’s choice pasta for $45.

“How Do I Love Thee?” Sacramento Master Singers Saturday, May 20, 8 p.m., and Sunday, May 21, at 3 p.m. First United Methodist Church, 2100 J St. mastersingers.org Sacramento Master Singers present a concert that explores the highs and lows of romantic love. The program will include compositions by Ralph Vaughan Williams, Eric Nelson and David Bednall, texts by William Shakespeare and Elizabeth Barrett Browning and tunes like “Go, Lovely Rose” by Z. Randall Stroope.

“Gears” Thursday, May 11, from 6–10 p.m. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St. crockerart.org Celebrate Bike Month in Steampunk style at this ArtMix event featuring a new installation by Pedal Theory and retro-futuristic inventions, workshops and fashions presented by Sacramento Steampunk Society and The League of Proper Villains. Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates will provide free bike valet service. Must be 21 or over to attend.

Celebrate Bike Month at Crocker Art Museum. Photo courtesy of George Young, Crocker Art Museum.

“Field Notes” UC Davis Art Studio MFA Program May 5–25 Beatnik Studios, 723 S St. beatnik-studios.com Beatnik Studios presents eight artists currently enrolled in the Art Studio MFA program at UC Davis, a two-year studio program. The featured artists from the class of 2018 include Noah Greene, Emily Clark-Kramer, Doug Loree, Joy Miller, Jodi Connelly, Ryan Meyer, Tavarus Blackmonster and Darcy Padilla working in painting, sculpture, photography and video. The opening reception takes place May 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. A student-hosted event will be held Wednesday, May 24, from 7 to 9 p.m.

Enjoy Sunday Dinner for Two at Hawks Public House, a special fixed-price menu. Photo courtesy of Esra Okar.

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SATURDAY, MAY 6 AT 8:00 PM Pre-concert talk at 7 PM by Conductor Donald Kendrick

Sacramento Community Center Theater MENDELSSOHN | Psalm 42 Wie der Hirsch schreit tabat Mater ROSSINI | Stabat Marina Harris, ris, Sop Soprano oprano Layna Chianakas, nakas as, Mezzo herty ty, Tenor T Kirk Dougherty, cKe Kenzie, Baritone Bari r ton ri to one ne Malcolm McKenzie, ss, Baritone Baritonee Shawn Spiess, duck ck, Tenor T orr Chester Pidduck,

Donald Kendrick | Music Director

GUEST CHORUS Sacramento State University Chorus

Enjoy a musical preview of the SCSO’s June 2017 international tour to Latvia, Estonia and Finland

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The RSVP vocal ensemble presents a concert to benefit Saint John’s Program for Real Change.

Big Day of Giving Thursday, May 4 Midnight–11:59 p.m. bigdayofgiving.org Big Day of Giving is a 24-hour online giving challenge that helps raise funds for local nonprofits. The event has raised more than $16 million for local nonprofits from more than 36,000 donors since it began. Mark your calendar to join the charitable challenge. Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. n

Sacramento Master Singers will perform two concerts at First United Methodist Church this month.

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e

7th Annual Fundraiser BeneďŹ ting Triumph Cancer Foundation

JUNE 17TH

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Join us at Helwig Winery for a special evening. Enjoy great food, wine & music while supporting a local nonprofit dedicated to helping cancer survivors!

camp troubie For Rising 5th - 8th Grade Girls Monday, June 12 - Friday, July 7

musical theatre camp For Rising 5th - 8th Grade Girls Monday, June 12 - Friday, July 7

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Concert in Amphitheater

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Art Preview

JAYJAY presents the work of Mary Warner and Kris Lyons through May 27. Shown right: Mary Warner’s “Through the Trees,” an oil on linen. 5524 Elvas Ave.; jayjayart.com

GALLERY ART SHOWS IN MAY Sparrow Gallery presents mixed-media photography by Dianne Poinski through June 2. Shown left: “Iridescence.” 2418 K St.; sparrowgallerysacramento.com

B. Sakato Garo presents the work of Robert Brady through June 3. Shown left: “Return #2.” 923 20th St.; bsakatagaro.com

Through May, Tim Collom Gallery will exhibit the ceramic work of Cindy Wilson. Shown above: “Canoe Girl.” 915 20th St.; timcollomgallery.com

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Northern California Arts presents a juried membership show called Artistic Journey through May 14 at Sacramento Fine Arts Center. Shown above: 2017 Best of Show “Song of the Woods” by Daphne Stammer. 5330 Gibbons Drive; sacfinearts.org/nca


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79


Amaro Does Italian Right NEW R STREET RESTAURANT DESERVES A ‘BRAVO!’

I

am sometimes surprised at how few Italian restaurants there are in the Sacramento region. Sure, we have our share of pizza places— Masullo, Hot Italian, Pizza Rock and OneSpeed come to mind—that transcend the pizza-parlor genre and creep into the remarkable-dining category. And we have some classic Chianti-and-two-pounds-of-pasta places like Espanol and Serritella’s. What we lack are restaurants that combine Sacramento’s farm-to-fork ethos with exquisite Italian cooking. Excluding a few prominent chains, the only name that comes to mind is

GS By Greg Sabin Restaurant Insider

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Biba. But now we have a new entry to add to the list: Amaro Italian Bistro & Bar.

When it comes to the menu, the dishes put out at Amaro are absolutely lovely. The latest enterprise from the team behind Shady Lady Saloon, B-Side, Field House American Sports Pub and Sail Inn, Amaro combines modern design with classic Italian cuisine. Perched in the middle of the bustling R Street Corridor, the space carves out a lovely corner next to WAL Public Market and across 11th Street

from a shuttered building that has “potential” written all over it. Compared to the nouveau-hip industrial exterior, the interior is a bit tongue-in-cheek. A simple smattering of tables and a large, open kitchen take up the ground floor, while above the diners’ heads are gorgeous reproduction Renaissance portraits, and a library of leather-bound Italian classics, all so fraudulent as to be a sardonic comment in itself. The only thing that doesn’t fit the slick atmosphere is the music—1980s pop tunes and reggae numbers—piped through the sound system. The food at Amaro is absolutely lovely. The scratch cooking, housemade pastas, freshly baked breads and high-quality desserts, speak to a kitchen that is staffed by mature hands and talented veterans. The word “maturity” came to mind more than once while I was eating at Amaro. A less experienced

group of restaurant owners and a less confident kitchen staff, may have tried to reinvent the Italian classics. They would have been miles too clever. Instead, the group seems to have centered the culinary enterprise on quality: quality ingredients, quality staff, quality recipes.

The vibe may be hip, but the food on the plate shows maturity and precision. Take, for example, the Caesar salad. Amaro’s version is simple and beautiful, made with polenta croutons and some of the best anchovy fillets I’ve ever enjoyed. Those fillets aren’t


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5723 Folsom Boulevard 457-1936 a big thing, but they let the diner know that care has been brought to bear on all aspects of the dish.

Or take the lasagna. The chef could have eschewed the basic lasagna and gone for something more refined or creative. He might have tried to

emulate Biba’s lasagna, which is still the finest plate of food a diner can eat within a 100-mile radius of Sacramento. Instead, the kitchen turns out a traditional, nonnastyle piece of lasagna, made with Bolognese, béchamel, fontina and locally sourced ricotta from Orland Farmstead Creamery, all heartily packed between layers of house-made pasta. The result is a dense, oversized, luscious square of decadence. It’s no more sophisticated than Mom’s potluck lasagna—it’s simply made with more care.

The sweets on Amaro’s menu are something to behold. Another standout dish is orecchiette con salsiccia, the classic combo of ear-shaped pasta, sausage, rapini, garlic and chili that attracts my eye on every Italian menu. Amaro’s version is on point and balanced to perfection. Also worth ordering are the melt-in-yourmouth gnocchi in brown butter, the

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mushroom pizza and the focaccia. Seriously, the focaccia! No matter the savory temptations, save room for dessert. Amaro’s sweets are something to behold. The panna cotta, made with candied kumquats and citrus curd, is silky and decadent. Similarly, the tiramisu is the classic dessert brought to its most indulgent. And the house-made cannoli is a perfect expression of the genre: crispy, candied and sweet. Hopefully, Amaro and its inevitable success will shine a light on a trend that I can get behind: traditional recipes prepared traditionally without any skimping on prep time, ingredients or care. The vibe may be hip, but the food on the plate shows maturity and precision. I’ll take that combination any time. Amaro Italian Bistro & Bar is at 1100 R St.; 399-4145; amarobistrobar. com. Greg Sabin can be reached at gregsabin@hotmail.com. n

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INSIDE’S

DOWNTOWN Cafeteria 15L 116 15th Street 551-1559 L D $$ Classic American lunch counter with a millennial vibe • cafeteria15l.com

DeVere’s Pub 1521 L Street L D Full Bar $$ Family-run authentic Irish pub with a classic menu to match • deverespub.com

Downtown & Vine 1200 K Street #8 228-4518 Educational tasting experience of wines by the taste, flight or glass • downtownandvine.com

Ella Dining Room & Bar

Grange 926 J Street • 492-4450 B L D Full Bar $$$ Simple, seasonal, soulful • grangerestaurant.com

Hock Farm Craft & Provision 1415 L St. 440-8888 L D $$-$$ Full Bar Celebration of the region’s rich history and bountiful terrain • Paragarys.com

South 2005 11th Street 382-9722 L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Timeless traditional Southern cuisine, counter service • weheartfriedchicken.com

OLD SAC

1131 K St. 443-3772

Fat City Bar & Cafe

L D $$$ Full Bar Modern American cuisine served family-style in a chic, upscale space Elladiningroomandbar.com

1001 Front St. 446-6768 D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine served in a casual historic Old Sac location • Fatsrestaurants.com

Esquire Grill

Rio City Cafe

1213 K St. 448-8900

1110 Front Street 442-8226

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Upscale American fare served in an elegant setting • Paragarys.com

L D Wine/Beer $$ Bistro favorites with a distinctively Sacramento feeling in a riverfront setting • riocitycafe.com

Firestone Public House

The Firehouse Restaurant

1132 16th Street

1112 Second St. 442-4772

L D $$ Full Bar Sports bar with a classical american menu• firestonepublichouse.com

L D $$$ Full Bar Global and California cuisine in an upscale historic Old Sac setting • Firehouseoldsac.com

Frank Fat’s 806 L St. 442-7092 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Chinese favorites in an elegant setting • Fatsrestaurants.com

Ma Jong’s

Ten 22 1022 Second St. 441-2211 L D Wine/Beer $$ American bistro favorites with a modern twist in a casual, Old Sac setting • ten22oldsac.com

1431 L Street L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Cuisine from Japan, Thailand, China ad Vietnam. • majongs.com

Willie’s Burgers 110 K Street L D $ Great burgers and more. • williesburgers.com

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Breakfast at 56 Try our Breakfast Tacos, Breakfast Nachos or Smothered Burrito Don’t forget our $12 Bottomless Mimosas Saturdays & Sundays

New plates added to the breakfast menu! Breakfast served Saturday & Sunday 9am - Noon | Daily Specials Happy Hour: 3-7pm Mon - Thurs & ALL DAY FRIDAYS

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24 Hours to Give Where Your Heart Is From midnight to midnight on May 4, go to bigdayofgiving.org and give to the nonprofits that lift up lives and make this the place we call home.

May 4, 2017 bigdayofgiving.org Brought to you by

R STREET

THE HANDLE

Café Bernardo

The Rind

1431 R St. 930-9191

1801 L Street #40 441-7463

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Casual California cuisine with counter service

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Cheese-centric menu paired with select wine and beer • therindsacramento.com

Fish Face Poke Bar

Zocolo

1104 R Street Suite 100 L D $$ Humble Hawaiian poke breaks free • fishfacepokebar.com

1801 Capitol Ave. 441-0303 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cuisine served in an authentic artistic setting • zocolosacramento.com

Iron Horse Tavern 1116 15th Street L D $-$$ Full Bar Gastro-pub cuisine in a stylish industrial setting • ironhorsetavern.net

Old Soul & Pullman Bar 12th & R Streets B L D $ Full-service cafe with artisan coffee roasts, bakery goods and sandwiches • oldsoulco.com

MIDTOWN Biba Ristorante 2801 Capitol Ave. 455-2422 L D $$$ Full Bar Upscale Northern Italian cuisine served a la carte • Biba-restaurant.com

Café Bernardo 2726 Capitol Ave. 443-1180

Magpie Cafe

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Casual California cuisine with counter service

1601 16th Street L D $$-$$$ Wine/Beer Seasonal menu using the best local ingredients • magpiecafe.com

Centro Cocina Mexicana 2730 J St. 442-2552

Nido Bakery

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cooking served in a casual atmosphere • Paragarys.com

L D $ Bakery treats and seasonal specialities. hellonido.com

Federalist Public House

1409 R Street Suite 102

2009 N Street

Shoki Ramen House 1201 R Street L D $$ Japanese fine dining using the best local ingredients • sshokiramenhouse.com

84

IES MAY n 17

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Wood-fired pizzas in an inventive urban alley setting • federalistpublichouse.com


/LF/LF

3(55, &75,&LQF (/( Call Frank Perri

455-3052 1740 36th St.

perri1740@att.net

‡5HVLGHQWLDO ‡&RPPHUFLDO ‡7URXEOHVKRRWLQJ 3URXGO\VHUYLQJ(DVW6DFUDPHQWR UHVLGHQWV EXVLQHVVHVZLWKTXDOLW\ ZRUNIRUPRUHWKDQ\HDUV

Hot Italian

Tapa The World

1627 16th Street 444-3000

2115 J St. 442-4353

L D Full Bar $$ Authentic hand-crafted pizzas with inventive ingredients, Gelato• hotitalian.net

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer/Sangria Spanish/world cuisine in a casual authentic atmosphere, live flamenco music - tapathewworld.com

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan 1215 19th St. 441-6022 L D Full Bar $$$ Modern American cuisine in an upscale historic setting

Thai Basil Café 2431 J St. 442-7690 L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Housemade curries among their authentic Thai specialties Thaibasilrestaurant.com

Red Rabbit 2718 J Street L D $$ Full Bar All things local contribute to a sophisticated urban menu • theredrabbit.net

Paragary’s Bar & Oven 1401 28th St. 457-5737 L D $$ Full Bar Fabulous Outdoor Patio, California cuisine with a French touch • Paragarys.com

Revolution Wines 2831 S Street L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Urban winery and tasting room with a creative menu using local sources • rwwinery. com

Skool 2315 K Street D $$ Inventive Japansese-inspired seafood dishes • skoolonkstreet.com

Suzie Burger 29th and P. Sts. 455-3300 L D $ Classic burgers, cheesesteaks, shakes, chili dogs, and other tasty treats • suzieburger.com

The Waterboy 2000 Capitol Ave. 498-9891 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Fine South of France and northern Italian cuisine in a chic neighborhood setting • waterboyrestaurant.com

EAST SAC 33rd Street Bistro

3301 Folsom Blvd. 455-2233 B L D $$ Full Bar Patio Pacific Northwest cuisine in a casual bistro setting • 33rdstreetbistro.com

Burr’s Fountain

4920 Folsom Blvd. 452-5516 B L D $ Fountain-style diner serving burgers, sandwiches, soup and ice cream specialties

Cabana Winery & Bistro 5610 Elvas 476-5492 LD $$ Wine tasting and paired entrees. Sunday Brunch 10 - 2. • cabanawine.com

Clubhouse 56 723 56th. St. 454-5656 BLD Full Bar $$ American. HD sports, kid's menu, breakfast weekends, Late night dining

OBO Italian 3145 Folsom Blvd. L D Full Bar $$ The rustic, seasonal, and nourishing flavors of Italy. Counter service • oboitalian.com

Español 5723 Folsom Blvd. 457-3679 L D Full Bar $$ Classic Italian cuisine served in a traditional family-style atmosphere

Evan’s Kitchen 855 57th St. 452-3896 B L D Wine/Beer $$ Eclectic California cuisine served in a family-friendly atmosphere • Chefevan.com

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

85


Buy 8 oz. yogurt or higher, GET UP TO 8 OZ. OF YOGURT FOR FREE! Limit one free 8oz. yogurt per coupon

5535 H Street | 455-6000 heavenlysyogurt.com 11 to 10:30 Daily

Formoli’s Bistro

La Trattoria Bohemia

Freeport Bakery

Ettore’s

3839 J St. 448-5699

3649 J St. 455-7803

2966 Freeport Blvd. 442-4256

2376 Fair Oaks Blvd. 482-0708

B L D Wine/Beer $$-$$$ Mediterranean influenced cuisine in a stylish neighborhood setting • formolisbistro.com

L D Wine/Beer $-$$ Italian and Czech specialties in a neighborhood bistro setting

B L $ Award-winning baked goods and cakes for eat in or take out • Freeportbakery.com

Opa! Opa!

Iron Grill

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio European-style gourmet café with salads, soup, spit-roasted chicken, and desserts in a bistro setting • Ettores.com

5644 J St. 451-4000

13th Street and Broadway 737-5115

Hawks Public House 1525 Alhambra Blvd. 558-4440 L D $$-$$$ Familiar classics combined with specialty ingredients by chefs Molly Hawks and Mike Fagnoni • hawkspublichouse.com

L D Wine/Beer $ Fresh Greek cuisine in a chic, casual setting, counter service

Nopalitos

Kru

5530 H St. 452-8226

3145 Folsom Blvd. 551-1559 L D $$-$$$ Beer/Wine Raw and refined, traditional Japanese cuisine and sushi • krurestaurant.com

B L $ Wine/Beer Southwestern fare in a casual diner setting

Roxie Deli & Barbeque

RIVER CITY

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

P & SALES, INC. MANAGEMENT “"Where Detail Counts”

Providing Quality Management & Service for over 35 Years • Full Property Management • Tenant Placement & Screening • Specializing in Midtown and East Sacramento

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Upscale neighborhood steakhouse • Ironsteaks.com

Jamie’s Bar and Grill 427 Broadway 442-4044 L D $ Full Bar Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Dine in or take out since 1986

86

IES MAY n 17

2813 Fulton Ave. 484-6104 L D Full Bar $$-$$ Fresh Mexican food served in a colorful family-friendly setting

2633 Riverside Drive 448-9988

Luna Lounge

L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American cuisine served in a contemporary setting • Riversideclubhouse.com

5026 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883

Selland’s Market Cafe 5340 H St. 736-3333 B L D $$ Wine/Beer High quality handcrafted food to eat in or take out, bakery, wine bar • sellands.com

OAK PARK La Venadita 3501 Thurd Ave. 4000-4676 L D $$ Full Bar Authentic Mexican cuisine with simple tasty menu in a colorful historic setting • lavenaditasac.com

Taylor’s Kitchen 2924 Freeport Boulevard 443-5154 D $$$ Wine/Beer Dinner served Wed. through Saturday. Reservations suggested but walk-ins welcome.

Willie’s Burgers 2415 16th St. 444-2006 L D $ Great burgers and more. Open until 3 on Friday and Saturday • williesburgers.com

ARDEN AREA

B L D $-$$ Full neighborhood bar serving dinner nightly. Open at 11am daily. Weekend breakfast. • bellabrucafe.com

Matteo’s Pizza 5132 Fair Oaks. Blvd. 779-0727 L D Beer/Wine $$ Neighborhood gathering place for pizza, pasta and grill dishes

The Mandarin Restaurant 4321 Arden Way 488-47794 D $$-$$$ Full Bar Gourmet Chineses food for 32 years • Dine in and take out

Roxy 2381 Fair Oaks Blvd. 489-2000

Oak Park Brewing Company

Bella Bru Café

3514 Broadway

5038 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883

L D $$ Full Bar Award-winning beers and a creative pub-style menu in an historic setting • opbrewco.com

B L D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine with a Western touch in a creative upscale atmosphere •

B L D $-$$ Full bar, casual, locally owned European style café with table service from 5 pm and patio dining • bellabrucafe.com

Sam’s Hof Brau

Cafe Bernardo

L D $$ Wine/Beer Fresh quality meats roasted daily • thehofbrau.com

LAND PARK

rivercitymanagementsales.com

La Rosa Blanca Taqueria

Riverside Clubhouse

B L D $-$$ Clean, lean & healthy snacks. Acai bowls are speciality. Kombucha on tap • vibehealthbar.com

(916) 443-7307

D $$$ Wine/Beer Five-course gourmet demonstration dinner by reservation only • Thekitchenrestaurant.com

B L D $ Deli sandwiches, salads & BBQ made fresh. Large selection of craft Beer • roxiedeli.com

3515 Broadway

2306 J Street, #201 Midtown

2225 Hurley Way 568-7171

3340 C St. 443-5402

Vibe Health Bar

Debbi Hart, Broker

The Kitchen

Casa Garden Restaurant 2760 Sutterville Road 452-2809 L D $$ • D with minimum diners call to inquire Wine/Beer. Operated by volunteers to benefit Sacramento Children’s Home. • casagardenrestaurant.org

2500 Watt 482-2175

Pavilions Shopping Center B L D $$ Full Bar Outdoor Patio Seasonal, European-influenced comfort food • Paragarys.com

Café Vinoteca 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 487-1331 L D $$ Full Bar Italian bistro in a casual setting • Cafevinoteca.com

Thai House 427 Munroe in Loehmann’s 485-3888 L D $$ Wine/Beer Featuring the great taste of Thai traditional specialties • sacthaihouse.com

Willie’s Burgers 5050 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-5050 L D $ Great burgers and more • williesburgers.com n


LUXELiving DWLWVŽQHÆ&#x201A; 2016 Diamond Club Top 25 RE/MAX AGENT Worldwide

More than $60 Million in Closed Sales in 2016

Sacramento, Placer & El Dorado Counties | Source: Metrolist March 2017

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/"*5$KH@EJ0EANN=,=GOÄ¡(EI-=?EJE%=Q?D /")1,/ĪÅ&#x20AC;Å&#x20AC;(EI-=?EJE%=Q?DĤCI=EH?KIÅ&#x20AC; =H/"

Sacramentoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #1 Luxury Agent for more than 16 years

.LPPacini·Hauch & Co. LUXE Living Team

KIM PACINI HAUCH 916.204.8900

JILL KHAN 916.856.2040

LEEANA ANDERSON 916.283.4863

KimPaciniHauch@gmail.com jilljustsold@gmail.com Leeana.Anderson@gmail.com www.KimPacini.com www.LeeanaAnderson.com www.jilljustsold.com CALBRE 00997109 CalBRE 01048768 CalBRE 01872150

KATHI JOBSON GREG & CATHIE SCHNEIDER 916.716.2233 916.296.3334

KatJobson@gmail.com www. KathiJobson.com CalBRE 01247089

schneider2re@aol.com Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CaBRE 01929444 Cathieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CaBRE 01928032

SUZANNE BESS 916.973.9300

DEMETRE PARASKEVAS 916.397.4591

Realtor, Executive Asst demetre@homesbydemetre.com suzannebess@comcast.net www.homesbydemetre.com CalBRE 01270624 CalBRE 01491946

)RUDFRQÅ&#x2026;GHQWLDOFRQYHUVDWLRQUHJDUGLQJ\RXUUHDOHVWDWHREMHFWLYHVSOHDVHFRQWDFWPHGLUHFWO\DW

916.204.8900 | KimPaciniHauch@gmail.com | www.KimPacini.com | CalBRE 00997109 | 1DA=??QN=?UKB=HHEJBKNI=PEKJ?KJP=EJA@DANAEJNAC=N@HAOOKBOKQN?AEJ?HQ@EJC >QPJKPHEIEPA@PKOMQ=NABKKP=CA=J@HKPOEVA EO@AAIA@NAHE=>HA>QPEOJKPCQ=N=JPAA@>U/"*5$KH@=J@ODKQH@>AEJ@ALAJ@AJPHURANEÅ&#x201A;A@>UPDA=LLNKLNE=PALNKBAOOEKJ=HO

IES n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

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Coldwell Banker

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

EAST SAC REMODEL! 3bd/2ba, spacious great rm, kit w/island + a media rm, den or office, bamboo flooring, All new electrical & plumbing, hardie cement siding, LED lighting, composite exterior trim. CHIP O’NEILL 341-7834 CaBRE#: 01265774 PRIME LOCATION! Custom built hm has it all. 3br/2.5ba, open flrpln, chef’s kit, mstr suite + HUGH mstr bath w/walk in closet, tankless H20, new plumb/elect, HVAC, prewired Alarm/HDMI/cat5 too. $749,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895 PRIME RIVER PARK! 3br/2ba remolded in 2008. Chef’s kit, liv/fam/din rms, hugh yd w/pool & garden. New plumbling, electric/tankless/sewer, HVAC. $639,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

CLASSIC EAST SAC COTTAGE BUNGALOW! 2bd/1ba, remdld kit w/quartz counters, new cabinets & lite. Separate bkyd guest hse w/bd/ba & entertaining area,blt-in wrap around seating, bit-in bar & sliding glass barn doors. $529,950 RICH CAZNEAUX 212-4444 CaBRE#: 01447558

SOLD

PERFECT TIME TO CALL THIS HOME! Cute Meister Terrace 3bd/2ba close to Compton’s, Orphan Restaurant & Roxie’s Deli w/ hdwd flrs & 2 car garage. POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

ARCHITECTURAL ELEGANCE! Gracious rms, chef's kitch, 5bd/3ba, finished 900+ sqft bsemnt, & 3+ car garage on almost 1/4 ac. $1,459,000 THE WOOLFORD GROUP 834-6900 CaBRE#: 00680069, 01778361, 00679593

1930’s HIGH WATER BUNGALOW! Hugh lot. 2br/1ba, 4 car gar, fully converted bsmnt w/kit, bath, bdrm & storage. Newer Roof, HVAC & water heater. $479,000 TOM LEONARD 834-1681 CaBRE#: 01714895

NICE COTTAGE IN DEL PASO MANOR! Formal entry, hardwood floors thru out, living rm w/frplc, frml din rm w/slider to bkyd, updated kit w/maple cbnts, covered patio, loads of storage. $325,000 PALOMA BEGIN 628-8561 CaBRE#: 01254423 OAK PARK BUNGALOW! Roomy 3br/2ba cottage w/ remodeled kitchen, hdwd flrs, dual pane windows, updated plumbing & electric. Walk to McGeorge & McClatchy Park. PALOMA BEGIN 628-8561 CaBRE#: 01254423

TWO STORY TUDOR IN FAB 40’s Modern interior w/ inlaid hdwds, arched entry, gourmet kit w/nook, great rm w/ blt-ins & frplc, mstr w/walk-in closet & balcony. $1,179,000 RICH CAZNEAUX 212-4444 CaBRE#: 01447558

MIDTOWN DUPLEX! Each unit is spacious 1br/1ba approx. 800sf. Updated & fully occupied. Laundry facility & storage avail on site. Close to McKinley Park, Sutter hospital. $529,000 MICHAEL OWNBEY 616-1607 CaBRE#: 01146313

BEAUTIFUL EAST SAC TUDOR! 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, updated kitchen and baths, hardwood floors and 2 car garage. $849,000 MIKE OWNBEY 616-1607 CaBRE#: 01146313

THE ICONIC L STREET LOFTS!! Located in the center of it all in the best location in Midtown. Walk out your door to top restaurants, galleries, wine shops, coffee houses & Specialty shops in town. MICHAEL ONSTEAD 601-5699 CaBRE#: 01222608 WILHAGGIN ESTATES! 5bd/3ba w/large family rm, dining rm, kitchen w/hugh Island, 2 sinks, double oven, commercial gas stove & nook. Sparkling pool & private backyard. $895,000 ANGELA HEINZER 212-1881 CaBRE#: 01908304

CUSTOM EAST SAC HOME! Spacious 3br/2ba hm sits on .25 acre lot! Alley access, lrg 2 car garage w/existing plumbing. POLLY SANDERS & ELISE BROWN 715-0213 CaBRE#: 01158787, 01781942

GORGEOUS MEDITERRANEAN! 4BR/4.5BA. 4br/4/5ba wremote upstrs ste, pool/spa w/ waterfalls, gas fire pit, outside kit & frplc. $1,065,000 ANGELA HEINZER 212-1881 CaBRE#: 01004189

GREAT EAST SAC HOME! 3br/1.5ba, hdwd floors, living rm w/stone frplc, granite counters, stainless steel appliances, bonus room w/plantation shutters. $509,950 RICH CAZNEAUX 212-4444 CaBRE#: 01447558

SACRAMENTO METRO OFFICE 730 Alhambra Boulevard #150 • 916.447.5900

GORGEOUS! 3br/3ba + office, extensively remodeled, close to American river.Lrg great rm w/arched wood beams & ceilings. Kit w/ marble Island. Beautiful pool. $1,365,000 RICH CAZNEAUX 212-4444 CaBRE#: 01447558

ColdwellBankerHomes.com

FABULOUS STREET IN FAB 40’s 2br/1ba, 1490sf cottage on the market for the first time since the 60’s. Don’t miss this opportunity to live in East Sac. $799,950 RICH CAZNEAUX 212-4444 CaBRE#: 01447558

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©2017 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each ColdwellBanker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

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