Inside Columbia Magazine September 2022

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INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE

INSIDE COLUMBIA

SEPTEMBER 2022

“We switched everything to Hawthorn Bank.”

Because of Hawthorn, we’ve been able to expand, and we’re still growing.”

– Kara and Benjamin Hook The Atelier School

PATIOS FOR PUPS • FAR OUT FASHION • TAILGATE TIPS

“We weren’t looking to switch banks when Hawthorn helped us with our PPP loan, but it was obvious from the start that Ryan and Hawthorn were committed to helping our school. Their guidance has meant everything to us.

Ryan Clifton

Senior Vice President Commercial Lending (573) 449-9933 NMLS #1006206

NASDAQ: HWBK ©2022, Hawthorn Bank

Find out more at HawthornBank.com

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WE’R E B U I LT FO R R E L AT I O N S H I PS . Whether you’re facing disruption, or it’s business as usual, you need a financial partner as resilient as you are. We’re here for the challenges that can make — or break — your organization. Our relationship-driven approach brings the tools and talent your business needs. No matter what challenges you face next, together, we’re built for this.

573.886.5367 commercebank.com/BuiltForThis ©2022 Commerce Bancshares, Inc. INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 3

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4 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022



6 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


ELECTRICITY IN ITS MOST POWERFUL FORM. As the first vehicle of its kind in BMW’s history, the i4 M50 combines all-electric power and efficiency with the unrivaled performance and expert engineering of the BMW M. Experience the breathtaking acceleration of 536 horses stampeding at a whisper. Indulge in a gorgeous interior equipped with the most advanced and innovative iterations of BMW’s onboard technology. And revel in the iconic handling that you’ve come to expect from the M. With an estimated range of up to 270 miles, the i4 M50 doesn’t just go fast―it goes far too.

MSRP starting at $65,900* *MSRP excludes destination & handling fee of $995, tax, title, license, and registration.

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INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 7


Message from Barry I usually use this space to give some sort of TrueSon company update. While there are plenty of updates to give, I feel I can better serve my community by telling a story that recently occurred to a potential customer. You’ll often hear and see us talk about choosing reputable companies to do your projects and this is a case study. Recently we’ve seen several instances of potential customers getting burned by a bad build. A potential customer reached out to us because their new deck (built by a company whose name I won’t mention) had some serious issues. In short, the deck is a brand-new safety liability for the homeowner. Not everyone realizes the amount of math and science that goes into proper construction. Without diving too far into the weeds, this particular deck has a 73% chance of failure because it was not built to code and the load bearing calculations were ignored. The customer is in the middle of a legal battle and they are hoping we can assist them with the x to make it safe for his family. TrueSon Exteriors & Interiors pull city and county builder permits. This ensures that we are building everything to code and your investment is protected. An inspector will come to your residence, inspect our piers and then they complete a nal inspection upon completion of your build. Because we take our time and do things the right way, you’ll see our lead times might seem long. I assure you this is the standard for businesses that stand behind the quality of their work. That said, we are always looking for able-bodied people that are willing to work to add to our family! If you, or anyone you know might be interested, have them swing by our office! We will train you to be the best!

Barry Roewe

Owner, TrueSon Exteriors & Interiors

The difference between a house and a home

8 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Helpful Hints to Help You Avoid a Bad Build Call TrueSon Exteriors & Interiors – we are 100% dedicated to the quality of our work Make sure your builder is licensed and insured – this should be a prerequisite Ask them how long they have been in business – experience is priceless Make sure the contractor is pulling the proper permits for your project – protect your investment Most reputable builders have a lead time – avoid the builder that can start tomorrow

is the attention to detail.

(573) 442-7292 • truesonexteriors.com


10 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022



12 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


features

Inside Columbia

features

C O N T E N T S

48 DINING WITH DOGS FIND THE PERFECT SPOT TO ENJOY WITH YOUR PUP.

60 FOOTBALL FEVER OUR GUIDE TO THE BEST BACKYARD TAILGATE.

54 GROOVY GARB

THREADS TO BRING YOU BACK IN TIME.

DINING WITH DOGS

FIND THE PERFECT SPOT TO ENJOY WITH YOUR PUP. INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 13


2022 Sprinter

The van that goes the extra mile.

2022 SPRINTER VAN

Mercedes-Benz of Columbia

1710 I-70 Drive SW • Columbia, MO 65203 • (573) 886-7040 Columbiamercedesbenz.com Base MSRP excludes transportation and handling charges, destination charges, taxes, title, registration, preparation and documentary fees, tags, labor and installation charges, insurance, and optional equipment, products, packages and accessories. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details, costs and terms.


September C O

N

T

E

N

T S

In every issue 16 20

FROM THE EDITOR ONLINE

Life 25

26

ENCOUNTERS Find Empowerment Through Martial Arts

28

HEALTH & WELLNESS Exercise Right in Your Own Backyard

31

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS Envisioning the Future of I-70

34

ULTIMATE WATCHLIST Shows for Your Next Sick Day

Flavor

38

38 113

37 DINING OUT Find Fare from Under the Sea

40

FOUGERE’S FAVORITES The Perfect Marinade

42

COOKING WITH BROOK Putting a Twist on the Philly Cheesesteak

47

COCKTAIL Taste A Spruced Up Classic

SPRING 2022 BOOM! 86-108

Insider

109 110 BOOKSHELF Author Alex Demczak Details a Path to Success 113 WEDDINGS Couple Celebrates Family Ties 117 SPOTLIGHT Fall Fun at the Harvest Hootenanny 119 CALENDAR

Views

125 127 DUELING DJS 129 ON THE TOWN 135 A NEW VIEW

136 DARKOW DRAWS 138 THE FINAL WORD

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 15


from the editor

MADELEINE LEROUX

THE LOVE OF A DOG

ENJOY THE PUP-FRIENDLY AMENITIES OF COLUMBIA

T

Madeleine Leroux

Editor | mleroux@insidecolumbia.net Inside Columbia magazine

here’s rarely been a time in my life when I didn’t have some kind of animal companion at home. Growing up, we always had dogs and cats (and a host of other random and short-lived additions, including the brief period when we had a baby raccoon). After I moved out on my own, I stuck with cats because while I love dogs, cats are much lower maintenance and far more suited to my lifestyle. Then, in 2019, my boyfriend took home the sweetest little dog from the animal shelter where he was working at the time. Technically, we were fostering her, but we both knew from day one that she would never go back to the shelter. (Look at those eyes. Could you send her back?) She was anxious and had obviously been mistreated, and it took time to build her confidence and gain her trust. But I can’t tell you how worthwhile it’s been. Since then, our sweet little Bella has been a wonderful addition to our family and our lives. And lucky for us, Columbia is quite the town for dogs. We love taking Bella to the dog park at Twin Lakes Recreation Area (though there are several others to choose from) and, when she’s been really good, bringing her to Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market for a special treat from the bakery on Green Meadows Road. It’s an added joy to be able to go out and bring your furry best friend with you. With that in mind, on pages 48-53 we decided to highlight just a few of the local spots where you can enjoy a bite or a drink on a beautiful patio with your dog right beside you (or sniffing that one spot that she just won’t leave). And with the sweltering heat of summer beginning to fade, September is the perfect time to enjoy some time outdoors. It’s also the start of Tiger football season — do you see where I’m going with this? It’s tailgate time! On pages 60-64, we bring you five tips to host the ultimate backyard tailgate spectacular and a great excuse to really go overboard on the black and gold. After the summer heat we’ve had, I’m sure I’m not the only one looking forward to the arrival of fall and all that it brings to our wonderful community. Here’s to autumn!

Madeleine 16 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Make your reservation today

(573) 698-2022 or schoolhousebb.com

Visit beautiful Rocheport, MO to relax and refresh in one of our 11 luxury suites featuring modern amenities with old-school charm. You'll love waking up to a 3-course, made from scratch breakfast before cruising the Katy Trail on one of our traditional or electric bike rentals! Our self-serviced Clark Street Lodge can host your next family weekend or girls' getaway, and our wee Dormitory rooms are just right for the budget-minded traveler. Planning your next business meeting or management field trip? Our Corporate Retreat Center has got you covered. It's all here at The School House, where staying in class takes on a whole new meaning!

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 17


Inside Columbia Staff CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Carla Leible cleible@mailzimmer.com FOUNDER & PUBLISHER EMERITUS Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net PUBLISHER Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net EDITOR Madeleine Leroux mleroux@insidecolumbia.net ASSOCIATE EDITOR Zola Crowder zcrowder@mailzimmer.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS John Robinson, John Darkow, Sara Fougere, Brook Harlan, Mason Stevens, Maria Seifert ART DIRECTOR Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com PHOTO EDITOR L.G. Patterson lg@insidecolumbia.net GRAPHIC DESIGNER Madelyn Jones mjones@insidecolumbia.net

On the cover

An Homage to "Lady and the Tramp". Photo by L.G. Patterson 18 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022



what’s online...

Enjoy additional digital content on our website and social media.

Inside Columbia Staff ADVERTISING COORDINATORS Bethany Smidt bsmidt@mailzimmer.com Kalie Kramel kkramel@mailzimmer.com MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Cathy Atkins catkins@insidecolumbia.net

FLYING FORTITUDE

Shags from 96.7 KCMQ and Branden Rathert from 93.9 The Eagle went head-to-head to see who could build the better paper airplane. Check out the surprising results on page 127, then visit insidecolumbia.net or find us on Facebook and Instagram to see video of the full challenge.

Josh Arnold jarnold@insidecolumbia.net Hayden Haumann hhaumann@insidecolumbia.net OFFICE MANAGER Becky James rjames@mailzimmer.com DISTRIBUTION ASSOCIATE Steve Leible

PROFESSIONAL POINTERS

Chef Brook Harlan has a few tips for selecting the right cuts of meat to make a proper Philly cheesesteak. Check out his recipe starting on page 42 then get his meat selection tips by visiting insidecolumbia.net or finding us on social media.

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 www.InsideColumbia.net Office: 573-875-1099

Inside Columbia is published by Zimmer

#INSIDECOLUMBIA

We have highlighted a few spots in Columbia where you can dine with your pup (on the patio, that is) and now we want to see pics of you enjoying a bite or even a beer with your favorite canine companion! Check out our feature starting on page 48 and when you’re hitting the town with your dog, snap a pic of the good times and post it on Instagram using #insidecolumbia by Sept. 15. We’ll pick from the submissions and award the winner a FREE one-year subscription to Inside Columbia! /InsideColumbia.net

20 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

/InsideColumbia

@Inside_Columbia

InsideColumbiaMagazine

Strategic Communications, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2022. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. Not responsible for omissions or information, which has been misrepresented to the magazine.


Life Insurance Does someone in your life rely on your income? What happens if they lose that? Make sure they're protected.

HOME · AUTO · LIFE · BUSINESS · HEALTH · PET · PROPERTY

Phyllis Nichols, Agent 1006 West Blvd N | Columbia, MO 65203 573-443-8727 | phyllisjnichols.com |


Details SUBSCRIPTIONS

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(573) 445-4465

Superior Irrigation (573) 875-5040

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THREE DIVISIONS, ONE GOAL

Quality in every aspect.

Subscription rate is $15 for 1 year. Call 573-875-1099 to place an order or to inform us of a change of address, or subscribe at www.InsideColumbia.net. For bulk subscription rates, contact Becky James at 573-875-1099.

ADVERTISING Inside Columbia is the best way to reach Columbia’s upscale consumers. Information about advertising is available online at www.InsideColumbia.net or by calling 573-875-1099.

NEWS RELEASES & EVENT NOTICES Contact editor at 573-875-1099, or email to editor@insidecolumbia.net.

ON THE TOWN

With roots conveniently close to home, Superior Garden Center is mid-Missouri’s most complete garden center with seven greenhouses and over six acres of trees, shrubs, and perennials.

Send your photos with the event description and subject names for captions to mleroux@insidecolumbia.net, or mail to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201. Not all photos received will be published.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send letters to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 or email to editor@ insidecolumbia.net. Inside Columbia reserves the right to publish any letter to the editor.

CUSTOM PUBLISHING

SERVING MID-MISSOURI

since 1985

2450 Trails W Ave, Columbia, MO 65202 (573) 442-9499 • rostlandscaping.com

/InsideColumbia.net 22 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

Let us publish a specialty magazine exclusively for your company or organization. Call Melody Parry at 573-875-1099 or email melody@insidecolumbia.net

REPRINTS Want to reproduce an article you’ve seen in Inside Columbia? We can provide reprints and customize them on glossy stock for your promotional needs. Minimum quantity is 500 copies. Call Melody Parry at 573-875-1099 or email melody@insidecolumbia.net.


To Do

ts statemen l ia c n a fin monthly Prepare Online kBooks ic u Q to y Convert data entr n o ti c a s n m on tra Train tea racy for accu s m te s y s our ls Evaluate al contro n r te in d an for e xpenses y n a p m co oney Analyze to save m s ie it n tu oppor

Or...

payroll Process es, deral tax e f d n a nce File state nt insura e m y lo p m state une Manage ue r’s reven te r a u q ne xt Forecast nses and e xpe t consultan g in n n la usiness p Find a b

Call Conver gence Accou nting

(573) 818-22 64

Jason Vann, CPA Chief Financial Officer

3919 S. Providence Rd., Columbia, MO 65203

818-2264• •Convergence-accounting.com Convergence-Accounting.com (573)(573) 818-2264

200 E. Southampton Drive, Suite 102 • Columbia, MO 65203 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 23


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Inside Columbia

life C O N T E N T S

26

The Joy of Jiu-Jitsu ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

28

Bring Your Workout Outdoors ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

31

Mapping Out A New Connector ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

34

Streaming Escapes

A LUSH LAWN

Missouri’s summer heat can be hard to bear, and our lawns can show the scars. If you have dead and bare areas, September is the best time to spot seed. This also will help prevent weeds from taking over before next summer.


life ENCOUNTERS

Finding a New Passion AMANDA JOHANNING USES JIU-JITSU TO EMPOWER WOMEN.

BY ZOLA CROWDER · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

A

manda Johanning never

was diagnosed with attention deficit

Johanning says her life changed in

thought martial arts

hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. While

multiple ways when she became

would be part of her

watching her daughter’s class, a friend

involved with the practice. Of course,

journey. But the moment

mentioned that an adult class was next,

there’s the physical transformation. Her

and that’s when everything changed.

body shape has totally changed; she says

she first stepped foot on the mat, her whole life changed. “I was hooked just from that very

she’s stronger and more flexible. But jiu-jitsu also has improved

first day,” Johanning says, noting that it

for training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu),

Johanning’s mental health. “I feel

was more than just a hobby. “I feel like

got me on the mat and I had a blast,”

like this is one of the best things that

I stumbled upon a pretty significant

Johanning explains.

I could possibly do for my mental

life passion.” Her interest in jiu-jitsu all started as a fun activity for her daughter who

26

“I have no idea how she got me to say yes, but she got me into a gi (a uniform

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

Now the program director and business manager for Gracie Barra Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in Columbia,

health,” she says. “It’s just a great outlet with a great support system.” It even has benefitted her social


life ENCOUNTERS life, which was especially meaningful

expanding your social circle.

“coming from my role as a stay-at-

Johanning hopes women walk away

home mom, which is incredibly

from the class feeling more empowered.

isolating.” And yet, the most important

“I think that it's important for everyone

change, Johanning says, has been the

to have a sense of how to defend

introspective ones. “I feel like jiu-jitsu

yourself if you need to,” she says.

has really helped me work on tenacity,

“Women are really the focus of where

my ego and how to check that, and kind

Gracie Barra, and Brazilian jiu-jitsu in

of humble yourself into a place

general, is headed.”

of learning.”

DID YOU KNOW?

With more women becoming involved

Jiu-jitsu is a judo form of martial arts.

I love that it is truly a game of chess, but with your whole body and I love that the knowledge is never ending. That journey continued when

through self-defense, Johanning says

Johanning decided to launch a women’s

she hopes at least a few will fall in love

self-defense class, making it a personal

with jiu-jitsu just as she did. “I love

goal to help build up women in the

that it is truly a game of chess, but with

community. That’s why it’s important to

your whole body and I love that the

her that the class be open to any woman

knowledge is never ending,” she says.

in Columbia, regardless of whether they

It translates to the gentle art.

For anyone considering jiu-jitsu or the

are a member of Gracie Barra. And there

women’s self-defense class, Johanning

are no strings attached when attending

has a simple piece of advice: “Just try it.”

the class, Johanning says. It’s simply an easy way to learn something new and strengthen your own defenses while

For more information on jiu-jitsu or the self-defense class, visit graciebarra.com.

Jiu-jitsu originated in Japan; however, basic elements of grappling can be traced back to places including Greece, India, China, Rome and even Native America.

The first Gracie Brazilian JiuJitsu School was founded in 1925 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Information from Gracie Barra

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

27


life HEALTH AND WELLNESS

The Backyard Bustle

TAKE YOUR FULL-BODY WORKOUT OUTSIDE WITH THESE EXERCISES. BY MASON STEVENS · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

t has been an exceptionally hot summer, but thankfully backyard fun is here again. The first things that come to mind are barbecues, yard games and simply relaxing with friends and family. But what about workouts? Your backyard can provide the perfect setting for convenient and challenging training. The following eight exercises take advantage of common backyard spaces and provide a full-body workout. Try to complete two to three sets of 10 to 12 repetitions of each exercise.

RETAINING WALL PUSHUPS Muscles worked: Chest, shoulders and triceps If traditional pushups are tough, try doing these on a retaining wall or bench. Begin with your hands on an elevated ledge, about shoulder width apart. Lower your chest as close to the ledge as possible and return to extended arms. If you need more of a challenge, perform standard pushups with your hands and feet on the ground.

28

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


life HEALTH AND WELLNESS

RETAINING WALL STEP UPS Muscles worked: Thighs and glutes Using the same retaining wall as your pushups, start by stepping both feet onto the ledge. Return to the ground and be sure to do the same number of reps leading with each leg. Is your retaining wall too tall? A heavy-duty patio chair or bench should work just fine.

HAMMOCK ROWS Muscles worked: Upper back, shoulders and biceps Have a hammock hanging in the backyard? Use the webbing straps for this one. If you don't have a hammock, a quality rope will work too. Wrap the straps around a sturdy tree, just higher than your head. Hold the straps while leaning back at about a 45-degree angle. Pull your body to your hands and return to extended arms.

WALKING LUNGES Muscles worked: Thighs and glutes Find a long, flat section of grass. Begin stepping forward and bending both knees to about 90 degrees. Keep your posture tall with shoulders stacked over hips. Stand up and bring feet together before stepping forward and repeating with your opposite leg. If walking lunges bother your knees, try reverse lunges: Instead of walking forward, remain stationary and step backward.

CHAIR DIPS Muscles worked: Triceps, shoulders and chest Place a solid chair behind you. Start with your hands on the edge of the chair, hips and knees bent, your body suspended just off the chair. While keeping your torso upright, bend your elbows and

lower your body as far as you can. Return to fully extended arms between each rep. Need a little more challenge? Try to straighten your legs to make the dips tougher.

your knees bent and your feet on the ground. Lift your legs until your knees are stacked over your hips with knees bent 90 degrees. If these feel easy, try straightening your legs.

CHAIR BRIDGES

SIMMER

Muscles worked: Hamstrings and glutes

Muscles worked: Low back and glutes

Lay down on your back, placing your heels on a chair. Move close enough to the chair so that your knees begin with a 90-degree bend. Lift your hips off the ground. Maintain a straight back and avoid arching your spine as you bridge up. If the back of your legs begins to cramp, ditch the chair and try these with your feet flat on the ground.

Pool season is coming to an end but that doesn't mean you have to stop swimming. Start this exercise laying on your stomach. Reach your arms and legs out straight. Start by lifting your right arm and left leg. Return both to the ground and repeat by lifting your left arm and right leg. Be sure to avoid arching your back as you lift the arm

AB REVERSE CRUNCH Muscles worked: Abdominals Do typical crunches bother your back? Try lifting your legs instead of your torso. Lay down on your back with

and leg. Mason Stevens is owner and exercise physiologist at MET-Fitness in Columbia. He has his bachelor’s in nutrition and fitness, and has more than 10 years of experience in sports conditioning, coaching and fitness.

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

29


Sept. 9-30 | Free Admission | Stephens College, Mezzanine Fashion Gallery, Lela Raney Wood Hall

The Burrell Foundation, in collaboration with artist Randy Bacon, is proud to present the Art of Being ME. This exhibit showcases portraits and videos of personal stories of more than 20 individuals who have lived experience with mental health conditions or diagnoses. This project ignites important conversations with the idea that mental health issues do not need to be discussed in a hushed voice, but rather, amplifies the message that mental health is part of the human experience and not something to feel ashamed of. Mental health is part of all of our lives. This is your brother, your sister, your child, your parents, your best friend...this is ME.

burrellfoundation.org randybacon.com 30

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

Inspiring Hope. Enriching Lives.


life ROBINSON'S RAMBLINGS

Fixing I-70

A FACELIFT FOR AN AGING HIGHWAY. BY JOHN DRAKE ROBINSON

I

f you hate Interstate 70, you’ll

a decade or two, as they await funding.

proposals — two to four different

love this.

The elephant in the room — the

options for most of the interchanges/

Maybe.

I-70/63 interchange knot — already has

exits along the route. The study breaks

You’re gonna see some

dedicated funding.

the I-70 aorta through Columbia into

changes … down the road. The

MoDOT has presented multiple

three sections: west, central and east.

proposed alternatives to changing Columbia’s stretch of I-70 have been discussed and debated, analyzed and scrutinized by a citizen advisory group which recently held its final public meeting. Members of the general public also had the opportunity to comment. Eventually, the Missouri Department of Transportation will make the final decisions on any changes. And, when enough funding comes along, you just might have a new six-lane I-70 coursing through Columbia. Someday. I hope I live to see the changes. My grandson will. An 18-mile length of I-70 through most of Boone County with 10 interchanges — from just east of Route BB (Exit 115 east of the Missouri River bridge at Rocheport) to just east of Route Z (Exit 133) — will undergo a makeover designed to improve the drive through the Columbia corridor. To make it safer; more efficient. Some of the improvements may take INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

31


life ROBINSON'S RAMBLINGS

I had a chance to see the proposed

ramp faces an uphill battle. There are

study recommended one additional

change options up close when I subbed

four current options for the I-70/63

lane in each direction on I-70, including

for my grandson, Austin, who couldn’t

interchange. And the left lane exit to

through the city of Columbia, plus

make a scheduled citizen advisory

the Business Loop only survives in one

replacement of all existing interchanges

group meeting. The advisory group

of those scenarios.

and overpasses, access management

is just one set of eyes studying the

where appropriate and continuous

massive project. Its members represent

meeting. Especially enlightening were

a cross section of the community,

comments from law enforcement

primarily stakeholders in one fashion or

personnel who spoke up about specific

foundation for the current reevaluation,

another. The usual suspects are on the

trouble spots with high accident rates.

according to MoDOT.

advisory group: mayor, former mayor,

Interestingly, one trooper urged the

city manager. But other stakeholders

group to examine ways to extend

is finished now, for the most part.

represent businesses, tourism, law

Missouri 740 (Stadium Boulevard) east

Members reviewed alternatives and

enforcement, cyclists and pedestrians.

to connect with I-70 at Lake of the

provided input but did not vote on

Woods or beyond.

solutions. Final decisions will be

I am proud of my grandson for standing up to join this advisory group.

In 1999, MoDOT studied the corridor

outer roads as necessary. This Second Tier EIS serves as the

The citizen advisory group’s work

made by MoDOT and the Federal

It’s just one of several civic efforts in

as part of a First Tier Environmental

which he participates. Beyond his wish

Impact Statement (EIS). That study

to see a more efficient I-70, Austin does

assessed needs and strategies for I-70

on dollars. But the design-build

have a specific interest in preserving

across the state and determined that

procurement process is scheduled to

that unique left lane exit ramp off

the most appropriate improvements for

begin early next year. See more specifics

westbound I-70 that delivers drivers to

I-70 would be six lanes in rural areas,

at modot.org/improvei70Columbia.

the Business Loop, where Lee's Tire Co.

eight lanes in urban areas and improved

sits. That's a business founded by his

access management.

other grandfather, the late Lee Stidham. Austin's quest to preserve that exit

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I learned a lot at the advisory group

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

Highway Administration. Time frames vary, dependent

John Drake Robinson is a former director of

Seven years later, a Second Tier EIS

the Missouri Division of Tourism and has

took a fresh look at the corridor. That

driven every mile of highway in the state.


ENTERTAINMENT, DOOR PRIZES, AND MUCH MORE!

Connect with local organizations and businesses dedicated to helping you lead an active and healthy lifestyle. Enjoy a day of education and information on living well at any age! 573-874-1646 silcolumbia.org/ActiveandAging

WHEN: SEPT. 16, 2022 TIME: 9AM-2PM WHERE: COLUMBIA MALL COST: FREE ADMISSION

PRESENTED BY:

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INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

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life ULTIMATE LIST

Sick Day Streaming 5 SHOWS TO WATCH WHEN YOU’RE NOT FEELING WELL.

BY KRISTIN MONICA

WELCOME TO OUR ULTIMATE LISTS! In each issue, you will find a curated selection of things to listen to or watch, put together by either an on-air talent from Zimmer Communications or a member of the Inside Columbia staff. For this issue, Kristin Monica has shared her ultimate watchlist from her time in COVID-induced isolation. Scan the QR code on this page to see more about each show. Enjoy! I recently went down with the dreaded BA.5 variant of COVID-19, and during my five days of quarantine in one bedroom, I watched a LOT of streaming services. I mean, a lot! The laughing, crying and shocking moments got me through the body aches and coughing spells. Here are some of the best things I watched while in seclusion:

“The Flight Attendant” — HBO Max

This suspenseful mystery on HBO Max starring Kaley Cuoco was one of the reasons I wanted HBO Max in the first place. A flight attendant with a drinking problem spends a wonderful night with a passenger on one of her flights, only to wake up with him dead in the bed next to her, brutally murdered, and she has NO memory of the night! To clear her name, she does some detective work of her own. It’s got some thrilling twists and turns, and now I’m very excited for the second season.

“Inventing Anna” — Netflix

You’ll recognize Julia Garner, who plays the title character, as Ruth from “Ozark,” and this show just proves she’s a fantastic character actor! Based on a true story (except for the parts that are totally made up), you follow a journalist’s journey through unraveling Anna’s story. Is she a German heiress socialite or is she a con artist? Each episode leaves you guessing, and you find the truth by the end of this limited series! It’s only nine episodes, so you can binge this one in a day!

“The Boys” — Amazon Prime

This show has a thrilling story, but it’s set behind some incredibly gory scenes. The show, based on a comic book series, shows superheroes as villains. The Boys are a group of guys working to expose them for who they truly are! They’ve all been wronged by a “supe” in some way — mostly a loved one that has been murdered, but it was covered up in an attempt to protect the hero’s image. I’d advise against watching this while eating.

“Insatiable” — Netflix

This one was canceled after two seasons but was a satirical spotlight surrounding fatshaming. It follows Debby Ryan’s character, Patty Bledel, who was often bullied in high school for being overweight. After her jaw is broken and wired shut, she loses a bunch of weight, becoming conventionally beautiful and is recruited to the pageant circuit. The first few episodes had me questioning why I was watching, but the end of the first season had my jaw dropping and ready for season two! It gets … ridiculous. SCAN TO DOWNLOAD THE PLAYLIST

“Dead to Me” — Netflix

This comedy-drama starring Christina Applegate and Linda Cardellini simultaneously had me cracking up and sitting on the edge of my seat! Christina Applegate’s character, Jen, finds herself in a widow support group after her husband died in a hit-and-run accident. There, she meets Linda Cardellini’s character, Judy, and they become unlikely friends. Jen is on the hunt for her husband’s killer, and there are twists and turns along the way that had me creating elaborate theories about a half-hour dramedy. Listen to Kristin Monica weekday afternoons on Y107.

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Inside Columbia

flavor C O N T E N T S

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A Taste of the South in the Midwest ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

40

Make Grilling Your Love Language ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

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A Meaty Meal ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

47

A Local Libation

GRILLING GUIDANCE

Next time you break out the grill, consider whether you’re better off with charcoal briquettes or lumpwood charcoal. The briquettes, which burn longer with a cooler heat, are perfect for cooking large cuts of meat or for large crowds, while the lumpwood is better for smaller cuts and veggies.


flavor DINING OUT

A Taste of Low Country FORMER TIGER OPENS KRUSTACEANS SEAFOOD ON NINTH STREET.

BY MADELEINE LEROUX · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

t’s been a few years since Marcus Lucas called Columbia home. The Liberty native came to midMissouri to attend Mizzou, where

he played for the Tigers, graduating with a business degree in 2014. After becoming an undrafted free agent for the Carolina Panthers, Lucas eventually settled in the Charlotte, North Carolina, area, where he opened the very first Krustaceans Seafood in May 2020. Just two years later, he brought the restaurant to his old college town, opening Krustaceans Seafood at 22 N. Ninth St. in May. While it’s the fourth location for the franchise (with more on the way, Lucas notes), it’s a particularly important one for Lucas. He says the driving factor in opening a location in mid-Missouri was “to give back to the community, help boost the economy a little bit and just provide business back to the town that really embraced me when I was there.” It also allows him to follow in the footsteps of other Mizzou alumni who have brought successful businesses to their college town. “I think about Jerrell Jackson and Michael Egnew with their API Elite,” Lucas says, referencing the local gym started by two former Tigers. “They're doing really great things there and the town has been really receptive of them. And I just wanted to follow in that mold.” Krustaceans specializes in low country

38

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


flavor DINING OUT

seafood boil, something Lucas says was

accustomed to. That was something that

says, waiting until the Mizzou students

always missing from the Columbia food

was important to me.”

returned for the fall semester to really

scene while he was at Mizzou. “It brings

While the culinary scene has changed

launch. “We just wanted to give the local

something to mid-Missouri that I didn’t

in the eight years since Lucas left, he

people of Columbia a preview of what’s

have when we were there,” Lucas says.

says the restaurant’s customizable flavor

to come and develop a strong base of

“We would go looking for good seafood

options make it a unique spot where

people who will come and support us,”

and there was almost nowhere to go.”

everyone can find something they enjoy.

Lucas says.

It brings something to mid-Missouri that I didn’t have when we were there. We would go looking for good seafood and there was almost nowhere to go.

Another unique special at Krustaceans

With the start of Mizzou football,

is the signature seafood and waffle

Lucas says he hopes people will think

combinations.

of Krustaceans when planning tailgate

“It’s a pair that you wouldn’t normally

events, noting that it’s important to him

think about but it’s one of our more

to try to work with his alma mater and

popular items,” Lucas says. “Especially

support it however possible. “We want to

the fried lobster tail with the red velvet

try to incorporate the university as much

waffle. … That is something that’s truly

as possible,” Lucas says.

unique to us.” Krustaceans also offers frozen

The dedication to Mizzou makes sense, as Lucas is not the only link between

daiquiris, something Lucas says

Krustaceans and Mizzou. One of Lucas’

compliments the food well as the recipes

business partners is his mother, a Mizzou

That is, he says, unless they ventured

are all inspired by Florida-style low

alumna who played women’s basketball.

to more upscale places like CC’s City

country seafood boils. “They actually pair

Broiler. But finding somewhere a little

really well together,” he says.

more casual that better fit a college

Since opening the doors in May, Lucas

Krustaceans is open for both dinein and carryout from 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday and Sunday, and

student’s budget was tough, he says. And

says there’s been a really great response

from 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday and

when they did find something, “it wasn’t

to the Columbia location. They used

Saturday. For more information, visit

that low country style that I really grew

the summer as a sort of soft opening, he

krustaceanscomo.com.

Darrell Brown, one of the business partners involved in Krustaceans Seafood, enjoys a bite at the new location on Ninth Street.

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

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flavor FOUGERE'S FAVORITES

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INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


flavor FOUGERE'S FAVORITES

A Magnificent Marinade BRING YOUR NEXT STEAK TO THE NEXT LEVEL.

BY SARA FOUGERE · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

B

eing born and raised on

houses, cars, businesses and near lakes,

The marinade infuses flavor into the

a cattle farm, some of my

I’ve learned how to judge heat, and

vegetables as well.

fondest memories are of

meat, pretty well.

riding in the truck with my

dad, checking fences, water and cattle. My family still owns the same cattle

operation, and we still produce some of

A great marinade, like this one, can

So here’s my grilling wisdom for you.

take any cut of meat to pretty good

It’s simple: Quality meat and a good,

and a good piece of steak to terrific. It

flavorful marinade.

adds complimentary flavors and, when

People are surprised when I say my

necessary, some tenderness. I count

the best meat anywhere. I’m literally all

favorite steak is a top sirloin. It's a

on this marinade for professional jobs

about beef.

really affordable cut and with a great

and when grilling for my own family on

marinade, it’s tender, full of flavor and

our deck. Short on prep time and long

has the best texture. I love a good filet

on results, you’ll wonder how you did

as well, but for the price, flavor and

without it.

And cooking beef? Grilling, especially? That’s my love language. As a professional caterer, I’ve had occasions to grill on gas, charcoal and

texture, give me a marinated top sirloin

wood; on great big grills and some

anytime. I love to turn it into kebobs,

pretty flimsy affairs. From behind

add some veggies and put it on the grill.

Make this the year grilling becomes your love language, too.

Sara's Steak Marinade INGREDIENTS ½ cup soy sauce

¾ cup olive oil

4 cloves minced garlic

½ cup lemon juice (I love fresh but bottled is fine)

¹⁄₃ cup Worcestershire sauce

Salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl. Place steaks in a glass baking dish. Pour marinade over steaks, turning over to make sure they are fully covered. Marinate in refrigerator for at least two hours, but no more than 24 hours or meat will get mushy. Remove from refrigerator at least 30 minutes before grilling. Grill over high heat to start, then lower temperature. Grill until medium-rare (time depends on the thickness of the steak). NOTE: To make kabobs, cut steak into 2-inch cubes before marinating. Marinate for two hours, then thread onto skewers with vegetables of your choice.

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

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flavor COOKING WITH BROOK

A Substantial Sandwich PUT YOUR OWN SPIN ON THE PHILLY CHEESESTEAK.

BY BROOK HARLAN · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

love a good Philly cheesesteak. You can always buy one (if you can find a good place), but sometimes I want onions

and peppers; sometimes mushrooms; sometimes garlic; sometimes I want “Wiz” (we can talk about that one later); and sometimes I want everything.

This is one of those great meals where you can prepare all of the ingredients a day or two ahead of time and have it all come together quickly when you are ready.

So, sometimes I cook it at home. Buns, meat, cheese and some vegetables

a roast, take it home and freeze it for

melting; a minute or so with a lid or an

are all that you need, ingredients you

about an hour until the outer inch is

upside-down pan will do the trick.

may already have at home. This is one of

starting to get icy. The partially frozen

those great meals where you can prepare

beef will allow you to slice it much

THE VEG

all of the ingredients a day or two ahead

thinner than a thawed piece of meat.

Vegetables are not always a common

of time and have it all come together quickly when you are ready.

thing in Philly cheesesteaks, as onions are sometimes the extent of the options.

Thinly sliced deli provolone is my

I find some extra peppers, onions and

personal favorite with Philly, but if you

mushrooms are a good way to “beef up”

Sometimes you can find some pre-sliced

go to Philly, you may hear some other

the sandwich, especially if you are using

Philly meat beside the beef in the meat

words: “Philly Wiz With” or “Philly Wiz

an expensive cut like ribeye or another

department. They typically use chuck,

Without.” The “Wiz” refers to Cheese

steak, as it can help stretch it out and add

top round or some other thinly sliced

Whiz, typically the cheese of choice in

some great flavor. I like to do one of two

tough cut of beef. You can also talk to

Philly, and the with or without refers

things: Cook my vegetables separately or

someone at the counter as they can

to with or without onions. American

vegetables first in the pan and add in the

typically talk you through what is in

cheese sometimes can be used as a

beef. I find that the vegetables sometimes

the case and use the slicer to cut some

substitution. Cheese Whiz and American

will take longer than the beef to cook.

chuck roast, rib roast or another cut

cheese don’t need much heat to melt,

(You want the beef to be cooked just

thinly across the grain. You can also buy

but provolone may need a little help with

past mid-rare, just until the pink is all

THE MEAT

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THE CHEESE

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


flavor COOKING WITH BROOK

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43


flavor COOKING WITH BROOK

gone.) When the vegetables are just starting to become tender, then the beef can be added. The vegetables can be stirred some, but mostly should hang out on the side of the pan cooking until the beef is done. If you want to add garlic, put it in just before mixing everything together and topping with cheese.

THE COOK There are two schools of thought: “High heat and crispy” or “low heat and juicy.” Both methods are delicious and might just depend on both your mood and your desired outcome. High heat and crispy is just like it sounds: Full throttle ahead, creating a lot of flavor and texture with heat at almost full blast. The sandwich cooks relatively fast, but you don’t have any time to gather ingredients or equipment. Everything needs to be ready, including your toasted bun and plate. Low heat and juicy is a little more relaxed. It is more like steaming the vegetables than the meat. You slowly bring the meat up to temperature and retain all the juices. There is not any additional texture or flavor created by the low-heat cooking process, but the sandwich is so succulent when you are finished. Brook Harlan is a culinary arts instructor at the Columbia Area Career Center and serves as Inside Columbia’s food editor. The native Columbian is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, where he earned associate’s and bachelor’s degrees. A Columbia Public Schools teacher since 2002, Harlan has coached a string of state and national champions in the annual SkillsUSA competition.

44

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


flavor COOKING WITH BROOK

PHILLY CHEESESTEAK WITH EVERYTHING

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

1 pound of thinly sliced chuck, ribeye or round steak

1 small red, white or yellow onion, thinly sliced

4 hoagie rolls, ¾ cut through

1 red, yellow or green pepper, thinly sliced

2 to 3 tablespoons of butter or oil

• 2 cloves garlic, minced

6 to 8 slices of provolone cheese

Oil as needed

(can substitute American or Cheese Whiz)

Salt and pepper as needed

4 to 6 mushrooms, thinly sliced

DIRECTIONS:

Prepare all ingredients. Heat a medium-sized saucepan over medium-low heat, add butter to the pan, lightly season with salt and toast the inside of the buns. (Be careful not to push the buns all the way flat into the pan until they have warmed slightly and are more pliable.) Reserve the toasted bus for later. Turn the pan to medium-high and coat the inside lightly with oil. Add in mushrooms and lightly add salt and pepper, then cook until a slight amount of color forms on the edges. Add in sliced onions and peppers, again adding light salt and pepper. Keep moving and cook until onions and pepper start to soften (adding more oil as needed if the pan gets dry). Add in more oil before adding the beef and season lightly with salt and pepper. Keep moving in the pan and, just before all of the pink is gone, add garlic. Mix the vegetables and beef. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Separate into four even piles and top with cheese. Turn off the heat and allow the cheese to melt, adding a lid to the pan if needed. Portion the meat, vegetables and cheese onto the buns and serve.

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45


SHOP ONLINE

MAGELINGSGAMES.COM Go to our Facebook Page for store hours and daily events schedule.

1 9 0 6 N Prov i d e n ce R d. Co l u m b i a M O • 5 7 3 - 6 3 9 - 8 0 3 1 46

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


flavor COCKTAIL

A Nod to the Classics ENJOY A HOMEGROWN TWIST.

T

he Bee’s Knees is a cocktail

BY MARIA SEIFFERT · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

Our Bee’s Knees is a twist on a classic

local than that. Another twist we offer

that’s special to me right now

cocktail that typically mixes gin, lemon

is your choice of traditional gin or how

because it uses hyper local

juice and honey. We spruce it up with

we like it, which is with your choice of

ingredients and embodies

lavender grown in our herb garden at the

tequila or mezcal.

what we are trying to do at Ozark

restaurant and honey from bartender

Mountain Biscuit & Bar with the bar

Aaron Brown’s neighbors’ apiary, Liberty

program. We think it is important to

St. Honey Co. The key ingredients are

barista station.

honor the classics while innovating and

from within a three-block radius to the

Maria Seiffert is the front-of-house

experimenting with new things.

restaurant and you can’t really get more

manager at Ozark Mountain Biscuit & Bar.

In addition to this cocktail, we also offer the lavender-honey syrup at our

The Bee’s Knees INGREDIENTS 2 ounces gin or tequila

¹/₂ ounce lavender syrup

¹/₂ ounce fresh lemon juice

TO MAKE THE DRINK: Simply pour all the ingredients in a shaker pint full of ice, shake hard and strain into your preferred coupe or martini glass. Garnish with a fresh sprig of lavender and enjoy!

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

47


Pooches & Pati s By Zola Crowder • Photos by L.G. Patterson

IS THERE ANYTHING BETTER THAN TIME WITH YOUR FAVORITE FURRY COMPANION? Lucky for local dog lovers, Columbia is quite the canine friendly place, and there’s more than a few patios that allow pups. We’ve put together a short list of a few of our favorite spots to grab a bite or drink while bringing your pooch. So grab your dog and head over to one of these staples of Columbia! 48 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Logboat Brewing Co. For beer lovers who want to have their furry friends tag along,

can be a part of your adventures.”

Logboat Brewing Co. is the perfect spot with its park, a fenced-in

If you want to make your pup Logboat official, you can even

grassy area that everyone, even pets, can enjoy.

purchase an Aztec dog collar with the Logboat Brewing Co. logo

While the park has had more limited access this past summer

for $15.

as Logboat continues its expansion, dogs are always encouraged there, though they must be leashed at all times. Logboat even

LAP IT UP: If you haven’t tried Logboat’s Shiphead, it’s a great sip

recommends its patrons share photos using #dogsoflogboat

on a warm day. And if there’s not a food truck on site, consider

on social media. According to Logboat's Instagram, “Whether

grabbing a bite from one of Logboat’s neighbors, including Ozark

you're outside exploring, at home, or at the brewery enjoying a

Mountain Biscuit & Bar, Beet Box or Pasta La Fata.

Logboat beer with your pup, make sure to snap a photo so we INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 49


SHAKESPEARE’S PIZZA It’s a staple in Columbia, not just for people but for pets as well. Shakespeare’s Pizza is incredibly well known, partly because it is pet friendly. Toby Epstein, general manager of the downtown location, says Shakespeare’s has always been pet friendly, but it became official in the last couple of years, as management wanted to make sure city codes and health codes were followed carefully. Some of those rules include making sure there is a plan in place for cleaning up after a pet, and not allowing aggressive or untrained dogs at the restaurant. “They can't cause any issues, and if they do cause an issue, then it's a very short leash, no pun intended,” Epstein says. Epstein says the process to get pets on the patio was long, but overall, incredibly worth it. “I do think that it lends a certain relaxed vibe to the atmosphere, which is definitely us; pet or no pet.” As long as pets follow the rules, Epstein says it’s a welcome place for all. CHOW DOWN: You can’t go wrong with a pint of beer and a slice of pizza.

50 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


MUGS UP Mugs Up has a love for pets that’s been around as long as manager Brandon Kewley can remember. The unique drive-in restaurant gives customers a chance to bring their pets along for the ride. “People come out here in their car, so they bring their dogs a lot,” he says. “We love dogs.” But it doesn’t just stop with dogs. Kewley says all kinds of animals have stopped by Mugs Up to say hello and maybe even try a sandwich. “I know that some people are afraid of snakes or different animals, but we've had customers bring those and different things to the restaurant,” Kewley says. “We give them cups of water and have treats for the dogs, and sometimes people even get sandwiches or hot dogs for their dogs as well.” The animal-friendly atmosphere can be traced back to the original Mugs Up owners, Kewley’s grandparents, and specifically his grandfather who grew up with animals on a farm before moving to the area and starting the beloved business. CHOW DOWN: Don’t skip the Zip Burger and try the homemade root beer.

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 51


CAFE BERLIN This popular Columbia brunch location offers more than just unique breakfast food, as Cafe Berlin is a place for your pets. Owner Sam Johnson says people at Cafe Berlin love dogs, and they have the space to allow pets. “Obviously we love dogs, and we love dog people too. It’s a source of joy and we have a patio, so why not?” Johnson says he wishes more people would bring their furry friends along to brunch (at least on the patio, where they are allowed). “I don’t think a lot of people know how acceptable it really is and how much we want this to be a dog-friendly environment.” The cafe even works with Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market to provide custom made treats for dogs. At Cafe Berlin, the same rules apply for pets as they do for people. “If a dog is acting out of hand just like if a person was, we would have to ask them to leave,” Johnson says. CHOW DOWN: Pay attention to the always changing waffle and drink specials.

52 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


COMO SMOKE & FIRE For Como Smoke & Fire, a family-owned barbecue restaurant in Columbia, family is more than just people, which is why the patio is open to furry friends to enjoy as well. “We have pets and always liked the option to take them with us, so we decided to open the patio up to dogs,” says Christy Hawkins, one of the owners of Como Smoke & Fire. “We have water bowls; we have dog treats, and sometimes the guys will be trimming the meat in the back, and they'll have bones.” However, there are still rules for the patio, she says, including having dogs stay on a leash and staying in the dog-friendly area. CHOW DOWN: Try the No Disgrace sandwich, a combination of Texas toast, brisket and smoked turkey topped with slaw, pickles, red onions and spicy barbecue sauce.

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 53


This fall, it’s trendy to be retro. The ‘70s style is back, with all of its nostalgic notes, including bright colors and patterns, fringe and that groovy flower power. We couldn’t have asked for a more perfect setting to show off these throwback styles than Hitt Records, which graciously allowed our three beautiful models Jennifer Romine, Kenna Rummel and Whitley Zitsch to play in the shop. And to complete the looks, Jennifer Romine helped each achieve a fully retro hairdo. So take a step back in time with us and find the perfect vintage look for your fall wardrobe! 54

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Diva sunglasses Maude Vintage Clothing $15 Paisely satin wrap dress in orange Kelly Fields Boutique $68 City Classified Truly Wooden Heels Glik’s $22.99

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

55


Show Me Your Mumu Reno romper in blue stream Kelly Fields Boutique $144 Karlie Denim snap shirt in blue Kelly Fields Boutique $88

Breton sunglasses Maude Vintage Clothing $15 MS Liza Hopeful Romantic Top The Tin Roof Monogram & Gift $34 Intentionally Blank Cooper-2 platform sandal in taupe American Shoe $199 56

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Show Me Your Mumu Seasons Change sweater in Flower Power knit Kelly Fields Boutique $138 Prettyfly women’s retro quad skates Academy Sports + Outdoors $99.99

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

57


Show Me Your Mumu Seasons Char tunic in Summer Sorbet Kelly Fields Boutique $138

58

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Shout Out sunglasses Maude Vintage Clothing $15 Diva sunglasses Maude Vintage Clothing $15 Breton sunglasses Maude Vintage Clothing $15

Show Me Your Mumu Reno romper in blue stream Kelly Fields Boutique $144

Bailey Rose blue print wide leg pants Glik’s $49 MIA Carla booties in white Glik’s $69.99 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

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5 TIPS FOR A Terrific TigER Tailgate By Madeleine Leroux Photos by L.G. Patterson

Host the Ultimate Watch Party This Fall. With the start of football season comes the perfect time to throw a great tailgate party to cheer on our own Mizzou Tigers. So we asked Andrea Lyn Seppo of Andrea Lyn Events to help us come up with your guide to hosting a great tailgate party this season — right in your own backyard! And we partnered with our friends at the Mizzou Store to make sure we had the proper gear to cheer on our Tigers. Simply follow these five tips to get your next party started off right.

60 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


1

TIMING IS ESSENTIAL

We all know that timing is everything, especially when it comes to a great party. While you can start as early as your heart desires, Seppo suggests a proper tailgate bash begin around 30 minutes before kickoff. And you can keep the party going as late as you like, or you can cap it to as early as 30 minutes after the game ends, she says. And while the heat will (hopefully) be less of a factor for our fall tailgates, it’s important to remember what time of day it will be during your party. For a late morning or afternoon game, you’ll want to keep in mind the shady areas of your yard. After all, you’ll need to make sure you’ve got seating and/or some of your activities in those cooler spots, as even in September, that Missouri sun can be sweltering.

2

LET THE GUESTS BE YOUR GUIDE

The next step is to think about the guest list. Remember to keep it manageable if you actually intend on watching on the game, Seppo says. You’ll need to keep the guest list roughly to the amount of seating you’ll have during the game. “Make sure you have comfortable seating for everyone,” Seppo says. That may mean capping the guest list at about 15. But will everyone attending be watching the game? That depends on your invite list. Remember that when inviting families, you’ll need to have activities ready for kids or just those not very interested in watching the game closely. We suggest cornhole or washers set up in the backyard, as well as an area for those who want to sit and chat away from the devoted football fans. Your guest list should also help guide your screen setup. Are you moving the fans indoors to watch the game?

Or are you setting up an outdoor screen? If your guest list is starting to grow, you may even want to consider multiple screens available, Seppo says. Even your decor plans should come back to your guest list. Are you just inviting a few close friends over to reminisce while cheering on the Tigers? Then maybe you don’t need much. “Decor really depends on who you’re trying to invite,” Seppo says. “If it’s a bunch of dudes, I wouldn’t worry about the decor.” But if your plans are a bit bigger and “you’re trying to impress and really make a kick, go out on decor,” Seppo says. Do some balloons and add some florals. And, of course, you can’t have too much black and gold. Or even too many Tiger-themed items, Seppo says. The tailgate party is when you can really go overboard with Mizzou pride. INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 61


3

IT’S ALL ABOUT PREP WORK AND STATIONS

Now for the food and drinks. There are so many options! When planning your menu, Seppo says to think about the time of day the game is being played. If it’s in the afternoon or evening, think standard tailgate fare, the level of which entirely depends on you, your vision and your budget. There’s nothing wrong with keeping it simple with brats and burgers on the grill, along with some chips and other snacks. Or maybe you want to do a few more varied homemade dishes. You can even do a more catered style, with pick up from a few of your favorite game day spots. (Just remember to order in advance when possible.) But if the game you’re watching is earlier, like the 11 a.m. kickoff at the Sept. 10 game against Kansas State,

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Seppo suggests a menu that leans more toward brunch. Whatever route you choose, remember to pick dishes that can be prepped in advance and quickly made ready when it’s time to party. “Do as much prep as you can ahead of time,” Seppo says. For serving, try to think in terms of stations. Have a snack or food station, where everything is in one spot and a beverage area ready to go. Getting those areas set up ahead of time will help minimize your duties as a host while the party is going on. “It’s all about having these stations set up,” Seppo says. “As a host, you want to have these things ready.”


4

MAKE IT YOUR OWN

If you’re hosting a Tiger tailgate, chances are you either went to or are affiliated with Mizzou or have a loved one who attended. And those connections are what a great tailgate should always highlight. Break out your favorite Mizzou memorabilia, whether it’s an old jersey, a worn Tiger tail or a favorite good luck charm. Maybe you have some photos of Faurot Field or your own days at Mizzou to show off and reinforce the Tiger spirit. Whatever your tradition is, just make sure to find ways to incorporate it. “That’s what tailgate is about,” Seppo says. “It’s that tradition, it’s that tried and true feel of this is what Mizzou is. These are our colors and this is what football is.”

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5

HAVE A BACKUP PLAN

No matter how great you’ve planned, something can always go wrong. And in Missouri, it can often be the weather. So even after the summer heat has died down and you’ve planned the perfect fall tailgate with the best outdoor setup, Seppo says to make sure you have a plan B. “You always have to have a backup,” she says. Know what the plan is if it starts to rain or gets way too windy for outdoor festivities. (We suggest having the living room or TV area ready for watching the game and setting aside another area for activities in case of bad weather. Indoor cornhole anyone?)

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Megan Walters Licensed Broker-Salesperson/Team Lead

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eal estate is so much more than a job for Megan Walters, Licensed Broker-Salesperson with The Walters Team, eXp Realty. The ability to help people through big life changes and assisting them in reaching their goals is what first sparked her interest in the field, Walters says. But she was also attracted to the idea of being able to create something truly her own without any limitations on what can be created for her career. That drive has allowed her team to grow this year to include Autumn Lear, Licensed Salesperson and Head of Sales, and Brittany Stone, Marketing Manager. The new additions have been a blessing for Walters. “They both entrusted us to walk alongside them and to help them drive their careers forward in an industry they are passionate about,” Walters says. “To have people put that much trust and faith in something you built from nothing is just beyond what words could ever describe.” Her team is always looking to be one step ahead in the ever-changing real estate industry. “We pride ourselves on our entrepreneurial outlook,” Walters says. That includes an aggressive approach along with outside-the-box marketing plans that not only stand out but yield the best possible results for clients. Walters says that kind of success cannot happen without hard work and the determination to keep low moments from affecting your outcomes. Instead of let-

ting those moments become distractions, “win by taking your time and energy, and keep walking forward,” she says. Real estate can be a challenging field to jump into and start. Walters tells everyone who approaches her with interest in getting into the field that when you are a new Realtor, you have to get used to rejection and learn to not take things personally when a client goes another direction. “The key is to turn that perspective around and instead of seeing it as rejection, seeing it as a red-hot motivator, and a learning opportunity,” Walters says. “The more times you jump in and keep trying, the sharper your skills get, the more your confidence will grow, and from there your success will flow.” For Walters, being a “Woman to Watch” means being part of a group of women who are taking charge while doing something they love. “’Women to Watch’ aren’t letting others dictate their success,” she says. “They are paving their own road maps, and are changing the name of the game of the industry they are in.” All the hard work of Walters and her team has not gone unnoticed, as Walters was the first real estate agent from Columbia to be awarded the National Association of Realtors 30 Under 30 Award. “I am personally a local to the Columbia area, and this was beyond an honor to bring this title to my hometown, and to be able to put Columbia on the map for this award,” Walters says.

The Walters Team, eXp Realty • 573-808-6457

• waltersteamrealty.com INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 67


Paula Schuh Owner

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car can be a prized possession, something you only want touched by people you trust. And that’s been the guiding force for Paula Schuh at GAPS Automotive Repair. “Our goal as a company is to help you maintain the investment you made in your car, save money and keep your vehicle working properly,” Schuh says. The company works hard to stay on top of developments in automotive technology to better serve customers. Schuh says GAPS recently became the only independent shop in Columbia with the ability to service advanced driver assistance systems, a calibration system that makes sure all the cameras and sensors in a car are working properly. “It makes us even more valuable to our customers,” she says. Being transparent about prices and services is what Schuh says makes GAPS Automotive even more unique to the community. “We stand behind all of our repairs because our relationship with our vendors is so strong,” she says. But they also stand behind their employees. Schuh says family time is essential for every employee, which is why the company made a permanent schedule change. “We recently went to a four-day work week so our employees could have a life outside of work,” she says. By working longer days Monday through Thursday, Schuh says the shop is still able to work a full load while allowing the staff to have three days a week for themselves and family. Schuh says being a “Woman to Watch” is an opportunity “to show people how many women in the community are vastly successful in all industries.” For Schuh, it’s all about inspiring the next generation.

GAPS Automotive Repair 1909 Vandiver Drive 573-474-9497 gapsautomotiveinc.com

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Jenny Williamson

Vice President, Market Operations

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eeling connected to Columbia’s community is one of Jenny Williamson’s favorite parts of working at First Midwest Bank. Williamson, vice president and market operations manager, says serving the community and building valuable relationships is at the heart of what they do. It’s been a welcome change for Williamson, who says her connection with the community waned during the pandemic. “I often felt disconnected from the people and places I love and didn’t feel like I had a pulse on what was happening around town,” she says. Now, First Midwest Bank has allowed her to be much more involved in the community, so much so that she was even honored with the Ambassador of the Year award from the Columbia Chamber of Commerce. Williamson says being a community bank means paying attention to each individual customer and their needs. “We know each customer is different and has a unique story and unique needs,” she says. “Being a small, community bank, we have the flexibility to mold our services to meet those needs.” While banking looks a little different since the pandemic began, Williamson says one thing that hasn’t changed is the importance of customer relationships. “Our customers are the best parts of our job, and our loyalty to them means everything in this business,” she says. For Williamson, being a “Woman to Watch” is all about making a positive impact in Columbia. “We all want the same thing, to do our best to give back to the people, businesses and associations we come in contact with,” she says. For other women starting their careers, Williamson has a simple piece of advice: Find great mentors to help you grow both personally and professionally. “Surround yourself with knowledgeable and motivational people who encourage you and give great advice,” Williamson says. “We all need people in our corner rooting for us who genuinely want to see us succeed.”

First Midwest Bank 1411 Grindstone Plaza Drive 573-442-9900 onemidwest.com

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McKenna Pierce Body Piercer Roxane Jeffries Tattoo Artist Callie Job Social Media Manager/Event Coordinator

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rt comes in different forms. For Roxane Jeffries, tattoo artist at Living Canvas Tattoo and Body Piercing, the journey with tattooing started at the age of 5, when she watched her father get tattooed in Hong Kong. “I have been fascinated by the art form ever since,” she says. That fascination blossomed into a career for Jeffries. During her apprenticeship, she received what she remembers as the best piece of advice: To live, eat and breathe tattooing. That phrase has become a part of the advice she now gives others in her field. “Dedicate yourself to your passion, make art every day and study all areas of your craft,” Jeffries says. Jeffries says when it comes to tattooing, there is one distinct difference from other forms of art. “Clients wear my art on their skin, and that will always be special and meaningful to me,” she says, adding that her goal is always to make it look as if the tattoo was meant to live on their body. McKenna Pierce, a body piercer at Living Canvas, says she feels the same way about the trust clients put into her and her work. “I am able to bring the vision for their body to life,” Pierce says. Pierce’s love for body modification began in college and she has never looked back. But it’s a challenging passion, where mistakes are heavily scrutinized. When a mistake happens, Pierce’s best advice is to own up to it. “They are going to happen. Acknowledge them and learn from them,” she says. For Pierce, being a “Woman to Watch” is a title she never thought she would receive, but she is proud to be a person of note in the community. “I expected to fly under the radar,” she says. But Living Canvas is more than just the artists. Callie Job, social media manager and event coordinator, says managing their account has been a dream. “Living Canvas is like family to me, so I can really put my whole heart into their social media.” Being a millennial, Job says she understands the importance of social media for business. “I’ve gotten to watch the true progression of social media being used to help the growth of a brand.” But, she says, you must be willing to show your personality when working in social media. “People like to see that there is an actual person behind the screen.” Job says being a “Woman to Watch” means exactly what it sounds like. “Watch out for me,” she says. “I plan on doing big things for my shop, my community and myself.” For Jeffries, Pierce and Job, Living Canvas is more than just a shop. It’s an inclusive, safe space for anyone to visit, they say, and it’s full of people who take pride in their work, community and each other.

Living Canvas Tattoo and Body Piercing

520 E. Broadway • 573-442-8287 • tattoocolumbia.com

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Ashley Angerer-Blunt

Director of Outpatient Services Burrell Behavioral Health

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shley Angerer-Blunt, LPC, NCC, found her passion in mental health after working in sports medicine. As director of outpatient services for Burrell Behavioral Health’s 10-county service area, she works to implement innovative clinical programming to address community needs. After identifying a need for group therapy services in Columbia, AngererBlunt got them up and running within months. “Seeing the power of healing through connection within the groups that our clinicians are running is truly remarkable,” she says. That type of work only helps to emphasize a life lesson she learned years ago: To try to always make time for connection and meaningful conversations. Angerer-Blunt believes being a “Woman to Watch” is a testament to the women who have mentored and empowered her to be herself. For others starting out, she advises they take the time to seek feedback and support while seeking connections with other women. 3401 Berrywood Drive • 573-777-8300 • burrellcenter.com

Julie Wundrack Center Manager

Plasma Biological Services

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eing a mentor and helping others is the most rewarding part of Julie Wundrack’s job as center manager for Plasma Biological Services. She not only gets to work with other staff members and further their careers, but also gets to help save lives. Being a leader is a lot of work, but Wundrack says it is important to keep pushing forward. “Work hard, never give up and stay focused,” she says. “There will be days that you will fail, so go home, reset and come back and do better the next day.” For Wundrack, being a “Woman to Watch” is all about continuing her process as a mentor to “assist other women in our community to follow their dreams and to never give up.” Ultimately, she says she is proud of the lifesaving work they do every single day.

916 Walnut St. • 573-449-3961 • grifolplasma.com 72 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Wendy Sprouse

Owner/agent

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or Wendy Sprouse, it’s all about helping people. At the Wendy L. Sprouse Agency, she uses her passion for Medicare to help people navigate the often confusing landscape of options to find the best fit for them and their budgets. Through that work, Sprouse has been able to help change people’s lives for the better. Sprouse recalls one instance where she helped a woman enroll in Medicare and the financial difference meant this client would now be able to purchase Christmas gifts for her children. “She hugged me and thanked me because what I did for her was financially changing her monthto-month bills,” Sprouse says. “It truly humbled me and warmed my heart.” Being a “Woman to Watch” is especially meaningful as Sprouse hopes to be a role model to young women who are coming up in the insurance industry. “Once upon a time, it was a male-dominated field, so it’s important that young woman can see it’s possible to become successful in this industry,” she says. For those women, Sprouse has a simple piece of advice: Use any mistake you make as a lesson to help your professional development and growth. Sprouse is adamant about finding the best ways to help people, and notes that a simple meeting or consultation with her doesn’t come at a cost. “People always ask what they owe me at the end of an appointment and I’m still always shocked,” she says. Plus, she says she’s always available to answer any questions for a client, regardless of business hours. But there is a perk to visiting her office during business hours: The office dog. Sprouse says the office is always dog friendly, with LJ, a 2-year-old Great Dane, often on site.

Wendy L. Sprouse Agency 204 Peach Way, suite B 472-292-6373 wendysprouseagency.com

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Leeann Cravens

Sr. Director of Operations

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ast-paced work along with new challenges are what Leeann Cravens enjoys about her work. At Manor Roofing and Restoration Services, Cravens puts an extra personal touch to all her work to build strong relationships with customers as well as employees. “I take the time to make every relationship more meaningful by taking a few extra minutes to make it more personal.” She says pleasant communication with customers, crews and suppliers is a very important step to keeping everyone happy and making sure business runs smoothly. For Cravens, it was her two-year anniversary with Manor when everything clicked and all the pieces started coming together. “I understood the operations of the business, I understood the production of the business and I knew what I was talking about,” she says. Being a successful woman in a male-dominated field running a multi-million-dollar construction company makes it even more meaningful for Cravens to be a “Woman to Watch.” “That is something I am really proud of,” Cravens says. Being a mentor and role model for other women as they enter their careers is something Cravens takes very seriously. It allows her to show that “it is OK to be different, to be confident, to be unwavering, and to be exactly who you are or want to be,” Cravens says. Along with being a respected exterior remodeling company, Cravens says Manor also focuses on supporting families in the community by being involved with Ronald McDonald House Charities of Mid-Missouri, Boys & Girls Clubs of Columbia, Job Point, Columbia Public Schools and more.

Manor Roofing and Restoration Services 7125 W. Henderson Road 573-445-4770 exploremanor.com

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Jaclyn Rogers Sales Representative

Ai Painting Plus

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aving an open mind, being brave, confident and passionate is what it took for Jaclyn Rogers to thrive in the painting industry. After all, she took a leap of faith by joining the Ai Painting Plus team without having any

background in the industry. Rogers, who is now a sales representative for Ai, says the career change was all about taking on new challenges and focusing more on herself. “If you are passionate about something, go after it,” she says. Rogers says being a “Woman to Watch” is empowering and especially important to her now that she is at a local woman-owned painting

company. “Men are very dominating in this field so it makes me feel good knowing that I can empower other women to get into different trades even without experience and make a difference,” she says.

6991 S. Sinclar • 573-529-2128 • aipaintingplus.com

Lisa Driskel Hawxby

Business Development Specialist

Regional Economic Development Inc – REDI

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aking meaningful connections to benefit the community is just one of Lisa Driskel Hawxby’s passions in the workplace. Hawxby, business development specialist for Regional Economic Development Inc, says

that’s why REDI is the perfect fit for her. Hawxby’s position was only created this year and it allows REDI to “recognize, celebrate and support those businesses that have been the backbone of the Columbia/Boone County economy.” When asked about being a “Woman to Watch,” Hawxby is quick to point to the many other women working hard in the community every day. “Columbia is bursting with amazing women who are rocking it every single day,” she says. “Many of those women have been working behind the scenes, and now they are stepping into leadership positions. … Those are the women I am watching and cheering for!”

500 E. Walnut St. • 573-442-8303 • columbiaredi.com INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 75


Kristy Trent

Chief Operating Officer

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summer job in college led Kristy Trent to her current position as chief operating officer at Advanced Radiology. That one summer, Trent witnessed “amazing caregivers in action” and saw the vital role played by medical imaging. Years later, Trent’s career has been filled with meaningful moments both with patients and other caregivers. She recalls “holding the hand of a scared patient and knowing I was making a difference” working in direct patient care. As Trent moved into leadership positions, she began to act as support for other staff members during challenging times. “Like many health care workers, our team at Advanced Radiology experienced tough times over the past two years, but they are resilient and continue to radiate a positive attitude every day.” Challenging moments are on every corner when working in health care. Trent says it’s important to learn from those moments of crisis and prepare for a stronger future. “Unplanned events can last for months,” she says. “Have detailed downtime plans, be prepared to improvise and be innovative. Know your resources and take good notes.” Being a “Woman to Watch” is a great honor for Trent, who says that the women showcased “always inspire me to do better, work harder and to empower the women around me to believe in themselves.” She says she is proud of her career and delighted to share the quality of care and compassion readers will experience when visiting Advanced Radiology. For other women looking to enter radiology, Trent advises taking care of yourself, first and foremost. “You have to take care of yourself before you can take care of others,” she says. It’s also important to look for ways to get involved and network, and always be a team player. “Know your team’s roles and responsibilities and recognize the value they bring to the organization,” Trent says. “Have fun and laugh! Laughter reduces stress.”

Advanced Radiology 311 Keene St. 573-442-1788 aradiology.com/columbia-2

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Dr. Jill Brown Co-Founder/Director Dr. Susan Deakins Co-Founder/Director

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r. Jill Brown and Dr. Susan Deakins both have a strong passion for educating children. It’s what led them to become owners and directors for the Columbia Academy for Learning and Enrichment. Both women believe all children should have access to the very best academic opportunities and they work to provide a place for mid-Missouri children to be in a nurturing, engaging and loving learning environment. Running a small business comes with challenges as well. Brown and Deakins say it is essential to set aside time to develop skills as a small business owner. “You stay focused on a mission and allow yourself the opportunity to go deep into your craft, while simultaneously building your capacity as a new business owner,” Brown says.

The CALE School 2201 W. Nifong • 573-777-1300 • comocale.com

While working with children every day brings many memorable moments, both Brown and Deakins found their first year with CALE to be special. “From our most academically gifted students to our students that require more intensive support, we were able to meet each child exactly where they were and provide the best learning opportunities,” Deakins says. “This school — our students and our families — feeds our souls.” Being a “Woman to Watch” is all about benefiting the community, for Brown and Deakins. “We are working to bring about new, exciting and necessary opportunities for children in a community we care dearly about,” Brown says.

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Sarah Darnell Bench Jeweler Molly Smith Owner Ami Hunter Sales Manager

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olly Smith has been creating art her whole life. She's been digging up clay and making animals since the age of 3. She grew up behind a jewelry case. “I would watch the jeweler carve and create tiny gold animals,” says Smith, now owner of Molly’s Jewelry Design and Repair. For her, jewelry is all about taking your imagination to the limit. “I just love the creative freedom you can have in jewelry,” Smith says. She says the special moments come when her jewelry directly impacts someone’s life. One moment in particular Smith will never forget was when she was able to fix a young boy’s cross necklace before his mother’s funeral. “The father came in a year later and told me how important it was for him to wear the cross that day,” she recalls. It’s also the customers who make it special for Sarah Darnell, bench jeweler at Molly’s Jewelry. “It’s the look of happiness when a customer picks up a sentimental piece,” Darnell says. While Smith loves her work, she says the best advice she received was to remember to “take time for yourself; mental health is important.” She says it’s important to not stress over things that are out of your control. Darnell agrees, adding that it’s important not to get hung up on mistakes. “It’s OK to make mistakes as long as you learn how to fix them,” she says. Ami Hunter, sales manager, says the job comes naturally because of her love of both jewelry and people. Plus, customer service is the No. 1 priority at Molly’s. “Our customers feel like family,” Hunter says. “We want you to leave in a happier mood than when you walked in. This has always been, and will always be, the goal.” Working in sales can be challenging, but Hunter says compassion and patience is key. “Stay true to yourself, but allow yourself to grow,” she says. That means taking care of yourself and recognizing the need for a break, Hunter says, echoing Smith’s emphasis on mental health. “We are in the retail business and here to serve, but we need time for ourselves too,” Hunter says. For Smith, being a “Woman to Watch” means embodying the future of her industry. It’s about inspiring other women for Darnell and Hunter, showing “that no matter what field we are in, if you have a passion and a fortitude, you can accomplish any endeavors,” Hunter says. Molly’s Jewelry is owned and operated entirely by women, of which Smith, Darnell and Hunter are all very proud.

Molly’s Jewelry Design and Repair 422 Main St. Boonville • 660-672-5074 mollysjewlerydesign.com

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Stephanie Goans Financial Advisor Edward Jones

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or Stephanie Goans, being a financial advisor for Edward Jones is about empowering and educating others to avoid making financial mistakes that can have serious consequences. Being able to provide that education and help positively impact lives means Goans often gets to experience overwhelming gratitude from clients. “Having someone grab my hand or hug me and simply say, ‘Thank you’ is the most rewarding feeling.” Goans hopes being a “Woman to Watch” will allow others to view her as a woman to lean on. “I have gotten to where I am thanks to many women and men who have lifted me up and encouraged me,” she says. For women looking to get into the finance field, Goans advises putting others’ needs first and asking for help. But most importantly, she says, be yourself, proudly. “Use your natural characteristics and skills to your advantage, and don’t be afraid or ashamed of success,” Goans says. 2412 Forum Blvd. suite 102 • 573-615-0019 • edwardjones.com/us-en/financial-advisor/stephanie-goans

Marissa VanDover Director

Burrell Behavioral Crisis Center

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arissa VanDover, a self-proclaimed boomerang, returned to Columbia after 22 years to become the director of Columbia’s new, 24/7 Behavioral Crisis Center. In returning to mid-Missouri, she brings more than 10 years of experience overseeing crisis centers and services in Denver, where she also helped develop a full continuum of care. VanDover says every day is different in crisis work. She gets the opportunity to meet new people and serve them in their darkest times. “Working with people in crisis has taught me so many valuable lessons,” VanDover says. “I think the most significant is that of resilience. People can and do recover, and it is a privilege to be with someone to start that journey.” While being a “Woman to Watch” is a true honor, VanDover says she hopes people reading will remember they are not alone when in crisis and that there are people who want to help.

1805 E. Walnut St. • 573-777-8300 • burrellcenter.com 80 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Connie Leipard President

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oming from a family rooted in blue collar occupations, Connie Leipard knows the construction industry is never boring. Leipard, president of Quality Drywall Construction, says the industry comes with its own challenges, especially during the past couple of years with unprecedented inflation and supply chain issues. In order to continue serving customers in the best possible way, Leipard says the company quickly made needed changes to how they estimate projects and order materials. “The most important lesson learned in the past year has been maintaining flexibility and staying resilient to conditions out of our control,” she says. Throughout its 40-year history in Boone County, Quality Drywall Construction has made its mark with several notable projects, including Aurora Organic Dairy and American Outdoor Brands. Leipard says the company is continuing in that tradition with current projects for Boone Electric headquarters and the Alpha Phi sorority house. In the male-dominated construction industry, Leipard says she would advise women to “choose your mentors wisely.” It’s important for women coming into construction to “believe in yourself and find the support network you need to succeed,” she says. For Leipard, her work has grown beyond that of Quality Drywall Construction. In 2016 and 2017, she served as the president of the National Association of Women in Construction and, in 2016, was named Columbia Daily Tribune’s Businesswoman of the Year. Leipard is hoping to add another title as she seeks an additional way to serve the mid-Missouri community by running for Boone County presiding commissioner. Leipard says she always has enjoyed reading about other successful women in the community who have had their stories told as part of “Women to Watch.” It’s inspiring to join that group of remarkable people who have each faced challenges and successes of their own, she says.

Quality Drywall Construction 165 E Hoe Down Dr. 573-449-1044

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Amaya Williams Owner Ellie LaPosha Director of Marketing Leanne Geiss Owner Kaylei Ramis Director of Sales

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rganization is not everyone’s strong suit, but at The Atrium and Eclipse Catering, the staff are experts. Owners Leanne Geiss and Amaya Williams use their years of experience to create the perfect event for clients in Columbia. “I love watching the reactions of our guests, looking at them and seeing how happy they are from the event we produced,” Williams says. To create an event people love all comes back to teamwork for Geiss and Williams. “We lead with our team. We put our people first,” Geiss says. Williams agrees, saying a team filled with trust is one that is successful, especially when it comes to delegating. “It’s important to put the people you trust in the right positions and treat them right, so they are happy and represent your business,” Williams says. Kaylei Ramis, director of sales, and Ellie LaPosha, director of marketing, have a knack for design that really helps strengthen the team. Ramis says her passion for event planning sparked back in high school. “It just felt natural, and I knew it was the right fit for me,” Ramis says. LaPosha says her passion was there from the start and she always knew she had an eye for design. But even with all the right people, challenges will arise. When hard times come, LaPosha says to ride it out because regardless of your career, “the grass is not always greener.” For Ramis, one hurdle she had to overcome in the business was realizing that it’s impossible to please everyone. “Not everyone is going to be happy all of the time, but it is important to take the feedback and make the event even better next time,” Ramis says. For Geiss, Ramis and LaPosha, being a “Woman to Watch” is an honor. Geiss says she is proud “to be seen as a leader in our community.” Ramis agrees, adding that the recognition gives her the opportunity to “empower more women to achieve their goals and challenge themselves.” For LaPosha, it’s about being able to be an inspiration to others. “So many women have helped me get to where I am and I’m excited to potentially be that person for someone else,” LaPosha says. Williams says the event industry has long been male dominated and being recognized as a “Woman to Watch” shows “that women have a place anywhere they want. You just have to show up and assert your belonging.” Through their continued teamwork and combined passion, Geiss, Williams, Ramis and LaPosha see nothing but success in their future. As long as they all continue to love what they do, stay true to themselves and remain open to new experiences.

Eclipse Catering and Events

22 N. 10th St. • 573- 607-0531 • eclipsecateringandevents.com INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 83


Shanon Fucik

Chief Nursing Officer

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arly in Shanon Fucik’s career as a nurse in Kansas City, one of her patients was a teen girl with persistent complaints of abdominal pain. The girl had seen her share of health care providers, who came to the same conclusion that she was seeking attention. After caring for her and listening to her parents, Fucik thought differently. She trusted her own instincts enough to forcefully suggest that the girl needed further evaluation. An MRI scan revealed a tumor growing in her abdomen, and surgery started the girl on the path to healing. “The family was so grateful for my continued advocacy and for being a voice for the patient during a really trying time,” Fucik says. “The most meaningful memories for me as a nurse were when I advocated for the needs of patients who were vulnerable.” Her experiences at the bedside have stuck with Fucik in her leadership role as MU Health Care’s chief nursing officer. She is committed to building and supporting a team of nurses who are empowered to create their own satisfying careers while delivering care that saves and improves lives. “My focus is on the professional growth and impact of nurses and nurse leaders,” says Fucik, who was recently elected to the board of the American Organization for Nursing Leadership. To successfully recruit, develop and retain highly skilled nurses, Fucik understands that MU Health Care must continue to adapt and offer more — more growth, more opportunity and more support. Part of her plan is a clinical ladder for bedside registered nurses with defined steps of professional and personal growth, and rewards for reaching them. “It’s about empowering all nurses who work at the bedside and incentivizing them to learn and grow professionally,” Fucik says. For anyone considering the challenging but rewarding career in nursing, Fucik has some simple advice. “Follow your passion,” she says, “and surround yourself with people who inspire and empower you.”

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84 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


Lauren Helmreich

Co-owner

D

owntown Appliance Home Center has always been a part of Lauren Helmreich’s life. The business, which has been a staple of Columbia for more than 60 years, was started by her grandfather and continued by her parents and uncle. Though it wasn’t originally Helmreich’s plan to follow in the family footsteps, the unexpected loss of her mother in 2010 changed Helmreich’s direction. While she was only stepping in to help at first, by July 2021, she had officially purchased the business and become the third-generation owner of Downtown Appliance. “This has been truly special to me that I am able to continue my family’s legacy,” she says. Helmreich says being a “Woman to Watch” means she is only starting her journey of building bigger and better things for her business and the community. “Downtown Appliance has supported numerous charities within the Columbia community for years and I plan to continue to do that for years to come,” she says. “My goal is to continue to have Downtown Appliance be a staple in our community and for it to be known as the No. 1 place to come when looking to buy appliances.” As a small business owner, Helmreich knows that things change daily and the best thing she can do is to take things in stride. “I try to always have a positive attitude, even when things get tough because my attitude then dictates how my employees react,” she says. The fields of appliance retail and service are mostly maledominated, Helmrecih says, so she would advise others looking to start “to not be intimidated, learn as much as you can about all aspects of the business and show that you deserve to be where you are.”

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INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022 85


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86 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022



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BOOM MAGAZINE 89

7/11/2022 5:13:56 PM


PUBLISHER’S NOTE

FALL 2022

publisher’s note A

s I was reading the very last sentence about historian Gary Kremer, who is featured inside this issue, I realized that his quote could have easily been the first line in the article. “Every generation of Americans thinks they are the first to live and that their

experiences are unique,” Kremer says. “We could all benefit from a greater understanding of history.” While most of us haven’t studied history voraciously like Kremer, we are fascinated when we hear a good story from the past. And that’s why in this month’s issue we’ve provided a lot of historical information — or stories that I think you’ll be delighted to read. For example, don’t miss the two-page spread on vintage ice coolers. The idea for the cover and inside feature of Boom! this month came when I was having lunch at Bud’s Classic BBQ recently. I was taken back with the vivid colors of the old-time coolers that were lined up along the floor. I just loved the nostalgia and the functionality of the ice chests. And later I got caught up in the story of how the father of restaurant owner, Jason Paetzold, was a collector of vintage memorabilia, which led to his own interest. You’ll undoubtedly also be interested by the new space that the Museum of Anthropology has moved into. Formerly at Mizzou North, the museum closed its doors last fall while it was being relocated and built. While not quite open yet, you’ll find a sneak preview of the space, which will be located on the ground floor of Ellis Library on the University of Missouri campus. You’ll find new exhibits that will be sure to tweak your interest in historic times. And, of course, we hope you share your own historical stories with your grandchildren. Spending time together and communicating is one method writer and mother-of-six Sarah Lyons suggests to strengthen your bonds with your grandchildren. She explains that sharing experiences and by spending quality time together can help create and bolster that all-important relationship. You’ll find all this and more in this edition of Boom! magazine. I’d love to hear about how you’ve benefitted from a greater understanding of history. Enjoy!

staff Chief Executive Officer Carla Leible Founder & Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry Publisher & Managing Editor Melody Garnett Parry Associate Editors Madeleine Leroux Zola Crowder Art Director Tim Flanner Graphic Designer Madelyn Jones Photo Editor L.G. Patterson Advertising Coordinators Bethany Smidt Kalie Kramel Marketing Representatives Cathy Atkins Josh Arnold Hayden Haumann Office Manager Becky James Distribution Associate Steve Leible Contributing Writers Jack Wax Sarah Lyons

Melody Parry Publisher

Email me at melody@insidecolumbia.net

90 BOOM MAGAZINE


BOOM MAGAZINE 91


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in this issue FA L L 2 0 2 2

good stuff 95

News Brief

Read about the construction status of the Museum of Anthropology’s new space on the ground floor of Ellis Library. The museum expects to reopen in 2022.

good life 96

Staying Cool

Bright colors, traditional logos and useful function make vintage ice chests a delight to collect. Enjoy this brief history on the innovation in the world of coolers.

98

Preserving The Past

Read how Gary Kremer’s own history shaped his approach to the past and how he keeps the State Historical Society of Missouri on course.

104

Five Tips To Meaningful Memories

Sarah Lyons, mother of six, shares five easy ways to strengthen your bond with your grandkids. Get suggestions on laying a foundation of love and support.

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96 106

Top Tips For Traveling Cheap

Is purchasing the National Parking Pass worth the price for seniors? Find out in this issue’s travel article.

BOOM MAGAZINE 93


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NEWS BRIEF

Assistant Curator Jessica Boldt works on relocating exhibits into the new space.

Coming Soon

BY MELODY PARRY PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

Museum Of Anthropology Finishes Construction On New Space

C

onstruction is complete on the

from MU’s art museum. The museum

Museum of Anthropology’s new

most recently was located at Mizzou

space on the ground floor of

North before the doors closed last fall

Ellis Library on the University of

while the museum was being relocated

Missouri campus. New exhibit cases are currently being installed in the

and built. The new construction allows for

extended space. The museum expects

expanded exhibits. For example,

to reopen before the end of 2022.

a dedicated space is now being

The museum’s total space includes

considered for objects from the

two main exhibition rooms with a

Osage Nation, one of the largest

connecting hall that will be used

tribes in the central part of North

for rotating exhibits. Low profile or

America and modern-day Missouri.

two-dimensional objects will also be

Dr. Candace Sall was appointed

exhibited in the entrance corridor that

director of the Museum of

divides the Museum of Anthropology

Anthropology museum last year.

BOOM MAGAZINE 95


If you’ve visited Bud’s Classic BBQ on Ninth Street, you’ve probably noticed the collection of vivid vintage ice chests that surround the menu. Bud’s owner Jason Paetzold has been collecting them for decades and says it adds a nice rustic edge to the industrial-style restaurant. His coolers were all manufactured by the Progress Refrigerator Co. from Louisville, Kentucky. The first modern cooler was made from Styrofoam in 1944, 96 BOOM MAGAZINE


which was light and had millions of air pockets in it. The Coleman Co. bought the patent in 1957 and plastic coolers became widespread. Over time, companies like Igloo got into the business, making hundreds of different models. As coolers were becoming popular, the advertising revolution was taking off as well. Large companies like CocaCola, Pepsi, Budweiser and others started producing branded coolers similar to the ones in Bud’s Classic BBQ.

Today, innovation in the world of coolers continues to evolve as Yeti, a $5 million company, changed the process of cooling to a new practice called rotomolding. Most recently, the use of solar power to cool contents has become popular, as well as adding waterproof speakers as a new cooler feature.

Stay cool! Source: bestcooler.reviews BOOM MAGAZINE 97


98 BOOM MAGAZINE


A Love Of History

BY JACK WAX PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

GARY KREMER: A Perennial Student Of The Past

G

ary Kremer is a modern-day time traveler. As an historian, he spends much of his time in the past, researching the lives of Missourians. As an administrator, he spends his days in the present, keeping the State Historical Society of Missouri (SHSMO) on course as the foremost research center for the study of Missouri’s history. And, as an adjunct professor at the University of Missouri, he looks forward to training more research assistants and serving on graduate student committees. Kremer stepped into his role as executive director of SHSMO in 2004, back when the organization was housed in the basement of Ellis Library on the MU campus. He’s as much at home now in the society’s beautiful new Center for Missouri Studies building on Elm Street, as he is in his Jefferson City home, where he lives with his wife, Lisa. If he wanted, he could retire at any time, but he enjoys his work and the SHSMO staff too much to seriously consider walking away. “If I was retired, I’d be doing most of the same things I am doing now,” he says. For Kremer, “the same things” are kept fresh by his voracious appetite to learn. When considering how digital technology has revolutionized historical research at the SHSMO and throughout the world, he says wistfully, “I wish I was 25 again and had all the tools current grad students have.” Unlike 25-year-olds, Kremer has a head of gray hair, a neatly-trimmed gray beard and a calm, contemplative manner. One thing that hasn’t changed

over the years is his curiosity. “The older I get, the more I feel I have to learn,” Kremer says. He expresses this sentiment humbly, despite having earned a doctoral degree in history from American University in Washington, D.C., and master’s and bachelor’s degrees from Lincoln University in Jefferson City. He’s humble, despite

from 1933-1972, had been the research assistant of famed historian Carter Woodson, the father of Black history and the only person whose parents were enslaved in the United States to obtain a doctorate in history. Kremer took his place in this esteemed line of historians when he became a research assistant to Greene.

"

If I was retired, I’d be doing most of the same things I am doing now.

having authored or co-authored about 13 books and innumerable articles, plus a 27-year teaching career that started at Lincoln and continued at William Woods University. Kremer’s education at Lincoln launched him into a unique place in the academic world of historians — especially for those pioneers of Black history. Lorenzo Greene, one of the nation’s premier Black historians, mentored and befriended Kremer as an undergraduate and master’s student at Lincoln. Greene, who taught at Lincoln

It’s an academic lineage that shaped Kremer’s approach to history. “I am a social historian,” he says. Which means that a major focus of his research is to study the “lived experience of individuals.” Oral interviews that probe people’s recollection of the past, recordings of past interviews, courthouse documents, newspaper stories and census data all contribute to the picture of individuals’ everyday lives. It’s a picture that would be missing important insights if not for Kremer. Antonio Holland, a colleague

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Gary Kremer was hired in 2004 as executive director of the State Historical Society of Missouri.

of Kremer’s who taught at Lincoln for many years, recalls Kremer’s devotion to uncovering the past. “If it hadn’t been for Gary’s interviews and articles, some important knowledge of African Americans in Missouri would have disappeared,” he says. When asked the purpose of historical studies, Kremer recalls the words of his mentor, Greene. “Dr. Greene would ask the rhetorical question: ‘What is the goal of the historian?’ He’d pause and say, ‘the search for truth.’” For Kremer, that search has a very practical side to it.

100 BOOM MAGAZINE

“History is a way of explaining the world in which you live,” he says. As a child, growing up in the very small town of Frankenstein, Missouri, Kremer didn’t have much interest in history. His childhood was spent playing neighborhood baseball games, riding his bike and enjoying the day-to-day adventures of rural life in the ‘50s. “One of my cousins who lived on a farm used to kid me about being a city slicker, growing up in a town of 38 people,” he says. Kremer’s family lived modestly. Instead of central heating, they got by

with a wood stove. Outdoor plumbing, which included a two-seater outhouse, was as modern as it got for many people in Frankenstein at the time. “We didn’t understand that we didn’t have money,” he says. “It was comfortable, not a culture of poverty. It wasn’t until I was 20 years old that I lived in a house that had indoor plumbing.” The only thing missing from his childhood was experience with people who weren’t like him, German Catholic. Frankenstein was anything but a diverse community. In the prologue to his


Three Don’t-Miss Exhibits At The Center For Missouri Studies This Fall

Dive into history by visiting the Center for Missouri Studies galleries, located at 605 Elm St. These three exhibits are all open this fall. The center is open to the public, Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free parking is available in the center parking lot.

Mr. Pruitt’s Possum Town: Trouble and Resilience in the American South Otis Noel Pruitt, a white photographer, documented life in the segregated town of Columbus, Mississippi — known locally as “Possum Town.” A selection of his photos from 1920-1960 are on display on the first floor art gallery. Pruitt’s complete collection is archived at the University of North Carolina — Chapel Hill, and consists of more than 90,000 photographs.

Picturing Missouri Sharecroppers To complement the Possum Town exhibit, SHSMO presents an exhibit focused on Missouri sharecroppers from the Bootheel during the 1930s and ‘40s. Photojournalist Arthur Witman and cartoonist Daniel Fitzpatrick document the 1939 interracial sharecroppers’ protest and “Cropppervile,” the community created to provide temporary homes for the sharecroppers near Poplar Bluff.

book, Race and Meaning: The African American Experience in Missouri, Kremer recounts being 12 years old and meeting his first Black child on a ballfield. “I wanted to tell him that I thought Black people and White people could and should get along … but the thought remained unspoken,” he wrote. Kremer’s view of the world began to expand when he was 13 and spent two years at St. Thomas Aquinas Preparatory Seminary in Hannibal. Not only did he meet others who didn’t share his small-town experiences, but

In Their Own Words This exhibit, located on the second floor in the Wenneker Family Gallery, celebrates the 35th anniversary of the National Women and Media Collection. It displays diaries, letters and personal papers of female journalists, including Lucile Bluford, who sued MU for denying her admission in 1939 because of her race. Also featured is Mary Paxton Keeley, born in 1885, who became the first woman graduate of the MU School of Journalism. Bluford was given an honorary doctorate degree by the university in 1989. BOOM MAGAZINE 101


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QUESTIONS ABOUT

among the nuns and priests who taught him were several from other cultures who had lived in Japan and France. He finished his high school education in Westphalia, a 25-mile bus ride from his home in Frankenstein. When he was 18, he enrolled at Lincoln because the tuition was affordable and he could live at home while taking classes. It never occurred to him that he’d be attending

see each other, and I regard him as a longtime friend,” Kremer says. Another of his students, Patsy Luebbert, credits him with changing history from a dull to an exciting class. She first met him as a student in one of his history classes at Lincoln, and now, many years later, works part time at SHSMO as manager of the newspaper digitization project. “I remember him

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I remember him telling students that history begins with us. a historically Black college, where half the students were African American or from other countries. Kremer intended to major in sociology and become an inner-city social worker, but two historical events changed the course of his studies and his career choice: the struggle for Civil Rights in the South and the Vietnam War. A close friend of his went missing in Vietnam and has never been found. “I wanted to understand what’s going on there, how did that war happen? And to do that I began to read history on my own. And because I wanted to understand what was happening with race in America — this was the ‘60s, and cities were burning after Martin Luther King’s assassination — I started reading Black history and took a course with Lorenzo Greene,” Kremer says. When Greene was about to retire, he offered Kremer a position as an instructor at Lincoln. Kremer finished his master’s degree, then started a 15-year career teaching history at the university. For 10 of those years, he also taught inmates of the Missouri State Penitentiary in the evenings. “These were among the best students I ever had. They were always well prepared,” he says. Fifty years later, he remains friends with one of his former students, who has since been released from prison. “We occasionally

telling students that history begins with us,” she says. “We are all a part of history, every day. He showed us that history was more than dates and places on a map. Kremer left teaching for four years to serve as Missouri state archivist, but returned to the classroom to teach the first women’s history classes at William Woods. After 13 years and hundreds of hours teaching William Woods students, he took on his current role leading the State Historical Society of Missouri. More than curiosity and a love for history have powered Kremer through his long and distinguished career. As a child, he was deeply moved by President John Kennedy’s inaugural address that called for Americans to participate in public service. The courage of those in the Civil Rights movement also inspired him. When he started college in the ‘60s, like many of his generation, he was idealistic and wanted to change the world. Now, at age 73, experience has tempered but not defeated his faith in the ability of people to learn from the past and apply it to the future. “Every generation of Americans thinks they are the first to live and that their experiences are unique. We could all benefit from a greater understanding of history,” Kremer says.

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Connecting With Grandkids Five Tips To Strengthening The Important Lifelong Bond BY SARAH LYONS

O

ne of the most important relationships we have in our lives is the one with our grandparents. Children learn how to love, play, interact and resolve conflict through the bond they form with both their parents and grandparents. From the moment children are born, they want the love and attentiveness of their parents and grandparents. As they receive this attention, it helps strengthen their own confidence and develop their own identities. As children mature, the bond strengthens through shared experiences and by spending quality time together. The grandparent’s role is even more special because less time is filled disciplining and correcting and leaves more time to focus on building a strong relationship and spending time together. Here are some easy ways to strengthen your grandparentgrandchild bond.

Play Together The simplest way to bond with your grandchild is to spend time playing with them. Play comes naturally to children and is a great way to spend quality time with them. Play teaches them life skills such as how to share, resolve conflict and how to follow rules. By playing peek-a-boo, tossing a ball in the backyard, playing house or making crafts, you are bonding with your grandchild because you are sharing in his or her joy of those activities. “My son would always open up when we played catch. We had some great conversations 104 BOOM MAGAZINE

playing together,” Angela Leever, mom of three, says. Playtime gives your child a safe place to share their feelings and express worries. By spending time doing what they enjoy, you are showing them they are important and that you are there for them.

Find A Mutual Interest What is your grandchild interested in? If your grandchild enjoys reading, create a two-person book club and discuss the books as you read. If your grandchild loves football, make game night a family event and cheer on your team. If your grandchild is interested in dinosaurs, visit a museum. Since lifelong friends grow from playing sports or participating in activities together, the same can be assumed about grandparent-grandchild bonding. If you truly enjoy activities together, a stronger bond will naturally form. “When they show interest in a sport, music, games, hobby or even a TV show, I will find free time to do it together,” says mother-ofthree Michelle Lyons. “I have found that while they are doing something they enjoy, they are more likely to talk about other things in their lives.”

Tell Them You Love Them And Why You Do It is likely your grandchildren know you love them, but how often do you tell them? Saying “I love you” has powerfully positive effects on your grandchild. “My kids and I have something we do in the car,” Pricella Edwords says. “I reach back

and lightly squeeze their legs three times which means ‘I love you.’ They know and will often say ‘I love you, too, mom.’” Don’t just say you love them, but also tell them why. Spell out your emotions by explaining: I love you because you are so fun to be around or because you care about others. Words of affirmation are powerful tools to give grandkids the self-confidence they need to face the world. Similarly, snuggling, hugs, kisses, pats on the back or even tickling and wrestling give your grandchildren the physical affection and bonding they crave.

Make Them A Priority Put down your phone and talk to your grandchildren. Show them that they are your No. 1 priority. If you have a task that needs to be done, ask him or her to let you finish it and when it’s complete, give your grandchild your full attention. “We read together before bed long after the storybook years,” Amy Cameron, mom of three, says. “Books spark discussion and debate and it’s an experience they will have forever.” If you have multiple grandchildren, it can be hard to spend one-on-one time with them. Set aside time to go on a “date” with each of your grandchildren so you can connect and check-in with what they are doing in their lives. Ask them open-ended questions and then listen to the answers. When you commit to making your grandchildren a priority, they will feel important and it will help to strengthen your relationship.


GRANDPARENTS

Create A Helper For the busy grandparent, finding the time to make quality moments is a daunting task in addition to all your other responsibilities. To ease this, try incorporating them into your daily tasks. While you are cooking dinner, doing dishes or folding laundry, ask your grandchild to help and start up a conversation. Some kids may bond with their grandparents over fixing the car, painting, gardening or any household task. Not only are you creating a great opportunity to spend time together but you are also teaching them life skills and a good work ethic. Amy Siebert, mom of two, suggests talking to your kids while you are in the car. “We spend a lot of time driving between activities. That’s where our best conversations happen,” she says. Carrie Miller says, “Our most

meaningful conversations happen before bedtime. It’s always worth the extra time, even when I’m tired from a long day.”

Love Them No Matter What One of the best ways to build a healthy bond with your grandchildren is to let them know you will love them no matter what. You communicate this by listening to their problems, offering advice when appropriate and then respecting their decisions — even if it will have negative consequences. If your grandchild makes a mistake, let him or her know you are there to lend love and support through the challenges that may be faced. “I’m vulnerable with my children and tell them when I mess up and apologize when I do,” says Sarah Clark, mom of two. “I ask them to do the same for me.

This authenticity creates a closer bond because they understand I’m not just an authoritarian parent figure.” Everyone needs to know they have someone in their corner, especially on bad days. Barb Shapiro, mom of six, says “Validate their feelings and truly listen when they talk. This lets them know how important they are to me and it’s not hard to do.” Most of these ideas are not profound or difficult to do, they just take a little planning and intentionality. Over time, without even trying, the bonds will be built and your grandchildren will have a foundation of love and support as they mature. Sarah Lyons is a Midwestern mom of six kids, including triplets. She enjoys bonding with her kids over reading, sports, movies and games. BOOM MAGAZINE 105


Budget-Friendly Travel Is The National Park Pass For Seniors Worth The Money?

M

BY JASON AND RAE MILLER

any people love to get outdoors and spend time in nature, regardless of age. However, accessing the best recreation areas in the country can be pretty expensive, especially for retirees who live on a fixed income. Luckily, the national park pass for seniors is a budget-friendly way to experience some of the nation’s top federally-protected lands.

person fee. Pass holders love the discounts on some amenity fees. The pass includes discounts on special-use permit fees, transportation systems, guided tours, boat launching, swimming and camping. Depending on how often you use these services, this pass can save hundreds!

What Is A National Park Pass For Seniors?

What Is The Difference Between The Passes?

The official name of the national park pass for seniors is the America the Beautiful — National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Senior Pass. This pass comes with options for a lifetime and annual membership. The pass is only available to U.S. citizens or residents 62 or older. If you’re eligible for this pass and enjoy using lands the federal government manages, this is an excellent deal. Those who frequent these lands can save a tremendous amount of money annually and even more with their lifetime pass. If you want admission to 2,000+ recreation sites that six federal agencies maintain, you’ll need the national park pass for seniors. At locations where access is per-vehicle, the pass covers the pass holder and the occupants of the noncommercial vehicle. However, the pass only covers the pass holder and up to three adults in locations that use a per-

The most widespread national park passes are the America the Beautiful Pass and America the Beautiful Senior Pass. Both passes provide access to more than 2,000 recreation sites with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. However, the senior pass offers more than the standard pass. The senior pass includes discounts on special use permit fees, concessionaires, transportation, tours and camping. Discounts vary by the site, so inquire whenever you’re making any reservation. However, the deals can amount to quite a savings if you take advantage of them! The national park pass for seniors comes in two versions: annual and lifetime. The annual pass is valid for a year and

106 BOOM MAGAZINE


Use apps like GasBuddy and Gas Guru, which provide updated gas prices in your area. With soaring gas prices, finding the best gas prices has now become easier. Also, gas prices tend to be cheaper between Sunday and Tuesday offers the same benefits as a senior lifetime pass but only costs $20. If you purchase multiple senior annual passes, you can exchange them for the purchase of a lifetime senior pass. For example, if you’ve bought four or more annual senior passes, you can exchange them for a free lifetime pass. The lifetime senior pass is $80, valid for the lifetime of the pass owner and non-transferable.

What Other Types of Passes Do National Parks Offer? Aside from the standard America the Beautiful and national park seniors pass, there are also passes for military members, citizens with permanent disabilities and individuals who have volunteered 250 service hours with participating federal agencies. There is an additional pass available to all U.S. fourth grade students, including home school and free-choice learners. You’ll need to complete some paperwork and take it to a federal recreation site to get the pass. Getting outdoors and staying active are essential activities for seniors. Getting a national park pass for seniors makes it easy and affordable to do both while enjoying some of the most breathtaking landscapes in the country. With more than 2,000 locations, you’ll have no trouble finding a place to use your pass. If you plan to visit multiple sites, the pass can pay for itself in no time! It’s an excellent investment or gift for a loved one. Which national park will you visit first? Rae and Jason Miller hit the road in 2017 for a one-year RV trip and are still traveling today after falling in love with the RV lifestyle. They are the creators of Getaway Couple, a website where they document their travels, lessons and tips.

than later in the week.

“Bring it — don’t buy it” it is one mantra to saving money. Bringing homemade snacks and sandwiches from home cuts down on purchasing items at convience and grocery stores.

Reuse it. Try using reusable water bottles rather than purchasing a case of bottled water. This can help with the environment and save money.

Look for happy hours. Many restaurants will offer significant deals on drinks and food if you come in to eat just a little earlier.

BOOM MAGAZINE 107


LyceumTheatre.org

|

660-837-3311

Sep 2 - Sep 11

Sep 23 - Oct 2

Rich with legend and big laughs, Sherwood: The Adventures of Robin Hood tells the enduring story of a hero of the people who takes on the ruthless, greedy Prince.

The most uplifting, and romantic musical theatre songs of all time have one thing in common: the unmatched writing team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II.

Scenic Design underwritten by

Scenic & Costume Design underwritten by

Joe & Sharon Timmons

Dave & Nancy Griggs

Costume Design underwritten by

Brought to you in part by

Season Sponsors


Inside Columbia

insider C O N T E N T S

110

Building Integrity ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

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Family Forever ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

117

Games and Gardens Galore ∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙∙

119 Calendar

TIGERS TAKE THE FIELD

The Mizzou Tigers open the 2022 season Sept. 1 at Faurot Field, where they will face Louisiana Tech. Fans attending the game are being encouraged to #TigerStripeFaurot in black and gold as part of a new home opener experience. The Tigers will next face Kansas State on Sept. 10 in their road opener.


insider BOOKSHELF

110

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022


insider BOOKSHELF

Creating Real Success

LOCAL AUTHOR’S LATEST BOOK OUTLINES STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE GOALS. BY MADELEINE LEROUX · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

A

lex Demczak knows firsthand the power of a really good motivational speech.

While attending the University

of Missouri, the former walk-on quarterback met best-selling author and speaker Jon Gordon, who was brought in to speak to the Tigers on

In this culture that we’re in right now, building trust is so important.

occasion. Demczak says he connected with Gordon’s message and the two

character,” he says. In fact, Demczak says the main character, in some ways, is himself. “I had an amazing job, but I was running at an unsustainable pace and I was trying to do all these different things,” he says. “At some point, I just had to make the decision on what I felt like I was called to do.” Since then, he’s pored his focus into writing and speaking all

Part of that is due to the prevalence

over the country, trying to help others

stayed in touch. After Demczak

of social media. Demczak says with all

build meaningful, enduring success

graduated, he began working with

the accessibility that comes with social

that leads to a happy, well-rounded life.

Gordon, who provided the forward for

media networks, it’s easy to lose track

“What’s cool about when I go to speak,

Demczak’s first book, Thrive U, which

of what’s genuine. That makes it all the

I can encourage people to find what

came out in 2016.

more important to establish yourself

they’re passionate about,” he says. “Are

as someone who can be counted on.

you living your values?”

Now the two have co-authored The Sale: The Number One Strategy to Build

“When you think about the people who

Trust and Create Success, which came

have made the biggest impact on your

intentional” about your goals and

out this spring. “It’s about integrity,”

life, those people have probably lived

taking actions now that help build the

Demczak says of his new book.

their lives with integrity,” Demczak says.

future you want to have in 20 years,

Through a fable about a fictional

“When they said they were going to do

Demczak says. Because when you

sales rep at an aviation technology

something, they did it and you knew

operate with integrity first, success will

company, the book lays out four

that you could count on them. … That

come. As proof of that philosophy, he

lessons about how to create lasting

sets them up for long-term success.”

points to the success companies like

success through trust and integrity.

And while Demczak and Gordon

Veterans United have seen. “One of

“In this culture that we’re in right

primarily speak to teams, businesses

their core pillars is to deliver results

now, building trust is so important,”

and other organizations, Demczak says

with integrity,” he says. And that has

he says. “There’s never been a

the lessons are meant to resonate with

led to incredible success that provides

more important time to talk about

individuals too. “We tried to write the

both top profits and an environment

building trust and having integrity as

book in a way where anyone who reads

where staff members want to be there

individuals or as companies.”

it can resonate and relate to the main

and be part of the team.

It all comes back to being “super

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

111


Creating that environment is so important now, Demczak says, as the younger workforce is looking for jobs with meaning, instead of simply those that are high paying. “Generation Z would rather make less money and be part of something that has a purpose they align with,” he says. That means employers need to ask themselves some critical questions: “Are you someone that they want to work for? Are you a great teammate? Are you someone who is investing in culture,” Demczak asks. “The old ways of management are being thrown out.” But Demczak isn’t only interested in helping people through his books and speeches. He wants to help others find their own stories, which is why he began Streamline Books last year. “Essentially, what we do is we help authors, in a 16-week process, write, edit and publish their book,” he says. “We believe that everyone has a book to write. That’s where we’re able to empower people.” For more information on “The Sale,” visit thesalebook.com.

NEED YOUR OWN SPACE?

Rent office space from

The Suites at Concorde Call or Text John at 573−489−5201

112

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

3316 Lemone Industrial Blvd

thesuitesatconcorde.com


insider WEDDING

A Family Affair

SARA ALLEN AND JACOB GIBSON CELEBRATE WITH LOVED ONES. BY MADELEINE LEROUX Catherine Rhodes Photography

F

amily has always been the top priority for Sara Allen and Jacob Gibson. So, as the

couple celebrated their nuptials with loved ones at the Missouri United Methodist Church, with a reception at The Atrium on Tenth, it was the family moments that stood out most. “We were incredibly thankful that so many traveled so far to help us celebrate in Columbia, where we first met,” Sara says. They were especially pleased to be able to spend time with Jacob’s grandparents, who recently celebrated their 70th anniversary. While there was no specific theme, the couple says it was important that the day feel classy with a touch of spunk. One particularly treasured moment was created when Sara’s family danced to “Family Tradition” by Hank Williams, which is known in the family as “their song.” “We knew we wanted the day to be beautiful, without losing sight of entering into the gift of marriage, and we are so thankful for those who made it a possibility,” Sara says.

To submit your wedding for consideration, send information and photos to mleroux@insidecolumbia.net. Include your and your spouse's names, occupations, wedding date, location and your photographer's name.

Sara Allen and Jacob Gibson were married April 9 at the Missouri United Methodist Church.

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Boone Hospital, Columbia, Missouri

INSIDECOLUMBIA COLUMBIASEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER2022 2022 114 136 INSIDE


UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI FARMHOUSE FRATERNITY McClure is a local engineering firm, providing a nationwide impact. It provides professional engineering services to public and private clients from coast to coast. One of the newest local projects by Celeste Spickert, a professional engineer for McClure, is a three-story structure for the University of Missouri FarmHouse Fraternity. Walking through the front door under the front balcony you are greeted by a grand stairway and a large meeting room. The steel framed building includes a first floor that is perfectly suited to be a social gathering area, along with an exterior patio that was made for entertaining. The building also includes a living space, residential rooms, a kitchen and dining area and study areas. This project, which should be completed in the next couple months, had an accelerated design process that saw many challenges, including in getting the right materials, because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Spickert’s team managed to put together an early structural steel package and foundation package that allowed construction to begin before the entire design team was finished. Spickert has 19 years of experience and says the best part of working on a project is the people involved and being able to help clients “bring their vision to life.” It was Spickert’s love

of math and figuring out how pieces go together that first attracted her to structural engineering. It’s been an interesting journey for her, considering how the engineering industry, and especially McClure itself, has evolved for women, she says. “Twenty years ago, there was a stigma of ‘you have to keep up with the guys’ and now females in the industry are treated much better,” Spickert says. That’s particularly clear at McClure, where Spickert says they’ve fostered an environment that is very welcoming to female employees. “They respect my family time, and they understand women’s needs and try to help balance as much as possible.” she says. The team at McClure thinks beyond concrete and steel, creating innovative structures that impress with both design and functionality. McClure restores buildings to their former glory and adapts historical buildings to a modern world. The team says their goal is to bring your ideas to life and rely on them for speed and responsiveness when fast action is critical to the success of your project. They say the goal is to build ideas together. The team has provided structural services on a range of high-profile projects including hotels in Las Vegas, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Museum in Colorado, the Philip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science in Miami and multi-story collegiate dorms with rooftop pools throughout the Midwest.

At McClure, we do whatever it takes

to get your job from concept to completion. Sometimes it’s solving a challenge before it becomes an obstacle. Sometimes it’s helping you navigate opportunities, even funding and selling the job throughout the process. Always it’s adding value and imagining what’s possible. We’re engineers, yes – but also visioneers, driven to make lives better.

573.814.1568 mcclurevision.com INSIDE INSIDECOLUMBIA COLUMBIASEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER2022 2022 115 137


Tuesday, October 11, 2022 | 5:30 - 8: PM

Holiday Inn Executive Center 2200 Interstate 70 Dr. SW, Columbia, MO

Art in Action Supporting seven mid-Missouri charities!

Featuring eleven renowned Missouri Artists Richelle Douglas Rachael Choma Cody Finely Kate Gray

Sharyn Hyatt-Wade Bethanie Irons Carrie Johnson Justin LeTourneau

EmmetT Russell Marie-Josee Thiffault David Spear

With Sincere Thanks to these Charity Sponsors

Kelly Family Foundation George and Leela Jashnani

Special Art & Music Festival

Friday, September 16, 2022 | 5:00 PM | $10 per car | Music, food, art, movie, and FUN! 116

5900 E Log Providence Rd columbia, MO2022 INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER

The purpose of this event is to give those who can’t attend the sold out gala a chance to support the work of Tigers on the Prowl.


insider

SPOTLIGHT

Photo by Jonathan Asher

Darn Tootin’ Hootenanny ANNUAL HARVEST EVENT RETURNS TO COLUMBIA.

BY ZOLA CROWDER

A

fter a summer where many

Lexi Linsenman, development

were just trying to make it

manager for CCUA, says the best part of

through the heat and humidity,

this event is showing off what Columbia

four for $50. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit columbiaurbanag.org. In case of inclement weather, Linsenman

the idea of spending more time outside

has to offer. Plus, she says, it’s a

says the event will go on by using the

can seem unfathomable. But that all

wonderful place to make a memory. “The

shelter at the Farmer’s Market Pavilion as

changes when the page turns to fall.

Hootenanny provides a place for people

well as large tents set up by the music and

throughout the community to sit down

beer garden.

And there’s no better opportunity to enjoy some time outdoors along with

together, share a meal, talk and make

food and games than at the Columbia

lasting memories,” Linsenman says.

Center for Urban Agriculture’s 13th Annual Harvest Hootenanny. From 4-9 p.m. Sept. 24 at Columbia’s

CCUA runs several programs to provide a variety of fruits and vegetables directly to people who need it in the

Agriculture Park, attendees will have a

community. It also has opportunities

chance to enjoy food, drinks, live music,

for people of all ages to develop skills

a petting zoo, garden tours, carnival

including gardening and cooking.

games and more. Some of the planned

For anyone who needs a nudge to

activities include mega Jenga, cornhole

get out and about, all the proceeds

and a duck pond.

from the Hootenanny will support

Meals will be prepared by the Columbia Area Career Center’s culinary arts students using local, fresh

CCUA in helping feed and educate the community. The event is free to attend, but tickets

ingredients, with alcoholic beverages

are needed for the carnival games, raffles

provided by area distributors, including

and to enjoy food and drinks. Tickets

Broadway Brewery and St. James Winery.

are $6 each or a 10-pack for $55. (The

Raffle prizes will be available and

Details

organization recommends estimating

include goodies from local organizations

about three to five tickets needed per

and farms, and even a Yeti cooler filled

person.) There also will be an option to

with beer from Logboat Brewing Co.

purchase a to-go meal for a family of

WHAT Annual Harvest Hootenanny

WHERE 1769 W. Ash St. Columbia’s Agriculture Park

WHEN 4-9 p.m. Sept. 24

COST FREE to attend; tickets needed for food, drinks and entertainment

WEBSITE columbiaurbanag.org

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

117


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118

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

FREE DELIVERY MEANS NO DELIVERY FEES. $50 ORDER MINIMUM.


What’s Going On THE EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW.

Dates and events are subject to change. Please visit the event website for the most up-to-date information.

September SEPT. 2 FIRST FRIDAY

NORTH VILLAGE ARTS DISTRICT The free gallery crawl, set for 6-9 p.m., is held on the first Friday of each month, with live music, art and entertainment going on throughout the North Village Art District. Participating venues will have a map or guide available for navigating the area. 6 p.m.; free; northvillageartsdistrict.org

SEPT. 2-11 “SHERWOOD: THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD”

ARROW ROCK LYCEUM THEATRE Theater fans will have a chance to view a play packed with thrills, romance, laughter and immortal characters including Robin Hood, in Ken Ludwig’s new play, “Sherwood: The Adventure of Robin Hood.” Children under 4 years old are not permitted. Shows at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m, showtimes vary by date.; prices vary; lyceumtheatre.org

SEPT. 9 MOVIES IN THE PARK: “SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS” COSMO PARK Movies in the Park, sponsored by Columbia Parks and Recreation, will show the Marvel film about a martial arts master confronting his past. People are welcome to bring a blanket or lawn chair. Concessions and food trucks will be on site. 7:45 p.m.; free; como.gov

SEPT. 10 TREATS UNLEASHED PET EXPO

TREATS UNLEASHED ON FORUM Enjoy free samples, a big one-day sale, paw printing, adoptable pets, cake walk and more, all for a good cause. Proceeds will go to Central Missouri Humane Society and The Spay Neuter Project/No Kill Columbia. 10 a.m.-2p.m.; treats-unleashed.com

SEPT. 10 2022 MO JAZZ MUSIC FESTIVAL

Special guest Adam Sanders also will be there. Doors open at 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m.; $35; thebluenote.com

SEPT. 16 GIMME GIMME DISCO: A DISCO PARTY INSPIRED BY ABBA

THE BLUE NOTE Dancing kings and queens should get ready for a DJ-based dance party that will be playing all your favorite ABBA hits, plus other hits from the 1970s and 1980s, including the Bee Gees, Donna Summer and Cher. Doors open at 8 p.m. 9 p.m.; $15-$20; thebluenote.com

ROSE PARK This family-friendly event is free and open to the public. People are invited to enjoy live music and SEPT. 17-18 tacos from Angelina’s. All ages are welcome. 2 p.m.; free; rosemusichall.com HERITAGE FESTIVAL AND CRAFT SHOW NIFONG PARK This annual festival has activities for all ages, SEPT. 10 including live entertainment, cowboys, LOVE COFFEE FIRST ANNUAL handmade crafts, ghost stories, tours of the CRAWFISH BOIL Boone County History & Culture Center, food TIGER HOTEL ON 8TH STREET and more. Enjoy good food, fundraisers, music and 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; free; como.gov surprises at the Tiger Hotel for Love Coffee’s Crawfish Boil. People will be able to have fun while supporting Love Coffee’s mission. Ticket prices vary from $15 for general admission to SEPT. 17 $1,800 for a VIP table. THE ROCHEPORT STROLL 2022 4 p.m.; prices vary; bit.ly/LoveCoffeeEvent ROCHEPORT Grab your friends and get ready to explore SEPT. 15 Rocheport while enjoying wine and beer DUSTIN LYNCH: PARTY MODE samples. Buying a ticket also gets you a TOUR 2022 commemorative wine glass. The event will be SUMMERFEST/NINTH STREET held in rain or shine. Time to dance and move your feet to the beat 4-8 p.m.; $25; missouriwine.com of Dustin Lynch’s drum this month. Enjoy live music, beer and a party in downtown Columbia.

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SEPT. 23-Oct. 2 “A GRAND NIGHT FOR SINGING”

ARROW ROCK LYCEUM THEATRE This series will celebrate more than 30 songs from several of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s musicals including “Oklahoma!,” “South Pacific,” “The Sound of Music,” “Carousel,” “The King and I,” “Cinderella” and more. Shows at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., showtimes vary by date; $20$46; lyceumtheatre.org

SEPT. 24 13TH ANNUAL HARVEST HOOTENANNY

COLUMBIA AGRICULTURE PARK This event is open to the public and includes local music, a petting zoo, activities and more. The Hootenanny is free to attend, however, in order to have food, drinks, partake in carnival games and raffles, you must purchase tickets. Tickets are available online or at the event. 4-9 p.m.; Free to attend; columbiaurbanag.org

SEPT. 24 MID MISSOURI COMMUNITY VENDOR FAIR

BROADWAY CHRISTIAN CHURCH Come and support The Ronald McDonald House Charities of MidMissouri at the Mid Missouri Community Vendor Fair. There will be vendors, door prizes, a silent auction and food trucks. The event is free for anyone under 10 years old. Admission includes a ticket for door prizes. 9 a.m.-3p.m.; $2 or box of to-go snacks or breakfast items; broadwaychristian.net

SEPT. 24 LARRY FLEET: ONE FOR THE ROAD TOUR

THE BLUE NOTE This country music singer-songwriter is heading to Columbia with special guest Tyler Booth. Doors open at 8 p.m. but the show starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 the day of show and $25 for tables. 9 p.m.; prices vary; thebluenote.com

SEPT. 29 “A FISTFUL OF HOLLERS” MURDER MYSTERY FUNDRAISER

SHAKESPEARE’S PIZZA SOUTH Who doesn’t love pizza and a murder mystery party rolled into one? Be prepared for some laughter while raising funds to support the Missouri Disability Empowerment Foundation. Doors open at 5 p.m. 6:15 p.m.; prices vary; givebutter.com

Save the date OCT.7-9 ROOTS N BLUES FESTIVAL

Photo by Jonathan Asher 120

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

STEPHENS LAKE PARK One of Columbia’s biggest festivals is back! This year’s event will feature Wilco, Jon Batiste, Old Crow Medicine Show, Kassi Ashton and more over this three-day music festival. Showtimes and prices vary; rootsnbluesfestival.com


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This section offers a selection of local restaurants in Columbia. The eateries featured in this section are picked by our magazine editors and are not chosen with any consideration to advertising. To include your restaurant in a future dining guide, email mleroux@insidecolumbia.net.

DINER

CHIM’S THAI KITCHEN ASIAN

sweet treats (like Grandma’s Cookie). Locally

sampling of what they have to offer, try the

owned and family friendly, you’ll enjoy the

Cajun Fried Catfish, served with fries, or the

904 E. Broadway

ambiance and small patio. Sip on a latte,

Gyro plate.

chimsthaikitchen.com

mocha or pourover. Or try one of their non-

Long a mainstay at Cooper’s Landing, Chim’s

coffee drinks — one delicious choice is the

downtown location is a more recent addi-

Flower Power, lavender and chamomile tea

SHORTWAVE COFFEE COFFEE

tion to CoMo’s downtown dining scene. It

with honey and blueberry milk.

915 Alley A; 29 S. Ninth St.

features a quiet setting perfect for a dinner

shortwave.coffee

Shortwave, in the artsy Alley A and newer

rolls as an appetizer and try the Pad Thai or

BROADWAY BREWERY BAR & GRILL

Kang Massa Man Curry with sticky rice for

816 E. Broadway

ated concoctions sure to cure any late night

your meal. For dessert, the Kao Neaw Sang

broadwaybrewery.com

or early morning woes. Their menu offerings

Ka Yha, or sticky rice with egg custard, is silky

Whether you’re going for brunch, dinner or

range from loose leaf teas to espresso and

and delicious.

just after-work drinks, Broadway Brewery

pour over coffee drinks, but their signature

is the perfect cozy spot. Start with Hemme

drink is the Mint Mayday, a sweet and

TELLERS GALLERY AND BAR AMERICAN

Brothers cheese curds that are hand-breaded,

creamy cold brew with fresh muddled mint.

deep fried and served with marinara or the

Try the honey rose or lavender latte if you’re

820 E. Broadway

short rib sliders, made with Thresher Porter,

looking for something a little different.

tellerscomo.com

caramelized onion, muenster cheese and

If you’ve never felt called inside by the

tomato aioli. True to its pub-like feel, the

twinkle lights lining this corner spot down-

food is on the heavier side, but definitely

D. ROWE’S AMERICAN

town, this is your sign to go in. Make sure

satisfying. Order the Chicken Fried Chicken

1005 Club Village Drive

you start off with either the fried artichoke

or the Catfish Sauce Piquant, with a catfish

drowesrestaurant.com

hearts with chipotle aioli or the house-made

filet served in a spicy tomato sauce over a bed

D. Rowe’s bills itself as Columbia’s “Regu-

sweet potato chips. The spicy black bean que-

of rice. Obviously with brewery in its name,

lar” Place, and it’s easy to see why — it’s

sadilla and salad of mixed field greens are our

this establishment’s well-known for its beers.

got a relaxed family-friendly atmosphere,

editors’ picks, but the Patchwork pork chop

A few of our favorites are the 11 Point IPA,

ample-sized portions of good grub and

with rosemary cream, sweet mashed potatoes

named after a Missouri river, and the Bonne

makes you want to keep returning. The

and vegetables will hit any home-cooked

Femme Honey Wheat, made with local honey.

minute you step inside, you’re smacked

meal craving you may have. Wash it all down

Check out their taproom on Ninth Street.

with the enticing aroma of woodsmoke — a

out with family or friends. Munch on the egg

delicious reminder of the hickory smoked

with a glass of local beer, or try one of their

CHI-TOWN EATS AMERICAN

wings that await. D. Rowe’s smoked wings

TOASTY GOAT COFFEE CO. COFFEE

2900 Trimble Road #105

and award-winning and flat-out fabulous.

Chi-Town Eats’ owner, Angelo Smith Jr.

The menu’s wide, another reason why it’s

515 S. Scott Blvd.

wanted to bring a taste of the Windy City to

easy to make D. Rowe’s a regular place. The

toastygoatcoffee.com

Columbia. The Chicago-inspired eatery offers

pulled pork sandwich on a Kaiser bun melts

Toasty Goat offers espresso and coffee bever-

classics such as the Vienna beef hot dog, best

in your mouth, and D. Rowe’s knows to offer

ages sure to pair perfectly with one of their

eaten without ketchup of course. For a true

creamy coleslaw as a topping.

specialty cocktails.

122

location on Ninth Street, serves up caffein-

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

are not to be missed! They’re dry rubbed


flavor DINING GUIDE

CHRIS MCD’S 1400 FORUM BLVD., SUITE 38

THE QUARRY SOUTHERN & HOMESTYLE

THE HEIDELBERG BAR & GRILL

1400 Forum Blvd., Suite 38

1201 E. Broadway

410 S. Ninth St.

tchrismcds.com

thequarrybar.com

theheidelberg.com

Chris McD’s is an oft-overlooked steak-

If you’ve ever been to New Orleans — or are

At The Heidelberg, happy hour means

house and seafood restaurant. One of their

still hoping to get to visit The Big Easy —

appetizers are buy one, get one free —

signature cocktails, the pineapple martini,

head to The Quarry to get a taste. Try the

otherwise known as half-priced apps to

features house-made sweet pineapple vodka

shrimp po’ boy with fried or sautéed shrimp,

regulars. The best way to experience this

and a sugared rim and is a must-try. While

served on a sandwich with lettuce, tomato,

deal is to make it into a meal with a group

you’re at the bar, try the baked crab and

mayo and spicy fries. Looking for something

of friends. Order several apps and share

shrimp dip with a five-cheese blend and

with a little more heat? Try the shrimp &

them with the table, tapas-style. The

toasted French bread. For an entrée, the Pan

crawfish etouffee, a spiced seafood stew

Heidelberg’s appetizer offerings draw on

Seared Jumbo Sea Scallops with fire-roasted

served with rice. Don’t leave without order-

classic pub fare and include some can’t-miss

peppers, sweet corn, select greens and avo-

ing the beignets and wash it down with

options. Try the bacon and cheddar skins —

cado puree will leave you wanting to come

something from their expansive bar menu,

potato boats topped with a hearty helping

back time and time again. Chris McD’s is

featuring local brews, custom cocktails like

of cheddar cheese and crumbled bacon —

perfect for business dinners, date night and

the Fla-mango and frozen Irish coffee.

and the spinach and artichoke dip, served

everything in between.

SAKE JAPANESE BISTRO

warm alongside vegetables and wonton chips for dipping. Gather earlier than

WICKED ASIAN WINGS ASIAN

16 S. 10th St.

807 E. Walnut St.

sakejapanesebistro.com

wickedasianwings.business.site

In addition to traditional sushi items, Sake

For the last few years, Wicked Asian Wings

serves hot Asian entrees. The downtown

has been serving up tasty boneless and

restaurant offers a series of signature rolls,

bone-in wings, with a wide variety of flavor

including the Mizzou: spicy tuna, avocado

options. Try the Honey Garlic Sriracha,

and cucumber topped with tuna, and the

Sweet Korean or Asian Zing wings, or any

23 S. Ninth St.; 1101 Grindstone Parkway

Lemon Drop: crab, cucumber, avocado,

of their other 13 flavors. Sides include fries,

Suite 107

salmon and lemons. Other tasty options

St. Louis-style fried rice, crab Rangoon and

bubblecuptea.com

include its Eggs & Bacon, starring seared

egg rolls.

If you’re a fan of tea, boba or Japanese cui-

pork belly and braised oyster sauce. Open

sine, you’ll definitely be a fan of Bubblecup

for dine in and carry out.

Tea Zone. As soon as you walk into one of

CRAZY GOOD BURRITOS MEXICAN

dinner and experience The Heidelberg’s patio overlooking the MU campus, or visit late and get cozy in one of the resturant’s many booths.

BUBBLECUP TEA ZONE TEA SHOP

their stores, you’re surrounded by all of the

815 Business Loop 70 E.

EL OSO MEXICAN

crazygoodburritos.com

522 E. Broadway

With fresh ingredients and traditional

What became a brick-and-mortar loca-

Mexican offerings, including quesabirrias

tion from a food truck has been wowing

and sope, Crazy Good Burritos has been

Columbians. The chips and salsa, a staple of

bringing authentic cuisine to the Business

any Mexican restaurant, are excellent. Try

Loop. For breakfast, try the Homestyle

the chicken taquitos or the Molcajete, with

Chilaquiles or Suegra, an egg and Colby jack

your choice of meat, cactus, onion, fried

NOURISH CAFÉ & MARKET BAKERY & CAFÉ

cheese between two yellow corn tortillas

jalapeños, spicy sauce, cheese and served in

1201 E. Broadway

and topped with Suegra sauce, avocado

a traditional molcajete bowl. They offer four

nourishcafemarket.com

slices and queso fresco. Meat options for

flavors of margarita: peach, mango, straw-

Nourish is known for organic, nutrient-rich,

lunch and dinner, depending on the item,

berry and jalapeño, as well as various beers.

unprocessed food made from scratch. The

include carne asada, pollo (chicken), chorizo

They offer rotating drink specials Tuesday

entire menu is free of gluten, soy, corn,

and al pastor (grilled pork).

through Sunday.

refined sugar and preservatives. In other

tea options that they offer. If you are a milk tea fan, try the Royal Milk Tea — or if you’re a matcha green tea lover, their matcha lattes are top-notch. Their food offerings include crepes, salads, tempura and more.

BOOCHES BILLIARD HALL

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words, it’s tasty food you can feel good —

fresh cilantro. This Pizza Tree pie packs

almost righteous — about eating. Nourish’s

a piquant punch. Plus, it’s pretty, with its

BANGKOK GARDENS ASIAN

minimalist atmosphere is as uncluttered and

colorful house-made kimchi and spiraling

811 Cherry St.

clean as its offerings. You can enjoy smooth-

drizzle of chile aioli.

bangkokgardens.com

ies, bowls, salads, sandwiches/wraps, even

If you go to Bangkok Gardens, you’re go-

LAS MARGARITAS MEXICAN

ing to get a lot of recommendations from

instance, offers a healthful and flavorful array of marinated kale, roasted sweet potatoes,

5614 E. St. Charles Road, Suite E; 220 S. Eighth St.;

amazing. Try the Nheu Phat or Phat Kaprow

roasted broccoli, lemon garlic hummus and

10 Southampton Drive

— green bell peppers, snow peas, carrots,

cauli balls. You can opt to add in hormone

lasmargaritascolumbia.com

onions, zucchini and Thai basil stir-fried in

free chicken, grass fed beef or other punches

Although they now have several locations

oyster chili paste. The coconut curry and de-

of protein for a few dollars more.

throughout Columbia, the original Las

mon chicken are also great choices. If you’re

Margaritas sits on Corporate Lake, near Rock

PIZZA TREE PIZZA

looking for a good appetizer, try the Street

Bridge High School. This Mexican restaurant

Side Sa-tay — grilled chicken marinated in

has stolen the hearts of many Columbians

yellow curry and coconut milk, and served

909 Cherry St.

with their margaritas, fajitas and tacos. Try

with the house-made peanut sauce. Every

pizzatreepizza.com

the fajitas nachos — tortilla chips topped

entrée is customizable with your spice pref-

Yes, Columbia has a plethora of pizza places.

with queso, fajita peppers, onions and your

erence but be careful — those spice rankings

But Pizza Tree stands apart because its pizzas

choice of meat. They are a perfect combina-

are serious and even devoted fans of spice

are so imaginative and delicious. Who else

tion of nachos and fajitas in one dish. You

may be surprised if they decide to go for a

makes a Mac and Cheese pizza? Or try the

can’t go wrong with a margarita, but Las

level of four or higher.

Kimchi Pie pizza with siracha-glazed pork

Margaritas also has delicious mojitos as well

belly, house-made kimchi, chile aioli and

— try their strawberry mojito next time.

raw vegan desserts. The Broadway Bowl, for

EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR A BEAUTIFUL BACKYARD AT

Shop in store, online at or

SCAN THIS QR CODE to start your project!

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locals. The best part? They’re all going to be


Inside Columbia

views C O N T E N T S

127 Dueling DJs

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129 On The Town

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135 A New View

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ILLUMINATING MESSAGES

Known around town as the keyhole, the Keys to the City sculpture in front of Columbia City Hall is an iconic piece of local public art. But did you know that different colored lights will illuminate the sculpture to signify national events and remembrances? In May, the keyhole was lit blue in honor of National Police Week and, in June, it was lit orange to mark National Gun Violence Awareness Day.

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The Final Word


PEOPLE LOVE MAGAZIN ES.


insider DUELING DJS

Antagonistic Aeronautics WHOSE PAPER AIRPLANE CAN GO THE DISTANCE?

Each issue, two on-air talents from two different Zimmer Communications’ stations will take on a seemingly simple challenge to see who comes out on top. This issue, Shags from 96.7 KCMQ and Branden Rathert from 93.9 The Eagle see who can build the best paper airplane. Make sure you visit insidecolumbia.net to see video of the full challenge!

THE CHALLENGE You have three minutes to make the best paper airplane possible. The airplane that logs the longest flight will be declared the winner.

THE CONTENDERS Shags from 96.7 KCMQ, focused and ready to go, and

Branden Rathert from 93.9 The Eagle, armed with tips and examples from his Eagle cohorts.

THE OUTCOME Shags' commitment to building his plane really paid off

when it sailed through the Zimmer Communications' conference room and landed nearly at the opposite wall. Then, in a very surprising twist, Branden's airplane managed to go straight into the air and get stuck in our ceiling. (Luckily, Shags could reach it!)

I may have had the distance, but he definitely had the creativity. And the height. Maybe one of the greatest airplane feats I've ever seen. -Shags

" "

I was up against a pretty tall competition, but I just came and I winged it. No plan. -Branden

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

127

” ”


CIVIL ENGINEERING TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING FORENSIC AND INVESTIGATIVE ENGINEERING STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

bd

Employee Spotlight Jason Klemme Jason is a Professional Engineer with a Master’s Degree in Civil/Structural Engineering from the University of Missouri. He has over 10-years of experience in helping communities and clients with their civil/structural needs. Jason serves as a Project Engineer in our Lee’s Summit, Missouri, office.

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Special Olympics Missouri Brad Boswell, Andy Reid and Martha Boswell

Rusty Drewing and Andy Reid

Special Olympics Missouri (SOMO) held the 2nd annual “An Evening with Andy Reid” event on June 9 at Kansas City’s Arrowhead Stadium. Coach Reid has been a champion for SOMO athletes for several years. The sold-out event entertained 350 guests who enjoyed dinner and an auction that raised more than $250,000.

Date June 9 Andy Reid, Gov. Mike Parson with Special Olympics Missouri athletes

Location Arrowhead Stadium

Photos by L.G. Patterson

Candy Neuner, Andy Reid, Brian Neuner

Paige Harper, Sara Harper, Dennis Harper

Kevin and Amy Sprouse, Andy Reid, Melanie and Ford Mendenhall

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Best of Columbia Gold Celebration The 2022 Best of Columbia gold winners were celebrated with food, drinks and collaborative art on June 28 at The Atrium on Tenth, thanks to event sponsor

Scott Schaefer and Jessica Schlosser contribute to a collaborate art piece by Cindy Scott.

Veterans United. In its 16th year, Best of Columbia recognized winners in more than 80 categories, from best barbecue to best nonprofit.

Date June 28

Location The Atrium on Tenth

Nevada Shelkey, Jana and Barry Roewe, Tyler Kallenbach

Emeri Burgher

Secily Devese

Amy Neisen and Justin Riley

Rachel Flynn, Robert Flynn, Kathi Betz, L.C. Betz

Rusty Drewing

Photos by L.G. Patterson

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12th Annual Gurucharri Foundation Golf Tournament The Vincent P. Gurucharri M.D. Foundation held its 12th annual Front row: Jean Gurucharri, Mary Starbuck, Rita Schulte, Gary Powell Back row: Nyle Klinginsmith and Suzanne McDavid

golf tournament July 18 at the Columbia Country Club, with 23 teams participating. The tournament helps the foundation provide benefits to families of cancer patients.

Date July 18

Location George and Rhonda Henstorf, Debbie Barnes, Steve Dressner

Leroy and Katy Kovar, John and Heather Patton

Columbia Country Club

Photos by Nancy Toalson and Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@compuserve.com

Paul and Lisa Humphrey, Jodi and Tyler Bales

David Bastow, Matt Johnson and Shannon Olson

Mary and Les Sapp, Mike and Deb Gerecke

Eric Metzdorf, Enrique Fuhlage, Kevin Johnson, Ron Ross

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Columbia Chamber of Commerce Century Club Dinner

Heather Stewart and Chrissy Jones

Tim Knarr and Jan Beckett

The Columbia Chamber of Commerce held its Century Club Dinner on July 18 at the Drury Plaza Hotel. The dinner recognizes chamber ambassadors who have attended a significant number of ribbon cuttings in the course of one year. However, due to the pandemic, this was the first Century Club Dinner held in

Greg Baker and Ann Merrifield

two years.

Date July 18

Location Drury Plaza Hotel

Photos by Columbia Chamber of Commerce Ellen Dent and Cathy Cook

Jim Cherrington and Gena Patton

Andrea Jira and Tom Trabue

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Inaugural Larry Gross Lewy Body Awareness Golf Tournament Ali Hamrah, Amy Gross Greenwood, Anna Gross, Rebecca Gross-Highland, Tom Highland

The inaugural Larry Gross Lewy Body Awareness Golf Tournament was held Aug. 8 at the Country Club of Missouri. Twenty-five teams participated in the event, which raised more than $50,000 for the Larry Gross Lewy Body Awareness Foundation. The foundation provides resources and support for families affected

Melinda Netemeyer, Sam Verslues, Cori and Steve Busby

Bill Laurie and Rebecca Gross-Highland

by Lewy body dementia, as well as education for medical personnel, health care workers and long and short-term facilities to better deal with the progressive dementia.

Date Aug. 8

Location Country Club of Missouri Meghan Buchert, Todd Keller, Nikki Reynolds, Bobby Guill

Jim and Donna Duncan and Rick and Denise Nelson

Photos by Nancy Toalson and Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@compuserve.com

Dennis Hazelrigg, Jess Peterson, Randy Minchew, Taylor Dalton

Bobby Atkisson, Jamie Fitzpatrick, Ron Netemeyer, Jill Harper

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views A NEW VIEW

A New View

BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER, I HAVE ACCESS TO SOME UNIQUE POINTS OF VIEW IN THE COMMUNITY. Assignment: Dog-Friendly Dining The Location: Logboat Brewing Co.

I

've always been a dog person. Throughout the years, I have met just about every breed of canine. I enjoy getting to know each and every one of them, as dogs seem to have completely different personalities. Since I like to get them riled up as I play with them, their owners aren’t always very appreciative. For the most part, dogs seem to mimic the attitudes of their owners and, in turn, are fiercely loyal to those people. For this issue, I met several dogs and the most unique critter of the bunch had to be Remi. Though he was constantly barking at nothing while hanging out in the shade outside Logboat, it was his incredibly long tongue, in constant motion, that first caught my attention. As I tried to photograph him, Remi kept an aloof attitude, coming off a bit like a diva who didn’t care what I was trying to do. But as I started to walk away from Remi, he looked at me and smiled. I think, ultimately, he liked me as much as I liked him.

L.G. Patterson

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views DARKOW DRAWS

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ADVERTISING INDEX

3Fifteen Primo Cannabis ....................................... 118

Manor Roofing & Restoration .............................. 74

Advanced Radiology .............................................. 76

McClure Engineering Company .......................... 114

Ai Painting Plus ....................................................... 24, 75

Mediacom ................................................................ 2, 102

Allstate Consultants LLC ...................................... 128

Menard Inc .............................................................. 124

Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre ................................ 108

Mercedes-Benz of Columbia ............................... 14

Automated Systems .............................................. 94

Mid America Bank ................................................. 17

Bank of MO .............................................................. 12

Millers Professional Imaging ............................... 46

BMW of Columbia ................................................. 7

Mollys Jewelry Design .......................................... 78

Boone Health ........................................................... 6

NH Scheppers Distributing .................................. 36

Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton ..................... 92

Prolific Exteriors LLC .............................................. 19

Burrell Behavioral Health ...................................... 30, 72, 80

Quality Drywall Construction Company ........... 81

City and Regional Magazine Association .......... 126

REDI ........................................................................... 75

Columbia Academy for Learning & Enrichment ... 77

River Hills Landscaping ......................................... 35

Commerce Bank ..................................................... 3, 89

Rost Landscaping & superior Gardens .............. 22

Convergence Financial .......................................... 23

School House Bed & Breakfast ............................ 17

Downtown Appliance ............................................ 85

Services for Independent Living .......................... 33

Eclipse Catering & Events ..................................... 82

State Farm Insurance - Phyllis Nichols .............. 21

Edward Jones - Gina Mauller ............................... 88

State Historical Society of MO ............................ 4

Edward Jones - Stephanie Goans ........................ 80

Suites at Concorde ................................................. 112

First Midwest Bank ................................................ 69

SumnerOne ............................................................. 134

Fleet Feet Sports Columbia .................................. 33

Terrace Retirement Community .......................... 91, 139

Gaps Automotive ................................................... 68

The Dove .................................................................. 121

Hawthorn Bank ....................................................... 140

The Walters Team, eXp Realty ............................ 66

Inside Columbia magazine ................................... 22, 128

Tigers on the Prowl ................................................ 116

Interstate Plasma ................................................... 72

TrueSon Exteriors & Interiors .............................. 8

Las Margaritas ........................................................ 10

University of MO Healthcare ............................... 84

Lenoir Woods .......................................................... 92

Wendy L. Sprouse Agency ................................... 73

Living Canvas Tattoo & Body Piercing ............... 70

Winter-Dent & Company ..................................... 103

Magelings LLC ......................................................... 46

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Building A Better Community

WELCOMING REFUGEES ENHANCES LOCAL CULTURE. BY FRED PARRY

A

t a time when immigration is an explosive political tinderbox in the national narrative, there’s a wildly different sentiment being expressed right here in our community where hundreds of refugees have settled in recent years. At last count, local officials estimate that nearly 2,000 refugees from other countries have made Columbia their home in the previous five years. On top of that, there may be just as many secondary migrants, immigrants who originally settled elsewhere but later chose to come to Columbia to be close to family members or to access the breadth of services available here. All in all, it’s been a relatively quiet migration that has largely avoided controversy, resistance or any type of sensationalized media coverage. A large number of the refugees who have come to Columbia in recent years have been from Burma, Afghanistan and, more recently, Ukraine. Most have come to the United States to escape murderous regimes and dictators who have gained power in their countries of origin. Last year, when the United States pulled its troops out of Afghanistan and relinquished power to the Taliban, there was a mass exodus from that country, especially among those who had, in one way or another, assisted U.S. military officials in their efforts to rid that country of terrorist factions. Much of the credit for helping these refugees successfully resettle in Columbia goes to Catholic Charities of Central and Northern Missouri and an organization called City of Refuge. These agencies have helped with housing needs, nutritional assistance and job placement. City of Refuge provides case management services in language training, health care coordination, 138

INSIDE COLUMBIA SEPTEMBER 2022

financial literacy, transportation needs and mental health services. Their ultimate goal is focused on reuniting families and smoothing the transition for those escaping global conflicts who are likely suffering from the mental anguish of losing their families and their lifelong homes. Thanks to the good work being done by these social service agencies, many of these refugees quickly transition to becoming productive members of our local society. Refugees have filled a significant gap in our workforce by working jobs in the hard-hit sectors of manufacturing, hospitality and other service industries. Oftentimes, these refugees are working at jobs far beneath their education and expertise. Once they adapt to their new surroundings, they often rise through the ranks due to their superior work ethic and desire to live a better life. A few years ago, my wife, Melody, worked with City of Refuge to adopt a family that had recently come to Columbia from Burma. Once a week, she would pay a visit to their home and help them sort through mail, navigate the rigors of the local school system and help with any of the other challenges associated with transitioning to a completely different way of life. Even though it was considered beneath his previous station in life, the father of this family took a nightshift job unloading trucks at one of the local Walmarts. In spite of the language barriers and the significant cut in compensation, this family managed to purchase their own home in Columbia within two years of arrival. After receiving initial assistance and support from City of Refuge, this family now stands on their own pursuing their new American dream. In so many respects, the story of these refugees is an inspiring reminder of what is truly possible in this

country if you’re willing to work hard and have the fortitude to overcome a wide variety of challenges. One of the things I appreciate about our refugee community is what they add to our local culture. Many of these newcomers have opened restaurants, grocery stores and have made possible a multitude of other amenities and services. We are a better community because of these refugees who now call Columbia home. Given the continuing conflicts in Ukraine and in other parts of the world, the need to accommodate refugees in our community is likely to grow. Recognizing this need, City of Refuge has recently announced plans to purchase a building at the intersection of East Walnut Street and North Garth Avenue that will give them nearly three times the amount of space to serve Columbia’s refugee population. This larger space will allow them to provide child care, English language instruction, a preschool as well as an entrepreneurial program and market space designed for refugees wishing to provide goods and services to the community. As a community, we should do all that we can to support these types of efforts. City of Refuge is in the process of setting up a capital campaign to raise the money needed to open its new facilities. You can donate online at cityofrefugecolumbia.org/ capital-campaign. City of Refuge is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and all gifts are tax deductible to the full extent of the law.

Fred Parry Founder & Publisher Emeritus fred@insidecolumbia.net

P M C


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