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help you INTRODUCING DR. JESSICA SMITH “Whether it is with cancer, infertility or pain, I want to help everyone live their best life and not sit on the sideline.” ellness Way is delighted to announce the addition of chiropractor Dr. Jessi, our new women’s health specialist. A St. Louis native, Dr. Jessi was an avid youth volleyball player who endured many sport-related injuries. She also suffered from severe migraines and began seeing a chiropractor at age 12. After receiving her first adjustment, she knew she wanted

to become one herself. She earned a BS in Human Biology, a Master of Nutrition and her doctorate in Chiropractic from Logan College of Chiropractic in Chesterfield, Missouri. She went on to earn a Webster Certification from the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association (ICPA) to care for pregnant women and is working toward her diplomate (or specialty) in pediatrics, as well as toward becoming a doula, post partem

depression counselor and lactation specialist. After being diagnosed with ovarian and uterine cancer, she faced many dire scenarios, and after successfully completing chemo therapy, she was drawn to the Wellness Way lifestyle as a way to help other women optimize their health. “I want to help other women in my situations work through their worst-case scenarios and help them win their fights naturally and come out on the other side healthier than before,” she says. “Whether it is with cancer, infertility or pain, I want to help everyone live their best life and not sit on the sideline.” Her passions in chiropractic care are women’s health, pediatrics and pregnancy.

SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT TODAY.

2401 Bernadette Dr. Suite 209 | Columbia, MO 65202 | (573)443-6828


on your way WHAT MANY PEOPLE DON’T KNOW It’s common to think of a chiropractor as someone who specializes in back or neck pain. But there’s a lot more to it. It helps to remember that the spine controls everything. The nervous system comes from the brain and goes to everywhere in the body. So, if there’s a disruption anywhere in that system, it can cause ANYWHERE in the body not to function at 100%. To put it another way, at Wellness Way clinics, we view the body as a Swiss watch: everything is interrelated.

IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT PAIN You don’t have to have pain for something to be going on. Only about 10% of the nerves in our body perceive pain, whereas the other 90% are allowing the organs to function. So, a lot of the time pain is actually the worst indicator that there’s anything going on.

WE DON’T GUESS…WE TEST We have each patient fill out a Functional Assessment Questionnaire, or FAQ, to assess

what’s going on in each system of their body. Then we do testing based on the answers, to see what’s causing it, potentially food allergies or hormone issues. We test to see not only what hormones your body is producing, but also what are being cast out. We then recommend a plan, including supplements and chiropractic adjustments, to help get things back on track.

A LEAKY GUT. SAY WHAT? Unlike your skin, which has eight layers to protect it, your small intestine or gut, only has one. So, it’s easy for bad things, such as toxins, to leak or seep through. If your gut health is off, it can cause inflammation in your body, putting stress on the liver or adrenal glands.

FERTILITY ISSUES Yes, we want to know where your hormone levels are, but it's bigger than that. We want to find the source of inflammation, and that could look like food allergy testing, to focusing on chiropractic care. We want to find that inflammation and help you remove it, so that your

body can return back to normal.

PREGNANCY With her Webster Certification, Dr. Jessi knows precisely how to provide chiropractic care for pregnant women. She relies on research protocol for adjustments that may help make sure your pelvis is ready for birth and the round ligaments are aligned. This has been shown to help women carry to term and can ensure the baby is in the correct position. In some cases, alignment can even shorten labor length.

INFANTS Dr. Jessi has adjusted babies as young as young as 2 hours old. It takes a gentle, small touch, she likens to lightly pressing a tomato. She can check inside a baby’s mouth and its palates, and check its upper neck then make adjustments to help with breastfeeding issues, such as latching.

MENOPAUSE Having hot flashes has become acceptable. But they’re not inevitable. Find out more.


Leading the way toward excellence.

(L-R) Libby Cowgill, Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies; Anthropology, College of Arts and Science · Daryl Smith, Associate Teaching Professor; Management, Trulaske College of Business · Angie Zapata, Associate Professor; Learning, Teaching and Curriculum, College of Education · Craig Kluever, Professor; Director of Undergraduate Studies; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering · Miriam Barquero-Molina, Assistant Teaching Professor; Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Science

Commerce Bank celebrates the 2020 William T. Kemper Fellowship recipients, each recognized for improving the human condition and quality of life through academics at Mizzou. This year—in honor of the 30th group of Kemper Fellows—each professor will be awarded $15,000 to be used at his or her own discretion.

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Handbags • Chanel • Louis Vuitton • Hermès

Other Items

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INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 7


Tax planning with the right team is always a wise investment. Travis Cook, CFP®, CMFC® CEO Convergence Companies

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Understanding the tax implications of any financial move is critical. And as an experienced CPA, Landon Cummins knows the financial decisions you make today can impact the taxes you pay tomorrow. That’s why Convergence Accounting is excited to share Landon’s expertise and “big-picture thinking” expe with our clients. Shelly Krueger, CPA Convergence Accounting

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It is with great happiness we announce the marriage of our jeweler, Jesse Miller, who has been a part of the Buchroeders family for over 15 years. Congratulations to Jesse and his wife Katelyn, wishing you a lifetime of love, health, and happiness! Being that Jesse is a master jeweler, he custom created his and Katelyn's rings from start to finish!

Trusted Jewelry Repair for over 120 YEARS Our repair Shop features state of the art equipment and virtually all repairs are done on site.


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*Base MSRP excludes transportation and handling charges, destination charges, taxes, title, registration, preparation and documentary fees, tags, labor and installation charges, insurance, and optional equipment, products, packages and accessories. Options, model availability and actual dealer price may vary. See dealer for details, costs and terms.


features

Inside Columbia

features Oct/Nov 2020

C O N T E N T S

92 CHOP LOCAL USE MID-MISSOURI INGREDIENTS THIS THANKSGIVING.

100 PIÈCE DE RÉSISTANCE HOW TO AMP UP YOUR IMMUNITY.

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 13


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C O

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Oct/Nov 2020 In every issue

16 ONLINE 18 FROM THE EDITOR

Life 23

24 ENCOUNTERS Getting through a rough patch: One teen’s pandemic plan. 28 5 THINGS Talking turkey: 5 things about the fascinating fowl. 30 FASHION A myriad of masks to help you put on a happy face.

SPECIAL SECTION

HOME 107

Insider

125 127 CALENDAR 131 HIGH NOTE The stories behind today’s top songs.

Views 133

135 139 140 146

24

ON THE TOWN A NEW VIEW DARKOW DRAW THE FINAL WORD

37 ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS Reasons to visit the charming railroad relic of Blackwater.

Flavor

41 43 DASH Fall in love with pumpkin pancakes topped with a special syrup. 44 DINING OUT There’s now more in store in the village of Pierpont. 46 COOKING WITH BROOK Squash Any Doubts One ingredient, two different soups.

CEO 50

On the cover

RJ Bechtold tried his hand at pumpkin production this year. Photos by L.G. Patterson

46 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 15


what’s online...

Enjoy additional digital content on our website and social media.

Inside Columbia Staff ADVERTISING COORDINATORS Jeff Ausmus jausmus@zrgmail.com Kalie Kramel kkramel@zrgmail.com Stefanie Joseph sjoseph@zrgmail.com

BUTTERNUT MESS THIS UP

Winter squash, such as butternut, can really shine in soups. But before you cut to the chase with your chef’s knife, head to our Facebook page to see Food Editor Brook Harlan’s helpful dicing demo.

MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Cathy Atkins catkins@insidecolumbia.net Lindsey Baxter lbaxter@insidecolumbia.net Josh Arnold jarnold@insidecolumbia.net Laura Fuchs lfuchs@insidecolumbia.net Blake Dunlap bdunlap@insidecolumbia.net OFFICE MANAGER Becky James rjames@zrgmail.com DISTRIBUTION ASSOCIATE Steve Leible

TOASTING TRIO

Find three wines that are perfect picks for the upcoming holiday season. Just go to insidecolumbia.net and search “holiday wines.”

INSIDE COLUMBIA MAGAZINE Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 www.InsideColumbia.net Office: 573-875-1099

Inside Columbia is published by Zimmer

HEALTHY HOLIDAYS

Whether it’s gorging on gravy or binging on boozy beverages, Thanksgiving and the other upcoming holidays can wreak havoc on our health. But they don’t have to. For hints on how not to totally lay waste to your waist, visit insidecolumbia.net and search “healthy holidays.”

/InsideColumbia.net

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16 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

@Inside_Columbia

InsideColumbiaMagazine

Strategic Communications, 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201, 573-875-1099. Copyright Zimmer Communications, 2020. All rights reserved. Reproduction or use of any editorial or graphic content without the express written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Postage paid at Columbia, Mo. The annual subscription rate is $15 for 1 year.


HELPING YOU IS OUR PEAK PRIORITY.

PEAK PROFILES

MEET OUR NEWEST PHYSICAL THERAPISTS FROM OUR COLUMBIA SOUTH CLINIC

TAALOR STEVENSON HOMETOWN: Columbia, Missouri TIFFANY HARBISON HOMETOWN: Waterloo, Illinois WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A PHYSICAL THERAPIST? TAALOR: Growing up with competitive sports, I

struggled with my fair share of injuries and spent several hours in physical therapy. Many of my trainers were phenomenal, knowledgeable, motivating, and passionate about helping me achieve my goals! Their desire to help inspired me to do the same!

TIFFANY: I became a physical therapist because I TIF

received help from physical therapists through some of my most challenging times in life, and it really left an impact on me. The more I learned about the physical therapy profession, the more passion I gained to pursue the career and make a difference in people's lives. The human body is an incredible cr creation and I believe that by maximizing the function of your body you can truly live life to the fullest.

WHAT DO YOU MOST LOOK FORWARD TO ABOUT WORKING AT PEAK SPORT AND SPINE?

TAALOR: I enjoy getting to know my patients and working with them to reach their goals. I love applying my knowledge and evidence-based research to help my patients overcome their injury and be successful!

TIFFANY: The aspect that I look forward to most about working at Peak Sport and Spine is not only gaining relationships with people to help them accomplish their current goals, but also to be the person they can rely on in the future as they come across new physical barriers as time goes on. This allows for a greater understanding of the patient's physical level and abilities, and a more informed level of care. ca

You didn't choose PAIN, but you can choose Peak Sport and Spine.

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from the editor

OLIVIA DeSMIT

AUTUMNAL ANTIDOTES

LOCAL FINDS FOR A FALL PICK-ME-UP

I

Olivia DeSmit

Managing Editor | odesmit@insidecolumbia.net Inside Columbia magazine

18 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

often find myself caught between a pre-COVID and post-COVID mindset, especially while watching TV shows. Big crowds of people at a festival with no social distancing and masks? Long buffet lines with shared serving utensils? 200-person weddings? Wow, those look like fun, I think for a brief second before my eyes immediately widen and I remember that those are no longer possible, at least for right now. Of course, in real life it’s much harder to return to a pre-COVID mindset, one reason being that now pretty much everyone wears cloth coverings on their faces. Masks have become an everyday necessity and for many of us, a fashion nightmare. Check out our masked mannequin models on page 30 for some fashionable locally available masks — the rule of 2020 seems to be that you can never have too many. Besides social norms and fashion trends, another area affected by the pandemic this year will be the holiday season. While most people will forego a big family Thanksgiving this year, there is still plenty of reason to celebrate with a smaller group. Instead of heading to the big box stores for your Thanksgiving dessert ingredients, check out the locally grown and harvested options in our Local Thanksgiving story on page 92. Not only will you be supporting Missouri farmers and their families, but fresh produce just tastes better. Speaking of tasty treats, how does munching on a clove of raw garlic sound? Dr. Chris Link dives into some natural immunity boosters on page 100, including some you’ve probably never heard of including, yes, garlic. Finally, if you’re looking for some home inspiration, check out the beautiful bonus space that local couple Will and Kaitlyn Schlacks created, complete with a rock-climbing wall for their three kids. As we settle into another, new season of the unknown, be sure to stop and remember that some things will always stay the same. Stomp around in some leaves, spurge on a pumpkin-flavored coffee and buy that cozy new sweater. It’s the small things that make winter bearable, and from someone who hates the cold, occasionally enjoyable.


Inside Columbia Staff

Visit Our New State Of The Art Office CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com FOUNDER & PUBLISHER EMERITUS Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net PUBLISHER Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net

Central Missouri Orthodontics Dr. Steven E. Taylor, D.D.S., MS. cmobraces.com | (573) 446-7259 1100 Club Village Dr Suite 103 Columbia, MO 65203

MANAGING EDITOR Olivia DeSmit odesmit@insidecolumbia.net ASSOCIATE EDITOR Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Brook Harlan CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Amanda Elliott, Chris Carson, John Robinson, John Darkow, Madeline Ewing ART DIRECTOR Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com

Because you have a choice.

SENDING YOU HOME STRONGER.

PHOTO EDITOR L.G. Patterson lg@insidecolumbia.net GRAPHIC DESIGNER Joy Griffin jgriffin@insidecolumbia.net

Life takes us to unexpected places. Love… takes us home. And at Columbia Post Acute, it’s the love their staff shows your family that sends them home stronger. REQUEST A TOUR AT

ColumbiaPostAcute.com

573-397-7144 3535 Berrywood Drive, Columbia, MO 65201

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 19


Details SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscription rate is $15 for 1 year. Call 573-875-1099 to place an order or to inform us of a change of address, or subscribe at www.InsideColumbia.net. For bulk subscription rates, contact Becky James at 573-875-1099.

ADVERTISING Inside Columbia is the best way to reach Columbia’s upscale consumers. Information about advertising is available online at www.InsideColumbia.net or by calling 573-875-1099.

NEWS RELEASES & EVENT NOTICES Contact editor at 573-875-1099, or email to editor@insidecolumbia.net.

ON THE TOWN Send your photos with the event description and subject names for captions to tflanner@zrgmail.com, or mail to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201. Not all photos received will be published.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Send letters to 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200, Columbia, MO 65201 or email to editor@ insidecolumbia.net. Inside Columbia reserves the right to publish any letter to the editor.

CUSTOM PUBLISHING Let us publish a specialty magazine exclusively for your company or organization. Call Melody Parry at 573-875-1099 or email melody@insidecolumbia.net

REPRINTS Want to reproduce an article you’ve seen in Inside Columbia? We can provide reprints and customize them on glossy stock for your promotional needs. Minimum quantity is 500 copies. Call Cathy Atkins at 573-875-1099 or email catkins@insidecolumbia.net.

/InsideColumbia.net 20 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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Inside Columbia

life Oct./Nov. 2020

C O N T E N T S

24

Growing Pains: Pandemic Prompts Project

28

5 Turkey Tidbits

30

The New Face of Fashion

37

Historic Blackwater's Calling

GOODNESS NOSE

We all know that certain smells can evoke memories, both good and bad. But in many ways, we often take olfactory factors for granted. Do you need to be sharp for a meeting or test? Research suggests sniffing fresh rosemary or inhaling rosemary essential oil may help you feel more alert and improve your memory.


life

ENCOUNTERS

24 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


life

ENCOUNTERS

The Reigning Pump-king LOCAL TEEN PLANTS PANDEMIC PATCH.

BY PEG GILL · PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

t was a friend who first planted the seed for the idea. After hearing how much fun Jacob Leffert had growing pumpkins, RJ Bechtold decided to plant a patch himself, and got permission from his Dad to use a one-acre plot behind his family’s business, the Midway Truck Stop. It seemed like the perfect pandemic project for the Rock Bridge Senior High School freshman, and he figured he could a earn a little extra money, too, selling his pumpkins from the Truck Stop’s Antique Mall and gas station, as well as from hay wagons and an old ‘59 Ford F-350. There was even another plus: “It also occurred to me that deer and turkey like pumpkins,” Bechtold said, “so I figured as an added bonus, that would help with our hunting!” Although he had the benefit of his pal’s pumpkin prowess, he had absolutely no personal experience

growing plants himself, so his venture required a lot of research. “I had to learn how to run a farm from scratch,” Bechtold said. “I learned that I enjoy growing plants and discovered the most rewarding part of farming is seeing how much bigger the plant has grown each week.”

“I had to learn how to run a farm from scratch...” He knew he wanted his crop to be varied and ordered seeds online for jack-o-lanterns, warty, and an array of different ornamental pumpkins/ gourds in a variety of different sizes and colors from Harris Seeds.

His biggest initial challenge was killing off the old grass on his plot, and he needed to hire someone to disc it up. He then planted 2,200 seeds, give or take, near the middle of June, and he ended up having to thin things out and remove about 200 plants after another friend of his, Newell Kitchner, deemed they had been planted too close together. Once he had sprouts, his Dad drove their tractor and used their own somewhat old and rickety disc between the rows. With no watering system installed at first, Bechtold had to rely on the rain. Luckily, pumpkins only need a few inches of rain every week and Columbia was getting that back in June. In July, he installed drip irrigation because, he said, “pumpkins do best with that system.” Weeding was another critical part of his caretaking. “At the start of my patch I was weeding

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 25


life

ENCOUNTERS

26 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

weekly but later on the pumpkins started to take over all the other plants, so I had less weeding to do,” Bechtold said. He also had to spray fungicide and insecticide weekly in August to prevent and stop bugs and fungus from killing the plants. Powdery mildew proved a bit of a problem, but the largest threat to his crop was undoubtedly prowling predators. He said he had many animals going for the pumpkins including deer, groundhogs, possums and skunks. He said they saw his patch as “an easy food source” and they helped themselves “to a feast!” He tried to deter them by putting pans on fence posts so that they would clatter and scare the animals away. He also soaked material and placed the fabric around the patch in hopes that the smell of ammonia would detract animals and used small baited game traps. Bechtold wasn’t sure how many pumpkins he’d actually be able harvest due to the critters but expected it to be around 4,000 because each plant can produce up to six pumpkins. His larger pumpkins were about 20 pounds and his smaller ones were closer to 5 pounds. He judged their readiness by their color. As September started, he already had some very large pumpkins and planned to harvest his entire crop at the same time, over the course of about a month. His pricing ranged from $2 to $15, depending on pumpkin size. Other than prepping his patch, combatting critters and maneuvering mildew, he said his only other challenge was that he worried his crop might be ready too early. Other than that, he said the whole experience was “super fun and educational.”


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life

5 THINGS

Let's Talk Turkey HERE'S THE WORD ON THE BIRD.

BY PEG GILL

ON THANKSGIVING, the turkey’s the star of the show, the man of the hour. The hen of the hour, actually, since the domestic birds most of us serve at our Thanksgiving feasts are females, due to their smaller size. Along with the fact that baby turkeys are called “poults” and flock with their mother all year, there are a lot of other interesting things about this fascinating fowl. Here are five:

1

Contrary to popular belief, Benjamin Franklin never lobbied for

the turkey to be the national bird. He was simply “anti-eagle,” saying the turkey was “a much more respectable bird … a bird of courage.”

2 3

Alexander Hamilton was a big turkey touter, too, declaring, "No

citizen of the U.S. shall refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day."

The very first Swanson TV dinner was made of turkey day left-

4

overs. The compartments contained sliced turkey, peas, dressing and sweet potatoes. It came about because a Swanson buyer grossly overordered frozen holiday turkeys — to the tune of 10 train cars’ worth!

According to the Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, roughly

5

40 to 42 million turkeys are produced in the state every year, making it the #1 turkey producer in the United States. Not surprisingly, the bird that’s pardoned by the president each year comes from the land of 10,000 lakes.

The majority of domestic turkeys are bred to have white

feathers, and the costume Big Bird wears on “Sesame Street” is largely made of turkey tail feathers — dyed yellow, of course.

28 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON 30 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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6 4

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hat began as blue and white disposable fashion faux pas have now evolved into something more akin to seasonal statement pieces. The general consensus seems to be, if you have to wear a mask, why not make it cute? Whether you try to match your mask to your outfit du jour, in either the color or pattern you pick, or prefer it to be more of a subtle accessory, there’s no shortage of locally available options. 1 2 3 4 5 6

EVERMORE, DELANEY FALL FLORAL FACE MASK – The Tin Roof $14 C.C. NAVY/WHITE PAISLEY FACE MASK – Glik’s $12 HENRY HANDBAGS FACE MASK IN BLUE DIAMOND – Plume $14.99 HENRY HANDBAGS FACE MASK IN BLACK & GOLD – Plume $14.99 GLIK’S PLAID CLOTH FACE MASK IN RED – Glik’s $12 MY FAIR ELLIE CARDINALS FACE MASK – The Tin Roof $18 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 31


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life

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS

A Quick Getaway

HISTORIC TOWN JUST DOWN THE ROAD AWAITS. BY JOHN DRAKE ROBINSON · PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE IRON HORSE HOTEL “Jay Turley is the Charles Dickens among

town he loved remains, awaiting your

the newly remodeled railroad depot

dramatic writers.”

discovery. Just three miles off busy I-70,

and try not to browse the antique shops

it’s a trip back in time.

along the way to the Iron Horse Hotel.

Don't take my word for it. That accolade spilled from the lips of fellow Missourian Tennessee Williams. He could've lived anywhere. A

Think I'm kidding? Name another town of 199 people

Ah, the Iron Horse. It was, after all, the railroad that built this town. The

that has a Museum of Independent

Missouri Pacific river route flourished

playwright with some sixty dramatic

Telephone Pioneers. Walk inside

for decades. But when the passenger

credits, Jay Turley was a hotel designer

this bank-like brick structure at the

trains stopped coming, and freight trains

by trade. But theater was his muse. He

main intersection of town, and you're

no longer needed infusions of coal and

co-established the Arrow Rock Lyceum

rewarded with a Disneyesque display

water, the town started to die. Years

Theatre, and he also produced plays in San

of dialing history that will keep you

passed, and bulldozers loomed, ready

Francisco, Hollywood and Blackwater.

cranking for just enough time to forget

to raze the village as it sagged under the

about cellular hell.

weight of time and neglect.

Yes, Blackwater, Missouri. In addition to co-establishing the Arrow

Then walk back out the front door.

That's when a character worthy of

Rock Lyceum Theatre, he bought an old

Stop to admire the towering windmill, a

Dickens — or Turley — stepped up to

Baptist church, converted it into the West

transplanted farm-style water well in the

save his hometown. A world traveler

End Community Theater and willed it to

middle of the intersection. Look down

who can tell you his adventures in five

the Blackwater Preservation Society, so the

the main street, wide enough to park

languages, Bobby Danner had a vision.

show can go on in perpetuity.

cars crossways in the middle, with plenty

Just as important, he has a unique set of

of room to spare. Head downhill toward

skills. He knows how to run a hotel. His

Turley died in 2004. But the charming

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 37


life

ROBINSON’S RAMBLINGS family still owns the Olivier House Hotel on Toulouse Street in New Orleans' French Quarter. He bought and transformed the old 1887 Iron Horse Hotel into a place that you and your sweetheart won't want to leave. Don't be distracted by the appellations — with room names like Marrakesh Express and The City of New Orleans, it is sure to be a memorable and unique stay. Each room has its own charming ambiance that runs anything this side of the Ritz out on a rail. Danner’s niece Nichole Corrine runs the hotel now. Whether it’s serving a great breakfast for guests or arranging private parties, you can tell she loves what she does. For other culinary options, Kimberly’s Restaurant is just across the street, near the Blackwater Country Store. And Arrow Rock is eight miles down the road. If you like to teach, or learn, the oneroom schoolhouse is a walk back in time. Step inside to see antiques and crafts. Spend time in the calaboose, a replica of the old jail, where inmates once cooled their heels. It sits strategically next to the public bathrooms and behind the telephone museum — a setup that would have been perfect back in its inmate-hosting days. Yeah, there's even legend. Decades ago, according to local lore, a lady from Blackwater entered a Mars Candy Company contest to name a new candy bar. She suggested Snickers. Mars agrees there was a contest years ago … they just can’t recall the winner. No matter. Blackwater rolls on. Jay Turley would be proud. John Drake Robinson is a former director of the Missouri Division of Tourism and has driven every mile of highway in the state.

38 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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Inside Columbia

flavor Oct./Nov. 2020

C O N T E N T S

43

Fall in Love with Pumpkin Pancakes

BURNT BUSTER

Soup season’s here! If you accidentally scorch a batch, transfer it to a new pot (take care not to scrape the burnt bottom.) Then wrap an English cucumber in cheese cloth, crush it with the back of a chef’s knife and drop it into your fresh pot. After 15 minutes, remove it. The cuke will “nuke” (absorb) all the burnt flavor. Taste the soup and season as needed.

44

The Pierpont General Store Adds More

46

Two Takes on Winter Squash


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flavor

DASH

Pumpkin Perfection EMBRACE FALL WITH THIS SEASONAL BREAKFAST.

BY AMANDA ELLIOTT

Nothing tastes quite like fall more than creamy pumpkin and the warm spices of cinnamon and cloves. And I can think of no better way to enjoy all those flavors than by making a batch of pumpkin pancakes topped with a brown butter maple pecan syrup. It’s perfect for a cool weekend morning.

PUMPKIN PANCAKES WITH BROWN BUTTER MAPLE PECAN SYRUP (Serves 6) Ingredients for Syrup ½ stick of butter 2½ ounces pecan pieces ¾ cup maple syrup 1 teaspoon salt Ingredients for Pancakes 1 smashed banana ¾ cup pumpkin puree 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ¾ teaspoon baking soda 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 1½ cups buttermilk 2 eggs 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups all-purpose flour Nonstick spray

Directions In a small saucepan, bring butter and pecans to a simmer. Toast pecans and butter until browned, foamy and smelling of toasted nuts. Pour in maple syrup and salt and set aside. In a large bowl, mix all the dry ingredients and in a medium bowl mix all the wet ones. Make a well inside the dry ingredient mixture and add in the wet ingredients and set aside for 5 minutes. Heat a large skillet on medium heat and spray the bottom. Pour 1/3 cup of batter and spread slightly. Cook until golden brown on the bottom, then flip and cook on opposite side until golden. Top with maple pecan syrup and serve immediately.

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 43


flavor

DINING OUT

44 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


flavor

DINING OUT

A Patio Project

PIERPONT GENERAL STORE'S NEWEST ADDITION BY MADELINE EWING · PHOTO BY L.G. PATTERSON

L

ive music on Saturday nights, picnic tables and a bar made out of repurposed wood and metal are defining characteristics of Jed and Brandy Taylor’s newest addition to Pierpont General Store. Owners since August 2018, the couple hatched plans from the beginning to introduce a café and bar to the historic general store. In order to preserve the authenticity of the century-old store, wood and metal from the original structure were fashioned into the indoor bar space that now occupies a room across from the operating general store. Outside the Pierpont General Store, tables with umbrellas are now scattered about a patio and in the grass. Music artists including Clayton Hicklin Band and See Rock City play under the open sky for all who come to listen on a Saturday night, which includes neighbors, along with Pierpont picnickers. “We are in the middle of a neighborhood, so it’s kind of fun because they will sit on their front porch and listen,” Brandy says. “We mix up the artists a little bit and some of them come back regularly. We try to find different people that fit us and fit the crowd.” The performances occurred from 7 to 9 p.m. during the summer, but at time of press happen between 6 and 8 p.m. as the sun sets earlier. Prior to the construction of the café and bar, the Taylors offered grab-and-go sandwiches at the store.

However, the menu has expanded with the opening of the new space. Accompanied by Shakespeare’s Pizza, a selection of sandwiches and drinks are available. “We have a Reuben and a gluten-free, vegan sandwich on the menu, too,” Brandy adds. “We continuously change it and mix it up. It’s constantly evolving.” All food is prepared off-site by Bleu Events due to limited space in the Pierpont Café kitchen. Deliveries on Wednesday and Friday bring in the necessary items, and Pierpont staff cook or bake the foods in their ovens and panini grills on-site. Despite the cozy and modest appearance of the bar with its repurposed stained wood and metal siding, the drink selection leaves nothing to be desired. “We kind of thought we were going to keep it a little more simple, but we ended up with about a full bar,” Brandy says, laughing. In addition to their stocked bar, On The Rocks pre-made cocktails and beer on tap are also on hand. The selection of On The Rocks cocktails served at Pierpont Café and Bar includes margaritas, old fashioneds, Cosmopolitans and Mai Tais. “They use very good ingredients and pair up with people who are already doing alcohol well,” Brandy explains. “So there is EFFEN vodka in the Cosmopolitan and Knob Creek whiskey in the old fashioned. They are wonderful and super strong, so we warn everybody that it’s a little

potent.” Six taps from the inside bar and four taps outside hold local staples Logboat beer and Wave Cider, as well as St. Louis’s 4 Hands beer and classics such as Blue Moon. In anticipation of cold weather, Brandy plans to incorporate a few features to keep the outdoor seating as functional for as long as possible. “We have the big fire pit here that will help us go further into the season and we’re looking to put up a roof over the deck in the back so at least it’s covered,” Brandy says. “I don’t know that we’ll be able to use the patio all winter, but I think we can get into November for sure.” The indoor bar seating will be put to use once COVID-19 regulations allow. Although the Taylors were concerned about the Pierpont Café and Bar opening amid the pandemic in March, the new outdoor seating proved to be just what they needed. “We thought we were crazy when the timing worked out that we were opening our bar and café in the middle of COVID, so we almost didn’t do it,” Brandy recalls. “We decided to go through with it and it’s been amazing. It has exceeded our expectations, but is keeping us on our toes for sure!”

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 45


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

A Tale of Two Soups

A DUO OF DIFFERENT FALL FAVORITES FROM WINTER SQUASH. BY FOOD EDITOR BROOK HARLAN • PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

I

t was the best of soups, it was the

still have some leftover from your fall

worst of — well actually, both

decorations on your front porch (I know

soups are really good. You can take

I do). The thick skins aid in storage, but

almost the same ingredients, change the

also cause a little timidness in some

method a bit, and have two distinctly

people. If you plan to roast the squash

different soups. This recipe is written for

(best for a smooth soup), you can cut the

butternut squash but could be made with

stem off, split the top half, then reverse

pumpkin, acorn squash, sweet potato,

the cut to cut through the base and the

French turban, spaghetti squash, or any

seeds. Use a spoon to scoop out the seeds

other type of root vegetable or winter

and you are ready to roast.

squash.

OR

If you plan to dice the squash for a chunky soup, it’s just a few more steps.

CUT

Instead of cutting the squash lengthwise,

We call them winter squash, but they

cut the stem of the squash off, then cut

with the garlic and ginger. Color should

are harvested in the fall. The thick skins

into 3 or 4 sections horizontally. Stand

develop on all the ingredients and by the

allow them to be stored throughout

each section upright and cut a small

end, the squash should easily pierce with

the fall into the winter. You may even

section down of the peel at a time,

a paring knife.

rotating until the peel is removed. Then cut into ½ sections, then ½ strips and then into ½-inch cubes.

together. You want to do this at pretty

COOK OR

46 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

As for the chunky soup, the onion and the squash can get diced then sauteed high heat. You’re not trying to cook the squash during this step —mostly just

Roasting is an easy part of the smooth

develop color and flavor — the squash

soup. The squash gets cut, scooped and

can cook with the stock later. Once the

slathered with oil and salt, then placed

color has started to develop you can

cut-side down onto an oven-safe vessel to

add in the garlic and ginger. After a few

cook. This allows you a little extra time to

minutes, you can add the stock and

gather and cut other ingredients. Be sure

maple syrup and cook until the squash

to start the roasting first. You can add the

become tender. If you’re not planning to

onion about halfway through, then finish

eat the soup that day, it may be best to


Brook Harlan is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. He is a culinary arts instructor at the Columbia Area Career Center.

flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

undercook the squash and cook it fully when you reheat it.

BLEND No need to blend the chunky soup, but for the smooth one I prefer a hand blender. This allows you to blend as soon as the milk comes to a simmer (soup will puree much easier when hot). You can then cook a little longer if it’s not as smooth as you desire — any slight chunkiness means that some of the vegetables need to cook a little longer. You can transfer the hot soup to an upright blender. It’s safer when blending hot items to place a towel over the top in addition to the lid.

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 47


flavor

COOKING WITH BROOK

BUTTERNUT SQUASH SOUP INGREDIENTS 1 butternut squash (3 to 4 pounds)

1 tablespoon ginger

4 to 5 ounces of cream (optional for

1 onion

1 pint of milk for smooth or stock for

smooth)

2 to 3 ounces olive oil or other fat

chunky (more as needed)

Salt and pepper to taste

3 to 4 cloves of garlic

2 to 3 ounces maple syrup

METHOD 1 - SMOOTH SOUP Cut the butternut squash in half

onion to the pan with the squash and

to a simmer over low heat and puree with

lengthwise and scoop out the seeds.

bake 15 minutes, add garlic and ginger and

a hand blender. You may also transfer

Oil the cut side and season heavily with

bake another 10 minutes. All of the items

to an upright blender to puree. Adjust

salt. Place cut-side down on a sheet

should be starting to develop some color

the thickness with more milk if desired.

tray, casserole dish or pan. Bake at 400

and the squash and onion should pierce

Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper

degrees for 25 minutes in a convection

easily with a knife. Remove from the oven

and serve with brown butter and sage.

oven (450 degrees in a conventional

and allow to cool for 10 to 15 minutes,

oven, no fan). While squash is baking,

flipping the squash cut side up to cool

prep other ingredients. Cut the top and

faster. Remove the peel of the onion, cut

bottom off an onion then cut in half, oil

into smaller chunks, and put it into a 3 to

and salt heavily and reserve the first 25

a 4-quart saucepan along with the garlic

minutes while the squash is baking. Peel

and ginger. Use a spoon to scoop out the

garlic cloves and cut off the root ends,

inside of the butternut squash and add to

peel ginger by scraping with a spoon and

the saucepan. Be careful not to add any of

slice thinly. Once the squash has baked

the skin from the squash. Add in the milk,

25 minutes, add the oiled and seasoned

maple syrup and cream, if desired. Bring

METHOD 2 - CHUNKY SOUP Cut the squash and onion into ½-inch

two pans, combine and add the stock

cubes. Over medium-high heat, sauté

(preferably darker chicken, beef or pork

in a large sauté pan with oil or split

stock, but water or vegetable stock

between two pans until color develops

would also work) and maple syrup. Cook

on the edges of the onion and squash.

over low heat until squash just starts to

Mince the garlic and ginger and add

become tender. If you go too far with

to the squash and onion. Cook until

it, it will fall apart. Adjust the seasoning

the garlic and ginger become fragrant,

with salt and pepper and serve with

about 2 to 3 minutes. If cooking between

brown butter and sage.

BROWN BUTTER WITH SAGE TO FINISH 3 to 4 tablespoons unsalted butter

occasionally until the edges just barely

3 to 5 small sage leaves per bowl

start to become brown. Add in sage

Salt as needed

leaves and keep swirling. Sage leaves will start to bubble and the rest of the butter

Once the soup is completed and

with brown. Before butter becomes too

portioned into warm bowls, add butter

dark, remove from the heat and spoon a

to a small sauté pan over medium heat.

small amount of butter and sage leaves

Add a small pinch of salt (don’t add salt if

in the center of each soup.

using salted butter). Cook while swirling

48 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


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CONTENTS Inside Columbia’s CEO • www.insidecolumbia.net

66

56

NEWS BRIEFS: The Buzz on Como Biz

58

UP & COMING: The Ladder Report

62

BUILDING UP BOONE: Greer Named New Hospital CEO

66

AGAINST THE GRAIN: Sawdust Studios Unveils Novel Concept

68

SHIFTING GEARS: Megan Matthews Is A Driving Force

70

CEO ROUNDTABLE: Columbia’s Leaders Speak Out on Economic Recovery

68

ON THE COVER: The CEO Roundtable hosts local business leaders to discuss COVID-19 recovery plans. (Left to Right) Mike Ireland, Nickie Davis, Jonathan Curtright, Stacey Button. (Individuals were shot separately.)

FALL 2020

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STAFF Chief Executive Officer Carla Leible cleible@zrgmail.com Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry fred@insidecolumbia.net Publisher Melody Parry melody@insidecolumbia.net Associate Editors Olivia DeSmit odesmit@insidecolumbia.net Peg Gill peg@insidecolumbia.net Contributing Writer Jack Wax Photo Editor L.G. Patterson lgpatterson@insidecolumbia.net Art Director Tim Flanner tflanner@zrgmail.com

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N E WS BRI E FS

OPENING BELL

News You Need To Know JOB POINT WINS CHAMBER'S SMALL BUSINESS OF THE YEAR Job Point recently won the Columbia Chamber of Commerce’s annual Small Business of the Year. Job Point is a Missouri employment center and Community Development Corporation based in Columbia. Since 1965, they have been linking people and jobs by providing career planning and job placement assistance. They specialize in preparing individuals to enter the workforce while meeting a critical need of the business community. During its Small Business Week, the Columbia Chamber of Commerce spotlighted some of the area’s best small businesses. Finalists for the award included: Heart of Missouri CASA, Just Jeff ’s, PedNet Coalition and Restoration Chiropractic.

PROVIDENCE BANK IS ACQUIRED FOR $145 MILLION The holding company for First Mid Bank & Trust, based in Mattoon, Illinois, is expanding in Missouri by purchasing the holding company for Columbia-based Providence Bank (LINCO). Once the deal is completed, First Mid will have about $5.3 billion in total assets. The transaction has been unanimously approved by each company’s board of directors and is expected to close in the first quarter of 2021, subject to regulatory approvals and the satisfaction of customary closing conditions. Providence is 132 years old and a family-owned bank. It has 14 locations in Columbia, Jefferson City, Osage Beach, Elsberry, Winfield, St. Peters, St. Charles and St. Louis.

SCHNUCKS TO ADD THIRD COLUMBIA LOCATION Columbia residents on the north side won’t have to travel far to purchase groceries at Schnucks. The company announced it will open its third location on the southwest corner of Clark Lane and St. Charles Road near Interstate 70. Construction on the 48,000-square-foot store is scheduled to begin this fall. In June, Schnucks opened EatWell, a natural food store at the former location of Lucky’s Market on Providence Road. Schnuck Markets Inc. was founded in St. Louis and is a family owned grocery retailer.

WILLIAMS-KEEPERS ACQUIRES MEXICO ACCOUNTING FIRM Columbia accounting firm Williams-Keepers LLC recently acquired Mid-Missouri Accounting Services. After a transition, the Mexico, Missouri, firm was relocated to Columbia. Mid-Missouri Accounting Services specialized in accounting, tax, payroll and bookkeeping services for independent grocers throughout Missouri, as well as other small business and individual clients. Most members of their six-person staff were expected to transition to Williams-Keepers in full-time roles, including co-owner Stephen Thoenen.

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OPENING BELL

The Ladder Report Look Who’s Moving Up In Business DR. PIYUSHA SINGH has been promoted to provost and senior vice president of COLUMBIA COLLEGE. She joined the college in June 2015 as the vice president of Online Learning before being promoted to chief of staff and then to provost and vice president for Academic Affairs. In this expanded role, she will lead the college’s academic initiatives including the in-seat, online and virtual experiences. Singh also oversees Student Affairs, the Department of Athletics, the Institutional Compliance Department, International Programs and the Office of the Registrar. 

ED SCAVONE was elected bank president and chief operating officer of THE CENTRAL BANK OF BOONE COUNTY by its board of directors. Scavone was previously executive vice president of commercial lending, and joined Central Bank of Boone County in 2000 as a commercial loan officer. He steadily rose to lead the commercial lending team as executive vice president. A U.S. Navy veteran who graduated from Chapman University, Orange, CA in 1991 with a BSBA degree in accounting, he has worked in financial services his entire professional career. STAN GERLING was promoted to senior lending officer for commercial loans. In this role, he will work with businesses in the community to help them grow and provide support to a team of 10 commercial lenders and a portfolio of more than $1 billion in outstanding commercial loans. Prior to his new role, Gerling served as the

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commercial lending manager and senior vice president. JAIME PALMER was promoted to assistant vice president in the commercial banking department. In this role, Palmer works with small businesses to provide lending solutions to grow their business and also assists customers with land and home construction financing. She previously served as commercial loan officer, relationship manager and credit administration officer in her 15 years of banking experience. HANNAH CAIN has been named the branch manager and consumer banking officer for the Smiley Lane Bank.  She previously served as branch manager for the Rock Bridge Bank and since starting with the bank in 2013 has served at the downtown, motor and Smiley Lane banks in various roles. ANGIE CARMICHAEL has been promoted to assistant manager of the business banking department. She previously served as cash management specialist for business banking, and has worked at the bank for more than 15 years. She started her career as a teller at the Woodrail Centre bank before joining business banking in 2012. CHARLIE LAY has been named the manager of the Keene Financial Center. He previously served as assistant branch manager for the West Broadway and Smiley Lane banks, and has worked for the bank for more than six years.

CENTRAL BANCOMPANY, a $15 billion bank holding company based in

Jefferson City, has named JOE HENDERSON executive vice president and chief credit officer. Henderson, who currently serves as president of Central Bank of Boone County, will oversee the company’s $10 billion loan portfolio. Though his duties will change in 2021, Henderson will continue to serve Central Bank of Boone County as a member of its board of directors. He earned his bachelor of science degree in finance and economics at the University of Illinois and his masters of business administration from Southern Illinois University. His 43-year financial career has spanned four organizations including joining Central Bank of Boone County in 2002 and becoming president of the organization in 2014.

ASHLY MOORE was promoted to assistant vice president of THE CALLAWAY BANK. She currently serves as the branch manager of the North, South and Mokane branches. She is responsible for ensuring a high level of customer service, day to day operations at each facility and overall management of employees. Moore has been involved in Callaway Women’s Networking Group, Callaway Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Callaway Class of 2019 and the Fulton Colleges Board of Associates. JASON RAMSEY was promoted to assistant vice president. Since joining The Callaway Bank in 2015, he has served as a commercial lender with primary responsibilities of developing and servicing commercial banking relationships in Boone County and


U P & CO M I NG

surrounding areas. Ramsey earned a Bachelor of Arts from Truman State University and received his master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Missouri — Columbia.

MATT PINKSTAFF joined SOA ARCHITECTURE as a project manager. He was the recipient of a Skidmore Owings & Merrill Traveling Fellowship, during which he studied buildings and civic spaces throughout Europe. He then served as a manager for construction work in the inner city of Memphis and in India as an architect and a coordinator for volunteer professional design teams. Recently Pinkstaff was a corporate architect for Columbia-based developer Real Equity Management. He earned his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Kansas State University.

DR. JOSEPH BURRIS was honored by the AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION with a 2020 Distinguished Member Award. He is the vice chair of Academics and Research and professor of Clinical Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation for the Department of Physical Medicine at the University of Missouri — Columbia. He is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and holds a BS in biology from the University of Missouri — Kansas City, as well as a graduate degree in exercise physiology from the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

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FOCUSING ON FORWARD

TROY GREER TAKES THE HELM OF BOONE HOSPITAL CENTER WRITTEN BY

PHOTOS BY

Jack Wax

L.G. Patterson

T

he best time to begin a new position as CEO of a major hospital probably isn’t in the midst of a pandemic. But that didn’t stop Troy Greer from starting work on Sept. 1 as the new CEO of Boone Hospital Center (BHC). Although he’s new to mid-Missouri as well, he already seems comfortable and sure of his and Boone Hospital's place in the medical community. His communication style is exactly what you’d expect from someone who will be growing the hospital’s network of referring physicians and outlying clinics — professional yet personal. (If he were a doctor, he’d be described as having a good bedside manner.) Asked about his priorities, he says, “I think the first thing you have to do is establish relationships. Even though I have a lot of strategic thoughts on what we can do, I have to get to know the medical staff here first — finding out what their needs and challenges are and how I can assist them.” When not learning about staff needs in the hospital, Greer is taking part in Zoom meetings or getting out to surrounding counties. He’s made a point of visiting neighboring clinics and meeting referring physicians. “Really, it’s an extension of that relationship piece, focusing on both the internal and external,” he explains. In the administrative offices of

BHC, Greer is wearing a mask, sitting at a conference table that has been marked with red decals indicating social distance spacing that must be followed. “We’re trying to deal with the pandemic while making sure we’re providing the other care our patients need,” he explains. “That’s becoming more normalized. In our early days we had to shut down our ancillary

of achievements. It was recently recognized by U.S. News and World Reports as the No. 1 hospital in midMissouri and one of the top five in the state. But if there’s one thing he’s learned about health care systems is that nothing can be taken for granted. While the pandemic stresses all health care systems, Boone is also undergoing a major transition. On

"Being part of a large system is sometimes wonderful, but it may not be as easy to respond as quickly to some challenges. We’ll have our same focus on quality and service, but we’ll be a more agile organization, which allows us to serve the health care needs of the greater Columbia area." TROY GREER services. Those are returning to us and patients are able to receive care that isn’t COVID-specific.” Part of Greer’s self-assured manner is based on his 23 years of experience in health care settings and part is based on Boone Hospital’s record

Dec. 31, the lease with BJC Health Care ends and Boone becomes an independent community hospital. That move to independence is a big part of what drew Greer from his most recent position as CEO of Lovelace Medical Center and Heart Hospital in

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Albuquerque, New Mexico. “It’s a bold, innovative step,” Greer says. “It shows the trustees’ level of commitment to the community. Something like this goes against the currents of conglomeration, and the excitement means a lot to me.” The shift to independence should make Boone more competitive and better able to meet community needs. “Being part of a large system is sometimes wonderful, but it may not be as easy to respond as quickly to some challenges. We’ll have our same focus on quality and service, but we’ll be a more agile organization, which allows us to serve the health care needs of the greater Columbia area,” he says. Greer is looking forward to exploring Columbia as he and his wife become part of the community.

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His wife Mandy will be joining him shortly, while his children, both grown, continue on their paths. He has a son George in the Army at Fort Benning, Georgia and a daughter who is a senior at the University of Alabama. “We really do make this move as a family. It’s our job to learn about Columbia and to be good contributors to the community,” he says. Already, he has been impressed with the Columbia Farmers Market, the MKT Trail and the welcome he has received from the area’s faith community. Although he is 48 years old, Greer has a lifetime worth of experience settling into new communities. As part of an Army family, he moved 11 times before he turned 14. Born in England, he considers himself an Alabamian and started his career at

a small rural hospital in Tuscaloosa, before assuming health care leadership positions in Florida, Texas and Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to a bachelor’s in health care management, he has masters’ degrees in business administration as well as in health management, all from the University of Alabama. Despite an ongoing pandemic, the transition away from BJC, and an uncertain economy, Greer is calm and optimistic about the future. “We’ve seen a lot of changes in health care and I think at some point it becomes almost the norm that our cycle of change is pretty quick. When you step into an organization that has a reputation for excellence and quality, it gives you a sense of comfort as you move forward,” he says.


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SAWDUST STUDIOS OPENS ITS DOORS

WRITTEN BY

Jack Wax PHOTOS BY

L.G. Patterson

CREATING A COMMUNITY OF WOODWORKERS

J

ohn Walter and Cruz Chavez are business partners, brought together by their love of woodworking and a shared vision for creating a community woodshop.

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Sawdust Studios, located at 2207 Nelwood, just off Route B and Vandiver Drive, is introducing Columbians of all ages and skill levels to the rewards of woodworking in a friendly environment.

“Actually, we think of this as a gym for woodworkers. It’s like Anytime Fitness, where you get 24-hour access to work on anything you want to,” Walter says. “We also have classes,”

Chavez says, an experienced contractor, who has been enjoying woodworking for as long as he can remember. Sawdust Studios members must first take one of Chavez’s safety classes before


being given free rein of the new workshop. Woodworking can be an expensive and solitary activity, the partners explain, but Sawdust Studios changes the hobby into a quite affordable one that can be shared with others. Although it can cost more than $1,000 to buy a quality table saw and other essential woodworking power tools for a home workshop, Sawdust Studios offers access to more than $50,000 worth of new, safe equipment for the cost of a membership, which is $35

for two weeks. Not only can members save money on tools, but they also get to experience top-of-the-line equipment with advanced safety features. Pointing to one of the two table saws in the woodshop, Walter notes, “If this sawblade is touched while it’s running, it stops almost immediately. It makes the difference between having a minor cut or a serious accident.” Fear of spinning blades stops some people from even thinking about woodworking, “but we’re trying to overcome that and

educate the community as well,” he says. Cruz estimates that the space can handle 20 woodworkers at a time. “We want you to come here and to feel that it’s your shop,” Cruz says. Pegge Pherigo has done just that. After moving recently to Columbia, she took the safety class taught by Cruz, then became a member. She is excited about the workshop and proud of the projects she has already completed. “I’ve made several cutting boards and boxes. Because of the pandemic, there’s not much

you can do — but you can go to Sawdust Studios and have fun woodworking,” she says. The workspace in Sawdust Studios is anything but dusty. It’s clean, bright and spacious. Miter saws, a planer, a router, band and jig saws and an assortment of other professional woodworking equipment fill but don’t crowd the workshop. In the center are several worktables, and for those members who want to bring some of their own tools, electrical outlets and compressed air lines are within easy reach, hanging from the ceiling. Several bins along the wall are filled with wood for projects. Through an arrangement with Cardwell Hardwoods in Jefferson City, members can purchase just about any species of wood they like and have it delivered to the workshop. Starting a new business in the middle of a pandemic isn’t exactly an easy thing to do, but Cruz and Walter follow all the standard protocols necessary for risk management. Masks are required in the workshop and Cruz wipes down equipment religiously. How will they know when their new business has established itself in the community? “I don’t live far from here, and for me, success means that when I drive past this place, I see people working on different projects,” Cruz explains. “I want a community of woodworkers. I want Boomers talking to Millennials about their projects and helping each other out. We want to continue making our members’ experience even better each time they come to the woodshop.” FALL 2020

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DRIVING GOOD DECISIONS

COACH MATTHEWS TEACHES STUDENTS THE ROAD TO SUCCESS WRITTEN BY

PHOTOS BY

Jack Wax

L.G. Patterson

M

egan Matthews, known in midMissouri as Coach Matthews, likes to help kids drive, whether it’s on the basketball court or behind the wheel. “I’ve been a coach most of my adult life,” she says. The students she coaches aren’t the only ones with drive. She’s a woman who strives for success in all she does. In addition to a full-time job as a driver’s education instructor at Capital City High School in Jefferson City, she aspires for a Ph.D. in education and runs a small business in the evening and on weekends — Coach Matthews Driving School, in Columbia. Matthews has an extensive background for her work. For 15 years she has taught P.E. and health, topping off her education with an administration

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certificate, a master’s degree in athletics and secondary education, and additional courses leading to certification for teaching driver’s education. For the past five years she has taught teenagers and adults to drive safely. Like most entrepreneurs, she has a variety of reasons for working so hard. “I want to give something back to my community, and I’d like to someday hire other teachers to do the instruction,” she says. She’s also inspired by her family, knowing that someday her 13-year-old son, Jalen, or 24-year-old daughter, Jordan, might find a place in the business. It takes a bit more than experience and a coach’s enthusiasm to teach driving. It also takes someone who enjoys what they do and can relate to

teens. “I like the immediate feedback I get. One day, I might be teaching someone how to make a left turn, and the next day, they have it down perfectly,” she says. Plus, she takes pride in her students’ success. One teenager had failed his driver’s test two times before his mother called for Matthews’ help. After just two lessons, he passed with flying colors. Teens and older learners benefit from Matthews’ expertise and her caring personality. Rose Cunningham, who recently moved to Columbia from Manhattan, Kansas, didn’t know where to turn for help in teaching her 16-year-old daughter, Faith, to drive. She found the Coach Matthews Driving School Facebook page and took a chance. “She is so patient, understanding

and authentic,” she says. “She’s the best thing we’ve experienced here in Columbia.” Faith not only perfected her driving with Matthews, but also got a welcoming introduction to Columbia, which is a much larger city than she was used to. Columbia’s heavier traffic and challenging roads made the thought of learning to drive here a stressful one. “Coach Matthews helped me with merging into traffic, and she was so encouraging, telling me how I’d do great in high school,” Faith says. Some parents dread teaching their children to drive. Some don’t have time. And even those who look forward to the task might be steering their children wrong. “A lot of people have picked up bad driving habits over


“I want to give something back to my community,” MEGAN MATTHEWS

the years, and their kids will imitate them,” Matthews says. Advances in car technology are making cars safer, but smart cars don’t do away with the need for new drivers to learn to parallel park. “When you take your driver’s test, they won’t let you use computerized features like that. They even put tape over the rearview camera, requiring you to use your mirrors and the skills you’ve learned.” Matthews says. Of all the reasons parents bring their children to Matthews, one stands out. On her business Facebook page, Matthews relates an important statistic: One out of five 16-year-olds is involved in an accident in their first year behind the wheel. Taking a driver’s education course doesn’t come with a promise to keep young drivers safe, but as most auto insurance companies agree, it changes the odds in their favor.

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ROUNDTABLE

Economic Effects of a Pandemic Columbia Business Leaders Discuss Solutions By Olivia DeSmit Photos by L.G. Patterson

D

uring many past nationwide disasters and downfalls, Columbia has tended to remain steady. However, no city or county was safe this year from the effects of COVID-19. To get a better idea of how businesses, local government and residents can help each other recover from the economic effects of the pandemic and the measures put in place to control it, Inside Columbia Publisher Emeritus Fred Parry hosted a CEO Roundtable at Zimmer Communications with 17 local business leaders. The event was sponsored by The Broadway Hotel; the hotel’s award-winning chef Jeff Guinn catered the meal that accompanied the conversation. Participants included business owners and leaders across several industries in Columbia, including health care, retail, banking, real estate and education. The main point of discussion: What can

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Columbia business leaders do to help businesses and residents recover from the economic and social effects of COVID-19?

Testing in Columbia One barrier to recovery from COVID is a lack of testing and the fact that we don’t know who has had it and recovered, Scott Dalrymple, president of Columbia College, says. “Consumers will act differently if they know that they have recovered, or if the clerks at the store they’re in have recovered. We need testing that’s easily done that either people can do themselves or that you could just go to the drugstore to have done.” Jonathan Curtright, CEO of MU Health Care, says that testing turnaround rates in Boone County are some of the fastest in the country. “But,” he says, “I couldn’t agree with Scott more. COVID-19 is a major, major challenge facing us. “It could be two, three years before some of these things happen and I hate to see what’s going to happen in the District during that time period. Cha went bankrupt, Kaldi’s is no longer with us — these are small businesses. I think we as a business community need to dramatically change the way we do business.” “What does it mean to be in a COVID-positive world and how do we respond to it?” is the question to ask, according to Troy Greer, the new CEO of Boone Hospital. “I think we’ve got to start looking at this and saying, if 10 kids show up to your son’s birthday party for a swim party and one can’t swim and

the other nine can, who do you put the life vest on?” he says. “We’ve got to approach this in a much more systemic fashion about what makes sense — how do you promote a healthy economy allowing those who can go through the process and not be at much risk?” A big part of protecting the vulnerable population, however, is access to timely testing. “MU has been selected to assist the federal RADx program, which was funded with half a billion dollars to accelerate additional testing capabilities for COVID-19 in the U.S.,” Bill Turpin, associate vice chancellor of Economic Development at MU and CEO of the Missouri Innovation Center, says. “MU is assisting the development of three novel, pointof-care diagnostic tests. These diagnostic tests could be a game changer in situations like testing staff at assisted living communities, you could test them every day. They wait in a waiting room until you know whether they’re infected.” Other rapid testing scenarios include football teams, pro sports, movie sets and cruise liners.

Real Estate Struggles Most Realtors were pleasantly surprised when instead of the market declining during the pandemic, it actually shot up in Columbia. “This has been a surprising year for us,” Brian Toohey, CEO of the Columbia Board of Realtors, says. “The market has done very well this year, maybe a little too well because of how high prices have increased


Individuals were shot separately.

Randy Cole, Heather Hargrove, Bill Turpin


Jodi Bales, Rusty Strodtman, Troy Greer


almost throughout the entire year.” Lower interest rates have helped those looking to purchase homes, but unfortunately people are unable to find homes they want to buy because inventory levels are so low, he says. “People are refinancing and just staying where they are.” This increased demand and low supply in the housing market translates to a spike in new construction as well. The price gap between purchasing an existing home and constructing a new one has become more marginal, Toohey says, so that coupled with a lack of inventory means more people are considering new construction. Unfortunately, this means building materials have skyrocketed — lumber is up 100% from earlier this year. “We’re starting to see some of those price increases come down in materials over the last month, but it’s still pretty volatile. We’ll have to see what impact that has on the real estate market.”

Unemployment, Childcare & Housing Needs While some businesses, such as real estate, are doing fine despite the pandemic, there are many more that are struggling, Randy Cole, housing programs manager for the City of Columbia, says. “There’s a huge portion of our workforce that is having trouble surviving,” he says. “The Voluntary Action Center got over four times the amount of housing assistance calls for requests for people who just can’t make basic rent payments and things like that. We’ve got utility shutoffs starting on Oct. 5. You have a lot of people that are struggling just to make

ends meet.” Another big issue is childcare while schools are not having inperson classes. Getting kids back into school, and if that’s not an option, investing in new strategies such as learning pods is essential, Cole says. Todd Hoien, president of Hawthorn Bank in Columbia, echoed the need for more childcare in Columbia. “We have a lot of employers that have openings for second and third shifts — opportunities for people to go make a better wage — but they can’t because they’re a single parent and there just isn’t childcare available,” he says. “We’ve got a lot of organizations that if we could team up resources and connect people and organizations I think we could provide expanded child care.” Matt McCormick, president of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, says parents now have to choose between working and staying home to take care for their children. “The deficiencies we have in our community, COVID is going to make even bigger, and that’s what we’ve got to figure out.” Greer agrees that a lack of childcare options is wreaking an emotional toll on the community. “I have a friend whose kid is talking about how much he misses being able to interact with other children,” he says. “I think we’re underestimating the emotional toll of not having children interact.” One potential solution that Turpin suggests is learning pods. “Stacey and I met with a young lady last week, whom used to run an after-school program. She wants to help people set up small pods around their own neighborhood where the kids

can come during the school day. It would create new jobs for the people running those and help the kids continue to learn in their own neighborhoods.” But, in Curtright’s experience, while employer-subsidized childcare offers additional options for employees, it may not fully meet their needs, and the demand may not be there. “We created a childcare on the second floor of the Thompson Autism Center with 128 slots for kids K to 5 of MU Health Care employees to make it so that nurses, for example, don't have to choose to stay home or not. And a month after opening, only half of the spots are filled.” Eligibility for enrollment now is expanding to children of all full-time MU employees.

Workforce Training It’s important to note that a few industries actually saw upticks this year, despite the pandemic. One would be college enrollment, according to Jeff Lashley, president of Moberly Area Community College (MACC). “Our enrollment for this semester is actually up over last fall just by a little bit,” he says. The main reason? A need for workforce development training. With unemployment rates rising due to COVID, some workers are turning to training programs rather than the traditional 4-year college program. MACC, as well as other community colleges in the U.S., are pivoting to compress programs into more easily attainable degrees and certificates, Lashley says. “For example, in health care we are about to start an accelerated RN program in Columbia and Hannibal and we

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also have our CNA program, which is done in less than a semester.” Stacey Button, president of REDI, echoed this sentiment. “All things given this year, we have really low unemployment when we look across not only at Missouri but at the nation,” she says. “But, even with unemployment being low in Boone County, we still have a great need for available workforce to fill positions out there and certification programs help our employers attain those employees they’re seeking with greater skills.” Columbia College recently added a new cyber security program — nationwide — that gained 150 students within two weeks, Dalrymple says. “We also have a new real estate program we developed in partnership with the National Association of Realtors that has a lot of potential going forward.” Most of the certificate programs only require four or five courses to complete, he says, and the National Association of Realtors offers financial assistance to students. The new tech college coming to Ashland, Ranken Technical College, will offer more technical training that Columbia, Boone County and central Missouri as a whole need. “I’m excited about Ranken coming to the area because there is a lack of people with construction training, and that will definitely help,” Toohey at the Columbia Board of Realtors says. Training and retraining those who have lost their jobs is essential, Mike Grellner, vice president of Plaza Commercial Realty, says. “But, reaching into the high schools and opening kids’ eyes to these other job opportunities is also essential. You don't have to expect your education and your career path to be at a desk all day long. “We’re hitting the bullseye of the wrong target with certain things

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in our education system, sending kids down the wrong path in a lot of instances where if we could expose them to certain career opportunities, they could have all sorts of job opportunities at a very young age.”

Collaboration with Surrounding Cities

One answer to recovery in Columbia and Boone County is collaboration, Curtright suggests. “We need to better partner with surrounding towns and cities such as Moberly, Kirksville, Lebanon and Jefferson City in a major way,” he says. He suggests modeling northwest Arkansas’ collaboration of Rogers, Bentonville and Springdale. “If we start to think that way, it’s going to help us in major ways. We’ve got to figure out how to better partner with Jefferson City." Hawthorn Bank's Hoien voiced his agreement. “We need a regional area because it’s so much more efficient and you have so much more economic growth power.” “I think we’ve thought of ourselves as bulletproof for so long, and this [COVID-19] has started to poke holes in what we thought couldn’t be touched,” Heather Hargrove, business development manager with Liberty Family Medicine, says. “We have for many years been kind of on the inside looking out — we’ve seen other communities and areas of the country go through these things, but now it’s affecting Columbia, Boone County and the towns around us. Collaboration could be the answer to business’ and towns’ fragility right now, she continues.

Local Government Action

A few steps that local government could take to ease the burden on local businesses and residents include increased communication, speaking

with restaurant and bar owners, provide utility help to those that need it and consider lifting ordinances. There has been a lack of consistency in communication, Hargrove says. “If they’re going to choose to use specific data, they should make sure they have all of that data.” Another important step is to leave industries that are doing well alone, Toohey says. Specifically, with regard to the construction industry, “I think a lot of their spending is what’s keeping the sales tax dollars up,” he says. “It’s not fixing everything, but at least it’s something right now.” Also, finding ways to support those that need financial aid in forms of internet and utility help is essential. “If I could check a box on my cable bill where I could sponsor a family to pay for their internet right now so their kids can go to school, that would be great.” Rusty Strodtman, senior general manager of the Columbia Mall, suggests that the local government lift the ordinances currently in place in order to allow businesses to recover. “I think we've taught a lot of customers how to shop off the internet that had no idea how to do it before that I won't ever get back,” he says. Nickie Davis, executive director of The District, says around half of the businesses she speaks with feel the same way. “Half of the businesses in The District love having the government to fall back on to say ‘I'm sorry, we can't do it this way’ because otherwise the people are getting mad at them for having to wear a mask or social distance. “Many businesses appreciate what the government is doing to make this end sooner ideally, but many of them absolutely they can't — they literally cannot function with many of the ordinances that are happening right now. The other thing I just have to say


Todd Hoien, Mike Grellner, Scott Dalrymple


Matt McCormick, Brian Toohey, Jeff Lashley


for these small businesses that are mom and pop shops, they have to have another infusion of capital. They are not surviving, and we are going to lose, I can't even tell you how many more of our institutional businesses that make up Columbia by the end of this year,” she says. Speaking with and taking

local restaurant and bar owners’ opinions and expertise into account is also vital, Chamber President McCormick says. “Bring in those groups of experts because they're also going to be able to help give solutions that aren't maybe so detrimental to their business or their industry that can also help our city, our county, our state

RAPIDFIRE “Some kind of communication pipelene to business is so important.” – Nickie Davis, The District “We need to find ways to open the door to financial resources for our small businesses in this town that they need right now to survive.” – Todd Hoien, Hawthorn Bank “Focus not on bouncing back and not going back to the normal but bouncing forward: What does your business structure look like tomorrow?” - Matt McCormick, Columbia Chamber of Commerce “Make the field a little more level so that small businesses can compete with the big boxes and be open.” – Rusty Strodtman, Columbia Mall “It's imperative that the economy stays open.” – Jonathan Curtright, MU Health Care “If we adapt, respond and are agile, I think we're going to do really well compared to the rest of the country.” – Troy Greer, Boone Hospital Center “How do we reach those people who need to be trained in certain skillsets and knowing what job opportunities are available for them that they just don't know about now?” – Heather Hargrove, Liberty Family Medicine “The new normal I think is going to be people from working from more flexible locations. We could attract a lot of people to Columbia.” – Bill Turpin, University of Missouri

governments figuring out how to put these things together,” he says. While no one knows the exact formula for recovery from COVID, one thing is for certain: If business leaders can continue to come together to discuss solutions and problem-solve, we will be well on our way.

Do you have additional thoughts or suggestions on dealing with COVID-19? “I think there's work to be done with providing access to capital for minority owned businesses.” – Mike Ireland, Bank of Missouri “We shouldn't try to reinvent the wheel. We've got MACC and Job Point and other great providers. I think staying the course with things that are working well.” – Randy Cole, City of Columbia “Startups and small businesses need business coaching, training, workshops, opportunities now more than ever to be successful.” – Stacey Button, REDI “I think it's useful in a time of crisis like this to look to history. We will struggle through it, but we will make it through.” - Scott Dalrymple, Columbia College “You don't want to lose sight of the people that aren't in this room. What can we do as a community to ensure that the economic divide of those affected most is not broadened?” – Jodi Bales, Miller Bales and Cunningham CPAs “We're going to continue to incorporate the positive things we've learned from this and we're going to be solution-focused rather than problem-focused.” – Jeff Lashley, MACC

ROUNDTABLE FALL 2020

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INSIDE COLUMBIA’S CEO

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MUTRUX AUTOMOTIVE We are your family friendly neighborhood full-service station.

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FALL 2020


automotive

NOW THAT SUMMER’S BEHIND US, it’s time to get ready for colder weather and the challenges it can bring. A safe, reliable and fuel-efficient vehicle is a must for most of us year-round, but especially during inclement winter weather, since it often means walking/biking are no longer viable options.

WHY WINTERIZE? Just as extreme heat can be hard on a vehicle, so can extreme cold. Certain systems and components of your car or truck get taxed more heavily — such as your battery and suspension. Plus, winter weather events, such as snow or ice storms can wreak major mayhem, too, and make getting around tricky — especially if you don’t have the benefit of a garage.

WHEN TO WINTERIZE “NOW! Before freezing temps,” says Cindy Mutrux, who co-owns Mutrux Automotive with her husband Ross. “If you wait, it may be too late. The damage happens while you sleep.” She says at their shop, the team makes the process of winter maintenance different: “When we service your vehicle, we also check many things that insure you will have a trouble-free winter. We’ll make suggestions as to what is needed for bad weather and to keep you safe in your vehicle.” She gives a perfect example. “We checked a car today and recommended windshield wiper blades. The customer said, ‘Oh yeah, I meant to tell you about those, we just moved here from California, and you know it doesn’t rain much there.’ We then proceeded to winterize his Honda.”

“When we service your vehicle, we also check many things that insure you will have a trouble-free winter.” - CINDY MUTRUX, CO-OWNER


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WHAT TO WINTERIZE

Tires Most tires are considered all season now, says Mutrux. “Snow tires have pretty well become a thing of the past. This makes the condition of your tires that much more important. Proper tread, depth is essential for good traction in inclement weather.” Proper inflation is also key. Every 10° change in ambient temperature could mean a gain or loss of one pound per square inch (PSI.) This means you should check your pressure more regularly during winter and add

Cooling System

air to your tires as needed.

Cooling systems do more than cool your engine. They also provide heat for the passenger compartment. That’s

Brakes

certainly something you want functioning fully in winter

While cold weather doesn’t necessarily harm your brakes, a

weather. It’s important to maintain the appropriate coolant-

thorough inspection can ensure the best performance when

to-water ratio to prevent against corrosion and potential

driving in winter conditions.

freezing.

Oil Your motor oil’s responsible for lubricating the various moving components of your engine. Living in the Midwest with harsh winters, it’s important to perform proper regular oil changes for the lubrication in the

Belts, hoses, spark plugs, wires and cables These can go bad at any time of year, but if they go bad during the winter, you could be stranded in a very cold place for a very long time.

frigid temps.

Battery Mutrux stresses the importance of checking your battery. “The battery needs to be maintained to provide the proper cranking amperage for starting your vehicle. Most batteries have a life expectancy of 3 to 5 years. This time slips

Suspension With winter’s constant freezing and thawing and water seeping into the pavement and expanding, roads can develop cracks and potholes that pose a threat to your vehicle. It’s wise to ensure your suspension’s in tip-top shape before subjecting it to this punishment.

quickly away as long as the car is starting,” she says. “Then one sub-zero morning you go to start your car and all you hear is a grunt. Your baby’s going NO WHERE without the proper voltage to start it.”

Wiper Fluid

Gasoline blend The correct octane and ethanol level are imperative to starting in sub-zero temps. Also, fuel line antifreeze maybe needed for poor quality fuels. Automotive experts also recommend keeping your gas tank at least half full.

A single snowstorm can use up a large amount of windshield wiper fluid, so the washer reservoir should be frequently refilled with wiper fluid formulated for winter conditions. A bottle of washer fluid antifreeze might need to be added to the reservoir.

TRACTION TIP How you should drive in 0° weather is much different from how you can drive in 32° weather. You generally have better traction at 0° since surfaces becoming more slippery at higher winter temperatures such as 32°.


automotive

WE’RE WINTERIZING WHIZZES

THE MUTRUX TEAM can take care of all your automotive winterizing needs.

IN THE SHOP

We offer quality and affordable maintenance and repairs.

AT THE PUMP

You can stay warm and cozy in your car: Just pull up to the pump and let a friendly, smiling, knowledgeable member of the Mutrux team:

PUMP YOUR GAS CHECK YOUR ENGINE FLUIDS WASH YOUR WINDSHIELD CHECK THE AIR PRESSURE IN YOUR TIRES AND FILL THEM TO THE CORRECT PRESSURE IF YOU GET GAS PROVIDE FREE TREATS FOR YOUR KIDS AND YOUR DOGS GRAB A SNACK OR DRINK FOR YOU

MUTRUX AUTOMOTIVE 2100 W. Rollins Road 573-445-3313 | 573-445-1070 mutruxauto.com


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Best Place to Get Steaks

Best Chef Dustin Norem (573) 445-7772 | 1401 Forum blvd | ccscitybroiler.com

“One of the nest steakhouses in Missouri” - St. Louis Post Dispatch Featured in “Meetings and Events” magazine

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EXPERTS HEALTH, BEAUTY AND WELLNESS When it comes to advice and information on beauty and health, you could ask family or friends, but let’s face it: You can’t beat experts. That’s why we’re bringing them to you! These businesses have a reputation for taking care of Columbians’ beauty and health needs, from microblading to Medicare. So if you’re looking for information on hairstyling, life coaching, or mental health resources, look no further. Take it from the experts.

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Ask the Expert: Stroke Disability and Inpatient Stroke Rehabilitation

Vovanti Jones, MD F.A.A.P.M.R,

About... Rusk Rehabilitation Hospital was established in 1997 as a Joint Venture between MU Health Care and Encompass Health. In addition to her role as the Medical Director of the Stroke and Amputee units, Jones is also Co-Director of the Muscular Dystrophy Association Clinic and the ALS Center of Excellence at the University of Missouri.

Q&A

Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: Twenty-six percent of the U.S. population (61 million) people live with a disability. That means there’s a 1 in 4 chance of having a disability in your lifetime. Stroke is the leading cause of neurological disability. As technology continues to improve, more patients are surviving the initial stroke but are left with disabilities. Evidence has shown that inpatient rehabilitation at a specialized stroke center, like Rusk, produces better outcomes in patients than rehab in a skilled nursing facility. Q: What is stroke rehabilitation? A: It’s an interdisciplinary team-based approach to helping patients who have disability following a stroke. The team consists of a Physiatrist (Rehab doctor) like myself, physical, occupational and speech therapists, a respiratory therapist if needed, rehab nurses, a neuropsychologist and case managers. As the Rehab physician I work to coordinate care from the team and manage the medical problems associated with the stroke, as well as, addressing comorbid previous conditions. Q: How can a person reduce his/her stroke risk or prevent a second one? A: There are a number of steps you can take: control high blood pressure, quit smoking, exercise regularly to maintain a healthy weight, lower blood cholesterol levels with diet changes &/or medications like Atorvastatin, and control diabetes tightly. Be evaluated annually for heart disease, including disorders like atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease. Rusk Rehabilitation Hospital 315 Business Loop 70W Columbia, MO 65203 573-817-2703 muhealth.org/doctors/vovanti-jones-md RuskRehabHospital.com

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Ask the Expert: Mind/Body Healing

Kelly Howe BSN, Certified EFT Coach

About... Kelly Howe earned her BSN in nursing from Mizzou and worked at the bedside for 10 years. As a wellness coach, she now combines that experience with several mastery certifications in a mind-body technique known as emotional freedom technique (EFT).

Q&A

Q: What makes your style of coaching different? A: EFT — also referred to as “tapping” — is a powerful stress reduction tool anyone can learn to use that combines modern psychology and principles from ancient Chinese medicine to rapidly reduce stress and rewire the nervous system. Q: Can you explain how it works? A: Any time we experience stress, there’s an underlying sense that, in some way, we’re unsafe. The mind may KNOW we’re not in danger, but our primal systems can take over and create intense physical reactions as if we’re being chased by a tiger. This dials up stress in the mind and body when it’s not actually called for. Q: What happens during EFT? A: The process involves lightly tapping on acupoints while thinking and/or speaking about something stressful. The gentle tapping sends a calming signal through the nervous system and to the brain that tells the body that, even with the thought or memory, in the present moment, we’re safe. This signal regulates brain waves and induces a sense of peace, calm and safety. Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: With the current state of the world, we’re collectively being called to uplevel our stress management skills. Don’t be afraid to try new tools and get outside your comfort zone if your normal routine just isn’t cutting it. Carving out time for YOU and making stress management a priority will positively impact every facet of well-being from mental health to physical vitality. Kelly Howe Coaching 104 E. Broadway 573-673-1382 | kellyhowecoaching@gmail.com

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Ask the Expert: Foot and Ankle Care

R. Scott Foster, DPM About... Board certified in foot surgery, Dr. Foster started Columbia Podiatry in 1986. He became interested in podiatry due to his own personal experience with injuries related to running while on high school and college track and cross-country teams. He continued to run long distance and has completed roughly 30 marathons, including six Boston Marathons. He still enjoys exercise and working with athletes with foot and leg problems.

Q&A

Q: What condition do you treat most often? A: One of the most common problems we see is heel pain when patients first get up to walk. This may be plantar fasciitis. It’s a strain or overuse of the muscles and the plantar fascia ligament along the bottom of our feet. The pain will be noticed most where this ligament attaches to the heel bone on the bottom of the heel. We treat it with several remedies that include stretching, icing, taping and padding, arch supports or orthotics, physical therapy, cortisone injections, and only rarely, surgery. Q: What services would you like readers to know more about? A: We provide a lot of foot care for diabetics to help prevent complication and amputations. If you’re diabetic or have a family history of diabetes, I would recommend having a good foot exam. We check circulation, the nerves and sensation (neuropathy), skin lesions, and deformities like bunions and hammertoes. Prevention is the best medicine. Q: What trends are you seeing in the industry? A: We can now use laser to treat fungal toenails, as well as treating plantar warts and painful scars. New technology in equipment and instruments make procedures easier and more precise for a quicker and less painful recovery. Columbia Podiatry, LLC 305 N. Keene St., Ste. 209 573-443-2015 | columbiapodiatryllc.com

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Ask the Expert: Immune Response

Dr. James Hamilton Chiropractor

The providers at The Wellness Way – Columbia think differently. They have a unique understanding of physiology and recognize that the human body was designed for order, not disease. They know that when the body is properly supported, it can return to normal function. Q: What should someone take to boost their immune system? A: There is no magic pill to keep you from ever getting sick. Everyone gets sick sometimes. It’s a sign your immune system is working. The sniffles, the fever and the cough are all signs your immune system’s doing what it needs to do. Q: So, what should a person do? A: The best way to support your immune system is to know how it’s doing. The only way you’ll know that is to get it tested. Our innovative testing techniques and cutting-edge diagnostic tools give us the best insight possible into your health and guide how we treat your health issues. There are lots of natural immune boosting tips like taking zinc, but if your body doesn’t need zinc, it’s not going to work for you. The Wellness Way - Columbia 2401 Bernadette Dr., Ste. 209 573-443-6828 | thewellnesswaycolumbia.com

Q&A

Ask the Expert: Healthy, Carefee Hair

Robin Roberts Co-owner, Stylist

The Look’s 10 professionally qualified stylists offer hair, nail, waxing and makeup services for all ages. Roberts has been with the salon for 27 years, and is certified in Pivot Point Cutting Systems, Hotheads Extensions and Keritan Smoothing Systems. Q: What’s the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: When obtaining either a high or low maintenance style, keeping up with the cut, color, and professional products are key to achieving the desired look. Q: What trends are you seeing in the industry? A: Anywhere from a textured bob to the shortest pixies. The Balayage coloring process has become very popular. It gives a more soft, blended color that’ll last longer between visits. We also offer Glossing service, a process done between color appointments to help keep color looking healthy and Shiny longer. The Look 1900 N. Providence Rd., Ste. 206 573-875-4446 | thelooksaloncolumbiamo.com

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Ask the Expert: Permanent Cosmetics &Microblading

Ani Alvarez

Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional About... Ani Alvarez has been in the beauty industry for 28 years, specializing in eyebrows. She’s been doing permanent cosmetics and microblading for 13 years and is Columbia’s only Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional (CPCP).

Q&A

Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: Don’t price shop your face. There’s a reason some charge more than others. Cheap isn’t good and good isn’t cheap. Correction work costs a lot more. Q: What does a brow procedure cost? A: The initial procedure is $400 and the touch up/perfection appointment 6 weeks later is $100. Q: Why does it cost so much? A: I take continuing education classes several times a year. Those cost quite a bit. I take them because I always want to be better and strive to be the best. From start to finish a brow procedure takes about 4.5 hours and will last you several years depending on how well you take care of your brows. I take my time and don’t rush you through a procedure. I use the best pigments and numbing anesthetics and single-use disposable needles and keep my procedure room sterile. Q: What services would you like readers to know more about? A: After a woman has had breast cancer, she gets her entire breast reconstructed. I do 3D areola pigmentation. It makes the areola look so real and makes the woman feel whole and normal again. I am so passionate about helping women feel better about themselves. I absolutely love what I do, and I care so much about my clients. I meet so many wonderful women. Beauty & Beyond Permanent Cosmetics and Full-Service Salon 2902 Forum Blvd. 573-447-0272 columbiamosalon.com pmubyanialvarez@gmail.com

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Ask the Expert: Integrative Nutrition & Lifestyle

Lisa Kinser Coach

About... Lisa Kinser provides private and group integrative nutrition and lifestyle coaching. She received her training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied a variety of dietary theories and practical lifestyle coaching methods. She specializes in depression, anxiety, diabetes, chronic pain, migraines and more.

Q&A

Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: You deserve to be happy and healthy! Take the time to learn how to take care of yourself so you have the energy to move beyond limitations. Today is the best time to start. Q: What questions do you get asked most often by clients? A: What would I eat if I ate healthy? There is so much healthy food available, you just have to know what it is and how easy it is to eat it. Q: Do you just focus on nutrition? A: We will focus on all aspects of your life because they are intertwined. Your world and how you move in it are just as important as what you put in your body. Q: What trends are you seeing in the industry? A: Coaching is growing by leaps and bounds! There is a coach for everything now. Business, health and nutrition are just a few of the options. You just have to find the right one for you. Q: What services would you like readers to know more about? A: I am a death positive advocate. I provide a safe space to discuss your feelings and thoughts about death, yours or another’s. I aid you to organize and plan for your end-of-life by promoting Living Now guidelines. Lisa Kinser 2100 E. Broadway, Ste. 305, Columbia, MO 65201 573-673-4018

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Ask the Expert: Mental Health

Dr. Garima Singh Chief Medical Officer

About... Burrell Behavioral Health is a mission-driven nonprofit established in 1977. It has been a part of the mid-Missouri community for over 14 years. This growing Community Mental Health Clinic connects with more than 40,000 clients across 17 counties in Missouri. As Chief Medical Officer, Singh collaborates with and supports its provider base of 400 clinicians to offer a full continuum of care.

Q&A

Q: What is your area of expertise? A: I specialize in child psychiatry, in particular the care of those with special needs, Autism, and developmental delays, and I am passionate about bullying prevention. I grew up in India and earned my medical degree there before completing a fellowship in child psychiatry at Southern Illinois University (SIU) and a general psychiatry residency at the University of Missouri School of Medicine. Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: Mental health is as important — if not more important —than our physical health and the two are closely linked. Any prolonged, unhealthy change in someone’s social or personal life, or their educational or work performance, may be a sign that they should seek help. Challenge yourself to have honest conversations and seek help today if you think you need it. Q: Why should someone seek care at Burrell? A: We have some of the shortest wait times to get help in the area, and offer multiple ways to receive care, including phone, Zoom or in person. We take a holistic, comprehensive approach to care that includes a team of trauma-informed clinicians, and a commitment to serving all populations — including marginalized communities. Burrell Behavioral Health 3401 Berrywood Dr., Columbia, MO 65201 Non-emergency: 573-777-8300 24-hour helpline: l-800-395-2132 burrellcenter.com

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Ask the Expert: Medicare

Wendy Sprouse Farmers® Insurance Agent

Wendy Sprouse initially took Medicare on as a line of business 13 years ago, as a way to help her home and auto clients. But she soon found she had a great passion for it. Today, she finds it very rewarding to help her clients understand and navigate what is an overwhelming topic. Q: What is the best piece of advice you could share with our readers? A: Always research your Medicare options with a local person face-to-face, rather than calling an 800 number. I’m always available to have as many conversations as it takes to understand it. Q: What’s a common question you hear? A: People want to know the difference between Medicare Supplement and Medicare Advantage. Wendy L. Sprouse Agency 204 Peach Way Ste. B 573-443-7500 | WendySprouseAgency.com

Q&A Ask the Expert: Chiropractic Care During Pregnancy

Dr. Taylor Sirois Chiropractor

Restoration Chiropractic has been in business for 4 years, specializing in specific chiropractic care for all ages and walks of life. Dr. Taylor is specially certified in Webster Technique for pregnant moms, and also specializes with babies and children. Q: Why choose chiropractic care during pregnancy? A: A more comfortable pregnancy, quicker labor, and better positioning for delivery are just a few of the reasons why women turn to chiropractic care during pregnancy. Treatment is also supportive for those wishing to have a drug-free natural birth with as few interventions as possible. Q: Tell us about the Webster Technique. A: It focuses on applying gentle and strategic pressure to the pelvis and surrounding ligaments, which restores alignment and helps the muscles and tissues around the uterus to relax. As a result, the baby can find more room to move into an optimal position, and mom can find greater comfort. Feeling good during pregnancy can help mom keep up her normal routine, exercise regimen, and regular range of motion. This all helps mom and baby prepare for an optimal labor and delivery! Restoration Chiropractic 1413 Grindstone Plaza Drive, Suite 109 573-476-1000 | chirorestoration.com

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A MID-MISSOURI

PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

Gather your great feast, locally.

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efore you grab that orange can of Libby’s® pumpkin puree from the grocery store shelf, we’ve got news for you: You can get most of your Thanksgiving meal ingredients from local farmers right here in mid-Missouri. And while we all enjoy the entire meal at

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Thanksgiving, let’s be honest: The best part is always the pie. That’s why we’ve rounded up four midMissouri businesses that grow ingredients for your holiday pies, from the always appreciated apple to the somewhat surprising sweet potato. And, we asked the

experts for some tips and tricks on making the best crusted desserts this fall. Not only are you supporting small businesses by purchasing directly from farmers in the area, but you also get the full experience, from picking out the perfect pumpkin to roasting and scooping out the


Sweet Potatoes

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filling all the way to putting that perfect dollop — or mountain — of whipped cream on top. This fall, round up the kids, a group of close friends or go solo and embark on a mission to create sweet memories certain to last longer than the pie!

ammy and Greg Sellmeyer have owned Sellmeyer Farm in Fulton, Missouri, since 1986. They both have a farming background — Greg grew up on a farm with livestock, such as hogs and cattle, and Tammy spent a lot of time at her  grandparents'  small farm with dairy cattle, chickens and row crops. During their ownership of Sellmeyer Farms, they’ve added different fruits and vegetables to their repertoire but perhaps most impressive is the number of varieties of sweet potatoes they now grow: 80 to 85, depending on the year.  “We have four different flesh colors of sweet potatoes,” Tammy says. “White, orange, purple and yellow and within those four colors, we have different varieties.” Purple sweet potatoes are a little denser and have a more earthy flavor, she says, while their oriental varieties with white flesh tend to be drier and a little sweeter, such as the Murasaki varietial. Even within the “typical” orange sweet potato, the flavor and texture can vary drastically depending on what variety you choose. “Our Georgia Jett sweet potato is extremely moist and creamy, so a lot of people really like to make baby food with it,” she says, “We also have some varieties

that are what we call ‘super sweets’ such as the Mayhem Bradshaw.” Sweet potato harvesting (digging) typically begins in mid- to late-September and wraps up in late fall. When it comes to choosing the best sweet potato for pie-making, you really can’t go wrong, Tammy says. “I like to mix a variety of sweet potatoes for my pie — I don’t stick with just one. I had a customer a couple years ago that did one pie that was half purple potato base and half yellow base and that was really bright and interesting, so it’s whatever you’re looking for.” One tip she shares is to save leftovers from roasted sweet potatoes in your freezer. If you find that the potatoes you boiled or roasted for dinner are too big for your appetite, simply mash the leftover potato and freeze. When you’re ready to make pie, you can defrost the mashed sweet potato and proceed as usual. Tammy’s recipe uses sweetened condensed milk, eggs, spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves and of course, sweet potato. Sellmeyer Farms sells sweet potatoes at the Columbia Farmers Market yearround, when supply allows.

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Pumpkins J

o Hackman and her late husband, Norlan, started Hackman Farms in 1979, first selling cantaloupes and watermelons out of the farm in Hartsburg. “I had no previous farming experience,” Hackman says. “But my husband did, and he’s the one that started it.” She still grows cantaloupes and watermelons each year, but perhaps what the farm is most well-known for is its pumpkins. Hackman grows around 10 varieties of pumpkins, ranging from miniature decorative pumpkins to pie pumpkins and carving pumpkins, all the way to behemoths. “Some of our pumpkins can get to 150 to 200 pounds,” she says. Typically they grow and sell around 100 of the giant pumpkins to customers looking for something a little different. When it comes to pie making, technically you can use any variety of pumpkin, Hackman says. “But there is one

variety called Dickinson that is buff colored that they say is the best for cooking. That’s the one that Libby’s uses in their canned pumpkin.” In fact, the Dickinson pumpkin has long been a point of contention in the pumpkin world because it is technically more similar visually to a squash than a pumpkin. But, who are we to say? It tastes delicious regardless. In a typical year, Hackman is too busy managing her business to use her pumpkins in pies, but plenty of other mid-Missourians get to enjoy the fruits — or vegetables — of her labor. As a former committee member and co-founder of the Hartsburg Pumpkin Festival, Hackman typically sells her  pumpkins at the annual festival, but it was canceled this year due to COVID-19.  Instead  you can purchase pumpkins directly from Hackman Farms in Hartsburg this fall.  INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 95


Pecans

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wners Randy and Ronda Thiessen have owned Sandy Creek Farm since 1992, where they first started selling iris rhizomes at the Columbia Farmers Market in 1993. “Each year we would change what we grew and sold as we learned what customers wanted,” Ronda says. Randy worked at the University of Missouri’s research farm in New Franklin in horticulture and agroforestry, where he learned to plant and graft trees. After they purchased the farm, he put his experience to use planting seeds and grafting different varieties of fruit and nut trees. Now they grow and sell 18 varieties of peaches, 21 varieties of apples, six varieties of pears, plums, cherries, elderberries, paw paws, persimmons and of course, pecans. When it comes to pecans, the Thiessens grow a multitude of varieties — seven to be exact — including Kanza, Goose Pond and Missouri native.  It takes six to 10 years before the trees produce enough nuts to harvest. Pecans are ready for harvest in the late fall/ early winter when the nuts fall to

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the ground, either by natural forces, such as wind and rain, or with a little persuasion from a tree shaker. The nuts are then picked up either by hand or with a tool that gathers them and are then sorted by size, sent to the processor to be cracked, taken out of their shells, packaged and frozen. One tip Ronda shares for utilizing pecans is to make sure you either keep them in the fridge or freezer to maintain freshness before using. Once you do pull the pecans out of the freezer, try using maple syrup in your pecan pie recipe instead of corn syrup for a better flavor, she suggests. “Maple syrup is thinner than corn syrup, so there are a couple tricks for the perfect pie,” she says. “Blind baking the crust ensures the thinner filling doesn’t seep to the bottom of the pan, and adding one tablespoon of flour into the filling mixture helps it set.” For the recipe Ronda uses, check out the Maple Pecan Pie from Sally’s Baking Addiction online. Find locally grown pecans from Sandy Creek Farm at the Columbia Farmers Market year-round.


Apples

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randt and Kelsey Schisler have owned Hickory Ridge Orchard since fall 2017, but Brandt’s farming experience goes back much further. He grew up on a traditional row crop farm in central Illinois growing corn, soybeans, wheat and cattle. After a move to Colorado, he became interested  in beekeeping, pumpkins and apples and began dabbling in all three. This experience, coupled with reading a lot of books and getting advice from other farmers, enabled him to begin Hickory Ridge Orchard with Kelsey.     The Schislers grow 24 varieties of apples, ranging from Gala to Empire to Arkansas Black, but the best for pie-

making are firm apples with a high brix measurement, Brandt Schisler says. “Brix is the measurement of dissolved sugar within the solid,” he says. “Some of my favorites for pie making are Goldrush, Fuji, Gala and Jonathan.” The range for Apple harvesting season  is anywhere from the end of July through the beginning of November,  depending on the variety of apple and the weather. Brandt and Kelsey are currently almost halfway through the process to become certified organic — if they complete the certification, they will be one of only two organic apple orchards in Missouri — and are learning the challenges that come

with those standards and regulations. When it comes to farming, the work is never done, and that’s certainly true for apple orchards. The couple is planning on planting 1,200 new apple trees this coming spring. When embarking on a homemade apple pie adventure, be sure to always peel your apples beforehand, he recommends. “The skin doesn’t always break down during the cooking process. The best tip I have is to mix multiple apples into a pie as it adds more flavor depth.” Find Hickory Ridge Apples at the Columbia Farmers Market or at their orchard in Mexico, Missouri.

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Natural IMMUNITY Boost your immune system with these tips and tricks. BY OLIVIA DESMIT

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hether you’re concerned about catching the flu, a common cold, or the more-feared COVID-19 this fall and winter, there are preventative measures you can take. The most essential? Optimizing your health and immune system. One way to do this is through integrative medicine, which combines conventional medicine’s medications, imaging and care with a natural approach that emphasizes nutrition. Dr. Chris Link of Integrative Medicine – Natural Healing Alternatives and Medical Acupuncture, says his practice focuses on five pillars for health: nutrition, sleep, exercise, stress management and nutra-ceutical supplements such as herbs, minerals and vitamins.

THE PILLARS Before we dive into what specific supplements or herbs you should be adding to your grocery cart, let’s focus on how to promote holistic wellness and an overall healthier immune system with those pillars. “You want the individual as healthy as possible so that they are resilient

"If someone is really stressed, not sleeping or eating well, it’s much more likely they will catch a cold and it will get deep into their system ." to any viruses or infection,” Link says. “If someone is really stressed, not sleeping or eating well, it’s much more likely they will catch a cold and it will get deep into their system.” The first step in helping out your immune system is to make sure you’re eating nutrient-dense foods. Basically, this means stay away from the grocery store chips, cookies and crackers. “Eat more real whole foods and less processed foods,” he says. This includes vegetables, meat, fish, berries, nuts, eggs and olive oil. “A healthy diet

is number one when it comes to supporting your immune system.” The second step is another one that many of us neglect: a proper amount of sleep. “If a person misses a couple nights’ sleep because they aren’t sleeping well, the likelihood that they will catch the flu goes up considerably,” Link says. “It only takes two nights of poor sleep for your immune system to break down, and you want to be resilient against viruses such as the flu and COVID-19.” He suggests seven to nine hours of sleep per night. As the weather gets colder, it can get trickier to drag ourselves out of bed in the morning and get in that recommended light-to-medium exercise each day, but it’s absolutely essential. If you don’t exercise — or

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 101


even if you exercise too much — you are making your body more susceptible to sickness. Whether you’re feeling stressed out because of too many responsibilities at home (hello, third sports practice of the week!) or because of work, it can be difficult to manage that stress and that can affect your health. “Eating whole foods, getting good sleep and exercise are important to reduce stress,” Link says. “Also be careful not to over commit, allow yourself downtime and avoid excessive alcohol intake.”

D

C

"...almost 50% of adults are vitamin D deficient, which can cause increased susceptibility to viruses such as the cold and flu."

THE SUPPLEMENTS The final pillar of a well-toned immune system is broken into two parts: vitamins and supplements and herbs and foods. Link recommends a few vitamins and supplements for everyday use:

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for becoming seriously ill from COVID-19, Link says.

2. Zinc. Up to 40% of adults are deficient in this important mineral, Link says. “Zinc acts to limit the spread of COVID-19 through the body by decreasing the virus’ ability to replicate.” He recommends adults take 10 to 20 milligrams of zinc per day.

3. Omega-3 oils. Omega-3, or fish oil, isn’t only good for our hearts; it also helps decrease inflammation, which can enable your body to have an appropriate and balanced response to infection and/or viruses.

1. Vitamin D. “This is the most important vitamin for the immune system,” he says. According to Link, almost 50% of adults are vitamin D deficient, which can cause increased susceptibility to viruses such as the cold and flu. The average adult needs around 2,000 IU per day and this is best found in supplements, since most foods we eat are not rich in vitamin D. Recent studies have also shown that being deficient in vitamin D is a risk factor

4. Vitamin C. Believe it or not, that orange you eat every morning isn’t enough vitamin C for your body — not even close. At 1,500 milligrams per day, vitamin C has been shown to decrease the frequency and duration of viruses, Link says. There are only about 50 milligrams in one orange, so turn to vitamin C supplements to fill the gap.

THE HERBS & FOODS You may have heard of taking vitamin C when you have a cold, but what about eating raw garlic? Check


out these four herbs/foods that can help boost immune function or just make you feel better when you’re a little under the weather.

1. Echinacea. Echinacea is a flower that once dried can be taken either in a supplement or as a hot cup of tea. “It is best used when a person gets a cold rather than as a preventative measure,” Link says. “It acts to ready the immune system for a prompt and effective response to the pathogen.” So, make sure to stock up for the next time you feel a scratchy throat or sniffle.

2. Elderberry. Technically a fruit, it is also known as Sambucus, the tree that it grows on, and has antiviral properties that help thwart viruses’ entry into our cells, according to Link. Take elderberry at a high dose when you do have any symptoms, either via a pill, lozenge or syrup. 3. Honey. Technically not an immune booster, Link says honey is a safe cough suppressant that can coat the throat much better than most over-the-counter drugs or cough drops. Not only does it naturally suppress your cough, but it can also soothe sore throats and mucous

are great resources for your body.

"People having the most trouble with COVID-19 are those with underlying health conditions, such as diabetes and obesity, and this lends them to a greater susceptibility of infection." membranes — and it’s safe for all ages.

Okay so you’ve stocked up on echinacea tea (Traditional Medicinals makes one that is available at most grocery stores in Columbia), you’re eating plenty of nutrient-dense foods and you’re getting enough sleep, but you’re still sick. Here are a few other things you can do to make yourself feel better and recover more quickly. Use a nasal rinse, such as a Neti Pot. “If you can keep nasal membranes clear, you can decrease inflammation and heal faster,” Link says. You can also use a humidifier next to your bed when you are sick to support and speed the healing of your upper respiratory tract. What about drinking plenty of juice, such as orange or pomegranate, you may be asking? While juice does have some nutrients, the sugar content is actually equivalent to soda, ounce

4. Garlic. Not just for flavoring your favorite dishes, garlic is great for respiratory and immune support because it helps activate infection-fighting white blood cells, according to Link. It also acts as a mucolytic – helping to clear excess mucous. Whether you like to crunch on some raw garlic or take a supplement, its nutrients and fiber

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for ounce. This doesn’t mean you absolutely can’t have a glass of orange juice once or twice a week, Link says, but make sure it’s a small one. “These days we know there is a tremendous obesity problem in the U.S.,” he says. “Drinking lots of sugary beverages such as juice and soda contribute in a very significant way to America’s obesity epidemic. You want to stay hydrated, so drink plenty of water, tea and chicken soup, but sugary beverages aren’t needed and probably aren’t helpful either. “People having the most trouble with COVID-19 are those with underlying health conditions,

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such as diabetes and obesity, and this lends them to a greater susceptibility of infection.” Link says he enjoys a 4-ounce glass of pomegranate juice a couple times a week, with a meal to avoid a spike in blood sugar. “I’ve had a diabetic patient that took too much insulin come in and if I put one tablespoon of orange juice into their mouth, within 60 seconds they go from stuperous to being awake,” he says. “You’re better off eating the actual fruit or vegetable than you are drinking the juice most of the time because you have the benefit of the fiber slowing the breakdown

of sugar, therefore decreasing dangerous blood sugar spikes.” Dr. Chris Link received his doctorate in medicine from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1987, and practiced emergency and trauma medicine for 18 years before completing a 2-year integrative medicine fellowship at the University of Arizona. He opened Integrative Medicine – Natural Healing Alternatives and Medical Acupuncture in 2009 and continues serving the Jeff City, Columbia and surrounding areas.


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Lessen Your Kitchen Chaos Hot Trends in Organization

BY PEG GILL

F

ew things are as frustrating as reaching for an item RIGHT when you need it — only to find it’s out-of-reach or missing altogether. A well-organized kitchen, with tools and ingredients that are easy-to-find and see, can help you avoid frustration and culinary calamity. Here are a few organizing trends that have become big lately.

CLEAR ADVANTAGE

Clear, stylish, often stackable screw top storage containers are taking up permanent — and prominent — residence in kitchens these days. Whether glass or plastic, they’re sometimes proudly displayed on counters or used in pantries. The idea is to remove foods from their original packaging and store them

in these easy-view vehicles instead.

DOUBLING UP

Today’s open concept floor plans sometimes provide enough space for two kitchen island units. This offers a serious storage solution, as well as more smoothly choreographed cocooking and prepping situations.

LARDER LARGESS

Larder cupboards, also known as pantry cupboards, are becoming a must-have in modern kitchens. With their generous capacity and built-in organizational functions, they allow all your foods to be stored in one central spot, instead of dispersed among different cabinets. This can free up space once needed for wall cabinets and can make putting away groceries more

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efficient. Wire shelving, baskets and drawers, and back-of-the-door real estate are often utilized.

OPEN ENDED

While upper wall cabinets definitely increase storage capacity in a kitchen, they can also detract from its open feeling. One option — kind of the opposite of the larder pantry mentioned above — is to forgo upper cabinets and go with openfront shelving instead. Or, to use a mix of upper cabinets and openshelving together.

PRO PERSPECTIVE

Charlette Heyer, owner/designer with local company Organize That Space, has been designing custom organization systems for more than 20 years. Her company works with


clients to design the systems and then builds and installs them. “We enjoy helping people maximize their space,” heyer says. She’s noted the clear container trend. She cautions that the containers should be food grade and that “you have to make sure

if you go that route that you’re willing to maintain it. Some people realize it’s a lot more work than they initially thought, and it can end up complicating your life.” Another problem is that sometimes all the contents of a box or bag may not fit in the container, meaning it has to

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be stored somewhere else. Heyer says that starting around the late ‘90s to 2000, the majority of floor plans in new homes included a pantry/closet, but often these are not being fully utilized. “It’s nice space but it’s big and undefined,” she says. “Bins are very helpful. Clear plastic ones for loose items like kids’ snacks, bags of rice, things that don’t stack very well. Especially if the bins don’t have lids, it can make it easier to keep things grouped for kids to find and grab them.” She’s also known people who store items in groups or sections. For instance, by cooking theme, say mexican or italian. Some even store by meal — everything that’s needed for the meal is kept in one bin, with the exception of the refrigerated/ fresh components. Heyer says one of the most popular requests for her company is for roll-outs for kitchen cabinets. She says these are often an ask from older adults who can’t easily bend or crawl to reach things at the back of cabinets. The customized roll-outs are made of melamine laminate with four solid sides and bottoms. Consultations are free and the systems take about 2-3 weeks from design approval until installation. Another hot option is expandable pull-outs, heyer says. These alternatives to a lazy susan for a blind corner cabinet are units designed and shaped to easily navigate around the opened cabinet door while you pull and swing them out. Her final tip on organizing is to accept that ‘good enough’ is an okay place to start. “Some people want it to be perfect so badly, that they don’t want to set it up and try to tweak it. They just want it to be perfect right off the bat,” she says. This ‘perfection paralysis’ can prevent people from taking any steps at all towards getting more organized.


Taking Stock

Pantry Priorities for the Coming Months

W

hen cooler weather comes calling and we spend more time inside, we tend to lean more on items in the pantry rather than the garden or market, says Inside Columbia’s Food Editor Chef Brook Harlan. We also tend to turn to hearty, filling foods to help us warm up and “weather” the falling temps. In order to make the seasonal switch successfully, Harlan says there’s “no need to bring the whole supermarket to you.” Instead, you just need to properly prep. “By keeping a handful of items in the pantry and refrigerator, it could help you get meals from ideas in your head, to food on the plate at a much quicker rate,” he says. He suggests taking a look at the recipes you cook throughout the winter to see if there are any common items that store well for months, either shelf-stable or in the refrigerator/freezer. “Hopefully you can stock up now and cut down on those one- or two-item trips to the store and spend that extra time with the ones you love,” he says.

BY PEG GILL

DRY ITEMS Do you have a pantry, cabinets devoted to food, or both? The last thing you want to do is have food overflowing to your countertop and taking over your workspace. Assess your space and your needs, Harlan says. “If you go through one small can of baking powder every three years, there’s no reason to buy multiple cans, even if they are on sale. Baking Items: □ flour □ sugar □ brown sugar □ powdered sugar □ baking powder □ baking soda □ honey □ vanilla extract □ oats □ cornstarch Oils: □ olive □ vegetable □ peanut □ sesame Canned or boxed stocks: □ chicken □ beef □ vegetable

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Bottles of vinegar: □ apple cider □ red wine □ balsamic □ pickles □ olives □ capers Dried or canned beans: □ black □ kidney □ pinto □ other Starches: □ rice □ polenta □ grits □ pasta Spreads: □ peanut butter

INSIDE COLUMBIA'S HOME | Fall 2020

□ jelly □ Nutella □ other Snacks: □ crackers □ cereals □ snacks □ tortilla strips or chips Canned staples: □ tomatoes □ tomato paste □ corn □ chipotles □ coconut milk □ condensed milk □ canned chicken


REFRIGERATED ITEMS Expiration dates will vary depending on the type of product, Harlan says. “As I’m buying things in the fall (especially when they’re on sale), I’ll take a look at the expiration date. Many times, some of the longer items expire after the holidays. I know I can purchase several quarts of cream, sour cream, or eggs that will not expire until the new year. Some things like hard vacuum-sealed cheeses may not expire until the spring.” He advises that you think hard about what you need. “If you go through two pounds of cheddar a year, there’s no need to purchase four pounds that will last you until spring.”

Essential vegetables and herbs: □ onions □ peppers □ carrots □ celery □ cilantro □ Italian parsley Dairy: □ milk □ sour cream

Open sauces and pickled items: □ mayo □ relish □ mustard □ ketchup □ barbecue sauce □ hot sauce

FROZEN ITEMS Harlan says frozen items are another great way to stock up and not have to make as many trips to the store. Steaks, pork chops and chicken breasts that go on sale can easily be wrapped and labeled to store for six months to a year. “If you’re just feeding one or two, you can probably stock quite a bit in your kitchen freezer. Items can be stacked tightly to a side and used as needed. If you are feeding more, a deep freeze in a pantry, garage or basement may help.” He says that with minimal effort, you can work your skill up to purchasing whole pork loins and cutting them into chops yourself. Labeling, dating and rotating are key. “Make sure when you purchase new items you rotate them behind the older ones. The older items need to be used first,” he says, “so you don’t find them at the back of the

□ Worchester □ soy

□ cream □ cheeses □ eggs

Other: □ salad dressings □ lemons and limes or juice □ garlic □ tortillas □ maple syrup

ITEMS TO UTILIZE freezer in five years.” If you roast chickens, turkey, or ever have any leftover meat scraps, it’s a great way to make your own stock/broth, Harlan says. “Stock/broth comes in handy every time you’re making soup, stews, rice, beans or sauces. Most places where you might normally use water could greatly benefit from using something more flavorful. □ Homemade stocks or broths □ Meats □ Butter □ Nuts □ Vegetables □ Buns and bread □ Berries □ Hashbrowns

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Often, Harlan says, we toss items that could be used at a later date. “Many items can be saved for a week or two in the fridge or for months in the freezer. Try keeping a freezer bag for scrap to make stock. You can put in scraps of meat, vegetables, bones, or chicken skin. Once the bag’s full you can make a large batch of stock and freeze it in smaller containers or into ice cubes to use a small amount at a time.” Keep: frozen vegetable and meat scraps for stocks and broth Keep: refrigerated egg whites and egg yolks Keep: frozen breadcrumbs you’ve made from stale bread


SEASONINGS AND SPICES The right seasonings can transform the same ingredient into completely different meals. A little cumin can help turn your ground turkey into taco filling, while a combo of oregano, basil, thyme and rosemary can add an Italian accent and make it perfect for meatballs. □ onion □ garlic powder □ chili powdes □ garlic salt □ cayenne pepper □ cumin □ thyme □ oregano

□ rosemary □ marjoram □ basil □ parsley □ paprika □ red chili pepper flakes □ cinnamon □ nutmeg

SPECIAL SEASONAL ITEMS □ nuts for fudge, cookies and holiday treats □ cocoa powder □ pumpkin pie spice □ canned pie fillings

□ cinnamon sticks □ peppermint sticks □ canned cranberry relish

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Surface Safety

Keep your kitchen and bathroom virus and germ free.

T

ypically, “germophobes” tend to come out of the woodwork during the fall as we approach and get into flu season. But, this year, it worked a little differently with COVID-19. Disinfecting products were sold out in most stores in Columbia during April and May, toilet paper was hard if not impossible to come by and it can still be difficult to find Lysol wipes or Germ-X in stores. As we venture into the uncharted territory of both a global pandemic and flu season this fall and winter, it’s essential that high-traffic areas are kept clean and free of germs. The first thing you should know is the difference between cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces. Cleaning is removing general filth such as dirt, food, etc., for example,

INSIDE COLUMBIA STAFF wiping your counter with a damp washcloth. Sanitizing reduces the amount of bacteria on surfaces, but disinfecting is the only method that actually destroys both bacteria and viruses. Some disinfecting products that Adam Kinser, owner of ServiceMaster of Columbia, recommends include Lysol and Clorox. “Finding these may prove hard but expanding your search to janitorial supply companies or commercial supply companies may help,” however, he says, “given the current situation, any reputable cleaning brand will suffice.” One rule to always follow is wearing gloves while disinfecting. Remember that disinfecting is always done after cleaning, so be sure to remove all debris before

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disinfecting a surface, Kinser recommends. He also suggests using microfiber towels instead of paper towels because they are designed to pick up more dirt and are more efficient. Disinfect your kitchen and bathroom daily. “High-touch areas, especially those with water sources, should be cleaned more thoroughly and more often,” Kinser says. Some common mistakes people can make when cleaning hightouch areas include failing to realize just how much use a kitchen gets on any given day and failing to remove debris and filth before disinfecting surfaces. One question Kinser poses is, “Which is dirtier? Your bathroom or your kitchen?” After following these tips and tricks, hopefully neither.


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AN ATTIC ALTERATION Columbia Couple Transforms Second Living Space

BY OLIVIA DESMIT PHOTOS BY L.G. PATTERSON

K

aitlyn & Will Schlacks decided to revamp their attic space in 2019 from insulation and

rafters to a beautiful second living space with rooms for their two daughters, ages 6 and 12. The remodel included building out the rough carpentry and installing structural elements and took about 6 months to complete. “For a home style, we love spaces designed to reduce ‘noise’ and create a sense of order,” Kaitlyn says, “while allowing for art or subtle signature furnishings to culminate in an overall feeling of balance.” The attic’s style could be described as “soft modern,” with modern aesthetics and approachable materials. The neutral white paint and furniture help to complete this look. Cruz Custom Construction completed most of the construction work, and the Schlacks worked with JBR Precision for paint. Teams from DK Power, a women-owned construction company of which Kaitlyn is co-owner,

The large open living space has a clean, contemporary feel and includes ample seating on a crisp white sectional.


completed the drywall. The luxury vinyl plank flooring was purchased from a local dealer, Erdel & Wood. The space features two bedrooms, an office, a spacious living area with vaulted ceilings and sky lights, a bathroom and a rock-climbing wall with a lighted fort. In the living space, a baby grand piano shows the family’s love for all things musical. “Our whole family loves to play music,” Kaitlyn says. “Particularly piano.” The piano’s digital capabilities allow the Schlacks to either physically play piano or play music through the piano, utilizing the acoustic piano strings rather than speakers. The unique light fixtures throughout the attic, including the iron chandelier in the living space, were purchased from Restoration Hardware to fit the style of the remodel. Skylights throughout the space also help to maximize natural light. The bathroom features a unique Ipe wood floor in the shower and a large standalone tub, with a small window that allows for natural light while still maintaining privacy. The rock-climbing wall is made of Crystal White Ledger Stone with white climbing holds to match and was built by Cruz. It’s 12 feet tall and the lighted fort within has plenty of space to play or curl up with a good book. “Now our three kids can literally climb the wall,” Kaitlyn says, “And not get into any trouble!”

The family’s prized piano enjoys a place of prominence in the multi-use area.

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The spacious bathroom boasts a double-sink vanity and unique Ipe wood floor in the glass-enclosed shower.

A large, curved standalone tub sits in a dramatic nook, and a small window allows natural light while still maintaining privacy.

The decor in one of the girls’ bedrooms is softly feminine yet contemporary.

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The 12-foot tall Crystal White Ledger Stone climbing wall features matching white climbing holds. A door on one side leads to a spare bedroom, while two framed access openings above allow entry into a lighted fort.

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Inside Columbia

insider Oct./Nov. 2020

C O N T E N T S

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Events Worth Noting

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Learn the Stories Behind Today's Top Songs

DOOMED DIGIT

We’ll see our second Friday the 13th of 2020 this month. Many are superstitious about the number 13 even when it’s not the date of a Friday. For instance, many hosts won’t allow 13 people at the table. Instead, they set up a second table. And skippers traditionally wouldn’t go out to sea with a crew of 12. When they included themselves, that made 13.


T H E

B A N K

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O F


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EVENTS

What’s Going On THE EVENTS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THIS MONTH.

All Month Long

Just Plein Air And Water Art Exhibition COLUMBIA ART LEAGUE

The works painted during the Columbia Art League (CAL) Oct. 18 plein air painting session, which benefitted Missouri River Relief, CAL and the participating artists, will be on display in CAL’s south gallery. Noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; free; www.columbiaartleague.org November 6

Holiday Shop Hop/ Magic Tree Lighting THE DISTRICT

This annual shopping event beginning at 10 a.m. includes special offers from your favorite downtown retailers. It will have a large virtual component, to help maintain social distancing. The Magic Tree Lighting will take place at 7 p.m. at Ninth Street and Broadway. Free; www.discoverthedistrict.com

November 7

Annual Veterans Day Honor Walk & 5K Run STEPHENS LAKE PARK

Sponsored by the Truman VA Medical Research Foundation, proceeds help support local medical research dedicated to understanding and improving veterans’ health and health care. Walk 10 a.m., run 10:30 a.m.; $25 walk, $35 run; https://runsignup.com/Race/Events/MO/ Columbia/AnnualVeteransDayHonorWalkand5k ResearchRun November 9

“Como Chopped” FACEBOOK AND YOUTUBE

Check out this fun fundraiser for United Way of Columbia! Some of CoMo’s top chefs will compete in “Como Chopped” to benefit the organization’s local efforts. Six chefs from area restaurants will each be paired with a local celebrity and cook a dish together. Unlike the TV show, the judges won’t “chop” anyone. The goal is to promote and celebrate what makes our community special. You can “vote” by making gifts to United Way. Each dollar = one vote. On Nov. 19, the chef/celebrity pair with the most votes will be announced. TBA; https://www.facebook.com/pg/ HeartofMissouriUnitedWay/events/?ref=page_ internal

November 14

Mizzou vs. Georgia FAUROT FIELD

Let’s see if the Tigers can tame the Bulldogs in this late season game. TBA; prices vary; www.mutigers.com November 26

Chapman HVAC Turkey Trax 5K

SEVENTH AND CHERRY STREETS

Join this family 5K walk/run through urban areas of Columbia and MU’s campus to raise funds for the Central Missouri Red Cross. 8:30 a.m.; $15 youths, adult cost varies by signup date; http://ultramaxsports.com/races/ turkeytraxrun November 28

Mizzou vs. Arkansas FAUROT FIELD

Let’s see if the Tigers can reduce the Razorbacks to rubble in the last home game of the season. TBA; prices vary; www.mutigers.com

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 127


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EVENTS

November 27-29 December 3-6, 10-13, 17-24, 16-30

Drive-through Holiday Lights

WARM SPRINGS RANCH

Enjoy an incredible display of holiday spirit at this enchanting annual event featuring thousands of twinkling lights and the world-famous Budweiser Clydesdales. This year’s event will be drive-through only. 6 or 8 p.m.; reservations required; $20 per car; www.warmspringsranch.com   As of press time, these events were scheduled to occur. Please check with the organizer to confirm whether details have changed.

Save the Date December 4

Living Windows THE DISTRICT 

Each year as December begins, local shopkeepers transform their front windows into vibrant holiday displays. This year’s event will be mostly virtual, giving residents the a chance to view videos of the windows and vote for their favorites. TBA; free; www.discoverthedistrict.com  December 14

One for One Holiday Food Drive EATWELL PARKING LOT 

Join volunteers from area businesses including Inside Columbia magazine and Zimmer Radio as they “freeze for food” at this outdoor drive benefiting the Food Bank for Central & Northeast Missouri. 6 a.m.-6 p.m.; donations welcome; www. sharefoodbringhope.org 

128 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


CHANGING MY LIFE. United Way fights for the health, education and financial stability of every person in every community. We have one life. To live better, we must LIVE UNITED. Volunteer or donate at United Way.org.

© 2018 United Way Worldwide

t c e f r e P c i n c i P Stone Hill is at your local retailers or stonehillwinery.com INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 129


BEERS

WE ARE STILL HERE, AND WE ARE STILL BEER.

TO YOU

KEEP YOUR HEAD AND YOUR GLASS HELD HIGH. BEERS TO YOU. FROM ALL YOUR FRIENDS AT

COLUMBIA | 573-874-4100 | 1306 Hathman Place NHSCHEPPERS.COM

JEFFERSON CITY | 573-874-4100 | 2300 St. Mary’s Blvd

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insider

HIGH NOTE

The Story Behind the Song THREE THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC.

BY CHRIS CARSON • PHOTO FEATURING LEWIS CAPALDI

“MOOD"

24kGoldn f. Iann Diorr

loss — dealing with a loved one’s passing, specifically by suicide. “Before You Go” lyrically illustrates the internal blame, questioning

TikTok has turned another unknown into an overnight star.

ourselves if we could have done something to help, and how we

After the official release of 24kGoldn’s “Mood” in July, the song

missed the warning signs. With this understanding, the chorus

was quickly featured in over 13,000 videos on the app in just the

becomes more clear: “Before you go, was there something I

first month, launching it into the mainstream. The song carries

could've said to make your heart beat better? If only I'd have

an infectious summer vibe without leaning Latin or “Tropical,”

known you had a storm to weather.” True to Capaldi’s style, it

as many modern summer songs do. Of course, a catchy “hook”

stems from a deeply personal place: He lost his aunt to suicide

doesn’t hurt either. Defined as rap/rock, the love song has

when he was young. The sadness behind both songs is a stark

mass appeal, combining “melodic rap” with an up-tempo beat

contrast to the singer himself, who is rather witty, with an

and simple, yet playful, guitar riff. In “Mood,” the 19-year-old

enormous sense of humor. Just check his twitter: @lewiscapaldi.

former USC student teams with 21-year-old rising Puerto Rican artist Ian Diorr to take the listener through the singers’ toxic relationships. They sing of girlfriends who are “always in a mood,”

“PRETTY HEART”

Parker McCollum

as they alternate between the joys of love and its frustrations and unhappy moments. According to 24kGoldn, it came about on a

A broken heart always provides inspiration for a song, and that’s

day he wasn’t even planning on making music. He was simply

exactly what it did for Parker McCollum. If McCollum’s name

playing the well-known “Call of Duty” video game with Diorr and

doesn’t sound familiar, it soon will be. His current hit “Pretty

a couple of producers when inspiration hit.

Heart,” which was influenced by the ending of a relationship,

“BEFORE YOU GO”

Lewis Capaldi

is quickly climbing the country charts. McCollum co-wrote the song with Randy Montana. He said the writing process began when he found an old video of himself singing, “What does that say about me?” Those lyrics became the chorus to “Pretty Heart.”

One thing’s for certain about Lewis Capaldi: He has a beautiful

You can find the song on his latest EP, “Hollywood Gold,” or listen

way to express his pain from loss. Following up his debut single,

to it on Clear 99.

“Someone You Loved,” the Scottish singer continues to tug at our hearts with his sophomore single, “Before You Go.” But like

Chris Carson is the director of music programming for

“Loved,” everything may not be what it seems. Both songs play

Zimmer Communications, which includes KCLR 99, Y107 FM

off as break-up songs. Yet for Capaldi, both are about a deeper

and 101.9 The Wave. He has worked in radio for 15 years.

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 131


RED ALERT

The Ultimate Employee Gift

Opening Early for Gift Card Sales Daily At Noon 1401 Forum Blvd Columbia, MO 65203 573-445-7772 ccscitybroiler.com

Starting Dec. 1st.


Inside Columbia

views Oct./Nov. 2020

C O N T E N T S

135 On the Town

139 A New View

140

Darkow Draws

146

BERRY POLARIZING

Come November, Americans will be faced with a choice that’s bound to cause some heated disagreements at dinner. No, not the election — conflicting cranberries! Some say Thanksgiving dinner just wouldn’t be the same without fresh cranberry relish, while others are adamantly in the canned camp. Is this issue likely to bog you down?

The Final Word


134 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


views

ON THE TOWN

2020 Men As Allies Breakfast

Front row left to right: Ashley Emel, Meagan Parcell, Elizabeth Herrera Eichenberger, Lee Russell, Wendy Wiederhold, Jennifer Roelands, Kate Boatright, Amy Greenwood Back row left to right: Sarah Butler, Jack McManus, Mike Middleton, Jon Class, Shatenita Horton, Jennifer Hickam

True North of Columbia hosted a drive-thru breakfast at the Country Club of Missouri. The event from 6:30 to 8:30 a.m. featured a breakfast sandwich and coffee to go. True North board members were on hand to greet participants, direct traffic and collect donations to help fund the organization’s comprehensive domestic and sexual violence victim service program.

Date Gage Mize & Jackson McCandless

Nathan Hesemann

September 24

Location Country Club of Missouri

Benefiting Organization True North of Columbia

Photos by Wally Pfeffer, mizzouwally@ compuserve.com

Brian & Mitzi Clayton

Bartley Stevenson

Natasha & Brian Brown

Kate Boatright & Wendy Wiederhold

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 135


PROMOTION

Unless You’re in the Business Of Printing Money, You’re Probably Spending Too Much On Your Printing.

A Few Facts Printing is expensive. It requires tons of paper, different colors of ink and toner, the printer itself, and service when something breaks down. Some companies are spending as much as 3% of their annual revenue on printing. Next to rent and payroll, printing is ranked as a business’ third largest expense.

Unseen and Unexamined The costs of printing often go unanalyzed since they’re hard to track and manage. With help from a Managed Print Services provider your business can gain increased transparency and specialized print services that can significantly cut costs.

The Hard Truth About Hardware Businesses may overspend on print hardware because they overestimate how many devices they actually need and may use more paper and toner than necessary. Managed Print Services help determine and optimize the right number of print devices supporting your company. The result: Devices that serve your specific needs.

Downtime Can Cut Down On Profits When print devices breakdown, it can interrupt your workflow and cause unproductive - and unprofitable - downtime. This is exacerbated when your business is forced to search for a service technician. With a Managed Print Service provider, there’s no time wasted on searching: One call will initiate a rapid response that leads to resolution of the issue.

Shine a light on your printing cost blind spots. Contact Sumner One to learn more about our free managed print services assessment.

www.sumnerone.com | 573.499.5300


views

ON THE TOWN

2020 Red Shoe Ride/ Walk/ Run Kevin and Celeste Czaicki

Amy and Mike Cable

Christy Sites, Wendy O'Connor and Sandy Sites

The Wayne McDaniel Memorial Red Shoe Ride/ Walk/Run to benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities® of Mid-Missouri was held virtually August 29 – 30. Over 200 people from 10 states participated in the event. The event raised nearly $20,000 to help the Ronald McDonald House provide compassionate care and family-centered services to children and their families being served by area hospitals and health-related facilities.

Date August 29-30

Location Virtual Event

Benefiting Organization Ronald McDonald House Charities® of Mid-Missouri Sharon McDaniel, Jeremy McDaniel, Heather Westenhaver, Lena Westenhaver and Lindsey McDaniel

Marc Bledsoe

Gertrude Vieth, Patty Johnston, Terri Gray and Cassie Gray

Susan and Madeline Jones

Photos by Since the event was held virtually, the photos were submitted by various participants.

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 137


INTERIOR DESIGN ASSOCIATES 1202 Rogers Street, Columbia MO 65201 573.874.1755 www.interiordesignassoc.com

Because you have a choice.

SENDING YOU HOME STRONGER.

It’s one of the most difficult parts of long term care for a family memeber. Missing out on precious time with them. At Columbia Post Acute, they help families “stay connected” REQUEST A TOUR AT

ColumbiaPostAcute.com

573-397-7144 3535 Berrywood Drive, Columbia, MO 65201 138 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


views

A NEW VIEW

A New View

BEING A PHOTOGRAPHER, I HAVE ACCESS TO SOME UNIQUE POINTS OF VIEW IN THE COMMUNITY. Assignment: Mid-Missouri Thanksgiving The Location: Calloway County ’m a Thanksgiving pie fan. I tend to eat more from the dessert table than main dishes during the Thanksgiving feast. I’m not picky — I like apple, sweet potato and pumpkin pies, but I tend to eat the pecan pie first. I was excited to take back roads through surrounding counties to visit the farms that produce my pie fillings. The leaves were just beginning to change, which made driving these littletraveled roads more scenic. As I walked the fields with the farmers, I learned a little about organic apple trees, the many varieties of sweet potatoes, the challenges of pumpkin farming and that a pecan harvest can be labor intensive. Seeing all these first hand will make the pies taste extra special this year. Now, I am really hungry for some pie.

I

L.G. Patterson

INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 139


views

DARKOW DRAWS

140 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020


IF A PICTURE IS WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS,

A VIDEO IS WORTH A MILLION WORDS. Telling the story of your business is one thing, but when you combine the right words with vibrant photos and videos, your products and services become irresistible to potential customers. At Zimmer Communications, we are master storytellers and we couple that ability with our award-winning videographers and photographers to truly bring your business to life.

573.875.1099

ZimmerCommunications.com

sales@zrgmail.com


P R O M O T I O N

Steps to help prevent Heart Disease TO HELP PROTECT AGAINST HEART DISEASE (and all cardiovascular diseases), you need to make smart choices. Ideally, you would have started eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise when you were in your 20s, and continued those habits. But once you reach your 50s, 60s and beyond, there are some additional steps to take, according to the American Heart Association.

Get smart about the signs. Do you know the warning signs of a heart attack or stroke? Not everyone experiences sudden numbness or severe chest pain. In fact, most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain and discomfort in the center of the chest that continues for more than a few minutes, or goes away and then returns. It can feel like unpleasant pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. You may feel discomfort or pain in one or both of your arms, your back, neck, jaw or stomach. You may be short of breath. Other signs can be nausea/vomiting or lightheadedness or breaking out in a cold sweat. It’s important to note that women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, especially shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain, although the most common heart attack symptom for both genders is chest pain or discomfort.

Recommit to eating right. Eating a healthy diet requires effort. It’s easy to grab fast food instead

of preparing a fresh, healthy meal. But if you want to stave off heart disease, it’s important to eat right. That means plenty of fruits and vegetables, fiber-rich whole grains, fish (ideally fish with good fats, such as salmon, at least twice per week), nuts, legumes and seeds, and baked or broiled foods instead of fried. Choose lower-fat dairy items. Eat skinless chicken and the leanest cuts of meat. Cut back on your meat consumption by eating some meatless meals each week. Try a whole grain bean burrito or tofu stir-fry. It’s also important to remember that as you get older, your body needs fewer calories. So cut back your portion sizes, too.

Follow your treatment plan. By this point in your life, it’s likely you’ve been diagnosed with health conditions that increase your risk for heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. You can lower your risk by following your doctor’s treatment plan, by taking your medications as directed and making any recommended lifestyle and diet changes.

Following the above recommendations is a good first step to preventing heart disease. Other important measures are not smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, managing stress, getting your lipid profile labs and exercising. Physical activity can help you maintain a healthy weight and lower your blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels. Quite frankly, a healthy lifestyle is a good investment in living a longer and healthier life.

SCHEDULE A CONSULTATION TODAY Visit moheartcenter.com or call us at (573) 256-7700

4 BOOM MAGAZINE


Don’t miss a beat... BOOM MAGAZINE 5


NIFONG SHOPPING CENTER, columbia, mo “Our family has worked with Coil Construction for more than 20 years. We’ve developed a great business relationship and personal friendships through the process. Coil’s expertise helps ensure high quality, on-budget projects. We look forward to working with David and the entire Coil family for years to come!” - Jay Lindner, President, Lindner Properties

David Coil

Jay Lindner


ocess. to

Advertising Index I NSI D E CO LUMB I A

Inside Columbia-CEO Update..................................134

The Look....................................................................87

All N One Outdoor Solutions.................................... 22

Inside Columbia-Inside Scoop..................................134

The Terrace Retirement Community........................... 36

Automated Systems..................................................134

Inside Columbia-CoMo Eats.................................... 138

The Trust Company................................................. 105

Bank of Missouri..........................................................4

Inside Columbia-Women’s Health............................104

Wabash Properties....................................................21

Beauty & Beyond...................................................... 88

Interior Design Associates....................................... 138

Wellness Way - Columbia.................................. 2-3, 87

BMW of Columbia.......................................................6

Kelly Howe Coaching............................................... 85

Wendy L. Sprouse Agency.........................................91

Boone Hospital Center..........................................10-11

Lee’s Tires................................................................. 49

Zimmer Radio Group-

Buchroeders Jewelers............................................. 5, 9

Lisa Kinser................................................................. 89

Photography/Videography......................................141

Burrell Behavioral Health.......................................... 90

Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market...................... 34-35

Zimmer Radio Group-Meet the Team........................ 20

Bush & Patchett LLC................................................... 49

Lordex Spine Center................................................. 33

CC’s City Broiler............................................... 106,132

Menard Inc................................................................17

CEO

CenterPointe Hospital............................................... 42

Mercedes-Benz of Columbia......................................12

Automated Systems................................................... 59

Central Missouri Orthodontics...................................19

Millers Professional Imaging..................................... 36

Binghams...................................................................54

Coil Construction..................................................... 144

Missouri Vein Care.................................................... 29

Bush & Patchett LLC................................................... 59

Columbia Podiatry.................................................... 86

MO Heart Center............................................. 142-143

CC’s City Broiler........................................................ 82

Columbia Post Acute......................................... 19, 138

N.H. Scheppers Distributing Company................... 130

Coil Construction....................................................... 55

Columbia Showcase Kitchens................................... 115

NW Industries, LLC......................................................7

fuse32....................................................................... 55

Convergence Financial.................................................8

Peak Sport & Spine .............................................7, 147

Mediacom................................................................. 52

Designer Kitchens & Baths.......................................123

Restoration Chiropractic.............................................91

Mutrux Automotive...............................................78-81

Downtown Appliance.................................................27

Rost Landscaping & Superior Gardens........... 109, 145

PCE........................................................................... 65

Flooring America.................................................... 108

Rusk Rehabilitation Center.................................. 14, 84

SumnerOne...........................................................60-61

Genesis Company............................................. 39, 124

Starr Properties......................................................... 42

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton.................... 65

Hawthorn Bank........................................................148

Stone Hill Winery.....................................................129

Tiger Court Reporting................................................54

Heart of Missouri United Way.................................129

SumnerOne............................................................. 136

Zimmer Radio Group: Custom Publishing.................. 65

House of Brokers-Spieler Winn................................ 117

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton.................... 40

Quality in every aspect. One of the most underestimated aspects of landscape design, landscape lighting enhances your property in three ways: accented property features, added security, and increased time for enjoyment of your outdoor space. Create additional living space and expand the amount of usable time you can spend in your outdoor space.

2450 Trails W Ave, Columbia, MO 65202 • (573) 445-4465 • rostlandscaping.com INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 145


views

THE FINAL WORD

Columbia Comeback RANKEN TECH IS ESSENTIAL TO OUR RECOVERY.

BY FRED PARRY

C

olumbia and Boone County’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic is going to take much longer than most people probably expect. At one point in the pandemic, Boone County had more than 19,000 of its citizens file first-time unemployment claims. That’s a staggering number when you consider that Columbia and Boone County have almost always led the State of Missouri in employment rates. Perhaps the hardest hit segment of our local economy has been the service sector which comprises almost 25% of the jobs in our workforce. When restaurants, bars and hotels were required to close because of severe restrictions in local health orders, thousands of our friends and neighbors were suddenly left with no way to earn a living. While some qualified for the temporary unemployment benefits, others came up short because of the amount of their income that was traditionally paid in gratuities. By mid-April, it was obvious that Columbia’s most vulnerable citizens had been the hardest hit. Columbia and Boone County will recover from this severe downturn in business activity but it’s going to take a well-coordinated effort to get us back to the robust economy we were experiencing before the onset of COVID-19 in midMarch. One of the first priorities in our workforce development efforts should be job training for those who are currently unemployed or underemployed. There are plenty of job openings in Columbia right now, but most require previous experience or some sort of a college degree. Only 47%

146 INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020

of our local population has the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree. We need to attract employers to this community who can absorb those who are non-degreed. Unfortunately, those employers won’t come if we don’t offer a skilled workforce. While we’ve seen Herculean efforts taking place at Moberly Area Community College and the Columbia Area Career Center to get workers ready for a variety of jobs frequently found in the local marketplace, we still have a long way to go in terms of getting workers job-ready for new opportunities. While Columbia has always taken pride in our role as the state’s mecca for higher education, we’ve done a lousy job of offering vocational and skillscentric training for those who chose not to pursue a four-year college education. Earlier this year, it was announced the St. Louis-based Ranken Technical College was considering opening a campus in Ashland. Ranken has been an essential staple of the St. Louis economy for more than 100 years and recently opened a satellite campus in Troy, Missouri. Ranken’s unique curriculum combines classroom instruction with a heavy emphasis on “hands-on” experience in a lab or shop setting. By the time a student graduates from Ranken, they are highly trained and well-equipped for a successful career. Ranken’s tentative plans for its Ashland campus include curriculum programs designed around careers in information technology, health, and medical jobs, manufacturing, industrial engineering technologies, construction and agricultural technology. While this

particular campus will serve a six-county region, there’s no doubt that Columbia will be the biggest beneficiary of this bold step in vocational education. The great news is that those responsible for attracting Ranken to Southern Boone County have already secured a $4.5 million grant from the Economic Development Administration. The community must now raise another $1.7 million to make the project a reality. It will now be up to the local community, including those business owners who can expect to fill their workforce needs with Ranken graduates, to raise the necessary funds. A successful campaign will be a true game-changer for Boone County. Our number one deficiency in attracting new employers has always been our shortage of an available workforce. The best way for Columbia and Boone County to recover from the devastating toll of this pandemic is to create new economic opportunities right here in our own community. As more and more local businesses expand in other markets to fill unmet workforce needs, we could find early success by reversing that trend and keeping local dollars here in our community. A healthy economy needs a vibrant workforce. Ranken Technical College’s arrival in Boone County could not have come at a better time.

Fred Parry Founder & Publisher Emeritus fred@insidecolumbia.net


ocess. to

Advertising Index I NSI D E CO LUMB I A

Inside Columbia-CEO Update..................................134

The Look....................................................................87

All N One Outdoor Solutions.................................... 22

Inside Columbia-Inside Scoop..................................134

The Terrace Retirement Community........................... 36

Automated Systems..................................................134

Inside Columbia-CoMo Eats.................................... 138

The Trust Company................................................. 105

Bank of Missouri..........................................................4

Inside Columbia-Women’s Health............................104

Wabash Properties....................................................21

Beauty & Beyond...................................................... 88

Interior Design Associates....................................... 138

Wellness Way - Columbia.................................. 2-3, 87

BMW of Columbia.......................................................6

Kelly Howe Coaching............................................... 85

Wendy L. Sprouse Agency.........................................91

Boone Hospital Center..........................................10-11

Lee’s Tires................................................................. 49

Zimmer Radio Group-

Buchroeders Jewelers............................................. 5, 9

Lisa Kinser................................................................. 89

Photography/Videography......................................141

Burrell Behavioral Health.......................................... 90

Lizzi & Rocco’s Natural Pet Market...................... 34-35

Zimmer Radio Group-Meet the Team........................ 20

Bush & Patchett LLC................................................... 49

Lordex Spine Center................................................. 33

CC’s City Broiler............................................... 106,132

Menard Inc................................................................17

CEO

CenterPointe Hospital............................................... 42

Mercedes-Benz of Columbia......................................12

Automated Systems................................................... 59

Central Missouri Orthodontics...................................19

Millers Professional Imaging..................................... 36

Binghams...................................................................54

Coil Construction..................................................... 144

Missouri Vein Care.................................................... 29

Bush & Patchett LLC................................................... 59

Columbia Podiatry.................................................... 86

MO Heart Center............................................. 142-143

CC’s City Broiler........................................................ 82

Columbia Post Acute......................................... 19, 138

N.H. Scheppers Distributing Company................... 130

Coil Construction....................................................... 55

Columbia Showcase Kitchens................................... 115

NW Industries, LLC......................................................7

fuse32....................................................................... 55

Convergence Financial.................................................8

Peak Sport & Spine .............................................7, 147

Mediacom................................................................. 52

Designer Kitchens & Baths.......................................123

Restoration Chiropractic.............................................91

Mutrux Automotive...............................................78-81

Downtown Appliance.................................................27

Rost Landscaping & Superior Gardens........... 109, 145

PCE........................................................................... 65

Flooring America.................................................... 108

Rusk Rehabilitation Center.................................. 14, 84

SumnerOne...........................................................60-61

Genesis Company............................................. 39, 124

Starr Properties......................................................... 42

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton.....................57

Hawthorn Bank........................................................148

Stone Hill Winery.....................................................129

Tiger Court Reporting................................................54

Heart of Missouri United Way.................................129

SumnerOne............................................................. 136

Zimmer Radio Group: Custom Publishing.................. 65

House of Brokers-Spieler Winn................................ 117

The Broadway, A Doubletree by Hilton.................... 40

Quality in every aspect. One of the most underestimated aspects of landscape design, landscape lighting enhances your property in three ways: accented property features, added security, and increased time for enjoyment of your outdoor space. Create additional living space and expand the amount of usable time you can spend in your outdoor space.

2450 Trails W Ave, Columbia, MO 65202 • (573) 445-4465 • rostlandscaping.com INSIDE COLUMBIA OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2020 145


HELPING YOU IS OUR PEAK PRIORITY.

PEAK PROFILES MEET OUR NEWEST PHYSICAL THERAPIST FROM OUR BERRYWOOD LOCATION

RACHEL MUENKS HOMETOWN: Frankenstein, Missouri KEVIN FETSCH HOMETOWN: St. Charles, Missouri WHY DID YOU WANT TO BECOME A PHYSICAL THERAPIST? RACHEL: I’ve always had a passion for helping

people as well as an interest in the medical field. I was drawn to physical therapy because of the amount of time I’d get to spend with a patient. PT is unique in that we get to spend 2-3 hours with a patient per week. It really gives me a chance to build relationships with them as they begin their journey toward towa recovery.

KEVIN: I’m fascinated by the complexities of the

human body and its ability to heal. Though there are many ways to improve health holistically, the benefits of exercise and manual therapy techniques are the way I felt I could have a huge impact on others’ lives in helping them overcome pain.

WHAT DO YOU MOST LOOK FORWARD TO ABOUT WORKING AT PEAK SPORT AND SPINE?

RACHEL: I’m driven to provide the best evidenced-based care to my clients and look forward to getting to know my new therapy and medical team and to work with them. I’m beyond excited to join one of the best therapy clinics and expand my professional career to include the treatment of vestibular disorders.

Receive science-based exercises to strengthen and stabilize speciic muscle group

Communicate directly with a therapist through video to make sure your movements are mechanically correct KEVIN: PEAK is a growing company and one with Find out if there are any changes that you need to make to your routine Therapist guided programs to ensure patients return to functional level

HELPING YOU IS OUR PEAK PRIORITY

a proven reputation. One long term goal I have is to pursue and develop a specialty in treating the spine. I feel that PEAK has the resources and desire to help me accomplish that goal.

You didn't choose PAIN, but you can choose Peak Sport and Spine.

peaksportspine.com


INSIDE COLUMBIA

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage

Zimmer Strategic Communications 3215 Lemone Industrial Blvd., Suite 200 Columbia, MO 65201

PAID

“Hawthorn Bank cares about me and my business.” “I think Hawthorn Bank knows we all serve a purpose in life and business, and they really want to help you.” ”It’s been a really good partnership. I am very happy with my choice to bank with Hawthorn.”

– Miha Britt Britt Immigration Law

Rob Patrick

Commercial Loan Officer (573) 449-3209

Member FDIC NASDAQ: HWBK ©2020, Hawthorn Bank NMLS #1240407

HawthornBank.com

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Inside Columbia magazine - October/November 2020  

Inside Columbia magazine - October/November 2020  

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