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MAY 2014

VOLUME 79 NO. 26

ARLINGTON’S SOURCE FOR HOMETOWN NEWS SINCE 1935

MAY 22, 2014

Kanninen Nets School Board Nod

Democratic Caucus Required ‘Instant Runoff’to Pick Winner SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

New Marymount University graduates Mark Anthony Curtis, Katelyn Fischer, Perla Braccio and Nana Marfo, who earned undergraduate degrees in business and economics, pose for a group shot before heading in to commencement exercises held May 18 at D.A.R. Constitution Hall. See more local commencement coverage on Pages 20-21.

Marymount Grads Celebrate Success SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

Chelsea Blair would be leaving the stage at D.A.R. Constitution Hall with a bachelor of arts degree in psychology, so it is perhaps no surprise that she posed some of her remarks to fellow Marymount University graduates in the form of a big-picture, somewhat rhetorical question. “Marymount has prepared us,” she said at the university’s 63rd annual undergraduate commencement exercises, held May

“You are poised to leave Marymount and make a difference,” she told students. Commencement speaker Kevin Plank, who over two decades has built the apparel and sportswear firm Under Armour from a $16,000-a-year operation to one that is set to gross nearly $3 billion this year, said students should be willing to take chances and deal with life’s detours. Quoting boxer Mike Tyson speaking of his opponents – “EvContinued on Page 14

Barbara Kanninen

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23% percent) for Van Doren and 839 (23 percent) for Greeley, but because she did not attain an absolute majority, the Democratic Committee for the first time activated its “instant-runoff” Continued on Page 14

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18. “The question is not ‘Are we ready for the real world?’ but ‘Is the real world ready for us?’” “It’s bittersweet,” Blair acknowledged while dissecting the end of this chapter of students’ lives. “Never will we forget this moment; never will we forget the friendships that we made.” Members of the Class of 2014 have been engaged in a “wonderful transformation” and “made Marymount a better place,” said Dr. Sherri Lind Hughes, the university’s provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Running what she hoped was received as an “aggressive but polite” campaign, Barbara Kanninen on May 17 captured the Arlington County Democratic Committee School Board caucus, making her the odds-on favorite to win the seat of retiring board member Sally Baird in November. Kanninen defeated Nancy Van Doren and Greg Greeley in the two-day caucus, which brought out more than 3,700 voters. Kanninen last year fell just short in her challenge to incumbent James Lander for the Democratic endorsement, and said that experience helped her this time around. For the 2014 run, “we were ready, we were organized and had a strong message,” she said while waiting for results to be announced at Washington-Lee High School. What has changed among the electorate over the past year? “There is more of a sense of urgency regarding [school] capacity and the change that is happening in Arlington,” Kanninen said. Kanninen received 1,549 votes (42 percent) to 1,329 (36


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SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

Faced with rising projected costs and a cranky electorate agitating for a referendum on the matter, Arlington officials plan to ask the federal government to supply about half Arlington’s share of the cost for the Columbia Pike streetcar system. To have the streetcar system on the tracks by 2021 – the new projected opening date – will cost Arlington $287 million and Fairfax County $71 million, according to new figures detailed May 13 by Arlington County Manager Barbara Donnellan. Of Arlington’s share, the county government hopes about 50 percent will come from federal sources, the remainder from a mix of state, regional and local funds. It’s a creative, but risky, strategy that could be assaulted by opponents as something of a Hail Mary pass. But county officials intimate they have a Plan B if Uncle Sam doesn’t come through. “Outside of federal funding, we have ad-

ditional opportunities with new state and regional money that we can explore,” said Eric Balliet, a spokesman for the county government’s Department of Environmental Services, although he wasn’t more specific and didn’t give a timetable for when a decision from federal officials is expected. County officials have been down this road before: The government applied for funding under the Federal Transit Agency’s (FTA) “Small Starts” program, only to find itself turned down when federal analysts concluded the Columbia Pike project would cost more than the $250 million maximum allowed under the program. Balliet said seeking funds from the wrong pot of federal money wasn’t a blunder, as some have portrayed it. “The FTA Small Starts review was valuable in advancing the Columbia Pike streetcar, by helping us to identify and manage project risks,” he said. “We now have a stronger case for federal funding, especially with our new projections that show the streetcar will provide capacity for

and attract more riders than the total bus ridership along Columbia Pike. And we are starting to make that case to our federal partners.” The new details on proposed financing for the streetcar project came as Donnellan unveiled her 10-year capital-spending package for County Board review. She estimates the total cost of the county’s two planned streetcar projects (Columbia Pike and Crystal City) at $514 million. The Crystal City project, which has not generated nearly the community division as the Columbia Pike proposal, would not need federal funds for completion, Donnellan told County Board members. Its expected operational date is 2020. County staff and a majority of County Board members remain committed to the Columbia Pike streetcar project; Donnellan called it a “transformative investment” and said “we need to make that investment now.” But the winds of change have been blowing against the project, as County

Board member John Vihstadt won election in part due to his opposition to it, and even Democratic County Board candidate Alan Howze has come out in support of a community referendum. County Treasurer Frank O’Leary, the longest serving Arlington elected official, worries that the streetcar is the one issue that could topple Democrats as a virtual monopoly party in the county. Donnellan’s proposal calls for no general-obligation bonds to pay for the project, but does anticipate selling bonds backed by funding from the newly created tax-increment-financing (TIF) district in Columbia Pike, a proposal that might necessitate a referendum. The five-mile-long streetcar line would connect Pentagon City west to Skyline, running through the heart of the Columbia Pike corridor. Boosters say it would encourage economic development and bring in significant tax revenue; opponents say an upgraded bus network would do the same thing for far less cost.

May 22, 2014

County to Rely on Feds to Finance Much of Streetcar

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Aquatics Center Is on Hold, But Still Costing Taxpayers SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

The Long Bridge Park aquatics center is on hold, but it is still costing taxpayers cash, Arlington officials acknowledge. Last spring, the county government sold $15 million in parks-and-recreation bonds, most of them to pay for the planned aquat-

ics center. Ever since the sale, when the cash was banked, the county government has been paying interest (in the range of 3.5 to 4 percent) on the bonds while earning much less (in the realm of 0.5 percent) on the money it borrowed. The issue came up at the May 13 County Board meeting, when fiscal watchdog Wayne Kubicki asked why the county gov-

ernment planned to sell an additional $3.6 million in parks bonds – this time for maintenance of facilities – when it could simply use the funds it has had on hand since last year. “I’m curious why we’re going to the till again . . . when there should be $10-, $12-, Continued on Page 14

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South Arlington Kiwanis Club Keeps Its Mascot Despite Spirited Bidding from Other Service Club SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

Despite some spirited bidding that threatened to take him away from them, the South Arlington Kiwanis Club will hold on to its mascot – dubbed “Nunc Kiwani” – for the coming year. Each springtime, the club puts its substantial Native American figurine up for bids by other Kiwanis clubs in the local area as part of its annual auction. The winning bidder and his or her club get to keep ol’ Nunc for the year. Over the past 12 months, the statue has rested securely under the control of South Arlington Kiwanis Club member Harro Wulf. But the bidding at the club’s annual social and auction, held April 26 at Our Lady Queen of Peace Catholic Church, heated up when Edd Nolen of the Kiwanis Club of Arlington (which is separate from the South Arlington club) attempted to wrest control of Nunc for the coming year. Riding to the rescue was South Arlington Kiwanis Club president Andres Tobar, who won the bidding to save the statue for his club. The Native American statue pays homage to the roots of Kiwanis International, which was founded in 1916 in Detroit by a group of business leaders interested in community service and fraternal activities. While there is some question of its etymological accuracy, history records that the name is a translation of the phrase “We build” from a Native American language. Nunc was the 25th and last item up for bid in the live auction, which was overseen by County Board member and Kiwanis

At left, members of the South Arlington Kiwanis Club pose with “Nunc Kiwani,” the club mascot that each year is auctioned off to raise funds. Shown in the photo is U.S. Rep. Jim Moran, who, if he looks a little overdressed for the occasion in a tuxedo, was heading off to another event when he stopped by. Bottom left, County Board member Walter Tejada was guest auctioneer at the event. Above, Commissioner of Revenue Ingrid Morroy (right) and her twin sister Judith Morroy performed in concert at the event.

Club member Walter Tejada. Funds from live and silent auctions at the event will support South Arlington Kiwanis Club

programs for the coming year. The event raised $5,100, and “all that goes to charity,” club president Andres To-

bar said. Among the beneficiaries will be the summer-reading initiative of Randolph Elementary School. The evening even featured a special touch of class, as U.S. Rep. Jim Moran (D-8th) arrived in black tie. Moran was making his way to two other functions that night, and was dressed up. The night also featured Arlington Commissioner of Revenue Ingrid Morroy and her twin sister, Judith, performing classic rock as The Two of Us. The South Arlington Kiwanis Club was chartered in 1947. For information, see the Web site at www.southarlingtonkiwanis. org.

Crime Solvers Celebrates Exceptional Public Safety SCOTT McCAFFREY

www.insidenova.com

Staff Writer

Sun Gazette

Regional efforts to reduce gang activity across Northern Virginia require constant reassessment and reinforcement to maintain their success, the coordinator of the Arlington County Gang Prevention Task Force said at the annual awards presentation of Arlington County Crime Solvers. “Gangs have been around for hundreds of years. No county, no city, no town is immune,” said Robert “Tito” Vilchez, who said efforts at reducing gang activity in Northern Virginia require total community involvement. “Collaboration is the answer,” Vilchez said at the awards ceremony, held May 8 at the Salsa Room on Columbia Pike. “We need to strengthen these partnerships.”

The county’s gang task force began life in 2005. Working both to disrupt gang activity and give gang members positive alternatives, the government effort has reached out to civic groups, the business community, schools, non-profits and individual volunteers to provide support services. “You can see for yourself how the community comes together,” he said. Vilchez noted that one of the big successes has been a twice-annual sports tournament. “Soccer was the hook” to reach members of Latino gangs, he said. “All of us have that human need to belong to something.” County Board member Walter Tejada, who also spoke at the event, said that while Continued on Page 14

Award recipients and community leaders gathered on Columbia Pike for the annual celebration of law enforcement sponsored by Arlington County Crime Solvers.


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May 22, 2014

The results come with some asterisks attached, but advocates say new figures show Arlington is moving aggressively in the right direction to combat homelessness. The annual “point-in-time” survey found 291 individuals described as homeless in the county, a 39-percent decline from the 479 counted a year before, by far the largest drop in the Washington region this year. “We are really, really making strides – we are doing all the right things,” said Kathleen Sibert, executive director of the Arlington Street People’s Assistance Network (A-SPAN), which provides services for the county’s homeless population. Sibert said the huge decline was probably not as large as the data made it out to be, since there were some changes in how homelessness is reported, and because the frigid temperature and snow on the night of the count (Jan. 29-30) likely caused some homeless individuals to find shelter in places where they would not have been counted. But Sibert said the numbers merited celebration. “Collectively in Arlington County, we’ve been really, really good in moving people from homelessness into homes,” she said. Efforts have been particularly effective in terms of families and homeless veterans. The number of those in Arlington described as “chronically homeless” dropped 52 percent, from 156 in 2013 to 74 in 2014. “These numbers are encouraging. They substantiate what we are seeing every day across our programs,” County Board Chairman Jay Fisette said. Sometime next winter, the county government will open a year-round emergency-services facility in courthouse, which is set to replace the dilapidated Emergency Winter Shelter. A-SPAN will run the new facility. The Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments each year supervises the point-in-time survey across the region. While Arlington’s numbers were significantly down, the overall regional figure was up 3.5 percent to 11,964. That higher rate was fueled by an increase in the District of Columbia, which reported 883 more homeless than a year before. Loudoun County reported a slight uptick, while all other jurisdictions showed declines in the number of people described as “literally homeless.” Family homelessness rose 11 percent across the region, another area of concern coming out of what was the 14th annual count of the area’s homeless population. The complete Council of Governments’ report can be found on the Web site at www.mwcog.org.

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May 22, 2014

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Opinion

Newsroom SCOTT McCAFFREY Managing editor (703) 738-2532 smccaffrey@sungazette.net DAVE FACINOLI Sports editor (703) 738-2533 dfacinoli@sungazette.net BRIAN TROMPETER Senior staff writer (703) 738-2534 btrompeter@sungazette.net ALEXANDRA MURRAY Copy editor amurray@sungazette.net

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Find more letters and an archive of editorials at www.insidenova.com/ news/arlington (Click on “Opinion”)

Highs & Lows

MAYBE COUNTY MANAGER BARBARA DONNELLAN knows something the rest of us don’t, when it comes to whether the federal government will chip in with loads of cash for the Columbia Pike streetcar. Donnellan’s new plan for financing the controversial transit line, revealed last week, seems an all-or-nothing affair. If the feds don’t come up with about half the money needed to pay Arlington’s 80-percent share of the $350 million project, there seems to be no other way to get it funded. You’ll recall that the county government has been down this road before. It applied for federal funding under what is called the “Small Starts” program, but found that application unceremoniously rejected when the feds (correctly, as it turned out) said the proj-

ect would be far in excess of the $250 million maximum to receive funding. Rather than admitting it had wasted time by going after money it was never going to get, the county government proclaimed the whole thing had been a net positive, since it could now use what it had learned to go after an even bigger pot of money. But the time lost in all this allowed anti-streetcar forces to mobilize, putting supporters at a decided disadvantage. What happens if the feds turn the project down, or don’t provide as much money as it hoped? Maybe the county government will scrap the project. But, being conspiratorial types, we see another possibility. You know all those dollars – hundreds of millions – the county

government has been squirreling away over the years? (The Sun Gazette is the only media outlet that has paid attention to that big, big story.) It’s entirely possible that, if federal funds are not forthcoming, the government could dip into that huge pile of cash it has lying around, circumvent the call for a community referendum and simply write a check from “petty cash.” THUMBS UP: To County Manager Barbara Donnellan’s proposal to spend a whole lot more money in coming years on street paving than had been the case in previous years. Arlington’s roads, both those overseen by the county and by the Virginia Department of Transportation, need all the attention they can get. This is a start.

Don’t Be Misled by Pandering Local Politicians Editor: Arlington County voters, do not be fooled by Patrick Hope, Alan Howze and others claiming to promote democracy in calling for a referendum on the Columbia Pike streetcar. They try to hide behind the skirts of citizens in an all-too-clear attempt to avoid a position in an election. A countywide vote doubtless could show lack of support for something that directly benefits only a portion of the

county, but this proves next to nothing. Ever-latent fear of who might end up paying drives this controversy, as much as any statistics on the economics of a streetcar vs. bus system. Unless funding can be identified, this hubbub is simply free-form Arlington Way with a side order of class warfare: the “I got mine” north vs. developing south. The entire process has been bass-ackward. My point: Urge our candidates put the cart behind the horse. Let the county gov-

ernment in due course reveal whether this streetcar will go anywhere in the real world or not, and how direct costs to the taxpayer will be avoided. Keep the streetcar issue off the ballot until it can be established there might be a way forward. The machine politics of the County Board is another matter, but the attempt of these candidates to defuse the streetcar issue may be a Trojan Horse. Perry Cofield Arlington

Editor: Throwing stones at streetcars is dangerous. But the critics missed in their criticisms of the return-on-investment study recently received by the county. The critics still fail to admit what the study confirmed, that even the best buses-only solution would fail at a transit system’s essential purpose: to carry all the passengers. The study projects future bus-ridership demand on Columbia Pike of 1,900 per hour in the busiest direction at peak, but the buses will only carry 1, 600 – that’s right, they would not carry all the passengers expected in the future. This means, as a practical matter, that as the population on the Pike increases through the years, buses cannot keep up even when adding big expensive articulated

vehicles. Streetcars can meet the demand, even when, as expected, more people choose to ride them than would choose buses. Using streetcars, the system will be able to carry 2,300 riders and attract 2,100 at peak in the busiest direction – within the capacity of the system. The critics are annoyed that the study did a like-for-like comparison, concluding that the economic benefits of streetcar systems like what is planned for the Pike far exceed the benefits of the best and highest capacity bus service that could be provided on the Pike. Comparing a streetcar system that can be built on the Pike to a bus-rapid-transit system that cannot be built on the Pike is misleading, regardless of what you call the buses.

The difference is critical because the Pike Neighborhoods Plan leverages both the resulting higher value and the greater building density that can be allowed with higher capacity transit to require 25 percent affordable housing set-aside for new projects exceeding by-right zoning. The most recent study confirms – again – that in the long run, the resulting economic benefits from streetcars will more than pay for the system, bringing in more tax revenue for schools and other needs, while we make our neighborhoods better places to live and protect the environment, as well. Arlington took the long view when Metro was being planned. Arlington should take the long view now. John Snyder Arlington

Take the Long View When Considering Streetcar BRUCE POTTER Chief operating officer Northern Virginia Media Services bpotter@sungazette.net (571) 333-1538

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SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

6:30 p.m.) while calling in from her home in Fairlington, where she is recuperating from injuries sustained in a bike accident. “I have the iPad on my lap on a pillow. Have my arm on a pillow. Have a pillow at my back,” Garvey told the Sun Gazette on May 13. “Pillows are very important for me right now.” Virginia law recently was changed to allow board members to participate telephonically under certain circumstances. Garvey’s status on injured-reserve allowed her to phone it in. Garvey was unable to participate in the May 10 meeting, but was sufficiently on the road to recovery May 13 to watch the board proceedings and participate, including casting votes. Things got off to a modestly rocky start at the 3 p.m. meeting, but quickly recovered: • County Board Clerk Hope Halleck: “Libby, are you there?” • (Pause.) • Garvey: “I’m here!” “I think the meeting went very well,” Garvey said. “I hope my colleagues and our staff agree. I could watch on my computer, listen and speak on my cell phone, call up documents on my iPad. And, of course, had a pad of paper and pencil.” “The only problem for me was getting distracted at times by grandchildren and trying to get comfortable,” Garvey said. “I did not want to use anything more than strong ibuprofen for pain while participating. When I’m in a good position, and don’t move, I’m good.” Board Members Laud Cooperative Ex-

tension: County Board members on May 13 saluted the centennial of Virginia Cooperative Extension and honored the staff and volunteers who make the Arlington program run. “It’s a partnership,” said County Board Chairman Jay Fisette, who noted that Virginia Cooperative Extension, currently overseen by Virginia Tech, was founded in 1914 and has been engaged in Arlington since the 1950s. Based at the Fairlington Community Center, the local affiliate provides education on a host of topics, from gardening and urban agriculture to nutrition, financial literacy and energy conservation. “We’re very grateful for the long partnership” with the county, said Jennifer Abel, who oversees the Arlington program. County Board Members Make Appointments: County Board members on May 13 made the following appointments to local boards and commissions: Dan O’Donnell was appointed to the Arlington Commission on Long-TermCare Residences. Bill Browning was designated chairman of the Arlington Partnership for Children, Youth and Families. Matthew DeFerranti was appointed to the Citizens Advisory Commission on Housing. Courtney Murphy, Carlos Velazquez and Jean Russell were appointed to the Commission for the Arts. Melissa Muscio was reappointed to the Commission on the Status of Women. Alice Barrett and Jason Powell were reappointed to the Community Housing Finance Board.

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BEAT THE HEAT! Stay cool at the rink this summer! KCI offers public skating sessions daily for all ages. Bring the whole family for an afternoon of fun. Special sessions are available for kids, adults, and seniors. Visit our website for a full schedule.

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Kettler Capitals Iceplex is the home of your Washington Capitals. Capitals practices are free and open to the public. KCI is located atop the Ballston Mall parking garage and is the only year-round rink in Arlington!

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SUMMER CAMPS MITE ADM HOCKEY CAMP

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Half-day camp for skaters ages 4 & up! Beginners welcome - develop your skating skills, meet new friends, and STAY COOL! Full-day and half-day summer skating and hockey camps are available throughout the summer for recreational skaters, experienced skaters, and hockey players from beginner to advanced. Visit our website for full details and to register!

627 N. Glebe Rd | Suite 800 | Arlington, VA 22203 | 571-224-0555

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County officials say more rigorous stormwater-management rules adopted May 10 by County Board members won’t affect “99 percent” of home-renovation projects, but will impact a good deal of other commercial and residential development. The new regulations were adopted in part to bring Arlington into compliance with ever-changing federal and state regulations to minimize stormwater runoff. “All of us – every business owner and resident in Arlington and the region – are being called upon to do our part to improve water quality and protect the Chesapeake Bay,” County Board Chairman Jay Fisette said in a statement that accompanied the 4-0 vote. (Board member Libby Garvey was nursing a collarbone injury suffered in a bike mishap, and was not at the meeting.) The county government will continue to regulate renovation projects on single-family parcels, but only when they disturb at least 2,500 square feet of land. That regulation, and its exemption, have been in place since 1992. New state regulations also require more comprehensive pollution-control efforts during construction, in an effort to minimize sediment releases. New state requirements also change the way runoff is calculated, which will have an impact on some projects. The stormwater-management requirements are found in Chapter 60 of the Arlington County Code. County Board Reconstitutes Western Rosslyn Planning Body: Whatever happened to the county government’s working group studying redevelopment in the western Rosslyn area? Now we know. The group, which was appointed late last year but has been dormant, has been resurrected with a slightly different mission and a larger membership. County Board members voted on the changes May 13. The biggest revision: The Wilson School site, owned by the county school system, will be taken off the list of parcels being studied. School leaders tentatively have decided to raze the school and use the land for a new, urban-style secondary school and open space. The County Board voted to not only keep the school system on the task force, but to add two citizen-members to represent the system. Also added to the roster were representatives from the county government’s Emergency Preparedness Advisory Committee, as well as from the Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing and Penzance, a development firm that owns land in the study area. The group is slated to meet for the first time in June; County Board Chairman Jay Fisette will serve as liaison between the board and the working group. County officials say they expect to have a finished report in their hands roughly by the end of the year. “It will not be an easy task to do in nine months – they’ll be juggling a lot of things,” Fisette said of the task force’s work. County Plans Expansion of CurbsideRecycling Efforts: It’s going to cost a little

green for homeowners to be a little more green. County Board members on May 13 approved a public hearing for next month that will, for the first time, offer yearround, curbside collection of yard waste to residential properties that participate in the government’s trash-collection service. Arlington officials said the new initiative will divert as much as 9,000 tons of compostable materials from the solid-waste stream, further improving the county’s overall recycling rate. But it will come at a cost: Officials plan to increase the annual solid-waste charge by $13.29 to $307.04 per household in the fiscal year that starts July 1. The County Board can’t act until a public hearing, slated for June 14. If the board adopts the plan, the county government will roll out a third waste-collection cart, this one green in color, where residents can put grass, leaves and small brush. According to county officials: “The phased rollout is expected to be complete by the end of September. Residents who do not generate significant amounts of yard waste or prefer to use paper bags will have the option to opt out of the new cart. With the convenience of this new service, the county is prohibiting the use of plastic bags for organics, because the plastic prevents the organics from being composted.” Nursing Injury, Garvey Participates by Phone: It was a first: A County Board member participating via speakerphone. Board member Libby Garvey took part in the May 13 board meetings (at 3 and

May 22, 2014

County Board OK’s Stormwater-Management Rules

7

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

8

EHO

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of Virginia’s policy for achieving equal housing opportunity throughout the Commonwealth. We encourage and support advertising and marketing programs in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, elderliness, familial status or handicap. All real estate advertised herein is subject to Virginia’s fair housing law which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, elderliness, familial status or handicap or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept advertising for real estate that violates the fair housing law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. For more information or to file a housing complaint call the Virginia Fair Housing Office at (804) 367-9753. Email: fairhousing@dpor.virginia.gov. Web site: www.fairhousing.vipnet.org

Caribbean Carnival Sunday, June 8 4 - 7 pm

Games! Cakewalks! Food! Prizes, & more! Cherrydale United Methodist Church

3701 Lorcom Ln, Arlington cherrydaleumc.org/Carnival, cherrydaleyouth@gmail.com

all proceeds benefit the community of Ponce, Puerto Rico

St. Michael’s Episcopal Church

Vacation Bible School July 14 – 18 l 5:30 ‘til 8:00 PM, ages 4 –12 l $35 per child; $90 family max (dinner included) l Friday family ice cream social l Visit our website or call for details;

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Registration form on website

Sun Gazette

1132 N. Ivanhoe Street, Arlington, VA 22205 One block off Washington Blvd. in Westover 703-241-2474 • www.stmichaelsarlington.org Sunday services at 8:00 and 10:00 AM Childcare is available during the 10:00 AM service

Arlington Notes GOVERNMENT OFFICES CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY: Most Arlington County gov-

ernment offices will be closed on Monday, May 26 in honor of Memorial Day. A complete list of what’s open and what’s closed in county government will be available on the Web site at www.arlingtonva.us. HISTORICAL SOCIETY ELECTS LEADERSHIP TEAM: John Richardson on May

8 was re-elected to serve as president of the Arlington Historical Society, which – due to a bylaws change adopted by the membership – will now be a two-year position. Also elected were Karl Van Newkirk (vice president), Gerald Laporte (secretary) and Nick Noble (treasurer). Elected as directors were Luis Araya, Max Gross, Garrett Peck and Fred Stokeld. In addition to the bylaws change related to the term of the president, additional bylaws amendments were adopted that are designed to streamline the organization’s leadership and its procedures. The Arlington Historical Society was founded in 1956 to help local residents better understand the community through its history. For information, see the Web site at www.arlingtonhistoricalsociety.org. HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO HOST ANNUAL DINNER: The Arlington Historical

Society will hold its annual membership banquet on Friday, May 30 at the Holiday Inn Rosslyn at Key Bridge. The keynote speaker will be Greg Hamilton of Arlington magazine, and the event will inaugurate two new awards: The Arlington Historical Society Civic Award and the Volunteer of the Year Award. The cost is $45 for members, $50 for non-members. For information and to register, see the Web site at www.arlingtonhistoricalsociety.org. AMERICAN CENTURY TO PRESENT ‘JUDGMENT AT NUREMBERG’: Ameri-

can Century Theater will present the courtroom drama “Judgment at Nuremberg,” directed by Joe Banno, from May 30 to June 28 at Gunston Arts Center Theatre II, 2700 South Lang St. The production is adapted from the 1961 Academy Award-winning film and live television drama that preceded it. “It is a large, complex and challenging play, and requires an audience with intelligence and intellectual curiosity,” said American Century artistic director Jack Marshall, who notes that disturbing archival newsreels of German death camps play an integral role in the show. The production has received a grant from the Arlington Community Foundation, which will allow outreach to schools, pre- and post-show programs, an enhanced audience guide and a free teleconference featuring a panel of experts on the trial. For tickets and information, call (703) 998-4555 or see the Web site at www.americancentury.org. ‘DISCOVER CHERRYDALE’ FESTIVAL APPROACHES: “Discover Cherrydale,”

a community festival of food, music and art, will be held on Saturday, May 31 from noon to 5 p.m. around the historic Cherrydale Firehouse.

Events will include a celebration of the undergrounding of wires along Lee Highway; unveiling of the Cherrydale Capital Bike Share station; scavenger hunts; demonstrations from dance, yoga and other local talent; and representation from local charitable organizations and other supporters of Cherrydale. For information, see the Web site at http://discovercherrydale.info. ‘GREEN HOME AND GARDEN TOUR’ MAKES ANNUAL APPEARANCE: The

12th annual Arlington Green Home and Garden Tour, sponsored by Arlingtonians for a Clean Environment and the county government’s Department of Environmental Services, will be held on Sunday, June 1 from 1 to 5 p.m. at locations across the county. The event will feature a mixture of new homes and renovations, as well as watershed-friendly gardens. Participants can speak with local residents about their experience “greening” their properties. For information, see the Web site at www.arlingtonenvironment.org. CULPEPPER GARDEN TO HOST SPRING RECEPTION: The Culpepper Garden se-

nior-living facility will hold a spring reception and fundraiser on Saturday, June 14 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on the grounds of the Arlington center. Jon and Barbara Kinney are serving as co-chairs of the event, and U.S. Rep. Jim Moran (D-8th) is honorary chairman. For tickets and sponsorship information, see the Web site at www.culpeppergarden.org. BIKE TOUR TO FOCUS ON ARLINGTON HISTORY: The Center Hiking Club pres-

ents an Arlington History Bike Tour on Saturday, May 24 beginning at 9 a.m. at the top of the escalator at the Ballston Metro station. The up-to-23-mile tour takes riders past historic sites from colonial times to the early 20th century. Riders can bike the entire route or just a portion. The cost is $2. For information, call Bernie Berne at (703) 243-0179 or see the Web site at www.centerhikingclub.org. KIDS’ GARDEN SERIES FOCUSES ON POLLINATORS: The “Kids in the Garden”

series at Westover Library continues on Wednesday, May 28 at 4 p.m. with “Plants and Their Pollinators.” The program is designed for students in kindergarten through fifth grade. There is no charge. For information and to register, call (703) 228-5260 or stop by the library, located at 1644 North McKinley Road. PROSTATE-CANCER SUPPORT GROUP TO GATHER: Virginia Hospital Center’s

Cancer Resource Center will host a prostate-cancer-support-group meeting on Tuesday, May 27 at 7 p.m. at the center, 1701 North George Mason Drive. The program is facilitated by a prostatecancer survivor. For information, call (703) 558-5555. Your items are always welcomed for inclusion!


summer Theatre camps for ages 4-12 | June 23-August 29

May 22, 2014

Arlington Notes II

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Locations throughout Arlington, VA.

Registration available online at Snow Make Up Daysis Changing Your Summer Plans? We’ll provide awww.encorestage.org. prorated enrollment fee for those with extended

Pat Ragan and Carol Sargeant were among those honored by the Arlington Woman’s Civic Alliance, which celebrated its 20th anniversary during a recent event at the Overlee Community Clubhouse. Proceeds supported the Arlington Pediatric Center’s efforts to provide mental-health services.

Kiwanis Club of Arlington president Steve Bevis, center presents a contribution to HACAN (Hispanics Against Child Abuse and Neglect) representatives Lolita Mancheno-Smoke and Carmen Fernandez.

WOMEN’S CIVIC ALLIANCE CELEBRATES 20 YEARS: The Arlington Women’s Civic

HACAN’s funding effort, see the Web site at http://hipgive.org/campaign/detail/2931.

Alliance used its recent 20th-anniversary celebration at Overlee Community Clubhouse to support the Arlington Pediatric Center’s mental-health initiative in support of uninsured children. The celebration, “A Taste of Arlington History: Savoring 20 Years of Friends and Community,” also raised funds to support another initiative of the Arlington Pediatric Center, in memory of Anne Penick and Emily DiCicco, two deceased club members. A highlight of the festivities was a tribute to Pat Ragan, who founded the Arlington Women’s Civic Alliance two decades ago to create an organization that fosters friendship of members while giving back to the community through donations and volunteer service. Janice McKelvey, the group’s current president, noted that the alliance has collected nearly $380,000 in cash to support 44 non-profit organizations, and that its members have contributed a cumulative 4,000 hours of service. Also honored at the anniversary celebration were Preston and Jeanne Caruthers; Susan Sarcone and Mitchell Schneider of McEnearney Associations; and La Cote D’Or Cafe. ‘HISPANICS AGAINST CHILD ABUSE’ RAMPS UP CROWDFUNDING EFFORT:

Don’t Miss Our Next Show!

The 12 Dancing Princesses May 30-June 8, 2014 | Tickets: $10-12 Thomas Jefferson Community Theatre

AFAC TO HOST SPRING CARNIVAL: The

Arlington Food Assistance Center (AFAC) will hold its spring carnival festival, “Moulin Rouge,” on Thursday, May 29 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Artisphere. The event will feature aerialists, acrobats, can-can dancers, an illusionist and other special features to highlight La Belle Epoch and raise funds to support those in need across the community. Tickets are $100 per person, with sponsorship packages available. Attire of black, white, or red, preferred. For tickets and information, see the Web site at www.afac.org.

125 S. Old Glebe Rd. Arlington, VA 22204

www.encorestage.org

KIWANIS CLUB AGAIN TURNS TO BLUEBERRIES TO RAISE FUNDS: Who would

have thought that blueberries would hold the key to fundraising efforts for a local service club? For the second year, the Kiwanis Club of Arlington will be selling fresh New Jersey blueberries to raise funds for its support of youth-based programs. Last year’s effort resulted in the sale of 236 10-pound boxes of the fresh fruit, with the goal more than doubled to 500 containers this year. “Funds raised from the sale are good for our kids, and blueberries are good for our kids,” said Julie Wright, who is coordinating the sales efforts. Of the $32 per box, the club will keep about one-third. All proceeds will go directly to provide grants to local organizations serving youth. Wright said orders will be taken through mid-June, with the actual date of arrival of the fruit depending on picking conditions; the blueberries will arrive a day after they are picked. “They’re so fresh, you’ll think you picked them yourself,” Wright said at a recent meeting. For additional information or to preorder containers, call (703) 646-1572 or email blueberriesinarlington@gmail.com. NATURE CENTER TO FOCUS ON BLOODSUCKERS: Gulf Branch Nature Center

will host “Bloodsuckers Campfire,” a family program designed to teach about creatures that love human blood, on Friday, May 23 at 7:30 p.m. The event will feature activities that may include stories, games and treats. The cost is $5 per person; children must be accompanied by a registered adult. For information, call (703) 228-3403.

(703) 548-1154 info@encorestage.org

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Hispanics Against Child Abuse and Neglect (HACAN) of Northern Virginia has been accepted to participate in the HIPGive crowd-funding initiative, and is seeking to raise $5,000 through a crowd-sourcing initiative. Funds raised will support “Fortaleciendo La Familia,” an effort to strengthen the parenting skills of immigrant families, primarily those from Latin American countries. “New immigrant families have many challenges navigating their new environment and their work demands sometimes leave their children vulnerable to a variety of unforeseen societal risks,” HACAN officials said. The Kiwanis Club of Arlington recently contributed $2,500 to the effort. Accepting the support were Carmen Fernandez and Lolita Mancheno-Smoak of HACAN. HIPGive is a crowdfunding platform for Latino-led, Latino-serving organizations. It is a project of Hispanics in Philanthropy, a non-profit organization dedicated to increasing investments in Latino communities. For information on the initiative and

school dates for Session 1 (June 23 - July 3). E-mail info@encorestage.org to learn more.

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

10

Business

Arrival of Frontier May Help Boost Sagging Dulles

Carrier Plans About 70 Flights Per Week Once It Starts Operations Over Summer The announcement that Frontier Airlines plans to start “focus-city” service to Washington Dulles International Airport may allow officials of the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority to breathe a little easier. The airline on May 13 announced that it plans to begin serving the airport in August and September with 68 weekly flights using 168-seat Airbus A320 aircraft. The new arrival is not likely to impact the dominant position of United Airlines, which controls about two-thirds of the passenger total at the airport. But it will serve as a shot in the arm for Dulles, which has seen United scale back service and other carriers decamp to Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and BaltimoreWashington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. The airline’s arrival represents “a signifi-

cant, positive development for passengers,” said Jack Potter, president of the airports’ authority. The airline expects to begin service Aug. 19 from Dulles to Atlanta, Charlotte, Orlando, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Chicago and Tampa. Service to Cincinnati, Detroit, Fort Lauderdale, Las Vegas, Memphis, Fort Myers, St. Louis and St. Augustine/ Jacksonville is slated to begin Sept. 8. “We believe Frontier has tapped a segment of the market that has the potential to expand much further at Dulles,” said Rob Yingling, a spokesman for the airports’ authority, which operates Dulles and Reagan National. Frontier, which has been in operation for 20 years as a low-cost, few-frills airline, currently serves more than 75 destinations across the U.S. JetBlue to Inaugurate More Service

from National: JetBlue Airlines will inaugurate service June 19 from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport to Charleston, S.C.; Hartford, Conn.; and Nassau, Bahamas. In addition, the airline plans to add a second daily flight between Reagan National and Tampa on July 2. The takeoff and landing slots obtained by JetBlue come from American Airlines,

which was forced by federal regulators to give up some of its presence at Reagan National to win approval of its merger with US Airways. With the increasing presence, JetBlue will now offer service to eight cities from Reagan National. The airline also operates flights at Washington Dulles International Airport and Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

www.insidenova.com

Region’s Home Values Underperforming Nation

Sun Gazette

Home values across the Washington region, which never fell as far as many areas across the country, also are not bouncing back at the same level, according to new figures. The median sales price of single-family homes sold across the D.C. region in the first quarter of 2014 was $358,900, up 2.9 percent from a year before, according to figures reported May 12 by the National Association of Realtors (NAR). That’s far below the national rate of year-over-year appreciation, which stood at 8.6 percent for the first quarter, according to preliminary figures. The median sales price of $191,600 for the first quarter represents the point at which half of homes sell for more, half for less. The median was up from $176,400 in the first quarter of 2013. The median existing single-family home price increased in 74 percent of measured markets, with 125 out of 170 metropolitan areas showing gains. Forty-five areas recorded lower median prices. Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said the price trend is reaching a good point: continuing to rise, but not so fast as before. The 8.6 percent year-over-year growth was down from a rate of 10.1 percent in the final quarter of 2013. “The cooling rate of price growth is needed to preserve favorable housing affordability conditions in the future, but we still need more new-home construction to

fully alleviate the inventory shortages in much of the country,” he said. Limited inventory is creating “unsustainable and unhealthy price growth” in some large markets, notably on the West Coast, Yun said. The national median existing singlefamily home price was $191,600 in the first quarter, up 8.6 percent from $176,400 in the first quarter of 2013. In the fourth quarter the median price rose 10.1 percent from a year earlier. The median existing single-family home price in the Northeast was $239,300 in the first quarter, up 2.2 percent from a year ago. In the Midwest, it increased 6.7 percent to $144,000. The median existing single-family home price in the South was $168,900 in the first quarter, up 7.7 percent from a year earlier. In the West, it jumped 14 percent to $282,100. The five most expensive housing markets in the first quarter were the San Jose, Calif., metro area, where the median existing single-family price was $808,000; San Francisco, $679,800; Honolulu, $672,300; Anaheim-Santa Ana, Calif., $669,800; and San Diego, where the median price was $483,000. The five lowest-cost metro areas were Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio, with a median single-family home price of $64,600 in the first quarter; Decatur, Ill., $69,600; Toledo, Ohio, $72,100; Rockford,

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Ill., $73,100; and Cumberland, Md., at $81,400. Yun notes many smaller areas had some of the biggest changes in median price from a year ago. “Prices in smaller areas tend to be a bit more volatile, with changes in the share of distressed sales affecting comparisons,” he said. “In such cases, looking at the annual prices for those areas help to put it into perspective.” At the end of the first quarter there were 1.99 million existing homes available for sale, 3.1 percent above the first quarter of 2013, when 1.93 million homes were on the market. The average supply during the quarter was 5 months; it was 4.6 months in the first quarter of 2013. A supply of 6 to 7 months represents a rough balance between buyers and sellers. NAR President Steve Brown, co-owner of Irongate, Inc., Realtors in Dayton, Ohio, said there’s been some erosion in housing affordability. “Both home prices and mortgage-interest rates are higher than a year ago, but the good news is that median income is enough to purchase a home in most areas,” he said. The national median family income was $64,500 in the first quarter. However, to purchase a home at the national median price, a buyer making a 5 percent down payment would need an income of $44,200. With a 10 percent down payment

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the required income would be $41,800, while with 20 percent down, the necessary income is only $37,200. D.C. Region Condo Prices Are High, But Others Rising Faster: The Washington region’s condominium prices are among the highest in the nation, but price appreciation over the past year has trailed the national average by a significant amount. The median price of existing, apartment-style condominiums and cooperatives across the D.C. region in the first quarter of 2014 was $261,700, according to figured reported by the National Association of Realtors. Among the roughly 60 condo markets watched by the group, only four – San Francisco ($573,700), Los Angeles ($363,500) Honolulu ($345,000) and Boston ($325,000) – had higher median prices. The national median was $191,400, according to preliminary first-quarter results. But the price growth over the past year among existing condos in the D.C. region stood at just 2.9 percent, compared to a national increase of 10.8 percent, according to the figures. Regionally, every sector of the country showed strength in the first quarter, compared to a year before: The median price in the Northeast was $243,400, up 8.2 percent; in the Midwest, it was up 11.5 percent to $133,300; in the South, it was up 9.3 percent to $144,400; and in the West, it was up 20.5 percent to $265,000.

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Members of the Arlington legislative delegation in Richmond received generally good grades from the Virginia Chamber of Commerce, even though their work in 2014 – like that of the General Assembly as a whole – is more worthy of an “incomplete.” The statewide business organization has put out its annual “report card,” based on selected pieces of legislation from the more than 2,800 bills introduced during the General Assembly’s 60-day regular session, which ran from mid-January to midMarch. (The legislature remains in special session, attempting to hammer out compromises on Medicaid expansion and the budget.) The roughly three-dozen bills that were selected to determine grades represented issues ranging from taxation and technology to energy and transportation. Barry DuVal, the Virginia Chamber’s CEO, said the highest grades went to legislators who had the interests of the business community and principles of free-market economics at heart. To say that the General Assembly is business-friendly is akin to saying the pope is . . . from Argentina. In fact, nearly 40 percent of the 140 senators and delegates voted with the Virginia Chamber’s positions 100 percent of the time in 2014.

None of Arlington’s legislators could be counted among them, but a couple were in the ballpark. State Sen. Janet Howell (D-32nd) rated the highest among the seven members of the Arlington delegation, with a score of 90 percent and a grade of A-minus. Her state Senate colleague, Barbara Favola (D-31st) received an 88 and a grade of B-plus, as did Del. Bob Brink (D-48th). Dels. Alfonso Lopez (D-49th) and Rob Krupicka (D-45th) each garnered scores of 84 and grades of B. At the bottom of the Arlington pack, from the Virginia Chamber’s perspective, were Del. Patrick Hope (D-47th) with 70 and a C-minus, and state Sen. Adam Ebbin (D-30th) was 66 and a D. Ebbin and Del. Charnielle Herring (DAlexandria), who also received a D, scored lowest in their respective bodies on the report card. Krupicka, who is the most junior member of the Arlington delegation, was one of four legislators statewide to receive the Excellence in Education and Workforce Development Award from the Virginia Chamber. He was singled out for his work promoting early-childhood education. All 140 General Assembly seats, both Senate and House of Delegates, will go to the voters in November 2015.

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Thank you all so much for turning to us for information yesterday during the double fatality on 95 and the manhunt in Manassas. Hal Baumgardner Well I for one think that you guys and gals rock. Shannon Bateman You always post the local news soooo quick! Thank you to YOU! Anne Krisko Seiff That because IN Rocks!!! What other place can you go for up to the minute breaking news, a good laugh, a good argument, traffic, and the weather?! No where! Thanks fo all you do and keeping your sanity doing it! Robbie Rother I’m sure you don’t hear it enough, but thank you and y’all are doing a great job. Lesley Sullivan You do an amazing job! Juanita Tellez Thank you for always keeping us informed. You guys are awesome!! Join almost 50,000 of your neighbors like us on facebook.com/insidenova. Download your free InsideNoVa Mobile app at the iTunes store or Google Play.

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May 22, 2014

Local Legislators Given Mostly Good Marks on Performance by Va. Chamber of Commerce

11

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

12

Donnellan Proposes $2.7 Billion Capital Plan SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

Assuming the economic rebound continues and interest rates don’t rise through the roof, Arlington should be able to shoulder the $2.7 billion 10-year capital-improvement program proposed by County Manager Barbara Donnellan without imperiling the county government’s coveted AAA bond ratings. Donnellan unveiled her proposed package of big-ticket items, with its decade-long time frame that surely will outlast both her tenure and that of most or all County Board members, on May 13. Board members will finesse the plan and adopt their own version in late July, the same day they will ask for court permission to put funding for a host of capital projects on Nov. 4 ballot referendums. Her package represents “prudent and responsible investments,” Donnellan told

County Board members. County taxpayers will not be on the hook for all the costs; funding will come from a variety of sources, including federal and state grants and contributions from developers. In order to maintain its AAA bond ratings, the county government’s generalobligation debt can rise no higher than 10 percent of the annual operating budget, or a little over $110 million each year in current dollars. Given the economic assumptions in the plan, the highest that figure will reach during the 10-year period is 9.7 percent. “We believe this is a financially sustainable plan,” said Michelle Cowan, the county government’s director of management and finance. But, she acknowledged, no proposal that looks a decade in the future can be cast in stone. “This is a plan – it will change as we go

forward,” Cowan said. The proposal contains the expected mix of new projects and maintenance funds. (See below for highlights.) A little over half the entire amount is planned to address transportation, ranging from road-paving to the Columbia Pike and Crystal City streetcar projects. “These are investments in our economic competitiveness,” Cowan said. While the total dollar figure is a jawdropper, the proposal stays within all financial-management guidelines that provide oversight of county debt policies. And Donnellan made no apologies for asking for as much as she did. “Making investments in our community benefits our entire community,” she said. Between now and July, County Board members will hold “very robust” conversations to tweak the proposal, board chairman Jay Fisette said. Adoption of the final plan is set for July 19.

Highlights of Fiscal 2015-24 Capital Improvement Plan: $318 million for water-and-sewer infrastructure, most of it for maintenance. $226 million to fund capital needs of the Metro system. $514 million for the Columbia Pike and Crystal City streetcar projects. $25 million for a new fire station to replace the current Station No. 8 along Lee Highway. $94 million for Neighborhood Conservation projects. $128 million for street paving. $11 million for parkland acquisition. $30 million for synthetic-turf fields. $88 million for park maintenance. $53 million in park projects, including development of Mosaic Park in Ballston in two phases. $28 million for a rebuild of Lubber Run Community Center on a speeded-up schedule.

County Leaders Pleased with Purchase of Open Space A Staff Report

Arlington County officials say that even though they paid above the assessed value for a parcel on Lee Highway, time will prove the acquisition to be a bargain. County Board members on May 13 agreed to pay $2.4 million for the Rosslyn parcel, which is expected to be used for open space or recreational use, possibly to

complement a long-awaited new Potomac River boathouse. County Board Chairman Jay Fisette said the opportunity to acquire the parcel was too good to pass up. “We have a willing seller and a willing buyer – it’s time to move forward,” Fisette said at the meeting. The vote to acquire the property was 5-0.

County officials said the future of the property would be “shaped by several factors,” and said there would be a “comprehensive” public process. One possibility would have the county government working with the National Park Service, which currently is contemplating a boathouse site on a nearby parcel adjacent to the Potomac River. But that is just one option, officials said,

and the county manager did not include funding for such a project in her proposed 10-year capital-improvement plan. County Board member Walter Tejada said the need to acquire space in the immediate vicinity has been a priority since he first became active in local civic life 20 years ago. “This has been long in the making,” he said. “This is the right thing to do.”

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Politics

13 May 22, 2014

As Treasurer O’Leary Mulls His Future, Chief Deputy Has Been Lining Up Support for Eventual Campaign SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer

If she ends up succeeding her boss as Arlington’s treasurer, expect Carla de la Pava to continue the firm-but-fair collection practices that have seen the county’s tax-delinqency rate reach an all-time low. “If everybody pays, everybody pays less,” de la Pava said during a May 15 presentation to the South Arlington Kiwanis Club, held at Busboys & Poets in Shirlington. The county’s reported tax-delinquency rate stood at 9 percent in 1983, the year current Treasurer Frank O’Leary first won office, but progressively has been cut to 0.41 percent in the most recent fiscal year. “If we had a 9-percent delinquency rate today, we’ve have about a $60 million [annual] shortfall,” de la Pava told the organization – an equivalent amount to the annual budget for police. O’Leary is widely expected to step down at or before the end of his current term, which runs through December 2015. De la Pava, who serves as chief deputy treasurer, has set up a campaign account to run for the job, with the blessing of her boss. Over the course of a year, the treasurer’s office will handle more than a billion dollars. More than half of it comes from real estate taxes, which are due in installments in June and October. In her remarks, de la Pava said that while collecting, safeguarding and investing tax revenue are the office’s primary role, it’s also important to prevent delinquencies by supporting taxpayers. “That’s one of the first things Frank talked to me about in my interview,” de la Pava said. “We’ve tried to do a lot of things

setting the tax rate. It’s a much healthier way,” de la Pava said. While the colorful and sometimes controversial O’Leary hasn’t shied away from voicing his opinion on local issues, de la Pava says he, she and everyone else in Chief Deputy Treasurer Carla de la Pava discussed tax policy during a recent the treasurer’s discussion at the luncheon meeting of the South Arlington Kiwanis Club. office take its duties seriouswith customer service.” Among her favorite outreach efforts: ly. It’s up to the treasurer’s office to safethe humble robocall. At 14 cents apiece, the guard the funds, but to the County Board calls go out to taxpayers whose bills haven’t to decide how to spend them. “We don’t say, ‘Oh, we don’t like the been paid as the tax deadline looms. “It’s very inexpensive, but effective,” de streetcar, we’re not going to pay for that,’” la Pava said. “At events I go to, I have peo- she said. O’Leary has made clear that this term ple coming up to me, saying we’ve saved will be his last, but has given no clear indithem $400 or $500.” (That’s the cost of the 10-percent fine cation – even to his closest staff – whether for late payment of semi-annual property he plans to serve out his term or depart taxes on a slightly more upscale than aver- early. Asked about it at the Arlington County age single-family home in Arlington.) Democratic Committee School Board cauThe treasurer is one of five so-called “constitutional offices” in Arlington, cus on May 15, the treasurer said he was whose powers derive from the Virginia still thinking it over, but did not rule out an early retirement. constitution. “I’m going to do whatever the right Neighboring Fairfax County and Alexandria do not have elected treasurers, but thing is,” he told the Sun Gazette, adding that, at the moment, “I’m not sure what the most Virginia jurisdictions do. “The treasurer reports to the voters of right thing is.” An early departure would set up a speArlington – that’s a really important point. It separates the collection of taxes from cial election, followed in November 2015

by the general election. That de la Pava is interested in succeeding O’Leary has been far from a secret; it’s likely that she has been the treasurer’s choice as his successor since he hired her six years ago. She has become more visible in the community, serving as vice president of the Arlington County Civic Federation, and has been active in a number of Democratic political campaigns. She has picked up the support of Kevin Appel, who preceded her as O’Leary’s chief deputy. De la Pava and her husband, Mark Dola, live in Bellevue Forest and are parents of three sons. O’Leary was first elected in 1983 in a razor-close race against Republican Dorothy Grotos, who had served on the County Board. But as is often the case with Arlington’s constitutional officers, once elected, he rarely found himself seriously challenged; O’Leary was unopposed in the general elections of 1987, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011, and faced only nominal opposition in 1991. A 2007 Democratic primary race between the incumbent treasurer and challenger Bob James left some bad blood within the party over campaign tactics; O’Leary emerged riddled with political paper cuts, with no lasting damage. Arlington’s other incumbent constitutional officers – Sheriff Beth Arthur, Commissioner of Revenue Ingrid Morroy, Clerk of the Circuit Court Paul Ferguson and Commonwealth’s Attorney Theo Stamos – are expected to seek re-election in 2015. Each serves a four-year term except Ferguson, who as clerk of court has an eight-year tenure.

Once Elected, Constitutional Officers Tend to Stick Around A Staff Report

more than 29 years in office between 1945 and 1974; the tenure of Commissioner of Revenue Henry Holmes from 1876 to 1903 spanned more than 27 years; and Commissioner of Revenue Geraldine Whiting, who served between 1978 and 2003, logged more than 25 years. • William Hassan, who was commonwealth’s attorney from 1952-75, and Howard Fields, who was sheriff from 1916-1919 and again from 1924-43, each served for 24 years. Scott McGeary, who has watched the local political scene for decades and who at one time chaired the Arlington County Republican Committee, said the Arlington electorate has had an “historical tendency to re-elect incumbents in these jobs.”

McGeary said the reason for the lengthy tenure is that the positions, while elected, often are viewed as above politics. “I think in part it’s [the constitutional officers] and the voters viewing the jobs as administrative/professional,” combined with the incumbents having “meaningful involvement in community activities,” he said. “Frank’s a great example, as is David Bell, along with [Commonwealth’s Attorney] Henry Hudson and [treasurer] Colin McPherson in their days,” McGeary said. Bell, who saw virtually no opposition in elections during his long tenure, said he believed a variety of factors lead the public to be content with constitutional officers. “There is more to the ‘administrative’ or everyday service side to constitutional of-

fices rather than policy-making or legislative, as in the case of the County Board,” Bell said. “For that to produce longevity means that the people holding them must be perceived to be doing good jobs, or the intelligent Arlington electorate would not keep them around.” Bell noted that when there are contested races for constitutional offices, they often attract more voters than for County Board races, suggesting the public does pay attention to the individuals who hold the offices and to the issues involved. “I think the combination of having competent professionals holding the respective office, and the fact that those interested in more general legislative offices seek election to other jobs, are some of the reasons for the long tenures,” he said.

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Unless he retires before next spring, county Treasurer Frank O’Leary early next year will become the longest serving elected official in Arlington history. Even if he departs early, O’Leary already is part of a venerable group. Whether Republicans or Democrats, Arlington’s constitutional officers have had long tenures in office: • Harry K. Green, the county’s commissioner of revenue, served for 31 years, twoand-half months between 1920 and 1951. • David Bell, who retired at the end of 2007 as clerk of the Circuit Court, ranks second at just over 31 years. Bell was appointed to the post in 1976, winning election thereafter.

• Clerk of Court H. Bruce Green spent

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

14

Election Continued from Page 1 procedure. Under the process – new for 2014 – the third-place finisher (Greeley) was eliminated, with his votes being given to the remaining candidates as was marked on their ballots. Of Greeley voters, 465 picked Van Doren as their second choice and 263 picked Kanninen, leading to a razor-thin finish, with Kanninen ending with 1,812 votes and Van Doren with 1,794. The margin of 18 votes was far closer than occurred eight years ago, when Baird won the Democratic endorsement by 69 votes over Sharon Davis. (Baird opted not to seek a third term this year.) Last year, Lander, who was serving his first term on the School Board, garnered 1,144 votes to 1,097 for Kanninen, who was making her first bid for elected office, in the Democratic caucus. Most observers had expected this year’s race to go to an instant-runoff,

Grads Continued from Page 1 eryone has a plan [for success] until they get hit in the face” – Plank said students shouldn’t be so fearful of failure that they opt not to take chances. “It will happen to you,” he said of defeats and disappointments. “Be willing to face it and go on.” Plank, who noted it took him seven years to make it through the University of Maryland (thus making his honorary

Aquatics Continued from Page 3 something million left over from last year, earning not very much interest,” Kubicki said. “It must be sitting somewhere.” The response from County Manager Barbara Donnellan: If she can find a way to get the aquatics center back on track, those funds currently in limbo will be needed to help pay for construction, so they can’t be spent elsewhere.

Crime www.insidenova.com

Continued from Page 4

Sun Gazette

a gang activity has been “reduced substantially” in the region, the effort required constant vigilance. “Now’s not the time to sit on our laurels; now’s not the time to drop the ball,” he said. “We aspire to end gang activity. It has got to be a comprehensive community effort.” At the event, Arlington Police Detective Timothy Parsons and Sheriff’s Deputy Jon Harrell were honored for their service in the community. Parsons led the police effort to catch

as the three candidates were relatively evenly matched in terms of support. Van Doren had picked up the endorsement of the Arlington Education Association. All three candidates agreed that the tone of the campaign had been positive and civil, focusing on issues of importance to the 23,000-student, half-billiondollar-a-year school district. “There was not a lot to be negative about,” said Van Doren, who praised the “extremely positive” competition among the contenders. Van Doren said that on the two days of the caucus, many voters were still asking questions of the candidates before casting ballots. “People are voting on issues,” she said. “People really wanted information and wanted to engage in conversation.” Greeley noted the “feeling of energy” from those who turned out to vote. “I love the fact that they were positive campaigns,” he said. “It was a good race. I was happy to have done it.” Kanninen now will have Democratic backing as she moves into the general election. Audrey Clement, who has run four times for County Board under the

Green Party banner, has filed to run for School Board, and so far is the only opposition to Democrats. The filing deadline is in June. The turnout was larger than Democratic officials had expected, giving the party leadership a boost in morale after more than a month of bad news that began with the April 8 defeat of Alan How-

ze for County Board. “We were thrilled to have three excellent candidates who ran excellent campaigns,” Arlington County Democratic Committee chairman Kip Malinosky said of the School Board field as ballotcounting took place. “Everyone was a winner today,” he suggested.

doctorate from Marymount “the quickest degree I’ve ever received”), said his desire to become an entrepreneur was instilled at an early age by his mother. Selling lemonade, mowing grass and shoveling snow all gave him “that sense of empowerment, that sense of pride” that came with being your own boss, Plank said. “Entrepreneurship is a spirit and an attitude,” he said. “I believed that tomorrow would be better than today.” Among those walking off the dais with a degree in hand was Perla Braccio, who earned a bachelor of business administration degree with a marketing

specialty. Though born in Florida, Braccio grew up in Nicaragua, and while she has dual citizenship, she’s planning to return to the Central American country to build her life there. “I’m happy to be going home, but I’m so sad to be leaving,” she said while waiting under sunny skies to be ushered into Constitution Hall for the morning ceremony. Commencement exercises for Marymount graduate students were held that afternoon. Braccio received a Senior Leadership Award from the university, as did Nana Marfo, a native of Accra, Ghana, who

earned a bachelor of business administration degree. (“It really is a small world,” Braccia noted as they stood together for a photograph.) Plank cautioned students that in a fast-changing world, those who stand still will not reap rewards. “It takes hard work,” he said. “If you want excellence, you have to work harder and hustle more than anyone else.” He ended his remarks with a request of the new graduates: If they see a kid on a corner selling lemonade, stop and buy some, and thank the youngster for his or her entrepreneurial spirit.

At the meeting, however, Donnellan offered few hints as to how the effort to resuscitate the aquatics center was going. “We’re still in negotiations,” she said of the project, which has been stalled since the start of the year, after construction bids came in far higher than projected. The county government generally sells bonds once per year in May or June. Michelle Cowan, the government’s director of management and finance, said the annual sales anticipate the needs for the ensuing 12 months. Last spring, plans were in place to start construction on the Crystal City aquatics

facility by the end of 2013, making the sale of debt a prudent thing to do. An additional $30 million for the project, which also was approved by voters, remains unissued, Cowan said. Pressed by County Board member John Vihstadt on how much the county is losing by having the money sitting around, Cowan acknowledged there was a cost involved, but said staff hadn’t quantified the amount. After that back-and-forth, County Board members voted 5-0 on May 13 to approve the sale of nearly $75 million in new bonds, including $3.6 million for park-

maintenance projects. Vihstadt only went along after receiving assurances that none of the $74.5 million in bonds had anything to do with streetcars, the aquatics center or Columbia Pike SuperStops, all of which currently are in political crosshairs in a debate over county spending priorities. Board members on May 13 also authorized staff to watch market conditions and, if possible, sell up to $200 million in additional bonds to pay off existing debt. That authorization would last for the coming year, and the refinancing would only take place if interest rates fell low enough to make it cost-effective to do so.

and convict an area thief who had been targeting upscale bicycles. “We wanted to send a message: If you steal property in Arlington, you’re going to do time,” said Police Lt. Robert Madeiros. The effort worked: Circuit Court Chief Judge William Newman Jr. sentenced the convicted thief to 12 years in prison, requiring him to serve eight years before being eligible for release. Madeiros described Parsons as “a hard charger and an excellent detective – one of my best detectives.” Harrell was saluted for serving as the sheriff’s office’s liaison on gang issues. He heads up a unit that specializes in “security-threat groups,” which range from terrorists to sex offenders, and supports efforts to provide security for high-profile trials.

“He’s done a phenomenally great job,” said Sheriff Beth Arthur, who praised Harrell for “the professionalism he brings to the table.” “He’s really a stand-up guy,” Arthur said. The luncheon event marked the third year the Crime Solvers group honored local law-enforcement personnel. The organization is showing resurgence after a period of dormancy. “We were just about ready to dissolve it,” Police Chief Douglas Scott acknowledged. Andres Tobar, who serves as president of the organization, said it provides an important link between law enforcement and the community at large, especially those who might not, for whatever reason, have

complete trust in public-safety agencies. “Its mission is to provide a way for people who have some knowledge of a crime to report it without getting directly involved,” Tobar said. “It’s a way that folks who are victims of crime, or have seen crimes, can literally do something about it.” Tejada said the efforts of the organization’s boosters are making a positive impact. “We really appreciate everyone coming together,” he said. “Any effort that seeks to prevent crimes or reduce crimes deserves support.” For information on Arlington County Crime Solvers, see the Web site at www.arlingtoncrimesolvers.org. For information on the Northern Virginia Regional Task Force, see the Web site at www.preventgangsnova. org.

Barbara Kanninen, family members and campaign supporters gather for a photo at WashingtonLee High School after the results of the Arlington County Democratic caucus were announced on May 17.


Featured Property of the Week

In the Heart of Lovely Lyon Park

1926 Bungalow Features Exceptional History, Opportunities

The rear yard is a place to multi-task, with a large patio and grilling area. The large garden is an added bonus that delights the senses. Bonuses include the kitchen, which was renovated and expanded in 2005, and a new garage, designed by local architect Harlan Hadley in 2006, which offers a circular staircase to a 550-square-foot bonus area that offers many opportunities. The large upstairs bedrooms are delight for all ages, but particularly for children; one was transformed into a “play extravaganza” with train-berth sleeping area and even a trapeze. While retaining its historic ambiance (the original hot-water radiators have never gone out of style), the home also has been updated with modern conveniences. The result is a wonderful blending in a home where many memories have been made, with many more to come. Articles are prepared by the Sun Gazette’s real estate advertising department on behalf of clients. For information on the home, contact the listing agent. For information on having a house reviewed, contact the Sun Gazette’s real estate advertising department at (703) 738-2520.

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Address: 3114 8th Street North, Arlington (22201). Listed at: $1,280,000 by Natalie Roy, Keller Williams Realty (703) 8194915. Schools: Long Branch Elementary, Thomas Jefferson Middle, Washington-Lee High School.

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Surrounded by nature’s beauty, this week’s featured property is a charming, mid-1920s bungalow with a spacious floor plan, where three families in succession raised their children and saw the evolution to a new generation. Set in the heart of Lyon Park, the 5bedroom/3-bath home’s creative force was Mr. Coates, a contractor who built many of the Sears kit homes in the vicinity. As individual homes were built to owners’ specifications, he salvaged items not utilized and incorporated them into his own home. The result is an iconic structure that has stood the test of time and to this day remains a testament to creativity and individuality. The property currently is on the market, listed at $1,280,000 by Natalie Roy of Keller Williams Realty. Throughout the generations, TLC has been plentiful, and the owners also incorporated their own additions to the property. After the Coates family came the Vishers and then the Petersons, and each had fond memories to share. The yard is one of the largest on the block, with a white-picket fencing bidding all welcome. The front porch is a highlight of homes in the vicinity, showcasing neighborliness that extends to this day.

Dampened in part by severe weather patterns and other factors, the national housing market was sub-par during the first quarter, but an uptrend is expected with healthy underlying demand over the balance of the year and through 2015, according to presentations at a residential real estate forum as part of the National Association of Realtors’ Party Convention & Trade Expo. Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said the U.S. population has been growing steadily, but job creation has not. “When you look at the jobs-topopulation ratio, the current period is weaker than it was from the late 1990s through 2007,” he said. “This explains why Main Street America does not fully feel the recovery.” Although existing-home sales rose more than 9 percent to nearly 5.1 million in 2013, sales activity retrenched during the past six months. Even with gradual improvement moving forward, they are projected to decline about 3 percent for the year to just over 4.9 million, but should trend up to more than 5.2 million in 2015, officials said. Because of tight inventories and rising sales last year, the median existinghome price rose 11.5 percent to just over $197,000. Home-price growth is likely to moderate from more new home construction, with the median price increasing about 6 percent in 2014 to $209,000 and reaching nearly $219,000 next year as market conditions begin to balance. An upside of rising prices is a recovery in home equity. “Based on our forecast for this year, the median home-equity gain over three years is expected to be $40,000,” Yun noted. Although the pattern is uneven month-to-month, mortgage interest rates are forecast to gradually rise, with the 30-year fixed rate averaging 4.7 percent this year and 5.5 percent in 2015. “Inevitably, rising mortgage interest rates will hurt housing affordability,” Yun said. Housing starts have stayed below 1 million a year for the past six years, but need to reach the long-term average of 1.5 million to balance the market. “Because of the prolonged slowdown in construction, we now need 1.7 million housing starts per year to catch up,” Yun said. While improving, housing construction is seen at nearly 1.1 million this year and approximately 1.4 million in 2015.

May 22, 2014

Real Estate

1st-Quarter U.S. Housing Situation Was ‘Sub-Par’

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Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

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The #1 Family Team in Arlington

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Call Solange Ize at 703-861-7706 or send me an email at Solange.ize@gmail.com

tom.anderson@longandfoster.com www.tomanderson.LNF.com

NEW LISTING IN N. ARLINGTON Incredibly charming, completely and beautifully renovated, with stunning kitchen, lovely family room, 4 bedrooms, 4 full bathrooms and 2 half baths, with 3 fireplaces, one car garage, professional landscaping and irrigation system, located in the Golf Club Manor neighborhood of North Arlington. Jamestown, Williamsburg, Yorktown schools. Nice parks nearby, bus stop at the corner, easy commute to everywhere.

4000 N. Upland St, Arlington, VA 22207

Call/text/email me any time

Your Life is Changing — I Can Help! ®

Colonial with New Kitchen addition with granite counter tops, space for table and chairs, 1st floor full bathroom, 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths, newer replacement windows, newer heating and air conditioner, finished basement, fenced rear yard and an additional fenced area for gardening. Oak hardwood flooring and ceramic tile. Covered deck and a yard with nice landscaping. Close location to Ballston Metro, Shopping, Restaurants, Metro Bus Line. Bike trails.

JIM McGARITY 703-522-0500 Office 703-283-7509 Cell

TOM ANDERSON 703-284-9348 Office

Asking price $1,150,000.

703-362-7764

www.BestArlingtonHomes.com CHRISTINE.RICH@longandfoster.com

John Plank, Associate Broker (703)528-5646 John.plank@LNF.com

Lyon 4.5BA--$1,839,900 $ 1,789,900 LyonVillage Village -- 4BR 4BR 4.5BA

Arlington is my neighborhood, let me make it yours. #1 Sales agent for 20 years Associate Broker, DC, MD and VA BSBA Real Estate Investment & Construction

4710 2nd St. N.

TIRED OF REPAIRING YOUR OLD HOUSE?

SOLANGE IZE 703-861-7706

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Arlington Forest $669,500

www.jimmcgarity.com jim.mcgarity@longandfoster.com

WOW!

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tra An unassuming front hides a home with walls of Con r Source: Information based on data supplied by MRIS and its member Association(s) of REALTORS, who are not responsible for its accuracy. Does not reflect all activity in the marketplace. January 1, 2011 – December 31, 2011. If you own a house that needs work and you don’t want to do e d and to multiple decks treetop verified, and does not constitute an opinion of MRIS or Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc. ©2012 All rights reserved. Information contained in this report is deemed windows, reliable but notdoors guaranteed, should bewith independently Un any repairs to prepare it for the market, call me. views overlooking Windy Run Park. Area lighting, I have the perfect buyer for your home. built-in seats, a super gas grill that conveys, even Follow us on: two electric awnings which allow you to sit and I have buyers looking for a fixer-upper or a tear-down. cook out in the rain! Plus, all the bells and Your house will be sold strictly in ‘AS IS’ condition. You don’t have to worry about inspections nor repairs. whistles of a custom renovation with lots of built-in shelving and cabinets; chef’s kitchen with Viking, Call me today for a Subzero, Bosch, etc. and adjacent breakfast FREE, NO OBLIGATION consultation. 1st floor Master Suite with whirlpool bath I can tell you what your best options are. Carol, Jerry & Jinx room; and separate rain shower, plus private deck with I can sell your property free of hassle for you. 703-622-4441 hot tub, and MUCH more! Perfect for the empty nesters. Only 5 minutes to Georgetown or I-66! 3 See more at McEwen-Lunger.com BR, 3 BA. $1,300,000 Virtual Tour at www.2415NLincolnSt.com

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Life Member, NVAR Top Producers Club Life Member, NVAR Million Dollar Club Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) Graduate Realtors Institute (GRI) 29 Years Real Estate Experience

Carol, Jerry & Jinx 703-622-4441 See more at McEwen-Lunger.com

Unfortunately for buyers looking for an excellent home at a great price, this one went to contract before we could even get it into the MLS. That happens a lot with our listings, cause other agents and people who know our past clients, know to come to us when they’re looking for a great property. Although this one’s already gone, you should still contact us if you’re looking for a great property at a great price. Don’t be fooled by the idea that you can see everything we can with your own Internet search, or that you can get a better price from the listing agent.

The #1 Family Team in Arlington

See ALL of our listings at www.longandfoster.com

Taylor ES • Swanson MS Washington-Lee HS

www.johnsellsarlington.com

Lovingly updated, expanded 4BR 4.5BA 1937 Tudor, 3 blocks to Metro, one stoplight to DC. Impressive 2 story addition boasts 12’ ceilings in expansive family room. True gourmet kitchen, breathtaking Master suite, full finished basement w/rec room & shop area, oversize 2 car garage w/alley entrance and lovely screened porch. Fenced rear yard. Professionally landscaped for year round beauty – over 1000 bulbs!

1505 N. Herndon Street Arlington 22201

ALEXANDRIA/Fairlington 1 Bed + Den / 2 Bath / Walk-out

TRULY RARE walk-out 1422 SF Barcroft II model: fenced backyard w/patio for entertaining or Fido * Remodeled kitchen that is gorgeous * Remodeled bath w/tub converted to shower equally gorgeous * LL painted paneling & replaced light fixtures * EZ access to/from I-395 * Tennis & swimming pool close by * Shirlington’s retail, restaurants, movies super convenient * Arlington mailing address, but located in Alexandria * More! * Please call for a private showing.

JOHN MENTIS 703-284-9457 202-549-0081 www.JohnMentis.com

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$384,900

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Your Life is Changing — I Can Help! ®

www.insidenova.com

www.insidenova.com

This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath brick colonial has an attached garage and an attractive lot. Property was sold “as is”, and is ripe for remodeling.

LD

CHRISTINE RICH

McLean Offices 703-873-3500 • 6862 Elm Street | 703-790-1990 • 1311A Dolley Madison Blvd.

Sun Gazette

$740,000

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

5 BR / 3.5 BA / Close-in / Convenient to everywhere—$1,295,000 REALTOR ®

Wynnewood Colonial

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

REALTOR ®

Long & Foster

~ Beautifully updated home in Stone Ridge ~ renovated master bath / two other updated baths / re-finished floors / new carpet / new deck / new terrace / 2-car garage Huge! / Gorgeous!

N ARLINGTON

Sun Gazette


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HOW TO CHOOSE AN OPTICIAN Choose a full service eye care center that is equipped to handle all your vision needs for prescription eyeglasses, contact lenses and prescription sunglasses. Ophthalmologists and Optometrists are doctors who specialize in eye health, diseases of the eye and vision disorders. Opticians take the written prescription and fill them accordingly. It is a good idea to make sure the optician you choose is a certified or licensed professional. Good opticians will consult with you about your general lifestyle that will help in the selection process. Once they understand your individual eyewear needs they can begin the frame selection process. A good optician should be able to match faces to frames that will enhance your look and your lifestyle. Interaction with your optician is crucial to being a happy and satisfied eyeglass wearer since you want to see your best and look your best. Choose a professional optician. It is important to feel confident in your eye doctor. Be sure your ophthalmologist does comprehensive examinations that includes: . General eye health evaluations of the eye, lids and surrounding tissue. . Evaluation of motility and convergence. . Refraction of the eye to check for vision errors . Glaucoma check

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virtually build and preview your storage shed. Customization options are nearly unlimited: size, style, color, windows and doors. Check to make sure you’re completely satisfied before delivery. #2 The second most important aspect of buying a storage shed is accessibility. It’s common for people to purchase storage sheds only to realize they have no way to get it in place. Often storage shed companies offer “site checks” where they come to the delivery site to confirm accessibility. If you have un-accessible passages, ask if the company builds on site. These sheds are usually referred to as “Kits.” Make sure to ask if the dealer uses their own delivery crew instead of an outside contractor. #1 The most important factor of buying a storage shed is your budget. Plan your budget to see what type, style, and size you can afford. Ask the sales representative if financing, credit cards, rent-to-own, and or cash discounts are available. Yet, it is important to realize that often you get what you pay for. Examine materials and structure before you purchase. There are still plenty of options for even the lowest of budgets. Visit your local dealers to determine the best value for your money.

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veryone has important questions and concerns when making a major purchase like a storage shed. Here are five helpful tips, facts, and overall useful knowledge to know before you invest in your storage shed. #5 When purchasing a storage shed it is often useful to research local companies’ websites before visiting their sales lots. Search the online rating of each company or check if they are a member of the BBB (Better Business Bureau). Compare prices, quality and service. Talk to your friends and neighbors that have previously purchased. Make sure you’re comfortable with the company’s customer service before buying. #4 An essential step in your storage shed purchasing is to determine whether you are allowed to have a storage shed on your property. Check with your local county zoning office to make sure the storage shed will meet local code when it’s delivered. Keep in mind many home associations require a certain style or matching color. #3 Research companies on the basis of customization. Some only stock a basic lot model and others offer numerous options. Some storage shed websites allow you to

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Choosing A Preschool Program: The Montessori Difference

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ne of the greatest controversies surrounding preschool selection is whether to choose a play-based or academic program. Well, what if you don’t have to choose? In a Montessori classroom, play IS a child’s work. What is Montessori? Montessori preschools use a child-centered approach where children make choices about activities based on their interests and natural abilities, which creates an outcome of successful hands-on experiences and joy in learning. While there is a focus on academics, children work at their own pace using special toys that build confidence and critical thinking skills. A Montessori student experiences a calm, engaging classroom that illustrates learning in a way that is an adventure in exploring life including:

is a set of sandpaper numerals, 1–9. For learning addition, subtraction, and place value, 1, 10, and 100 are represented in various shapes made of beads, plastic, or wood. » Language: Montessori language materials provide experiences to develop use of a writing tool and the basic skills of reading. For writing skill development, the metal insets provide essential exercises to guide the child’s hand in following different outline shapes while using a pencil or pen. For reading, a set of individual letters, commonly known as sandpaper letters, provide the basic means for associating the individual letter symbols with their corresponding sounds. Displaying several letters guides children to learn the letter sounds, which blend together to make certain simple phonetic words like “up” and “cat”. » Cultural Studies: The world’s geography and peoples are explored through such materials as maps, globes, flags, water and landforms, books, and cultural suitcases containing country-specific materials. » Integrated Art and Music: The arts are incorporated into daily classroom activities from painting and creating sculptures from basic craft materials, music through listening, playing and performing. Finding and maintaining a beat is crucial in forming attention and assist with memory development. » Science: The children explore

in the natural and physical world and conducting experiments with simple equipment. They learn to ask and work and what causes change, as well as communicate what they expect to happen and what they actually see. Observe a Montessori classroom! Call Northeast Stars Montessori Preschool at 703-945-0408 to make a reservation. www.nestars.net

Energetic young explorers will enjoy a journey through the culture and lifestyle of South America, Northern Africa and Northern Europe.

• Creative Cooking & Crafting • Hands–on Science Experiments • Music and Movement • Outdoor Exploration

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Arlington Campus

(Mt. Olive Baptist Church) 1601 S. 13th Rd • Arlington, VA 22204

Alexandria Campus

(Old Towne near Trader Joe’s) 688 N St. Asaph Street • Alexandria, VA 22314

DC Campus

www.nestars.net

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Ages 30 months to 6 years old June 24 – August 22 Monday-Friday, 8:30am – 3:00pm $300 per one-week session After camp care, 3:00pm – 6:00pm (additional fee)

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2014 Summer Camp Casting Call:

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» Mathematics: In this area, materials are provided to show such basic concepts as numeration, place value, addition, subtraction, division and multiplication. For numeration, there is a set of ten rods, with segments colored red and blue and “spindle

learning the numeral symbols, there

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» Sensorial: The sensorial materials provide a range of activities and exercises for children to experience the natural order of the physical env ironment, including such attributes as size, color, shape and dimension. Many materials are basic concepts for complex math and geometry such as sequential cubes, knobbed blocks that fit variable sized cylinders, and color tablets for matching pairs or examining variations of shapes and colors.

into separate compartments. For

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» Grace, courtesy and socialization: Living in community with others is essential to creating a calm environment where children feel safe to explore. Everyday living lessons focus on polite manners, such as folding hands, walking in line, not interrupting, being attentive, and respecting people and property.

sets of objects in groups, 1–10,

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» P r a c t i c a l l i f e : Fu n c t i o n a l independence is one of the greatest ways to boost a child’s confidence and self-esteem. The precise movements and sequences developed doing practical activities such as polishing, buttoning, bow tying, and lacing strengthen motor skills and concentration. Pouring, scooping and sorting activities, washing a table, and food preparation.

boxes”, which consist of placing

703.945.0408

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northeaststarsmontessori.nes@gmail.com


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May 22, 2014

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Schools & Military n David Crawford of Arlington, a graduate of Wakefield High School and Marymount University, earned a juris doctor degree, with specialization in communications law, during recent commencement exercises at the Catholic University of America. n The following Arlington students earned degrees during recent commencement exercises at the University of Oklahoma Norman: Allison Lamp earned a master of arts degree, David Burpoe earned a master of arts degree, Jamie Fleischhacker earned a master of arts degree in administrative leadership and Heather Hopkins earned a master of arts degree.

Nick Apseloff, the son of Roy Apseloff and Barbara Shaffer of Arlington and a 2010 graduate of Washington-Lee High School, earned a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering, with high distinction, during recent commencement exercises at the University of Virginia. He will attend Georgetown University Medical School in the fall. n

n The following Arlington students earned degrees during recent commence-

ment exercises at Clemson University: Anne Buckalew earned a bachelor of science degree in financial management; magna cum laude; Sarah Eule earned a bachelor of arts degree in English; James Nottingham earned a bachelor of science degree in marketing; and Krista Vikander earned a bachelor of science degree in management.

n Dina Hamami has been named to the president’s list for the spring semester at Coastal Carolina University. n Tyler Ford of Arlington earned a bachelor of science degree during recent commencement exercises at Keene State College.

Sophia Maxstadt of Arlington has been named to the dean’s list for the winter term at Washington and Lee University. n

Michael Tramonte of Arlington earned a bachelor of business administration degree during recent commencement exercises at Gonzaga University. n

n Troi Morgan of Arlington earned a bachelor of science degree, cum laude, during recent commencement exercises at Upper Iowa University. n Dina Anbinder, the daughter of Tyler Anbinder and Jordana Pomeroy of Arlington and a graduate of Georgetown Day School, and Jeffrey Schlossberg, the son of Robert and Helene Schlossberg of Arlington and a graduate of Saint Albans School, have been named to the dean’s list for the fall semester at Franklin & Marshall College.

n Shannon Johnston of Arlington has been named to the dean’s list for the spring semester at Marietta College. n Ryan RisCassi of Arlington has been named to the honor roll for the spring semester at Brevard College. n Jasmine Passa of Arlington, a student at Denison University, has been awarded a Benjamin Gilman International Scholarship to participate in off-campus study.

Yorktown High School senior Hannah Shoultz received Outstanding Interpretation in the photography category of the National PTA Reflections competition.

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Sun Gazette

Stanley Martin Green Living Homes

MHBR No. 3588 | *Prices, incentives and availability are subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions apply. Closing cost coverage and option incentives do not apply to all communities, lots and house types. Design Studio Options Incentives applies to non-contingent contracts written and ratified on or before 5/31/14. Structural Options Incentives applies to non-contingent contracts written and ratified on or before 6/1/14. 50% of options up to $15,000 with a maximum discount of $7,500. *Closing cost incentive only applies when using First Heritage Mortgage. See your sales manager for details.

Get the Right Jobs

HOME OF THE YEAR 2012 & 2013

The Washington Academy of Sciences has recognized Arlington Career Center teacher Anne Cupero with the Bernice Lamberton Award for innovative approaches to teaching science and motivating students in STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering and Math]. Cupero and six other teachers were recognized in the fields of mathematics, computer science, physical sciences, biological sciences and environmental sciences. All awardees become recognized as Fellows of the Academy. Cupero is the eighth Arlington educator recognized by the Academy since it began more than a century ago in 1898, and is the fourth to become a Lamberton Fellow of the Academy. Cupero has been science teacher for more than 25 years and is certified in other subjects, including English and social studies. She created a course in forensic science and forensic technologies for Arlington Public Schools and the Virginia Department of Education, which she has also taught at the undergraduate level at Marymount University. In addition to her career with APS, Cupero is an adjunct professor of biology and human biology at Northern Virginia Community College. The Washington Academy of Sciences serves as an affiliation of more than 60 science, engineering and technical societies in the Washington region. n Kenmore Middle School instructional-technology coordinator Michael Goodman and seventh-grade social studies teacher Lilo Stephens have been selected to attend the 2014 Global SMART Exemplary Educators Summit, taking place in July in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. They will be among 76 educators from across the nation gathering to share their passion for educational technology and expand their skills. TM

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Emma Pierson of Arlington is one of 18 students across the nation to be awarded a Hertz Fellowship for 2014. The fellowships allow students to complete their doctoral studies in the applied physical, biological and engineering studies, and are given the independence to pursue their scientific work without the constraints of traditional research funding. A Rhodes Scholar who studies physics and computer science at Stanford University, Pierson has worked as a statistician at 23andMe and Coursera. Her long-term research interests lie in using computational statistics to study genetics and cancer. n

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Build the home of your dreams -

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Her work, “Ink Mirage,” was judged against top works from across the nation on interpretation of the theme “Believe! Dream! Inspire!” as well as artistic merit, creativity and mastery of the medium. National award winners will be recognized at the annual PTA Convention, to be held in Austin, Texas, June 19-22.

Jobs.insidenova.com


55+ News

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nior centers will be closed on Monday, May 26 in observance of Memorial Day.

p.m. at Aurora Hills Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-5722.

TRAVELERS HEAD DOWNSTATE TO VISIT GARDENS: Arlington County 55+

WALKERS HEAD ACROSS WOODROW WILSON BRIDGE: Members of the Ar-

Arlington’s reAltor® #1 Agent

lington Walking Club will traverse the Woodrow Wilson Bridge on Wednesday, May 28 at 9:30 a.m. The cost is $4 for transportation from Culpepper Garden Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-4403.

Travel hosts a trip to Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens in Henrico County on Tuesday, May 27. The cost of $39 includes lunch. For information, call (703) 228-4748.

in Arlington Office Life Member, NVAR Million Dollar Club NVAR Top Producers Club Certified Residential Specialist

TRAVELERS HEAD TO VALLEY FORGE:

GUIDE DOGS TAKE CENTER STAGE:

Arlington County 55+ Travel hosts a trip to Valley Forge, Pa., and the King of Prussia Mall on Thursday, May 29. The cost is $15. For information, call (703) 228-4748.

Guiding Eyes for the Blind will host a demonstration of guide-dog services on Tuesday, May 27 at 11 a.m. at Arlington Mill Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-7369.

Owned and Operated by NRT Incorporated

www.ArlingtonHouses.com carol@ArlingtonHouses.com

LEE WOODCARVERS SHARE TIPS: The

DISCUSSION FOCUSES ON FUNERAL PLANNING: A discussion on funeral

703-568-1100

Lee Woodcarvers of Lee Senior Center share carving tips on Thursday, May 29 at 1 p.m. For information, call (703) 2280555.

planning will be presented on Wednesday, May 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Arlington Mill Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-7369.

ESTATE PLANNING TO BE DETAILED:

TRAVELERS HEAD TO BLUEGRASS FEST: Arlington County 55+ Travel hosts

a trip to Round Hill, Va., for a bluegrass jam on Friday, May 30. The cost is $12. For additional information, call (703) 228-4748.

An estate-planning session will be presented on Wednesday, May 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Arlington Mill Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-7369.

WALKING GROUP TO MEET: The Fast

WORKSHOP LOOKS AT SURVIVING RETIREMENT FINANCIALLY: Making the

What Carol’s Clients say “Generally, when I am asked for referrals I try to provide at least two or three names. If, however, someone asks me if I know a good residential real estate specialist, the only name I would consider providing is Carol Temple.”

Forwards fast-paced walking group meets on Friday, May 30 at 9 a.m. at Aurora Hills Senior Center. For information, call (703) 228-5722.

most of retirement assets will be discussed on Wednesday, May 28 at 1:30

May 22, 2014

SENIOR CENTERS CLOSED FOR HOLIDAY: Arlington County government se-

- Roger O.

SELLERS: ALWAYS INTERVIEWING FOR LISTINGS • CALL BILLY BUCK • Large rear addition • 11,968 sq. ft. lot • Master suite • Dual vanity • Jetted tub • Walk-in closet • Granite counters • 2 fireplaces • Extensive land & hardscape • Attached garage • Bonus room • Move-in ready

5709 LITTLE FALLS ROAD

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703-528-2288 x21 • www.BuckRealtors.com • 703-855-2825

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Buck & Associates, Inc. Realtors • Billy Buck

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3017 N. PERSHING DRIVE

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May 22, 2014

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Ron Cathell | Monica Gibson | Eileen Aronovitch Tim Anderson | Tagrid Wahba | Pam Sachs

NVCC Graduates Lauded for Overcoming Obstacles

YOUR ORANGE LINE SPECIALISTS®

LYON PARK CHARMER

LYON PARK COLONIAL

25 N. Highland Street • Arlington • $1,225,000 • Modern Colonial in Lyon Park nice walk to Clarendon Metro • New kitchen w/Caeserstone counters, GE & Bosch appliances, island w bar • 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths; gorgeous high end master bath • 3 pristine finished levels, front porch, 2-car garage & long driveway

3011 N 3rd Street. • Arlington • $1,099,900 • Just 5 blocks to Clarendon Metro, shops & dining • Vintage Craftsman, tall ceilings, crown trim, fireplace • 3 bedroom plus den, 1 bath, new kitchen appliances • Two-level deck with hot tub, great yard for play or pets SPECTACULAR RENOVATIONS

STUNNING TOWNHOUSE

New graduates of Northern Virginia Community College enter the George Mason University PaPHOTO BY KEVIN MATTINGLY/NVCC triot Center on May 18 to begin commencement exercises.

SCOTT McCAFFREY Staff Writer 1511 #105-A North Rolfe St. • Arlington • $949,900 • Spectacular 2-level TH just steps to Courthouse Metro • Walk to shops, dining, movie theatres, and more • Gorgeous chef ’s kitchen and open floor plan • Stunning master suite and large designer closets • Cheerful stonescape patio; 2-car covered garage parking

6335 Lakewood Dr. • Falls Church • $665,000 • Stunning renovation with open floor plan for today’s living • Enjoy gorgeous chef ’s kitchen with top appliances & breakfast bar • Spacious Master Suite with spa bath, shower & soaking tub • Total 4 BRs, 3 full BAs on over 1/3 acre, gardens & deck • Lower level ideal for extended family, au pair, guests

CALL OUR DIRECT LINE

703-975-2500

www.teamcathell.com Each office is independently owned and operated.

John Plank Real Estate Services, Inc. Long & Foster Real Estate john.plank@longandfoster.com (703) 528-5646

#1 Sales Agent for 20+ years Over 1,500 Homes Sold Over 25 Years of Full Time Experience BSBA, R.E. Investment & Construction

www.insidenova.com

Associate Broker Licensed in VA, DC & MD

Sun Gazette

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Even within a student body as diverse as that of Northern Virginia Community College, the route Frank Maia took to commencement day was far more circuitous than most. Born in Swaziland of Portuguese ancestry, Maia grew up in South Africa, settled in Portugal after high school, found no work there and then found himself in the United States, at times facing homelessness and hunger. When he first enrolled in NVCC, he couldn’t afford the cost. But on May 18, the 28-year-old Manassas resident earned an associate of science degree, summa cum laude, in business administration, and soon will head to Georgetown University with a $30,000-a-year scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation to assist with his studies. “My path is no more special than yours,” Maia told fellow graduates during commencement exercises at George Mason University’s Patriot Center. “We all came here to be better versions of ourselves.” Many of the 6,000 students who earned degrees and certificates during the academic year were on hand. They all share the traits of “commitment, courage, persistence and determination,” said Robert Templin Jr., president of the college. Templin said Maia is emblematic of that determination, while singling out the efforts of two other recipients of Jack Kent Cooke Scholarships: Amin Syed of Sterling, who aims to ultimately attend medical school, and Armian Hanelli of Arlington, who this fall begins engineering studies at Virginia Tech. “Each has struggled to overcome significant challenges,” Templin said, as have many of the other students at what is Virginia’s largest institution of higher education. What pushes students like Maia to succeed against unfavorable odds? He pointed to his wife as well as his desire to make a difference. “I always wanted to take care of people the way my mother took care of me,”

Frank Maia, who is headed to Georgetown University in the fall, was one of the student speakers at Northern Virginia Community College’s commencement ceremony.

he said. The main speaker at the college’s 48th commencement ceremony was Dr. Charles Errico, a longtime history professor who, like many of the students earning degrees on May 18, was in the first generation of his family that had the opportunity to attend college. Noting that students at NVCC come from 170 different countries and speak 15 languages, Errico said they should feel welcomed in “a nation that has given us a second chance.” “The real strength of America is in its diversity,” Errico said, but remarked on a sense of complacency among many across the U.S. and in his classroom. Pointing to centuries-long struggles for civil rights that have yielded fruit, Errico noted that “some of my students take all of this for granted – then we are shocked back into reality.” “It’s now your obligation to carry the struggle forward,” he told the Class of 2014. Northern Virginia Community College began life in 1965 in a warehouse in Baileys Crossroads. Today, it has 78,000 students spread across six campuses. NVCC board chairman Jerome Bennett told the fresh graduates that commencement is “really the beginning of what’s next for you.” Bennett pressed the new graduates to “share what you know [about the college] with those who don’t know . . . [it’s] an amazing place, it has a great story to tell.”


GMU Grads Urged to Be True to Mason’s Principles

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George Mason University graduates should emulate the courage, civicmindedness and inspirational leadership shown by the school’s namesake, keynote speaker David Rubenstein told the Class of 2014 on May 17. George Mason resisted pressure from other founding members of the United States and did not sign the Constitution until it was amended to include a Bill of Rights, which made the document much more powerful, Rubenstein said. Rubenstein, who founded The Carlyle Group and has been active in the preservation of historical documents and buildings, urged the graduates to give back to their community and country, follow their consciences when making difficult decisions and learn how to write and speak well in order to become effective leaders. “Regard yourself as one of the progeny of George Mason,” Rubenstein said. “Avoid the path of least resistance.” Graduates included 4,711 students who earned bachelor’s degrees, 2,512 with master’s degrees, 187 with law degrees and 285 with doctorates. As has been the case in years past, psychology was the top undergraduate major, with 311 candidates earning degrees in that field. Rounding out the Top 5 majors were biology (263 degrees); accounting (254), criminology, law and society (243); and information technology (228). Graduates hailed from 54 countries and 42 U.S. states, plus Washington, D.C. In the lead-up to the ceremony, GMU officials honored military veterans and asked them to stand and be recognized as the band played the song of their service branch. GMU president Angel Cabrera lauded the graduates for their achievements and asked them to sit through one more event before departing. “I still have your diplomas, let me warn you,” he joked. Cabrera singled out four bachelor’s degree recipients as exemplifying the university: Francis Aguisanda, who majored in biology and has accepted a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health; David Lucas, who has excelled in the field of

finance; and Cordelia Cranshaw, a major in social work who was among the only 3 percent of children in foster care who graduate from college; and Mia Norton, a 79-year-old theater major. “Never forget that example,” Cabrera said of Norton’s achievement. “Learning never ends.” Class of 2014 member Zach Eisenstein, who received his bachelor’s degree in communications, gave the graduate address. Eisenstein said GMU fosters a learning environment that recalls “The Opposite of Loneliness,” a book of essays by Yale University graduate Marina Keegan, who was killed in a car accident on Cape Cod two years ago. “We have found something bigger than ourselves,” he said. “The pursuit of happiness is only possible by people coming together.” C. Daniel Clemente, rector of GMU’s Board of Visitors, bestowed Mason Medals on three people – the most ever in one year. This year’s recipients were West*Group Inc. founder, CEO and president Gerald Halpin, a noted developer who was responsible for building much of Tysons Corner’s office space; Dr. Frank Pettrone, an orthopedic surgeon who teaches sports-medicine practices and cares for athletes on several sports teams; and Peter Stearns, GMU provost and executive vice president, who will retire as provost in June. Janel Taylor, 22, of Newport News, who received a bachelor’s degree in communications, said she chose GMU for a change of scene and to broaden her horizons. “I wanted to expand myself as much as I could,” Taylor said. “GMU was very diverse and different from the area I was [living] in. There are many opportunities in the D.C. area.” Kelsey Vermaaten, 22, of Richmond, who earned her bachelor’s degree in global affairs, chose GMU for its eclectic campus and proximity to the District of Columbia. “You get the best of both worlds,” she said. “After I came here and saw the programs that they have and everything that goes on on campus, it was a perfect fit.”

Sun Gazette


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n High school spring sports action. n Local baseball, soccer roundup.

For more sports visit:

www.insidenova.com/sports/Arlington

W-L Rallies For Victory In Opener

Teeing Off

Bad Home-Plate Umpiring Is So Frustrating to Watch Inconsistent and tight strike zones. Is their anything worse in the games of baseball and softball? Nothing drives pitchers, catchers, coaches and fans nuttier.

Generals Increase Win Streak to Six

Dave Facinoli

ALLEN KHA For the Sun Gazette

Entering her team’s matchup against the Hayfield Hawks in the first round of the Liberty Conference 6 girls lacrosse May LACROSSE tournament 15, WashingtonLee Generals coach Jenni Macintosh knew her high school squad needed to play with pace to be successful. The Generals betrayed that style in the first half, a physical 25 minutes that saw the score tied at 4. Washington-Lee responded early in the second half with that pace and resolve, using an early scoring run to secure a 12-8 victory for its sixth win in a row and ninth victory in 10 games. Next, third-seed Washington-Lee (114) plays the Yorktown Patriots on May 21 in the semifinals. Against Hayfield, Washington-Lee built a 3-1 lead in the first 10 minutes. By slowing the game’s tempo and crowding the crease, Hayfield battled back with three unanswered goals to take a 4-3 lead. Sophomore attacker Courtney Coster paced the visiting Hawks, scoring two of her three goals in that first-half stretch. “Hayfield is a very physical team, and that’s not where our strengths lie,” Macintosh said. “I told our team at halftime that while we were playing well, we needContinued on Page 24

Top: Washington-Lee’s Meghan Fox is defended by Hayfield’s Leah Brennan. Above: WashingtonPHOTOS BY DEB KOLT Lee’s Elie Seff gets past Hayfield’s Nicolette LaPalme. Jackie Cook is in goal.

Longtime Wakefield Coach Receives Sendoff DAVID BALICK For the Sun Gazette

was recognized for his more than 20 years of service to the team. Baker is stepping down after spending the last 16 years as the Warriors’ head coach. A number of Baker’s former players were on hand for the event, including standout shortstop Gene Burpoe, who played at Temple University, as well as some of his former coaches and current and past Wakefield coaches, and Wakefield faculty members attended. “The support tonight was incredible,” Baker said. “My favorite part of coaching was watching and turning young kids into gentlemen during my four years with them.” “We have had some great teams and

a great coaching staff, with a lot of fond memories,” Baker said. “But it is time for me to step down and watch my son play high school baseball.” In other ceremonies before the game, Wakefield’s senior players were honored, as was Burpoe. He was chosen all-state twice while playing for the Warriors. “I loved coaching guys like Gene Burpoe, who would get me to throw him batting practice until my arm fell off,” Baker said. “Guys like him gave it their all and were a pleasure to coach.” When the game began, the contest became a pitcher’s duel. Park View scored Continued on Page 24

Unfortunately, those zones exist and they can significantly change strategies and approaches to games. When that happens, adjustments have to be made. By trial and error, pitchers and catchers have to determine just where a particular umpire’s strike zone is, then adapted according, if that’s possible. The only problem? When the zone is inconsistent, it’s always changing, so adjustments don’t work. On one pitch the outside corner is called a strike, then on the next it’s not. Sometimes a low pitch is a strike, then it’s not . . . and so on and so on. That was the case during the championship game of a recent high school baseball tournament in Northern Virginia. The home-plate umpire’s zone was so tight and inconsistent, any adjustments didn’t matter. The game became very frustrating to watch, and it was a challenge for the coaches to keep their tongues. “I almost got myself thrown out, I was so frustrated for my pitchers,” one coach said. “The zone was tight and all over the place. Nothing worse.” Umpires are human so there will always be some variations of strike zones. But overall, the area between the knees and shoulders needs to become better defined and consistent across the board in both baseball and softball. If that means better training for umpires and regular evaluations of their strike zones, then that needs to happen. In doing so, if it’s determined that an umpire’s strike zone is unsatisfactory, then he or she should not be allowed to work home plate, relegating them to field work only. Some umpires admit they aren’t very good, or comfortable, calling balls and strikes. They would rather work the field. Crews usually work that out among themselves. In contrast, a number of home-plate umps are top notch and have consistent and fair strike zones. They are always welcomed and much appreciated for their quality work.

Find daily updates on the Web at www.insidenova.com. Stay in touch through Twitter (@sungazettespts) and Facebook (sungazettenews).

www.insidenova.com

There was more than just a high school baseball game, involving the host Wakefield Warriors, played May 15 at rainy Barcroft Park. Wakefield lost to the Park View Patriots, 1-0, in eight BASEBALL innings in that contest to finish the regular season with a 2-13 record. Next for Wakefield was a first-round game of the Conference 13 Tournament on May 18 against the top seed and host Marshall Statesmen. Before the game with Park View, longtime Wakefield head coach George Baker

May 22, 2014

Sports

See More on the Web

23

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

24

O’Connell Caps Season With Yet Another State Title DAVE FACINOLI Staff Writer

A runner-up finish in their conference tournament didn’t sit well with the Bishop O’Connell Knights, especially since the girls high school softball team was the 10-time defending champion. So the Knights (20-5) did something about that bad feeling and bitter taste. A few days later, the No. 2 seed its season by winning a SOFTBALL ended third straight Virginia Independent School Athletic Association Division I state tournament. The night of May 16, O’Connell downed the top seed Paul VI Catholic Panthers, 3-1, in the championship game at Dinwiddie Sports Complex near Richmond. The state crown was O’Connell’s 19th in 21 years. After having a 5-4 record through nine games, O’Connell got hot and ended the season strong. “This group overachieved,” O’Connell coach Tommy Orndorff said. The coach said losing in their conference tourney final inspired the Knights. “The energy and enthusiasm they had in the dugout in the state final was the best I’ve seen in my 29 years

The Bishop O’Connell Knights gather with their state championPHOTO BY ELENI GOLDSMITH ship trophies the night of May 16.

here as head coach,” Orndorff said. “They didn’t like coming up short. We played awfully good softball in the state. [tournament]” Junior right-hander Erin Sweeney pitched a complete-game five-hitter against Paul VI in the state final.

She struck out five and did not walk a batter. “I really think that loss to [St. Mary’s] Ryken in our conference final and that experience made her better prepared for the state final,” Orndorff said. “She pitched with a lot of confidence. It was a growing process for Erin this season. She was filling big shoes.” In the state final, O’Connell scored single runs in the second, fourth and fifth innings after two batters were out in each frame. Maggie Goldsmith doubled and scored on an error in the second. Kayla Turner singled in the fourth and scored on Maddie’s Kelly’s popup that was misjudged and fell for a hit. In the fifth, Amanda Ehlers walked and scored on Olivia Giaquinto’s double to deep center. The Knights had seven hits. Hayley Metcalf, who will play at Pennsylvania, was 2 for 4. O’Connell was 3-0 in the state tournament, defeating No. 7 seed Flint Hill, 11-2, in the first round, then No. 3 seed St. Gertrude, 16-0, in three innings in the semifinals. Sweeney was the winning pitcher in each game. Metcalf was 3 for 3 and Sweeney 2 for 2 with a triple and three RBI in the semifinal. O’Connell had 10 hits. For more on O’Connell, visit www.insidenova.com and click on Arlington sports. NOTE: The 20-win season was the 22nd in a row for O’Connell.

High School Roundup YORKTOWN GIRLS TENNIS CHAMPION:

Yorktown High School freshman Valerie Marshall won the Liberty Conference girls singles tennis championship in straight sets. Marshall defeated Harman Waraich from South Lakes in the semifinals, 6-3, 6-1, then Simone Stoyen from Langley in the finals, 6-3, 6-4. Marshall teamed with Zoe Dormuth (senior captain) to advance to the doubles championship. The pair defeated the McLean team of Ellie Capozzi and Nicole Bruner, 6-1, 6-4, in the semifinals. The doubles final against a team from Langley was scheduled to be played on May 19, after the Sun Gazette’s print deadline. YORKTOWN BOYS TENNIS TEAM TO REGION: The Yorktown Patriots boys tennis

team qualified for the region tournament after emerging from a three-way playoff by defeating South Lakes and Madison by 5-4 scores. Against South Lakes, Yorktown got singles wins from sophomores Luke Maxwell and Will Donahoe and freshman Tate Arevalo. In doubles, Maxwell and Jacob Dormuth won at No. 1, followed by a come-from-behind win at No. 2 by Arevalo and Donahoe.

Lacrosse www.insidenova.com

Continued from Page 23

Sun Gazette

ed to play to our strengths and counter more, run more.” After Hayfield’s senior midfielder Emily Ryan scored early in the second half to give the visitors a 5-4 lead, Washington-Lee scored six unanswered goals over

Wakefield Continued from Page 23 the only run in the top of the eighth in-

Against Madison, Yorktown won at the first four singles positions, then at No. 1 doubles. Yorktown finished the regular season with a 13-3 record. Also contributing to the regular season were sophomores Perry Kaufman and Kiernan Stroup. W-L BLANKS YORKTOWN IN BASEBALL ACTION: Sophomore right-hander Teddy

Herbert threw a three-hitter and struck out three in the Washington-Lee Generals’ 4-0 home win over the Yorktown Patriots last week in baseball action. Herbert threw 96 pitches and walked four. Yorktown junior right-hander Graeme Fineman started and took the loss in the final regular-season game for both teams. Washington-Lee (11-10) advanced to play in the Liberty Conference tournament, where it blanked Fairfax, 5-0, in the first round. Visit www.insidenova. com for a story about that game. For Washington-Lee against Yorktown, Andy Collins, Will Burgess and Paul Landini each had two hits, and Chris Seymour and Alex Wandler had the others. T.R. Sheehy also made a significant contribution. The night before, Washington-Lee

lost to West Potomac, 8-4, as Sheehy had two hits. The Generals had an 8-1 record against National District opponents this season, which was the best of any teams in the league. n The No. 5 seed Bishop O’Connell Knights (16-14) ended their season with a 2-1 road loss against No. 4 seed Norfolk Academy (24-4) in a first-round game of the Division I state private school tournament. For more baseball roundups visit www.insidenova.com and click on Arlington sports. STATE CHAMPIONSHIP CREW RESULTS:

the girls varsity eight was fourth in the petite finals, and the girls second varsity eight was fifth in the finals. YORKTOWN WINS IN ICE HOCKEY:

Yorktown’s club team (5-0-1) defeated Flint Hill, 3-0, to remain unbeaten in the spring hockey league. Yorktown’s stiff defense was led by goalie Stephen Lovelace. He made 16 saves to earn the shutout. Jacob Dormoth, Chris Guastaferro and Teddy Dalquist each scored once on Yorktown’s 25 shots on goal. Nick Puglisi and Dalquist also added assists.

At the Virginia Scholastic Rowing Championships, the Washington-Lee High School boys second varsity eight shell earned a bronze medal in the finals. Members of the shell were Connor Bradfield, Robert Powell, Kelly Quillin, Ariel Pizzamiglio, Henry Mai, Lance De Koninck, Nathanial Grevatt, Eliott Ishak and Tuck McFarlane. Also, the boys varsity eight was sixth in the finals and the girls junior varsity four was fifth. Yorktown’s boys lightweight four was second in the finals, the boys junior eight was third in the finals, the boys varsity eight finishing third in the petite finals,

WAKEFIELD BASKETBALL CAMP: The

the next 10 minutes to take a commanding 10-5 advantage. Macintosh was pleased with her team’s resolve in the second half, enough to give her team the next day off from practice. “I’m so proud of the effort our team gave the entire game. The girls battled through the first half, then came out so strong in the second half by getting back to how we play best,” Macintosh said. The Generals are looking to exact

revenge for their 10-9 overtime loss to Yorktown during the regular season. “That’s going to be an intense game. We all know each other. It’s friends playing against friends, even sisters against sisters. It’ll be an emotionally-charged game and we’ll have to come out and play our game,” Macintosh said. Sophomore midfielder Meghan Fox led the Generals with seven goals, five of which came in the second half. Junior

midfielder Julia Fyffe added three goals. Under the old National District format, W-L had a 6-1 regular season record, with the lone loss to Yorktown. Yorktown (11-3), which was undefeated in the district with a 7-0 record, nipped the South Lakes Seahawks, 9-8, in the Patriots’ first round of conference playoff action. It was Yorktown’s fifth one-goal win of the season.

ning. Wakefield freshman Jaime Seguy allowed one run in six innings, striking out five. His Park View counterpart, Jason Leckembly, threw a complete-game shut-

out. He did not allow a hit until the fifth inning. Wakefield seniors Marcus Boyd, Jalen Carver, Leo Biette-Timmons and Alex Ward all reached base, but the Warriors

were unable to score. Biette-Timmons provided two scoreless innings on the mound in relief in what was the final home game of his Wakefield career.

Wakefield High School boys basketball camp run by head coach Tony Bentley in Wakefield’s new gym is June 23-27 for session I and June 30 until July 3 for session II. Current and former Wakefield players and coaches run the camp. For more information, visit www.tonybentleybasketballcamp.com or e-mail Tony. Bentley@apsva.us. WAKEFIELD

COACHING

VACANCY:

Wakefield High needs a varsity girls volleyball coach and a freshman girls coach. Contact Noel Deskins at (703) 228-6733 or e-mail noel.deskins@apsva.us.


Sports Briefs II

25 May 22, 2014

SAGE TAKE SECOND IN SOFTBALL TOURNEY: The

Arlington Sage 10-under girls softball team had its strongest outing of the season, earning the top seed and reaching the finals at the Spring Opener Invitational in Sterling. In pool play, the Sage went undefeated by defeating the Manassas Blaze, 12-5, behind strong pitching from Abby Kohan, multiple-hit games from Molly Kaufman and Riley Keelan, and strong defense by Emilie Doty. The Sage then downed the Fauquier Freeze, 6-1, behind Olivia Fried’s nine strikeouts, timely hits from Lucy Lee Treene and Ava Edwards, plus a key pick-off at third base by catcher Nina Schroeder. In the semifinals, the Sage rallied from a 7-2 deficit against the Fusion, with Kaitlyn Potts scoring three times to ignite a comeback and a 9-8 victory. In the finals, the Sage trailed, 7-1, but three big hits from Kirsten Gulbranson and key defensive plays by Eva Butler, Emily Reagan and Audrey Maxwell got the Sage back to within two before finally losing, 11-9, to the Xplosion. LOCAL PLAYER ON D.C. UNITED AFFILIATE TEAM: The

D.C. United Academy has several affiliate clubs that actively help identify, develop and monitor players in the Maryland, Virginia and D.C. area. These affiliate clubs assist D.C. United in developing high quality players that are ready to perform at premier college programs and potentially play for D.C. United’s first team. Six clubs are affiliate members with the D.C. United Academy including the Arlington Soccer Association. Lucas Mendes is an example of the symbiotic relationship between D.C. United and affiliate club member, Arlington Soccer Association. Mendes played for Arlington since he was in the third grade and accomplished several feats with the Arlington Impact Red. He

The Arlington Sage display their tournament honors.

is now a member of the D.C. United under-16 team and looks forward to continuing the winning ways he had with Arlington. “Arlington gave me everything,� Mendes said. “They prepared me well and gave me the opportunity to come play at D.C. United. I can’t think of a better situation.� Mendes has played on three Virginia State Cup championship teams. ARLINGTON TRAVEL BASEBALL TRYOUTS: Arlington

County baseball players can register to try out for an Arlington Travel Baseball fall 9-under team. Tryouts are for players born May 1, 2005 or later. Tryouts are Sunday, June 8, from noon until 3 p.m. Players should register in advance at www.arlingtontravelbaseball.org. Players selected will practice twice a week and play doubleheaders on Sundays during the fall. FOOTBALL CAMP: On Saturday, June 14, Washington-

Lee High School football coaches and players, in conjunction with Arlington Youth Football Club, host a non-contact football camp for kids ages 8 to 14 at W-L. The camp will focus on skills, drills, and proper tech-

Arlington’s Lucas Mendes plays for the D.C. United Academy.

nique for all youth football players. Registration is from 8 to 8:30 a.m. and the camp runs until 11 a.m. MARYMOUNT BASEBALL CAMP: The Marymount Uni-

versity baseball Summer Youth Day Camp for players ages 7 to 15 is June 23-27 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Bishop O’Connell High School. Marymount head baseball coach Frank Leoni is the camp director and coaches from his staff and other area high school coaches will lead the camp. The fee is $300 per camper or $250 per camper for multiple campers. The camp will cater to all skill levels. For more information, visit http:collegebaseballcamps.com/saints. CYCLING EVENT IN ARLINGTON: Professional and

amatuer cyclists, in partnership with the Crystal City Business Improvement District and the Boeing Company, the Air Force Association Cycling Classic returns to Arlington June 7-8. Registration is open at www. cyclingclassic.org/general-registration.html.

classiFieds legals FOr sale

Steel Building:

4UFFM#VJMEJOHT #JHPS4NBMM4BWF Allocated Bargains. VQUP'PS 40x60 on up. CFTUEFBMXJUI We do deals. DPOUSBDUDPOTUSVD www.gosteelbuildings.com. UJPOUPDPNQMFUF Source# 18X. 4PVSDF9 540-907-4270  lawn/garden

Alan’s Mowing Service

Small Yards Welcome.

$35 and up

571-535-0067

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www.insidenova.com

• McLean • Vienna • Arlington

"#$-*$&/4&

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

26

legals 7*3(*/*"*/5)&$*3$6*5$06350'5)&$06/5:0'"3-*/(50/ $06/5:0'"3-*/(50/ 7*3(*/*"  B1PMJUJDBM4VCEJWJTJPOPGUIF$PNNPOXFBMUIPG7JSHJOJB            $PNQMBJOBOU         $BTF/P$-  W        +".&41"3,4 &5"-  





 





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www.insidenova.com

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Sun Gazette

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employment

27

NEEDED NOW! Dental/Med Offices now hiring No experience? Job Training & Placement Assistance Available 1-888-395-8261 CTO SCHEV

Opening for a part-time Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Home Monitor. Must have dependable transportation. This position requires visiting family child care providers in Arlington and office hours in Warrenton. Experience in Early Childhood and/or CACFP preferred. USDA and Child Nutrition, Inc. are equal opportunity providers and employers.

Please fax resume to (540) 347-2225 or email bethw@cni-usda.org

professionalservices financial services

accounting services

C3 Financial Services

ACCOUNTING FINANCIAL LTD

Have you reached the point where you are sick and tired of trying to get your finances in order? I can help you...

ESTABLISH a plan for retirement and college NAVIGATE through a financial crisis BUILD a working budget ELIMINATE debt

Vienna. Small business accounting & financial services since 1975. Corporate & Individual Taxes New business formation, budgets, procedures, financial reports.

We have the answers you need! Call 703-224-8078 or visit www.c3financialservices.com

703-255-5508

Dave Ramsey trained coach*

*Disclaimer: I am an independent coach who is neither an agent nor employee of, or subject to the direction of, Dave Ramsey or his company, the Lampo Group, Inc.

Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc

Senior Program Director Volunteers of America Chesapeake, Inc. is a faith-based, non-profit organization whose mission is to inspire self-reliance, dignity and hope through health and human service. We are looking for a talented Senior Program Director of the Residential Program Center (RPC) who will be responsible for the overall management and development of substance abuse and residential services for persons seeking detoxification and pre-detoxification services as well as individuals who are homeless or at risk of homelessness in Arlington County. The RPC SPD shall work with the Vice President of Homeless Services to ensure the provision of services that promote the client’s ability to engage the participant in appropriate community activities, and enable the individual to develop the daily living skills needed for independent functioning. The SPD shall have operational oversight of the Homeless/Substance Abuse programs including recruiting, hiring, training and supervision of staff. In addition, the SPD shall supervise the Program Director of Homeless Services and the Program Director of Substance Abuse programs and work to develop, implement and monitor the operating budget.

We provide a drug-free and harassment-free workplace for all employees.

lawn&garden JMJ Horticulture AssociAtes 10% Winter Discount • Mulching/Winter Pruning/Spring Clean-Up • Ponds & Pondless Waterfalls • Landscape Design Installation • Landscape Lighting/Nightscaping • Retaining Walls • Walkways • Patios • Irrigation • Powerwashing

All PlAnts & MAteriAls GuArAnteed 571-334-6142 www.jmjhort.com Over 25 years experience • Licensed & Insured

J.P. Ventura Lawn Service, LLC

Sweet Garden Lawn Care Licensed and Insured

Complete lawn and garden maintenance

Mowing • Pruning • Mulching • Leaf Clean-up Weeding • Planting • Seeding • Fertilizing Aeration • Edging • Tree Removal • Hauling Gutter Cleaning• Power Washing • Handy work



(703) 863-7465

Spring Clean-Up

P. sosA LAndscAPe

Safari Lawn & Landscaping

571-405-0254

Since 2009

Leo Coelho, owner www.sweetgardenlawn.com SPRING CLEAN UP

• Patio and walkways • All kinds of retaining walls • Deck & gazebo • Sum pump installation • Erosion control /sod & seed • Grading Lily ponds • All kinds of concrete work • Basement Dewatering

Lawn Mowing • 1/4 acre yard $30 Deck staining • Deck repair Driveway sealing • Yard clean-up Mulching • Trash hauling • Fence repair Powerwashing And MUCH MORE!

dba ARLINGTON ORGANIC Lawn & Garden Care

(703) 915-2458 arlingtonorganic@me.com

A&S Landscaping and Construction

Complete Lawn & Garden Care Spring Clean- Up Mulching • Gutter Cleaning Tree Work 'SFF&TUJNBUFT -JDFOTFE*OTVSFE

PALMER LAWN & GARDEN

We Guarantee a Great Job! Call for FREE estimate!

703-627-7723

703-585-0474 703-385-2127

HVAC SERVICE TECH Residential New Construction HVAC Company located in Sterling, VA is seeking CFC certified and experienced technicians for DC, MD and VA areas. Year round work, excellent pay, benefits, and company truck Please call Maria Perez @ 703-674-5846 to set up an appointment or email your resume to maryh@falconhvac.com.

career training

Interested & qualified candidates should send a letter of interest & resume/curriculum vitae to Tonya Fulwood, Vice President of Homeless Services at: tfulwood@voaches.org Volunteers of America Chesapeake, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. It is our policy that we will not discriminate against any person based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, disability or veteran status.

FREE TUITION AND TRAINING* Join our Elite Team and receive the best training, technology and marketing as well as a full package of Real Estate Services. We are committed to our agents so you can work hard for your clients and produce more business with higher earnings. *(Reimbursed)

BE YOUR OWN BOSS TODAY! Please Call Now for Class Schedules!

SCOTT THOMASON• 703-201-6272

Leonard Landscaping, Inc. A Creative Garden Design & Installation Company Since 1987

N. Arlington, Mclean, Tysons, Vienna, Reston, Great Falls

SPRING CLEANUP SPECIAL ONE FREE CUBIC YARD OF SHREDDED HARDWOOD MULCH WITH A NEW 2014 MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT

LICENSED • INSURED • EXPERIENCED • FREE ESTIMATES

Amazonia Inc. Lawn & Landscaping Service Mowing Starting at $25 Weekly • Every 10 Days • Biweekly Yard Clean-up •Trimming Edging • Overseeding • Aeration Mulching • Lic & Ins

703.799.4379 703.799.4378

May 22, 2014

Child Nutrition, Inc. (CNI)

Dental/Medical Assistant Trainees

703-675-7460 leonardlandscaping.com Elmer’s Lawn and Garden • Lawn Mowing • Fertilizing • Weed Control 20+ Yrs. • Mulching Experience • Aeration • Trimming • Tree Pruning

• Gutter Cleaning • Seasonal Cleaning • Planting • New Lawns • Retaining Walls • Patios • Drains

Call for free estimate 703-878-4524 elmerslawnandgarden@msn.com

Fairfax’s Outdoor Living Experts

Lawn Care, Mulching, Trimming, Pruning, Trash Removal, Power Wash, Stone Work, Gutter Cleaning, Cut Trees & More!

Mention this Ad for A 10% discount Licensed & Insured With Over 15 Years Experience sosalandscape@gmail.com

in the Sun Gazette, Leesburg Today, Ashburn Today, Prince William Today & Middleburg Life

Call Tonya Fields today at 703-771-8831 • tfields@sungazette.net

• rain Exchange Systems • ponds and waterfalls • rain gardens • Stormwise Solutions • permeable pavers • native plantings

• patios & walkways • Masonry walls • LEd Lighting • Fireplaces • outdoor Kitchens • designs & Masterplans

1352 East Market St, Leesburg VA 20176 • 703-777-2210 www.northErnVirginiALAndScAping.coM

www.insidenova.com

Reach over 160,000 homes!

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

28

lawn&garden tree services

EXPERT Tree Cutting & Stump Removal At Affordable Rates

Spring Special 15% OFF Tree Service! Gutter Cleaning • Stone Work • Sod Tree Planting •Spring Cleanup • Mulch Accepting All Major Credit Cards johnqueirolo1@gmail.com www.vaexperttreeremoval.com

HES Co. LLC

703-203-8853

Licensed/Insured • Member Angie’s List & BBB

The Heart of Wood

tree services

tree services

tree services NORTH’S TREE & LANDSCAPING tree Experts for over 30 Years family owned & operated Sprin SpECiaG 540-533-8092 l Spring Clean-up Specials 25% o

f

f witH • Clean Up • Trimming • Pruning tHiS • Deadlimbing • Tree Removal aD! • Uplift Trees • Lot Clearing • Grading • Private Fencing • Retaining/Stone Walls • Grave Driveways Honest & Dependable Serv. • 24 Hr. Emerg. Serv. Satisfaction Guaranteed Lic./Ins. • Free Estimates • Angie’s List Member • BBB

S&S Tree

DaviD KenneDy’s Tree service Mulching & Power washing seasoned Firewood available all TyPes oF Tree work Tree & sTuMP reMoval 10 Years experience Licensed & insured We accept aLL Major credit cards 540-547-2831 • 540-272-8669

Services

• Trimming • Removal Pruning • Landscaping • Gutter Cleaning

540-683-0470

Licensed & Insured yourhandymanservice1@gmail.com All Major CredIt Cards Accepted

Tree Service

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We offer tree removal, pruning & stump grinding. We will clean out your trees & yard, not your pockets! We thoroughly blow clean your yard before we get paid. Our prices are the same today as they were before the storm. Licensed • Insured • Workers Comp Owned & Operated by N. Arlington Homeowner 18 Years Experience

your landscapIng busInes s?

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www.InsIdenova.com

contact tonya Fields for advertising rates and deadlines!

tfields@sungazette.net 703.771.8831

homeimprovement architectural design

Mitchell Residential Design Custom Home • Room Additions Remodels • Decks CADD Work 25+ Years Experience

703-577-1737

mitchellresidentialdesign@yahoo.com Licensed VA Realtor

brick & block

brick & block

Decorative Concrete & Paver Specialists We offer a variety of finishes, including Stamped Concrete & Pavers, to provide your project a unique & special look. Driveways • Patios • Walkways • Pool Decks • Steps Stoops • Retaining Walls • Pavers

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MOTTERN MASONRY Design

An Award Winning Firm

Custom Home & Remodeling 703-999-8824 • www.ajalliarch.com Licensed in VA, MD, DC

Historic Restorations • Specializing In Custom Patios • Walls • Walkways • Stoops • Small & Large Repairs

All Work Guaranteed • Free Estimates Top Rated on Angie’s List • Licensed & Insured

703.496.7491

www.motternmasonry.com

bath & kitchen remodeling

Bathroom Remodel Special $6,850 Celebrating 15 Years in Business!!

TWO POOR TEACHERS Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling

www.insidenova.com

5x7 Tub Bathroom Remodel

Granite countertop

Sun Gazette

Select your remodeling products from our Mobile Showroom and Design Center!

Handyman Servcies Available: Call 703-999-2928

Full Insured & Class A Licensed EST. 1999

Free Estimates Estimates 703-969-1179 VisitFree our website: www.twopoorteachers.com

    

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carpentry

Master Carpenter • 25 yrs exp • Free Estimates • References Available

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carpet cleaning

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BRICK - FIeldstone FlAGstone - ConCRete

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advertIse your busIness! Call Tonya Fields for rates! 703-771-8831 tfields@sungazette.net

Enjoy your patio this summEr! Call the talented professionals in the Sun Gazette Classifieds for help with those pavers, bricks or flagstone! Need to advertise your business? Contact Tonya Fields for rates 703-771-8831 • tfields@sungazette.net


homeimprovement concrete

Celeste’s Cleaning

SPR I CLENG 10% AN OFF

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Mar y’s

Cleaning Ser vices, I

Residential / Commercial

nc .

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Cell: 571-426-2517 email: Lovellservices@gmail.com

Handyman S & S Services Interior•Exterior Painting Drywall • Plumbing • Electrical & much more! All Major Credit Cards Accepted

540-683-0470 • Licensed & Insured yourhandymanservice1@gmail.com

home improvement , LLC

Finished Basements - Complete Kitchen & Bath Remodeling Finish Carpentry - Decks - Screened Porches - Custom Painting - Cambridge Pavers Patios - Pressure Washer Full Service Roofing - Siding - Gutters Francisco Rojo Licensed & Insured

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References available. Call for Free Estimate.

o Interior & Exterior Painting o Carpentry o Decks o Basement Refinishing o Stain o Fences o Power Wash o Kitchens o Bathrooms o Ceramic Tile o Electrical o Plumbing o Gardens o And Much More! Free Estimates • Since 1992 • Lic & Ins

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edwin@heroshomes.com

hauling AAA+ Hauling

Garages

D&B Hauling And Moving

Junk

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handyman

The Handy Gopher Handyman Services Brent Landreth

703.340.0942 Small Job Specialist 40 years of experience

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703-403-7700

General Carpentry Repairs • Drywall Tile • Door & Window Installations Int & Ext Painting • Concrete & Stonework • Baths Basements • Additions • Total Remodeling Floor Heating Installations Insured/Licensed • Free Estimates/Excellent References

703-989-9946 • 703-242-5107 adrcorp@yahoo.com www.homeimprovementnova.com

KB Home Improvement For all your home improvement needs! • Rotton

Wood & Window Seal & Trim Repair / Installation of Hand Held Bidet • Garbage Disposals • Drywall Repairs • Remodeling • Cabniet Refinishing • All Masonry • Brick Retaining Wall Repairs • Painting • Plumbing

703-508-9853 • 703-207-9771 25 Years Experience • Licensed & Insured

constr debris

No Job Too Small, Too Large! We do it all!

Light & Heavy Hauling Trash Removal • Yard Clean-Up Raking & Mowing! Call Bob 703-338-0734 or 703-250-3486

home improvement

Additions & Renovations

Setting a Standard in Home Renovations

& New Construction Solutions

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Residential & Commercial Remodeling

CONTRACTORS, INC.

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Build it the right way with R&J!

Residential & Commercial Remodeling Since 1979 Custom Additions • Basements 2nd Story Additions • Kitchens & Baths Garages & Carports Sunrooms • Replacement Windows Licensed • Bonded •Insured Free Estimates • References

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appliances

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We do general Cleaning & one Time Cleaning You name it, We Do it! Free in Home estimates! available Monday-saturday Lic. Bonded. ref’s negotiable rates

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decks

License# 2705146711 Lic./Bonded/Ins. Good References All Major CC’s Accepted

Heating Cooling Plumbing

My HandyMan

Great References • Licensed, Bonded & Insured

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heating & air conditioning

handyman

May 22, 2014

cleaning

29

Sun Gazette


May 22, 2014

30

homeimprovement HBM SunGazette Flat Ad 2-10-2014.pdf

home improvement

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painting

KEITH’S PAINTING

C

IT’S SPRING PAINTING TIME!

M

SMALL JOBS OK

Y

Touch-ups • 1-4 rooms only! Available evenings & weekends. Powerwashing ALSO. References Available.

CM

MY

CY

Cell: 571-426-2517 Email: Lovellservices@gmail.com

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plumbing

Martin Thibault

Interior & Exterior Painting for 20 Years

703-476-0834

Very Reasonable Prices Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates

Ercilla Home Improvement   -JDFOTFE #POEFE *OTVSFE (PPE3FGFSFODFT

Residential & Commercial r*OUFSJPS&YUFSJPS 1BJOUJOH r%SZXBMM r1PXFS8BTIJOH r#BUISPPNT r5JMF

PAYLESS PAINTING •Interior • Exterior

•Floor Sanding & Installation

• Powerwashing • Light Carpentry • Drywall Repair Free Estimate

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0EZTTFZ 1BJOUJOH --$ -JDFOTFE*OTVSFE

Interior/Exterior • Drywall • Wood Replacement Power Washing • Deck Staining

odysseypaintingllc@gmail.com • Tel: 703-586-7136

Finished Product, LLC

No Job Too Small!

• Wallcovering installation and removal • Interior and exterior painting • Specialty Finishes • Power Washing • Carpentry • Drywall • Wood replacement • Moldings Design and color consulting available

Sewer and Water Repair and Replacement Bathroom Remodeling & All Your Plumbing Needs

Finishedproductllc.com

703-627-3574

703.281.0452

VA Contractors License # 2705-129028 CIC,HIC,PTC

Starlight Painting

Wallpaper Removal

www.StarlightPainting,LLC.com Residential & Commercial Interior/Exterior Paints & Stains All Home Improvements

ATLANTIC ROOFING 703-685-3635 Family owned & operated since 1987

See us on the web! www.atlanticroofing.org

roofing

Drywall Repair Powerwashing Windows Gutters Decks

Don Voigt/Virginia Contractor

Roofs

703-490-3900

dvhousepainter@gmail.com License/Insured/Bonded FREE ESTIMATES

Carlos Painting, inC.

ut abo Ask Spring r ou cials! Spe

Advertise your service weekly in the Sun Gazette. tfields@sungazette.net

roofing

Syd’s Plumbing & Repairs

painting

Does 61,000 homes in Arlington & Fairfax know about you?

Special Price for Empty Houses!

DOUGLAS ROOFING CO, INC. Quality Roof & Gutter Service Since 1985 Family Owned & Operated in Northern VA for Over 40 Years! New Roofs • Guttering & Downspouts • Shingles • Shakes • FRT • Flat • Slate

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•Interior & Exterior •Drywall •Plaster Repair •Textured Ceiling •Water Damage •Deck Sealing •Pressure Washing •Wall Paper Removal •Crown/Chair Molding •Rotton Wood •References •Window Seals •Guaranteed •Trim Repair

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Call George Anytime! 703.901.6603

WE DO

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Sun Gazette

The Sun Gazette reaches 61,000 homes every Thursday, by mail, not tossed on driveways. You can trust that your ad will reach homeowners. Contact Tonya Fields for advertising details. 703-771-8831 • tfields@sungazette.net


US_OL200

Items taken from the archives of the Northern Virginia Sun. For information on local history, see the Web site at www. arlingtonhistoricalsociety.org. May 23, 1944: n Auto dealer Joseph Cherner is spearheading an effort to build a major shopping district in Shirlington. n All Virginia men between the ages of 18 and 45 with “4-F” draft status soon could be called to duty for work in essential industries. May 21, 1960: n Developers have sent plans for a new $2 million Lee-Harrison Shopping Center to the Planning Commission. n The editorial page asks: Does the recent rejection of nine bond referendums by Arlington voters suggest bad news for Fairfax County’s proposed $26 million school bond? n A National Labor Relations Board examiner has ruled partially in favor of each side in the 14-month strike of the International Typographical Union against the Northern Virginia Sun. May 23-24, 1967: n Marymount College will hold its largest commencement ever, as 240 women receive diplomas. Elizabeth Campbell will receive the Mother Gerard Phelan Medal. n A state study group wants Virginia’s cigarette tax, imposed as a “temporary” measure in 1960, rescinded by 1970. n Yorktown High School will hold its annual carnival later this week. May 22, 1975: n The Kann’s department store chain is going out of business, and will close its big Virginia Square store. n Arlington’s superintendent, Larry Cuban, lacked minimum state requirements for the job when he was hired last year, but got a waiver, the Sun has learned. n The county government could close three recreation centers to solve the budget crisis. May 23, 1986: n Helen Fahey has been appointed to succeed Commonwealth’s Attorney Henry Hudson, who will be sworn in June 3 as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia. n It appears that Strom Thurmond has the upper hand over John Warner to take over the Senate Armed Services Committee upon the retirement of Barry Goldwater.

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21. Perk up, as an appetite 22. Boot camp outing 23. Checklist detail 24. Mild expression of wonder 25. ___ buco 28. Sitcom staples 30. Helter-skelter 31. Pirate hideout 32. Go a round with? 35. Brothers’ keeper? 38. Garfield, to Jon

42. Visibly frightened 44. Banded stone 45. Colony member 46. What comes to mind 47. Weather report stats 48. Safe end of a sword 51. Time before 52. Boxcars half 53. Modicum 54. Lyrical preposition 55. Bear necessity

INSIDENOVA pocket-sized. Now no matter where you are, you can get all your local news, sports, and traffic. Download the InsideNoVa app, then follow all the news in Northern Virginia, anywhere you go.

CROSSWORD SOLUTION

www.insidenova.com

Download your free INSIDENOVA app at the itunes store or google play.

Sun Gazette

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Weichert

May 22, 2014

32

Real Estate

Mortgages

Arlington, N

®

Closing Services

Ultra Convenient Locale!

$579,900

Handsome all brick Colonial close to Ballston & Metro sited on a lovely landscaped garden lot in N. Arlington’s Bluemont/Bon Air neighborhood. Enjoy 2 bedrooms/2 updated baths, spacious living rm w/fireplace & built-ins, separate dining rm w/charming architectural curved archway & period corner cabinet, kitchen opening to huge deck & level, fenced backyard-the perfect spot for outdoor enjoyment after the long winter! Gleaming refinished hardwoods, fresh paint throughout, & a finished lower level w/rec rm complete the package. All just steps to county parks, bike trails and around the corner from the vibrant Orange Line corridor

Annandale

Insurance

Gorgeous Water View Setting!

8333 Chapel Lake Court

5121 N. Carlin Springs Road

DAVE LLOYD & ASSOCIATES

q

703-593-3204

WWW.DAVELLOYD.NET

q

$350,000 6207 LEE HWY

Oakton Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla mattis, enim nec sollicitudin pulvinar, nibh eros tincidunt mauris, eu consequat metus risus eu odio. Cras fringilla ullamcorper urna, at mattis felis ultricies eget. Cra fringill. (Web ID 1234567) $1,299,000

New Listing

$829,900 9113 SAUNAS CT

2804 JEFFERSON ST N

Jane Smith

Sales Associate 703-555-1234 jsmith@weichert.com

$1,269,900 3439 MARTHA CUSTIS DR #927

$267,500

Style, Comfort and Elegance

Style, Comfort and Elegance

For more information, call Jane Smith at 703-555-1234

DAVIDLLOYD@REALTOR.COM

For more information, call Jane Smith at 703-555-1234

For more information, call Jane Smith at 703-555-1234

Oakton Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla mattis, enim nec sollicitudin pulvinar, nibh eros tincidunt mauris, eu consequat metus risus eu odio. Cras fringilla ullamcorper urna, at mattis felis ultricies eget. Cra fringill. (Web ID 1234567) $1,299,000

q

Style, Comfort and Elegance

Style, Comfort and Elegance

Oakton Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla mattis, enim nec sollicitudin pulvinar, nibh eros tincidunt mauris, eu consequat metus risus eu odio. Cras fringilla ullamcorper urna, at mattis felis ultricies eget. Cra fringill. (Web ID 1234567) $1,299,000

801 GREENBRIER ST S #219

$819,900

5 bedroom, 3.5 bath Colonial nestled on a spectacular garden cul-de-sac lot overlooking scenic pond in the convenient “Chapel Lake” neighborhood. Enjoy the elegant entrance foyer, living and dining room each with charming bay window seats, remodeled granite kitchen with breakfast area, butler’s pantry and adjoining great room overlooking the resort worthy deck and grounds, 2 brick hearth fireplaces, hardwood floors, spacious master with sitting room & luxe bath, and a fully finished walk-out lower level complete with huge rec room, wet bar, bedroom, bath & laundry room with storage. WOW!

Jane Smith

Sales Associate 703-555-1234 jsmith@weichert.com

$1,949,000 4054 41ST ST N

Oakton Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla mattis, enim nec sollicitudin pulvinar, nibh eros tincidunt mauris, eu consequat metus risus eu odio. Cras fringilla ullamcorper urna, at mattis felis ultricies eget. Dir: 123 Main St. (Web ID 1234567) $1,299,000

Open Sun 1-5 PM

For more information, call Jane Smith at 703-555-1234

$2,200 2991 WESTHURST LN

Jane Smith

Sales Associate 703-555-1234 jsmith@weichert.com

$1,560,000 1925 ARLINGTON RIDGE RD S

$1,879,000

CT RA T N S CO AY R 5D E D IN UN

123 MAIN ST.

$1,500,000

949 POTOMAC ST

123 MAIN ST.

$695,000 6305 15TH RD N

$1,500,000

123 MAIN ST.

$1,500,000

$1,559,900 900 MCKINLEY RD N

123 MAIN ST.

$699,900 1530 KEY BLVD #1023

Industry-leading training, on-line 123 MAIN ST. $1,500,000 both 123 MAIN in ST. class and $1,500,000 123 MAIN ST.

123 MAIN ST.

$1,500,000

$1,500,000

$2,000

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SPECIAL Get your Real Estate J oin the Weichert family. We’re proud of every neW arrival. PRICE license now!

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Great market, many locations.

You’re a free agent, so you can sign on with an exciting team at Weichert – whether you’re an experienced Sales Associate who wants the support to make your business grow or you’re wondering how to kick off a great new real estate career. If you’re new, you can earn your real estate license quickly and return to Weichert for the industry’s best training. If you’re experienced, we’ll help you succeed with our innovative Internet strategy, our industry-leading Open House program, and much more. www.insidenova.com

For more information contact:

Sun Gazette

For more information, contact Jaclyn Jacobsen at:

Jaclyn Jacobsen 973-656-3435 973-656-3435 (office) or jjacobsen@weichertrealtors.net jjacobsen@weichertrealtors.net

Offices Across America

Arlington Office

4701 Old Dominion Drive • 703-527-3300


Sun Gazette Arlington May 22, 2014