Page 1

Contemporary Artists & Exhibitions

Issue 7 winter 2017


Professional Giclee Printing on fine art papers from £7

Image © Soon Editions / Wes21

Open a trade account & get benefits such as: - A free white label service, send direct to clients - Manage & authenticate limited editions online - Priority service and discounts - Discounted artwork scanning 9.8 out of 10 on Trustpilot

15% off your giclee print order, use code “insideartists”

www.point101.com

020 7241 1113

“When looking for a giclée printer I considered three things. The print quality, the cost and the speed of delivery. Point101 offers an affordable, reliable and fast service and, perhaps most importantly, the prints are faultless. Excellent.” T Wilson


Subscribe to the printed magazine for just ÂŁ12.99 + postage Subscribe online at insideartists.co.uk InsideArtists

InsideArtists


Fine Art Printing, Mounting and Framing

Printing We specialise in printing for photographers and artists that demand the highest possible quality and colour accuracy, delivered at competitive prices.

Framing A complete in-house framing and mounting service from standard frames up to conservation and museum grade. All bespoke sizes and designs catered for.

Quality Guaranteed We are certified Fine Art Trade Guild members giving you the guarantee of approved quality. Delivering the highest standards is our passion and at the core of our business.

TEL: 020 3212 2024 WEB: theprintfoundry.co.uk EMAIL: info@theprintfoundry.co.uk


Embracing a balance between the old and new has led to many of the artists in this issue pushing the boundaries of contemporary art both visually and through their choice of subject matter, and through their techniques, process and mediums too. Cover artist Iva Troj draws on Flemish painting methods to create her intricate paintings, layering thin veneers of paint between layers of varnish; a technique which she has used throughout her training and career, combining her established approach with modern motifs. Meanwhile Kuniko Maeda is trained in traditional Japanese woodcarving techniques, and while this gives her sculptural pieces a solid base and sense of history, it is her use of cutting-edge technology that brings a freshness and sophistication to the aesthetics her work. Of course there will always be a place for the tradition and history in the art world, but it is exciting to ponder where the future of technology will take us.


EDITORS Kieran Austin Toby Oliver Dean COVER IMAGE Iva Troj, Embrace Series: A Place 2013, mixed media (pencils, pastels, inks acrylics on fine art paper), 71 x 51 cm PROOF READER Daisy Francome FOLLOW US InsideArtists InsideArtists WRITE TO US Inside Artists 35 Holland Mews Hove, East Sussex BN3 1JG ONLINE insideartists.co.uk ENQUIRIES info@insideartists.co.uk +44 (0)1273 748 630 Inside Artists is a registered trademark. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without permission from the publishers. The magazine can assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or illustrations.

"This mixed-media piece was inspired by a Japanese tale about beauty, transience and imperfection. I remember listening to it thinking about cold winds blowing, plants flying around with different symbols attached to them, causing havoc. Beauty has always seemed like a chaotic thing to me." Iva Troj


Exhibitions 08 Worthing Museum and Art Gallery

Interviews 10 Iva Troj 32 Kuniko Maeda

56 Alex Voinea

Artist profiles 14 16 20 22 28 36 44 48 50

Linden Eller Sivan Sternbach Ryota Matsumoto Tomas Urbelionis Philippe Thelin Hyun Kim Marta Utsler Miroslav Trubac Halina Domanski

54 60 64 66 68 76 78 80

Victoria Atkinson Alan Sbaffi Stefanie Schmid Rincon Warren S. Heaton David Vanorbeek Asta Caplan Tadao Cern Richard Marsh

Artist showcase 84 Jason Clarke 88 Barrie Dale

Artist exhibitions 94 Upcoming artist exhibitions

92 Franco Di Cesare


08 EXHIBITIONS

Open16 exhibition

Costume Trail

Worthing Museum and Art Gallery

F

unding from the Heritage Lottery Fund this year has helped Worthing Museum and Art Gallery unveil an exciting programme of exhibitions and events for the coming months.

The grant has helped the West Sussex museum to celebrate its extensive costume collection which is the third biggest in the country - with a trail currently taking place across the town. The state-of-the-art showcase of historic clothing will be hosted by businesses across Worthing, and will allow the public to view items chosen from WMA’s 30,000 pieces. The trail of costumes will show how changes and trends in fashion can be linked with the history of Worthing, creating a visual reminder of the people who lived during various periods. The earliest item, a black work

jacket, dates back to 1612. The Worthing Museum and Art Gallery Costume Trail runs until May 2018 across nine venues. Another important exhibition in the gallery’s calendar is The Open16 exhibition and competition which welcomes local artists of any age; both professional and amateur, to enter their art work and have the chance for it to be displayed in the Main Gallery. The exhibition of selected works opened in November and will remain on display until March 2017. worthingmuseum.co.uk


EXHIBITIONS 09

Fear and Love: Reactions to a Complex World The Design Museum, London Until 23 April 2017 The inaugural exhibition at the Design Museum’s new Kensington High Street site explores a spectrum of issues that define our time, through eleven new specially commissioned installations by leading international designers. The multidisciplinary and global exhibition aims to capture the mood of the present and establish the Design Museum as the home of design debate. designmuseum.org

Lucy Raven: Edge of Tomorrow Serpentine Gallery, London 8 December 2016 – 12 February 2017 Lucy Raven’s work focuses on the marginal spaces at the edges of image production, what happens behind the camera or between the frames of a film or animation. This exhibition will bring together a diverse selection of works in a site specific installation within the spaces of the Serpentine Gallery. At the heart of the exhibition, a cinematic space will feature the animated film Curtains (2014). serpentinegalleries.org

Only In England The Bowes Museum, Country Durham 25 February - 7 May 2017

Lucy Raven: The Deccan Trap, 2015; Video with sound, 4:19 min; Sound by Paul Corley; Courtesy and © 2016 Lucy Raven

Roger Hiorns Ikon Gallery, Birmingham 7 December 2016 – 5 March 2017 Through the transformation of materials and readymades, Roger Hiorns focuses on various aspects of modern life, often through current affairs. To date Hiorns’ work has involved growing vast amounts of copper sulphate crystals – on objects ranging from car engines to domestic interiors – paintings made from brain matter, and jet engines containing anti-depressant drugs. ikon-gallery.org

Fascinated by the eccentricities of English social customs, Tony Ray-Jones spent the latter half of the 1960s travelling across England photographing what he saw as a disappearing way of life. Humorous yet melancholy, these works had a profound influence on photographer Martin Parr. This exhibition of photographs examines the close relationship between the work of these two important photographers and their fascination with the English. thebowesmuseum.org.uk


10 INTERVIEW IVA TROJ

Iva Troj

I

va Troj is an award winning mixed media artist based in East Sussex. Her richly detailed Renaissance-style works challenge the notion of societal conformity, seamlessly combining her traditional painting techniques with contemporary motifs. Troj has long been inspired by Japanese art and culture, and stories of beautiful imperfection passed down by her grandmother. Collaborations have recently made up a portion of her work, creating pieces with artists whose disciplines vary from her own. An ongoing partnership with Friendship Shoes has seen her work exhibited exclusively in their London store.

Your work brings together many different techniques and mediums, from the traditional to more postmodern elements; tell us more about your process and how you combine all of your different artistic resources? Traditional elements are very central to my body of work. I grew up in a communist country. We sang songs about machines being superior to man and praised modernity while destroying nature and killing creativity and the human spirit with it. At the same time, my summers were spent in the mountains with my grandmother who had hanging gardens, thousands of stories and no TV. These two realities are inseparable in my mind, although my true identity was very much formed by the mountains and my grandmother. She taught me how to see beauty in imperfection and that was probably the best thing anyone could

of paint between layers of varnish. I start with pencils, pastels and varnish. After that I paint a lighter layer with acrylics and finish with a couple of thicker layers using a combination of mediums, often acrylics and oils, but sometimes gold leaf and inks.

ever teach me.

Your paintings are highly detailed, and as a viewer you get the sense of a story unfolding; do you begin each piece with a pre-formed narrative? My best work has evolved through making mistakes and trying new things. I plan my work meticulously, using models, photographs, and textures scanned from my canvases, but I tend to discard elements on the go. Also, I have a photographic memory, which is on autopilot. I’ve had to learn to control that and use it for good! Details are central to everything I do. I don't

The painting technique I mostly use resembles the Flemish painting method of layering thin veneers

think I could ever paint an abstract painting. The narrative comes through in the detail, without it the painting is just background. It makes all


IVA TROJ INTERVIEW 11

Dancer Series Diptych 1, 2015, pastels, acrylics, oil, gold leaf, varnish on canvas, 91 x 60 cm


12 INTERVIEW IVA TROJ

Don't Worry I'm Coming, 2016, pastels, pencils, posca pens, varnish on fine art paper, 48 x 70 cm

the difference, as one creates conflict using subtle nuances. Without the conflict, the artwork becomes boring. Imagine a couple embracing: they are smiling and it’s beautiful. Now imagine the same couple embracing and smiling, but the woman is holding the man’s arm real tight, leaving marks that appear painful. The second image will engage you both intellectually and emotionally. That said, it is pivotal to let go of the initial plan and let the detail find itself. I took a yearlong cognitive science class once hoping to understand my subconscious mind a little better, but it didn’t happen that way, I ended up engaging in much more complex techniques and playing more. You’ve recently collaborated with a few different artists; can you tell us more about these?

A lot of people seem to think that what’s in their own heads is so important. What comes out of you isn’t the whole story. It is a collective effort really, and we can’t allow ourselves to be egocentric about it. Brian Eno talks about ‘scenius’ instead of genius, meaning that it is the intelligence of the whole rather than the genius of one ‘Great Man’. Re-examining his own perception of events in art history he realised that it wasn’t the intelligence of one single individual that created history, it was all sorts of people who created a kind of ecology of talent. And out of that ecology arose some amazing work. Collaborative work can take many forms. I started at the wrong end really, creating work in separate rooms and then combining the elements rather than truly creating together. Some of the collaborations have been quite emotional and life-changing.


IVA TROJ INTERVIEW 13

Make A Child In The Forest, 2015, pastels, acrylics, oil, varnish on canvas, 51 x 71 cm

The collaboration I did with Seiko Kato was really interesting. She did the opposite of what anyone else would do. Instead of finding a centre in the work I’ve already created, she created a myriad of smaller works using the details in my painting, dressing it all up, like she was putting costumes on everything. That made me tremendously happy. Have you found your personal working style has changed since creating the collaborations? One thing that has changed is that I have become more spontaneous. I even started doodling, something I haven’t done since I was a kid. The street art collaborations did that. People have strange ideas about street art; many don’t take it seriously, as the definition includes a lot of conflicting principles. Street art is a rare thing when it is done well. I am planning several collaborations at the moment, with artists Etienne

and Ollie Redding, aka Ten Swords, to name a few. What are you currently working on? I recently started something that has the potential of becoming a lifelong project. I am working together with the creators of the vegan footwear brand Friendship, who just opened their first store in Shoreditch, London. The store is also a gallery hosting a permanent exhibit of my work. I am midway through developing a series of paintings depicting worlds that may seem utopian to some, but are quite an accurate image of what my life is like nowadays; I live in the country, just outside of Brighton. When I look out the window I see trees, flowers and our dog running around chasing birds. ivatroj.com iva.troj@gmail.com


14 ARTIST PROFILE LINDEN ELLER

Lambs, 2016, mixed media sewn on paper, 21 x 30 cm

Linden Eller

L

inden Eller considers her collages to be ‘Field notes from the mind’. She creates artworks which delicately trigger reflections of memories through a combination of found fragments and personal elements; thoughtfully composing abstract floating shapes before sewing them together with thread on paper. The artist’s attraction to the medium of collage came from a primary interest in place and selfarchiving. Through her use of pale colour palettes together with layers of tracing paper for softness and depth, her pieces attempt to replicate the quiet hazy environment from which a memory is recalled. She blends autobiographical narratives

with larger collective subjects such as childhood, longing, and home. Since leaving Southern California where she obtained her BA in Studio Art, Eller has lived and worked in Europe, India, Australia, and currently New Zealand. She recently completed a two month residency at the Tiapapata Art Centre in Samoa where she produced a solo exhibition about island nostalgia entitled ‘Sleep/Swim’. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, both online and in print. lindeneller.com lindeneller@gmail.com


LINDEN ELLER ARTIST PROFILE 15

“Island Bedroom No.3, 2016, mixed media sewn on paper, 30 x 21 cm


16 ARTIST PROFILE SIVAN STERNBACH

Sivan Sternbach

I

nspiration is all around in sight, touch and taste for Sivan Sternbach, whose work with ceramics are a pure expression of her life and surroundings. The playful, tactile quality of the balloons - which she creates in many different shapes, sizes and colours and can be presented flat on a shelf or hung on the wall or from the ceiling as if floating - reflect the artist’s natural appetite for freedom and connection to the present moment. Rather than using casting techniques, Sternbach’s approach sees her building each piece by

Holding On, 2016, 68 x 88 cm

physically wrapping a real inflated balloon with clay. This method of creation is a meditative process for the artist, for whom the balloons have become a language of expression as she creates new shapes and ideas. Sternbach is currently creating new pieces for upcoming exhibitions in Shanghai, London and Israel. sivansternbach.com sivansternbach@gmail.com


SIVAN STERNBACH ARTIST PROFILE 17

Sue Me, 2015, 73 x 75 cm


18 ARTIST PROFILE SIVAN STERNBACH

Helium Balloon, 2016, 34 x 34 cm


SIVAN STERNBACH ARTIST PROFILE 19

Classic Balloon, 2016, 32 x 24 cm


20 ARTIST PROFILE RYOTA MATSUMOTO

Ryota Matsumoto

R

yota Matsumoto’s mixed media work sits between art, science and technology as he creates visual commentaries on morphological transformations of our ever-evolving urban and ecological milieus, visually speculating changes in cities, societies and cultures. The result is works which manifest as towers of colour branching across in seemingly eclectic configurations. To achieve this seemingly alien effect, the artist combines traditional techniques and media such as ink, acrylic and graphite with advanced digital media; algorithmic processing, 3d parametric modelling, data transcoding and image compositing with custom software and plugins are all standard aspects of his process.

Transient Field in the Air, 2014 mixed media, 57 x 85 cm

Matsumoto is a principal of an award-winning interdisciplinary design office, Ryota Matsumoto Studio based in Tokyo. He received a Master of Architecture degree from University of Pennsylvania in 2007, after his studies at the Architectural Association in London and the Mackintosh School of Architecture, Glasgow School of Art in the early 90’s. He currently serves as an advisor and adjunct faculty member of Transart Institute, University of Plymouth. His art and design work has been featured in numerous publications and exhibitions worldwide. ryotamatsumoto.com ryotamatsumotostudio@gmail.com


RYOTA MATSUMOTO ARTIST PROFILE 21

The Indistinct Notion of an Object Trajectory, 2014, mixed media, 75 x 56 cm


22 ARTIST PROFILE TOMAS URBELIONIS

The Sculpture, 2009, Silver gelatin print, 50 x 65 cm

Tomas Urbelionis

A

sense of otherworldliness runs throughout Tomas Urbelionis’ photographic works, which eschew the polished, sterile environments of a studio in favour of grimy surfaces and grainy imperfections, occultist subject matter and apocalyptic atmospheres. While some of the photographer’s compositions embrace the use of significant negative space, others appear collage-like, overcrowded with kitsch elements from the everyday; symbols of mass media, personal idols and fetishism. Traces of post-soviet brutality and imperfection are visible throughout his images, which range

from anonymous voyeuristic street shots to inside views of grubby shrine-filled dwellings. Generally favouring film, the photographer describes his images as cinematographically ‘Lynchian’; the sense of the absurd permeating the work. Alongside his photographs Urbelionis makes short films, paints and designs sculptures. His work has been exhibited in Lithuania, England and the United States. utomas.com fuzznails@gmail.com


TOMAS URBELIONIS ARTIST PROFILE 23

Great Grey Future, 2016, C-type print, 70 x 45 cm


24 ARTIST PROFILE TOMAS URBELIONIS

Funeral, 2010, Silver gelatin print, 50 x 50 cm


TOMAS URBELIONIS ARTIST PROFILE 25

Albert Einstein, 2011, Silver gelatin print, 50 x 50 cm


26 ARTIST PROFILE TOMAS URBELIONIS

Entrance, 2015, C-type print, 40 x 100 cm

Golden Power, 2015, C-type print, 45 x 70 cm


TOMAS URBELIONIS ARTIST PROFILE 27

From project "Three Gods", 2013, C-type print, 70 x 60 cm


28 ARTIST PROFILE PHILIPPE THELIN

Philippe Thelin

W

hen viewing Philippe Thelin’s work it is clear to see how painting has become a form of selfexpression for the artist. Using oils, acrylics, water-colours, pastels and charcoal, he escapes into his medium as a way of visually articulating his internal conflicts,

Portrait d'un enfant, 2014, acrylic, 60 x 73 cm

work secondary to the act of physical creation, describing his process as ‘exorcising ghosts of yesteryear’. Based in Montreux, Switzerland, Thelin started painting in the early 90s; however it wasn’t until 2012 that he started sharing his work outside of his studio. Since 2015 he has exhibited his work in many group and solo shows internationally,

avoiding the illusions of outside life and the evolution of society.

including exhibitions in Milan, Paris and New York.

Thelin’s painting techniques mirror his lyrical visual style. There is an essence of violence seen through his thick strokes and frenetic scratches; created from a combination of brush, knife and finger painting. He considers the subject of his

philippethelin.ch pthelin@bluewin.ch


PHILIPPE THELIN ARTIST PROFILE 29

Autoportrait aux pansements, 2002, acrylic, 81 x 65 cm


30 ARTIST PROFILE PHILIPPE THELIN

Portrait à l'oeil crevé, 2016, acrylic, 80 x 100 cm


PHILIPPE THELIN ARTIST PROFILE 31

Judas au bas de la Croix, 2000, acrylic, 116 x 89 cm


32 INTERVIEW KUNIKO MAEDA

Kuniko Maeda

K

uniko Maeda studied traditional Japanese craft wood caving in Kyoto, Japan before gaining her BA and MA in textile design at the Chelsea College of Arts, London. Her works, which take the form of undefined, twisting shapes in space, question ideas of consumption and the value we place on everyday commodities, using a combination of classical techniques and modern technologies such as laser cutting, which played a significant part in her project ‘The Landscape of Paper’.

You utilise many different new technologies to create your artworks, how much of your process is given to experimentation? I always carry out lots of experimentations at each process of making, and enjoy them. After getting a concept and ideas, I normally start with material and technical research. In the ‘Landscape of Paper’ project, I created long lasting paper by applying traditional Japanese natural lacquer on recycled waste paper. I needed to experiment for some time, as this was an innovative approach. I combined varied skills, technology and invented a method of upcycling paper. In addition, I spent many hours on laser cutting to achieve the desired outcome. One of the most difficult aspects was to create digital files for laser cutting while maintaining the strength of paper alongside the delicacy.

Having studied traditional woodcarving techniques, why did you decide to start using modern technology in your work? When I was studying traditional wood carving, I found that Japanese craftsmen tend to be too conservative to protect their skills and avoid an introduction of new technology into a traditional arena. The dominant ideal being that handcraft is more precious than machine making. Therefore, I have questioned this attitude and started to investigate the relationship between handcraft and digital tools through contemporary art and design. Applying the new technology does not mean to replace the traditional skills. I believe the merge of new technology and traditional skill contributes towards art practice providing a wider choice of tools, materials and processes, which facilitate artists to realise unconventional


KUNIKO MAEDA INTERVIEW 33

Blackbird, 2016, recycled paper, natural lacquer(kakishibu), laser cutting 15 x 30 x 15 cm


34 INTERVIEW KUNIKO MAEDA

Rock dove, 2016, recycled paper, natural lacquer (kakishibu), laser cutting, 40 x 30 x 5 cm

ideas, concepts and creation. At the same time,

paper is the simplest form but has so many facets

it might provide extremely new working methods, which leads us to create a new value of materials. I am convinced the fusion of traditional skills and modern technology would make a huge difference with our perception of material value and sustainable approaches. This is the major reason why I combined the traditional technique and new technology in my practice.

to be applied, we tend to regard it as very invaluable and short life materials because of commodity and recyclability. Therefore, I wanted viewers to develop emotional attachment to the artwork to change their mind. I expected the artwork would give the audience perceptual illusion by contrasting opposite things - Beauty and filth, high and low quality, precious and wasteful artefacts. I believe those things expose themselves as utterly different objects against what the audience would conceive and associate. I assumed it would be very effective to let the observers reconsider our life, possession, value and consumption.

Despite being made of conventional media such as paper, there is a visual otherworldliness to your works; is it your intention to remove the viewer away from the original function of your materials? Yes, I tried to find a new possibility of paper and add more value on it by upcycling the material and removing the original function. I started this project to reconsider the actual value of paper and review our overconsumption. While the

To what extent do you plan the finished visual outcome to your work when beginning a new piece? Basically I don’t clearly plan the finished visual


KUNIKO MAEDA INTERVIEW 35

Waterfowl, 2016, recycled paper, natural lacquer (kakishibu), laser cutting, 45 x 30 x 30 cm

outcome when beginning a new work. While

enjoyable and yet important part of my process

all my works are based on my drawings, the final outcomes are always decided after the experimentation. I often start with some material research that I am interested in and play with the materials to develop my ideas. I explore each character of the materials and associate them with natural and organic forms which I am always fascinated by. For example, in this project, I was inspired by bird wings since the lightness, flexibility and delicacy of paper project an image of the fluidity and elegant movement of birds. I observed bird wings and did some drawings of them. I picked up some elements from my drawings and developed rough ideas for sampling. I tried to visualise small details, texture and shape from my sketches into 3D shapes. However, I often get new ideas and methods and find unpredicted outcomes through the experimentations. And this is the most

of creation. What are you currently working on? I am still carrying on this project to develop further more. Since I am interested in material lifecycles, I will keep experimenting with different mediums, focusing on sustainable ways of thinking. In addition, I would like to seek a way of combining traditional techniques and 3D printing technology as it seems to have so many possibilities to be explored. I believe digital creation could be developed in more positive and innovative ways and provide a new value of artworks. kuniko-maeda.com studiokunikomaeda@gmail.com


36 ARTIST PROFILE HYUN KIM

Hyun Kim

T

he work of South Korean artist Hyun Kim reflects strongly on his home country, using collage, video and performance to convey his experiences of life, death, faith and power.

The artist’s recent work focuses a gaze on his views of the anti-communism ideology internally engraved in individuals by the South Korean government. Through the use of archival documentary images, collage and decoupage, he aims to question how the power of the state functions within each individual. The <Untitled> series approaches the topic from two perspectives; the individual as the receiver of oppression, and also the individual as the agent of the oppression. The first uses redacted images and layers of red papers underneath the removed sections, representing the artist’s perceptions of the state’s misuse of power which has eradicated diversity into ‘one ideological colour’.

The second perspective uses black paper to powerful effect, symbolising the anonymity of the power of state by cutting the individual or background within the image, and replacing them with empty black space. For Kim the black paper contains the fear constantly experienced by those who are under oppression, encompassing the despair and sense of futility of the others who are ostracized by the physical violence the power of state unleashes upon them. Having completed his BFA at Seoul National University, Kim has relocated to the UK to attend the Royal College of Art, where he is currently undertaking an MA in sculpture. hyunkim.net kimh860822@gmail.com


HYUN KIM ARTIST PROFILE 37

Untitled No.1, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 29 x 21 cm


38 ARTIST PROFILE HYUN KIM

Untitled No.2, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 21 x 29 cm

Untitled No.3, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 21 x 29 cm


HYUN KIM ARTIST PROFILE 39

Untitled No.4, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 21 x 29 cm

Untitled No.5, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 21 x 29 cm


40 ARTIST PROFILE HYUN KIM

Untitled No.2, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 14 x 25 cm

Untitled No.5, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 14 x 25 cm


HYUN KIM ARTIST PROFILE 41

Untitled No.1, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 20 x 24.5 cm


42 ARTIST PROFILE HYUN KIM

Untitled No.3, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 29 x 21 cm


HYUN KIM ARTIST PROFILE 43

Untitled No.2, 2016, photo decoupage and collage, 20 x 24.5 cm


44 ARTIST PROFILE MARTA UTSLER

Blue Painting, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 50 x 76 cm

Marta Utsler

M

arta Utsler works with acrylic on canvas to create abstract impasto works, incorporating thick lines, mark making, drips and splashes to

dramatic effect.

The artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s method of layering different shades of paint gives a real sense of light and shade to her work, and allows for a range of expressive techniques to be applied; scratching emotive lines in the surface, applying extra paint to create both rough and smooth textures, and even adding jagged, broken script directly across the canvas.

Born in England, Utsler grew up in the United States before returning to the UK in 2010, where she has since lived in London and Cornwall before settling on the Scottish Borders where she currently lives and works. Since her first solo show in 2001 she has exhibited regularly in both the US and UK, and maintains an open studio, allowing visitors to view her work and talk about art. martautsler.com martautsler@gmail.com


MARTA UTSLER ARTIST PROFILE 45

Black and White with Red, 2016, acrylic on panel, 61 x 41 cm


46 ARTIST PROFILE MARTA UTSLER

Dark Corner, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 81 x 81 cm


MARTA UTSLER ARTIST PROFILE 47

Time (No Answers), 2007, acrylic on canvas, 96 x 96 cm


48 ARTIST PROFILE MIROSLAV TRUBAČ

The Little Prince, 2016, sculpture, 37 x 53 x 7 cm

Miroslav Trubac

S

culptural representations of domesticity make up the main body of Miroslav Trubač’s work, albeit with an extra dose of parody, irony and the occasional touch of sarcastic humour. Drawing on his own memories and shared experiences, he considers the collective past and present, creating narratives from situations that he finds strange and unsolvable. At the conceptual stage of his work, Trubač utilises many sculptural technologies such as computer modelling, 3D visualisations set in the

virtual space and a 3D scanner. The finished pieces are sculpted in plaster before being painted with simple, representational tones. Trubač graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava in 2011, and has since had work featured in many exhibitions including an extensive solo show at Jan Koniarek Gallery in Slovakia. works.io/miroslav-trubac miro.trubac@gmail.com


MIROSLAV TRUBAÄ&#x152; ARTIST PROFILE 49

Marry Go Round, 2015, sculpture, 50 x 70 x 50 cm


50 ARTIST PROFILE HALINA DOMANSKI

Lupin Fields, 2016, mixed media, 76 x 102 cm

Halina Domanski

A

fascination with the different qualities of materials is at the heart of Halina Domanskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, whose abstract expressionistic paintings are bold explorations of texture.

When viewing Domanskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings it is clear to see her inspirations, which are found in the lines and patterns of sliced wood, and in the deep cascades and ripples of waves. Working primarily with acrylic, the paint is applied in thick layers with loose brush strokes, building depth and texture from the base of the smooth canvas.

Alongside her paintings the artist also creates vibrant collage works, again using layering techniques. Domanski is a member of the National Collage Society, and has exhibited regularly in the United States since moving from her native Poland in the early 80s. Throughout her artistic career she has had 101juried competitions, and gained over 50 awards and accolades. halinadomanski.com halina@halinadomanski.com


HALINA DOMANSKI ARTIST PROFILE 51

Spread the Love, 2016, mixed media, 76 x 61 cm


52 ARTIST PROFILE HALINA DOMANSKI

The Center of Love, 2016, mixed media, 152 x 122 cm


HALINA DOMANSKI ARTIST PROFILE 53

Yellow River, 2016, mixed media, 61 x 61 cm


54 ARTIST PROFILE VICTORIA ATKINSON

Shadow Talk, 2016, bronze resin, 51 x 49 cm

Gabriel, 2016, bronze, 25 x 9 cm

Victoria Atkinson

S

culptor Victoria Atkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works are born from everyday observations of human nature, along with a fascination for Greek Mythology. Working primarily with stoneware clay she creates abstracted figurative sculptures and light-hearted depictions of mythical beasts. Although the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sculptures may appear minimal in their conception, there is finesse to her work which comes from a complete affinity with her medium. Every mark, every shape and every fingerprint in the clay is made with purpose, and a resonance of serenity, poise and expression exude from the sculptures.

Alongside her ceramic work Atkinson has also completed a number of bronze and terracotta commissioned pieces for public and private display. Her work has been exhibited both in the UK and overseas, including with the Royal Society of British Artists and the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. victoriaatkinson.co.uk atkinsonvicki@aol.com


VICTORIA ATKINSON ARTIST PROFILE 55

Julian & George, 2016, stoneware clay, 29 x 16 & 22 x 12 cm


56 INTERVIEW ALEX VOINEA

Alex Voinea

A

lex Voinea is a Romanian artist, currently based in Barcelona where he works and exhibits. His paintings are slick, vibrant abstract expressions of saturated and fluorescent colour full of movement and fluidity. Through experiments with paint poured over vibrating surfaces such as speakers at full volume, the artist creates streams of colour in space, freezing drips and motion in an instant of time. He has shown his work in various European cities; most recently in Paris, at the Accessible Art Fair in Brussels, and The Other Art Fair in London. Although creating abstract pieces, you describe your work as ‘almost hyper-realist’; can you explain a bit more about this? I say hyper-realist because I give a lot of attention to detail. Every drop, every splatter, every brushstroke, I try to do perfectly with well-defined and differentiated colours, creating a work that engages the viewer. They don’t see everything in just 5 seconds. In fact, the longer they look, the more they see. Although it sounds contradictory, friends, other artists and collectors are always telling me this, that they see this hyper-realism in

right moment or in the right situation. Perhaps I am creating a certain life in my work and I don’t even realise it!

the abstraction. They see everything; galaxies, figures, animals and it always surprises me. I believe this is the essence of art, that everyone interprets the works from their own perspective and finds a way to appreciate the work. “Controlled accidents” are an important part of my work. They say life itself came to be by accident; that accidents happen sometimes at the

obsessed with trying to create ‘accidents’ with a certain amount of control over how to create them. It was at this moment that I became interested in vibrations and the effects they create when liquid colour is poured over them or the splattering of colour that is caused when adding tint to a can of white paint from a certain height. I have always been very interested in the physics

How did you develop your process using vibrating surfaces? How does this affect the final piece compared to painting flat? When I first began working on the ‘Shock Value’ series, while preparing the materials, trying to get the viscosity and fluidity of the materials just right, I discovered that some unintentional splashes of paint created incredible effects. I became


ALEX VOINEA INTERVIEW 57

av_339, 2016, acrylic on linen, 92 x 65 cm


58 INTERVIEW ALEX VOINEA

av_312, 2016, acrylic on linen, 100 x 162 cm

of materials and how they respond to vibrations applied to them. Actually, everything around us is vibrating although we are not always aware of it. There is a cosmic vibration that moves everything. These effects captivated me and I wanted to go further. With these ideas spinning in my head, I started to play and got satisfaction out of imagining and trying to recreate these dances and big bangs of colour created by vibration. I decided to try to obtain these effects in my paintings using movements and vibrations made by my own hands rather than a mechanical source of vibration such as speakers. In the end, I am trying to capture and freeze in a moment in time an imaginary explosion of colour, where certain real effects are created intentionally, capturing movement and representing it on the canvas. I want to give the work a certain depth and 3D effect, characteristics that normally, with a few exceptions, are not typical of abstract painting. In most cases, there are only splatters or

textures of colour which are not well defined and the majority of abstract works are flat. I wanted to go further and bring something more. Your paintings have an almost digital quality visually, like a glitch on a computer monitor; has technology played a part in your work as an artist in any way? No doubt that I have been influenced by technology. In fact, I think current technology has greatly influenced all artists and works made in the last few years. I am inspired a lot by the internet, effects and experiments that are produced with pixels on a screen. The saturated colours of certain cartoons are also an inspiration. I have hundreds of images and screen captures of digital errors, including those of televisions when the signal fails. The image quality of mobile devices and television screens nowadays gives us incredible colour and surely transmits a subtle message to artists. Nowadays


ALEX VOINEA INTERVIEW 59

av_340, 2016, acrylic on linen, 92 x 65 cm

we are surrounded by colour, particularly saturated colours like those I use in my paintings. The challenge and difficulty is later to translate all of this information and ideas to the canvas. While my work in the end is contemporary, I use traditional manual means of applying the materials to the canvas. Colour plays a big part in your work; do your plan your colour palettes for each piece or is it more of an instinctive decision during painting? Yes, I plan out my colour palette ahead of time, beginning with the background colours and followed by the colours I will use after. I place a lot of importance not only on the colour, but on the backgrounds; creating textures with thick brushstrokes as a base which complement the final work. Instinct and impulse come after. I always know how I am going to start a painting, but I never know how I will finish. My technique obligates me to make decisions throughout the

av_313, 2016, acrylic on linen, 73 x 54 cm

process; there is a constant dialogue with the work. Some of these decisions are risky, as every action is important in my work; I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go back or get rid of something once itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there. Many times, just as I am finishing a piece, the last brushstroke or splatter of colour can ruin everything. What are you currently working on? Do you have any upcoming exhibitions? I just returned last month from Brussels and London where I participated in two art fairs. Right now, I am working on a couple of commissions that resulted from my participation and I am talking with some galleries in London, Hong Kong and New York about possible future collaborations. I am moving more and more at an international level and am open to new projects. alexvoinea.com alexvoineadeco@yahoo.es


60 ARTIST PROFILE ALAN SBAFFI

DEN.8-016, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm

DEN.7-016, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm

Alan Sbaffi

B

ased in Ancona, Italy, Alan Sbaffi is a self-taught artist, painting large scale canvases with expressive marks in shades of black and grey against expansive areas of white. This blank space acts as a frame for his abstract gestures, forcing the viewer to examine the smallest of brushstrokes so that the most subtle of lines becomes as prominent as a crack in a windscreen.

any Freudian assumptions or psychological reasoningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behind this.

The abstract representation of the female nude is a constant theme throughout Sbaffiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, and the one recurring motif seen in most of his paintings; although the artist is quick to dismiss

alansbaffi.com alansbaffi@gmail.com

Sbaffi is elusive when it comes to describing his process, but although he admits to not having a routinely practiced method to his painting, the spontaneity of his technique sees him finishing each painting completely physically exhausted. Acrylic varnishes, wall paints, pens, pencils and markers are all common materials in his work.


ALAN SBAFFI ARTIST PROFILE 61

DEN.6-016, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm


62 ARTIST PROFILE ALAN SBAFFI

DEN.12-016, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm


ALAN SBAFFI ARTIST PROFILE 63

DEN.13-016, 2016, acrylic on canvas, 120 x 100 cm


64 ARTIST PROFILE STEFANIE SCHMID RINCON

Gold import Berlin, 2013, 35mm film

Stefanie Schmid Rincon

P

hotographer Stefanie Schmid Rincon captures snapshots of ethereal magic in everyday moments. Her images consider ideas of identity, nationality and sense of place; shooting in analogue on the streets of New York, Barcelona and her current home, Berlin. Three months spent in New York provided inspiration for the series ‘White, Blue and Wild Red Glory’, which was shot on 35mm colour film. Part documentary, part road-trip journal, the series is a look at America’s extreme display of patriotism, from the perspective of an outsider. It is interesting to view these images in contrast to

the black and white of the photographer’s ‘Home Sweet Home’ series, which casts a gaze on Berlin's neighbourhood Neukölln, and the places, people and situations that show us another side of Germany. Schmid Rincon has been shortlisted in several important International Awards. Her work has been exhibited successfully in the UK, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Germany and the US. stefanieschmidrincon.com stefsphoto@gmail.com


STEFANIE SCHMID RINCON ARTIST PROFILE 65

Toystories, 2016, digital


66 ARTIST PROFILE WARREN S. HEATON

Rising Mists, Penberry, 2016, 91 x 119 cm

Warren S. Heaton

T

he love of his surroundings in Pembrokeshire have instilled Warren S Heaton with a need to recreate the beautiful coastal landscapes on canvas, often working en plein air, sketching in oil to create visceral drawings in situ. There is a purity to Heaton’s painting style; by simplifying his process and limiting his palette he finds himself absorbed in the moment of creation. Immersed in his outdoor locations, painting first hand, he reacts intuitively to add an unbidden grandeur to the most ordinary scenes, evoking the drama of light and shade. This is seen in the

artist’s series of twelve paintings ‘Whatever the Weather’, which were completed entirely on site over six days as he travelled the Pembrokeshire coast. Heaton has shown work in New York as well as Galleries across the UK, and has an upcoming exhibition entitled ‘Winter in St.Brides’ in early 2017 at the Druidstone Hotel, St.Brides Bay. warrenheaton.co.uk warrenheatonart@gmail.com


WARREN S. HEATON ARTIST PROFILE 67

Ebbtide, Aber Felin, 2016, medium, 101 x 101 cm


68 ARTIST PROFILE DAVID VANORBEEK

David Vanorbeek

A

true affinity to the metal with which he creates his dynamic sculptures is at the heart of David Vanorbeek’s work. Based in South-West France, Vanorbeek is a selftaught artist and has been creating sculptures professionally since the late 90s. Insects were originally the main focus of his work, acting as his muse as he recreated the beauty found in the tiny and delicate yet powerful creatures; mirroring his fascination with the small intricate details of metal. Although still inspired by the natural world, the sculptor’s more recent works are monumental and abstract in style, taking the form of giant geometric structures, origami-esque silhouettes

Mégalo X, 2013, welded recycled metal 350 x 350 x 350 cm

and inventive combinations of shape and texture, letting the metal speak for itself as he cuts, welds and constructs the pieces. Recycling is a key theme tying together all of Vanorbeek’s works, and the sourcing of discarded and abandoned metal is all part of his process. He states that the great joy in his work comes from being able to turn something considered worthless into the artwork it becomes. Vanorbeek has shown his work across Europe, and has many pieces on display in several public spaces. Recent shows include Biennale Ile d'Orléon, France in 2016, and Andorra Land Art Biennale in 2015. vanorbeek.com davidvanorbeek@gmail.com


DAVID VANORBEEK ARTIST PROFILE 69

Le Cercle Carré, 2010, welded recycled metal, 280 x 280 x 100 cm


70 ARTIST PROFILE DAVID VANORBEEK

Before Time changed us, 2012, welded recycled metal, 105 x 105 x 25 cm Radar Grey, 2011, welded recycled metal, 90 X 90 X 10 cm

3 cubes, 2009, welded recycled metal, 36 x 36 x 36 cm


DAVID VANORBEEK ARTIST PROFILE 71

Bee, 2015, welded recycled metal, 120x 85 x 65 cm

Ant, 2015, welded recycled metal, 45 x 25 x 20 cm


72 ARTIST PROFILE DAVID VANORBEEK

MetalloTextile, 2010, collaboration with Natalie Magnin, welded recycled metal and wool, 23 x 19 x 5 cm

Metal Wings, 2008, welded recycled metal, 120 x 55 x 55 cm


DAVID VANORBEEK ARTIST PROFILE 73

Serge, les yeux sur l'Horizon, 2014, welded recycled metal, 320 x 120 x 120 cm Le Cercle Carré @ artist residence Chateau de Lagravade, park de Sculptures, France


74 ARTIST PROFILE DAVID VANORBEEK

Wallhanging, 2011, welded recycled metal, 30 x 30 x 5 cm


DAVID VANORBEEK ARTIST PROFILE 75

In the Forest, 2009, welded recycled metal, 320 x 150 x 30 cm


76 ARTIST PROFILE ASTA CAPLAN

From a Dream Collector's Catalogue VI, 2016, 40 x 60 cm

Asta Caplan

W

orking across many diverse disciplines from drawing and painting to photography and model making, Asta Caplan ponders the human need for beauty with works that focus on small moments in time; fleeting scenes that feel intimate and personal. The artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works in oil and watercolour specifically give this sense, using the canvas to frame and immortalise objects such as decorative tea sets and delicate flowers. When observing the paintings together, Caplan intends the viewer to take a mental journey into both the future

and past, considering the subject matter not as descriptive but as inspirational in its expression in paint. Caplan has exhibited regularly with solo shows in her native Finland, and as part of group exhibitions across the world from Italy and the USA to Japan. astacaplan.com asta@astacaplan.com


ASTA CAPLAN ARTIST PROFILE 77

When the Flowers Dream IX, 2015, 140 x 100 cm


78 ARTIST PROFILE TADAO CERN

Tadao Cern

A

decision to change from a career in architecture to photography in 2010 paved the way for Tadao Cern’s path as an artist. He began with an extreme series of wind-swept portraits, a new interpretation of Van Gogh's self-portrait and ‘Comfort Zone’, a documentary photo project of beach sunbathers,

Black Balloons, 2016, black mylar cotton helium carbon dioxide, 720 x 720 x 720 cm

his immersive ‘Black Balloons’ projects, which feature both large and small scale installations of slick black helium filled balloons, suspended in space. The temporal quality of the artworks gives each piece a living, breathing lifespan. They are playful works to behold, inciting a unique childlike sense of discovery for the viewer. Cern lives and works in Vilnius, Lithuania and

each of which gained considerable attention for the photographer.

continues to exhibit both photographic and installation works globally.

The viral success of these projects led to exhibitions across the world, and saw the artist creating advert campaigns for many high end brands. Recently however Cern has moved to a more conceptual form of artistic expression with

tadaocern.com info@tadaocern.com


TADAO CERN ARTIST PROFILE 79

Black Balloons, 2016, black mylar cotton helium carbon dioxide, 400 x 400 x 400 cm

Black Balloons, 2016, black latex rubber cotton metal helium carbon dioxide, 360 x 200 x 25 cm


80 ARTIST PROFILE RICHARD MARSH

Richard Marsh

I

llustrator and watercolour artist Richard Marsh finds inspiration in the vibrancy of Brighton and Hove where he lives and works. The seaside city has become a main protagonist of his work, as he seeks out unique perspectives of his surroundings and translates them in paint. Having trained as a landscape architect and worked for major architectural practices in London and Stuttgart, an increase in private commissions encouraged the artist to move to freelance work; a change which has allowed for more personal painting work. His impressionistic watercolour landscapes focus on the beauty of English towns and countryside, often with dramatic colour-filled skies; the richly infused hues

New York Snow, 2015, watercolour, 30 x 38 cm

of red and purple heightening his perceptions of piers and pavilions. His work shows a sincere connection and understanding to his subject matter; whether he is painting the architectural lines of a London landmark or perfectly capturing the personality of animals; pets being another recurring theme in his work. Richard Marsh is a resident artist at Bailey Alexander Gallery in Brighton, and his paintings can be found in many collections both in the UK and overseas in the USA and Europe. baileyalexander.co.uk enquiries@baileyalexander.co.uk


RICHARD MARSH ARTIST PROFILE 81

Adelaide Crescent, Hove, 2016, watercolour, 38 x 30 cm


82 ARTIST PROFILE RICHARD MARSH

Brighton Bandstand Gold, 2016, watercolour, 46 x 69 cm

Nightfall Over London, 2016, watercolour, 30 x 38 cm


RICHARD MARSH ARTIST PROFILE 83

West Pier Stormy Skies, 2016, watercolour, 45 x 67 cm

Impressions of Arundel Castle, 2015, watercolour, 30 x 38 cm


84 ARTIST SHOWCASE JASON CLARKE

Jason Clarke

B

irmingham based artist Jason Clarke uses his art as therapy to combat his Bipolar disorder. Using black ink, he creates intricate graphic monochrome drawings filled with personal visions representing his innermost thoughts and feelings. Clarkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s method is to continue drawing until his head is clear, resulting in large-scale works

Mobile, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm

where lines and shapes fill the page. Although his pieces may at first appear chaotic, there is a definite sense of a precise, organisational element to the drawings, mirroring the therapeutic nature of the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice. jasonclarke-bipolarart.com bipolar.art@gmail.com


JASON CLARKE ARTIST SHOWCASE 85

Project, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm

Burgler Bill, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm


86 ARTIST SHOWCASE JASON CLARKE

Brick By Brick, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm

Jazz Hands, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm


JASON CLARKE ARTIST SHOWCASE 87

Teardrops, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm

Lay Me Down To Rest, 2016, Gel Pen, 45 x 64 cm


88 ARTIST SHOWCASE BARRIE DALE

Barrie Dale

T

hrough his lens, Barrie Dale meticulously follows the changing of seasons, and how light transforms the features of the flora that surrounds him. His extreme close-up photography captures the almost-unseen, changing the way we look at the delicate leaves and flowers in front of us as new shapes and possibilities appear from everyday moments in nature. The photographer favours the use of natural light, and slow shutter speeds are

A Taste of Lemon, 2014, digital photography, 24 x 36 cm

key to his technique. He is particularly drawn to indications of tension, imbalance and movement, often observing similarities between plants and dancers. wildhaven.co.uk barrie@wildhaven.co.uk


BARRIE DALE ARTIST SHOWCASE 89

Greeting the Sun, 2015, digital photography, 36 x 24 cm


90 ARTIST SHOWCASE BARRIE DALE

First Steps, YEAR, digital photography, 24 x 36 cm

Through the Mask, 2016, digital photography, 24 x 36 cm


BARRIE DALE ARTIST SHOWCASE 91

Emergent, 2016, digital photography, 36 x 24 cm


92 ARTIST SHOWCASE FRANCO DI CESARE

Franco Di Cesare

F

ranco Di Cesare is an Italian artist currently based in London. He creates work which acts as an open dialogue; a platform for an everlasting conversation within the Constructivist concepts of space, colour and forms. His mixed media geometric abstract paintings and wall sculpture

L.D.I. F 24-16, 2016, acrylic, oil and sand on canvas, 102 x 102 cm

compositions are painted in series, with the aim of creating an overall conceptual, plastic and dynamic connection through each new set of works. francodicesare.com franco@francodicesare.com


FRANCO DI CESARE ARTIST SHOWCASE 93

C.B. 3o-216, 2016, steel plate, acrylic and plaster, 148 x 35 x 7 cm


94 ARTIST EXHIBITIONS

Upcoming artist exhibitions Asta Caplan Northern Light - Group exhibition , Málaga until 1 December 2016 From a Dream Collector’s Catalogue - Solo exhibition, Antibes 16 February - 16 March 2017

Iva Troj Studio 45, Brighton 24 November - 12 December 2016 Small Classics, Studio 45, Brighton 13 January - 17 February 2017

Miroslav Trubac Window Gallery, Trnava Disturbia 19 December 2016 - 8 January 2017

Victoria Atkinson Artichoke Gallery, East Sussex Until 24 March 2017

Warren Heaton The Druidston Hotel, Pembrokeshire Winter in St Brides 4th January - 31 March 2017


Subscribe to the printed magazine for just ÂŁ12.99 + postage Subscribe online at insideartists.co.uk InsideArtists

InsideArtists


Inside Artists | Issue 7  

Embracing a balance between the old and new has led to many of the artists in this issue pushing the boundaries of contemporary art both vis...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you