Issuu on Google+

INSIDE

3 1 0 4

O

S T R E E T

S A C R A M E N T O

C A

9 5 8 1 6

******ECRWSS******

PRSRT STD US Postage PA I D Permit # 1826 Sacramento CA

G E T

P U B L I C A T I O N S . C O M

2014

POSTAL CUSTOMER

I N S I D E

JUN

ARDEN ARCADE SIERRA OAKS WILHAGGIN DEL PASO MANOR CARMICHAEL

I N T O

T H E

N E I G H B O R H O O D


AMERICAN RIVER CLOSE Stylish mid-century design, great room Àoor plan with updated kitchen opening to family and dining rooms. Large master suite and bonus of¿ce room that could be 4th bedroom. Lovely entertainer’s backyard, complete with outdoor kitchen, pool and deck. $599,000 JAY FEAGLES 204-7756

CROCKER ROAD Wonderful Old Sierra Oaks location. Classic white brick Tudor. 5 bedrooms, of¿ce, 3 car garage, and media room are some of the special features. Beautiful back gardens feature pool, spa, waterfall and outdoor BBQ kitchen. Flagstone paver patio. Security gate. Pool and pool deck $1,945,000 PATTY BAETA 806-7761

SIERRA OAKS CUSTOM Beautifully built Ken Dyer Construction custom home located on a private .3 acre lot with gorgeous pool! A very spacious Àoor plan of 4 or 5 bedrooms and 4 full baths, over 4300 sf plus a 4-car tandem garage. High ceilings, hickory oak Àoors, custom cabinets with built-in buffets, and granite counters! $1,745,000 CHRISTINE BALESTRERI 996-2244

SPACIOUS HOUSE AND YARD Mariemont Avenue home over 8400 square feet with 5 or 6 bedrooms 6½ baths located on a 1½ acre parcel. Spacious rooms, each bedroom has its own bath, an amazing master bedroom suite, custom wood work, box beamed ceilings, an attached maid’s quarters, RV access and a 4-car garage. $1,999,900 ERIN STUMPF 342-1372

DEL DAYO CONTEMPORARY Spacious open Àoor plan, 4 bedroom 3 bath ranch one story. Private master retreat adjoins spa-like bath with jetted tub and multiple spray shower. Fine wood cabinetry, granite counters and oak wood Àoors. Entertaining backyard with pool and gazebo. $749,900 CHRIS BALESTRERI 996-2244, COLLEEN WIFVAT 719-2324

MAGNIFICENT HOME Meticulous design and luxury ¿nishes abound in this 3 bedroom 2 bath two story home. Large kitchen with island; lots of counter space and storage. Downstairs bed and bath. Luxurious master suite with huge walk-in closet, beautiful spacious bath. $659,000 ROSLYN LEVY WEINTRAUB 952-6602

SHELFIELD ESTATES High ceilings and grand spaces de¿ne this one-owner custom home. Separate large family room has beamed ceiling, ¿replace and wet bar. Handsome maple wood Àoor in kitchen & service areas. Walls of glass overlook huge backyard with pool and spa. 5 bedrooms 3½ baths. $875,000 JAY FEAGLES 204-7756

CAMPUS COMMONS & POOL Great location for this 5500A plan with 2 or 3 bedrooms 2½ baths … two very large bedrooms upstairs. Master has sitting area plus ¿replace and walk-in closet. Enjoy your own private pool and hot tub in backyard. Walk to shopping, coffee shops, and American River Parkway. $350,000 LEIGH RUTLEDGE 612-6911

CARMICHAEL WHISPERING OAKS Wonderful family home and Àoor plan located in gated community. 4 bedroom plus upstairs bonus room, 3 full baths. Very open and light and bright with lots of glass and high ceilings. Gourmet kitchen opens to family room. Good sized lot with trees and Àower beds for privacy $499,900 PATTY BAETA 806-7761

for current home listings, please visit:

DUNNIGANREALTORS.COM 916.484.2030 916.454.5753 Dunnigan is a different kind of Realtor.

®

2

IA JUN n 14


R

achel and Jerad arrived in Sacramento from the east coast with only their ski equipment and clothes in tow. After exploring Lake Tahoe, they found Sacramento and fell in love with East Sac. A great choice. We put together a plan and identified what they were looking for in a house. Since they both are in the tech field working from home offices, space was a priority. Diligence and patience paid off. They just closed on their home purchase and have begun remodeling to make it a perfect fit. Next up—getting married this September. Congratulations Rachel and Jerad!

Our Stories. Our Home.

916.996.2244

chrisbhomes.com

DRE#01511288

E XPERT

“Rita Gibson is great to work with for our

G UIDANCE FOR Y OUR F INANCIAL F UTURE

insurance and retirement planning needs— always attentive, informative and very service oriented. Thanks, Rita!” — LYNDA JOLLEY & BETH JONES, Owners of JAYJAY

IRA & 401k Plans Life Insurance Planning Estate Planning College Funding

Testimonial(s)/recommendation(s) may not be representative of the experience of other clients and/or peers and are not indicative of future performance or success. Provided recommendations are not representative of the experience of investment advisory clients or personnel.

Registered Representative of and Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Hornor, Townsend & Kent, Inc. (HTK) A Registered Investment Advisor, Member FINRA/SIPC; 401 Ratcliff Dr., SE #110, Salem, OR 97302, 503-375-3202. Rita Gibson Insurance & Investment Services is not affiliated with Hornor, Townsend & Kent, Inc. A3CM-1217-08E2

Coverage for Business Owners & Executives

Rita Gibson– your neighborhood insurance & investment specialist for 25 years

For a Complimentary Portfolio Review, call

648-2550 R ITA G IBSON.COM

Insurance & Investment Services CA LIC. #0594805

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

3


4

IA JUN n 14


JUST LISTED BY KIM! SIERRA OAKS VISTA 751 LILAC LANE $1,495,000

ON THE SACRAMENTO RIVER 3445 GARDEN HWY $1,395,000

STUNNING CUSTOM HOME 5244 ARDEN WAY $1,200,000

ASHTON PARK ESTATES 594 ASHTON PARK LANE $1,198,000

CUSTOM IN CARMICHAEL 6140 ROSY LANE $1,095,000

IN WILHAGGIN 4461 ASHTON DRIVE $899,000

IN WILHAGGIN 423 CLAYDON WAY $695,000

CUSTOM HOME LOT 6237 GOBERNADORES LANE $549,000

GATED IN CARMICHAEL 6241 GOBERNADORES LANE $1,698,000

COMING SOON!

FA B U L O U S H O M E S F O R S A L E ! GATED IN CARMICHAEL 1953 CENACLE LANE $2,495,000

ARDEN OAKS GATED ESTATE 3721 RANDOM LANE $2,350,000

ON THE AMERICAN RIVER, SACRAMENTO 9855 FOLSOM BLVD $1,850,000

GATED IN CARMICHAEL 3500 AUTUMN POINT LANE $1,490,000

NEW PRICE!

1821 LADINO ROAD $2,600,000

DEL PASO COUNTRY CLUB SIERRA OAKS VISTA 3031 MORSE AVE. 2684 NORTHROP AVE $1,290,000 $810,000

NEW PRICE!

KimPaciniHauch@gmail.com www.KimPacini.com

IN ARDEN PARK 3710 ESPERANZA DR $899,000

GARDEN OF THE GODS 2020 VENUS DRIVE $334,000

NEW PRICE!

This is the Moment. This is the Market.

Call Kim to discuss your 2014 real estate plans! IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

5


In a market like we’re seeing this year, sell your home when you’re ready!

Sacramento homesellers are

With our intense Marketing Blitz

SOLD ON SANDERS.

NOW IS A GOOD TIME TO SELL. Call us today.

ThePollySandersTeam.com

we will sell your home quickly and for top dollar. So let’s get started before your replacement

916.341.7865

home gets any more expensive.

POLLY SANDERS CALBRE LICENSE #01158787 ELISE IVES CALBRE LICENSE #01781942

C

C a sino o l r a

• FREE WiFi

t igh

Join us for an exciting FREE Casino Night at Winding Commons Senior Community on Saturday, June 21st, 3:00 - 6:00 pm. Play your game of choice — Blackjack, Roulette, Texas Hold ‘em and Craps — with professional dealers. It’s fun. It’s free. Winding Commons will provide all of the chips! Redeem your winnings for raffle tickets and prizes at the end of the evening. If gambling isn’t your thing, enjoy wonderful hors d’oeuvres, desserts, cocktails and dancing while a live DJ spins your favorite tunes. You won’t want to miss this event. Seating is limited, so RSVP early! DRE #00357904

6

IA JUN n 14

NEW! Free WiFi

• Spacious Apartments • All-Inclusive Rent • Imaginative Meals Served Daily • Weekly Housekeeping • Scheduled Transportation • Emergency Alert System • Inspiring Recreation Programs

N

Mon te

R AY S T O N E I N D E P E N D E N T S E N I O R L I V I N G C O M M U N I T I E S

Winding Commons (916) 485-0100 6017 Winding Way Carmichael, CA 95608 RayStoneSeniors.com


COVER ARTIST Jeff Myers "One day in the delta I started to paint the form of the tractor itself. The tractor manifested a powerful intimacy that suggested 'many secrets' especially the older ones richly draped in rust and chipped paint." Myers lives and works in Land Park.

Visit jeffmyersart.com EAST SACRAMENTO

L A N D PA R K

ARDEN

POCKET

%

LOCAL JUN 2014

PUBLISHER Cecily Hastings publisher@insidepublications.com 3104 O St. #120, Sac. CA 95816 (Mail Only) 916-441-7026 (Information Line) EDITOR PRODUCTION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY AD COORDINATOR ACCOUNTING EDITORIAL POLICY

VOL. 13 • ISSUE 5 9 10 16 22 24 30 34 38 40 46 51 54 56 60 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 80 82

Marybeth Bizjak mbbizjak@aol.com M.J. McFarland Cindy Fuller, Daniel Nardinelli Linda Smolek, Aniko Kiezel Michele Mazzera Jim Hastings, Daniel Nardinelli 916-443-5087 Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Inside Publications. Inside Publications is delivered for free to more than 65,000 households in Sacramento. Printing and distribution costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. We spotlight selected advertisers, but all other stories are determined solely by our editorial staff and are not influenced by advertising. No portion may be reproduced mechanically or electronically without written permission of the publisher. All ad designs & editorial—©

SUBMISSIONS Submit cover art to publisher@insidepublications.com. Submit editorial contributions to mbbizjak@aol.com. SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions at $20 per year guarantees 3rd class mailing. Send check with name & address of recipient and specify publication edition.

VISIT INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

Publisher's Desk Out and About Arden In Tune With Carmichael Meet Your Neighbors Shoptalk Local Heroes Building Our Future The Club Life Garden Jabber Babies Spotted Real Estate Guide Spirit Matters How Green Is Our Valley Home Insight Pets & Their People Getting There Momservations Doing Good Science In The Neighborhood Artist Spotlight River City Previews Restaurant Insider Dining Guide

CONTACT OUR ADVERTISING TEAM

Ann Tracy

Duffy Kelly

Michael Boyd

East Sacramento

Arden - Pocket - Native Advertising

Central City - Land Park

798-2136

224-1604

341-9755

Cecily Hastings Publisher - Select Accounts

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

7


help for

hip pain

Feel better, faster with hip arthroscopy When hip pain and stiffness interfere with your life, Summit Orthopedic Specialists can help. Hunter Greene, M.D., is the only orthopedic surgeon in the region who is fellowship trained in hip arthroscopy.

Our highly trained surgical team offers hip arthroscopy, a minimally invasive technique to diagnose and treat hip pain so you can do what you want – without pain. Spend less time recovering and more time doing the things you love. Contact Summit to learn more about hip arthroscopy.

CARMICHAEL: 6403 Coyle Avenue, Suite 170 (916) 965-4000

8

IA JUN n 14

V

GRASS VALLEY: 150 Glasson Way Suite, 150B (530) 272-7593

V

www.mysummitortho.com


Signs of the Times POLITICAL LAWN SIGNS ARE FREE SPEECH, BUT ARE THEY DIVISIVE?

BY CECILY HASTINGS PUBLISHER’S DESK

W

ith an election coming up early this month, political campaign signs have been prominently displayed in our neighborhoods for many weeks. This year, there are city council races in three of the four districts we serve. In the county, there’s a competitive race for district attorney, not to mention a couple of very competitive races for the state assembly and senate and a hotly contested race for the U.S Congressional District 7 seat. Within the city limits, campaign signs tend to be small ones posted on front lawns, with an occasional larger sign or two. In less congested neighborhoods, a few property owners post large signs along busy thoroughfares. This past weekend, I was in Napa and was astounded by the number of bold, 4-by-8-foot political signs along beautiful bucolic Highway 29. Within a single mile, I stopped counting at 25. Signs of this size are legal but regulated under state law. Some cities restrict their use to 30 days before an election. Other cities restrict them so much that no one even uses them.

While political signs are as old as our republic, new printing technologies have made them less expensive to produce, and they now come in more durable materials. They are more readily used these days to endorse a voter’s candidate of choice. Most political campaign consultants dislike them. They say they don’t produce winners and are a pain to store and distribute. On the other hand, candidates love them because they provide visible proof of the candidate’s support. Polls usually aren’t conducted for local races, so voting trends can be tough to call. It is understandable that candidates and their supporters want to count something to gauge their progress with the electorate. And I wonder if anyone ever made their decision based upon a lawn sign. I’ve seen some pretty effective campaign strategies that employed lawn signs. Four years ago, District 3 City Councilmember Steve Cohn was challenged by Chris Little, a relatively unknown and comparatively underfunded candidate at the start of the race. But Little walked every precinct and talked to voters early and often—all the while amassing a list of supporters who wanted lawn signs. A few months before the election, hundreds of Chris Little signs appeared almost overnight throughout the neighborhood. No doubt it signaled to Cohn that he had a real race on his hands. Three-term incumbent Cohn ultimately prevailed with 53 percent of the vote to Little’s 38 percent, but Cohn significantly outspent him. Sacramento district attorney candidate Anne Marie Schubert was the first in my East Sac neighborhood to put up lawn signs this election cycle.

This led to a bit of confusion among voters. I had several readers wonder why we didn’t include her in our question-and-answer coverage of the district’s city council race. The city code allows political or campaign signs on behalf of candidates for public office or measures on election ballots, provided that the signs are not erected earlier than 90 days before the election and are removed within 15 days after the election. A sign cannot exceed 6 square feet in area, or about 2 feet by 3 feet.

Another relatively common practice is for candidates to post signs on commercial property without the owner’s permission. It’s illegal to post political signs in public right of ways. Yet as I ride my bike on the mile-long stretch of Elvas Avenue in East Sac, I see numerous illegally posted signs for three council candidates on the railroad right of way. I see the same practice in other parts of town for other candidates. When they appear in parks, I take them down myself. To me, that illegal practice just shows an amateurish campaign desperate for attention. Although commercial property owners have the same right to post as residents, their signs often exceed the city’s legal size limit. Another relatively common practice is for candidates to post signs on

commercial property without the owner’s permission. In many cases, an unsuspecting property owner doesn’t see it for a while—maybe never. The candidate hopes he or she will get away with it long enough to gain some visibility. While retail business owners also have the right to post political signs, I am always surprised when they do. My sense is that a business owner might not want to risk alienating potential customers. Truth be told, I am not a fan of political lawn signs. My husband and I put up signs many years ago but have sworn off it for several reasons. I believe that political signs tend to polarize neighbors. I’ve heard stories of neighbors yelling at each other in their yards over political differences. That is not good. With a country desperately polarized politically, I’d prefer our neighborhoods be gentler and more tolerant places. I find it easier to develop relations with neighbors without getting into politics. As a publisher covering local political races, I’d rather not have my neighbors know my voting preferences. While major newspapers routinely endorse candidates, they have relatively faceless editorial boards that zealously assess candidates for endorsement. We, on the other hand, strive to embed our business into the communities we serve. Even though we employ dozens of writers, I tend to be the public face of our papers. In my own East Sacramento neighborhood, I’m involved with neighborhood and business associations and run a

PUBLISHER page 13

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

9


Firing On All Cylinders THE TOOLEY FAMILY ENLIVENS FIVE POINTS WITH RENOVATED GAS STATION

BY DUFFY KELLY OUT AND ABOUT ARDEN

A

fter 55 years in the gasoline business in Sacramento, you’d think Sierra Oaks resident and patriarch of petrol Mick Tooley would be a little “exhausted.” But it takes less than a minute upon meeting him to realize he’s still having a gas after all these years. The family’s latest launch is a gas station and convenience store at Five Points, where Walnut Avenue, Arden Way and Fair Oaks Boulevard meet. No doubt Mick and his two sons, Mike and David, will pump not just gas, but new life into a once-foundering, weed-bedraggled location. Plus, we’ll all appreciate a new, well-lit, 24-hour shop where we can fill up the tank and tummy while giving our business to the same family that has coached our kids in baseball and sat beside us at Jesuit football games. “I used to drive by this store every day on my way to (Our Lady of Assumption) and the weeds were as big as trees,” said Mike Tooley. “It had roll-up doors that made it look like it was in the ghetto. We wanted to change that and make this a neighborhood, family-friendly store.

10

IA JUN n 14

Now we have the opportunity to make a difference in our neighbors’ lives.” He explains that the family was willing to pay a little extra for the store at a recent auction just to make sure they’d get it. And he explains that it will be a Shell-branded Circle K convenience store. Now for the story of how Mick Tooley went from zero to 60 in the gas business. After graduating from the University of Nebraska, he worked for a Phillips 66 before starting his own oil company, Tooley Oil, in 1978. You might remember Tooley Oil stations at various Arden locations, including Arden and Watt as well as Mission and El Camino. -Today Mick Tooley and his sons wholesale Shell fuel to area dealers as well as own and operate nearly a dozen stores while also acting as a “master franchisee” for Circle K. And with all that gas to drive around town, it made sense for the Tooleys to own their own tanker trucking company. So the question remains: Does Mick Tooley still pump gas? Not exactly, because the company employs about 85 people, some who have been loyal employees for more than 20 years. “He still comes to work every day. In fact, he’ll come to the office till the day he dies,” said Mike Tooley. “But he does find a way to play a little golf.” David Tooley handles the retail side of things and Mike Tooley takes the lead on wholesale. The Five Points location is opening with a big in-store kick-off event June 14 featuring games, prizes, 89-cent Polar Pops, and sports team mascots. And in keeping with the family’s focus on the community, Mike Tooley says

Sierra Oaks resident Mick Tooley (center) started working in the oil business in Sacramento in 1978. Today he works alongside his sons, David (left) and Mike (right) at the family’s Tooley Oil Company, which owns 10 Sacramento stations. The newest location opens this month at Walnut Ave. and Fair Oaks Blvd.

they’re planning all kinds of rewards programs, including a friendly fuel rewards program where shoppers can earn hundreds of dollars in free gas each month, free lift tickets, tee times and tickets to River Cats games. Also on tap, the Tooleys will be giving special discounts to kids who come in their team sports uniform.

BEAUTY AND THE BEST OF FRIENDS The Banville sisters each had her own room when they were growing up. But no matter how hard their parents tried, or how many times the girls would go their separate ways, the pair always ended up sleeping in the same room. Even in the same bed. They’d whisper secrets and giggle about boys, sharing hopes and fears, schemes and tears. It took everything to get them to sleep.

But it didn’t take sleep to make them dream. Since the girls were old enough to coo, they’ve been conjuring up fantastic plans. And now those plans are becoming a reality at Carmichael’s Five Points shopping center, at Fair Oaks Boulevard where Arden Way and Walnut Avenue converge. In June Erin Banville and Melissa Banville Burgoon are opening Hourglass Salon and Boutique next door to Matteo’s courtyard garden. The store’s debut coincides well with the center’s makeover—a master plan to repaint, repave and redecorate everything at the center, from the awnings to the planter boxes. The girls are bringing their international training in fashion, hair and makeup right back home and within babysitting distance of their mother, Anne Banville, a Carmichael native who loves everything local including walks on the river, her alma mater El


FREE HAIRCUT Complementary haircut with any color service. $40-$60 Value. Cannot be combined. New clients only. Free Consultations. Expires 6-30-14 GS HAIR 2415 Walnut Ave. / Carmichael, CA 95608

(916) 481-2340 / gshair.com

The Banville sisters are opening Hourglass Salon and Boutique this month

Camino High and staying connected to your roots. “We are so excited to be home and build a community of all our clients, to have a family environment,” said Melissa. “That desire stems from us. We are sisters and best friends and this is our home. We plan to be here for a long time to come, to raise our families here.” Hourglass isn’t just any salon or boutique. It’s a mix of San Francisco chic, London lavish and Carmichael cozy. It offers fancy salon stuff like organic bronzing, braid bars and high tech “look books” that let you try on hairstyles before the scissors even get near your scalp. It also offers clothing and accessories to accent your look and styling for weddings, proms and assorted special events. If it’s a head-to-toe style makeover you’re after, you can start right here with a little expert help. Plus, Melissa’s 8-month-old daughter, Elliott (the family’s first grandchild), inspired clothing not only for little ones but also for the woman behind the diaper bag. The girls credit their designer, Leslie Reinking, with helping make their ideas a reality. To meet these girls in person you can see their dreams and excitement dancing in their eyes. They’re both so pretty, it was hard to look away. But I realized it was something more than skin deep that made them that way. I couldn’t help but be reminded of a Keats quote I saw nearly every day while I was a journalism student

at USC. It was etched in big concrete letters atop the doorway of a beautiful brick building near the school’s library. “Beauty is truth. Truth beauty. That is all ye know and all ye need to know.” There was something decidedly truthful about these two sisters and the bond they shared. “We are young and we’ve been dreaming about this for as long as we can remember,” said Erin. “We can’t believe it’s actually here.” Hourglass is open Tuesday through Saturday and Sundays by appointment. For more information, go to stylebyhourglass.com.

CARMICHAEL MARKETPLACE COMING SOON Shoppers, grab your wallets and get ready for the Magnolia Antiques Marketplace Show and Sale on Saturday, June 21 at Fair Oaks Boulevard near Palm Avenue. The event will take place in the store and the parking lot and feature the wares from dozens of antique dealers and vendors selling everything from garden décor to antique dressers to vintage clothing and collectible jewelry. The event is organized by Caryn Conway of Magnolia Antiques and draws shoppers from throughout the ARDEN page 14

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

11


Eskaton Village Carmichael Summer Home Tours Lunch is on us. Reserve your spot today. We’re the area’s only continuing care retirement community that lets you build the retirement lifestyle you want. Our unique resident-driven culture means we offer more choice and variety than any community around. You’re invited to our Summer Home Tours for an up-close look at our spacious cottages and apartment homes. Take in our beautiful 37-acre campus and imagine your life with so many exciting opportunities right outside your door.

Your community. Your life. Your choice. Call 916-844-2999 for Home Tour dates in June or to schedule a personal tour.

Eskaton Village Carmichael 3 3939 9 Walnut Avenue | Carmichael, CA 95608 eskaton.org

Lice Li cens nse e #3 #340 4031 3133 3383 83 / COA #20 202 2

12

IA JUN n 14


PUBLISHER FROM page 9 nonprofit that maintains McKinley Rose Garden and Clunie Community Center. We need to solicit volunteers and raise funds each year, and any polarization among neighbors makes those jobs more difficult. We also need to work with whoever wins the local elected offices on coverage of issues in our neighborhoods. Political recriminations are always possible. I’ve seen some deep memories among elected officials. Lastly, I believe political signs tend to make our neighborhood streets less beautiful. Sadly, struggling neighborhoods tend to have far more illegal signs and postings than better neighborhoods. The freedom to publicly endorse candidates is an important part of your constitutional right to freedom of speech. But so is the right to keep your voting preferences private. At a recent city council meeting, Councilmember Steve Hansen recalled a great quote I first heard years ago from Lady Bird Johnson: “The clash

of ideas is the sound of freedom.” Maybe—despite my own thoughts to the contrary—that is the appeal of posting political signs on one’s property.

BIG DAY OF GIVING UPDATE The Sacramento Region Community Foundation and its partners spent months gearing up for the BIG Day of Giving on May 6, which I covered in my column last month. They hoped to raise $1 million in donations and $250,000 in matching funds. The results far exceeded that goal: $3,020,000 was raised from 18,915 donors among 394 local nonprofit organizations. Sacramento ranked second in the entire country in terms of total donations. To those of you who joined the effort, we offer a great big thank-you!

For a Beautiful Home. In a Beautiful World. Professional Cleaning, Repairing & Appraisals Free Consultation in Your Home

Cecily Hastings can be reached at publisher@insidepublications.com. n

SACRAMENTO 2550 Fair Oaks Boulevard (916) 486-1221 ROSEVILLE 1113 Galleria Boulevard (916) 780-1080 www.mansoursruggallery.com

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

13


ARDEN FROM page 11 region who live to haunt antiques stores throughout the West. She hosts three marketplace events each year. This year a live jazz band, a solo guitarist and several performers will be set up to entertain the crowd. Conway knows a thing or two about antiques and got an early start in the business. “When I was a child, I would go with my grandmother to the dump on a regular basis looking for cool artifacts,” she said. “My mom and I both got the antique bug from Grandma. I thought it would be just a fun hobby, but here I am 20 years later—an antique dealer!” And a very successful one at that. “I would say if a small business like ours can make it through the recession and be going strong for 12 years, then we are doing OK,” she said. Conway is offering 20 percent off throughout the store from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 21.

ETTORE’S OPEN SEVEN NIGHTS If you thought Ettore’s was top drawer for the breakfast pastry, you’re in for a treat when it comes to dinner, a glass of wine after work or live music on a Saturday night. The popular brunch spot is now open for dinner seven nights a week and features everything from fine wines to award-winning hamburgers and savory comfort foods. There’s also free live music every Saturday night through September on the patio. Don’t forget to try Ettore’s new menu item, a special twist on the Bloody Mary. It’s Ettore’s secret recipe made with an imported lowalcohol vodka. The owners are quick to point out this drink goes down easily no matter what time of day.

RED SHOE CRAWL Time to dig out those red shoes and get downtown to benefit the Ronald McDonald House at the charity’s fifth annual Red Shoe Crawl set for June 29. The event allows up to 700

14

IA JUN n 14

Magnolia Antiques Marketplace Show and Sale takes place on Saturday, June 21 at Fair Oaks Boulevard near Palm Avenue

participants the opportunity to walk about downtown, visiting more than two dozen restaurants, sampling beverages and small bites of their best dishes. The event begins at 1 p.m. with registration at the Citizen Hotel; premium ticketholders register at noon at 15th and K streets. The day concludes with an “after-party” at Mulvaney’s B&L. Sponsorships are available and additional restaurants are encouraged to participate. For more information, go to rmhcnc.org.

research and found out the league’s last no-hitter was 10 years ago. But what’s so sweet about this story is how history repeats itself. Charlie’s grandfather, Jerry Heimann, was also just 12 years old when he pitched a no-hitter for Chico Little League. That was about 60 years ago, but Grandpa still proudly displays the faded newspaper clipping that details the fateful day. Hm. I wonder if Charlie will hold onto this Inside Arden clip for his own grandson ...

NO-HITTER HURLEY

SAN JUAN STUDENTS WIN BIG

Our Lady of Assumption sixthgrader Charlie Hurley is the kid to watch when it comes to baseball. (And basketball, for that matter.) The 12-year-old threw a no-hit, shutout game in May at a major division league game. He gave up just one walk and struck out 13 batters in that contest. Hurley got his start at Eastern Little League when he was only 5 years old. He now plays for a tournament baseball team as well as two basketball teams. Charlie’s father, John Hurley, is just a tad bit proud. He did a little

San Juan High School members were awarded more than $193,640 in scholarships, cash and prizes at the 67th annual state leadership meeting of FHA-HERO this spring in Riverside. Sandi Coulter, Shirley Bowers and Marti Howton of the San Unified School District and 41 San Juan High School students attended the meeting of FHA-HERO to receive their awards. FHA-HERO is a technical career student organization for grades 7-12. Approximately 70 chapters, including 750 FHA-HERO chapter

members, advisers, administrators, and business and industry representatives, attended from California. FHA-HERO members competed for more than $636,000 in prizes and scholarships in 20 events in leadership and career development areas. Some of the colleges providing scholarships include The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, The Art Institute, The Culinary Institute of America, Kendall College, Johnson and Wales University and Sullivan University. San Juan students Ilona Gritsko and Evialina Lutsyk were among the top prize winners. They took second place for Team Commercial Food Preparation and each earned $64,000 each in scholarships.

WELCOME, BOB AZZARITO University Presbyterian Church is pleased to welcome new pastor Bob Azzarito to the campus of Fremont Presbyterian. He has just moved to Sacramento from Fredericksburg, Va., where he was a campus minister at Mary Washington College. He has a background as a baseball player!


Beautiful Courtland!

Welcome to Pear Orchard Paradise! 0DJQLÂżFHQWVSUDZOLQJUDQFKKRPHDSSUR[VIRQDFUHSHDURUFKDUGEHGEDWK JOLVWHQLQJSRROLQFRPHSURSHUW\VIJXHVWKRXVHFRXQWU\OLYLQJRQO\PLQVIURP GRZQWRZQ6DFUDPHQWR

Call Terry Mulligan 768-3796 BIBLE SCHOOL, GILLIGAN’S ISLE-STYLE If you can’t get to the beach, let the beach come to you. Northminster Presbyterian Church is offering a free “Gilligan’s Island�style of vacation plan for kids in the Arden and Carmichael area from 5 to 8 p.m. June 9 through June 12, at 3235 Pope Ave. The church is hosting Vacation Bible School, a summer recreational and educational program centered around beach fun and the Bible. Children will be dancing to some beach tunes, navigating oceans of obstacle courses and making friends while being part of the church program “Trusting in God.� The camp is for children from kindergarten through sixth grade, said Gerry Halley. It will center on how God provides for and protects children. Skits, games, crafts, singing and assorted projects are on the schedule. Dinner will be provided nightly. High school- and college-age students will serve as youth counselors while

adult volunteers will be on hand as mentors. To register for VBS or to be a high school counselor, go to northminsteronline.org or call (916) 487-5192.

JESUIT RUGBY PLACES SECOND AT NATIONALS Congratulations to Jesuit High School’s varsity rugby team for taking second place in the nation after competing at the national championship level in Elkhart, Ind., in May. The team was led by Coach John Shorey and seniors Joey Pevec, Zac Tavenner and co-captains Matt Coyle and Trent Terra. The national finish comes after both the junior varsity and varsity teams won the Northern California Youth Rugby Championships in early May. In that contest, the varsity squad defeated De La Salle 70-18, while the JV team beat Dixon 24-10. Bringing their Marauder pride to the bay this fall, Tavenner, Coyle and Terra are slated to play rugby for UC Berkeley.

&ODUNVEXUJ 7XUQRIWKHFHQWXU\9LFWRULDQRQDFUHVULYHURXW IURQW%RJHO9LQH\DUGRXWEDFNEHGVEDWKVOXVK JDUGHQVEULQJKRUVHVPLQVIURPGRZQWRZQ 6DFUDPHQWR

GOOGLE THIS! SACRAMENTO VALLEY CHORUS How sweet it is to Google “Sacramento Valley Chorus� and hear the lovely voices of some of our community’s most talented and committed female singers?

The Sacramento Valley Chorus regularly entertains the community with musical events throughout the year. You’ll get a chance to sample some of the best women’s barbershop quartets and there’s no better time to check them out than now after our city’s fantastic showing at a regional competition in Las Vegas in May. Sacramento singers blew away

the judges by scoring 640, which is their highest mark ever in such competition. The Sacramento Valley Chorus is a chapter of Sweet Adelines International, a group of women dedicated to the art of barbershop music. Led by Master Director Lynne Erickson, the chorus recently performed at Carnegie Hall in New York. They also regularly entertain the community with musical events throughout the year, including an annual show in the fall, Christmas concerts, and a variety of for-hire musical events such as Valentine’s Day and private parties. The group’s mission is to stay committed to singing and performing at the highest level possible. The nonprofit group welcomes new members and is available for performances. For more information, go to sacramentovalleychorus.com. Duffy Kelly can be reached at dk@ insidepublications.com. n

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

15


A Reign Of Grace MARY PURVIS HELPED YOUNG WOMEN WIN PAGEANTS AND HELP OTHERS

BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER IN TUNE WITH CARMICHAEL

M

any people knew Mary Purvis as a woman whose abiding passion was beauty pageants. There was much more to the Citrus Heights resident. But legacy’s spotlight inevitably falls on her court of crowned proteges. “She was my hero. My savior, my teacher and my other mother,” said former Miss Orangevale Tamara Barbu-Brown at Purvis’s recent funeral. At 86, Purvis died from complications following a fall. From the 1970s, the Oklahomaraised entrepreneur molded young women to decorate civic events. City officials knew her as a force to be reckoned with. When Citrus Heights councilors wanted to lead the city’s July 4 parade, Purvis assembled her girls in another staging area. As the police vanguard moved out, she stopped the parade and directed her girls’ cars into the front. She valued her ambassadors as more than pretty faces. She expected exemplary volunteerism from them. From teens to matrons, pageant winners were channeled into community service that many still continue, decades later. Confirms former Mrs. Metropolitan, Sheryl

16

IA JUN n 14

Among many pageant winners at her funeral, queens honored the late Mary Purvis. For more than 40 years, the businesswoman groomed sash wearers to work for nonprofits.

Casper: “I learned so much from Mary’s example.” Formidable Purvis grit was honed by the Great Depression. Her own mom fed legions of hungry wanderers from the family’s Oklahoma door. “No one left the farm without a meal,” confirmed her son Russ Purvis. If supermarket cashiers later wondered at the petite octogenarian’s massive shopping habit, the poor blessed her. “Wanting no publicity, Mary was the go-to person for people who needed assistance,” said Citrus Heights staffer Helen Brewer.

The benefactor also supplied crockpots for fundraiser prizes. When Macys discounted them, Purvis bought 10 at once. Other customers heard her explanation and added their credit cards to the pot; Purvis left the store with 15 crocks. She took charm school lessons in her teens but never entered a beauty contest. “When she married, Mary only had sons,” said protégé Tamara BarbuBrown. “Pageants were her way of having little girls to love and to pass on what she’d learned.”

Acquiring the rights to many titles, she bestowed sashes and educational scholarships on generations of young ladies. Many contestants were changed for life. She taught that “poise” stood for Posture, Obedience, Intellect, Sincerity and Enthusiasm— qualities she felt defined women of worth. “It wasn’t just how you looked in a gown,” said Mrs. Northern California Melisa Mistler. “She expected us to be role models for younger girls.” Wife to Air Force veteran Jay Purvis for 68 years, Mary was also


Helping Families Make the Right Move!

The TreasŸed Home HOME DECOR • NO-PREP O FURNITURE PAINT & C CLASSES SS S • G GREAT GIFTS

Ron Greenwood bre# 01134887

- President Elect Sacramento Assn. of Realtors - Board of Directors California Assn. of Realtors

Paint with Dad! $10 Off/Person use code: paint

Visit www.TheTreasuredHome.com for a complete class listing and to register!

9906 Fair Oaks Blvd. | 514 • 5272 (Next to Bob’s Cycle Center) Tue – Sat 10:30 – 4:30 | Fri until 5:30

Do You Love It? Or Should You List It? Call Now For Expert Solutions! 712-4442 ron.greenwood@cbnorcal.com

a mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother. Tamara Barbu-Brown, who will take over Purvis’ pageant event empire, said her “other mother” lived for the excitement of a pageant and the good such an event could do. “Her motto,” said Barbu-Brown, “Was, ‘Let’s make a difference every day.’ ” For information about pageants in Greater Sacramento, call (916) 967-8336

THIS PEW’S FOR YOU Thirty-two age-hardened Carmichael church pews recently took a trip to Southern California. They returned re-varnished and reupholstered. User reviews since proclaimed them some of the most comfortable seats in Carmichael. While American River Community Church members take pride in one of the area’s oldest churches, outdated furnishings previously left much to be desired. “Some people brought their own cushions on Sunday,” lamented ARCC refurbishment manager Doris Reimer. “That was a sure sign that

American River Community Church governors Cyndie Holland, left, and Eva Willis anoint refurbished pews. The blessing was part of recent services to celebrate a spruce-up project.

our pews were not comfortable. Well, they are now.” Observed Reimer’s brother Pastor Rich Reimer: “Our culture demands nice things. Churches need curb appeal. Take care of your buildings and you send a message that you’ll care for people’s souls, too.”

To this end, the Church Foundation Memorial Fund covered the makeover cost through parishioner donations. More than $45,000 saw the 64-year-old church interiors refurbished. Augmented by volunteers, tradesmen pitched in after Christmas services and turned the

mission-style building around in four weeks. Doris Reimer recalls that through months of planning, she felt “the wind of the holy spirit pushing from behind.” In Riverside, she found a company called Worship Interiors Group. “They had the specialized skills and equipment needed,” she said. “Our pews are longer than most and could not be dismantled, so the company had to make two truck and trailer trips to haul them all down to Riverside.” Generations of scratches, kicks and nicks were sanded to absolution. Varish returned mirror sheens. Rustic red upholstery came next. “We’d selected our fabrics and carpet from swatches,” said Reimer. “I held my breath as the first pew came off the truck and was set down on the new carpet. At last, I could see the colors we’d chosen were perfect together.” On a recent Sunday, her brother blessed and flung open the chapel IN TUNE page 18

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

17


IN TUNE FROM page 17

Hungry? Carmichael restaurants offering a-la-carte American breakfasts include the Lido Bar and Grill (7739 Fair Oaks Blvd.), Denny’s (7433 Fair Oaks) and Bella Bru Café (5038 Fair Oaks).

doors. He then led his 150-strong flock into a home redolent with unmistakable new-carpet scent. Doris Reimer beamed through following services. She heard whispered raves. “I had a sense of joy and thanksgiving,” she said. “The project was hard work but I praise God for the opportunity to be part of it.” Anyone may visit or attend American River Community Church at 3300 Walnut Ave. For information, call (916) 483-3465.

MAESTRO IN FINAL POPS SEASON

THE LAST BRUNCH A neighborhood tradition for 15 years, Carmichael’s Waffle Barn recently served a farewell feast. Breakfast and lunch sessions fed 500 hungry regulars. From shelves and hanging mobiles, hundreds of animal ornaments watched waffles, eggs and pancakes consumed for the last time. Staffers kept their sunny sides up. Customers were replete but not happy. “I’ve been eating here for 15 years,” said an octogenarian. “The staff knows me by name. I don’t know where I’ll get my strawberry waffle now.” A week earlier, owner Roger Russ posted a glum farewell on his door. It explained that demolition of his building necessitated closure. “We have had a wonderful 15 years here and many of our guests have become family,” he wrote. “We will truly miss you.” His staff observed faithful customers with long faces all week. Closure, or at least an operational hiatus, has been on the popular eatery’s menu for two years. The building is part of the Fair Oaks Boulevard property now being developed as the Milagro Centre. Initial plans included renovating the Waffle Barn’s ranch-style design to match Milagro’s Tuscan theme. This plan meant temporary closure and a 2014 re-opening. Developers since opted for demolition and rebuilding. “We hoped to have the Waffle Barn back as when the new building was ready,” said Milagro co-owner Allan Davis. “We’re sad this might not be the case. My wife and I loved

18

IA JUN n 14

Leticia Gamez delivers breakfast to final customers at the Waffle Barn. Owner Roger Russ (background, right) supervised servers during the 15-year-old restaurant’s final day.

Citrus Heights Mayor Mel Turner, left, presents Capitol Pops Director Jerry Lopes with civic plaudits. Lopes will relinquish his baton in August.

their food. Roger was one of three remaining tenants when we bought the (former Hillside) mall and we’ll miss him. “When the bottom line was put to our project, it was clear that working around an existing 1970s building was just not economically feasible. Construction codes are too different now.” Said Russ: “We initially thought we might be closed for two to three months. The decision to demolish and rebuild means a much longer delay before reopening. We decided we couldn’t wait that long. I’ve looked all over the boulevard for another place. I haven’t yet found one suitable.”

Owning other Waffle Barns in Folsom, Yuba City and Roseville, the restaurateur will not be idle. His 12 Carmichael staffers were job-hunting this week. “I feel bad for them,” said their former employer. “My cook’s been with me 15 years. But the situation is not under my control.” Every morning for 15 years brought a merry clatter of cooking, serving and eating to the main street restaurant. The Monday following the last Sunday brunch dawned to empty chairs; empty tables. Soon to join another of Russ’s restaurant décors, an overhead herd of porcelain cows, chickens and sheep gazed unblinking into the silence of china lambs.

In his farewell summer with the Capitol Pops, director Jerry Lopes plans entertaining public concerts. The band’s recent Rusch Park performance event heralded a full 2014 season in the Greater Sacramento area. The Rusch Park date also marked the 17th anniversary for the 60-piece ensemble. The all-volunteer ensemble gave its first performance at Carmichael Park in 1997. “Maestro” Lopes, whose career includes 50 years as a music educator, helped assemble the group and refine a pops and patriotic style for its programs. Membership ranges from teens to nonagenarians and includes many professional musicians. For June 6 at Folsom City Lions Park (403 Stafford St.), Lopes promises a diverse repertoire including show medleys, marches and vocal numbers. The free two-hour concert kicks off at 6:30 p.m. On July 4, the band will join festivities in Royer Park (Douglas Boulevard, Roseville) at 11 a.m. The Maestro’s final hoorah will be hosted by Fair Oaks Village Park (4238 Main St.) at 7 p.m. For more information, go to capitolpops.org.

KINDEST CUT LAUNCHES HEALTH PROGRAM Joining VIPs at the ribbon-cutting, grade-school kids’ excitement might have heralded an ice cream parlor opening. If not dessert, Thomas Edison Elementary pupils were getting something deserved: access to wellness. They beheld a first-of-its-kind vehicle for Sacramento. The new mobile health clinic will deliver a program dubbed Health on Wheels. In the style of traveling libraries and IN TUNE page 20


Actual Wilhaggin home. Jonathan Perez Photography

home is where

YOUR HEART LIVES DON’T FORGET! Del Dayo Soccer Signups APRIL 1- MAY 31 deldayosoccer.net

Kyle Groves, Broker/Owner

Steve Grimes

Carol Patel

Brenda Heng

BRE#01720537

BRE#01939821

BRE#01863108

BRE#01709829

Brenda is a realtor who will watch out for your best interest. She is personable, professional, very honest and we had no surprises during escrow. We will recommend Brenda to all our friends, neighbors & family and would not hesitate to use her again in the future! –Fred & Mary

J.K Groves P 916.359.9549 E info@JKGroves.com

JKGroves.com facebook.com/JKGROVESRE 3436 American River Drive Suite 17 Sacramento, CA 95864

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION: 916-214-2082

May 2014

BUY / SELL / INVEST

ad by IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

19


California Fish and Wildlife Department spokes-bear Warden Grizzly congratulates junior Creek Week volunteers

IN TUNE FROM page 18 blood drives, the 44-foot van will roll into San Juan District schools this summer. With a $400,000-plus price tag, it contains two state-of-the-art examination rooms. Children and parents from poor and immigrant neighborhoods will be among the first customers. Elica Health Centers, which are federally qualified, have added the vehicle to Sacramento services. A grant partnership between Elica and San Juan School District enabled Affordable Health Care Act funding for the purchase. At-risk children, including those from Encina High and Howe, Dyer-Kelly, Thomas Edison and Greer elementary schools, may seek treatment from on-board medical professionals. The truck’s other function is to initiate children and families into health care systems. It will also provide referrals to hospitals and benefit programs. The clinic may also visit at-risk folk through churches, food banks and homeless shelters.

20

IA JUN n 14

“We are breaking out of traditional boxes by reaching people who have not been reached before,” approved Elica CEO Elizabeth Cassin at the truck’s recent welcome event. “We can take pride (in improving) the health of our underserved and immigrant families.” Kaiser Permanente Chief Physician Robert Azevedo, whose organization joined Dignity Health as co-sponsor, deemed the van “a wonderful gift.”

He predicted it would help “some of the most vulnerable people in the community.” Those selected San Juan schools serve diverse and needy populations; most students receive free or subsidized lunches. San Juan District Superintendent Kent Kern predicted the mobile clinic would make students “healthier, happier and more ready to learn.” For more information on the Health on Wheels program, visit elicahealth.org.

Rep. Ami Bera (left) helps launch a new a Health on Wheels program at Thomas Edison School.

CLEAN SWEEP FOR CREEKS A party celebrating creeks recently caused a big splash in Carmichael Park. More than 1,500 volunteers snagged T-shirts and scoffed snacks. Exhibits by many sponsoring nonprofits and agencies were added attractions. The cleanup army included members of about 50 youth and neighborhood organizations. Many area streams benefitted from their work. Creek Week is a 24-yearold spring project aimed to rejuvenate waterways that drain and nourish Sacramento County. For the recent work-athon, volunteers scoured 70 creek locations from the Delta to Folsom, from Galt to Antelope. More than 12 tons of garbage was hauled away. Invasive plants were removed to make room for beneficial native species. Sacramento Area Creeks Council president Alta Tura confirmed a lower 2014 trash count: “Because of the winter drought, less garbage was washed down the creeks,” she said. “Nevertheless, they always need cleaning. Our volunteers did a stellar job.”


1717 Bell St. Sacramento, CA. 95825 (916) 252-4100 www.windowanddoorshop.com

Bi-Fold Door

Stacking Door

Moving Glass Wall Systems Seamlessly transition from the indoors to outdoors. Large glass panels offer sweeping outdoor views, flooding the room with natural light and fresh air.

Pocket Door Part of their reward was 1,500 hot dogs, dished up by Carmichael Chamber of Commerce members. “The Carmichael party celebrates everyone’s hard work,” said Tura. “It also helps people to learn about nature; how to be better stewards of our environment in everyday life.” Learn more about the annual creek cleanup at creekweek.net. Susan Maxwell Skinner can be reached at Sknrband@aol.com. n

Please Join Us in Our Efforts By Donating Useable Clothing, Furniture and Miscellaneous Household Items. If you need a special pick-up CALL (916)480-0688

www.windyouth.org Hope is in the Wind

Dianetics: THE MODERN SCIENCE OF MENTAL HEALTH

If you have ever felt there was something holding you back in life, ruining your plans and stopping you from being who you want to be, you were right.

GET IT , READ IT AND USE IT! Available at Church of Scientology of Sacramento Bookstore 1007 6th Street Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 319-5440 Ext. 3613 Hardcover $35+tax Paperback $25+tax or order on our website at www. Scientology-Sacramento.org

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

21


Doctor to the Rescue

PIONEERING PLASTIC SURGEON SHEDS LIGHT ON A NOTORIOUS MALPRACTICE CASE

BY DUFFY KELLY

Clark asked. His question echoed

MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS

that of so many licensed plastic surgeons in our community who

N

have spent years beyond medical ot only is Sierra Oaks

school studying to specialize in plastic

Vista plastic surgeon

surgery. Clark himself is a board-

Richard Clark the world’s

certified otolaryngologist (ear, nose

first published pioneer in the

and throat) and also is certified by the

cosmetic use of Botox, but

American Board of Plastic Surgery.

also he helped put a Puerto Rican

The process takes 16 years of college,

gynecologist out of business for

medical school and residency training.

allegedly botching plastic surgeries in Sacramento. Three years ago while I was working for Channel 10, Clark tipped me off to what would become one of medicine’s biggest crime stories: the story of Efrain Gonzalez. It was Clark who pointed out to me that authorities revoked Gonzalez’s medical license in Puerto Rico for bungled plastic surgery cases there. Plastic surgeon Richard Clark

But that didn’t stop Gonzalez. He

In the process of this treatment, Clark became the first FDA investigator approved to use Botox for the forehead wrinkles.

simply moved to California and in 2007 began performing cosmetic

While researching that story, I

The day after I broke the story on News10 in September 2011, dozens

“Despite justice being served to

surgeries here—tummy tucks, breast

met many of these women and saw

implants, vaginal rejuvenations, etc.—

Gonzalez’s surgical results myself.

more patients with similar results

protect Sacramento-area patients in

at offices on University Avenue and in

One woman had scar tissue so taut

lined up to tell me their experiences.

this case, there are many inadequately

Rocklin.

across her abdomen that her doctor

It took a while since that first story

trained practitioners jumping on the

Turns out, dozens of Gonzalez’s

told her she could never become

broke, but Gonzalez and his wife

bandwagon and calling themselves

Sacramento-area surgery patients

pregnant. Another had surgical

were arrested March 14, 2013. In

cosmetic or plastic surgeons,” Clark

ended up in emergency rooms and

material sewn into her belly. Some

January of this year, Gonzalez was

said.

offices such as Clark’s because

had completely lopsided breasts

forced to surrender his right to

of horrific results, including

that were vastly different in size. I

practice medicine in California. He

proper training to obtain privileges to

disfigurement, pain and dangerous

interviewed Gonzalez in his office

now faces 37 felonies, 15 counts of

do an operation at a major community

infections. Some of those patients

on camera where he defended his

mayhem, 15 counts of grand theft by

hospital, does it make any sense to let

were seeking legal action and

right to perform complex plastic

false pretenses, conspiracy to practice

that doctor perform that procedure on

demanding the state medical board

surgery cases because he was a

medicine without a license and

you in their private clinic? At present

investigate.

licensed gynecologist. His office

conspiracy to operate a clinic without

there is a legal loophole that allows

was jam-packed that day because

accreditation.

this insanity so prospective patients

That’s when Clark did a little investigating himself, uncovered

he was offering a Groupon special

Gonzalez’s past and called me with

on Botox treatments.

the story.

22

IA JUN n 14

“Any doctor can say he is a plastic surgeon, but is he properly trained and certified in plastic surgery?”

“If a doctor does not have the

need to do their homework. “It’s cost-effective and convenient to have your cosmetic surgery at


Carmichael Shell and Circle K coming soon! 5103 Fair Oaks Blvd at Walnut Avenue At Five Points: Opening in June!

5

¢

th

Sh

up to 20 gallons

e ll

®

®

s rd

wi

on every gallon

w F uel Re

a

wh when you buy one any bu size coffee siz or fountain dri drink.* *Offervalid valid with with w Fuel Network Card forCard a limited whiletime, supplies last. Fuel Rewards savings *Offer FuelRewards Rewards Network™ for time, limited while earned through throu the Shell Fuel ® Rewards program expire on the last day®of the month following the month in savings earned through FuelRewards Network , which is supplies last.wwere Fuelearned. Rewards which they The Shell Fuel Rewards program isthe partShell of the Fuel administered by Excentus may apply.®See fuelrewards.com for details. Rewards Fuel Rewards® Corporation. which they Other were restrictions earned. The Shell Fuel Rewards All trademar trademarks are the property of their respective owners. program is part of the Fuel Rewards Network™, which is administered by Excentus Corporation. Other restrictions may apply. See fuelrewards.com for details. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ™

®

21370_Shell_FRN_PumpTopper_SingleProduct_Dailys.indd 1

®

®

®

®

10/22/12 10:50 AM

21370_Shell_FRN_PumpTopper_SingleProduct_Dailys.indd 1

the doctor’s office, but make sure he

10/22/12 10:50 AM

His results were astonishing and he

or she has been approved for that

published them in August 1989 in the

procedure at a hospital where they

Journal of Plastic Surgery, where the

check credentials thoroughly.”

editor credits him with being the first

So who is the man who tipped me off to that story? Clark did his otolaryngology residency at the University of Tennessee and his plastic surgery

doctor in the world to use Botox for aesthetic purposes. Twenty-five years medical procedure in the world. Clark is well known and respected for his surgical expertise,

before opening his practice at Scripps

and he has performed almost every

Drive in 1984. As a young surgeon

type of cosmetic surgery procedure

and future father of three, Clark

possible. He’s particularly known for

studied how Botox had been used

his finesse with rhinoplasty.

spasms. In the late 1980s he had a patient

OUTSTANDING LIFE MEMBER

REALTOR®

Clark also lectures around the world on facelifts and rhinoplasty and has in the past served as

with a facial injury that caused

a faculty member for both UC

a paralysis on one side of her

Davis Medical Center and the

forehead. His challenge was to make

Stanford Review for plastic surgeons.

both sides of her forehead match. He

He served as chair of plastic surgery

wondered if Botox would work to stop

at both Mercy and Sutter and as

certain muscles from causing deep

president of the Sacramento Plastic

wrinkles with animation. In the

Surgery Society, where he and other

process of this treatment, Clark

plastic surgeons work to protect

became the first FDA investigator

patients from folks like Efrain

approved to use Botox for the

Gonzalez. n

forehead wrinkles.

Choose the right agent with a proven track record of success and a long list of satis¿ed customers who tell me that it is a combination of getting desired results, trusting in experience and gaining peace of mind.

later, Botox is now the most requested

residency at the University of Utah

to treat cross-eyed babies and facial

WHEN IT’S TIME TO BUY OR SELL YOUR HOME...

485 Crocker Road Wonderful Classic White Brick Tudor on Won half a acre nestled in heart of old Sierra Oaks Features Fea a Formal LR and DR with tall ceilings, generous moldings and lots of light Add Added features: 5 Bedrooms, Office, Library, Family/Media Room - 3 Car Garage – Inviting Fam m gardens, Pool, Spa, Waterfall & Outdoor Kitchen gardd

Call 806-7761 Visit pattydbaeta.com

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

23


Happy Birthday, Bella Bru! 21 YEARS LATER, NEIGHBORHOOD CAFE BRANCHES OUT TO LOUNGING, TOO

BY JESSICA LASKEY SHOPTALK

T

wo decades is a long time for any business to last, but in the case of local café Bella Bru, which celebrates its 21st anniversary this month, some things get better with age. “Our business has always been about responding to neighborhood wants and needs,” says Bella Bru owner Liz Mishler. “We started as a cafe, a neighborhood gathering spot that offers affordable, gourmet food in a casual atmosphere. But customers wanted Bella Bru to be more.” Since founding Bella Bru in 1993, Mishler has overseen its steady expansion even amid the economic woes of the past several years. To survive as a restaurant in any climate is a feat, but Mishler was up for the challenge, and adapted accordingly by cutting costs where she could while maintaining the stellar service and impressive menu that had put her on the map. Now Mishler boasts three Bella Bru outposts in the region (at its original location in Carmichael, in Natomas and in El Dorado Hills) and customers couldn’t be happier. But what really makes Mishler grin is the updated Luna Lounge attached to Bella Bru in Carmichael. Although the lounge is seven years old, it recently underwent a patio expansion complete with waterfall that will significantly increase its capacity and ability to serve hungry (and thirsty) Arden-area patrons. “(After we’d been open for a while,) the natural outgrowth was to create Luna Lounge, a neighborhood bar

24

IA JUN n 14

Liz Mishler and Mike Carlson of Bella Bru

serving food and beverages,” Mishler explains. “It also offers late-night dining and has a private party room upstairs.” The addition of a full bar helped Bella Bru capitalize on the barfly culture that has seemed to capture the Sacramento imagination over the past decade.

“It’s a challenge to stay current with cocktail trends and match the culinary diversity we’ve established in the cafe,” Mishler says. “We handcraft drinks, from muddled cocktails to the classics—which are making a big comeback. Regular customers stop by many times during the week knowing that there will

always be special additions to the menu like dinner entrées, local beers, wines and specialty cocktails. Some even walk over, getting exercise as well as dinner.” The French-cafe-in-your-ownbackyard appeal of Bella Bru and Luna Lounge continues to draw regular crowds, a testament to Mishler and her team’s consistent, and often cutting-edge, offerings. “We always try to keep abreast of food and drink trends and adapt our menus to reflect those ideas,” Mishler says. “The menus change with the seasons, our creative chefs have nightly specials and the small plate menu has been really popular.” And, as always, Bella Bru’s heavensent bakery scents are like nothing else in town. “We still bake all of our own breads, pies, cakes, bagels and sell to a long list of wholesale customers,” Mishler says. “We even make wedding cakes! The bakery seems to be the best-kept secret in town, but it assures that the (local) cafes will have great baked products—the freshest around.” But Mishler’s proudest accomplishment, after the longevity of her local establishment and the newand-improved Luna Lounge? “We have many customers who have met in the cafe or lounge,” she says. “Many have even married. It’s gratifying to know that we’ve provided a neighborhood gathering place that has resulted in so much happiness.” Keep the fresh-baked bread, delectable dishes and top-notch drinks coming, and we bet Bella Bru will be SHOPTALK page 26


IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

25


SHOPTALK FROM page 24 celebrating another 21 years before Mishler knows it. Celebrate Bella Bru’s birthday and the reopening of the Luna Lounge from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on June 22 at the Luna Lounge Patio Party with live music, food and drink service and “other surprises.” For more information, go to bellabrucafe.com. Bella Bru is at 5038 Fair Oaks Blvd.

EVERYTHING AND THE KITCHEN SINK

D

arius Baker has been in the business of remodeling kitchens and baths for 33 years. As the founder of D & J Kitchens and Baths Inc. (he’s the “D” in D & J—his business partner, John (“J”) Scofield, retired in 2011), he knows his way around a remodel from the pipes to the paint, the foundation to the fittings. So he’s the guy you want to ask if you need advice about an upcoming remodel. “The most important thing is who you pick to do the job,” Baker says, in a rare moment of quiet between visits to job sites and meetings with clients. “There are things you should look for in your selection process aside from how long any particular company has been in business. Some of these companies have survived (the economic downturn) ‘in spite of themselves,’ so to speak. “There are many ways to check on a company you’re considering. You should check license information and currency at the state contractor license board and call the Better Business Bureau to see if they have a track record there. However, there is no better way to get the best report on a company than to talk to folks who have been down the road with that company. I honestly feel it is the single biggest mistake consumers make when they don’t check references.” Baker himself supplies potential customers with a seven-page document containing the names and contact information of all his past clients—his projects number in the 400s—organized by ZIP code. Like

26

IA JUN n 14

Darius Baker, of the founder of D&J Kitchens and Baths Inc.

most of this bright businessman’s actions, there’s a method to his madness. “Calling references will give you a lot more information than simply, ‘Yes, they did a good job, on time and on budget,’ ” Baker says. “You might learn about things people would do differently if they did it over.

“Now people are deciding to make this house what they want,” Baker says, “so they can go out of it in a box.” “You should learn how the company’s employees were to work with. Were they considerate of my family? Did they respect the rest of my property? Were they clean and tidy? Did they communicate well through the course of our relationship? Were they helpful in solving issues/problems throughout the project? “You might be really surprised at the things past clients might discuss with you that you would

never consider at the early stages of a project.” For Baker, more information is good information, especially when a client is looking at making a major investment in improving their home for years to come. “Don’t be swayed by the bottom line,” Baker cautions. “Obviously there’s no money tree, but you’re investing—you need to get the most out of your money. IKEA might come in with the lowest bid, but how can you think that [product] will last you a long time?” The longevity of a project is coming into play more than ever before— Baker has noticed an overwhelming trend in the baby boomer population of “aging in place” (revamping their current homes with accessibility features like widened doorways, safety bars and curbless showers) instead of selling their current home to downsize. “Now people are deciding to make this house what they want,” Baker says, “so they can go out of it in a box.” In addition to the advancing age of some of his clients, Baker has noticed an uptick in the interest surrounding green remodeling—“the whole ‘green’ thing,” as he calls it.

To meet a growing demand for more eco-conscious housing features, the city of Sacramento is working on a series of guidelines and building codes to address the increased interest in residential projects such as gray water recycling systems (bathroom water being recycled to irrigate property, for example). But regardless of how gray, green or otherwise a project may be, Baker recommends considering one other crucial reality of a remodel. “Be sure to consider the emotional trauma of living through a remodel,” Baker says. “I tell folks I will guarantee one thing over all else: You will get to the point where you want us out of your house—and we won’t even be there yet. Therein lies the value of references. I have people tell me that they didn’t realize how much it would mean to them that the workers left the toilet seat down until they had them in their house day after day.” So go ahead, call any one of Baker’s hundreds of references. We bet they’ll tell you he left the seat down. In need of a new kitchen or refreshed bath? Call Baker and his team at D & J Kitchens and Baths Inc. at 925-2577 or go to djkitchen. com. n


5.=.;6.;p@.?:605.29B?;6AB?2 6:6A92@@#<@@6/696A62@&6;02 

A+

*Available by Special Order

6649 Fair F i O Oaks k Blvd. Bl Carmichael 916-487-7895

www.carmichaelfurniture.us

5 Year FIXED RATE Home Equity Line of Credit Loan

5.00

%

Initial APR

CHECK THE EL DORADO ADVANTAGE:

 FIXED RATE for 5 Years  Local Processing & Servicing  No Closing Costs on Qualifying Transactions  Flexibility and Convenience  Have Funds Available for Current and Future Needs  Home Improvement, Debt Consolidation, College Tuition  Interest May be Tax Deductible (Please consult your tax advisor)

Serving our local communities since 1958 www.eldoradosavingsbank.com CARMICHAEL 0DQ]DQLWD$YHÂ&#x2021; 6H+DEOD(VSDQROÂ&#x2021; The initial Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is currently 5.00% for a new Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC), and is ďŹ xed for the ďŹ rst 5 years of the loan which is called the draw period. After the initial 5 year period, the APR can change once based on the value of an Index and Margin. The Index is the weekly average yield on U.S. Treasury Securities adjusted to a constant maturity of 10 years and the margin is 3.50%. The current APR for the repayment period is 6.125%. The maximum APR that can apply any time during your HELOC is 10%. A qualifying transaction consists of the following conditions: (1) the initial APR assumes a maximum HELOC of $100,000, and a total maximum Loan-to-Value (LTV) of 70% including the new HELOC and any existing 1st Deed of Trust loan on your residence; (2) your residence securing the HELOC must be a single-family home that you occupy as your primary residence; (3) if the 1st Deed of Trust loan is with a lender other than El Dorado Savings Bank, that loan may not exceed $200,000 and may not be a revolving line of credit. Additional property restrictions and requirements apply. All loans are subject to a current appraisal. Property insurance is required and ďŹ&#x201A;ood insurance may be required. Rates, APR, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Other conditions apply. A $375 early closure fee will be assessed if the line of credit is closed within three years from the date of opening. An annual fee of $50 will be assessed on the ďŹ rst anniversary of the HELOC and annually thereafter during the draw period. Ask for a copy of our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fixed Rate Home Equity Line of Credit Disclosure Noticeâ&#x20AC;? for additional important information. Other HELOC loans are available under different terms. 

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

27


#1 Sierra Oaks Team in Homes Sold 2007â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013* Specializing in 95864, 95608 and 95821 *Source: Trendgraphix Inc.

We Not Only Know The Area, We Make Arden Park Our Home

Call Tom & Kathy at 799-4571

4434 Mapel Lane $5,700,000

1622 Arden Bluffs Lane, $1,250,000

7 Rosebriar Court (Natomas) $454,000

6 Acre One of a Kind Estate in the heart of Carmichael. Restored and expanded Victorian home with fountains and tennis court.

Outstanding Custom Gem with 3 stories, large elevator, room for gracious entertaining.

Desirable North Natomas Park spacious home with resortstyle yard and pool.

1240 Meredith Way $424,950

2750 Laurel Drive

4237 Los Coches Way $1,850,000

Del Dayo Riviera home with hardwood floors, spacious family room on a landscaped lot.

Sierra Oaks Vista at its Finest. Custom and Classic 6 bed/5.5 bath Home with Bonus Room on a Park-like Secluded Lot.

Custom Nantucket Cottage in Arden Park. Custom 6 bed/6 bath Home Boasts 6,700 Square Feet on a Very Spacious Lot.

1841 Parliament Circle $849,000

5208 Whisper Oaks Lane $575,000

5905 Oak Avenue $439,000

4-5 Bed/4.5 Bath home on prestigious Parliament Circle across from Shelfield Park. Master suite downstairs with fireplace, huge bonus room, and large pool.

Wonderful 5 Bed/3 Bath Infinity home in gated community. Gourmet kitchen, large master suite with walk-ins & jetted tub, spacious patio & pool.

Marvelous custom 4 Bed/3 Bath home built in 2007 & updated with gourmet kitchen, detailed touches, downstairs bed & bath, pretty yard & patio.

$1,950,000

Pending:

5903 Oak Avenue $435,000

4828 Patric Way $415,000

Built in 2007 and updated 3 Bed/2.5 Bath home with gourmet kitchen, generous family room, downstairs bedroom and charming yard.

Spacious single-level Carmichael 3 Bed/2.5 Bath open floor plan home with spacious yard and patio.

5205 Whisper Oaks Lane, 95608 2613 Catalina, 95821 2028 Medusa, 95864 4961 Olive Oak Way, 95608 3631 Miami Street, 95821 3230 Fieldcrest Drive, 95821 2613 Butano Drive, 95821 4915 Hope Lane, 95821 4386 Malana Way, 95742 3119 Whitney Avenue, 95821 5249 Wyndham Oaks, 95608

(Photos courtesy of Valado Mori; Olivia Darzell)

799-4571 â&#x20AC;˘ TPhillips@GoLyon.com 28

IA JUN n 14


TOM&Kathy PHILLIPS T

960 Los Molinos Way, 95864

E

A

M

$1,699,000

Stunning Cape Code home with matching Guest Cottage. No details have been missed on this outstanding property in Arden Park. This elegantly comfortable home features a wonderfully spacious floor plan, large gourmet kitchen with high-end appliances,granite counters,and opens to the family room. Custom wood mouldings and built-ins throughout lend warmth and charm to the separate living and formal dining rooms. The downstairs Master suite boasts a sitting area and doors to the back brick patio. The upstairs bedrooms are large & full of character, situated around a library landing and sitting area flanking the stairs. Amazing laundry room with tons of storage, windows and long counter tops. Step outside to the beautiful brick patio and pool, with separate dining patios and manicured lawns. Nestled beyond the home and surrounded by mature trees is the detached guest house with a living room & office. Upstairs is nearly 800sqft of additional attic storage space. Property is wired for flawless and easy surround sound. This is a one-of-a-kind custom beauty in Arden Park.

591 Crocker Road, 95864

$1,495,000

Delightful home in Sierra Oaks Vista. Showing off redwood shingles trimmed out in white, this country home is nestled on one acre featuring manicured lawns, tall shady trees and a secret garden full of hidden nooks. Plenty of area to entertain outside and in as you step inside this well-designed & comfortable home with a very spacious and open floor plan, a generously sized wonderful kitchen and family room with a cozy fireplace. The outstanding downstairs Master Suite caps off the elegant comfort and luxury of this home.

TomandKathy.GoLyon.com

CalBRE #01401556 CalBRE #01402867 IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

29


Giving Back A FORMER CLIENT NOW VOLUNTEERS TO HELP HER PEERS

says Berry. “She knows if they’re diabetic or vegetarian, and she also knows about their different cultures. She makes a connection with them, and that’s very important.” TLCS’s SRO program office has one part-time and two full-time paid staffers, so it relies heavily on volunteers like Abdullah. Most are former clients of the program. Few have had the impact that Abdullah has had. “We stumbled along before she came,” says Berry, “and now I don’t know what we’d do without her.” When the case managers are out of the office, Abdullah runs things.

BY TERRY KAUFMAN LOCAL HEROES

S

ameerah Abdullah could have just fallen through the cracks. Like so many residents of downtown single-roomoccupancy hotels, she was living hand to mouth, struggling with the demons of addiction and mental illness. When she walked through the door of the nonprofit agency TLCS, she was at the lowest point in her life. Today, Abdullah is the picture of dedicated volunteerism. Over the past three and a half years, she has organized and energized TLCS’s food distribution program, making a difference in the lives of scores of mentally ill seniors in the downtown area. Through her efforts, homebound elderly residents of several of the hotels receive custom care packages personally delivered with love. “Their rent is $550 to $600 a month, not including utilities, and they receive an average of $700 to $1,100 a month,” says SRO case manager Sharon Berry. “There’s no cooking allowed in their rooms, and they share a bathroom and laundry room. How can they afford to eat? Either they go to Loaves & Fishes or they’re being robbed by the corner grocery store.”

30

IA JUN n 14

“She has compassion because she experienced this stuff herself, plus she has a boatload of energy that she can channel and do amazing things.”

Volunteer extraordinare Sameerah Abdullah helps a client load up his groceries at TLCS

On a meager budget of $200 a month, the TLCS program stocks its pantry with food purchased from Senior Gleaners, sent over from Sacramento Food Bank or donated by local businesses. On Friday mornings,

residents from 20 nearby SRO hotels and senior apartments, as well as many homeless, line up for food. For those unable to leave their rooms, Abdullah is a godsend. “Sameerah knows just what people need to eat,”

Abdullah is candid about her journey to this point in her life. “I was busted for drugs, and I had to come here to use the phone every day,” she says. “I started pulling myself together. My faith is strong, and I decided to use my energy to be productive.” When she first came to TLCS, she was living downtown in Hotel Sequoia with sex offenders and parolees, cleaning up after everyone and compulsively recycling. She had HEROES page 33


Lose 20-45+ lbs. in 40 days

Guaranteed results! Sacramento

D! A E R O T PAWS Summer Reading â&#x20AC;˘ June 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 31

The Ultimate Fat Loss System â&#x20AC;˘ No pre-packaged foods â&#x20AC;˘ No hunger, no cravings â&#x20AC;˘ No exercise â&#x20AC;˘ Fat melts away where you want it to â&#x20AC;˘ Resets metabolism so you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t gain it back â&#x20AC;˘ Safe, EASY, doctor supervised â&#x20AC;˘ Naturally balances hormones

5HDGERRNV:LQSUL]HV )UHHIRUDOODJHV Sign up at

You could win:

any Sacramento Public Library branch or at www.saclibrary.org

L3DGPLQL*UDQG3UL]H

one per age group

%DUQHV  1REOHJLIWFDUG

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on exciting free events for all ages at all 28 branches!

three per library branch

6XQGD\-XQHČ?6XPPHU5HDGLQJ.LFNRÎ?SDUW\Č?Č&#x201A;SP DQG6FKRODVWLF%RRN)DLUČ?QRRQČ&#x201A;SPČ?&HQWUDO/LEUDU\ FRIENDS OF THE SACRAMENTO PUBLIC LIBRARY

Our CERF technology is the most advanced bio-communication scanning system that assesses over 2800 different bio-markers to put your body in the perfect fat burning zone. Most people will reduce or eliminate medications for B.P., diabetes, cholesterol, and thyroid. CERF technology is unlike any other system out there by restoring health and permanently giving you a younger metabolism.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;O

ver the past 20 years I have lost and found 30-50 lbs on ten different diets. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tried virtually everything from Weight Watchers, Jenny Craig, South Beach, Mediterranean, NutriSystems and more, only to regain my weight and add even more pounds! Needless to say, I was very skeptical when I heard the NutriMost approach would guarantee the loss of 20-45 lbs in 40 days. Day 30 report: Quality of life is rapidly returning, my optimism has resumed. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lost 49 lbs have more energy and am enjoying walking, swimming and other fitness activities. After about ten days, medications for postnasal drip and arthritis aches and pains were no longer necessary. Yes, the NutriMost approach to wellness works and the support of Dr. Kit Langstroth and his staff significantly help manage the challenges along the way!â&#x20AC;? - Phil B., Sacramento

Before

FREE WORKSHOPS TO REVIEW OUR SYSTEM! Reserve Your Seat Today! Please call

Kit Langstroth D.C.

Mary Ann Downey Interior Design

916-925-2007

office@MADinteriordesign.com offi ce@MADinteriordesign.com

SacramentoFatLoss.com

www.MADinteriordesign.com 916.443.2509 IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

31


Rediscover your freedom to move. Back and neck pain is a discomfort you shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to live with. The Dignity Health Neurological Institute of Northern California can help you enjoy freedom of movement again. We offer the latest in technology and treatment, including minimally invasive procedures and nonsurgical options to get you back to living pain-free. Our Spine Center of Excellence in California is one of only four nationwide certiďŹ ed by The Joint Commission. Attend one of our informational events, where you can meet our renowned spine specialists to learn more about spine pain causes and treatment options. Register online at dignityhealth.org/SacramentoSpine or call 916-851-2511.

Tuesday, June 10 Courtyard Marriott at Cal Expo 1782 Tribute Road Sacramento, CA 95815

Tuesday, June 24 El Macero Country Club 44571 Clubhouse Drive El Macero, CA 95618

Wednesday, June 25 Hampton Inn Folsom 155 Placerville Road Folsom, CA 95630

Monday, June 30 Hilton Garden Inn Roseville 1951 Taylor Road Roseville, CA 95661

All events are from 6:15 to 8:00 p.m. Healthy appetizers and beverages will be served.

32

IA JUN n 14


Another reason to have the right living trust: Your son-in-law, Kyle… • His idea of commitment is a two-year gym membership. • He brags about once having three girlfriends in two states. • He often travels alone to Las Vegas “for business.” • He may be over 30, but he still parties like he’s 21. • He’s sure your daughter is ridiculously lucky to have him in her life. Could some of your daughter’s inheritance end up with him? Visit wyattlegal.com and call me for a free consultation. Protect your family from the “Kyle” in your life.

law office of brian d.wyatt ,PC FUTURE FROM page 30 also raised four children and held many physically demanding jobs. She wasn’t afraid to take on a new project. She started at a desk job, “not thinking she could do anything,” says Berry. “She’s done that and more. She single-handedly runs the food closet. She multitasks like nobody’s business. There aren’t enough words to express the gratitude we have for her every day.” It’s a never-ending challenge: people walking in from Greyhound buses, sleeping on the doorstep, waiting just to use the phone or get a cup of coffee. TLCS provides support and services to the mentally ill homeless and elderly. Having been on the other side of the handouts, Abdullah knows exactly what these people are going through. “I’ve lived in this community,” she says. “When they come in here, they have problems, and we don’t need to make them worse. We give them coffee and a place that’s warm and safe. If I was in that position, I would want my

family to know that I’m taken care of.” “This woman here is the definition of a hometown hero,” says TLCS development director Erin Johansen. “She has compassion because she experienced this stuff herself, plus she has a boatload of energy that she can channel and do amazing things.” Johansen says that the SRO program has seen its primary funding sources dwindle or disappear in recent years. “It’s funded by a ragtag of cobbledtogether resources,” making someone with Abdullah’s skills and vision indispensable. “This community saved my life,” says Abdullah. “This is how I’m giving back. I live for that. All I have is love. Now my kids are proud of me, and I’m back on track. Now I get respect, but I give respect too.” For more information about TLCS, go to tlcssac.org. Donations of nonperishable food products, such as canned goods, cereal and rice, are always needed and welcomed. Terry Kaufman can be reached at terry@1greatstory.com. n

trusts & estates probate special needs planning

3406 American River Drive Suite B Sacramento, CA 95864 273-9040

FEATURED HOME OF THE MONTH

Stylish mid-century design! Great room floor plan with updated kitchen. Large master suite & bonus office room. Private resort back yard with outdoor kitchen, pool, sun room. Set in a popular neighborhood close to the river and Shelfield Park. $599,000. Visit 5709RiverOak.com

JAY FEAGLES, GRI, SRES VICE PRESIDENT, DUNNIGAN SIERRA OAKSS

Trust Knowledge Care

2401 A American i River D Ri Dr. S Suite it #150

204-7756 jcfeagles@gmail.com

VIEW LISTINGS AT JAYFEAGLES.COM IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

33


A Big Idea: Little Parks SACRAMENTO LOOKS TO JOIN THE NATIONAL PARKLET MOVEMENT

BY SENA CHRISTIAN BUILDING OUR FUTURE

P

arking spots are only for cars, right? Wrong. These spots can actually become openair mini-parks where people sit, eat, drink, converse and enjoy the scenery. You can already see these parklets, as they’re called, in San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles, Seattle, Philadelphia and Nevada City. Now, Sacramento is poised to make room for some of our own. A makeshift parklet that sprung up outside the MARRS building in Midtown on national PARK(ing) Day last September revived interest in creating more green space in urban settings for the public to enjoy. The first PARK(ing) Day occurred in 2005 when employees from the art and design company Rebar fed some parking meters in San Francisco, laid sod and hung out until the meters’ time was up. Back then, people thought, you don’t hang out in parking spots. Those are reserved for cars. “It's kind of like how you can’t walk through a drive-through,” says Matt Winkler, operations general supervisor for the city of Sacramento’s parking division. “You’re not supposed to do that.” But maybe it wasn’t such a bad idea after all. City staff began examining how parklets could exist here in response to calls from merchants and pedestrian and bicycle advocates. “Word of mouth spread and next thing you know, people are asking how can we get that program here?” Winkler says.

34

IA JUN n 14

Parklets are open-air mini-parks where people sit, eat, drink, converse and enjoy the scenery.

In October, the city council first heard a presentation from staffers about the benefits of parklets, which are basically low decks installed in adjacent parking spots as an expansion of the sidewalk. The council approved a two-year pilot parklet program in March. If it proves successful, the city will move toward making these features a permanent part of the local landscape. Parklets are part of a bigger vision by the council to beautify utilitarian spaces and promote a bike- and pedestrianfriendly culture.

Winkler says the program emulates San Francisco’s successful parklet endeavor. The City by the Bay officially installed its first parklet in 2010. Now, there are more than three dozen. Sacramento is accepting applications from businesses interested in becoming one of six to 10 to be granted a revocable encroachment permit to cordon off pavement for a parklet. A review committee composed of, among others, representatives from Downtown Sacramento Partnership, Midtown Business Association and

Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District will determine who gets the permits. The air quality district is offering $1,000 grants for projects that include two spaces for bike parking. “The Midtown Business Association is in support of parklets because they encourage our community to be less dependent on cars in a dense urban area, create a unique public space and challenge our city to continue to invest in unique urban design,”

FUTURE page 37


Free community event at

www.shoppavilions.com

Discover Unique Fine Art . . . on display from over 150 artisans: paintings, pottery, glass, photography, jewelry and more.

56th annual

Fiesta! sponsored by the Sacramento Suburban Kiwanis Club

Saturday & Sunday

June 7 & 8 10 am – 5 pm

Pavilions Shopping Center Fair Oaks Blvd. near Howe Ave. • Sacramento

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

35


916-920-2888

1338 Howe Ave, Bldg B

Near Hurley, Next to Red Lobster

newhappydayspa.com

1 Hour Foot Massage Only $18

Full Body Massage Only $36

Reg $25

Reg $45

(One coupon per customer, cannot be combined. Valid only at Howe Ave Location. Expires 6/30/14)

(One coupon per customer, cannot be combined. Valid only at Howe Ave Location. Expires 6/30/14)

Facing Divorce? TAKE CONTROL. GET RESULTS. MARGARET B. WALTON Attorney at Law CertiÀed Family Law Specialist State Bar Board of Legal Specialization

• Spousal & Child Support • Child Custody/Move-aways

Classic Facial Only $38

Pedicure Only $18

Reg $45

Reg $20

(One coupon per customer, cannot be combined. Valid only at Howe Ave Location. Expires 6/30/14)

(One coupon per customer, cannot be combined. Valid only at Howe Ave Location. Expires 6/30/14)

*Special discount for package deals *Onsite laundry facility to guarantee all linens are fresh *Walk in welcome *Gift card available *Locations in Roseville • Granite Bay • Fair Oaks • Natomas

• Complex Asset Division • Business Valuation • Paternity • Prenuptual Agreements • Restraining Orders

IA JUN n 14

Free ConÀdential Initial Consultation

CALL 924-9800 700 University Avenue

Visit Our Website: mbwalton.com

When we started this dental practice eight years ago, we decided to break away from the status quo and run a “patient focused” practice. We specialize in providing kind, gentle family care, including in house, custom-designed porcelain crowns, full service orthodontia, cosmetic, periodontal and children’s services. The things that are important to us are providing a warm, trusting relationship between our friendly patients and team of professionals. We run on time, accommodate your schedule and we’ll even pick you up if you need a ride. Come see what we are all about… you’ll be glad you did!

36

Strong and effective representation every step of the way

Practice Emphasizing:

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

Jayson A. Chalmers, D.D.S.

CALL 483-8182 Visit chalmersdental.com 3315 Alta Arden Expressway


FUTURE FROM page 34 says Emily Baime Michaels, the association’s executive director. Permit recipients will be selected in July. Construction on the parklets should be complete by September. Applicants must meet a laundry list of criteria. The business must be front-facing the street and in a 25-mile-per-hour-or-less zone, and the plan must include appropriate lighting for safety, nearby garbage and proper drainage. Manholes can’t be covered and the decks must be enclosed with rails and meet all requirements of the Americans With Disabilities Act. The review committee will also consider remediation plans for loss of parking in high-density areas. The committee wants to see that the applicant has solicited input from the public and adjacent businesses. “I want to make sure everybody wants this,” Winkler says. Parklets aren’t necessarily cheap. According to Winkler, they cost a business anywhere from $15,000

to $100,000 to construct. They’re also not permanent. If, for example, roadwork needs to be done or the hosting business closes, the city will remove the feature. According to Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates, parklets make neighborhoods more inviting, reduce sidewalk and traffic congestion, improve air quality and increase the visibility of businesses. At a city council meeting in March, SABA executive director Jim Brown said the parklets signal that streets are not only for cars. “What is so important to us about this is it’s a step toward acknowledging that our streets are public places,” Brown said. “They are not the exclusive domain of cars. This is one of the first steps in making our streets a safer, calmer, friendlier place to visit and to do business.”

T

he ccourtyard ou urt rtya ya a rd do on n th the he ca campus a mp mpus uss of S acra ac ra am mee nt nto o Ch Char arterr ar Sacramento Charter H igh High hS choo ch ooll in i O ak kP ark ar k School Oak Park w as lo o ng ng u nuse nu s d an and d ov o ergr er grown n was long unused overgrown with wi th Bermu muda da g rass. The sp ra spac acee ac Bermuda grass. space jjust ju st w a n’tt ve as very ry yh ospi os pitab ble to o llife. ifee. if e. wasn’t hospitable Butt a fe Bu few w ye year arss ag ar ago o , a ffellow o, ello el low lo w with wi th wi th years ago,

()L[[LY4H[[YLZZ

 Naturally

Sena Christian can be reached at sena.c.christian@gmail.com. n

LIKE

INSIDE PUBLICATIONS Serving the Neighborhood for 55 Years Full Service Auto Care Station

Arden Village Ser vice

Deeper Sleep By Design • • • • •

Authentic European style mattress systems Natural and organic mattresses, bedding and pillows Custom firmness options within same mattress Inquisitive, non-commissioned sales environment No gimmicks, sensible pricing

Come in for the Personally Fit Pillow

Furniture of Strength, Simplicity and Quality • • • •

Finely crafted American hardwood bedroom furniture Simple, clean, yet elegant designs. Platform and storage beds Styles from contemporary, mission, arts & crafts to traditional Sustainably grown – FSC Certified

EUROPEAN SLEEP DESIGN 12 Months Same as Cash

At Scott’s Corner - Arden & Eastern • 489-0494 STAR CERTIFIED SMOG STATION

O.A.C.

6606 Folsom Auburn Rd. Folsom, CA. 95630 916-989-8909 www.sleepdesign.com

Chip & Jill

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

37


Get Your Walking Shoes on THIS GROUP’S MEMBERS LOVE TO WALK AND TALK

BY GWEN SCHOEN THE CLUB LIFE

Y

ou have to love a walking club that begins and ends its evening exercise route at a bakery. Maybe that’s why Sacramento Walking Sticks is the nation’s largest American Volkssport Association club. When Barbara Nuss, president of Waking Sticks, called to invite me on a walk with the club, I was a bit hesitant about starting out with a 5k on a warm evening. I do a lot of walking, but it’s mostly on a golf course or dragging our old dog around the block for what we call a museum walk (walk a few steps, look around, walk a few more steps, etc.). Then Nuss mentioned they would start and end at Les Baux bakery on Folsom Boulevard. That sounded quite delightful. At least there was the promise of a treat at the end of the trail. “The group is a chapter of the American Volkssport Association,” said Nuss. “It is a national walking organization. There are a variety of membership levels, which are designed to get you off the couch. Some members track the number of events or distances they walk in event books. Others just go for fun.”

38

IA JUN n 14

Walking Sticks members enjoy a walk. The club was started in 1984.

Walking Sticks has 573 members. They walk at least once a week, usually more often. The routes vary. The evening I joined them, they met at 51st Street and Folsom Boulevard in East Sac, then walked to McKinley Rose Garden and back to the bakery, just over three miles. The previous weekend, the group walked the North Laguna Creek Wildlife Area. Upcoming walks were scheduled for the historic Sierra Oaks Vista and Woodland neighborhoods. To celebrate World Walk Day in May, many members drove to Redding to

walk the botanical gardens at Sundial Bridge. “The length of walks varies from 5k to 10k, and often the longer walks have an optional route for people who can’t go the whole way,” said Nuss. “Volkssporting uses the metric system to measure distances, primarily because the sport started in Germany. One kilometer is approximately .62 miles, so 10k is about 6.2 miles and 5k is 3.1 miles.” Routes are always well planned with rest stops, parking suggestions, locations of restrooms and other

amenities. Although they walk in a group, everyone is given a map and cell phone number to call if they get separated or have problems. According to Nuss, anywhere from a dozen walkers to 300 might turn up for an event. Besides walks for humans, the group also sponsors Doggie Do Walks for members and their dogs. Registered dogs receive an achievement button and a pat. The evening I joined them, there were about 15 walkers. A few were very serious and looking


BUY 4 WEEKS - GET 2 WEEKS

FREE* *Limited Time Offer

LOSE UP TO 10-15 LBS IN JUST 21 DAYS!

636 Watt Avenue • Sacramento, 95864 (In Arden Town Shopping Center at Fair Oaks Blvd. & Watt Ave) Individual results may vary. Registration fee and any required products additional. VISA and MasterCard accepted.

for a challenge. Most, however, were just there for a leisurely walk on a pleasant evening. The pace was comfortably quick but slow enough that we could have easy conversations. I was, however, glad that “old dog” stayed home on the couch. The 5k took about an hour and 20 minutes. Most walkers were age 40-plus, and there was a big variety of fitness levels. As promised, the end of the walk was delightful, not just for the sweets at Les Baux, but for the new friendships forged along the way. For membership information and lists of future walks, go to the group’s website, sacramentowalkingsticks. org. You can also reach the club by mail: Sacramento Walking Sticks, P.O. Box 277303, Sacramento CA 95827-7303. Feel free to drop in for a walk with the club. But beware: They are an infectious group and before you know it, you will be pulling on your walking shoes. To learn more about AVA, visit the national association’s website at ava.org. If you know of an interesting club in the area, contact Gwen Schoen at gwensclubs@aol.com. n

“We can’t imagine spending our

Marketplace at Magnolia

best years

70 vendor outdoor antique faire

anywhere but home.”

CALL TODAY!

Our Life. Our Memories. Our Home. Live Well at Home with Home Care Assistance!

Saturday, June 21, 2014 8am - 3pm

· Senior Tuesday (10% off)

rain or shine... · Rare & Exquisite Antiques food and fun... · Design Inspiration spaces for rent $20 and up... · Vintage Jewelry & Clothing · Pictures & Artwork Magnolia Antiques & · 28 Dealers STOREWIDE Home Interiors · 10-6 Daily SALE · Layaway & Delivery 6468 Fair Oaks Blvd. magnoliaantiquesandhomeinteriors.com 973-8590

20% OFF

• NEW! Home Care Assistance is the only home care agency to train care partners in mental stimulation. We help clients delay symptoms of cognitive decline by engaging them in research-based, enjoyable cognitive activities. • Home Care Assistance’s unique Balanced Care Method™ promotes healthy mind, body and spirit. • Home Care Assistance is the only senior care company with a Home Care University to train and develop care partner employees.

• Drought Tolerant Landscapes • Consultations • Sprinklers & Drainage

Exterior Lighting Pruning Plantings & Sod Full Landscaping

916-648-8455

916-706-0169

5363 H Street, Suite A Sacramento, CA 95819 HomeCareAssistanceSacramento.com

• • • •

Cont. Lic. #874165

Neighborhood References • Since 1984

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

39


Bee Friendly CREATING A BUZZ IN YOUR GARDEN

BY ANITA CLEVENGER

T

GARDEN JABBER

he news has been full of reports that bee populations are declining across the world for reasons that scientists still don’t fully understand. Farmers and home gardeners worry about how our food crops will be pollinated if Colony Collapse Disorder continues. You and your neighbors can make a difference by creating a colorful pollinator paradise in your home gardens. Plant a variety of flowering plants, provide appropriate water and shelter, and the bees will come. How best to do that? It depends on the type of bees. If you weren’t aware there were thousands of different species of bees, you are not alone. Most people think that all bees live in hives and make honey. Actually, we know what honeybees are, but we don’t understand them very well. Did you know that they were brought to North America by early European colonists? Did you know that millions of honeybee hives are moved across the country in order to pollinate many key agricultural crops? Did you know that honeybees scout for sources of nectar and pollen, then return to the hive to tell their sister worker bees where to go? The workers are all

40

IA JUN n 14

Christine Casey in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Garden at UC Davis

business. They fly directly there and visit every flower. No flitting allowed! Then they make a beeline home. If you look closely at bees in your garden, you will discover many are not honeybees. There are a thousand native California bee species ranging from tiny iridescent green bees to big black or golden carpenter bees. Nearly all of them are solitary, not hive dwellers. Individual bees make their nests in the ground, in hollow stems or reeds, or holes in wood. Native bees

are threatened, too, because their habitat is declining as people clear weeds from hills and roadsides, cover up soil with pavement and mulch, and cut down dead trees. A visit to UC Davis’ HaagenDazs Honey Bee Haven shows how beautiful a bee-friendly garden can be. Despite its name, this half-acre garden is designed for all bees. To accommodate honeybee foragers, each variety of plant is grouped in an area at least three feet square. Bees

vary considerably in size and tongue length. Some bees use colors and others use chemical cues to find their hosts. Accordingly, the garden has plants with blossoms in many shapes, sizes and colors. Plants are chosen that bloom throughout the seasons because different species of bees are active at different times of the year. In this garden, bees find many places to nest, including blocks hung in trees, bare undisturbed soil and sandy areas between pavers. There are rocks to shade their nests. Bees need water and congregate at dripping faucets and puddles. The haven has specially designed blocks to collect water and simple water-filled basins with stones in them for the bees to rest upon. The Honey Bee Haven has at least 10 to 15 diverse bee-friendly plants blooming in each season of the year. Christine Casey manages the garden. When asked for plant recommendations, she is especially enthusiastic about Ceanothus, also known as California lilac. If a California garden doesn’t have this plant, she says, it’s not a bee garden. It’s possible to have one variety or another of Ceanothus in bloom from January until frost. She considers catmints (Nepeta) one of the best plants for bees and advocates other members of the mint family such as salvias. Bees are attracted to composite flowers such as asters, daisies and sunflowers. They like members of the rose family, too. Single or semi-double roses that open to reveal their stamens attract more pollinators than those that are packed with petals. Eighty-five different native bees have been identified in the Honey


We have a commitment to deliver, literally. Garments Bee Haven. Sacramento Historic City Cemetery’s perennial garden, Hamilton Square, has been studied by UC Berkeley researchers who found 65 varieties there. Other pollinators, including moths and hummingbirds, also frequent these gardens.

Some people are reluctant to have bees in their garden because they are afraid of them. You have to work at it in order to be stung. Bees are going after flowers, not people. Some people are reluctant to have bees in their garden because they are afraid of them. Casey says that you have to work at it in order to be stung. Bees are going after flowers,

R Y T I N A

fine cleaning Est. 1958

Every customer is assigned a personal Delivery Specialist – part of a team with over 20 years combined experience.

From Granite Bay, Elk Grove and everywhere in between - delivery is ALWAYS FREE.

Shoes, Handbags & Belts

Wedding Dresses

not people or their food, and will sting only if stepped on or trapped. Most of the best bee-friendly plants thrive with infrequent, deep irrigation. If you are planning to reduce or eliminate your lawn and replace it with a water-efficient landscape, why not create a bee haven of your own? Anita Clevenger is a Sacramento County UC Master Gardener. Master Gardeners advocate integrated pest management practices and advise gardeners to use pesticides with great care because of potential impact on bees and other good bugs. For answers to gardening questions, call the Master Gardeners at 875-6913 or go to ucanr.edu/sites/sacmg. UC Davis’ Haagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven is a half-acre bee-friendly garden on the college campus, next to the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility on Bee Biology Road. For more information, go to beebiology. ucdavis.edu. For plant lists and other tips on bee-friendly gardening, go to helpabee.org. n

Home or office? We deliver to wherever is most convenient for you and your busy lifestyle.

Leather, Fur & Delicates

630 Fulton Ave. Sacramento (916) 485-4700 rytina.com

Linens, Draperies & Rugs

Alterations

NEW LOCATION COMING SOON! 5142 Arden Way 488-5353 Carmichael, CA carmichaelcycles.com

SE Ripstyle Ladies Single-Speed Cruiser Light alloy construction Limited Edition Reg.$ 369.99 sale $269.99

expires 6/30/14

$5999 Tune-up Special reg $79.00

Kestrel Talon Tri Road Bike Reg. 1599.99 sale 999.99 expires 6/30/14

Full Carbon Road bike with Shimano 105 components and Aerobars

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

41


TAYLOR CT CENTER

Where Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Something For Everyone 485-4566 485 4566

From Waldenpond to wallpaper, from sushi to sasparilla, from big beefy burgers to itsy-bitsy ballerinas, from Call of Duty to Call of the Wild, from learning how to fish to eating a fish

2700-2828 Marconi Ave. (East of Fulton)

42

IA JUN n 14


TAYLOR CT CENTER

Where There’s Something For Everyone 485-4566 485 4566

Sacramento Academy of

Discovery Shop

DANCE BALLET SCHOOL

EyeChicks

Gently Used Clothing • Treasures Net proceeds benefit cancer patients

Your Summertime Headquarters

$5 OFF

purchase of $10 or more

Specializing in European Eyewear for Men and Women

(One coupon per customer per day. Exp. 6/30/14)

BALLET LESSONS STARTING AT AGES 5 AND UP

The Discovery Shop is staffed by volunteers and new volunteers are always welcome.

Enroll today at sacdance.org or 971-0945

K•B

$5 OFF

EXPERT REPAIRS RENTALS SALES INSTRUCTION HUGE MOUTHPIECE & REED SELECTION

purchase of $25 or more through 6/30/14

New & Used Books

BEAUTY SUPPLY

487-3723

OUR COMPLETE SOURCE YFOR PROFESSIONAL

bookchek.com

10% OFF Purchase

through 6/30/14 See store for details

excluding sale items and salon equipment

Hours: Mon–Sat 10–6

1 per customer • while supplies last • exp. 6/30/14

www.timsbis.com

971- 6500 TaylorCenter.indd 1

Fly Fishing

Bring this ad for 25% OFF!

Bring this coupon in for

Band & Orchestra Instruments

Mani Pedi $30 (Marconi location only. Expires 6/30/14)

Now Open! 486-9958 Open 7 days a week Online store ships daily

11/2/2006 1:59:31 PM

Robinson’s Taekwondo

Buy 1, Get 1 FREE

Classes for Men, Women & Children

One Week FREE (V (Valid alid lid withh coupon at Taylor Center location. Exp 6/30/14.)

Lunch & Dinner Authentic Japanese Cuisine Sukiyaki • Tempura • Teriyaki • Sushi

971-1279 489-8230 | nagatosukiyaki.com

489-1110

Call Sandy or Davette for your appointment today!

BOOKCHEK KT’s Coiffure Salon Kiene’s

BEAUTY PRODUCTS!

Over 30 Years in Business

Fabulous Eyewear

481-6815

Original Chicken Sandwich

483-6643

(Valid only at Taylor Center location. Expires 6/30/14.)

2700-2828 Marconi Ave. (East of Fulton) IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

43


INSIDE

OUT

CONTRIBUTED BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER Recent events rejoiced in the season, conservation, civic politics and community progress. Here are some dates that got folks out and about.

1.

2. 3.

5.

4. 1. Arden Middle School staff and friends broke ground for the school’s centennial project. 2. Easter brought traditional Carmichael Park harvests. 3. Rep. Ami Bera met businesspeople at a Carmichael Chamber of Commerce luncheon. 4. California Auto Museum executive Karen McClaflin welcomed car fans to an outreach event. 5. An ambassador for Suburban Water Districts, mascot “Mister Leaky,” enjoyed Creek Week celebrations in Carmichael Park. 6. On Cinco de Mayo, mariachi bandsmen entertained sunset diners at Carmichael’s Rey Azteca restaurant.

44

IA JUN n 14

6.


LET US HELP YOUR TEETH SPARKLE!

We do all aspects of general dentistry including Àllings, crowns, root canals, dentures, implants, veneers and extractions.

Call us at 483-5900

to find out what we can do for you!

Endless Summer Days

Diamond Dental

When we were little Mom would boot us out of the house and tell us to go play with our toys in the backyard. She had too many chores to do to hang out and “entertain” us all summer. She would cook, clean, do yard work – all the adult stuff that seemed so boring.

of Sacramento

Dr. Black is a member of:

American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry Academy of General Dentistry ADA, CDA, SDDS

2711 Watt Avenue www.ddofs.com

REMODEL WITH AN AWARD-WINNER! Sacramento’s MOST Award-Winning NARI Remodeling Firm Kitchens • Baths • Room Additions • Whole House Remodels

Once in awhile, when the sun was so hot and the days were so long, even Mom couldn’t resist the allure of the “swimming pool”! She would try to cool off alone and my brother and I would have nothing of that, in we’d go and spoil her moment to chill and relax. Now I’m her caregiver with life responsibilities and kids of my own. And I know what she knew back then – summers fly by in an instant. If you are caring for a parent, full or part time, you deserve a break. Go ahead and plan that summer get-away, it’s important to reconnect with your spouse and kids – slow down, breathe. Peace of mind is possible, just call Áegis Living. Áegis Living is the trusted senior living company, known for the finest care, the most delicious and nutritious cusine, all in a loving environment where seniors enjoy planned activities and socializing all day long. Short-term stays can be custom made to your family’s needs. Please call the Áegis nearest you and learn how we can help you take the break you need.

100% Guild Quality Satisfaction Rating “This company is highly professional, hugely communicative, and has earned our complete trust! I recommend Eberle to my friends and associates.”

Áegis of Carmichael 4050 Walnut Ave. Carmichael, CA 95608

–Jo F., Curtis Park

Visit EberleRemodeling.com for MORE Guild Quality Customer Ratings

Call today to schedule your FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

369-6518

Lic# 659954

916-231-9458

AegisofCarmichael.com RCFE # 347003994

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

45


Babies Spotted SOME MOTHERS PREFER HOME DELIVERIES

PHOTOGRAPHY AND STORY BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER

C

hallenged by drought, dehydration and predators, black-tailed deer fawns can endure tough first months on the American River Parkway. Some pragmatic does now prefer to deliver babies in backyards. Near the American River, many gardeners last year reported surprise at what sprouted overnight in their flowerbeds. Garden deliveries are a practical option for mothers and their progeny: Shade is plentiful, predators are less common, birdbaths are handy troughs. Sprinklers ensure greener grazing than the parched parkway offers. “I looked out my window and a baby fawn tottered toward me,” marveled a California Avenue woman. “Her eyes were unfocused and her fur was wet. I guess she’d just been born. I was thrilled to see nature renewed in my own yard. Eventually, the mom came back, suckled her baby and they went off together. I haven’t seen them since.” The owner of a large property near Carmichael Creek, Allan Davis headed outdoors for a sunset stroll. “I heard a rustle and a tiny fawn was feet away from me, just staring,” said Davis. “He was so cute. He eventually ran away but stayed in the garden.” Later, Davis saw a doe greet the baby. Mother and child wandered down the drive and into the night together. What both Carmichael residents observed was a behavioral norm often mistaken for maternal neglect. After

46

IA JUN n 14

Hours old, a baby black-tailed fawn holes up in a quiet garden corner

Just birthed in a Carmichael Creek backyard, a fawn obediently awaits his mother

a doe gives birth, she disappears. No matter how frightened, the fawn waits in a prescribed area. Moms soon retrieve babies that are schooled in lesson one: fidelity. In the following months, fawns are often left beneath thickets, camouflaged by dappled coats. Obedience to the stay-put message is a fawn’s greatest protection. Does usually keep newborns hidden for weeks after their spring births. With summer upon us, new fawns will become more visible on the parkway, but from all indications, this summer might present special hardships. The river will be low. Heat waves will desiccate grasses and dry up creeks. Staple acorns won’t be available till fall. “That explains why many fawns are now being birthed in private gardens,” said Effie Yeaw Nature Center staffer Betty Cooper. “On the parkway, deer compete with other animals to eat whatever’s out there. I guess our gardens are a refuge.” Here’s what to do if a lone fawn appears in your yard: Don’t assume it is abandoned— mothers almost always return. Don’t move or enclose the youngster—this may stop mom from finding it. Don’t befriend or feed fawns—their lifelong survival depends on wariness. Do fill birdbaths or leave water pans in shade. Fawns dehydrate easily and can often be seen panting for water. Only if a fawn seems abandoned for an alarming length of time, chopped apples or grapes might be scattered on the ground to help hydration. BABIES page 48


Get our 3-Bed, 2-Bath, 4-Door, V-6 discount. Put auto and home together for hundreds in savings. When you have a State Farm® car and a State Farm home, get ready to drive around with a big, money-saving State Farm smile. GET TO A BETTER STATE.™ CONTACT AN AGENT TODAY.

Lori McCarter Curry Insurance Lic. #:0690212 451 Parkfair Drive Sacramento, CA 95864 Bus: 916-487-5151 www.loricurry.com

statefarm.com 1103162.1

Timothy Aust ChFC CASL Insurance Lic. #:0I27810 2710 Arden Way Sacramento, CA 95825 Bus: 916-482-5328 www.timaust.com

®

State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company, State Farm Indemnity Company, Bloomington, IL

2334 Fair Oaks Blvd. Sacramento 916-925-8533 8am-6pm Daily

Expires 6/30/14

Expires 6/30/14

Expires 6/30/14

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

47


What to Plant? Where to Plant? When to Plant? We solve problems, renew old gardens or create a garden oasis just for you. We are a father daughter team with 40 years experience in the nursery business and garden design. Our experience makes us uniquely qualified to help your garden thrive.

$200 for 2 Hour Consultation (drawing and notes included)

Visit TheGardenTutors.com or Call 606-6029

Mono Mia

Personalized & Monogrammed Gifts

Graduate Gifts

BABIES SPOTTED FROM page 46 Do restrain Fido until the newcomer departs—even friendly dogs may initiate flight and injury. Canine odor might also deter returning does. Do caution neighbors to drive carefully—the mobile mom might appear suddenly on a street or drive way.

Above all, honor the little newcomer’s presence as a brief, precious gift. We are all nature’s children. Responsibility to share habitat begins in our own yards. For advice or assistance with orphaned fawns, go to kindredspiritsfawnrescue.org. n

Whether you’re attending a high school or college graduation this spring, ccelebrate post-ceremony with a gift that’s sure to delight the overachiever in your life. Personalized gifts perfect for dorm living.

Please allow 1-2 weeks for personalization orders.

979-9354

2580 Fair Oaks Blvd #8, Lyon Village Open Mon-Fri 10am-6pm; Sat 10am-4pm

48

IA JUN n 14

A doe and newborn twins (far left) forage on the dry terrain of the American River Parkway


We are a leading provider of ABA therapy for autism and related disorders. Since 1979, our family-owned practice has been empowering families impacted by special needs to achieve independence and their best quality of life!

OUR SERVICES Conducted in Home, School and Clinic settings Serving children and young adults (ages 0 – 24) • Behavior Assessment & ABA Therapy • Parent & Caregiver Training • Social Skills Programs (Kids & Teens) • Support for Schools, Pediatricians & Other Caregivers

Now accepting new clients! Connect with us today! Toll-free number (888) ICT-3223 info@IntercareTherapy.com careers@intercaretherapy.com SACRAMENTO OFFICE 777 Campus Commons Road, Suite 200 Sacramento, CA 95825

www.intercaretherapy.com IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

49


Luxury Senior Living $VVLVWHG/LYLQJĂ?0HPRU\&DUH

2DNPRQW6HQLRU/LYLQJĂ&#x2013;VQHZHVWSURMHFWLVQRZXQGHU FRQVWUXFWLRQDQGVFKHGXOHGWRRSHQLQ 2DNPRQWRIIHUVDZHOOQHVVFHQWHUDQGDIXOOWLPHQXUVHWRDVVLVW ZLWKDOORI\RXUGDLO\OLYLQJQHHGVLQWKHSULYDF\RI\RXURZQKRPH

Restaurant-Style Indoor and Outdoor Dining Private Movie Theatre Ă? Day Spa Ă? Fitness Center 3HW3DUNĂ?Resident Gardens and Walking Paths

Proceeds to Benefit Youth Programs of

Society for the Blind & Other Sacramento Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charities EVENT PRICING Early Bird ADULTS $40 UNDER 17 $20 After July 31st ADULTS $50 UNDER 17 $30

WHEN WHAT WHERE EXPECT WHO

August 9th: 8 pm, first riders out at 10 pm 5 mi or 17 mi loop; FUN ride Combo of City Streets & Bike Trails West Capitol Steps Great fun, great food and a wonderful time Food Trucks and Music & Activities before the ride! All ages welcome

4717 Engle Rd &DUPLFKDHO&$

916-553-2408

SPONSOR A SFTB CLIENT!

RDNPRQWRIFDUPLFKDHOFRP 5&)( License Pending

Call today to schedule a private tour! 50

IA JUN n 14

For more info and to register www.lunarlunacyride.com

916-542-8844


Neighborhood Real Estate Sales Sales Closed February 16 - March 17, 2014

95608 CARMICHAEL

4045 MCCLAIN WAY $379,900 5301 MANZANITA AVE #3 $57,143 6420 QUIESCENCE LN #B $139,000 3108 WILKINS WAY $330,000 4936 BOYD DR $364,000 6520 PALM AVE $250,000 6364 CREEKCREST CIR $216,416 5530 WOODLEIGH DR $170,000 4950 FRANCIS WAY $255,550 4700 CAMERON RANCH DR $445,000 1061 HARRINGTON WAY $455,000 3915 OAK VILLA CIR $135,000 4925 CLEAR CIR $270,650 3313 HUNTER LN $320,500 4951 HEATHERDALE LN $295,000 2519 EL TONAS WAY $265,000 6435 LANDIS AVE $355,000 4800 PAISLEY WAY $700,000 5033 CYPRESS AVE $295,000 1242 JACOB LN $580,000 3219 PETTY LN $239,500 6210 STANLEY AVE $370,000 5733 PARKOAKS DR $204,000 5912 ASHWORTH WAY $252,000 4331 VIRGUSELL CIR $562,000 6037 ELLERSLEE DR $189,500 5637 ROBERTSON AVE $231,000 4032 MARSHALL AVE $261,000 5253 BELLWOOD WAY $350,000 4514 RUSTIC RD $365,000

4948 KIPLING DR 6116 TEMPLETON DR 5101 RICHON VISTA CT 6000 NATALEE LN 5812 WOODLEIGH DR 4738 JAN DR 2721 GUNN RD 2374 VIA CAMINO AVE 6184 ORSI 5144 KOVANDA AVE 4704 BOWEWRWOOD 4008 FAIRWOOD WAY 3221 SHURWIN LN 3650 KIEKEBUSCH CT 3100 WILKINS WAY 4934 KURZ CIR 3043 HANNA CT 4807 OAK VISTA DR 76 RIVERKNOLL PL 1156 MCCLAREN DR 4543 LONGHORN ST 6628 CHIQUITA WAY 5273 SONORA WAY 5312 FLAGSTONE ST 2501 LOS FELIZ WAY 3912 OAK VILLA CIR 4533 ONYX WAY 5963 VIA CASITAS 6032 DENVER DR

$640,000 $206,000 $159,000 $359,000 $240,000 $290,000 $225,000 $135,000 $200,000 $270,000 $400,000 $206,000 $310,000 $550,000 $315,000 $194,000 $263,500 $620,000 $399,000 $569,850 $292,000 $1,150,000 $220,000 $185,000 $279,900 $131,500 $250,000 $128,000 $215,000

95816 EAST SACRAMENTO, MCKINLEY PARK 3345 N ST 1154 37TH ST 1558 SANTA YNEZ WAY 733 36TH ST 3961 L ST 1619 26TH ST 857 33RD ST 616 SANTA YNEZ WAY 1051 34TH ST 316 28TH ST

95817 TAHOE PARK, ELMHURST 3431 38TH ST 6122 3RD AVE 4920 U ST 3123 SANTA CRUZ WAY 3810 9TH AVE 3811 4TH AVE 3826 Y ST 2517 51ST ST 2531 35TH ST 2117 55TH ST 2511 33RD ST 6015 2ND AVE 4217 12TH AVE

$350,000 $371,000 $645,000 $470,000 $350,000 $362,500 $360,000 $413,000 $600,000 $307,000

$51,000 $216,000 $355,000 $57,000 $56,700 $194,000 $289,000 $315,000 $209,000 $421,000 $148,050 $298,000 $55,000

95818 LAND PARK, CURTIS PARK 2679 16TH ST 1923 3RD AVE 900 FREMONT WAY 810 U ST 2537 10TH AVE 2612 17TH ST 2723 HARKNESS ST 2833 4TH AVE 2125 7TH AVE 2026 21 ST 1833 BURNETT WAY 2340 MARSHALL WAY 1025 4TH AVE 2656 HARKNESS ST 756 MCCLATCHY WAY 2280 11TH AVE 1130 4TH AVE 776 PERKINS WAY 2410 17TH ST 2416 DONNER WAY 2111 MARKHAM WAY 2012 21 ST 2725 FLORENCE PL 3721 17TH ST 2613 17TH ST

$378,000 $251,000 $450,000 $351,000 $519,990 $470,000 $500,000 $317,500 $389,900 $648,789 $510,000 $361,000 $415,000 $280,000 $314,950 $305,000 $593,000 $390,000 $199,000 $328,000 $546,800 $695,799 $580,000 $1,125,000 $400,000

95819 EAST SACRAMENTO, RIVER PARK 1056 56TH ST 1318 60TH ST 3950 M ST 1908 50TH ST 5206 C ST 908 45TH ST 700 44TH ST 1373 57TH ST 5311 CAMELLIA AVE 4217 A ST 5884 CAMELLIA AVE 147 MEISTER WAY 5625 CALLISTER AVE 4409 E ST 1070 55TH ST

$369,000 $330,000 $715,000 $449,000 $340,000 $639,000 $753,500 $270,000 $350,000 $360,000 $310,000 $395,000 $426,000 $425,000 $654,950

95821 ARDEN-ARCADE 2016 EL CAMINO AVE 2272 TAMARACK WAY 3921 HILLCREST LN 2704 WATSON ST 3964 ROSEMARY CIR 2430 EDISON AVE 2820 BECERRA WAY 5033 CYPRESS AVE 2247 RAINBOW AVE 2600 DANUBE DR

$67,000 $260,000 $323,000 $165,000 $295,000 $157,000 $242,500 $295,000 $198,000 $265,000

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

51


Get listed. Get an offer. Get moving. Total Unit Sales

Kelley Waters

26

(916) 206-5966

C21 Select RE

$2,595,000

REMAX Gold

52

Carmichael retreat sits atop 1.97 acres directly above the American River. It’s premiere location & timeless charm promise cherished memories for generations to come.

Keller Williams

78

Lyon

104

Coldwell Banker

130

Best of the Best in classic Old Sierra Oaks! 4058 sq ft Main house + 600 sq ft Guest house/game room $1,795,000

Diana Scheid

(916) 595-7884

0

Look Who’s Selling Houses!

LYON SIERRA OAKS Gated Tuscan Community! This 2004 Custom-built 4-6 Bed/4.5 Bath home has a Traditional & Contemporary Design with Top Of the Line features.

Custom crafted Traditional Home in the heart of Arden Oaks. This elegant gated estate features 4 bedrooms with ensuite baths and a Saltwater pool! $1,575,000 Diana Scheid (916) 595-7884

$1,450,000

Hilary Devine

(916) 425-9384

*As of Date 05/31 #1 in Listing Sales in Units** #1 in Listing Sales in Units Market Share** #1 in Total Sales in Units**

** Statistics based on Trendgraphix reporting in the 95608, 95821, 95825, 95826 and 95864 zip, aggregated brokers

Beautiful 4 Bed/ 3 Bath Contemporary home on an excellent Wilhaggin Street. Features include vaulted ceilings and a terraced backyard with pool. $1,100,000

Debbie Davis

(916) 213-2323

$919,000

Spacious & very open 4 Bed/ 3 Bath on a cul-de-sac in the Del Norte Oaks area. Beautifully updated with large kitchen – pool $469,000

Gloria Knopke

(916) 616-7858

Lovely gated community.Wonderful 2 Bed/ 2.5 Bath with vaulted ceilings, tons of windows & skylight - 2 decks & balcony that overlook greenbelt & creek, very private $450,000

Lovely freestanding 3 Bed/ 2 1/2 Bath Townhome. Great location in Robert Powell Development. Wonderful patio Áows from front to back, great for entertaining! $395,000

Vivian Daley

(916) 849-7314

IA JUN n 14

Vivian Daley

(916) 849-7314

Outstanding Garden of the Gods 3 Bed/ 1.5 Bath home with oversized pool! A must see before it’s gone! $339,950

2580 Fair Oaks Blvd. Suite 20 481-3840 • GoLyon.com

52

Cherish the charm of this Arden Oaks ranch-style home nestled on .83 ac withbeautiful, park-like landscape. Includes a guest cottage and a sports court.

Tom Phillips

(916) 799-4571

Tom and Nancy Harvey (916) 599-3018

InÀnity home in Whisper Oaks. Outstanding 4-5 bedroom, 3 full bathroom home with open Áoor plan. Must see to appreciate! $444,000

Tom Phillips

(916) 799-4571

Updated 1613 Model in prime location – 3 Bed/ 2.5 Bath Kitchen has replaced cabinets, granite, and appliances – Faces Greenbelt $339,000

Barbara Frago

Sierra Oaks

(916) 425-3637


Neighborhood Real Estate Sales

95822 SOUTH LAND PARK 4121 LOTUS AVE 2160 MURIETA WAY 4622 JOAQUIN WAY 7331 SPRINGMAN ST 3871 BARTLEY DR 4425 EUCLID AVE 7579 RED WILLOW ST 7567 29 5000 HILLARD ST 1431 DICKSON ST 7345 STRATFORD ST 6594 GOLF VIEW DR 7548 32ND ST

$205,000 $258,500 $290,000 $180,000 $386,500 $325,000 $121,000 $185,000 $345,000 $120,000 $90,000 $150,000 $137,500

95825 ARDEN

2016 EL CAMINO AVE 1019 DORNAJO WAY #112

$67,000 $70,000

2430 PAVILIONS PLACE LN UNIT 312 $510,000 829 COMMONS DR $307,000 882 WOODSIDE LN #4 $139,500 901 FULTON AVE #403 $47,000 2000 WOODSTOCK WAY $120,000 351 RIO DEL ORO LN $253,000 2308 ESTRELLITA WAY $94,000 3123 VIA GRANDE $117,000 2270 WOODSIDE LN #6 $53,500 2064 UNIVERSITY PARK DR $335,000 660 WOODSIDE SIERRA #4 $72,000 2470 NORTHROP AVE #7 $129,000 2286 SIERRA BLVD UNIT F $210,000 722 WOODSIDE LANE E #5 $130,000 2368 WYDA WAY $125,000 624 COMMONS DR $269,020 1528 HOOD RD UNIT E $124,500 1014 COMMONS DR $320,000 925 COMMONS DR $274,000 2402 LARKSPUR LN #259 $100,000 728 WOODSIDE LN E #5 $69,500 560 HARTNELL PL $289,000 3122 ELLINGTON CIR $246,500 27 ADELPHI CT $290,000 102 ELMHURST CIR $240,000 2484 LARKSPUR LN #184 $68,500 2152 UNIVERSITY PARK DR $345,000 2391 ALTA GARDEN LN $94,000 1833 MORSE AVE $292,000 1809 RICHMOND ST $230,000

Christopher J. Cantrell, DMD Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry Esthetic Smile Design As a dental professional I have the ability to educate, motivate and inspire my patients. The power of a smile promotes confidence, which can change lives.

A good place to find a great dentist. • Children & Adults • Cosmetic Dentistry

Always accepting new patients.

44-SMILE www.sutterterracedental.com

95831 GREENHAVEN, S LAND PARK

$160,000

7320 SOUZA CIR $171,000 6816 CLAIBORNE WAY $290,000 6330 CHETWOOD WAY $370,000 815 HARVEY WAY $179,000 7468 HIGHWIND WAY $286,400 342 RIVERTREE WAY $345,000 1111 FAY CIR $545,000 6241 RIVERSIDE BLVD #203 $93,000 7449 POCKET RD $565,000 6151 FORDHAM WAY $612,000 2 BINGHAM CIR $189,000 15 CORIANDER CT $238,000 11 CAPRI CT $257,000 491 TWIN RIVER WAY $269,900 149 FORTADO CIR $382,500 7457 POCKET RD $649,950 710 ROUNDTREE CT $130,000 48 ROSE MEAD CIR $241,000 7790 RIVER GROVE CIR $398,000 7435 RUSH RIVER DR $175,100 7412 FLOWERWOOD WAY $183,000 21 YUBA RIVER CIR $272,900 6640 S LAND PARK DR $375,000 8054 LINDA ISLE LN $430,000 7966 COLLINS ISLE LN $420,000 913 GREENSTAR WAY $367,438 7230 RUSH RIVER DR $317,500 20 SAGE RIVER CIR $404,000

95864 ARDEN

3224 KADEMA DR $628,000 1705 DEVONSHIRE RD $360,000 821 LAKE OAK CT $745,000 2044 CERES WAY $275,000 3325 WHITE OAK CT $630,000 530 HAWTHORN RD $1,900,000 1636 LA PLAYA WAY $670,000 3551 BUENA VISTA DR $439,299 3630 FAIR OAKS BLVD $625,000 820 LA GOLETA WAY $1,116,500 3221 CHURCHILL RD $130,000 3767 ESPERANZA DR $530,000 1721 LA PLAYA WAY $830,000 455 WYNDGATE RD $575,000 1848 VENUS DR $292,000 1011 WILHAGGIN PARK LN $755,000 3881 AMERICAN RIVER DR $839,000 3304 WHITE OAK CT $800,000 1210 CARTER RD $576,000 1140 AMBERWOOD RD $140,000 1337 KEENEY WAY $165,000 701 CASMALIA $360,000 3016 HUNTINGTON RD $565,000 4235 STOWE WAY $612,000 4308 BAYWOOD WAY $230,000 1708 ORION WAY $310,000 3400 MAYFAIR DR $185,000 3201 SOMERSET RD $136,550 1329 RUSHDEN DR $225,000

What makes an area like the American River Corridor so special? Things like the Parkway, a 23 mile preserve that provides endless opportunities for every outdoor enthusiast and has more visitors annually than Yosemite. Wonderful schools and communities centrally located within Sacramento. What makes an American River Corridor Specialist? Knowledge of the ins and outs of a unique place like the Corridor, local market knowledge and a deep appreciation for this special place and its very special people. When you’re passionate about where you live... it shows! Put my passion to work for you! A Different Approach to Real Estate. Angela Heinzer Your hyper-local agent

a|h angela heinzer www.angelaheinzer.com

• Dental Implants

or visit us at

2312 BRUNTON WAY

Specialist

$313,000 $225,000 $158,000 $227,000 $205,000 $232,500 $238,500 $228,000 $335,000 $228,500 $279,900 $364,000 $173,000 $215,000 $425,000

$123,000 $148,500 $135,000 $160,000 $81,499 $155,000 $476,900 $312,500 $239,000 $201,500 $170,000 $418,000 $170,000 $245,000 $165,000 $36,000 $115,000 $305,000 $231,000 $233,000 $229,000 $204,000 $130,000 $220,000 $180,000 $150,000 $424,900 $176,000

CORRIDOR

4467 N PARK DR 3001 MIRAMAR RD 3542 LEATHA 3560 WEST WAY 2442 TOWN CIR 3240 FREDERICK WAY 3920 HILLCREST LN 3448 NORRIS AVE 4435 WOODSON AVE 3107 IVA WAY 3858 WOODCREST RD 4601 SAGAR AVE 3201 SAINT MATHEWS DR 3421 HARMONY LN 4352 BRIARWOOD DR

5684 JOHNS DR 6453 ROMACK CIR 2749 MEADOWVALE AVE 1408 69TH AVE 7361 STRATFORD ST 1750 60TH AVE 1206 40TH AVE 5201 DANA WAY 3260 TORRANCE AVE 2441 37TH AVE 2016 67TH AVE 5980 S WYMORE WAY 7528 THORPE WAY 2636 52ND AVE 1973 65TH AVE 1429 ATHERTON ST 1698 WAKEFIELD WAY 2280 11TH AVE 5310 ROSITA WAY 5310 CARMELA WAY 5689 JAMES WAY 7000 CANYON TREE DR 2701 YREKA AVE 2236 IRVIN WAY 5673 EL GRANERO WAY 7209 CROMWELL WAY 5850 14TH ST 2732 PROVO WAY

Your American River

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

3001 P St. Sacramento, CA

angela.heinzer@camoves.com mobile: (916) 212-1881 CA DRE Lic# 01004189

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

53


Teachable Moments WE ARE ALL MEMBERS OF ONE FLOCK

BY NORRIS BURKES SPIRIT MATTERS

L

ast Thanksgiving, my wife, Becky, challenged her secondgrade class to write thank-you notes to those people for whom they were grateful. “How about God?” suggested a towheaded boy. “Well,” said my wife, pausing for clarity in a public school environment, “maybe you can save those thankyous for your bedtime prayers. Suddenly, a pigtailed pontificator stood and pointed her accusing finger toward a little boy who had recently shared that he was Buddhist.

“He can’t!” she proclaimed. “He doesn’t believe in God.” “That was rude!” Becky said. Then, not one to miss a teachable moment, Becky turned to her whiteboard and added the girl’s name to a discipline list. Years earlier, I introduced a similarly teachable moment to an Air National Guard commander when she dropped by for an impromptu visit. “How are you, chaplain?” she asked from outside my open office door. Keeping protocol, I stood to answer; but perhaps since I measured at least a foot taller than she, she insisted I keep my seat. “What are you working on today?” she asked, seeming genuinely interested in a friendly chat. “I’m trying to write a retirement prayer for a squadron commander, but I’m having trouble finding the right fit.” “Fit?” “Yes,” I said. “The retiree is a Buddhist, but since our audience will likely be Christian, I’ll need something acceptable to both. Silence.

high fashion...affordable prices Sizes 0-3X | Designer | Casual Attire Evening Dresses | Wedding Gowns

$5 OFF $25 purchase (Cannot be combined with any other offer. Exp. 06/30/14)

5925 Fair Oaks Blvd, Carmichael | 488-3200

54

IA JUN n 14

I kept talking. “I’m thinking about using this Buddhist poem our retiree has selected for the ceremony handout.” I passed it to her and watched her lips silently move, her facial contortions building on every word. “You should use a Christian prayer,” she suggested. “After all, this is a Christian Air Force.” Now it was my turn to wear a disappointed expression. “You don’t see it that way?” she asked. Like Becky, I paused to reflect. Then, recognizing the careershortening possibilities of my answer, I respectfully stood to share my thoughts. “No, ma’am. I’m sorry, but I don’t.” While I can’t recall my exact words, it was something like this: “Ma’am, we serve in an Air Force that is made up primarily of Christians, but I don’t think that our majority status makes us a Christian Air Force.” Sensing I needed to serve the whole enchilada, I forged ahead. “We are sworn to protect the Christian majority just as much as we pledged to protect and serve the minorities of all faiths.” Then, I took my seat, sure that my position expressed the principles in the 10th chapter of John’s Gospel. Most Christians recognize this chapter as the one where Jesus so famously introduces himself as the “good shepherd.” However, Jesus also includes a cryptic saying that seems to oppose those who sequester themselves in theologically gated communities. “I have other sheep that are not of this sheep pen. I must bring them,

also. They too will listen to my voice, and there shall be one flock and one shepherd.”

“We are sworn to protect the Christian majority just as much as we pledged to protect and serve the minorities of all faiths.” Unfortunately, neither of the two ladies mentioned in this column seemed to get that part of the scripture. At the end of that school day, my wife phoned the girl’s mother to share her thoughts on pluralism in a public school. Not surprisingly, the mother gave an answer not unlike her daughter’s. As for my commander, she expressed no further objections to the poem/prayer. Unfortunately, five years after my conversation with the commander, a malignant brain tumor put a tragic end to her promising career. However, my guess is that her best teachable moment came when she was welcomed into heaven with salutes and open arms from all of Jesus’ flocks. Norris Burkes is a chaplain, syndicated columnist, national speaker and author of the book “No Small Miracles.” He can be reached at ask@thechaplain.net. You can read more of his columns on his website, thechaplain.net. n


Supporting Local Farmers, Youth & Our Communities

Thinking of selling your home? ...

, lthy a e H l! Eat Loca y Bu

Organic Produce • Specialty Food • Live Music • Chef Demos • Artisans • Health Fairs SUNDAY

Carmichael Park (Open Now—Year Round) 5750 Grant Ave at Fair Oaks Blvd. 9 am—2 pm

SATURDAY

Sunrise Mall (Open Now—Year Round) 6190 Sunrise Blvd (Behind Sears 8 am—1 pm

SATURDAY

Sacramento Midtown (Open Now—Year Round) 2020 J St. (Between STANF & Bioware Bldgs.) 8 am—1 pm

SATURDAY

Historic Folsom (Open Now—Year Round) 900 Sutter St. Folsom Plaza 8 am—1 pm UC Davis Health System (Seasonal—Opens 4/24)

THURSDAY 45th and Y Street (UC Davis Campus) 3 pm—7:30 pm Fair Oaks Sunset (Seasonal—Opens 4/16)

WEDNESDAY 8101 Sunset Ave. (New Life Church) 3 pm—7:00 pm VA Mather (Seasonal—Open Now)

WEDNESDAY 10535 Hospital Way (VA Hospital) 9 am—1 pm

California Certified Farmer’s Markets For more info:www.bemoneysmartusa.com

I’m on it! Helping Families for 12 years, Over 50 transactions last year alone!

Mark Waterman

Dads love gifts from S. Benson With three new lines from Rodd & Gunn, Stone Rose and Matt Totillo, our selection has never been better! & If your Pop is one who likes to pick — we have gift certificates!

bre# 01363608

Please call 916-410-1284 or visit www.watermansacramento.com IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

55


How Green Is Our Valley CREATED AND TENDED BY A COUPLE FOR 50 YEARS, SECRET GARDEN IS CARMICHAEL TREASURE

PHOTOGRAPHY AND STORY

A friend, legendary Olympic swimming coach Sherm Chavoor, introduced the Farias to the woman architect who designed the wood-andstone cottage where they raised their son, Erik. On nil budget, Pauline planned terraced gardens with EuroAsian accents.

BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS

W

hen we came to Sunny Dell estates in 1964,” recalls Irv Faria, “the area was just oaks and blackberry. We saw quail by the hundreds. Fox kits ran around our yard. Pheasant and kingfishers were everywhere. They’re mostly gone now.” Known to neighbors as Pauline’s Garden, the Faria property is hardly a bleak house. Thanks to 50 years of work by the husband-and-wife team, a creekside acre has become a woodland idyll in suburbia. Seventy towering oaks remain. Beneath them, hundreds of Japanese maples provide springthrough-fall color. In April, wild flowers run riot. Cherry and dogwood petals daub the Faria valley in pastel. Soon roses and clematis begin an eager climb over pathway arches. Year round, citruses bear golden fruit. Even when Carmichael Creek is dry, the property’s leafy canopy nurtures ferns, lichens and an intriguing variety of wildlife. Irv adds to avian comfort with handmade nesting houses and feeders. Says the retired university professor of exercise physiology: “We try to live with nature and support it. We provide animals with water and shelter and places to raise their young.” Through the years, nature has returned the compliment with rich experience. When a doe died in their valley, they saw her twin fawns raised by a lone buck. Irv used doll bottles to feed an abandoned squirrel kit. For two years, Squeaky Squirrel had the run of the house. “At night, she’d climb inside my sleeve and sleep there,” he says.

56

IA JUN n 14

The gardeners’ greatest fortune lay in soil formed by centuries of accumulated oak leaves. Constantly adding to flowerbeds, they find almost anything takes root and flourishes.

At creek level, visitors reach Irv’s Japanese teahouse via a log bridge

“I gradually reintroduced her to the wild; she’d take off but always returned when I called her. After a year, she didn’t come back. Perhaps she found a mate. We wanted her to be happy.” High school sweethearts, the Farias married in Concord in 1953.

Irv’s California State University, Sacramento job brought them to the area. Exploring Carmichael, they found a valley with the smallest level space for building. The price was $7,000. Irv beheld the unspoiled acre from a real estate agent’s car and said: “I’ll take it.”

“While I worked for the state Department of Education,” she recalls, “I spent lunchtime in the Capitol’s gardens. I picked up camellia seeds and planted them here. Most of our camellias came from the Capitol.” The gardeners’ greatest fortune lay in soil formed by centuries of accumulated oak leaves. Constantly adding to flowerbeds, they find almost anything takes root and flourishes. Irv transplanted Japanese maples from a friend’s garden and over many years propagated saplings by the hundred. The terraced maples include 110 cultivated varieties with different leaf shapes and colors. “They change with the season,” says Pauline. “We even like their bare branches in winter.”


In a homemade birdhouse, a wren prepares a nest. Gardeners Irv and Pauline Faria share their haven with pooch Lennie

The couple opens the valley for seasonal visitors. Irv explains: “Over the years, we enjoyed touring other people’s gardens. We thought others might appreciate ours. On our last tour (spring 2014), 200 people visited. Everyone seems to love Pauline’s Garden.”

“It’s wonderful to see everything looking so beautiful.” A walnut-sized nest houses a brooding hummingbird. Many avian species find refuge in the Farias’ leafy glen

Love’s labor is never done. Some mornings, Irv finds his 81-year-old sweetheart deep in the valley, pruning in her bathrobe. He reminds her to eat breakfast. Spring, Pauline says, is all the feast a gardener could desire. “You wake up excited to see what has come up overnight,” says the artist. “It’s wonderful to see everything looking so beautiful.” For more information on the Farias’ garden, email irvfaria@ gmail.com. n

Many varieties of clematis surprise with exotic splashes of color

Foxgloves provide an English accent in the woodland retreat

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

57


HAVE “INSIDE,” WILL TRAVEL 1. Colleen Perez near the visitor center at Valley Forge Park, King of Prussia, PA 2. Chase Haman’s graduation from Texas A & M with Haman/Vogeli families 3. Joyce Wing with iconic landmark, Burj Al Arab, in Dubai 4. Bill and Jo Anne Bernhard in Arromanches, France in front of the D-Day Museum 5. Larry Friedman and Susan Orton at Iguazu Falls in Brazil 6. Ted Cobb at Wave Rock near Hyden in Western Australia

Take a picture with Inside Publications and e-mail a high-resolution copy to travel@insidepublications.com. Due to volume of submissions, we cannot guarantee all photos will be printed.

58

IA JUN n 14


TICKETS - ON SALE NOW -

STARTING AT $35! at the WELLS FARGO PAVILION

JUNE 24 - 29 A multiple Tony-winning singular sensation. Featuring music by the brilliant Marvin Hamlisch, including “What I Did For Love,” “I Hope I Get It,” and the show-stopping “One.”

JULY JU J U LY LY 8 - 1 13 3 JULY 8 - 13 With a spoonful of sugar and a whole lot of magic, the quintessential nanny in this Disney classic will delight all ages. Featuring “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” and “Chim Chim Cher-ee.”

JULY 22 - 27

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s sweeping tale of love transcending war won a Pulitzer Prize and 10 Tonys, and features “Some Enchanted Evening” “Bali Ha’i” and “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair.”

AUGUST 5 - 10 Travel to the mystical Scottish Highlands village of Brigadoon where, with true love, anything is possible, even miracles. Featuring a soaring score by Lerner and Loewe.

AUGUST AUGU A UG GUST U S T 19 - 24 Teeming eming with song, dance and hilarity, his bawdy musical comedy by Jerry this erman and Harvey Fierstein won six Herman ny Awards in 1984, and inspired the Tony 1996 film “The Birdcage.”

W ELLS F ARGO P AVILION B OX O FFICE 1419 H S TREET , S ACRAMENTO

(916) 557-1999 G ROUP D ISCOUNTS : (916) 557-1198 WWW .S ACRAMENTO M USIC C IRCUS . COM

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

59


Designing Woman A STORYBOOK COTTAGE IN CURTIS PARK GETS A CHARMING MAKEOVER

BY JULIE FOSTER HOME INSIGHT

“It was important to me that we kept the cottage scale and feel of the home and that the addition looked original to the home.”

M

elding her professional and personal lives came easy to Joan Muttera. An interior designer since 1976, Muttera remodeled her 1926

60

IA JUN n 14

Curtis Park home with her former partner, Vince Dutcher of Dutcher Construction Company. The home’s previous owner, a 90-year-old woman known in the

neighborhood as The Fern Lady, lived in the two-bedroom, one-bath brick cottage for 50 years. When Muttera moved in, not much had been updated during the previous five decades.

There was a laundry room but no washer or dryer hookup. (The owner preferred to use an outdoor HOME page 62


IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

61


A curved walkway leading up to the house and a retaining wall encircling a large Deodar cedar were constructed from broken brick to emphasize the house’s fanciful look.

HOME FROM page 60

The home is filled with details, including the arches found throughout the house

62

IA JUN n 14

clothesline.) The house had knob-andtube wiring, copper water pipes and a gravity-flow heater. Muttera wanted to update and expand the house without sacrificing any of its considerable charms. “It was important to me that we kept the cottage scale and feel of the home and that the addition looked original to the home,” she says. Her experience as an interior designer made hiring subs for the electrical, plumbing and cabinetry work a snap. Muttera and Dutcher also did plenty of the work themselves, painting the interior, replacing the window sashes, ropes and weights and refinishing the redwood jambs on numerous doublehung windows throughout the house. “The process was really time consuming,” she says. They added diamond-pane windows in the kitchen, breakfast nook and living room to enhance the home’s storybook feel. The kitchen received a face-lift, including new appliances, custom cabinets and dark marble countertops. Several of the cabinets have glass panels so that Muttera can display her collection of dishes, which includes a few pieces of her grandmother’s Haviland china.

In the dining room, a new curved staircase with a wrought-iron handrail leads to the second-story addition. Natural light from a large window at the top of the stairway illuminates the staircase. Configured out of the attic, the 700-square-foot suite consists of a master bedroom and bathroom. Muttera designed the plan. The bedroom’s stunning coffered ceiling engages the eye. Two large walk-in closets provide welcome additional storage. Painted in Restoration Hardware’s Silver Sage accented with crisp white trim, the room is soothing and elegant—no fussy details. The original attic rooflines are evident in the bathroom. Two dormer windows, on the street side of the home, provide natural light. Two sinks are set in vanities topped with classic Carrara marble. “I wanted a clean, classic feel for the addition,” Muttera says. “It is a bit less traditional than the downstairs but still has that sort of feeling.” A cabinet in the bathroom displays Muttera’s collection of 1930s powder jars, all in shades of soft pink. “My mother and I would go to flea markets and antique stores when I was a girl,” she says. “I fell in love with the figurines on top of the powder jars.”


ild u B / ign s e D es c i v Ser For All of Your Kitchen, Bath and Whole-House Remodeling Needs om

ns.c

che djkit

ork sign W use. All De In-Ho d te le Comp terior ed In ff Certifi n Sta ner o Desig

’s mento a r c a ods ng S Ser vi eighborho n t oldes 81 19 since -home ree in &J f a r o D Call f t i o n w i t h a t l u cons

ense

rs lic 4 4 5 9 8 2 acto

contr

7

.257

925 916.

Homeowner Joan Muttera

Outside, Muttera showcased the home’s storybook quality by painting the beams over the front porch. “Our neighbors said they didn’t realize the brick house had beams until we painted them,” she says. A curved walkway leading up to the house and a retaining wall encircling a large Deodar cedar were constructed

from broken brick to emphasize the house’s fanciful look. The unique concrete roof tiles were custom made. “They allow you to choose the color as well as what percentage of moss you want included on your tiles,” Muttera says. Muttera stresses the importance of having a solid plan at the initial stages of a project. “Many people will complete portions of a project, then find themselves backed into a corner when it doesn’t all come together,” she explains. Personalizing with family furnishings or antiques you love is key. When working with clients, Muttera draws inspiration from what they like and already have in their homes. “People generally know what they want,” she says. ���But they often can’t achieve the look they want.”

BASIC SEWER LINE INSPECTION - EXPIRES 7/01/14

If you know of a home you think should be featured in Inside Publications, contact Julie Foster at foster.julie91@yahoo.com. n

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

63


Parks for Pups WITH JUST A LITTLE PUBLIC SPACE, EVERY DOG HAS ITS DAY

I

BY R.E.GRASWICH

f anyone is responsible for the upheavals that will soon take place at University Park in Campus Commons, blame Sophia. Sophia is an elegant combination of Italian greyhound and Chihuahua with very long, brown legs and a slender figure and highly sociable disposition. The neighborly disposition is what gave her human companion, Ann Harriman, a big idea about University Park. “There is really no place close by within walking distance where she can go and meet other dogs,” says Harriman. “Then some of us who love dogs and live nearby, we got to thinking about this little portion of University Park, and we realized it was the perfect place for a dog park.” Monumental transformations of urban planning don’t always require eminent domain lawsuits and the destruction of faded shopping malls. Sometimes, a brilliantly innovative idea for improving a community can be reflected in the bright eyes of an Italian greyhound. The proposed dog park at University Park is one example of the small ways in which Sacramento residents find creative ways to keep themselves and their canines happy and well socialized. Another example is the monthly pop-up dog park in Midtown, a temporary affair that corresponds with the Second Saturday farmers market in the vicinity of 20th and J streets. The two dog parks have been driven by neighborhood desire, not bureaucratic decree or governmental whimsy.

64

IA JUN n 14

Ann Harriman and Sophia, center, among two-legged and four-legged friends

The pop-up park, which serves petite breeds (there’s a 30-pound weight limit; Sophia would qualify twice), was triumphantly funded by crowdsourcing and has become a monthly Midtown mainstay. “Our pop-up park is only about 300 square feet, so we have to limit the size of the dogs,” says Midtown Business Association executive director Emily Baime Michaels. “I’m not familiar with anyone else doing the same sort of thing, but we’d love to be an inspiration to other places.”

While it remains a gleam in Sophia’s eye, the University Park dog corral may ultimately serve as the classic dissertation on what happens when small-scale civic involvement seeks to solve the dilemma of fourlegged urban leash laws. In Sacramento and most other cities, it’s illegal to allow a dog off leash in a public place. The owner of an off-leash dog can be ticketed and fined. If an off-leash dog attacks a person or animal, the consequences can be severe, even fatal.

But as anyone who has visited a neighborhood park can attest, some dog owners can’t resist the temptation to ignore the rules and unclasp their dog’s leash, if only to let Scraps chase a tennis ball for a few uninhibited minutes. It’s a dumb move. This is where dog parks come in. Behind the sturdy fences and waived liabilities of a dog park, leashes are freed—along with the territorial aggression that leashes can encourage, some dog experts claim. It’s every dog for herself.


Sophie, the little dog who started it all

In Sophia’s case, the problem wasn’t the lack of a dog park—the city of Sacramento has nine of them— but rather the lack of one within reasonable walking distance. The Granite Park dog park is about one mile from Sophia’s home in Campus Commons. But what a mile: Harriman and Sophia would have to brave Howe Avenue, cross the American River, breech Highway 50 and dart between semi trucks at Power Inn Road and Folsom Boulevard. “As the crow flies, it is only a mile,” Harriman says. “But you take your life in your hands getting there.”

The solution was a short walk from their front door. University Park backs up along American River at the Howe Avenue bridge. One section of the park sits by itself, near the levee. It’s perfect for a dog park. “It’s just an idea that made sense,” says Marty Henderson, a Campus Commons neighbor. “A lot of us walk their dogs there and thought, why not?” Harriman and Henderson linked up with other dog people, including Lauren Archer, John Lenk and Cheryl Summers, and contacted their city councilmember, Kevin McCarty, who promised to help create a University Avenue dog park if the residents raised half the money. It will cost $118,000 to build a twosided dog park, one for bigger breeds and one for little Sophia and friends. The Campus Commons neighbors are seeking donated materials and raising money through social media. They are confident the dogs will be barking by winter. “It makes real sense to put a dog park here,” Harriman says. “The city has been very helpful and the neighbors are working together.” Dogs, it seems, have a talent for making things happen.

Glenbrook Dog Park 8500 La Riviera Drive Granite Dog Park 8200 Ramona Ave. Jacinto Creek Dog Park 8600 West Stockton Blvd. North Natomas Regional Dog Park 2501 New Market Drive Partner Park 5699 South Land Park Drive

 

'HQWLVWU\7KDW¶V)XQ «DQG-XVWIRU.LGV

     

 Artists of the Month:

.DGH  DQG(OL  

3461 Fair Oaks Blvd. (at Watt Ave.) /DSWDOR'0'FRP‡

R.E. Graswich can be reached at reg@graswich.com. n

OFF-LEASH DOG PARKS Bannon Creek Dog Park 2780 Azevedo Drive



Regency Community Dog Park 5500 Honor Pkwy North Natomas Sutter’s Landing Dog Park 20 28th St. Tanzanite Community Dog Park 2220 Tanzanite Way Carmichael Dog Park 5750 Grant Ave.

More kittens are born each year than there are families available to give them a home. Join the Sacramento SPCA in reducing pet overpopulation. Schedule an appointment to have your cat spayed or neutered at its affordable, highquality spay/neuter clinic. Call 504-2811

Howe Dog Park 2201 Cottage Way Bark Park 3839 Bradshaw Road

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

65


Genuine Progress IT’S IMPORTANT TO COUNT THE RIGHT THINGS

BY WALT SEIFERT GETTING THERE

I

f you don’t count something, it doesn’t count. What and how we measure not only reflects what is important to us; it influences how important it is. The Preamble to the U.S. Constitution says the Constitution’s goals are a more perfect union, justice, domestic tranquility, security, the general welfare and liberty. Yet we don’t devote serious resources to tracking justice, tranquility or the general welfare. Nor do we formally measure the happiness we’re diligently pursuing per the Declaration of Independence. Instead, our focus has been keeping tabs on economics—and economics measured in a rather crude, bruteforce way. Since before World War II, a key measurement of economic well-being in the United States has been gross domestic product. GDP is the sum of all the goods and services sold in the country. Many consider GDP per capita a measure of how well off we are, but not everyone agrees. While developing the idea of GDP and knowing GDP’s dollar value have been great achievements, GDP is not the be-all and end-all of

66

IA JUN n 14

measurement. In fact, the economist who was instrumental in formulating the notion of gross national product (GDP’s forerunner), Nobel winner Simon Kuznets, said, “The welfare of a nation can scarcely be inferred from a measurement of national income as defined by the GDP.” Thirty years after GDP was introduced, Robert Kennedy, while running for president, observed, “It counts napalm and it counts nuclear warheads, yet the gross national product doesn’t allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.” GDP treats the costs of pollution and the costs of cleaning up pollutions as “goods.” It treats money spent on drug abuse, pharmaceutical overuse, natural disasters, prisons and wars as positives, but that does not mean such outlays represent progress. Economic activity is not really a surrogate for well-being. By itself, it doesn’t distinguish between what is good or bad for society. Economists and others have proposed more holistic alternatives to GDP. Increasingly, governments are putting these new yardsticks into use. Some years ago, I wrote about the Kingdom of Bhutan’s intriguing gross national happiness metric. There’s also something called the Genuine Progress Indicator, a collection of statistics that not only measure the benefits of economic activity, but the costs as well. GPI measures social and environmental factors that relate to economic activity. For example, it adds values

for household work and parenting, education and volunteer work. It subtracts the costs of pollution, loss of wetlands, farms and forests. If GDP is viewed as “gross profit,” then GPI is more like “net profit.”

GDP treats the costs of pollution and the costs of cleaning up pollutions as “goods.” It treats money spent on drug abuse, pharmaceutical overuse, natural disasters, prisons and wars as positives, but that does not mean such outlays represent progress. Economists have calculated GPI over a period of decades for a number of countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Austria, Canada, Chile, France, Finland, Italy and the Netherlands. Maximizing industrial production hasn’t always turned out well. In most countries, GDP has continued to rise while GPI has stagnated since 1980. Perhaps that’s the reason many people feel no better off than they were decades ago.

A striking feature of the Genuine Progress Indicator is the number of factors that relate to transportation. Of the 26 GPI elements, nine are linked to transportation. One is a positive: the value of highways and streets. The others are negatives: cost of commuting, loss of leisure time, cost of vehicle crashes, cost of air, water and noise pollution, carbon dioxide emissions damage and depletion of nonrenewable energy resources. In order to make more informed policy decisions, Maryland and Vermont are now tracking GPI. Oregon and Washington are adopting forms of GPI. Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber, Governing magazine’s public official of the year, has pushed for a 10-year state budget plan integrated with GPI. David Johnston, Canada’s governor general, said about the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (another GDP alternative), “Collectively, this index helps us to determine trends in our overall quality of life, giving us a powerful tool for action.” It would be nice to see California and the United States added to the list of states and nations using GPI or something similar. A more comprehensive measure of what’s important for the general welfare could result in our having more leisure time, less commuting cost and less pollution—all pretty good outcomes from counting things that matter. Walt Seifert is a bicyclist, driver and transportation writer. He can be reached at bikeguy@surewest.net. n


O N V I E W M AY 25 – S EP T E M B ER 1

QUILTS

Experience and celebrate the beauty and history

Piecing Together America’s Story

of quilting. Workt by Hand: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts showcases 35 quilt masterpieces that are superlative examples of the most iconic quilt designs spanning two centuries. “Workt by Hand”: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts is organized by the Brooklyn Museum. Elizabeth Welsh, Medallion Quilt (detail), circa 1830. Cotton, 110 1/2 x 109 in. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of The Roebling Society, 78.36. Brooklyn Museum photograph (Gavin Ashworth, photographer), 2012.

216 O Street • Downtown Sacramento 916.808.7000 • crockerartmuseum.org

June is here… Cycle “In” and Cycle “Out”

LISA WIBLE WRIGHT ATTORNEY AND MEDIATOR FAMILY LAW

900 UNIVERSITY AVE., SUITE 101 SACRAMENTO, CA 95825

www.cyclein.net

564-6262

Specializing in...A Little Sparkle...A Little Dazzle...A Little Unique...

Cycle In is your neighborhood indoor cycling studio offering Keiser M3+ magnetic bikes, 60” screens showing scenic rides and music videos, experienced instructors, and classes seven days a week! Online reservations are easy and there are no membership fees!

Gift certificates can be printed out online at www.cyclein.net

1828 Walnut Avenue

Corner of Fair Oaks and Walnut

Sign Up Today at www.cyclein.net 993-8355

Arden Park Floral & Gift $10 OFF with order of $50 or more (Expires 6/30/14. Exceptions apply.)

Arden Park Florist At Arden Town Center - Fair Oaks & Watt Avenue • 489-7602

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

67


Don’t Mistake That Milestone SAVE GRADUATION CELEBRATIONS FOR LITERALLY THE REAL END, PLEASE

BY KELLI WHEELER MOMSERVATIONS

I

have a few pet peeves: People who use “literally” wrong in a sentence. I literally want to choke them. Especially if it’s a television news reporter who should know better. I feel like literally jumping through the TV so that I can challenge them and say: “Really. It is literally blowing up at that hot, new downtown restaurant? There is an actual explosion, with smoke, shrapnel and maimed bodies everywhere? Wow, that literally is news!” I also cannot stand the new teenage trend of saying “literally” in every sentence (as annoyingly illustrated

Oriental Rug Bazaar We bring the world to your feet

^JFWXTKJ]UJWNJSHJ >LHSZVKVWYVMLZZPVUHSJSLHUPUN YLWHPYZHUKHWWYHPZHSZ

/:[:HJYHTLU[V 916-731-4444

68

IA JUN n 14

above). It literally uses intelligent vocabulary to make people sound dumb. Backtracking. I almost feel physical pain if I have to backtrack when I know it was unnecessary. In a driving situation, it actually pains me to keep my mouth shut and not be a backseat driver. Which leads me to another one. The overuse of the word “actually.” Another teenage phenomenon that is like nails on a chalkboard to me. My daughter is currently in an “actually” phase: “So then she actually said that! And he actually Tweeted it! It was actually the funniest thing I ever saw! I was literally dying!” Yeah, fun times here. But before you add People With a Long List of Pet Peeves to your own peeve list, let me just get in one more for this month of June—our season of school graduations: Celebrating a kindergarten, sixthgrade, or eighth-grade “graduation.” Where do I begin? First, though big milestones in children’s school careers for sure, they are promotions, not graduations.

The definition of graduation is the receiving or conferring of an academic degree or diploma. So unless your children are being handed a document that could result in gainful employment, they are not graduating.

It really waters down the achievement of students who have labored for 12 years or for that advanced degree if we are giving disproportionate celebration to what is really just a change in school location. Which leads me to my next gripe. Parents turning a promotion from a lower level of education into a huge celebration worthy of a graduating high school senior or the obtaining a college degree. It really waters down the achievement of students who have labored for 12 years or for that advanced degree if we are giving disproportionate celebration to what is really just a change in school location. Now I know there will be a lot of kindergarten, sixth-grade, and eighth-grade “graduations” at schools around the area. (Sorry, I have to keep it in quotes; I just can’t make myself refer to it seriously.) And I know some of you feel it is a milestone

worth making a big deal of—even I’m a sucker for an-end-of-the-year tearjerker slideshow of our babies growing up set to a heart-tugging “I Will Remember You” by Sarah McLachlan. I agree any time a kid does well in school it is a worthy achievement. But to me this falls under the Give Every Kid a Trophy Regardless of Accomplishment problem in modern– day parenting. You need to give kids something to strive for. Teach them to work hard in order to achieve. Show them that the reward and acknowledgement for a job well done come at the end of a race, not at the water station. And in case it’s not clear— kindergarten, sixth, and eighth grades are the water stations. My son, Logan, is completing eighth grade this month. It is not a graduation, it’s an expectation. Graduation implies he is done. By my calculation, he’s only halfway there. So don’t send him a graduation card. Don’t put him in a cap and gown. Let’s not make a big deal of this. Here’s what he gets for this achievement: “Nice job, buddy. Glad you survived middle school relatively unscathed. Keep up the good work. Glad you got promoted. You’d be in big trouble if you didn’t. Go clean your room.” Literally. I actually mean that. I am literally, actually going to tell him to clean his room on June 4. And now I’m in pain because I just backtracked. Kelli Wheeler is a Sacramento mother of two and author of “Momservations—The Fine Print of Parenting.” She can be reached at Momservations.com. n


INSIDE

OUT

CONTRIBUTED BY SUSAN MAXWELL SKINNER Carmichael Park’s summer concerts begin with a community band festival on May 31 and June 1. This event features 14 ensembles. Over the next three months, free performances are scheduled most weekends. Concert downbeat is at 6:30 p.m. unless otherwise stated. Mardi Gras band Z.O.O.M. (Zydeco On Our Mind) will play on June 22 Saturday, May 31; Sunday June 1: Community Band Festival (Saturday at noon and 11 a.m. on Sunday.) Sunday, June 8: Speakeazy Jazz Orchestra (1920s style dance band). Saturday, June 14: Departure (Journey tribute band). Sunday, June 15: Swing Masters (big band/swing music) Sunday, June 22: Z.O.O.M. (Zydeco/Mardi Gras Jazz) Saturday, June 28: Because (Beatles tribute band). Sunday, June 29: Lincoln Highway (Country/ rockabilly). Sunday, July 6: Metro Swing (big band dance music) Saturday, July 12: On Air (classic rock) Sunday, July 13: The Kick N 60’s (1960s songs). Sunday, July 20: Group Therapy (Classic rock/rhythm and blues) Saturday, July 26: Mick Martin and the Blues Rockers (Rhythm and blues). Sunday, July 27: Carmichael Kiwanis Band (big band swing) Sunday, Aug. 3: John Skinner band (variety dance band) Saturday, Aug. 9: The Count (60s to 90s rock and soul) Sunday, Aug. 10: Todd Morgan & the Emblems (50s Rock/30s jazz) Sunday, Aug. 17: It’s About Time Swing (swing music). Saturday, Aug. 23: Bad Catz (Blues/classic rock). Sunday, Aug. 24: River City Concert band (60-piece ensemble) Carmichael Park is at is at 5757 Grant Ave. For information, go to carmichaelpark.com.

A rockabilly quartet called Lincoln Highway (top) will entertain on June 29.Carmichael heartthrob Todd Morgan (left) will lead his Emblems rock group on Aug. 20.

Lead singer Frank Houre fronts for Journey tribute band Departure on June 14

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

69


Money for Scholars BLACK CAUCUS HONORS TWO LOCAL STUDENTS

who began working with Junior Achievement eight years ago when she joined the Deloitte company. Since then, she has been involved in several “JA in a Day” programs, most recently teaching a local fourth-grade class. Interested in learning more? Go to jasac.org or call 480-2770.

BY GLORIA GLYER DOING GOOD

T

he Sacramento Area Black Caucus recently presented academic scholarship awards at its To Be Young Gifted & Black recognition dinner. Sandra Kamba, a nursing student at Sacramento State University, received the Cheryl Ann Fisher Memorial Scholarship. Originally from Zimbabwe, Kamba was instrumental in creating Munhu Inc., a nonprofit that provides tuition for AIDS orphans in rural Zimbabwe. She is on the dean’s honor roll at Sac State. Tanisha Wilson, a senior at McClatchy High School, received a Rosenwald (Robbie) Robertson memorial scholarship. Wilson plans to major in astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz. For more information, go to sacramentoabc.blogspot.com.

A GOOD EXAMPLE Junior Achievement has more than 500 local volunteers who go into classrooms to talk to students about financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship. They encourage students to shoot for the stars. One such volunteer is Denise Shepherd,

70

IA JUN n 14

STOP BY FOR A BITE My Sister’s Cafe recently opened at 455 Capitol Mall. The restaurant, staffed mostly by volunteers, serves breakfast and lunch from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Proceeds go to My Sister’s House to help survivors of domestic violence and human trafficking. Before opening its doors, My Sister’s Cafe received a helping hand or two from local businesses and organizations, including Blue Shield of California Foundation, Teichert, Bella Bru Cafe & Catering, Paul Blanco’s Good Car Company and Soroptimist International. For more information, call 475-1864.

HELP WANTED If you know a Santa with a beard, red hat and suit, Roseville Home Start has a job for him at its annual Holiday Teddy Bear Tea Nov. 30 at Flower Farm Inn in Loomis. Roseville Home Start helps homeless families find permanent housing. For more information, call 782-6667 or email info@rosevillehomestart.org.

WEAVE WALKERS About 620 men slipped into women’s shoes for WEAVE’s annual

Walk a Mile in Her Shoes event, held April 27on Capitol Mall. The walk raised more than $237,000 for WEAVE. WEAVE operates an emergency shelter program for survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and human trafficking. More than 50 percent of the women arrive with children. Often, they come with little but the clothes on their backs. To find out how you can help, call WEAVE at 448-2321 or go to weaveinc.org.

TWO GRANTS Women’s Empowerment helps homeless women find work through a comprehensive job-readiness program. The organization recently received two major grants: $25,000 from Save Mart CARES and $15,000 from Anthony Robbins Foundation. For more information, go to womensempowerment.org or call 669-2307.

FOR FITNESS Triumph Cancer Foundation, a local nonprofit that provides a free 12-week fitness program for cancer survivors, will sponsor an event called Triumph Uncorked on Friday, June 20, from 5 to 10 p.m. at Helwig Winery in Plymouth. Here’s a nice touch: charter bus service from Dante Club to Plymouth at $20 per person. What a great idea. The event includes a gourmet picnic dinner supplied by Taste Restaurant, an insulated backpack, a bottle of wine and a concert by Chicago Tribute Authority. The fee: $225 for two, $135 for one. Tickets must be purchased in

advance. For more information, go to triumphfound.org.

CELEBRATE THE SPIN The 10th annual Mustard Seed Spin—a cycling fundraiser for Mustard Seed School—will take place Sept. 28. In the past decade, the Spin has introduced many kids and their parents to organized cycling while raising more than $215,000 for Mustard Seed School for homeless kids. Through the event, hundreds of underprivileged children have received bikes and helmets and attended bike safety rodeos. For the September anniversary ride, a jersey by Voler will be available for purchase. For more information, go to mustardseedspin.org or call 955-5065.

TRAINING TIME On Saturday, June 7, CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) will sponsor a training program on how to prevent the commercial sexual exploitation of children. According to law enforcement data, girls in foster care in the Sacramento area make up 60 to 85 percent of sexual assault victims. The training program will teach CASA members how to advocate for girls who are at risk of sexual exploitation. For information on attending, email patricia@ sacramentocasa.org. Gloria Glyer can be reached at gglyer@sbbmail.com or (530) 4775331. n


C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S C L A S S O F 2 0 1 4

A SACRAMENTO COUNTRY DAY TRADITION On May 1, seniors advertise their college destinations by wearing shirts from the schools they will attend in the fall. The members of the Class of 2014 were accepted to many fine institutions of higher learning, including the following: Carnegie Mellon University Columbia University Cornell University Elon University Franklin & Marshall College Goldsmiths-University of London Harvey Mudd College Loyola University Chicago Morehouse College New York University Northwestern University

Occidental College Reed College Rollins University Santa Clara University Stanford University Swarthmore College University of California University of Puget Sound University of San Francisco University of Virginia Vassar College

SACRAMENTO COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL | EDUCATION FOR A LIFETIME A coeducational, fully accredited grades PK-12 independent school 2636 Latham Drive, Sacramento, CA 95864 | 916.481.8811 | saccds.org

NEW LISTINGS 600 38th Street - 95816. McKinley Park tudor. 1,645 s.f. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, beautiful master suite. Remodeled kitchen. $629,000 5213 Shelato Way - Del Dayo area, 95608. Delightful 1504 s.f. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, solar-heated pool. Walk to Del Dayo School $465,000 5119 Adelina Way - 95608. 2,300 s.f. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, delightful move-in ready home close to Glancy Park. $444,900

FOR SALE IN ARDEN PARK and 95864 3929 Las Pasas Way - 2930 s.f. 3 bedroom, 3 bath, office, quality throughout. This beautiful property was built in 2006. High ceilings, dramatic open floor plan. $799,000

AUGUSTINE & ASSOCIATES

4381 Ashton Drive - 2800 s.f. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, office. Beautiful traditional ranch. Two blocks from Ashton Park. $749,000

Bernadette Augustine 916-541-1607 remaxbernadette@gmail.com BernadetteHome.com

FOR SALE IN RIVER PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 95819 5508 State Ave - 2800 s.f. 4 bedroom, 4 bath, mid-century modern home in the heart of River Park. Completely remodeled. $585,000

Keri Sternberg Associate / Del Dayo Resident

916-402-9492

SOLD & SALES PENDING

sternbergk@gmail.com Arden Park Resident

1600 La Sierra Dr., Arden Park (sold) 1816 Maryal Dr. Del Paso Manor (sold) 4720 Marguerite Way, 95864 (sale pending)

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

71


Hot Pot SOLAR COOKING IS FUN AND EFFICIENT

cook. On sunny days when they can use a solar cooker, it frees up a huge amount of time. Kids can go to school instead of gathering wood.” Solar cookers come in three basic designs. Parabolic cookers look like shiny satellite dishes with a pot suspended in the middle. These cookers have the advantage of getting very, very hot (up to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit), but they’re expensive and must be adjusted frequently to follow the sun and keep its rays in focus. Box solar cookers are lined with a shiny, reflective material and have a transparent cover to keep warm air inside. They can be as simple as a pizza box lined with foil, or a more sophisticated version that can reach 400 degrees.

BY DR. AMY ROGERS SCIENCE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

S

ome days in Sacramento, it feels hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk. But it doesn’t take triple-digit air temperatures to cook just about anything using California’s abundant sunshine. Solar cookers, or sun-powered ovens, concentrate the energy of the sun and provide a free, zero-emissions way to prepare meals even when you’re wearing long sleeves. In our area, solar cooking season generally runs from April through October. Surprisingly, higher summer air temperatures are not the reason. The sun’s “heat” doesn’t power a solar cooker. A solar cooker collects electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, from the sun and focuses it on a black-colored cooking pot. The radiant energy absorbed by the pot is turned into heat, which the cooker is designed to trap. Therefore, solar cooking is fastest and easiest not on the hottest days, but on days when the sun’s energy is at its peak—that is, any cloudless day around the summer solstice, which is June 21 this year. On this first day

72

IA JUN n 14

of summer, the Earth’s tilted axis points the northern hemisphere most directly toward the sun, giving us the longest day and the most intense solar fuel for cooking. What can you cook using the sun? A simple cardboard-and-aluminumfoil panel cooker can cook anything your Crock-Pot can. Stews, either vegetarian or with meat, are foolproof in a solar cooker because they’re impossible to overcook. Foods that take a lot of heat on the stove, such as hard-cooked eggs, whole fresh beets, rice, potatoes and lentils, can all be prepared outdoors in a solar cooker. In June and July, you can even solar cook baked goods such as banana bread and brownies. When you’re

running the air conditioner and you dread turning on your kitchen stove or oven, solar cooking can save you money and help to keep you cool. While solar cooking is a fun hobby in Sacramento, in poorer parts of the world it can change lives. Sacramentobased Solar Cookers International is a local nonprofit that works with organizations all over the world to bring solar cooking to those who can benefit from it most, especially poor women and people in refugee camps. After recently attending a United Nations meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women, SCI executive director Julie Greene said, “Poor women may spend three to five hours per day gathering firewood to

Solar cooking is fastest and easiest not on the hottest days, but on days when the sun’s energy is at its peak— that is, any cloudless day around the summer solstice, which is June 21 this year. Panel cookers are the easiest to make and the cheapest to buy. They can be portable and collapsible for easy storage or carrying to a campsite. Panel cookers act like a funnel


Summer Sale! June 20-21 Up to 40% Off Selected Spring and Summer Favorites

from your favorite brands, including Splendid, Persnickety, Mayoral, Coccoli and more! Exclusions apply. Sale valid on in-stock purchaes only. Discounts do not apply to previous purchases.

OPEN: MON–SAT, 10AM - 5PM LOCATED IN LYON VILLAGE AT 2580 FAIR OAKS BLVD, SACRAMENTO, CA 95825

PHONE: 916.481.KIDS(5437)

WWW.PUDDLESSHOPPE.COM

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FOR NEW ARRIVALS, EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS! for sunshine with a set of shiny cardboard panels slanted around a pot. Food is placed in a thin-walled black metal pot with a lid. (GraniteWare is ideal.) A clear, heat-resistant bag (such as a turkey roasting bag) or an inverted glass bowl goes over the pot to trap heat and moisture. At our latitude, a CooKit, a panel cooker designed here in the Central Valley, can reach 220 degrees. The intensity of the heat generated surprises people. Greene, who is an experienced solar cook, says, “I tell people, ‘Don’t touch the pot—it’s hot!’ They look straight at me and touch the pot.” Want to see for yourself how hot the pot can get? On July 19, solar chefs from around the world will gather for SCI’s Solar Cooking Festival. A wide variety of solar cooker designs will bake, simmer, and slow cook from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the southeast corner of William Land Park. SCI sells complete solar-cooking starter kits, including pot, for as little as $40. Such kits can be an important

part of household emergency preparedness, making it possible to cook food and pasteurize water if utilities fail. But you don’t need a crisis to enjoy this special use of solar power. As Greene says, “Solar cooking is fun, it’s easy and it works for anyone who lives where there’s sunshine.” Amy Rogers is a writer, scientist and educator. Learn more at her website, ScienceThrillers.com. n

FF O 15%Any

tio4n a r e Alt . 6.30.1 Exp

Professional P f i l TTailoring For Men & Women Custom Fitting • Leather Furs • Wedding Gowns

Helping You Find Your Way Home

• • • • •

Rental Properties Vacation Retreats Senior Living Commercial Space Condos, Apartments

At Milagro, we are committed to improving the beauty of our community through real estate development, aesthetic improvements and renovation. Stay tuned for ‘Milagro Centre’, a Carmichael Culinary Hub celebrating California’s agricultural diversity with an open-air market, cafes & shops!

MilagroProperties.net 916-692-0642

2380 Watt Ave 480-2959

(Located Inside Country Club Plaza)

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

73


Like a Photo THIS ARTIST FOUND SALVATION IN CREATING HYPERREALISTIC CHARCOAL DRAWINGS

BY LESLEY STEIN ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

A

nnie Murphy-Robinson, an award-winning artist and teacher, is just as passionate about the art she creates in her Carmichael studio (in a garage converted by her husband) as she is about teaching art at Roseville’s alternative Adelante High School for troubled youth. But her road to success hasn’t been easy. Murphy-Robinson’s formative years were turbulent, to say the least. She ran away from home, used drugs and alcohol and ended up in juvenile hall before doing a stint in the army. Fortunately, this Sacramento native was able to turn her life around by embracing art and education. After earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in art, she picked up teaching credentials. For five years, she taught ceramics at Sac High before moving to Adelante, where she teaches both drawing and art history. Now in her 17th year of sobriety, MurphyRobinson says, “I have been in recovery basically since I started getting serious about art.” Known for very realistic, deeply personal, often haunting charcoal drawings of her two daughters, Murphy-Robinson has shown her work locally at John Natsoulas Gallery, b. sakata garo and Crocker Art Museum, as well as in Miami, New York and Los Angeles. Her portrait of Mayor Kevin Johnson hangs at city hall. At Carmichael’s Boulevard Coffee Roasting Company, Murphy-Robinson recently discussed art, education and drawings as realistic as photos.

74

IA JUN n 14

Artist Annie Murphy-Robinson

Why did you choose to become a teacher? For practical reasons. Before I went to graduate school, I was a substitute teacher and I really liked it. I thought it was a great job. Teaching has saved me. It’s given me purpose. What are your goals as an educator? In the realm that I’m working in, my No. 1 goal is to give the kids the help they need. My job, more so than teaching two-point perspective drawing, is getting to know the students, earning their trust and finding them help. At the same time, through art I can help the students find their voice. By teaching them art

techniques, they learn to convey their feelings visually. It gets them noticed and gives them a sense of power. What motivates you in the classroom? The thing is, these kids know I’ve been there. They trust me. I know their struggles and what they’re going through. And that goes a long way with them. I love my job because I think I’m making a difference. What are some challenges you find in teaching art? Mainly the kids who don’t want to learn. So I tell them to put the pencil on the paper and move it around. As long as it’s not lewd or crude, drug or gang related, they can draw whatever

they want. The other challenge I face is that I’m always worried what’s going to be the next required course to go. Right now, fine arts is still a requirement to graduate, thank God. How do you describe your own artwork? I call it hyperrealism. I like to draw things that resonate with me. Mostly, I draw my kids because they’re little me’s, and they’re beautiful, but not all sweetness. The portraits I do of my children move beyond portraits. There is always something to do with the past, but also something to do with transformation. Some people might look at that and be fearful.


Does your work have a message? What I want people to get from my work is for them to feel connected. I try to convey a sense of being in the moment and that there is beauty in everything. My job as an artist is to create the vision and to fascinate the viewer. I want the viewer to say, ‘I’ve got to look at that more and I’ve got to know what’s behind this.’

Through art I can help the students find their voice. By teaching them art techniques, they learn to convey their feelings visually. It gets them noticed and gives them a sense of power. Can you describe your technique? I work with 42-by-60-inch-wide, 100 percent cotton rag paper, and I draw with fine compressed charcoal. After putting on a mask, I open the studio door and use an electric sander to remove sizing from the paper. It opens up the weave and softens the paper. Then, I select an image I’ve photographed and begin drawing, starting with the eye. You strike me as a perfectionist. Is that accurate? Absolutely, and my art dictates that. I’m known for it. People always

say, ‘It looks just like a photo.’ But it’s not. I would have blown up a photo instead of taking 140 hours to draw it. Do you have a mentor? Although I’ve never taken a class from him, it would be local artist and Sac City College professor Chris Daubert. He gave me my first show at Sac City’s Kondos Gallery. What does the future hold for you, especially after your children are grown and out of the house? I’d love to do commissions but I don’t project too much into the future. I try to stay in the now. I’ve learned in recovery: one day at a time.

Making connections between people and homes for over 20 years.

Some of Annie Murphy-Robinson’s portraits will be on exhibit at city hall’s Robert T. Matsui Art

Gallery until September. For more information about the artist, go to anniemurphyrobinson.com. n

810 Alhambra Blvd 444-2011 McKinleySquareHome.com

Nancy Reid & Richard Price

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

75


The Hills Are Alive MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS BRINGS DIVERSE ACTS TO GRASS VALLEY IN JUNE

By Jessica Laskey RIVER CITY PREVIEWS

M

usic in the Mountains’ 33rd SummerFest season starts June 11 in Grass Valley. Lend an appreciative ear to the festival’s impressive array of musical acts, from classic Beatles to Celtic fiddle and more, in three concert series at multiple beautiful venues. The Concerts Under the Stars series takes place on the Great Lawn at the Nevada County Fairgrounds and features assorted musical acts that are sure to delight and entertain: “Grand Fiddler’s Rally” at 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 21 (Alasdair Fraser’s Sierra Fiddle Camp celebrates the fiddle music of Scotland with more than 150 musicians); “The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute” at 8 p.m. on Friday, June 27 (“The best Beatles show in the world,” according to the Los Angeles Times); and “A John Williams Spectacular” at 8 p.m. on Saturday, June 28 (the MIM Festival Orchestra and Chorus presents music from Williams’ movie soundtracks). The Orchestra Series takes place at the Amaral Center at the Nevada County Fairgrounds (11228 McCourtney Road) and includes family-friendly fare: “Family Music

76

IA JUN n 14

The Beatles tribute band, the Fab Four-The Ultimate Tribute, will be a featured act at the Concerts Under the Stars series at SummerFest 2014

Faire” at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, June 21 (Nathaniel Stookey’s “Lemony Snicket: The Composer is Dead” Family Concert and Interactive Music Faire, conducted by Pete Lowlen); “Young Geniuses” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 22 (the world premiere of groundbreaking young composer pieces that explore the mind of a teenage music master); “Tales from the Exotic East” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 25 (featuring Alexander Borodin’s “Polevetsian Dances,” Henry Cowell’s “Persian Set” and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade”); and “Nordic Fantasy” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 29 (Scandinavian folklore set to music by Edvard Grieg, Felix Mendelssohn and Niels Gade).

The Chamber Works series will play at selected venues in Grass Valley and features a slew of masterful musical works: “Young Composers Project” at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, June 11 and Friday, June 13 at Peace Lutheran Church (828 W. Main St.) features 27 world premieres by talented regional youth musicians; “Feste del Caribe” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 19 at the Center for the Arts (314 W. Main St.) celebrates Cuban jazz trio Gardenia Azul alongside the MIM Festival String Quartet and Woodwind Quintet; and “The French Connection” at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 26 at the Amaral Center (11228 McCourtney Road) features pianist-in-residence Konstantin Soukhovetski playing the “Faure Piano Quartet in C minor.”

Ready to take a jaunt to Grass Valley to hear everything that MIM has to offer? For tickets and more information, call (530) 265-6124 or go to musicinthemountains.org.

SINGULAR SENSATION As the days get more and more sweltering, Sacramento denizens know there’s one place to go to get their fill of entertainment and air conditioning—the Sacramento Music Circus season is back up and running with “A Chorus Line” playing June 24-29 in the Wells Fargo Pavilion. California Musical Theatre has come a long way from the suffocating circus tent theater of yore, but the shows are the same classic musicals


Michelle & Carlos Kozlowski

#1

Coldwell Banker Real Estate Team Sacramento County

Proudly Present: 3711 Random Lane, Arden Oaks

Don't miss Crocker Art Museum’s Art Mix/Pride party from 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, June 12

you remember attending as a kid. “A Chorus Line” promises to bring the nostalgia—the music by Marvin Hamlisch (including songs “What I Did for Love,” “I Hope I Get It” and the iconic “One”) is recognizable from the first three chords—and the dynamic dancing that has made starry-eyed chorus kids of us all. Since most of us aren’t exactly kids anymore, California Musical Theatre and its president and CEO, Richard Lewis, have implemented a new schedule this year to accommodate the often three-hour run time of many Music Circus shows: Due to an overwhelming demand from patrons, all evening performances will start at 7:30 p.m. (instead of the usual 8 p.m.) and a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m. has been added for all shows. Now you can catch all the shuffling before you shuffle off to Buffalo! For tickets and more information, call 557-1999 or go to californiamusicaltheatre.com. The Wells Fargo Pavilion is at 1419 H St.

SUGAR, SUGAR Sure, Second Saturday is all abuzz in midtown, but it’s also hoppin’ over at the Delta Days Second Saturday Artwalk from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 14 at Old Sugar

Mill Wineries in Clarksburg, just 15 minutes south of Sacramento. Meet the monthly artists (June features the work of Sharon Gerber Scherer), observe plein air painting and taste wine from 10 local wineries as you revel in the lovely Delta breezes. Is all that art and fresh air making you hungry? You can bring a picnic lunch or purchase food from vendors on site to enjoy with your glasses of grape juice. For more information, call 744-1615, ext. 8011, or email artdeltadays@gmail.com. Old Sugar Mill Wineries is at 35265 Willow Ave. in Clarksburg.

$1,425,000

Luxury and privacy – Breathtaking grounds - Pool www.RandomLn.com 1675 Del Dayo Drive, Del Dayo

$799,900

Remodel just completed – A must see - 5 bedrooms – 3 bathrooms www.DelDayoDrive.com 2560 Morley Way, Sierra Oaks

$635,000

RAINBOW CONNECTION June is Pride Month, celebrating Sacramento’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) community, and no one does it bigger and better than the Crocker Art Museum’s Art Mix/Pride party from 5 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, June 12. Let the high-flying feats of Body Waves from the Topsy Turvey Queer Circus take your breath away, groove to live music, meet local drag divas, watch short films produced by the Sacramento International Gay & PREVIEWS page 78

Sweet 3 bedrooms 3 baths – OfÀce – Large rooms 3 Àreplaces - www.MorleyWay.com

Real Estate Service That Moves You! Michelle & Carlos Kozlowski Call 601-4228 Visit CarlosTheRealtor.com BRE#01252727 & 00878571

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

77


PREVIEWS FROM page 77

HEY, JUDE!

Lesbian Film Festival, take in some stunning art by local artists who are part of the Sacramento Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Center and lend a hand to help build the Sacramento LGBT Center Pride Parade float. The event is free for museum members, only $10 for nonmembers, $8 for college kids and drinks are under $5 all night. Talk about partying hearty! Wondering what the youths are up to these days? Check out “Mu Phi Epsilon Presents” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, June 8. The concert will feature the winners of the Sacramento Alumni Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon International Music Fraternity’s 2013 scholarship competition, which includes University of the Pacific clarinetist Michael Salas and CSUS bassoonist Taylor Haugland. Space is limited, so buy your tickets early by calling 808-1182. To accompany the Crocker’s new exhibition “African American Artists: The Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond” (more on that in a moment), the Jazz in the Courtyard performance at 6 p.m. on Thursday, June 19 will feature jazz vocalist and recording artist Vivian Lee singing standards from the likes of Ellington, Brubeck, Monk and Gillespie. And now about that new exhibition: “African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond” opens June 29 and will be on display until Sept. 1. The exhibition includes 100 paintings, sculptures and photographs by African American artists drawn from

“Come Together” is a multimedia Beatles tribute performance of the Sacramento Gay Men’s Chorus on June 6 and 7 at the Crest Theatre

the collection at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. As the only West Coast venue for this exhibition, the Crocker got quite a coup! The 48 featured artists include William H. Johnson, Alma Thomas, Jacob Lawrence, Sam Gilliam, Renee Stout and other renowned artists active before, during and after the Harlem Renaissance. For tickets and more information for all Crocker events, call 808-1182 or go to crockerartmuseum.org. The Crocker Art Museum is at 216 O St.

TO THE BEAT OF A DIFFERENT DRUM Ready for an aural and visual feast for the ages? Don’t miss the 35th annual Moonlight Classic, the longest-running drum and bugle corps competition in the Western United States, at 6 p.m. on June 22 at

CASH PAID FOR DIABETIC TEST STRIPS Do you have extra diabetic test strips left over that you do not need? Sell them to us for CASH! We will get them to someone who can use them! OneTouch Ultra Blue, Freestyle Lite, Bayer Contour, Accu Check, and most other brands We Pay Up to $25 Per Box, CASH ON THE SPOT

Fast pick up at a location near you Boxes must be unopened and unexpired For Prompt Attention call Rachel at

916-505-4673 (Prices vary depending upon brand, quantity and expiration.)

78

IA JUN n 14

Hughes Stadium at Sacramento City College. Hundreds of young competing corps members will descend on the field to present their best performances of marching percussion and brass, front ensemble (vibraphones, marimbas and other percussion instruments) and color guard. Each creative corps, which can contain up to 150 members, ages 8-21, will execute an 11-minute performance and will be judged on musical performance, general effect on the audience and color guard. (Past performances have included a field of mirrors, an entire corps decked out in gladiator gear, a James Bond-themed performance complete with tux-clad corps members, an actual horse race, and plenty of other mind-boggling, eye-popping presentations.) Participating drum corps include the Blue Devils from Concord (15time national champions); the Blue Devils B, also from Concord (two-time national champs); the Mandarins from Sacramento (eight-time national champs); the Santa Clara Vanguard from Santa Clara (six-time national champs); the Vanguard Cadets, also from Santa Clara (three-time national champs); and many more. For tickets and more information, visit Sponsors of Musical Enrichment (SOME)’s website at someinc.com or purchase tickets at the gate. General admission is $20, reserved VIP seating is $30. Hughes Stadium at Sacramento City College is at 3825 Freeport Blvd.

Where can you hear singing seniors, a crooning chorus and a veritable bouquet of Beatles tunes? At “Come Together,” the multimedia Beatles tribute performance of the Sacramento Gay Men’s Chorus on June 6 and 7 at the Crest Theatre. In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ historic appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” this show will feature choral interpretations of Beatles classics along with vintage still photos and video footage featuring Beatle mania in America, the U.S. civil rights and gay rights movements of the 1960s, and images from rallies and rock festivals throughout pop culture history in the United States. “Come Together” will feature a vocal quartet and dancers, with choreography and “choralography” by Darryll Strohl, as well as dancing seniors, LGBT parents and kids and the melodious music of the Sacramento Gay Men’s Chorus. For tickets and more information, go to sacgaymenschorus.org. The Crest Theatre is at 1013 K St.

WINDS IN THE WILLOWS Looking for something to do to ring in the merry month of June? Don’t miss the Sacramento Valley Symphonic Band Association’s annual Carmichael Park Community Band Festival on May 30 and June 1 at the Carmichael Park Amphitheater. Bring a picnic and some lawn chairs and sprawl on the grass in the sun as you listen to the song stylings of community bands (including the Sacramento Symphonic Winds) from across California. This festival has been one of the largest community band festivals in the state for more than 20 years. Music will be played from noon to 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 30 and from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, June 1. And don’t worry about your pocketbook: admission and parking are free. For more information, call 4892576 or go to svsba.net or sacwinds. org. Carmichael Park is at 5750 Grant Ave. in Carmichael.


Building or Remodeling?

SENIOR DENTAL CARE ‡$IIRUGDEOH 'HQWLVWU\ ‡5HGXFHG )HHV

OVER 20 YEARS in the construction industry!

FREE

:H+DYH*RRG1HZV

Denture Cleaner Bath for all new patients

1HZWHFKQRORJ\DOORZVXVWRUHZRUNROGGHQWLVWU\ IRUWKHSULFHRIEX\LQJDQHZDSSOLDQFH

Kosta J. Adams DDS, MAGD, FICOI #2 Scripps Drive, Suite 307

Call 927-0800 Today

Experience & craftsmanship within your budget

Design–Build

Work with our designers or your architect

Whole House Remodeling Custom Homes

FREE CONSULTATION in your home

Kitchens & Baths Room Additions Garages & Casitas

www.millsbuilders.com 451-9733, ext. 2

Visit smilerestoration.com

HEART OF GLASS Lindsay Filby’s first gallery show, “Big Hard Color,” premieres at the

Jessica Laskey can be reached at jessrlaskey@gmail.com. Please email items for consideration by the first of the month, at least one month in advance of the event. n

insidepublications.com

Talk about a mind-body connection. On Wednesday evenings from 6:30 to 8 p.m. from June 4 through July 2, bring your brain and a healthy dose of curiosity to a five-session poetry workshop for women, “At Home in Our Bodies.” During five class meetings, workshop coordinator Alexa Mergen (a poet in her own right) will have you exploring guided breathing and mediation, reading poems by American female poets, and writing poetry with and about bodily awareness. No experience is necessary—just an open mind. As the class is limited to six women, register soon by emailing Mergen at alexamergen@gmail.com or calling 606-9952. The class will be held in a private office meeting space at 2131 Capitol Ave.

Alex Bult Gallery on June 12 and will be on display through July 5. A fourth-generation Sacramentan, Filby studied fine art at Sacramento City College, Cuesta College and California State University, Sacramento, until she decided that she wanted to focus on glass because she loves “the color and the freedom” it gives her. This show will mark her first foray into a gallery setting, and it was at the behest of Matt Bult—a collector, fellow artist and the father of gallery owner Alex—that Filby will finally show the world just what she (and her art) is made of. The preview reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on June 12 and the opening night reception will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Second Saturday (June 14). For more information, call 476-5430 or go to alexbultgallery.com. The Alex Bult Gallery is at 1114 21st St., Suite B.

VISIT

BODY OF WORK

CA License No. 782869

One Hour Massage and

One Hour Facial

$79 Exp. 6/30/14 Massage Heights Arden Town and Country VIllage 916.913.0994

2936 Fulton Avenue Sacramento, CA 95821

* Limit 1 per person. Offer expires June 30, 2014. Introductory rate valid for first-time Guests only. Offer valid at Arden location only.

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

79


Cafe Bernardo 5.0 WHATEVER YOU DO, DON’T CALL IT A CHAIN

BY GREG SABIN RESTAURANT INSIDER

P

aragary Restaurant Group has been a fixture of the Sacramento restaurant scene for decades. Along with the Haines brothers (33rd Street Bistro, Riverside Clubhouse, etc.) and the Selland family (Ella, Selland’s Market-Cafe, The Kitchen), the Paragary group blankets the region with its different personas. There’s the flagship Paragary’s Bar & Oven, temporarily closed for a large-scale renovation and set to reopen in late summer; Centro Cocina Mexicana, the Mexican-American standby on the party block of J Street; Esquire Grill, the reliable if predictable steak-and-potatoes retreat of theatergoers and lobbyists on K Street; Hock Farm Craft & Provisions, the recent downtown entry in the farm-to-fork field; and Cafe Bernardo, Paragary’s fast-casual/ order-at-the-counter/midprice go-to, with five locations in two counties. Before we continue, let’s define our terms. There’s a distinct difference between Paragary Restaurant Group and a restaurant chain. Like the Haines and Selland groups, Paragary Restaurant Group is a regional restaurant group that owns and operates several eating establishments in the region. Some of these establishments might share a name, but they are not cookie-cutter replicas of a single restaurant. A chain is an attempt to make each location as identical as possible. In order to maintain standards and meet customer expectations, products

80

IA JUN n 14

The dining room at Cafe Bernardo at Pavilions

are sourced from central locations sometimes thousands of miles away, recipes are followed without deviation and economies of scale are exploited to their fullest. In most chains, there’s no room for fresh, local ingredients or for experimentation by talented cooks. There’s no possibility for a unique experience. A regional restaurant group, however, uses each location to its fullest, customizing the menu,

decor and service to the place and people it does business in and with, respectively. Paragary’s most popular and repeatable enterprise is Cafe Bernardo. Each restaurant feels unique. The 15th Street location is a wee bit industrial, the Davis location a bit town square-ish, the Midtown location continental and neighborhoody. No single Cafe Bernardo defines the brand.

Each location also has its own bar with its own separate identity and attitude. On 15th Street, it’s R15. In Midtown, it’s Monkey Bar. On K Street, it’s KBAR. The names aren’t particularly creative, but each bar feels authentic—not an easy thing to do. The newest addition to the Bernardo family is Cafe Bernardo at Pavilions, the upscale shopping center on Fair Oaks Boulevard near Howe Avenue. Opening an eatery in Pavilions is quite a brave undertaking. First, many of Sacramento’s best restaurants have had homes at Pavilions (think Mace’s and Mitchell’s Terrace), and many other good restaurants have come and gone there. Add the fact that Bernardo opened in one of the great food spots in our town’s history, the former home of David Berkley Fine Wines & Specialty Foods, and you’ve got one risky proposition. David Berkley was a food lover’s paradise. Part market, part deli, part bakery, part wine merchant, it was Arden-Arcade’s answer to Taylor’s Market and Corti Brothers. Its prepared foods were unbeatable, the skills of its wine buyers undeniable. Moving into that hallowed ground is a brave move for any restaurateur. While Cafe Bernardo doesn’t quite replace David Berkley, it does a fine job of treating the local bounty with respect. It also pays homage to the dearly departed grocery store by naming its bar Berkley Bar and focusing its efforts on California wine and craft cocktails. Several wines are available on tap, by the glass or the bottle at reasonable prices. The well-appointed bar even has a bit of


celebrate grads & dads . . . order your sliders . . . skewers . . . platters today! bring Dad in for breakfast June 15 favorite breakfasts include . . . steak & eggs, prime rib hash with eggs, lobster omelet, brisket benedict

BELLA BRU

bellabrucafe.com Carmichael ΠNatomas ΠEl Dorado Hills 928.1770

485.2883

933.5454

Make Father’s Day Reservations Now

Sacramento’s Oldest Restaurant

ESPAÑOL

Arugula and strawberry salad is a light and cool lunch on a hot summer day

Since 1923

a winery feel, with reclaimed barrels and cork accents.

Cafe Bernardo also pays homage to the dearly departed grocery store by naming its bar Berkley Bar and focusing its efforts on California wine and craft cocktails.

won’t spend much time on it other than to say the execution is spot on and the service first rate. Dinner specials rotate nightly and deserve a try, especially the pan-fried petrale sole on Fridays. Breakfast is served seven days a week. While each Cafe Bernardo feels unique and fresh, the menus are the thing they most closely share. Thankfully, the food is reliable and well priced and always presented with impeccable service. The cookie cutters are tucked away but consistency never fails. A chain this is not. Cafe Bernardo is at 515 Pavilions Lane; 922-2870; paragarys.com.

ITALIAN RESTAURANT

$10 OFF

Grilling on Father’s Day?

Olive OUR OILS HAVE A HIGH SMOKE POINT! POINT!

Specializing in ultra-premium, extra-virgin olive oils, & balsamic vinegars.

Greg Sabin can be reached at gregsabin@hotmail.com. n

With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 6/30/14.

$5 OFF

Total LUNCH or DINNER food order of $25 or more With coupon. Cannot be combined with other discounts. Expires 6/30/14.

Gourmet Foods & Gifts Tastings & Private Parties

5723 Folsom Boulevard 457-1936

2600 FAIR OAKS BLVD.

Dine In & Take Out • Cocktail Lounge • Banquet Room Seats 35

SACRAMENTO, CA. 95864

The menu is similar to that at most other Cafe Bernardo outposts, so I

Total DINNER food order of $40 or more

(Corner Munroe, next to Temple Coffee)

916 . 974 . 7467 vsoliveoil@gmail.com

O P E N D A I LY

Lunch 11-4 pm • Dinner 4-9 pm Sundays • 11:30-9 pm • Closed Mondays

www.espanolitalian.com Closed June 27 - July 7

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

81


INSIDE’S

:HőUH2SHQ

“Honest to goodness Russian cooking done right” - Darryl Corti

$10 OFF Total DINNER food order of $40 or more

Midtown $4 off any large pizza $3 off any medium pizza

With coupon. Dinner Only. Expires 6/30/14.

4715 Manzanita Ave Near Winding Way

485-7747 Member of Opentable.com Dine In & Take Out Happy Hour: 2 for 1 Beer, Wine & Well Drinks (Daily 5-7) Banquet Room

Family owned and operated Celebrating 20 years!

ARDENCARMICHAEL

La Rosa Blanca Taqueria

Andaloussia

L D Full Bar $$-$$ Fresh Mexican food served in a colorful family-friendly setting

1537 Howe Ave. 927-1014 L D $-$$ Authentic Moroccan cuisine, lunch & dinner specials, belly dancing weekends • bestmoroccanfood.com

Bandera 2232 Fair Oaks Blvd. 922-3524

4215 Arden Way (Arden and Eastern)

482-1008 Open 7 days a week

Lunch 11-4 pm • Dinner 4-9 pm Sundays • 4-7 pm • Closed Mondays

Mon - Sat 11am-10pm; Sun 12-9

ŵUHELUGUHVWDXUDQWFRP

Dine in,Take Out or Delivery

D Full Bar $$-$$$ American Cooking served in an all-booth setting. • Houtons.com

Bella Bru Café 5038 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-2883 B L D $-$$ European-style cafe serving espresso, omelettes, salads, sandwiches, dinner entres, full bar, table service from 5 p.m., patio dining bellabrucafe.com

Café Vinoteca 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 487-1331 L D $$ Full Bar Italian bistro in a casual setting • Cafevinoteca.com

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Chinois City Café 3535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 485-8690 L D $$ Full Bar Asian-influenced cuisine in a casual setting • Chinoiscitycafe.com

Ettore’s 2376 Fair Oaks Blvd. 482-0708

AWARD WINNING NEIGHBORHOOD ITALIAN BISTRO!

Timpano Night Thursday, June 26th!

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio European-style gourmet café with salads, soup, spit-roasted chicken, and desserts in a bistro setting • Ettores.com

Kilt Pub 4235 Arden Way 487-4979 L D $ Beer/Wine British Pub Grub, Nightly Dinner Specials, Open 7 Days

Jackson Dining 1120 Fulton Ave. 483-7300 L D $$ Wine/Beer Creative cuisine in a casual setting • Jacksoncateringevents.com

Jack’s Urban Eats 2535 Fair Oaks Blvd. 481-5225 L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

The Kitchen 2225 Hurley Way 568-7171

916.487.1331 3535 FAIR OAKS BLVD./ SACRAMENTO, CA 95864 WWW.CAFEVINOTECA.COM

82

IA JUN n 14

D $$$ Wine/Beer Five-course gourmet demonstration dinner by reservation only • Thekitchenrestaurant.com

3032 Auburn Blvd. 484-0139 2813 Fulton Ave. 484-6104

Leatherby’s Family Creamery 2333 Arden Way 920-8382 L D $ House-made ice cream and specialties, soups and sandwiches

Lemon Grass Restaurant 601 Munroe St. 486-4891 L D $$ Full Bar Patio Vietnamese and Thai cuisine in a casual yet elegant setting

The Mandarin Restaurant 4321 Arden Way 488-47794 D $$-$$$ Full Bar Gourmet Chineses food for 32 years • Dine in and take out

Matteo's Pizza 5132 Fair Oaks. Blvd. 779-0727 L D Beer/Wine $$ Neighborhood gathering place for pizza, pasta and grill dishes

Roma's Pizza & Pasta 6530 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-9800 L D $$ Traditional Italian pizza & pasta Family Friendly Catering + Team Parties • romas-pizzaand-pasta.com

Roxy 2381 Fair Oaks Blvd. 489-2000 B L D $$-$$$ Full Bar American cuisine with a Western touch in a creative upscale atmosphere

Ristorante Piatti 571 Pavilions Lane 649-8885 L D $$ Full Bar Contemporary Italian cuisine in a casually elegant setting

Sam's Hof Brau 2500 Watt 482-2175 L D $$ Wine/Beer Fresh quality meats roasted daily • thehofbrau.com

Thai House 527 A Munroe in Loehmann's 485-3888 L D $$ Wine/Beer Featuring the great taste of Thai traditional specialties • sacthaihouse.com

Thai Chef's House 2851 Fulton Ave. 481-9500 L D $$ Thai cusine in a friendly, casual setting

Willie's Burgers 5050 Fair Oaks Blvd. 488-5050 L D $ Great burgers and more


A

SE

LL

A

N

D

FA

M

Y IL

RE

AU ST

RA

N

T

IS HEATING UP FOR SUMMER FREE Live Music on the Patio Friday and Saturday Nights NOW Serving Dinner Seven Nights a Week Great Craft Beer and Wine Lists!!!

LUNCH, DINNER & HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 2376 Fair Oaks Blvd. 916.482.0708

WWW. ELLA DINING ROOM AND BAR.COM 1131 K STREET DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO 916.443.3772

Our Staff Congratulates

Marlene Goetzeler On her Presidency of the

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

83


Brunch J O I N U S F O R O U R F AT H E R ’ S D A Y

C H A M P A G N E

French-inspired pastries, cakes and breads handcrafted on-site every morning by artisan bakers and chefs!

FRIDAYS Doughnut Day CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH

&

Served 10am - 3pm Sunday, June 15, 2014 Call for reservations and details.

F A T ’S ASIA BISTRO

2585 Iron Point Road Folsom 916-983-1133 1500 Eureka Road Roseville 916-787-3287 www.fatsbistro.com

Yo-Yo Yogurt has sugar free, fat free, tart and Greek high protein Àavors, ...and over 75 toppings! Family Owned and Operated

84

IA JUN n 14

SUNDAY Croixnut Day (flavor changes every week)

FRENCH TEA SERVICE $25/PERSON Set menu includes: tea sandwiches, assorted pastries, macaroon, tarts and choice of organic tea (reservation required)

Located on the corner of 9th & K in downtown Sacramento M-F 7-6, Sat 8-6, Sun 8-4 | 551-1500 | info@estellspatisserie.com


MIDTOWN

Aioli Bodega Espanola 1800 L St. 447-9440 L D $$ Full Bar Patio Andalusian cuisine served in a casual European atmosphere

Biba Ristorante 2801 Capitol Ave. 455-2422 L D $$$ Full Bar Upscale Northern Italian cuisine served a la carte • Biba-restaurant.com

Buckhorn Grill 1801 L St. 446-3757

Lucca Restaurant & Bar 1615 J St. 669-5300 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Patio Mediterranean cuisine in a casual, chic atmosphere • Luccarestaurant.com

(With coupon. Not valid w/any other offers. Dine in only. LLimit 1 coupon per party. Substitutions extra. Exp. 6/30/14)

D $$-$$$ Eclectic menu in a boutique setting

Mulvaney’s Building & Loan 1215 19th St. 441-6022 L D Full Bar $$$ Modern American cuisine in an upscale historic setting

Café Bernardo

B L D $ No table service at this coffee roaster and bakery, also serving creative artisanal sandwiches

Centro Cocina Mexicana

$19.95

(for 2 or more) Includes: Beef Tacos, Cheese Enchiladas, Chile In Rellenos, Rice/Beans, Chips & Salsa

2028 H St. 443-7585

Old Soul Co.

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Casual California cuisine with counter service

Monday–Thursday after 4pm Six Course Mexican Platter for Two

Moxie

L D $$ Wine/Beer A counter service restaurant with high-quality chicken, char-roasted beef, salmon, and entrée salads

2726 Capitol Ave. 443-1180 1431 R St. 930-9191

Simply Great M Mexican Food!

1501 16th St. 444-5850

Paesano’s Pizzeria 1806 Capitol Ave. 447-8646 L D $$ Gourmet pizza, pasta, salads in casual setting • Paesanos.biz

2730 J St. 442-2552

FREE DINNER

Restaurant

2813 Fulton Avenue • 484-6104 Live music Fridays

Folsom

402 Natoma Street, Folsom • 673-9085 Live music Fridays & Saturdays

Hot City Pizza

1801 Capitol Ave. 441-0303

5642 J Street 731-8888

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cuisine served in an authentic artistic setting • zocolosacramento.com

EAST SAC

Chicago Fire

3301 Folsom Blvd. 455-2233

3260B J St. 449-8810 L D $-$$ Thin-Crust Pizza, Deserts and Beer in an intimate setting and popular location

B L D $$ Full Bar Patio Pacific Northwest cuisine in a casual bistro setting •

4920 Folsom Blvd. 452-5516 B L D $ Fountain-style diner serving burgers, sandwiches, soup and ice cream specialties

1730 L St. 444-1100

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Outdoor Dining Crepes, omelettes, salads, soups and sandwiches served in a casual setting

Ernesto’s Mexican Food 1901 16th St. 441-5850

B L D $-$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Fresh Mexican food served in an upscale, yet familyfriendly setting • Ernestosmexicanfood.com

58 Degrees & Holding Co. 1217 18th St. 442-5858 L D $$$ Wine/Beer California cuisine served in a chic, upscale setting • 58degrees.com

Fox & Goose Public House

Paragary’s Bar & Oven 1401 28th St. 457-5737 D $$ Full Bar Outdoor Patio California cuisine with an Italian touch • Paragarys.com

Suzie Burger 29th and P Sts. 455-3300 L D $ Classic burgers, cheesesteaks, shakes, chili dogs, and other tasty treats • suzieburger.com

The Streets of London Pub 1804 J St. 498-1388 L D $ Wine/Beer English Pub fare in an authentic casual atmosphere, 17 beers on tap streetsoflondon.net

1001 R St. 443-8825

Tapa The World

B L D $-$$ Wine/Beer English Pub favorites in an historic setting • Foxandgoose.com

2115 J St. 442-4353

Harlow’s Restaurant 2708 J Street 441-4693

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer/Sangria Spanish/world cuisine in a casual authentic atmosphere, live flamenco music - tapathewworld.com

L D $$ Full Bar Modern Italian/California cuisine with Asian inspirations • Harlows.com

Thai Basil Café

Italian Importing Company

L D $-$$ Wine/Beer Patio Housemade curries among their authentic Thai specialties Thaibasilrestaurant.com

1827 J Street 442-6678 B L $ Italian food in a casual grocery setting

Jack’s Urban Eats 1230 20th St. 444-0307 L D $ Full Bar Made-to-order comfort food in a casual setting • Jacksurbaneats.com

Kasbah Lounge 2115 J St. 442-4388 D Full Bar $$ Middle Eastern cuisine in a Moroccan setting kasbahlounge.com

2431 J St. 442-7690

The Coconut Midtown 2502 J Street 440-1088 Lunch Delivery M-F and Happy Hour 4-6 L D $-$$ Beer/Wine Food with Thai Food Flair

The Waterboy 2000 Capitol Ave. 498-9891 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Patio Fine South of France and northern Italian cuisine in a chic neighborhood setting • waterboyrestaurant.com

La Bombe Ice Cream & More 3020 H Street 448-2334 L D $ European and American Frozen Confections, sandwiches, soups and espresso

Burr's Fountain

Crepeville

D $ Wine/Beer Fresh made to order pizza served in a cozy dining room; or to take out

Italian Stallion

33rd Street Bistro

D $$ Full Bar Chicago-style pizza, salads wings served in a family-friendly atmosphere • Chicagofirerestaurant.com

(With coupon. Not valid w/any other offers. Dine in only. Exp. 6/30/14)

Zocolo

L D $$ Full Bar Patio Regional Mexican cooking served in a casual atmosphere • Paragarys.com

2416 J St. 443-0440

Buy 1 Dinner Plate At Regular Price & Get The Second Dinner Up To $7.00 FREE. Must Include 2 Drinks.

La Trattoria Bohemia 3649 J St. 455-7803 L D Wine/Beer $-$$ Italian and Czech specialties in a neighborhood bistro setting

Clarks' Corner Restaurant 5641 J St. L D Full Bar $$ American cuisine in a casual historic setting

Clubhouse 56

Les Baux 5090 Folsom Blvd. 739-1348 BLD $ Wine/Beer Unique boulangerie, café & bistro serving affordable delicious food/drinks all day long • lesbauxbakery.com

723 56th. Street 454-5656

BLD Full Bar $$ American cuisine. HD sports, kid's menu, beakfast weekends

Opa! Opa! 5644 J St. 451-4000 L D Wine/Beer $ Fresh Greek cuisine in a chic, casual setting, counter service

Evan’s Kitchen 855 57th St. 452-3896 B L D Wine/Beer $$ Eclectic California cuisine served in a family-friendly atmosphere, Kid’s menu, winemaker dinners, daily lunch specials, community table for single diners • Chefevan.com

Nopalitos

Español

Selland's Market Cafe

5530 H St. 452-8226 B L $ Wine/Beer Southwestern fare in a casual diner setting

5340 H St. 473-3333

5723 Folsom Blvd. 457-3679 L D Full Bar $-$$ Classic Italian cuisine served in a traditional family-style atmosphere

B L D $$-$$$ Wine/Beer High quality handcrafted food to eat in or take out, wine bar

Formoli's Bistro

Star Ginger 3101 Folsom Blvd. 231-8888

3839 J St. 448-5699 B L D Wine/Beer Patio $$ Mediterranean influenced cuisine in a neighborhood setting •

Asian Grill and Noodle Bar • starginger.com

Istanbul Bistro 3260 J Street 449-8810 L D Wine/Beer $$ Mediterranean-inspired cuisine in cozy neighborhood bistro setting

DOWNTOWN Foundation

400 L St. 321-9522 L D $$ Full Bar American cooking in an historic atmosphere • foundationsacramento.com

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

85


party on the patio . . .

Chops Steak Seafood & Bar

Morton’s Steakhouse

1117 11th St. 447-8900

621 Capitol Mall #100 442-50

L D $$$ Full Bar Steakhouse serving dry-aged prime beef and fresh seafood in an upscale club atmosphere • Chopssacramento.com

D $$$ Full Bar Upscale American steakhouse • Mortons.com

Downtown & Vine

10th & J Sts. 448-8960

1200 K Street #8 228-4518

Wine Bar, Event Center & Retail Sales, 36 wines by the glass, beer on tap • downtownandvine.com

Ella Dining Room & Bar 1131 K St. 443-3772

please join us Sunday, June 22 . . . 5:30 to 8:30 music by Ryan Hernandez appetizers . . . crafted cocktails complimentary dessert

BELLA BRU Π485.2883 Fair Oaks Boulevard & Arden Way

bellabrucafe.com/Luna Lounge tab

L D $$$ Full Bar Modern American cuisine served family-style in a chic, upscale space • Elladiningroomandbar.com

Esquire Grill 1213 K St. 448-8900 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Outdoor Dining Upscale American fare served in an elegant setting • Paragarys.com

Estelle's Patisserie

901 K St. 916-551-1500 L D $$-$$$ French-inspired Bakery serving fresh pastry & desserts, artisan breads and handcrafted sandwiches. EstellesPatisserie.com

Fat's City Bar & Cafe 1001 Front St. 446-6768

L D $$$ Full Bar Global and California cuisine in an upscale historic Old Sac setting • Firehouseoldsac.com

Frank Fat’s

1022 Second St. 441-2211 L D Wine/Beer $$ American bistro favorites with a modern twist in a casual, Old Sac setting • ten22oldsac.com

LAND PARK Freeport Bakery

2966 Freeport Blvd. 442-4256 B L $ Award-winning baked goods and cakes for eat in or take out • Freeportbakery.com

Iron Grill 13th Street and Broadway 737-5115 L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Upscale neighborhood steakhouse • Ironsteaks.com

Jamie's Bar and Grill L D $ Full Bar Featured on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Dine in or take out since 1986

2633 Riverside Drive 448-9988 L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American cuisine served in a contemporary setting • Riversideclubhouse.com

Taylor's Kitchen 2924 Freeport Boulevard 443-5154

Il Fornaio

Tower Café

L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Chinese favorites in an elegant setting • Fatsrestaurants.com

926 J Street • 492-4450 B L D Full Bar $$$ Simple, seasonal, soulful • grangerestaurant.com

1415 L St. 440-8888 L D $$-$$ Full Bar Celebration of the region's rich history and bountiful terrain • Paragarys.com

Claim Jumper 1111 J St. 442-8200 L D $$ Full Bar Upscale American in a clubby atmosphere

IA JUN n 14

Ten 22

806 L St. 442-7092

Hock Farm Craft & Provision

86

L D $$-$$$ Full Bar Seasonal menu of favorites in a setting overlooking river • Riocitycafe.com

Riverside Clubhouse

Grange

442-4256

1110 Front St. Old Sac 442-8226

The Firehouse Restaurant

L D Full Bar $$$ Fine Northern Italian cuisine in a chic, upscale atmosphere • Ilfornaio.com

2966 Freeport Boulevard Freeportbakery.com

Rio City Café

427 Broadway 442-4044

400 Capitol Mall 446-4100

Cakes ƒ Cookies Cupcakes ƒ Pies Cakepops

D $$ Full Bar Relax with drinks and dinner in this stylish downtown space

D $$-$$$ Full Bar Steaks and Asian specialties served in a casual historic Old Sac location • Fatsrestaurants.com

1112 Second St. 442-4772

Graduation Cakes Father's Day

Parlaré Eurolounge

Mikuni Restaurant and Sushi Bar 1530 J St. 447-2112 L D Full Bar $$-$$$ Japanese cuisine served in an upscale setting • Mikunisushi.com

D $$$ Wine/Beer Dinner served Wed. through Saturday. Reservations suggested but walk-ins welcome.

1518 Broadway 441-0222 B L D $$ Wine/Beer International cuisine with dessert specialties in a casual setting

Willie's Burgers 2415 16th St. 444-2006 L D $ Great burgers and more. Open until 3 am Friday and Saturday n


4th Annual Fundraiser

Benefiting - Triumph Cancer Foundation

Join us at Helwig Winery for a special evening. Enjoy great food, wine & music while supporting a local nonprofit dedicated to helping cancer survivors! Gourmet Picnic Dinner

Concert in Amphitheater

by TASTE Restaurant

Chicago Tribute Authority

Premiere Sponsors

Wells Fargo . Blue Shield of California . Ten2Eleven Carrington College . Sage Architecture, Inc. Clark Pacific . Helwig Winery . Lumens Light + Living Hanson McClain . Puente Construction

JUNE 20TH

Buy Tickets Online at

triumphfound.org

IA n INSIDEPUBLICATIONS.COM

87


Coldwell Banker

#1 IN CALIFORNIA

COVETED CENACLE RETREAT Gracious home, beautiful park-like setting on 1.15 ac, gourmet kitchen, an entertainers delight. $1,495,000 RENE SMERLING 7983074 CalBRE#01905750 Rene.Smerling@CAmoves.com

PRIVATE SECLUDED MEDITERRANEAN VILLA! 4/5bdr 5 bath home, 500 sq.ft. workout room. Outdoor kitchen including a pizza oven. $1,475,000 KAREN SAENZ 549-8212 CalBRE#01083222 SaenzSells.com

PRESTIGIOUS SIERRA OAKS CORNER LOT 4bd 3ba + lg game room approx. 2700 sq. ft. 5 car garage on .36 corner lot, beautiful back yd & pool $765,000 DALE APODACA 973-4595 CalBRE#01233424 HomesAtSac.com

NEAR ANCIL HOFFMAN & AM RIVER 4bd 3 full ba, 2 Master Suites, beautiful large & private lot boasts pool & amazing views $539,000 DENISE CALKIN 803-3363 CalBRE#01472607 CalkinRealEstate.com

3200 BEN LOMOND DR, BROADMOOR ESTATES Open floor plan, 3 bed/4 bath, 2781 sq ft with resort backyard. $499,900 VICTORIA LEAS 955-4744 CalBRE #01701450 VictoriasProperties.com

DEL NORTE RANCH STYLE w/a sprawling floor plan. 5bdr/2.5ba family room kitchen makes great for entertaining. Formal dining. $449,000 KAREN SAENZ 549-8212 CalBRE#01083222 SaenzSells.com

PENDING

SOLD

PICTURESQUE STREET and ideal location makes this classic ranch winner. 5 bedrooms, 3 bath with a spacious yard $625,000 JONATHAN BAKER 837-4523 CalBRE#00484212 ARDEN PARK VISTA Neighborhood Gem! 2013 Renovations, artful design details, Wonderful natural light Open floor plan 3 bdrm/2bath spacious yard. $574,000 JONATHAN BAKER 837-4523 CalBRE#0048212

ONE STORY ON LARGE LOT W/ 3 CAR GARAGE. Gated Sierra Mills with 3Br, 2Ba + 3 car. 1969 sq. ft. per assessor. $399,000 ROBERTA LAUTRUP 944-4434 CalBRE#00579502 RobertaLautrup@gmail.com

CHARMING CARMICHAEL ESTATES 3 Bd, 2 Ba, approx. 1874 sq. ft. on .23 acre lot. Updated kitchen, hardwd flrs, lg bonus room. $339,000 NICOLE DONLEVY 973-4594 CalBRE#01454256 NicoleDonlevy.com

EAST RANCH 3bdr/2.5 ba two story with cathedral ceilings. Private courtyard, plantation shutters, newer kitchen. $310,000. KAREN SAENZ 549-8212 CalBRE#01083222 SaenzSells.com

COUNTRY CLUB AREA opportunity to decorate & fix up to your own liking 3bd. 2baths. hdwd floors throughout, Cent. H & A, landscaped for easy maintenance. $239,000 PEGGY ADAMS 973-4521CalBRE#00414765 CARMICHAEL HOME charming, cheerful, park-like 3Bd/2Bth, lrg lot .43, 2 car garage, 1583 sq ft, mostly wd. flrs, kitch updated 2006 $355,000 JOE GIBSON 798-3258 CalBRE# 01088927

SPACIOUS LARGE LOT IN CARMICHAEL 4 bed, 3 bath well maintained w/outstanding detached guest quarters that includes 1 bed, 1 bath, MUST SEE! $309,900 RON GREENWOOD 712-4442 CalBRE#01134887

SIERRA OAKS OFFICE 440 Drake Circle, Sacramento, CA 95864 916.972.0212

88

IA JUN n 14

UPDATED 4BR 3BA + RV near Gibbons Park Wonderful Carmichael 4BR has lovely hardwood floors, fireplace, 2 mstrs, large family rm, dining rm, pool. LEEANA ANDERSON 283.4863 call/text CalBRE#01048768

A PLACE TO CALL HOME Lovely Carmichael home, well maintained with newer kitchen appliances and newer gutters, dual pane windows in front. $269,900 RON GREENWOOD 712-4442 CalBRE#01134887

CaliforniaMoves.com

facebook.com/cbnorcal

©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. DRE License #01908304.


Inside arden jun 14