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Independent News | November 7, 2013 | Volume 14 | Number 42 | inweekly.net

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GIVING UP THE GHOSTS

photo by Molly Rockwell

publisher Rick Outzen

art director Samantha Crooke

editor & creative director Joani Delezen

staff writers Jessica Forbes, Sarah McCartan

contributing writers Ed Banacia, Jesse Farthing, Whitney Fike, Hana Frenette, Jason Leger, Chuck Shepherd, Paul F. South, Lilia Del Bosque Oakey Whitehouse

copy editor Ashley McLain contact us 438.8115

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winners & losers

HAVE YOU BEEN STALKED? You can help other victims by talking about your experience.

Pat Young

winners PAT YOUNG The president of The Arc

Gateway has been sworn in as president of The Arc of Florida. Pat's focus will be to bring state attention to the needs of those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, especially in the Panhandle where budget cuts have been felt more deeply. She will lobby for increasing state funding for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the misuse of restraints and seclusion rooms.

DAISY ROBINSON The Escambia County school bus driver has been hailed as a hero for rescuing a 3-year-old whom she spotted wandering across railroad tracks on East Kingsfield Road and State Road 95 in the Gonzalez area. Robinson, who was taking a bus of students to Ransom Middle School, stopped the bus and took the child to a nearby Circle K and called the Escambia County Sheriff’s Office. HALLOWEEN AT THE Y Every year, the YMCA brings together businesses, community groups, and volunteers of all ages to host a unique trick or treat event for special needs kids at the Crowne Plaza Hotel. Last week, more than 300 of these special kids dressed up, enjoyed costumes and treats, and danced to crowd favorites—proving that those with different abilities are much more like their typical peers than they are different.

losers ESCAMBIA COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER Two more unwanted deaths

occurred last month at the county facility. In one incident, the euthanasia occurred when a dog owner changed her mind the same day she turned custody of her aggressive pit bull over to the shelter. However, when she called the shelter, the dog had already been put down. The following day, another dog was killed after the shelter employees were unable to contact the pet owner via phone.

ESCAMBIA COUNTY WATERS A sec-

ond case of the flesh-eating bacteria Vibrio vulnificus has been confirmed in Escambia County, bringing the total number of cases reported in Florida to 37. This bacterium normally lives in warm, brackish seawater. People with open wounds can be exposed through direct contact with seawater and can cause disease in those who eat raw shellfish. Brevard and Hillsborough are the only counties with more cases, four each.

Lakeview Center’s Rape Crisis/Trauma Recovery Program is seeking information that can be used to improve services for victims of stalking. They are inviting anyone who has experienced it to participate in listening groups or individual interviews. The CDC estimates that 1 in 6 women and 1 in 19 men have been stalked in their lifetime. Because stalking is associated with other forms of violence, it is essential that we develop strategies and resources to help victims and keep them safe. Whether you are young or old, male or female, LBGT or straight, if you have been stalked, your input can help others. If you want to learn more or if you are willing to participate in a listening group or interview, call 850.469.3800. This message was supported by funding from the Florida Preventive Health and Health Services Block grant provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through Florida Department of Health (DOH). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the US Department of Health and Human Services, the CDC, or DOH.

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PRETERM BIRTHS Florida again earned

a “D” on the 2013 March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card. The state’s preterm birth rate peaked 2005 through 2008 at 13.8 percent of all live births. The 2012 preliminary preterm birth rate jumped to 13.7 percent. Escambia County’s preterm birth rate for 2010-2012 was a whopping 16.6 percent, the fourth highest in Florida.

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outtakes

by Rick Outzen

EMERALD EMPIRE The Emerald Coast Utility Authority is the most secretive local government agency in Northwest Florida. Unlike the Pensacola City Council, Escambia County School Board and Escambia County Commission, its meetings aren’t televised. The Pensacola City Council sends out a link to its meeting agendas. ECUA does not. The county commission and city council meet at night so the public can easily attend. The elected ECUA board meets at 2 p.m. in a hard-to-find room at Ellyson Industrial Park. ECUA’s original name was Escambia County Utility Authority. It changed its name over a decade ago because it had dreams of being a regional utility that expanded outside of the county. That was derailed when the utility tried selling to Gulf Breeze brown water in the 2000s. The city bought a filter and then sued ECUA to be reimbursed for the cost. Eventually Gulf Breeze led the effort to create its own regional water supply for all the water utilities in south Santa Rosa County. And that is pretty much how it has been with ECUA over the years. Those outside the agency have been the ones who have shed light on the myriad of problems at the utility. Last decade, attorney Mike Papantonio revealed ECUA may have used contami-

nated wells to supply drinking water to its customers, which led to a $70-million settlement with ConocoPhillips. When the utility relocated and demolished its Main Street Sewage Treatment plant, they bragged about finishing the largest public works project in the county’s history on time and under budget. Then the federal government released its audit of the $149.2 million grant it gave ECUA for the project. We learned ECUA only spent $1.09 million of the grant with minority-owned contractors and only $4.9 million with women-owned businesses—far below the grant requirements. Since June 2012, the utility has been operating under a DEP consent. The state wants the ECUA to address issues with its infrastructure. We are now getting nearly weekly announcements of sewage leaks throughout the system. What has all this secrecy gotten us? Some very well-paid employees. The executive director, Stephen Sorrell, is the highest paid local government employee in the entire county—$181,916. He is paid more than any elected official in the county. In total, the utility has 15 employees making more than $90,000 a year. There is a move to consolidate the “Emerald Empire” into the Escambia County government. It’s a discussion worth having. {in} rick@inweekly.net

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A BICYCLE BUILT FOR GOOD also affecting where individuals are trafficked. “As a society we have that responsibility, if we’re evolving, to say ‘This is wrong.’” And that is exactly what Shelby—who first became aware of human trafficking in 2008—is hoping to promote through his ride. “I was doing photography and videography for an organization called ‘Life Without Limbs.’ We were working with another organization that frees and rehabilitates women and children from the Red Light district in Mumbai,” Shelby stated of his first exposure to the world of trafficking. “Seeing how you can take a broken life and help them—that gave me hope,” said the California native, who began brainstorming what he could do to draw attention to the issue stateside. “If you’re faced with it and you don’t do something about it then you’re wasting an opportunity to help other people. And that’s what happened to me in India,” Shelby continued. “I saw it and could not not do anything. I had to do something.” And so in 2011, Shelby, who said he had never been much of a hiker previously, hiked 2,000 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail to raise money and awareness for Bombay Teen Challenge, the organization he worked with in India. “I thought, ‘What’s next?’ and I then thought, ‘Cross-country bike ride.’ I’m not a hiker, so I hiked; I’m not a bicyclist, so I thought I’d bicycle.” After two years of planning, Shelby set off from California this past September, riding between 80 to 120 miles a day and camping along the way to minimize costs. “I wanted to be able to talk to people,” Shelby stated of his motivation to cycle as a means of spreading the word about the issue of trafficking. “When you talk with somebody it’s different than reading it,” said Shelby. “This bike is a conversation starter. I don’t do anything; I ride up and people walk over.” Aside from accomplishing the feat of riding from coast to coast, Shelby is the first person to do so on a wooden bike. “I know you have to make it different for people to notice,” said Shelby of his motivation to locate a unique vehicle. Searching online, Shelby found Klaus Volkmann of ArtBikeBamboo in Brazil who built, donated, and shipped the bamboo bicycle to Shelby. Upon returning to California, Shelby said he will send the record-setting bike back to Volkmann so he can display it in his shop. Shelby will split all funds raised during his ride among Bombay Teen Challenge and two other non-profits: his own organization, the Oasis Projeckt, and The WellHouse in Birmingham, Ala.

In addition to planning his bike trip and working his regular job as a taxi driver in Paso Robles, Calif., Shelby founded Projekt Oasis after his PCT hike and inspiring at least one person to undergo a similar venture. “Essentially, all my non-profit does is enable people to do things like this. I get them gear, support and they raise money,” said Shelby, who, while hiking the PCT, met Gen Shimizu. Shimizu was so inspired by Shelby that he later unicycled over 2,000 miles on the Great Divide Bike Trail and raised $10,000 for human trafficking while doing so. The WellHouse works to rescue women from sexual exploitation and human trafficking, and Shelby plans to visit them on his drive back to California. “I found them as I was searching for people to donate to and be involved with,” said Shelby, “It was so obvious it was exactly one of the organizations I’d love to support. It’s just an honor to ride for those women.” Though due to time restrictions Shelby had to alter his original goal of cycling north to New York from Florida, he feels every mile has been worth the effort. “Sometimes as you’re riding and things get really tough, certain things come to mind that really motivate you and that’s one of them: the people that you’re riding for. It makes everything a lot easier,” Shelby reflected. While in Pensacola, Shelby visited with John Fifer, a fellow hiker he befriended while on the PCT in 2011. Hiking over 1,000 miles with Shelby, Fifer, who works locally as a realtor with Beck Property Company, said seeing Shelby at work was an inspiration. “Dug absolutely opened my eyes to the immensity of the issue,” Fifer remembered of Shelby’s discussion with him and others they encountered along the way. “Meeting him on that trip allowed me to join his journey briefly,” Fifer continued, stating that Shelby’s dedication to the cause drives him to complete the physical challenges he has undertaken. “He dreams big, makes a plan, and then makes it happen,” Fifer said. And indeed, not quite finished with his ride at the time he spoke with the IN, Shelby was already conceiving his next fundraising effort for the cause of trafficking: hiking four of the tallest peaks in Great Britain in 24-hours. “I can’t really be Rambo,” concluded Shelby, “I can just do this.” {in}

“As a society we have that responsibility, if we’re evolving, to say ‘This is wrong.’” Dug Shelby

courtesy photo

Riding to Raise Awareness of Human Trafficking by Jessica Forbes

If you were downtown on October 31 and saw a man riding a bicycle that appeared to be a cross between something from Swiss Family Robinson and Mad Max, you probably took notice. But far from being a Halloween prop, the bike—and its rider—were in town representing a cause. Dug Shelby cycled through Pensacola on a recumbent bike made of bamboo while on a cross-country journey to raise awareness of human trafficking. Shelby is completing his coast-to-coast ride this week in Jacksonville, Fla., having left from Santa Barbara, Calif. on Sept. 19. “I chose this route because there’s trafficking happening from San Diego to Jacksonville, more so than most places in this country. So I took the hot route, November 7, 2013

trafficking-wise,” said Shelby. “It’s huge anywhere where there are trucking lines or a hub, like an airport. Like Atlanta, Ga.—it’s massive there.” The human trafficking to which Shelby was referring—also described as a modern slave trade—involves the exploitation of individuals who are forced into prostitution or those who work in resorts, restaurants, and other service industries for little to no wages and whose daily activities, from where they sleep to whether they eat, are controlled by people profiting from their labor. “It’s been going on for a long, long time,” said Shelby, noting that this system provides labor in the lucrative convention and resort industries, with happenings like the Super Bowl and other high profile sporting events

Catch up on Shelby’s efforts, donate, and find more information about the organizations for which he rides on his blog, “Thru Ride 4 Freedom” at TR4F.wordpress.com. 5


all the political news and gossip fit to print

buzz A BRAND PLAN Pensacola’s idgroup, an

award-winning branding firm, is opening up voting to the public for their second “Brand on Us" project. “Brand on Us” is an idgroup initiative that provides pro-bono consulting to one area non-profit. The first organization they worked with—the Pensacola Humane Society—received a seven-month branding makeover, involving a range of idgroup’s “Branding from the Core” services valued at over $100,000. For the 2014 campaign, 13 not-for-profit organizations will compete for an idgroup guided image update. The candidates are: The Epilepsy Society of Northwest Florida, Escambia County School Foundation, Healthy Start, Seastar Aquatics, United Ministries, Health and Hope Clinic, Chain Reaction, Pathways for Change, The Global Corner, Sunday's Child, Manna Food Bank, Be Ready Alliance Coordinating for Emergencies (BRACE), and Re-Entry Alliance of Pensacola (REAP). For more information about the organizations and to vote for the 2014 "Brand on Us" winner, visit svy. mk/1h5DPUd. The voting period ends on Nov. 15.

UP TO CODE As a result of Florida House Bill 7207, a 2011 state bill aimed at provid-

ing county governments more authority in their local planning and development guidelines, a multi-department collaboration is underway to update the 2030 Escambia County Comprehensive Plan and the Land Development Code (LDC). The code provides the regulations by which officials implement the stated goals the plan describes. At the request of the Board of County Commissioners, county staff have produced a draft plan for 2030 in which ordinances no longer required by the state have been removed. The Escambia County Planning Board met on Monday, Nov. 4 and discussed upcoming workshops in which the board will evaluate changes to the county’s Comprehensive Plan. The Public Works and Facilities Department in coordination with a consultant Engineering & Planning Resources, has produced a draft, which the planning board will discuss at upcoming workshops. The first workshop will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 19. A public hearing on the changes will be held at a later date. The county staff is accepting written comments regarding the process through Friday, Nov. 8. Written comments should be submitted to Allyson Cain at macain@ co.escambia.fl.us.

DIB SHAKE UP In a small room in the

Rhodes Building, over 30 people attended the Nov. 5 meeting of the Downtown Improvement Board. Many were vendors at the Palafox Market. They were there because they had just learned that Hillary Gilles, the manager of both Palafox Market and Gallery Night, and the DIB office manager, Gloria Heckman, had been terminated last Friday, Nov. 1. The audience was told that there were no plans to do away with the market, and all five board members–John Peacock, Teri Levin, Corbett Davis, Bernie Merrill, Susan Hatler and Brian Spencer–voiced their support for the popular event. However, they refused to discuss the terminations. The executive director said that he was rewriting the job descriptions and looking at how to improve workflow in the office. Executive Director Ron Butlin said, “The DIB, myself and the board, are very excited about the market. It has been a great success and continues to be a success. It continues to grow. The board is very committed to the continuation of the market.” Eric Schmidt, Gilles’ husband, asked, “Why don’t you explain to the people exactly what was done to Hillary? Instead of just saying she’s no longer with the market.”

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Chairman Corbett Davis said, “Right now it’s not something we can discuss. Her leaving is still in negotiation.” Schmitt said, “But she didn’t leave.” The chairman recommended people talk with Butlin in private. He promised that her dismissal would be explained at future date. Deborah Dunlap said that she had sent an email prior to the Palafox Celebration to Butlin, Davis and Mayor Ashton Hayward. “In that email, I stated to the mayor that, while his heart was in the right place, it was a mistake not to include Hillary,” said Dunlap, who owns several buildings on Palafox Street. “In the American Planners Association statement as to why we were named one of the top 10 streets in America, two events were mentioned–Palafox Market and Gallery Night. Both of these events have been orchestrated and run, pretty much singlehandedly, by Hillary Gilles.” She said that she had hoped that Hillary and the DIB staff would be recognized and commended for their efforts at today’s meeting. With emotion in her voice, Dunlap said, “You could have knocked me over with a feather when Sandra called me and told me that she was fired. That’s all I want to say.” {in} ▶ For the whole story everyday check out ricksblog.biz

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Go here. Get there. Register online at

pensacolastate.edu or call 850-484-1547 Pensacola State College does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, color, gender/sex, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation or genetic information in its educational programs, activities or employment. For inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies, contact the Associate Vice President of Institutional Diversity at 850-484-1759, Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd., Pensacola, Florida 32504.

inweekly.net


VETERANS DAY 2013

viewpoint

SON OF A SAILOR MAN by Edwin Banacia

Today, sitting among Virgilio’s fellow of a sailor was much higher than what could It’s easy to feel guilty about our innate Filipino immigrants now American veterans, be found in the villages where they lived. sense of American exceptionalism. And you can’t help but think, these guys should A mixture of chance and education gave although the term doesn’t necessarily define probably go buy a lottery ticket. The fellas just Virgilio just the opportunity he was seeking. a national superiority complex, it’s not a stretch that most of us Americans really feel, deep down inside, as a Nation, we do march to our own drumbeat. We really do feel exceptional. Let this story, even if just temporarily, suspend your guilt. As a country, we may not always live up to the promise of America, but like a lighthouse guiding a ship safely to shore, the American promise is one exceptional beacon. Perhaps no decade, more than any other, threatened to dim that light more than the ‘60s. It was a decade of racial struggle, a Presidential assassination and a war that would see thousands of Americans die. Even now, most of us can recall images of black civil rights proL-R: George Castelluci, Ed Banacia, Edgar Adriano, Virgilio Domingo and Mike Mazo / photo by Samantha Crooke testors menaced by fire hoses finished their daily karaoke session. They’re “There was a newspaper ad with an applicaand police dogs in Alabama during the earlier all retired U.S. Navy Vietnam Veterans so it’s tion accepting Filipino citizens into the U.S. part of the decade. a little disappointing to have just missed their Who doesn’t remember the assassination Navy. You had to fill out the application and morning of living room American Idol. send it in. If they randomly selected your of Martin Luther King Jr., President Kennedy Quite a large group of non-natural born application, they contacted you and gave you and his brother Robert? What about the CuU.S. veterans gather an opportunity to ban Missile Crisis or the national fuel shorthere at retired Petty test and interview,” age? The country was divided more than Officer First Class he explains. Some ever before and there was real revolutionary Edgar Adriano’s young Filipinos were fervor. Sure there was free love. And who house. Adriano was known to send in could forget the drugs? But those were just assigned to the USS dozens and dozens of symptoms of the fragile seam barely holding Mullinix operating applications. the country together. Yet, even in the most in the Mekong Delta In 1947, the turbulent of times, elsewhere in the world, during the Vietnam United States enAmerica’s promise shined through it all. War. He eventually tered into agreement It is 1963. In the Philippines on an island retired right here in with the Republic jutting out into Manila Bay was an 18-yearPensacola at Corry of the Philippines, old Filipino kid just dreaming about the Station. Just about which permitted it to American promise. “America was the land of every morning the opportunity,” a familiar thread we’ve all heard recruit citizens of the guys gather here for a bit of walking followed island nation for military enlistment. Later before. But hearing Virgilio Domingo say it, by some mid-morning karaoke. But today, in 1954, the agreement was amended and you believe it. He’s approaching 70 now, but retirees Senior Chief Storekeeper Manny 2,000 Philippine citizens were allowed into you can see how extraordinary his journey Zabala, Chief Aviation Storekeeper Noly the U.S. Navy per year. was simply by making eye contact with him. Perea and Yeoman First Class Danny SanAlthough the Philippines is a relatively “Back then you knew if you could just get to tiago aren’t here. small country, there are over 98 million America, you could provide for your family “For me, right after boot camp, I was sent people living there. That’s quite a lotand maybe one day even bring them here.” to Cuba. It was still kinda hot there,” George tery system. In fact, Virgilio’s odds were The U.S. military presence in the PhilipCastelluci interrupts. By hot, he’s referjust about .002 percent. He was selected, pines exposed the natives to not only Ameriring to the Cuban Missile Crisis. During the however, shipped to the United States and can culture and opulence, but to the promise Vietnam War, Castelluci was assigned to a of America as well. Also the financial incentive in boot camp by October in 1963. A month patrol squadron (VP-8) ironically based out later, President Kennedy was assassinated. for joining was remarkable; after all, the salary

“Back then you knew if you could just get to America, you could provide for your family and maybe one day even bring them here.” Virgilio Domingo

November 7, 2013

of the Philippines. Mike Mazo, good friend and compatriot adds, “My dad was in the U.S. Navy first. He was a steward for Admiral Nimitz actually. My father had a plan that when we turned 18, he would send for us.” Mazo’s personal story is different than his friends. His dad was able to join the U.S. Navy before him and had applied for American citizenship already. The plan was always to bring Mazo to the U.S. “But before he sent for us, I had already joined the Navy.” The promise of a better life through enlistment in the Navy was strong. Although at this time the world was a dangerous place and the military a dangerous profession, Filipinos weren’t allowed but to serve in one capacity—a steward. Navy stewards would perform the domestic work of the Navy serving as cooks and doing the mundane jobs such as cleaning the galley, wardroom and living quarters of officers. On occasion, stewards would serve ship Captains and Admirals directly as their personal stewards. Not yet familiar with the American fight for civil rights, at first the only option to be a steward didn’t seem to bother any of these veterans. But that changed with time. Virgilio explains, “At that point, we didn’t care. But after a while you look at yourself as a maid or servant. You’re thinking of a way to change that and go to something else.” “Despite the inequalities, you were proud you had made it, even when it got scary,” Ed Banacia, a retired Senior Chief Petty Officer explains. Just after enlisting, Banacia found himself aboard the USS Anchorage, a ship heavily involved in the Vietnam conflict. “It was our job to land South Vietnamese Marines at Quang Tri province during the Nguyen Hue Offensive. We were continually bombed and our escort Destroyer was hit. Even as stewards, we all had wartime responsibilities. My battle station was as a loader on the three-inch guns. We didn’t look at ourselves as Filipinos fighting alongside Americans. We just thought of ourselves as Americans fighting for our country.” Despite not yet having U.S. citizenship, the bond of war gave these men a sense of brotherhood, under one nation. 7


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Finally in 1973, well after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the U.S. Navy altered this policy and Filipinos won their right to test for other jobs in the service. Virgilio would become a Navy Corpsman. Castelluci would transfer to Aviation. Mazo became a Yeoman. And, Banacia would become a Supply Officer. After five consecutive years of serving in the Navy, each one of these Filipino US servicemen was granted the opportunity to apply for U.S. citizenship. There was never a promise of citizenship, but the mere glimpse of an opportunity to apply was enough for these men and indeed every single Filipino who had the chance and choice to join the U.S. Navy. There will deservedly be plenty of differing takes on the meaning of Veterans Day this November. As a nation, we are still

embroiled in two conflicts that have taken a heavy toll on our society. New threats are developing both domestically and abroad. The world can still be a dangerous place. But what can we learn from these non-natural born American veterans? The opportunities provided to us are still rare. The promise of America really is that we are that shining city on a hill. That people all over the world still can see America’s brilliance from any distance and will pay whatever price just for an opportunity at maybe grasping that promise. And that Veterans Day is an opportunity to thank all of those who protect that promise. {in} *Banacia isn't a common name, so we are sure you figured out the writer is related to one of the veterans in this story.

Show Your Support

VETERANS DAY PARADES AND CEREMONY INFORMATION As the home of Wall South and Veterans Memorial Park, it makes sense that Pensacola would have a large and noteworthy Veterans Day celebration. And in recent years, under the care of the Gulf Coast Veterans Advocacy Council (GCVAC), the city’s Veterans Day Parade and activities at the memorial have steadily grown. Grown so much, in fact, that Washington, D.C. has taken notice, with the Veteran’s Administration recently naming Pensacola a Veterans Day Regional Site. Despite some growing pains related to financing—a steady increase in participants has also increased insurance costs—Nathaniel Bass, GCVAC’s chairman says the show will go on. “In spite of the obstacles we’ve had, we’re going to have a parade,” stated Bass, referring to additional permitting requirements and costs that GCVAC, a non-profit that serves veterans in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, and Louisiana, and Mississippi, learned of only weeks before the parade. “We’re expecting a larger turnout than we had last year,” Bass reported, stating that this year’s parade will top the 140+ units and over 2,000 participants of 2012’s display. Capt. Keith Hoskins, commander at Naval Air Station Pensacola, will serve as Grand Marshal of the parade, and will also speak at a ceremony to follow at 12 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Park.

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PENSACOLA VETERANS DAY PARADE

WHEN: Parade at 9 a.m., ceremony at 12 p.m. WHERE: Parade begins at the corner of Spring and Main streets and moves along Bayfront Parkway to Veteran’s Memorial Park, where the ceremony takes place If you live or plan on being on Pensacola Beach on Veterans Day, the island is hosting a parade of its own. That’s twice the oppor88

GPC-1141 PensIndNews.indd 1

10/9/13 9:07 AM

tunity to show support of area vets and to celebrate their service. Jeff Goudey, Veterans Services Coordinator at Elk’s Lodge #497, organizes the beach parade, which is in its 26th year. “This is kind of a low-key parade,” Goudey stated, adding that there are few floats, but more groups on foot, including the color guards of Washington High School and Gulf Breeze High School. The parade’s Grand Marshal will be retired U.S. Marine Col. Harry Hewson, who will also speak at a ceremony to take place at the Gulfside Pavilion at Casino Beach following the parade.

PENSACOLA BEACH ELKS LODGE VETERANS DAY PARADE

WHEN: 2 p.m. WHERE: Begins at Avenida 10 and rolls west along Via de Luna to Casino Beach Also home to a veteran’s memorial in its historic downtown, Milton will likewise be the site of a large Veterans Day parade and ceremony. “It will be an interesting parade,” said Ralph Nesenson, manager of the Santa Rosa County Veterans Memorial Plaza and Veterans Day parade coordinator. “It’s going to make history, because it will be the first time all six high schools from the county will march as a single unit,” Nesenson said. The high school groups alone total over 700 members; other parade participants will include a number of veterans and community groups. Retired Navy Capt. Dick Catone will serve as the parade Grand Marshal and as guest speaker at the ceremony to be held at 11 a.m. at the memorial.

MILTON VETERANS DAY PARADE

WHEN: Parade at 9:30 a.m., ceremony at 11 a.m. at the Veterans Memorial WHERE: Parade begins at Milton High School and rolls to the Veterans Memorial inweekly.net


VETERANS DAY 2013

TAKING CARE OF VETERANS

photo by Samantha Crooke

An Interview with Rep. Jeff Miller by Rick Outzen Veterans are always on Congressman Jeff Miller's mind. He serves Florida's 1st District—a district that has more veterans than any other district. He also chairs the House Veterans Affairs Committee, which serves as the watchdog over the VA, its $140 billion budget and 300,000 employees.

November 7, 2013

"When I was first elected in 2001, there were two committees that I felt I needed to be on because of this congressional district—Armed Services and Veterans Affairs," said Miller. "We have such a big veterans community and I felt I could affect some positive change, like the VA clinics at Corry Field and Eglin AFB." Miller is currently the only Florida representative that chairs a House committee, which gives him a seat at the leadership table with the Speaker of the House and Majority Leader for most of the major policy decisions. He is also the only congressman from this district to ever have a full House committee chairmanship. “While the Veterans Affair Committee may not be attractive to many, it fit me and my desire to work perfectly," he said in interview at the office of the Independent News. He had just taken part in the Combined Rotary Clubs Veterans Appreciation luncheon. Rep. Miller talked with the paper about the federal government shutdown that lasted the first 16 days of October. Though the 85 percent of the VA budget was advanced funded on a two-year cycle, veterans were still impacted by the political battle. Miller received a lot of calls from veterans. "There were only 7,000 out of the VA's 300,000 employees that were furloughed,"

he said. "However, there were other veteran programs administered by other agencies impacted, like training, education and labor.” However if the shutdown had continued past Oct. 31, disability checks would have been delayed. Rep. Miller said, "The VA had two billion dollars and it takes $4 billion a month to cut disability checks." Last February, Miller co-sponsored with Rep. Mike Michaud (D-Maine) H.R. 813, “The Putting Veterans First Act of 2013,” that sought to fully-fund the VA budget for four years to avoid this from happening again. "Neither side should be able to gain a political advantage by scaring veterans that they are not going to get their disability checks," said Miller. The bill was passed by his committee. On Oct. 30, Miller and Michaud held a press conference with several veteran support organizations, such as Paralyzed Veterans of America and Military Officers Association of America, in support of it. "They all agreed to make the passage of the bill their number one issue to prevent this from being used politically in the future," said the congressman.

or three years," Miller said. "Right now they are down to a backlog of about 300,000 claims. That's down from earlier this year." Veteran Unemployment: Soldiers are getting out of the service with skills that don’t always transfer over to the civilian job market. Miller said, “We have done some things the past couple years to help market their skills. If you are a combat medic, you should be able to become an EMT. If you’re a truck driver, let us help you go in that direction."

“One of the biggest problems I have had with the VA is with transparency.” Jeff Miller

What are the other issues facing Veterans Affairs? Backlog of disability claims: "It is horrendous that anybody should have to wait two

Transparency: The medical care is very good, according to Miller, but there have been a few problems. "We recently had a few preventable deaths in Memphis. We've had some suicides take place because of mental illness. One of the biggest problems I have had with the VA is with transparency—to acknowledge where a problem may exist and let’s work on trying to fix it." Miller said the VA bureaucracy is a challenge, regardless of which party controls the White House. He said, "I’m chairman for six years. If I’m harping on the backlog or the mental health provisions, they know they can outlast me. That's unfortunate because some of this is going to take a ‘sea change’ in the way they do things." He is committed to helping our military veterans. “Taking care of veterans is a cost of war,” Miller said. “It's difficult to predict but it’s a cost this country should be ready to pay.” {in}

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DIFFERENCE MAKER

Escambia County Public Schools Foundation to Award $53,862.34 for Innovative Classroom Projects Escambia County Public Schools Foundation’s Grants for Excellence Committee is thrilled to announce the recipients of the 2013 Grants for Excellence Classroom Grant Program. Grants for Excellence is a competitive grant program through which the Foundation awards funding for classroom projects to enhance curriculum and drive student achievement in Escambia County classrooms that is not available through current school or district budgets. This year, the Committee is proud to announce that it has selected 62 projects to fund for a total of $53,862.34. The Committee would like to thank all of the 2013 fall applicants. The Foundation congratulates the following 62 recipients, who will receive up to $1,000 each for their innovative classroom projects in the areas of literacy, STEM education, low-performing students, increasing graduation rates, career and technical education, and teaching quality: · Mitzi Allen, Tate High School, “Literally Great Photos” ·Kimberly Andreoli, Bratt Elementary School, “Learning Through Literacy” ·Angela Avery, Ransom Middle School, “Hide and Seek-Geocaching Project” ·Dr. Alana Battaglia, Escambia High School, “Skeleton in Search of a Closet” ·Edward Bauer, Washington High School, “Bringing Back the Bayous” ·Saundra P. Bell, Hellen Caro Elementary School, “Sailboat Breeze Meets Captain I. Seegood” ·Janice Bello, Navy Point Elementary School, “Math Madness” ·Russell L. Bertles, Workman Middle School, “Who Said All Great Music Composers are Dead?” ·Adam Bretschneider, Roy Hyatt Environmental Center, “Touch of the Gulf” ·Rose M. Briggs, George Stone Career Center, “Shining a ‘Light’ on Mathematics” ·Donna Burch, West Florida High School, “Photo Me This” ·Rebecca Burt, Global Learning Academy, Beulah Elementary and Cook Elementary Schools, “The ART of Writing” ·Anita Carnley, Ensley Elementary School, “Wingspan of Monarch Butterflies” ·Nichole Childress, Jim Allen Elementary School, “Visual Vocabulary Cards” ·Leslie R. Cuyuch, Workman Middle School, “Kickstarting Student Discourse with Kagan” ·Elizabeth Dunaway, Oakcrest Elementary School, “Paying it Forward” ·Jennifer Etheredge, Scenic Heights Elementary, “Creating a Therapeutic Play Therapy” ·Stephanie Furey, Washington High School, “Helping Students One Question at a Time” ·Stephanie Gaffney, Navy Point Elementary School, “Looking, Hearing, and Feeling Through Literacy” ·Kathy Gilliland, Pine Forest High School,

“Connected, Unique, and Powerful!” ·ReNae Grant, Semmes Elementary School, “Android-Powered Learning” · Janice Hall, Bellview Middle School, “Cooking with the Write Stuff” ·Anna K. Harageones, Ferry Pass Elementary School, “What’s the Weather Today?” ·Ila Harvey, Sherwood Elementary School, “Bridging the Learning Gap” ·Pam Hicks, Washington High School, “Volumetric Measurement” ·Maurine Kramerich, PATS Center, “Let’s Make a Puppet!” ·Justin Luciano, West Florida High School, “E-magine That!” ·Matthew MacGregor, Escambia High School, “Protecting Our Estuaries” ·Jason Majors, Escambia High School, “Original From Step One” ·Jeffrey R. Mason, PATS Center, “Physical Computing and Digital Electronics” ·Sarah Mason, Blue Angels Elementary School, “The Engineering Wall: Rube Goldberg Style” ·Janneke McElroy, Oakcrest Elementary School, “Kicking It Up A Notch” ·Angela McFarland, West Florida High School, “iPhotograph, iOptimize, iCode” ·Jill Mealy, Ensley Elementary, “Ensley’s Project Green” ·Cathy S. Melton, Weis Elementary School, “Boots and Bits and a Little ‘Bit’ More” ·Nancy Melton-Buffington, Workman Middle School, “Thinking Differently to Change the World We Live In” ·Catheryn Morrison, Bellview Middle School, “Discover and Explore Pensacola” ·Jean Odom, N. B. Cook Elementary School, “Reader’s Theatre” ·Dawn Parnell, Pensacola High School, “Increasing STEM Skills” ·Paula Petsel, West Florida High School, “Aquaponics System” ·Hytza Piatt, Tate High School, “My iSpanish Experiences”

·Karen Potter, Ransom Middle School, “Getting Middle School Readers ‘Interactive’ with Reading” ·Sharon Powers, Longleaf Elementary School, “Literacy for All” ·Jeff Pribble, Escambia High School, “Career Preparation in High Definition” · Sylvia Ramos, West Florida High School, “Virtual Hispanic Center” · Julie Reda, West Florida High School, “Color My World” ·Dottie Ritchie-Riddle, Global Learning Academy, “Small Group Learning Stations” ·Anita M. Schmitt, Lipscomb Elementary School, “Young Mentors-Kindergarten Reading Buddies” ·Jennifer Shiver, Holm Elementary School, “Learning Through Music” ·Cindy Speed, Weis Elementary School, “EBooks for Every Student” ·Paula Stillman, A.K. Suter Elementary School, “Pocket Full of Sunshine” ·Alicia Stone, Lipscomb Elementary School, “Reading Fluency with Technology” ·Zenda G. Swearengin, Workman Middle School, “Music and Tech Geeks Meet” ·Angela Taylor, Myrtle Grove Elementary School, “Check Out Math!” ·Nancy Thomas, Ferry Pass Elementary School, “Bop and Skip Into Reading” ·Chet Truett, Ransom Middle School, “Music Video Translation” ·Kevin Turner, Washington High School, “Observing Benthic Diversity and Water Density” ·Kristi Waldrop, Ransom Middle School, “Let’s Get Those Boards Out!” ·Shawn Walker, West Florida High School, “Go Out on a STEM!” ·Pamela Weiseman, Capstone Academy, “Increasing Engagement and Success” ·Ronald J. Williams, Extended Program, Hall Center, “Flying ‘B’ Enterprises” ·Dorice Zeier, Holm Elementary School, “Ready Bodies”

Sponsored by Quint and Rishy Studer 010 1

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Ways to Get Involved and Informed During World Vegan Month

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by Sarah McCartan November marks the return of countless holidays, including Veterans Day, Thanksgiving, Black Friday, and "No Shave November." It also marks the return of a holiday you may be less familiar with— World Vegan Month. It’s a time that vegans around the world come together not only to celebrate a lifestyle they have chosen to live out year round, but to educate and encourage others to consider following suit. And so, in honor of World Vegan Month, November 7, 2013

what better time to dispel a few myths, and pay homage to members of our own community who are sustaining plant-driven, primarily whole foods diets and empowering others. But why vegan? Be it for compassionate reasons, or on behalf of concern for the health of our bodies, minds or the planet, or all of the above, the reasons for adopting any degree of herbivore lifestyle are more than compelling. They are overwhelmingly convincing.

The health argument for veganism can perhaps be best summed up in the book, “The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted,” written by Dr. T. Colin Campbell, Professor Emeritus at Cornell University, with the support of his son. Although published in 2005, it is the foundation upon which the ever-growing plant-based diet movement is based. His message can perhaps best be summarized in an excerpt that follows.

“The idea is that we should be consuming whole foods. We should not be relying on the idea that genes are determinants of our health. We should not be relying on the idea that nutrient supplementation is the way to get nutrition, because it’s not. I’m talking about whole, plant-based foods. The effect it produces is broad for treatment and prevention of a wide variety of ailments, from cancer to heart disease to diabetes.” 11


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Jen Knight-Shoemaker / photo by Samantha Crooke Since the China Study, there has been a laundry list of research and resources launched into the world supporting his findings, including documentaries “Food, Inc.” (2008), “Food Matters” (2008), and “Forks Over Knives” (2011). It’s safe to say that whatever platform herbivores are most passionate about, most simply want to share their experiences with others, not strictly in the hopes of converting, but rather to enlighten. After all, there is always new information and it’s a continuous learning process for all of us. Yes, I said “us,” meaning I include myself in the mix. I have practiced some degree of vegetarianism for an entire decade, and have been a full-fledged vegan for the latter half of this duration. This means for the past five years I have adopted an entirely plant-based diet—one that along with excluding meat, or as some like to refer to as “anything with a face” also excludes animal products such as eggs, dairy, and butter, not to mention animal byproducts that try and sneak their way into the mix. Although every now and then I must admit that I scout the job listings that national non-profit group Mercy for Animals posts and find myself fantasizing about packing my bags to go work as an undercover investigator—a secret animal-saving agent of sorts, you typically won’t find me throwing red paint on someone’s mink coat PETA-style, sneaking into slaughterhouses in the middle of the night to let the animals run free, or interviewing animals about their feelings, not that there’s anything 212 1

wrong with any of the above mentioned— it’s simply not representative of vegans as a whole, and personally not my style. That’s just it—it’s personal to each individual. The beauty of veganism and all dietary and lifestyle choices for that matter is that they are individual choices and personally, although I care about all the associated platforms, I choose a plant-based lifestyle first and foremost for its resounding health effects on my own individual body and life. Before continuing further, to answer the most frequently asked questions, yes I get my fill of protein and then some. No, I don’t miss cheese even though I am a recovered cheese snob. And contrary to popular belief, it hasn’t cost me an arm or a leg to sustain my lifestyle. When I first made the switch to vegan, the food options were limited, tofu was still a bit taboo, conversations were infrequent and the support was scattered. Today that is far from the case. On the national front, Forbes Magazine recently listed high-end vegan dining on the list of “Top 10 Food Trends of 2013,” there’s the growing adoption of VB6, or vegan before 6 p.m., and even our own local health department

brought the national three-month long Meatless Mondays campaign to town at the start of this year, recognizing a meatless diet as a step in the right direction for reducing the risk of diseases, including heart disease and type2 diabetes. Celebrity endorsements certainly haven’t hurt bringing veganism into the light either. There’s Alicia Silverstone, author of “The Kind Life,” along with Natalie Portman and Paul McCartney. And of course, one can’t forget Bill Clinton. Although he steps off the vegan wagon from time to time, he has taken a vocal stance on the importance of a primarily plant-based diet for improved health. On the local eatery front we have The East Hill Yard and Cactus Flower Cafe with vegan menu options, The Magnolia who has adopted a "Meatless Monday" ritual, Restaurant IRON plates up fresh produce from their garden, and Carmen’s Lunch Bar who will send out alerts to the vegans when specials are coming down the pipes. And to top if off, we are spoiled with two full

“With food, a variety makes it seem less of a diet, and more of a meal. Vegan food should be thought of as less of a diet or health food and more of another type of cuisine.” Jen Knight-Shoemaker

on vegan cafes in our downtown backyard: Sluggo’s Vegetarian Restaurant and End of the Line Cafe. “What used to be thought of as an ‘extreme’ hippy diet consisting of fried dirt and boiled water, now is recognized pretty much everywhere,” acknowledges Jen Knight-Shoemaker, owner of End of the Line Cafe. “Along with celebrities, TV chef shows and doctors, I think taking control of your personal health is starting to become more clear to people. You are what you eat is beginning to make more sense.” Through her meals, Knight-Shoemaker shares her passion for not processed, or boxed, instant alternatives for meat consumption, but rather whole, plant based cuisine—while helping shift both perceptions and stereotypes in the process. “Plant-based natural food prepared with minimal ingredients allows our bodies to actually absorb the nutrients and eat the food we feed ourselves. We need food to survive. Why make it harder for our bodies to have that?” she asks. When it comes to preparing plantbased meals that are delicious, KnightShoemaker has been offering up palatable dishes for years, dishes that are just as nutritious as they are pretty. The variety included in her dishes has helped dispel the myth that being vegan means eating inweekly.net


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the same old same old all the time, or what some may consider the dreaded—living off of salads. “I think a variety of anything is always more fun. With food, a variety makes it seem less of a diet, and more of a meal. Vegan food should be thought of as less of a diet or health food and more of another type of cuisine. Also, you can expose people to more options than just a salad. Which is what a lot of people think vegan is—that you are condemned to eat salads for all of eternity,” said Knight-Shoemaker. If you walk into End of the Line on a Sunday morning for brunch, you better get there early because the masses line up, and it’s not just who individuals might consider to be stereotypical vegans, or even vegans at all. The room includes individuals of all ages and stages in life. “I think Pensacola is still growing in the veg-friendly direction. I think places are offering what the people want— vegan, allergy friendly and gluten free options—but not really going out of their way to see repeat business from people with dietary specifics. If restaurants offered a dish that was awesome and just happened to be vegan, non-vegans might enjoy it and everybody wins,” said Knight-Shoemaker. In addition to wowing diners at her cafe, Knight-Shoemaker offers frequent cooking classes to provide hands on instruction to her patrons, showing them how to recreate the cuisine at home. “A lot of people think that it is more expensive or that you have to live near a juice bar or eat the specifically ‘Vegan’ labeled food,” she said. “With just a little information and a couple new recipes it knocks that right out of the window. New things are intimidating. Learning a whole new way of cooking can be terrifying. A little guidance and introduction to new products can be very helpful.” WHAT: End of the Line Vegan Cooking Class: “Holiday Food and Main Course Options” WHEN: 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18 WHERE: 610 E. Wright St. COST: $25 per person DETAILS: 429-0336 or eotlcafe.com

(W)HOLISTIC WELLNESS

The name Betsy LeGallais first caught my ear when I was sampling some homemade almond milk to go along with my iced coffee at The Bodacious Brew. Like myself, LeGallais is a vegan. However, she takes things one step further—she lives a vegan lifestyle that is “high raw.” A caterer, and previous ice cream shop owner, LeGallais has been well versed in the world of food her entire life. As someone who struggled with both systemic and discoid forms of Lupus, after battling intense flare-ups a few years ago, LeGallais overhauled her diet. November 7, 2013

Sue Shattuck and Betsy LeGallais / photo by Samantha Crooke “The only thing I knew of to keep off medications was raw foods. I went completely raw and it changed my life,” she said. When she says it changed her life, she really means it. “I have had no lupus flares since I went raw,” she confirmed. “I’ve had thyroid nodules completely disappear. I lost weight, it stays off and I don’t count calories. If I’m hungry I eat.” LeGallais left her nearly decade-long career in Human Resources behind and went back to school for nutrition, becoming certified as a Raw Foods Educator and Health Coach, operating under the name, “Sagacity Wellness.” Sagacity comes from the root word sage, and means the quality of being discerning, sound minded and farsighted. She now conducts corporate wellness events, prepares breakfast at The Bodacious Olive, hosts a series of onsite classes, and performs one on one coaching and raw food education. By definition, a raw food diet is a method of sustenance that involves the consumption of uncooked, unprocessed and often organic or wild/living foods. The closer to the natural state your food is in, the more nutrients your food contains. This principle comes as no secret. That said, think of a raw diet as attempting to preserve and enjoy food in its truest form. Still, this does not simply limit you to munching on cold carrots. A raw food diet includes food that is heated or warmed, just not above 115 degrees Fahrenheit. Blenders and food processors allow for multi-step recipes to be in the mix. “Recipes today make it so much more palatable. It’s not all rice and carrots,” said LeGal-

lais. “The food is so beautiful and there are so many things you can do with raw foods—you’d be surprised. I can make a cheesecake you can’t tell is gluten and dairy free.” On top of being tasty, LeGallais’ cooking classes and recipes bust the myths that it is too time consuming to sustain such a lifestyle. “You can make it as complex or simple as you want,” she explained. “I can spend an hour in the kitchen doing the traditional cooking class. And I can make just as much food or more spending the same amount of time preparing a raw meal.” “People will go through a lot of trouble to marinade and make their own bread and all this kind of stuff and they’re afraid to chop a lot of vegetables—it’s the same amount of prep time no matter what you’re doing,” she added. Along with the time consuming myth, for those who are quick to say it is too expensive, LeGallais begs to differ. “I think veganism is something people ought to try if not a whole lifestyle at least several days a week to clean up your diet,” she said. “People think it’s more expensive and it isn’t. You can buy a watermelon for the same price you buy a really big bag of potato chips.” For those just getting started, she offers some advice.

“I try and tell people to eat the rainbow every day. Make sure you have something green, yellow, red, purple—that way you’re getting the different phytonutrients,” she said. When it comes to cooking classes at The Bodacious Olive, for a “gourmet” touch, LeGallais teams up with fellow culinary instructor Sue Shattuck of Gourmet Mom’s Inc. Together “Sagacity Gourmet” offers a complete living well, culinary experience. Throughout the month of November, in addition to holiday, and baking classes, the lineup includes a Healthy Lifestyle Series of classes, introducing a different dietary lifestyle through each session. Up next is the Macrobiotic diet, centered on the idea of eating within 100 miles of your location. LeGaillais will be working with Off the Vine, using local organic produce. “My goal in my cooking classes is if it’s going to be a gourmet meal, it’s going to be organic and not processed,” said LeGallais. While not all of the cooking classes are strictly vegan, LeGallais uses each class as a unique educational opportunity in relation to the healthy healing properties of foods, and how to incorporate more whole foods into your diet. Participants are presented an explanation of each dietary theory, plus informational handouts and recipes to try at home.

“I have had no lupus flares since I went raw. I’ve had thyroid nodules completely disappear. I lost weight, it stays off and I don’t count calories.” Betsy LeGallais

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Vegan menu items from Sagacity Gourmet's Raw Food Basics Lunch Class: Avocado Lime Cheesecake with Walnut Crust & Alfredo Zucchini with Peas and Red Peppers / photos by Samantha Crooke “It’s a lifestyle and not everybody is the same. If you incorporate more raw unprocessed food it reduces the sugars and can affect diabetes and auto immune disease and the list goes on and on—not to mention your weight and your skin,” said LeGallais. WHAT: Healthy Lifestyle Series: “Macrobiotic Diet” WHEN: 12 - 1 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 12 WHERE: The Bodacious Olive, 407-D S. Palafox COST: $35 per person DETAILS: sagacitywellness.com or 529-5513

HEALTHY EMISSIONS

The local interest doesn’t stop at the restaurants, with health educators or even with food-related community groups. Members of environmental group 350 Pensacola are far from strangers to the climate crisis. However, this month they are welcoming a presentation, showcasing the effects of dietary choices on the environment, exploring everything from aquifer depletion to deforestation, reduction of biodiversity, and soil erosion. This particularly meeting is one with a vegan spin. “My goal of the presentation is for individuals to understand if they want to help the environment, a vegan lifestyle can be a very large component of that,” explained speaker Marcus Lackey. He goes back to the UN’s conclusion in a 2006 report that more greenhouse gas emissions come from rearing cattle than cars, with much higher concentrations of CO2. “The numbers are so staggering,” he said. “The biggest problem is that the gases that are released are much more concentrated in comparison to the CO2 emissions from your car—many times more potent.” Although food production is something that those on the environmental front are certainly aware of being a driving factor, along with gases from buildings and transportation, it’s something that 350 Pensacola has yet to openly address, until now. 414 1

“We’ve never publicly explored the question of diet in relation to climate change,” said 350 Pensacola member Christian Wagley. Wagley notes that everyone is always asking what they can do to reduce their carbon footprint—and this is one substantial answer to that question. “It’s not that everyone has to become a vegan to make a difference, but eating less meat certainly reduces your carbon footprint,” he said. “We spend so much time getting wrapped up over plastic bags, or plastic bottles, when really we can make a monumental difference just by forgoing a single hamburger or single car trip.” Still, Wagley recognizes that suggesting someone take their bike to work or to the store rather than a car, is a far less sensitive request, than a dietary choice. “What you eat is such a personal thing,” said Wagley. “It doesn't get more personal than that.” When it comes to environmental research and activism on the matter, Wagley cites the Union of Concerned Scientists as a go-to resource for those interested in delving in further. Immediately upon visiting their website you are greeted with The Healthy Farmland Diet (2013 report) showcasing the unhealthy farm landscape in our country, and the subsequent effects on the environment. Additionally, Mary Guiterrez of Earth Ethics wrote a thought provoking piece as a part of the November issue of Natural Awakenings Magazine, titled, “Food Choices for a Healthy Planet” that looks at the environmental impact of diet even further—extending to social issues. “More than two-thirds of all agricul-

tural land is devoted to growing feed for livestock, while only 8 percent is used to grow food for direct human consumption. There would be a fairer distribution of food and resources in the world if the food fed to farm animals was used to feed people. If resources from meat production were diverted to other uses, there could be enough food to feed everyone on the Earth,” she states. Although the vegan presentation and associated dialogue will be largely centered around environmental research and impact of meat production and consumption, Lackey will be bringing his own personal experiences to the table, including showcasing the turn that not only his own health has taken, but the health of his family members. On top of a challenge to help the environment, Mackey will leave attendees with a vegan challenge—similar to one he challenged his parents to. “There are all these different reasons to be vegan. It’s a very compelling case,” said Lackey. He sums his presentation up as follows. “If you care about the environment, this is one very serious thing to consider. Oh and by the way, it could transform your health as well.” Although Lackey’s experience with veganism began January of this year, he initially began vegetarianism in 2004. Despite his affinity for cheese, he made the switch January 1 of this year to vegan. Not only did he immediately lose weight, he saw drastic health effects in his own life—including being able to stop taking his cholesterol medication. He then challenged his family to follow his lead, beginning with his mother.

“If resources from meat production were diverted to other uses, there could be enough food to feed everyone on the Earth.” Mary Guiterrez

“In March of this year, I challenged my mother to a three month vegan diet because she has heart disease and diabetes.” Then in April of this year he convinced his father to try it out. A survivor of a quadruple bypass heart surgery and like Mackey’s mother, someone who battles diabetes, he saw a great change in his health, on top of the outwardly visible effects, including weight loss. “He got off all of his high blood pressure medicine. His endocrinologist said it was the best he had ever seen him,” said Lackey. On behalf of the lifestyle change, both of Lackey’s parents were able to lower the amount of insulin they were dependent on by 50 percent. The challenge Mackey extends to those who attend the presentation is one of a similar nature, minus the binding contract. It simply involves a three month commitment to veganism—getting a blood panel conducted before and afterwards. “This isn’t a military boot camp program—it’s changing your diet,” he stated. “It’s not some sort of ‘loosey goosey’ thing. It’s purely based on the numbers.” To accompany the presentation, Lackey will be serving a gluten-free quinoa dish so that guests have a true taste of what they are getting into. If you’re not sure you are ready for such a challenge, the presentation is a prime opportunity to learn more about the monumental steps you can take to reduce you footprint, and improve your health.  To read “Food Choices for a Healthy Planet” in its entirety, visit nwfnaturally.com.  To learn more about the UCS: Union of Concern Scientists, visit ucsusa.org. WHAT: 350 Pensacola Presents: “Veganism Primer: A Healthy Solution to Climate Crisis” WHEN: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12 WHERE: Bayview Resource Center, 2000 E. Lloyd. St. COST: Free DETAILS: facebook.com/350pensacola inweekly.net


5 Veg-Friendly Go-Tos They even have a veg-starter kit available for download to get you going in a few easy steps. vegnews.com

UWF Downtown: A LECTURE SERIES HONORING THE ARTS &HUMANITIES

One Green Planet: This online hub is home to a plethora of vegan recipes, product reviews and lifestyle tips to help guide you in making conscious choices that help people, animals and the planet so you can stay up to speed on all the latest and greatest in the vegan realm. onegreenplanet.org

Whether you are interested in a vegan lifestyle on behalf of concern for animals, the environment, or yourself, there are so many resources out there, it’s oftentimes hard to know where to begin. Here are 5 veg-friendly resources, or what I like to consider “go-tos” to help you out along your journey. These resources also serve as myth-busters for those who err on the skeptical side and are not yet quite convinced, or for those who simply have questions regarding how to reap the full nutritional benefits of a vegan lifestyle without leaving yourself deprived of necessary fuel for your body.

Skinny Bitch: Don’t let the name fool you, this book is a comprehensive look at what we are putting into our bodies. In fact, it was this very book that turned me away from dairy. Since the initial success of “Skinny Bitch,” follow up books include “Skinny Bastard” (so not to exclude males from the equation) and even “Skinny Bitch: Bun in the Oven,” for the expectant mothers out there. They’ve even launched a recipe book by demand. skinnybitch.net

uwf.edu/cas/DowntownSeries

The China Study: Although

the book itself may be overwhelming in page count, The China Study is not to be read in a single sitting. It is rather a prime resource guide you can return to time and time again. The online community takes it a step beyond the book, and touts itself as the information source for the whole-foods plant based movement. thechinastudy.com

VegNews: You don’t have to be a magazine subscriber to “Think. Eat. Thrive.” vegan with the help of VegNews and its online outlet. Read up on everything from how to be vegan on a budget, to where to take your next veg-getaway.

November 7, 2013

NOVEMBER Healthy. Happy. Life.: My own personal favorite resource and inspiration in the kitchen happens to be run by top vegan food blogger and photographer and writer for VegNews Magazine, Kathy Patalsky. On top of managing and regularly updating her own blog, kblog.lunchboxbunch.com, she also founded findingvegan.com.

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WEEK OF NOVEMBER 7-14

Arts & Entertainment art, film, music, stage, books and other signs of civilization...

Giving Up the Ghosts by Sarah McCartan

photo by Molly Rockwell A typical interview with local band Pioneers! O Pioneers! consists of sipping on beverages of choice, including PBR and orange juice, while engaging in what I like to refer to as “down-home porch talk.” Our most recent encounter was no exception. Despite this interview being conducted at the home of drummer Jason Leger and lead guitarist/vocalist Michael Bishop, this time around I sat down on the front porch with the other two Pioneers—guitarist Ben Rockwell and bassist Joe Napier—to converse about Pioneers’ first full length album, “New World,” and their upcoming release show. In keeping true to this album being their most honest effort to date, Pioneers elected to do a live recording, working with Pensacola native and friend, Paul Kimsal. Thanks to the support of family, friends and fans alike, through the Indiegogo fundraising platform, the band was able to raise enough funds to cover the actual recording costs. Although scheduled for official release Friday, Nov. 8., I had the privilege of getting my hands on a copy of the 10-track album early so I could take a sneak listen. The album contains updated takes on a few established tracks, interspersed with ample new material. “If you’ve come out and heard us live you’ve probably heard a couple of the songs. But even those didn’t come out exactly the way that we’ve been playing them,” said Rockwell. “It was the last six months leading up to recording that we really wrote the majority of the album,” he added. November 7, 2013

The lineup includes title track “New World,” and “Back Into the Dust,” the first two tracks the band released online last month. While “New World” carries a slightly heavier weight, the upbeat “Back Into the Dust,” catches on so quickly you’ll find yourself singing along before you even know the words. The remaining tracks on the album possess a similar synergy and balance. As an unexpected element, listeners will find themselves greeted with a different voice on one particular track. Not only is “And, How Will I Find You There?” the longest song on the album, it’s one that serves as both an interlude and a heartfelt ballad. A follow up to the track directly preceding it, it’s a song Rockwell brought to the table, and one he takes the lead on for both guitar and vocals. One line in particular stands out: “It’s all for you.” It’s a song Rockwell wrote to his wife—a love song. “I hope that other people can find something in that as well where they’ve had to carry out selfless acts of love for somebody and that this can be a song that touches their heart,” he said. As a whole, the album is communicated like a prayer and seeks to paint a picture of the Pioneers’ search for honesty and truth, as it gracefully carries you through from one song to the next. “There’s definitely a set order to the album,” said Rockwell. “Each song was meant to run into the next one—almost like a concise story.” While the album represents the band’s own search, the hope is that it resonates with listeners much in the same way. “It’s almost like we found some of the answers and some of the truths we were looking for in writing it,” said Rockwell. “We hope that some question we pose resonates with the people who are listening and maybe helps them search themselves and our music to find an answer.”

On the visual front, the album art, designed by fellow local musician and artist Nathan Dillaha, was inspired by a painting found just outside of the Pioneer household, next to a trashcan. The painting temporarily lived on Bishop’s speaker cab but acted as a sound muffler, and was nearly discarded, that is, until it was resurrected to guide the artwork. The painting was deemed by the band as “epic, unknown and emblematic” and seemed to capture the essence of the album wholly—almost as if they were riding down the river into the unknown, or into a “new world.” But, what about the ghosts? If you are familiar with Pioneers, you surely have made note of the ghost references, after all, it is the title of their first EP, “There’s No Ghost Left to Haunt this Home.” “New World” is living proof that rather than focusing on the representations of past hopes and ideas coming to an end, the band is clearly moving forward—continuing their quest for honesty and truth. As a natural part of their story and progression, they have given up some of the ghosts along the way, so to speak. “We’re exorcising the ghosts,” said Rockwell, with a lighthearted laugh. “It is Halloween and we’re sitting by a Jack O’ Lantern after all.” Still there remain strong influences of spirituality, and the powerful presence of expansive sounds that perhaps redefine the otherworldly essence, presenting it in a newfound light. “It’s a new world for Pioneers,” said Napier. “I think it is representative of where we’re going.” {in}

“Every note and every word is a small piece of the entire prayer of the album to our friends and family and the people who just want to listen.” Ben Rockwell

Though the album signifies a new chapter for Pioneers, their newest chapter happens to be Napier himself. “I came in two weeks after they finished recording,” said Napier. “I’ve sort of adopted the album. It’s funny because it’s not mine and I didn’t have a hand in writing it, but I feel partial ownership. It’s a very inclusive album—especially playing it—it really feels like I have a part of it.” “I think that speaks to us hoping that it resonates with people,” noted Rockwell. “Joe coming in is almost a testament to that.” On top of being the most vulnerable they’ve been individually, the album serves as both a bold statement and true testament of who Pioneers has grown into together—a true collective entity. “It’s definitely got its own life and it’s definitely us. It’s not just little pieces that we’ve each put in. It’s collective,” said Rockwell. “Every note and every word is a small piece of the entire prayer of the album to our friends and family and the people who just want to listen. The hope is that they’ll not only find a piece of themselves but a piece of us in it too.” “Every lyric and every note is very intentional and placed where it is for a specific reason,” agreed Napier. “It doesn’t sound like any part of the album is meandering around, it just sounds very purposeful.” For the album release show, in keeping with the story-like essence of the album, Pioneers will be playWHAT: Pioneers! O Pioneers! with Jonni ing the album in its entirety. Greth, Jpegasus and Black Taxi “We want people to hear and feel WHEN: 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 what we put into it so that way when WHERE: Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox they get their album and take it home, COST: $5 cover; CDs available for $10 they’ve got the same thing. And that’s DETAILS: pioneersopioneers.bandcamp.com the entire reason we did it live too—to capture the feel and the emotion and even the quirks,” said Rockwell.

PIONEERS! O PIONEERS! CD RELEASE SHOW

17


a&e

by Sarah McCartan

Come On Down!

photos courtesy of "The Price is Right Live!" “Come on Down! You’re the next contestant on ‘The Price is Right.’” Throughout the many decades that have followed the inaugural debut of “The Price is Right” game show on cable television, this catchphrase has been immediately followed by many hoots and hollers as animated individuals hustle down the aisles toward Contestants’ Row, with their arms waving in the air, fist-pumping and high-fiving—each busting at the seams with hopes of earning a spot on the stage, if not to win big in cash and prizes, to at least give Bob Barker a kiss on the cheek. While the legendary Barker is no longer the host of this iconic game show, “The Price is Right” lives on and continues to entertain both members of its studio audience, and its dedicated network of fans who religiously tune in their television sets and play right along at home. Still, hearing the words, “Come on Down!” and picturing yourself doing a little victory dance wearing your resurrected college sweatshirt, or another sort of festive or flashy attire is a dream for many. Now, thanks to “The Price is Right Live!” stage show, this no longer has to be a figment of your imagination or a fantasy that you are forced to live out in solitude while glued to the TV in the confines of your living room. The stage show has been making its rounds in the U.S. and is stopping through Pensacola, premiering at the Saenger Theatre, Tuesday, Nov. 12. Hosted by Emmy award winning television host Todd Newton, “The Price is Right Live!” presents the op818 1

portunity for you to take part in all the action you’ve seen on TV, except this time, witness it up close and personally. Not only that, you even have a chance to play—and potentially win, that is, if the price if right. “Being able to host the show I've loved for so many years in beautiful theaters across the country has been a thrill,” said Newton. Each performance is loaded with an abundant energy that is said to rival the actual show—an energy Newton describes as “high octane game show excitement.” “We're all game show fans first and employees second so we take great pride in each performance,” he said. “Our show has been described as part rock concert, part church revival. We keep the energy up from the moment the lights go down.” Much like the televised show, contestants participate in a variety of games. The live show takes the opportunity to bring the best of the best to the stage, and of course, promote audience involvement and participation throughout the event. “There are over 85 different pricing games on ‘The Price is Right,’” said Newton. “We have a huge convoy but even that's not big enough to haul that much gear across the country so I describe the live show as being like seeing your favorite band in concert and knowing they're only going to play the greatest hits.” Not only are the greatest hits played— such as Plinko, and Hole in One, for added authenticity, Newton affirms that both the games and the entirety of the set pieces

“Our show has been described as part rock concert, part church revival. We keep the energy up from the moment the lights go down.”

Todd Newton

play, making level of suspense match if not exceed what you’ve witnessed on TV. “That's the beauty of the live stage show,” explained Newton, “All of our contestants are chosen completely at random just minutes before the show begins. Everyone in the theater has an equal shot of getting called down to Contestants’ Row.” In case you’re wondering if there is in fact a giant wheel to spin and whether or not guests can really expect to hear "Come on Down!" You better believe it. In fact, you can bet your bottom dollar. While Bob Barker most likely won’t be making a guest appearance at the live show, he is set to reappear on the televised show for his upcoming 90th birthday, Dec. 12. In the meantime, brush up on your pricing skills, strengthen your wheel-spinning arm and get ready to hopefully hear, “The Price is Right!” And in the words of Bob Barker, “Help control the pet population. Have your pet spayed or neutered. Goodbye, everybody!” {in}

are created by the same team that is responsible for the TV set, resulting in a true touch of Hollywood, if you will. “Authenticity is key for us,” he said. “The goal was to bring a little bit of Hollywood to people who couldn't make it out to LA and I think we've done a heck of a job.” Along with authenticity comes the prospect of taking home some cash—and of course, one can’t forget the collection of prizes. “You want to win a car?,” Newton asked. “We give you the opportunity to do just that. Cash? We've got it. Trips, kitchen appliances? Yes and yes. And we also give prizes out to audience members between the games so the winning never stops.” While the sole intent of your attendance perhaps shouldn’t be to win the top prize or be a part of the showcase showdown, who doesn’t love the thought of winning something, even if not winning big. “Sharing the stage with a contestant when they win a large sum of cash or a great prize never gets old for me,” said Newton. “We're lucky WHAT: Price is Right Live! Stage Show to be able to make those kinds of WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12 memories every night.” WHERE: Saenger Theatre, 118 S. Palafox All ticketed show attendees, COST: $43.50 - $103.50 plus service fees regardless of level of tickets are DETAILS: pensacolasaenger.com or 595-3880 considered registered contestants and eligible to be called down to

PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE!

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happenings

FOREVER DIETING?

The Art of Yoga by Sarah McCartan

Inhale into plank. Exhale into downward-facing dog. Nothing says relax, renew and revitalize on a Monday morning quite like a yoga class led by one of the community’s most acclaimed yogis, Nancy LaNasa. Although LaNasa just closed her doors at Abhaya Yoga Center last month, she is leading a free yoga class Monday, Nov. 11, at the Pensacola Museum of Art. Participants will sprawl through the museum’s expansive upstairs gallery space. While hosting yoga in the museum is a test run for the PMA, practicing the art of yoga within gallery spaces is far from a new concept. “There are a number of museums that have been offering yoga within their galleries for years and the concept has shown itself to be an incredible draw,” said Alexis Leader, PMA Contemporaries (PMAC) board president. “Experiencing a personal connection within a space, such as the PMA, bonds individuals, and helps to strip away previous elitist ideas potentially associated with the conventional and outdated stereotypes of a museum.” This idea of this personal connection and community experience includes the art showcased within the space. In honor of Veterans Day, attendees have an opportunity for an up close look at the latest exhibition on loan from the Rowe Collection, “The Design of War: World

THURSDAY 11.7

RUNNING: SIX AT SIX 6 a.m. Running Wild, 3012 E Cervantes St. 435-9222 or werunwild.com. FIRST CITY ART CENTER 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. 1060 N. Guillemard St. 429-1222 or FirstCityArt.org. ARTEL GALLERY 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 223 Palafox, Old County Courthouse. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. DRAGONFLY GALLERY 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. 5188 Escambia St., Milton. 981-1100 or thedragonflygallery.org. QUAYSIDE ART GALLERY 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Presenting the work of artists Cathy Pascoe and Laurie Flynn. Exhibit on display through Nov.12. 17 E. Zaragoza St, 438-2363 or quaysidegallery.com. BLUE MORNING GALLERY 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 21 S. Palafox. 429-9100 or bluemorninggallery.com. PENSACOLA MUSEUM OF ART 10 a.m. Currently on display: “The Design of War: World War I and II Posters and Flags,” “The American Indian: Original Art and Artifacts and Interpretations Through Western Eyes,” and “Painting and Process,” by Mikaela Sheldt. 3. 407 S. Jefferson St. 432-6247 or pensacolamuseumofart.com. TAG UWF 10 a.m. "Points of Departure" Foundations Students Exhibition currently on display. The Art Gallery (TAG) 11000 University Pkwy. Bldg 82, Room 240. 474-2696 or tag82uwf. wordpress.com. MESS HALL 2 – 5 p.m. The Pensacola MESS Hall (Math, Engineering, Science & Stuff) offers weekly themes, special activities and workshops November 7, 2013

PMAC aims to promote leadership, War I and World War II Posters and Flags.” “The dichotomy of peace and harmony social, and educational opportunities within the visual arts realm and beyond to within the yoga exercise set against the its members, with the idea and intent of backdrop of war presents an unexpected, sustaining a younger active and engaged and mindful, tribute to our armed forces,” arts community in the area. said Leader. “Members serve as ambassadors of While this public yoga event is free and the PMA while networking with other likeopen to yoga enthusiasts of all ages and minded individuals interested in supportskill levels, it is a part of the greater working the arts and cultural awareness within ings of a new affiliate group of the PMA their community,” said Leader. geared toward young professionals. All young professionals interested in “Despite a vibrant group of young proPMAC membership, mark your calendars: fessional associations within Pensacola, The official PMAC launch “Membership none were devoted to arts and culture Kick-Off & Mixer” will take place at 5 1/2 within the community,” said Leader. Bar from 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 26. “PMAC members represent the next There is no attendance limit for the generation of arts patronage, leadership, yoga class, although RSVPs via social and community involvement within the media, email, or phone are encouraged. All arts in Northwest Florida.” attendees are asked to bring a mat. Water “‘The Art of Yoga’ is a free event open and light snacks will be provided. {in} to the public with the intent to attract young professionals and further showcase the wide range of programming that the PMAC will be offering to their members,” explained Leader. WHAT: The Art of Yoga with the PMAC Leader notes future exWHEN: 10 - 11:15 a.m., Monday Nov. 11 clusive PMAC programs and WHERE: Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. events to include a range of Jefferson involvement opportunities such COST: Free, Donations to the Museum Acas networking mixers, artist cepted studio tours, film screenings, DETAILS: pensacolamuseum.org/pmalectures, workshops, arts-relatcontemporaries or 432-6247 ed trips and fundraising events.

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THE ART OF YOGA

that captivate curious minds of all ages and inspire a lifetime of discovery. 116 N. Tarragona St. 877-937-6377 or PensacolaMESShall.org. WINE TASTING AT AWM 5 p.m. Aragon Wine Market, 27 S. Ninth Ave. 433-9463 or aragonwinemarket.com. WINE & GLIDE SEGWAY TOUR 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. This one-hour Segway tour includes a stop at Seville Quarter or Aragon Wine Market for a wine tasting. Emerald Coast Tours, 701 S. Palafox. $45. 417-9292 or emeraldcoasttours.net. PLT PRESENTS: NONE OF THE ABOVE 7:30 p.m. Pensacola Little Theatre. 400 S. Jefferson St. $17 cafe seating; $10 general admission. 4382787 or pensacolalittletheatre.com

live music

RADIO LIVE 6 p.m. Musical guest include: singer/songwriter Bally Barris; Lon and Lis Williamson; and pianist Scott Cossu collaborating with violinist/singer Mark Russell. Museum of Commerce. 201 E. Zaragoza St. 474-2787. KARAOKE NIGHT 6 p.m. VFW Post 706 5000 Lillian Highway, 455-0026. LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 6 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. THE DAVENPORTS 6 p.m. The Leisure Club, 126 S. Palafox. 912-4229 or tlcdowntown.com. VINYL MUSIC HALL PRESENTS DONNA THE BUFFALO 7:30 p.m. Donna The Buffalo, with Aubrey and Jordan of Timberhawk. 2 S. Palafox.

$17-$20. 607-6758 or vinylmusichall.com. DUELLING PIANOS 8 p.m. Rosie O’ Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. KRAZY GEORGE KARAOKE 8:30 p.m. Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com.

FRIDAY 11.8

FIRST CITY ART CENTER 9 a.m. 1060 N. Guillemard St. 429-1222 or FirstCityArt.org. ARTEL GALLERY 10 a.m. 223 Palafox, Old County Courthouse. 432-3080 or artelgallery.org. DRAGONFLY GALLERY 10 a.m. 5188 Escambia St., Milton. 981-1100 or thedragonflygallery.com. QUAYSIDE ART GALLERY 10 a.m. 17 E. Zaragoza St, 438-2363 or quaysidegallery.com. BLUE MORNING GALLERY 10 a.m. 21 S. Palafox. 429-9100 or bluemorninggallery.com. TAG UWF 10 a.m. 11000 University Pkwy. Bldg 82, Room 240. 474-2696 or tag82uwf.wordpress.com. WINE TASTING AT SEVILLE QUARTER 5 p.m. Palace Café at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. OPERA OPEN HOUSE 5 – 7 p.m. In addition to purchasing tickets at exclusive prices, guests can learn more about volunteer and membership opportunities, and as a special feature, opera singers will perform musical highlights from “Carmen.” Pensacola Opera Center 75 S. Tarragona St.433-6737 or pensacolaopera.com

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happenings

Ears & Fingers by Jason Leger

Arcade Fire – ‘REFLEKTOR’

Sometimes, to see the bigger picture, we have to broaden our own horizons. Instead of simply adjusting our focus, there are times when we must find ourselves a whole new lens. Moments enter our lives where we find that our own perspective just won’t do, and in order to find a way forward, perhaps we have to revisit the past. There are few ways to understand where we are going

that are as cogent as understanding where we have been. “You’re down on your knees, begging us please; praying that we don’t exist.” These lyrics unfold on “We Exist,” the second track from Arcade Fire’s fourth full length, “Reflektor,” just before they are dutifully answered with the track’s titular line. Over the course of the past several months, we have all been made very aware of Arcade Fire’s existence. What began early in the summer with a mere tweet to a fan, grew like wildfire into a massive PR campaign to promote “Reflektor,” including secret shows under a collective surname, leaks of songs through secret channels, and finally a YouTube post of the entire 85 minute LP. If “Reflektor” managed to catch you off guard, you have probably spent the better portion of this year in an underwater cave with your eyes closed and ears covered. Win and Regine Butler, along with their cast of musicians, have always been ambitious and full of desire to tell stories. From their own past on “Funeral” to the bleakness they have found in religion on “Neon Bible” to the somberness which exists in suburbia

on their Grammy flare “The Suburbs,” Arcade Fire have brought stories into our lives which we can all connect to and empathize with. However, after the booming success of “The Suburbs,” one would have been remiss to not think to himself, “How could they top this?” Well, it really seems simple. Go into musical territory where you’ve never ventured, write songs about the human condition and things which compound its volatility, throw James Murphy behind the board, and sneak David Bowie into the cracks for good measure. Reeking of the influence of greats like Byrne, Eno, Bowie, and Murphy’s own LCD Soundsystem, “Reflektor” is easily the band’s most far reaching piece of art to date, and is certain to open them up to a broader audience than even their Grammy could. Mostly lacking the Springsteen-tinged indie rock from previous releases, while not completely being devoid of original elements of Arcade Fire, this new long player is more Calypso, more neo-disco, more funk, and adds a new dimension to an already versatile group of musicians proving that they deserve any attention that comes their way.

Early on in September, the album’s title track, an almost 8 minute dance anthem, was released via two videos and gave us our first taste of what was to come. We celebrated, because this song showed a promise of big things on the horizon. Now that I have been able to take in the entire picture, I can say that “Reflektor” slides easily into place as part of this grand puzzle, where each song plays off the others and helps to form a holistic work. Other highlights include the aforementioned “Billie Jean”-esque “We Exist,” the sobering “Here Comes the Night Time,” which was written about the time Win Butler spent in Haiti, as well as the pulsing “Afterlife.” With a gap of sound in between, the album is separated into two movements from “Reflektor” to “Joan of Arc,” then from “Here Comes the Night Time II” to the slow-burning, nearly bare bones closer “Supersymmetry.” Giving us a bit more of a lighthearted approach musically, while still maintaining heavy thematic imagery, Arcade Fire have continued to show us why they are on top of the indie(ish) rock food chain. “Reflektor” is out now via Merge Records. {in}

BIG CITY OPERA W I T H S M A L L TOW N C H A R M

A riveting drama of love and jealousy, filled with famously alluring melodies and captivating dances, Carmen is one of the world’s most popular operas!

With colorful characters and sparkling orchestration, Cinderella is an enchanting, romantic comedy based on the classic fairytale you know and love.

Tickets on sale now starting at $20! Order yours today! www.pensacolaopera.com | (850) 433-6737 CARMEN & CINDERELLA SPONSORED BY:

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020 2

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happenings

Wine in the Afternoon by Jessica Forbes

Seville Quarter’s Wine Festival returns for the third year this Sunday. Celebrating both wine and food in an event that takes place throughout the Seville Quarter complex, Bill Carlson, purchasing manager at Seville Quarter, said the goal is to give patrons as much bang for their buck as possible. “It’s a pretty big tasting,” said Carlson, referring to the over 200 wines from across the globe that will be on hand for sampling. Carlson works with the 11 participating distributors throughout the year to stock Seville’s Wine and Gift Shoppe, as well as the venue’s multiple bars and events. As the primary distributors in Northwest Florida, those supplying the festival know which labels are more prominent in this area, and those that might just need a friendly introduction. “We’re trying to feature wines you don’t commonly see out there,” Carlson explained. Guests will sip samples from souvenir Govino cups customized with the festival’s logo. Featured wines will be available for purchase at a special festival price, and

There is something even for beer fans, each ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off who can sample over 20 hand-crafted a wine purchase. The festival features varying themes that microbrews poured with care from largeformat bottles. Add in Grand Reserve link food and wine pairings within the seven Cigar & Smoke Shop’s cigar tasting in the different rooms and two courtyards of the grounds. For instance, in “The Italian Room,” courtyard and three bands providing live entertainment and you have the makings Italian wines will be served alongside flat of one of Seville’s most popular recently breads and other Italia-inspired dishes from established events. When compared to Jaco's Bayfront Grill, one of several area the prices of wine festivals in the region vs. restaurants lending what Carlson regards as the number of wines offered, it’s not dif“some really great local talent.” ficult to see why, according to Carlson. The Grand Marlin will provide seafood “One of the biggest selling points is for the event including the shellfish staple the price,” said Carlson, “It’s a tremendous of the Champagne and Oyster Bar, which value for trying 200 wines.” {in} centers on 13 sparkling wine and champagne varieties. Seville’s culinary team will lead a grilling demonstration paired with red wines, at a station dubbed “Beefy Reds.” Culinary Productions, Cajun WHEN: 2 – 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 10 Specialty Meats, and Harris WHERE: 130 E. Government St. Ranch Natural Beef are also COST: $35 in advance, $40 day of the festival participating in the event. “It’s alDETAILS: sevillequarter.com most a misnomer to call in a wine

SEVILLE QUARTER WINE FESTIVAL

WINE TASTING AT CITY GROCERY 5:15 p.m. City Grocery, 2050 N. 12th Ave. 469-8100. WINE TASTING AT EAST HILL MARKET 5:30 p.m. 1216 N. Ninth Ave. GROUP RUN AT PLAY 5:30 p.m. All abilities welcome. A casual run with fun partner exercises. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Suite 100. 466-3080 or iplaypensacola.com. WINE & GLIDE SEGWAY TOUR 5:30-7:30 p.m. This one-hour Segway tour includes a stop at Seville Quarter or Aragon Wine Market for a wine tasting. Emerald Coast Tours, 701 S. Palafox. $45. 417-9292 or emeraldcoasttours.net. ICE HOCKEY 7:05 p.m. Pensacola Ice Flyers vs. Knoxville Ice Bears. Pensacola Bay Center. 201 E. Gregory St. PLT PRESENTS: NONE OF THE ABOVE 7:30 p.m. Pensacola Little Theatre. 400 S. Jefferson St. $17 cafe seating; $10 general admission. 4382787 or pensacolalittletheatre.com

live music

LUCAS CRUTCHFIELD 5 p.m. The Deck at The Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. 470-0003 or fishhouse.goodgrits.com. DUELLING PIANOS 8 p.m. Rosie O’ Grady’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. 434-6211 or sevillequarter.com. VINYL MUSIC HALL PRESENTS PIONEERS! O PIONEERS! 8 p.m. Pioneers! O Pioneers! with Jpegasus, Black Taxi and Jonni Greth. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. $5. 607-6758 or vinylmusichall.com.

festival, because we have just as much food,” Carlson stated.

the most memorable

for more listings visit inweekly.net

day of your life

an event space in historic downtown pensacola (850) 433-9450

November 7, 2013

21


When I was a teenager, my father told me that the greatest education I could have was to travel the world and learn about other cultures. Travel is my education, and Public Radio provides multi-dimensional news, information, and entertainment with an international flavor. On WUWF, I can hear a world view that expands my understanding of other cultures and world viewpoints. WUWF is my international education in radio!

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Linda Szulczewski

Agent Collateral for Florida Blue

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HELP IS HERE! Got questions? answers. HELP IS Get HERE! HELP IS HERE! Got questions? Get answers.

NOW OPEN Space Ad Agent Collateral Created: 8/28/13 for Florida Blue Rev. 9/12/13 Agent3:Collateral

for Florida NOW Blue OPEN Final:Space 9/13/13 Ad

NOW OPEN Size: 7.5” SpaceCreated: Ad x 10”8/28/13 Rev. 3: 9/12/13

Created: 8/28/13 Final: 9/13/13 Rev. 3: 9/12/13

We’re here to help you get the health care plan you need. Call us or come in.

7.5” x 10” Final:Size: 9/13/13

Got questions? Get answers. We’re here to help you get the health care plan you need.

Size: 7.5” x 10”

Call ushere or come in. you get the health care plan you need. We’re to help Call us or come in.

If you’ve been living without a health insurance policy—STOP!

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It’s Call: simple! And we can help you find a plan that meets your needs Barnes Insurance & and your Call:budget. Barnes Insurance & Questions

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The healthbeen insurance is now open. policy—STOP! Get the coverage you need. If you’ve living marketplace without a health insurance You can no longer be denied because of existing health problems. If The you’ve been living without a health insurance policy—STOP! health insurance marketplace is now open. Get the coverage you need. You can no longer because of existing health problems. Get informed aboutbe thedenied new health insurance marketplace in just The health insurance marketplace is now open. Get the coverage you need. 5 easy steps! You no longer bethe denied because of existing health in problems. Getcan informed about new health insurance marketplace just Understand how reform works 51easy steps! Get2 informed theeligible new health Find outabout if you’re for ainsurance tax creditmarketplace in just 1 Understand how reform works 5 easy steps!your health care needs 3 2Assess Find out if you’re eligible for a tax credit 4 a plan from a variety 1 3Choose Understand how reform worksof options Assess your health care needs 5 enrolled 2 4Get Find out ifa you’re eligible for of a tax credit Choose plan from a variety options 3 5Assess your health care needs Get enrolled It’s4simple! And we from can help you of find a plan that meets your needs Choose a plan a variety options and your budget. It’s simple! And we can help you find a plan that meets your needs 5 Get enrolled

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Financial Services 1582 Airport Blvd. 1582 Airport Blvd. Pensacola, FL 32504 Call: Barnes Insurance & Pensacola, FL 850-473-1500 32504 Financial Services 850-473-1500 www.biafs.com 1582 Blvd. www.biafs.com 8 a.m.Airport - 5 p.m. CST, Mon. - Fri. to speak with a licensed agent. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. CST, Mon. - Fri. to speak with a licensed agent. Pensacola, FL 32504 Policies have exclusions and limitations. 850-473-1500 79226-1013/78322 0913 Policies have exclusions and limitations. Policies have exclusions and limitations. Florida Blue is awww.biafs.com trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., Florida Blue is a trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., Florida Blue is Licensee a Licensee trade ofp.m. Blue Blue ofAssociation. Florida, Inc., Association. anan Independent of theCross Blueand Cross and Blue 8 a.m.name - 5the CST, Mon. - Fri. toShield speak with a licensed agent. Independent of Blue Cross and BlueShield Shield 79226-1013/78322 0913

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an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

222 2

Policies have exclusions and limitations. Florida Blue is a trade name of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, Inc., an Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.

79226-1013/78322 0913

inweekly.net 79226-1013/78322 0913


news of the weird A PIECE OF THE ACTION "Fantasy sports" are hugely popular, but when fans "draft" players for their teams, they "own" only the players' statistics. Recently, Wall Street and Silicon Valley entrepreneurs created Fantex Holdings, which will allow investors to buy actual pieces of real players— namely, rights to 20 percent of the player's lifetime earnings (including licensing and product endorsement deals). The firm told The New York Times in October that it will soon stage an "IPO" for budding NFL star Arian Foster and hopes to sign up many more athletes, plus singers and actors similarly early in their careers. (On the other hand, Fantex's lawyers drew up a 37-page list of potential investment risks, such as injuries, slumps and scandals—and the fact that the stock will trade only on Fantex's private exchange.) CULTURAL DIVERSITY "For Japanese boys, the train driver sits alongside footballer, doctor and policeman as a dream job," according to a September Agence France-Presse dispatch, and consequently, the system for the Tokyo metro area (covering 35 million people) runs with the "precision of a finely crafted Swiss watch," where delays, even for as long as a minute, seldom occur. (When they do occur, operators repeatedly apologize and hand out "notes from home" to commuters to present to their bosses to excuse the tardiness.) Among the system's drawbacks is the still-irksome groping of females on packed rush-hour trains, when operators routinely shove as many as 300 riders into cars designed for 150. • Among the surprising legacies of the oppressions of communist East Germany is modern-day Germany's commonplace "clothing-optional" lifestyle (FKK, or "Freikoerperkultur"—free body culture). A September Global Post dispatch counted "hundreds" of FKK beaches across the country and referenced a turned-up snapshot (not yet authenticated) of a young Angela Merkel frolicking nude in the 1960s or 1970s. Foreigners occasionally undergo culture shock at German hotels' saunas and swimming pools, at which swimsuits are discouraged (as "unhygienic"). • In December China joined only a handful of countries (and 29 U.S. states) by strengthening the rights of elderly parents to demand support from their adult children—not only financially (which has been the law for more than a decade) but now allowing lawsuits by parents who feel emotionally ignored, as well. An October Associated Press feature on one rural extended family dramatized China's cultural shift away from its proverbial "first virtue" of family honor. Zhang Zefang, 94, said she did not even understand the concept of "lawsuit" when a local official explained it, but only that she deserved better from the

by Chuck Shepherd

children she had raised and who now allegedly resent her neediness. (A village court promptly ordered several family members to contribute support for Zhang.) LATEST RELIGIOUS MESSAGES Recent separate testings in 21 springs in Austria and 18 fonts in Vienna yielded a conclusion that 86 percent of the holy water in the country's churches was not safe to drink— most commonly infected with diarrheacausing E.coli and Campylobacter. University of Vienna researchers found samples with up to 62 million bacteria per milliliter of water, and the busier the church, the higher the count. • Various studies show "churchgoers" to be happier, more optimistic and healthier than other people, leading some atheists and agnostics to wonder whether the church experience could be fruitfully replicated but minus the belief in God. Hence, the "Sunday Assembly" was created in London, and has now spread to New York City and Melbourne, Australia, with 18 other hoped-for openings by year's end, according to a September report in The Week. Founders seek such benefits as "a sense of community," "a thought-provoking (secular) sermon," "group singing" and an "ethos of self-improvement," exemplified by the motto "live better, help often, wonder more," and they hope that eventually Sunday Assembly will organize Sunday school, weddings, funerals and "non-religious baptisms." • First Things First: An alleged drug ring in the Brooklyn, N.Y., neighborhood of Sheepshead Bay was busted in September after police cracked a stream of Internet messages offering heroin (called "DOB") and cocaine ("white girl"). Among the messages was one sent at 6:45 one Friday evening advising customers that they had "45 minutes" to get their orders in for the weekend because the sellers would obediently shut down at 7:30 (i.e., sundown) for the Jewish sabbath. LEAST COMPETENT CRIMINALS Ariel Sinclair, 23, an assistant manager at a Rite Aid drugstore in Virginia Beach, Va., was charged in October with stealing $6,000 from the store's Virginia State Lottery machine. According to police, access to the machine requires an authorized fingerprint, which she supplied, apparently failing to think ahead that this would eventually be difficult to explain. "We work a lot of different cases," said a police spokesman, and "some are (easier) than others." {in}

From Universal Press Syndicate Chuck Shepherd’s News Of The Weird © 2013 Chuck Shepherd

Send your weird news to Chuck Shepherd, P.O. Box 18737, Tampa, Fla., 33679 or weirdnews@earthlink.net, or go to newsoftheweird.com November 7, 2013

Saturday, November 16, 2013 Pensacola Beach • 8 am • Register Online: escambiaso.com Supporting Florida Sheriff’s Youth Ranches

So You Think You Can Write? Let Us Be The Judge. The Independent News is hiring local freelance writers to contribute articles spanning a range of topics—including local goverment, music, dance, theater, visual arts and literature. To be considered, please e-mail a résumé and recent clips to joani@inweekly.net. *We are also on the hunt for a experienced freelance copy editor. So if you spotted the typos in this ad and would enjoy fixing our mistakes on a weekly basis, you should also email joani@inweekley.net. 23


Independent News | November 7, 2013 | inweekly.net

Nov 72013issue  
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