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Independent News | February 13, 2020 | Volume 21 | Number 7 | Photo by: Natalie Allgyer | Model: Brittany Miller

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winners & losers

outtakes

4

5

news 6, 8

I feel like the elephant is being shoved down my throat.

buzz

feature 13

10

contact us info@inweekly.net

publisher Rick Outzen

graphic designer Michael Daw

editor & creative director Joani Delezen

contributing writers Savannah Evanoff, Jennifer Leigh, Jeremy Morrison, C.S. Satterwhite

calendar 16

Independent News is published by Inweekly Media, Inc., P.O. Box 12082, Pensacola, FL 32591. (850)438-8115. All materials published in Independent News are copyrighted. © 2018 Inweekly Media, Inc. All rights reserved.

“Holding careless drivers accountable makes Pensacola safer for us all.” JOE ZARZAUR BOARD CERTIFIED CIVIL TRIAL ATTORNEY

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winners & losers

Dr. Scott Taylor

winners DR. SCOTT TAYLOR The assistant professor

in the University of West Florida Department of Biology has secured a $400,000 grant from the National Eye Institute to study how zebrafish regenerate preceptor cells in their eyes after they’ve been damaged. The research will focus on using Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats, or CRISPR, genomeediting techniques to explore how zebrafish regenerate the retinal cells that receive light and start the visual process. The research could eventually have applications for treating blindness in humans.

INTELLIGENT RETINAL IMAGING SYSTEMS IRIS is a grantee for the Microsoft

AI for Health Initiative. AI for Health, Microsoft’s newest initiative under their AI for Good program, will encompass a $40 million, five-year program that will leverage AI to empower organizations like IRIS in the realm of improving health. Each organization will work with Microsoft to use AI to decipher issues like discovering the cause of SIDS, eliminating leprosy and building an ecosystem that allows safe and secure sharing of biomedical data.

BJ’S WHOLESALE CLUB The company an-

nounced a $30,000 donation to fund classroom projects currently listed by teachers in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties through crowd-funding website DonorsChoose. The funds from BJ’s Charitable Foundation provide classroom essentials and projects for the students of Pensacola and the surrounding area. The donation will fulfill 55 projects on DonorsChoose and impact over 5,000 local students.

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losers COMMON CORE It’s official. The educational initiative implemented under former Governor Rick Scott has been “officially eliminated.” The new curriculum from the Florida Department of Education—Florida BEST (Benchmarks for Excellent Student Thinking) Standards for English Language Arts (ELA) and Mathematics—is expected to be formally adopted by the State Board of Education this month. Governor Ron DeSantis said, “We’ve developed clear and concise expectations for students at every grade level and allow teachers the opportunity to do what they love most—inspire young Floridians to achieve their greatest potential.” AQAP The White House last week announced that the U.S. had killed the leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), Qassim al-Rimi, in a counterterrorism operation in Yemen. AQAP, considered the most dangerous branch of al-Qaida, was the group that claimed responsibility for the terrorist attack on NAS Pensacola that killed three people and wounded eight others. The group had released an 18-minute video that claimed it was in communication with the shooter whom the video alleged had been planning an attack for years. IOWA CAUCUS Iowa Democrats showed up at more than 1,600 caucus sites on Monday, Feb. 3. The actual caucusing went pretty well, but when precinct officials went to send the results to the state party, the new app created for that purpose crashed. The results took days to tally, leaving people questioning whether too much emphasis was placed on the Iowa caucus.

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outtakes

By Rick Outzen

UNEQUAL ACCESS Early Friday morning, a poor, young black mother of three died in her home. With friends and family present, she finally succumbed to brain cancer. She had no insurance and couldn’t afford the medical care that might have extended her life. At a recent PYP event, Mark Faulkner, the president and CEO of Baptist Health Care, talked about how our community has excellent healthcare available. Unfortunately, he added that medical care isn’t readily accessible to everyone in the greater Pensacola area. Then Faulkner asked, “Is healthcare a right or a privilege?” If medical care is a right, then every citizen should have access to the best care possible. If the care is a privilege, then only those with wealth or medical insurance have the benefit of the best—the rich and insured live; the poor die. When he ran for re-election in 2014, Governor Rick Scott touted his support for the expansion of Medicaid, which was available to all states under the Affordable Care Act. However, after winning the race, he reversed his position and adamantly fought against efforts by the Florida Senate to expand Medicaid in 2015. The proposed expansion, which would have offered coverage to over 600,000 uninsured Florida residents, died in the Florida Legislature. Scott’s reversal won support from this conservative base and paved the way for him to get President Donald Trump’s help when he successfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 2018. His

political calculation paid off. He supported Medicaid expansion to win the gubernatorial elections and changed his stance to position himself for the U.S. Senate. Of course, there is an irony in Scott’s position. He got wealthy thanks to Medicaid. In 1997, he resigned as CEO of Columbia/HCA, one of the nation’s largest for-profit healthcare systems, after federal investigators uncovered massive Medicare fraud. Columbia/HCA eventually agreed to pay $840 million in criminal fines, civil damages and penalties. Scott left the company with $300 million in stock, a $5.1 million severance and a $950,000-per-year consulting contract for five years. Meanwhile, Florida’s uninsured have stayed uninsured because of Scott’s political flipflop. Emergency rooms continue to serve as the family doctor for the poor. Charity hospitals struggle to cover their costs. And the lives of poor, uninsured Floridians are cut short. In Pensacola, we have wonderful hospitals and top-notch physicians. Baptist, Ascension Sacred Heart and West Florida regularly send out press releases about awards they have won for quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, not all Pensacola area residents have access to the same procedures, care and prescriptions. Extending Medicaid coverage might not make access equal fully, but more Floridians would have a better quality of life. Yes, I believe that healthcare is a right, not a privilege. {in} rick@inweekly.net

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WEIRD SCIENCE

Jeff VanderMeer / Photo by Kathy Hutchins / Shutterstock.com

By Jeremy Morrison Much like his body of fiction, author Jeff VanderMeer absorbs the natural world. He took a moment in the middle of an interview recently, pausing for fuller immersion—“I was just looking down into the ravine we live on here, and there was just such a huge flurry of birds, it kind of blew my mind.” The natural environment and environmental issues, in fact, might be considered a muse of sorts for the award-winning, New York Times-bestselling author, whom The New Yorker has hailed as “the king of weird fiction” and “weird Thoreau.” St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge near the Northwest Florida writer’s home, for example, inspired Area X in the “Southern Reach Trilogy,” and the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had seeped deep into his subconscious as that work took shape—“It was like a thing that you felt, you felt not just in your mind but physically ill in your body, and there was no way that wasn’t going to impact the fiction in some way.”

VanderMeer has long incorporated environmental themes into his writing, but in an age when people are awaking to the realities of a climate crisis, such fiction seems to reflect a relevance that almost transcends literature or art in its approach toward the mission. “I’ve always been addressing environmental issues from early on in my work,” VanderMeer explained. “It’s just that urgency in the world seems to have caught up with it, if you know what I mean.” As keynote speaker for the University of West Florida’s STEAM2020 conference, VanderMeer will deliver a lecture Friday, Feb. 14, entitled “This World and the Next: Storytelling and Real Life in an Uncertain Era,” which delves into the role of fiction in addressing the issues surrounding the climate crisis. “I think we’re all looking for ways to talk about what’s going on that are productive in terms of not just convincing people that, you know, facts are facts, but also trying to figure out the best ways to move us towards the kind of actions and the kinds of policies that we need,” VanderMeer said. “And fiction may be not real,

"And fiction may be not real, but there’s not real that’s useful and there’s not real that’s harmful." Jeff VanderMeer

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findings,” VanderMeer said, explaining but there’s not real that’s useful and there’s that other scientists used dream states to not real that’s harmful. So, what I really try explore their hypothesis. “And you would to do is I try to make sure that even in the have naturalists that would deliver their most fantastical things I write, there’s a factual anchor or basis or some psychologi- findings in the form of poetry back in the 1800s, so there’s always been kind of a cal truth that might make someone think blurring of those lines.” more closely about these issues.” And while the author understands he’s VanderMeer started writing at a young not a scientist or environmental expert— age, attempting reconstructions of “Ae“there’s a certain amount of limitation in sop’s Fables” from memory as a child. He what I can speak about and what I feel first began incorporating environmental comfortable speaking about”—his focus themes around the age of 13. on addressing environmental themes in “I wrote a story called “Disintegration,” his fiction has landed him on the climatewhich was about a character encountercentric speaking circuit. ing basically a surreal kind of fantastical “At this point, it feels like I have a version of ecological collapse through responsibility to be a responsible advocate invasive species and the whole world kind for this subject because people now actuof dissolving because of that,” the author ally turn to me,” VanderMeer said. said. “That’s the first time I remember kind At such public appearances, the author of consciously dealing with it.” increasingly does encounter actual scienThroughout his career, VanderMeer has tists who cite his works of fiction as inspiwritten numerous novels—in addition to the ration in their own professional pursuits. “Southern Reach Trilogy,” there’s works like “I get more and more of this thing where “Borne” and “Dead Astronauts—and won lityoung people come up to me and say, ‘In part erary accolades including the Hugo, Nebula because of your books, it really made me want and Shirley Jackson awards. He has been to go into environmental science,’ things like compared to Franz Kafka and spoken before that,” VanderMeer said. “So it’s something that the American Library Association. His work I’m aware of. That is important to me because falls into the sub-genre of fiction referred to so often you can’t really see if fiction has a as the New Weird, and he appreciates the practical impact on people. So any time it does, term—“It’s not a term of the market place you have to kind of be aware that that is part of or easily commodified and it does kind of your audience and be kind of thankful for that.” embrace this idea, kind of the extremes of The author’s success—in addition to the world, the fact that the world is more bestselling books, some work has been beautiful than we can even imagine someturned into film—also affords him a sometimes because we don’t see it clearly.” what unexpected venue in which to have But beyond the critical consensus a positive environmental impact—many that VanderMeer’s work is up to snuff, his writing has something else—a sense of pur- non-readers have found their way to his Twitter feed, where he encourages people pose, a mission to inform its readers on an to embrace small-step measures such as almost subconscious, cellular level of the re-wilding their yards to attract pollinators environmental realities beyond its story. and stopping the use of pesticides. VanderMeer believes that fiction is an “Weirdly enough,” VanderMeer said, appropriate venue for the exploration of “they’re only coming there because of the environmental issues, that it provides “the fact that the books have been successful, but perspective and the distance to see somesome of them are only staying because of the thing clearly” or as the author explained in nature posts and they don’t care about the relation to 2019’s “Dead Astronauts”—“In fiction at all, which is hilarious.” {in} terms of the storytelling, talking about the stuff, you can’t just use the normal ways of storytelling. It’s impossible to convey some of this stuff. It’s too surreal; it’s too out there; the real world is too out there.” “I think that fiction can be a laboratory,” VanderMeer said, “to WHAT: A lecture with author Jeff Vanderkind of extrapolate or show you Meer that’s part of University of West Florida’s things that, again, go beyond fact or STEAM2020 conference show facts in motion so to speak, and WHEN: 6-6:30 p.m. reception, 6:30-7:30 p.m. I think that can be very compelling.” lecture, Friday, Feb. 14 The author sees parallels with WHERE: Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefearly scientists who melded with ferson St. the mythic. COST: Free “Scientists actually use to use DETAILS: uwf.edu/steam2020 poetry and fiction to convey their

THIS WORLD AND THE NEXT: STORYTELLING AND THE REAL LIFE IN AN UNCERTAIN ERA

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PENSACOLA’S $18 MILLION DOWNTOWN EXTRAVAGANZA ing a public-private partnership that critics have cast a sharp eye toward.

By Jeremy Morrison Pensacola has $18 million to spend in the downtown core. A suite of four potential projects largely focused on walkability and connectivity are on the table. “I think this is great, man,” said Pensacola City Council Vice President Jared Moore as he looked over architectural renderings of the projects along with members of the public during a presentation earlier this month. Not everyone, however, is on board with the proposed projects. Members of the public and city council members have raised concerns about the appropriateness of the projects or the need to spend the money elsewhere. “I didn’t vote to borrow this money, and I’m not going to vote to spend it because of what it’s going to be spent on,” City Councilwoman Sherri Myers said a week after the projects were presented, as council members discussed the issue.

EATING THE ELEPHANT

Last summer, city council members decided to refinance bonds associated with the Community Maritime Park in order to get $17.8 million, now $18 million with interest, to use for improvements within the downtown Community Redevelopment Agency, basically the downtown core. The council made this decision shortly after hearing a pitch for two separate downtown projects from New York City-based landscape architectural firm SCAPE, an effort funded by downtown businessman Quint Studer. The SCAPE projects—both on the list of potentials—include improvement for Bruce Beach, as well as walkability and connectivity improvements along the downtown waterfront and within a cluster of downtown streets dubbed the Hashtag. The remaining two 88

projects being considered by the city council include the construction of a municipal marina at Community Maritime Park and a reimagining of an area off of East Garden Street, as well as a road diet along Jefferson Street. According to outside consultants hired by the city, the four projects together total north of $21.6 million. The Hashtag Waterfront Connector project is the most expensive at more than $10 million, though it’s split into phases. The Bruce Beach project will run an estimated $8.6 million. The CMP marina is expected to cost nearly $1.6 million, while the East Garden District/Jefferson St. Road Diet project, which involves a public-private partnership with a developer, costs about $1.3 million. “I believe these are all transformative and catalytic projects,” CRA Executive Director Helen Gibson told city council, sitting as the Community Redevelopment Agency, as she presented the projects. Gibson connected all four potential projects—including the two pitched from SCAPE last year—to the 2010 Urban Core Plan. She listed off other recommendations from that plan that the city had already tackled—“We have been taking bites of this elephant to consume it one bite at a time”—and acknowledged the total price tag for this collection of projects may require working in phases, “We can’t eat the whole elephant at one time. What kind of bites can we take out of it?” Mayor Grover Robinson told city council members that he thought the city could likely secure the lacking funds to complete all four projects via grants. “I wouldn’t worry about everything to the penny,” Robinson said.

‘TRANSFORMATIVE AND CATALYTIC’

This collection of projects within the CRA focuses on creating a more walkable downtown and better public amenities, while also featur-

Here’s a quick rundown: HASHTAG—Proposed by SCAPE, the Hashtag project concentrates on better connecting downtown Pensacola to its waterfront and also improving the walkability of the city’s urban landscape. The project has been divided into three phases. Phase one of the Hashtag project includes a Complete Streets revitalization of Main Street between Alcaniz and Baylen streets, as well as traffic calming components, bike lanes, bioretention features and urban landscaping. The second and third phases of the Hashtag project involve Complete Streets related improvements along Cedar Street, between Bartram Park and Spring Street. This portion of the project would also see better pedestrian connectivity between Baylen and Port Royal Way, as well as near the Port of Pensacola. Also, a “woonerf,” or shared street concept, would be employed along a stretch of Cedar. BRUCE BEACH The other project proposed by SCAPE aims to tie Bruce Beach, to the north of CMP, into the rest of downtown and also capitalize on the beach’s presently underutilized urban waterfront. Like the Hashtag project, the Bruce Beach project was presented as a phased effort. Phase one of the Bruce Beach project includes the construction of terraces and a pedestrian bridge, as well as a kayak launch. This phase is estimated to cost $1.99 million. The second phase involves the addition of sitting walls, an overlook area, exercise equipment, as well as parking and a marsh trail. Phase two will run $1.96 million. At $1.94 million, phase three would include an entry plaza, a learning garden and water feature, as well as shade structures and cultural exhibits. And finally, phase four, would include more cultural and educational exhibits and other site amenities and run $1.98 million. CMP MARINA The proposed day marina at the CMP would have 49 slips. The facility would not feature electricity or running water. Some of the work needed ahead of the actual marina has already been completed. The dredging was done in 2010, at a cost of $600,000, and the breakwater was constructed in 2015 for more than $1.8 million. The marina itself is expected to cost about a million and a half. EAST GARDEN DISTRICT/JEFFERSON STREET ROAD DIET The East Garden District would be a public-private partnership with local developer Chad Henderson, founder

and CEO of Catalyst HRE. The project entails overhauling the area of downtown near the intersection of Garden and Jefferson, adding retail, residential, a restaurant, a hotel and a parking garage. Around 20,000 square feet of existing buildings would be repurposed. There would be about 30,000 square feet of new mixed-use development and 175,000 square feet of hotel and parking garage space. While the city expects to put in a bit more than a million dollars, there will be an estimated $40 million of private investment in the project. The city projects the project will add $247,000 to the property rolls and generate $2.2 million in sales tax and $368,000 in bed tax.

PUZZLE PIECES

Initial reaction to these four potential projects was positive. “I’m excited. I wish that we had the money to do it all,” said Councilwoman Jewel Cannada-Wynn. “Every project is something that’s needed. Every project is something that’s going to improve our city.” But council members later expressed some reservations about committing so much money to plans that were admittedly “very much first brush conceptual.” Myers contended that the city was focusing too much in the downtown area, and Councilwoman Ann Hill voiced specific concerns about the Garden Street public-private partnership, asking when it made its way onto the list of proposed projects (Gibson informed her it had been proposed by the developer but also connected to the 2010 plan—“It’s not a project out of thin air”). “I feel like the elephant is being shoved down my throat,” Hill said. Members of the public, too, expressed reservations about spending the $18 million on these projects as opposed to improving the city’s flooding issues in the CRA area or focusing the funds elsewhere. And they questioned whether the SCAPE projects were true to the firm’s vision—“They had fought the city on this,” said Drew Buchanan, who oversaw walkability issues on the mayor’s transition team, referring to the absence of dedicated bike lanes in the city’s proposed plans for Main Street. Ultimately, though, five of the seven city council members—again, sitting as the CRA—were on board with the four proposed projects and voted Feb. 10 to give city staff the go-ahead to pursue them, while allowing the plans could evolve after further consideration or public input. Nodding toward Pensacola’s downtown revitalization puzzle coming together over recent years, Councilman Moore said he thought these projects fit nicely—"These catalytic projects seem like big pieces.” {in} inweekly.net


February 13, 2020

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the votes are broken down by age groups, Casey leads with the Millennials (22-34) and Gen X (35-44). Bergosh leads in the other age groups. According to an Inweekly/Political Matrix poll of 580 likely State House District 1 voters, incumbent Mike Hill holds a strong lead versus challenger Michelle Salzman. In the survey, 51.4% supported Hill with 21.7% going toward Salzman, leaving the remainder 26.9% undecided. One telling part of the poll was that with Millennials, Salzman led with 40.9% compared to Hill's 34.1% of the vote.

CARPENTER CREEK WORKSHOP

Carrie Chapman Catt / Photo Courtesy of Library of Congress

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS League of Women Voters Pensacola Bay Area is celebrating its centennial anniversary from 10 a.m.-noon on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Pensacola State College Student Center, Bldg. 5, 1013 Underwood Ave. In 1920, founder Carrie Chapman Catt believed that within five years, a League of Women Voters could give millions of women voters a crash course in civic engagement and launch them into the American political system. The League was a safe-haven for women, regardless of formal party affiliation, to find their voices on issues that mattered to them. As one early leader described it, the League is "like a university without walls ... whose members enter to learn and remain to shape the curriculum." As the organization approaches its 100th anniversary, we are reminded that government of the people, by the people and for the people cannot function without active involvement of the people. The League remains a force for change today because its members and supporters have never lost sight of the importance of the voice of the people. HOUSE DISTRICT 2 TIGHT According to an Inweekly/Political Matrix poll of 625 010 1

likely Florida House District 2 voters, we found that 48.8% of the respondents were undecided about six months out. Challenger Cris Dosev had an eight-point lead over incumbent Alex Andrade, 29.6%-21.6%. Dosev surprisingly was favored most by the 18-21 age group (42.4%), while Andrade had his highest percentage of support (40.2%) among Gen X, ages 35-64. The final GOP primary vote may hinge on the 65-plus age group, usually the largest voter bloc, where over 60% is undecided. The likely GOP voters were called using an Interactive Voice Response system during the hours of 1-7 p.m. between Jan. 2931. The margin of error for this study was +/- 4.5% with a confidence level of 95%.

OTHER POLLS Inweekly had Political

Matrix poll 404 likely Republican voters in Escambia County Commission District 1. First-term incumbent Jeff Bergosh leads the crowded pack, which isn't surprising this early in the campaign cycle, but Jesse Casey, who is running for the post for the third time, is close. With 40.1% of the vote, Bergosh is trailed by Casey with 33.7%. Jonathan Owens, who recently got into the race, has 4.5%. Political newcomer Jimmie Trotter has 3%, and 18.8% are undecided. When

Escambia County will host the first of four public workshops concerning the Carpenter Creek and Bayou Texar Revitalization Plan at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 19, at the Booker T. Washington High School auditorium, 6000 College Parkway. District 4 County Commissioner Robert Bender said the Carpenter Creek and Bayou Texar Watershed Management Plan is part of an overall effort to restore and improve the creek and the surrounding environment. "This watershed management plan is an important part of the work that is already being done to improve the health of Carpenter Creek and Bayou Texar," Commissioner Robert Bender said. "The county is already acquiring land along the creek to protect the water quality and the downstream watershed, and this plan will be the next step to securing the future of Carpenter Creek." Community input gathered from the workshops will be used to create an overall long-term plan to restore Carpenter Creek and Bayou Texar and to make the waterways more accessible for the community. "Thanks to the hard work of citizens, advocacy groups and elected officials like my predecessor Mayor Robinson and Councilwoman Sherri Myers, the community has a growing awareness of Carpenter Creek," Commissioner Bender said. "This watershed is not only an important piece to our environmental future, but with the input from this plan, we can make Carpenter Creek a natural asset to our quality of life as well." Seating for the workshop is limited, and registration is suggested. Citizens can register to attend at restorethewatershed.com.

BOWDEN RUNNING Last Thursday,

Ginger Bowden Madden announced she would run for state attorney in the First Judicial Circuit of Florida, seeking to replace Bill Eddins, who is retiring. Bowden Madden has served as an assistant state attorney for over 25 years prosecuting cases in every division of criminal court—circuit, county and juvenile court. She currently supervises assistant prosecutors serving in county and juvenile

courts and has served as lead prosecutor in several innovative programs to include Florida's first Veterans Treatment Court. "I'm so excited to begin this new phase of public service by putting my name before the voters and earning their trust to lead this critically important office," said Bowden Madden. "Our police, sheriffs' offices and other first responders do a magnificent job as our first line of defense. It is the state attorney's responsibility to see that work through to its proper conclusion, to put dangerous criminals behind bars and keep our neighborhoods safe." In a press release, Bowden Madden outlined her vision to keep Florida's Panhandle safe—"As Florida continues to grow, we have seen a greater threat of human trafficking and gang activity creep into Northwest Florida. As a woman, and as a mother, I have zero tolerance for any threat to the safety and wellbeing of our children and most vulnerable, and I will work with our law enforcement to forcefully deal with that kind of criminal behavior. " Bowden Madden sits on the board of directors of Shelter House. Both current and past civic involvement also includes Homeless Veteran's Stand Down, Krewe of Bowlegs, Fort Walton Beach Junior League, the Stage Crafters Theatre, FSU Seminole Boosters and several supporting organizations for Choctawhatchee High School. She is currently a member of Shalimar First United Methodist Church. Her oldest son, John, Jr., is a former felony prosecutor and is now a partner in the law firm of Campbell & Madden in Okaloosa County. Her other son, Mike, recently completed graduate school at Florida State University and works for the Wake Forest University football program. She comes from a football-rich family, as daughter to legendary Coach Bobby Bowden and sister to Coaches Tommy, Terry and Jeff Bowden. "When I was growing up, teamwork and leadership came up in every conversation," said Bowden Madden. "What I was taught then has followed me my whole life—no one can lead without first proving character and commitment. I'm pursuing this office because I'm committed to the citizens of our four counties—to keep them safe and protect our most vulnerable."

AMBASSADORS SOUGHT United Way of West Florida (UWWF) invites locals to apply for the 2020-21 Ambassador Program. By volunteering their time each month, these individuals help raise funds to meet critical needs in our community—addressing gaps in health, education and financial stability. Each ambassador supports multiple companies by planning and implementing successful fundraising campaigns. The Ambassador Program is designed to help participants gain a better understanding of the needs of our community, all while building inweekly.net


CAT-TASTIC Pensacola's locally-owned country radio station Cat Country 98.7 has been nominated as Radio Station of the Year by the Academy of Country Music. This will be Cat Country 98.7's 10th nomination in the last 16 years, and the station has previously won this award in 2006, 2009 and 2011. Dave Hoxeng, owner of Cat Country 98.7, said, "I'm so proud of our whole team. From morning to night, they are passionate about country music and our community and how the two work together in Pensacola." lasting relationships with current and future leaders in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties. As an ambassador, participants will strengthen their leadership skills, build strong community connections and be part of something much larger than any one person or organization. "In addition to igniting my passion for my community, serving as an ambassador gave me the opportunity to network and enhance my public speaking skills," said Brooke Potrzeba of the 2019 Ambassador Class. "The program helped me learn more about the true needs within the areas of health, education and financial stability in Escambia and Santa Rosa counties." The Ambassador program launches with participation in the Community Investment Panel, an opportunity that allows ambassadors and other panelists to witness and take part in how donations made to United Way of West Florida support local nonprofit agencies. Ambassadors make a time commitment of approximately 10 hours per month from March through December. To become an ambassador or to learn more, download an application at uwwf. org. Applications will be accepted through Feb. 21. For more information, contact Development Manager Blaise Moehl at blaise. moehl@uwwf.org.

INHOME RECOVERY InHome Recovery Care (IRC) has brought a new addiction treatment approach that eliminates many of

the barriers people identify when considering getting help for drug and alcohol problems. IRC offers an affordable, effective substance abuse treatment for those struggling with managing their daily lives and responsibilities to the patient's home for a period that lasts between six months and a year. "Our InHome Recovery model is the most innovative, comprehensive approach I have encountered in all of my time working in the substance abuse treatment field," said Clinical Director Colleen Donovan Brown. "We provide evidence-based services in our clients' homes for as long as a year. It just doesn't get better than that, in my opinion." Mike Flounlacker, CEO and managing director of InHome Recovery Care, believes the country has taken a "broken approach to its continuum of care." "What we know is that the longer an individual receives professional care and support, the better their chances of success are," said Flounlacker. "If you think about it—is it reasonable to expect that a person that has abused alcohol or drugs for several years can go to a treatment program for 30 or 60 days and completely reverse those behavioral patterns?" InHome Recovery Care is licensed by the state of Florida and is available now. Many of the treatment costs may be covered by insurance. For more information about InHome Recovery Care for you or someone you know, visit inhomerecoverycare.com.

FINANCIAL AID DAY Pensacola State

College's Financial Aid Day will be noon3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 16, at the Student Center, Bldg. 5, on the Pensacola campus, 1000 College Blvd. Admissions, advising and financial aid counselors will be available to help new and returning students and their parents get started at Pensacola State College. Potential students can ask questions, use the computer lab for online forms and receive one-on-one assistance. "Knowledgeable volunteers will be on hand to walk attendees through the entire process," said Kathy Dutremble, Pensacola State's dean of Student Services and Enrollment Services. "And if potential students and parents are stumped by FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) forms, they can receive personal help filling out and submitting the FAFSA form. The FAFSA form is a mandatory first step to receiving financial aid." To complete FAFSA, please bring FSA ID—apply at fsaid.ed.gov—2018 IRS tax transcript and W-2 statements (or Form 1099), Social Security number, driver's license or another valid photo ID, alien registration card or Certificate of Naturalization, untaxed income records for 2018 (if applicable), Social Security benefits, veterans non-education benefits (disability compensation), most recent military LES (active-duty), DD214 and value of 2018 child support received and/or paid.

Attendees should enter the Student Center from Underwood Avenue. For more information, email fava@pensacolastate.edu.

LIVING SHORES WORKSHOP Escambia County will host the first public workshop concerning the Pensacola Bay Living Shoreline Project at 6 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 24, at Redeemer Lutheran Church, 333 Commerce St. The Pensacola Bay Living Shoreline Project is a large-scale living shoreline project in Pensacola Bay with the goal of creating 200 acres of aquatic habitat. The project encompasses three sites—Site A, White Island; Site B, Eastern Shore of NAS Pensacola; and Site C, Southern Shore of NAS Pensacola. The design of this project is funded by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council through RESTORE Act Pot 2 funds in the amount of $217,000 and through the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Defense Infrastructure Grant funds in the amount of $375,000. Volkert Engineering and South Coast Engineers were selected to design the project. Visit myescambia.com for more details. The public workshop will include project overview, one-on-one opportunity to ask questions and time to present Escambia County with written or verbal comments.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR DIB Parking &

Traffic Committee will meet at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13, in the Bowden Building, Room #1, 120 Church St. Pensacola City Council will meet at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13, at Pensacola City Hall, Council Chambers, 222 W. Main St. Brownsville Neighborhood Cleanup starts at 7 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. The general cleanup area is south of Fairfield Drive, west of North Z Street and north of Mobile Highway. Visit myescambia.com/cleanup for more details. Escambia County Commission will meet at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 20, at the Ernie Lee Magaha Government Building, 221 S. Palafox. Open forum begins at 4:30 p.m. {in}

OVER $1.1 MILLION VERDICT SECURED BY LEVIN PAPANTONIO Our Clients' Awarded 100% of Losses, Attorney's Fees, and Costs.

PETER J. MOUGEY & MICHAEL C. BIXBY Recovered $250 Million on Behalf of Over 3,000 Investors SECURITIES & BUSINESS LITIGATION | HOLD YOUR STOCK BROKER ACCOUNTABLE

850.435.7000 | LEVINLAW.COM | PENSACOLA, FL February 13, 2020

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inweekly.net


Things We Love Right Now In honor of Valentine's Day, we decided to declare our love in big, bold print for some of our current favorite people, places and things. Because anyone who doesn't agree that love comes in a variety of shapes and forms obviously hasn't eaten the right slice of pizza yet.

Photo by: Natalie Allgyer | Model: Brittany Miller February 13, 2020

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The Daily Squeeze Photo by Steven Gray

•To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You

We know we aren't the only adults who are totally obsessed with this YA love story... right? We also have to give a special shout out to Netflix for being smart enough to release this sequel this week. You really made our Valentine's Day plans a no-brainer.

•Supertouch Vintage

Mid-century furniture has never looked cooler—especially not in Pensacola—than it does at this new retail spot on Navy Boulevard. Same goes for vintage Levi's. 3960 W. Navy Blvd., #18, supertouchvintage.com

•Jerry Harris

Jerry from "Cheer" is hands down the best person reality TV has given us in a long, long time. Maybe even ever. And following him on Instagram is hands down the best decision we've made in 2020. You should do it too. @jerry.h.arris

•Best Coast

Bethany and Bob are finally releasing a new record, and we are 100% here for it, especially after hearing the first two singles. "Always Tomorrow" will be out next Friday (Feb. 21), bestcoast.net 414 1

•Such a Fun Age

It doesn't happen often, but Kiley Reid totally has us reading fiction and recommending it to anyone who will listen. kileyreid.com

•Issa Rae

Hollywood has finally figured out that Issa is exactly the kind of leading lady we all want and need to see on the big screen. We can't wait to watch her work her magic in "The Photograph" this weekend and "The Lovebirds" with Kumail Nanjiani in April.

•Nomadic's Cafe

Name a better trio than Big Jerk Soda, Mrs. Jones Cold Brew and Nomadic Eats. Yeah, you can't and neither can we. That's why we love this new collaborative cafe so damn much. 9 E. Gregory St.

•Sunday Service

Every class at Ride Society is a good one, but their weekly Sunday Service is the best cure for the "Sunday scaries" we've ever found. Even if you've never tried a spin class before, just trust us on this one and book a bike, OK? 3 S. Palafox, ridesociety.com

•Mardi Gras

Who's ready to let the good times roll next weekend? Because let's be honest—when Valentine's Day happens before Mardi Gras, it kind of just feels like a speed bump on the way to the best part of February. Sorry Cupid. pensacolamardigras.com

•Kingfisher Sweet Treats

Unless you've been living under a rock, you've probably been to Kingfisher for a sandwich or mullet basket. But if you haven't tried one of their tarts, cookies or slices of cake, you have to go back. Immediately. They have some of the best desserts in town—and we say this with the kind of confidence that only comes from trying pretty much every cupcake and donut around. 1500 Barrancas Ave., kingfishersandwiches.com

•The Wilderness, Season 2

We know, we know. Saying we "love" a podcast about the 2020 election might seem a little weird, especially since election fatigue is already hitting most of us pretty hard and it's not even Super Tuesday yet. But Jon Favreau really makes exploring the four

most competitive regions on the current electoral map a journey worth taking. crooked.com/podcast-series/the-wilderness

•She Warrior

If you aren't familiar with local badass Natlyn Jones and her activewear line She Warrior yet, you will be soon. We promise. iamshewarrior.com

•Mitt Romney

He's playing the long game and we respect that.

•Behind the Grind

If you're looking for a new podcast to add to your weekly rotation, this should be it. The focus is local entrepreneurs and highperforming individuals, and they've already recorded episodes with some impressive guests—like former Mayor Ashton Hayward. facebook.com/behindthegrindshow

•The Daily Squeeze

We aren't doctors or scientists, but we are smart enough to know that your body will love you if you treat it to a smoothie or coldpressed juice from The Daily Squeeze. So will your Instagram—because their toasts and bowls are straight-up works of art. 901 N. 12th Ave., thedailysqueezepcola.com inweekly.net


Valentine’ Day MAKE IT SPECIAL AT OUR HOUSE

Celebrate Valentine’s Day Weekend at the Fish House! From Thursday, February 13, through Sunday, February 16th, we’ll be offering Valentine’s Day specials throughout each day. Chef de Cuisine John Huggins will offer a special feature with lunch service from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., and a dinner feature beginning at 3 p.m. In addition, our current lunch and dinner menus will be available.

For details, visit fishhousepensacola.com.

850-470-0003 · 600 S. BARRACKS ST. · OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. February 13, 2020

15


calendar PENSACOLA ICE FLYERS VS. MACON MAYHEM 7:35 p.m. $15 and up. Pensacola Bay

Center, 201 E. Gregory St. pensacolabaycenter.com GLOW BOWL 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Every Friday and Saturday. $12 per person. Strikerz Entertainment Center, 3200 N. Palafox.

SATURDAY 2.15

THURSDAY 2.13

WORK ON THE FLORIDA TRAIL 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Every Thursday. Three miles north of Deaton Bridge Road. meetup.com/ftawesterngate YOGA WITHIN REACH 9-10 a.m. Free. Community Health Northwest Florida, 2315 W. Jackson St., Room A. healthcarewithinreach.org COMMUNITY PILATES 9 a.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org BREAKERSPACE ELECTRONICS 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Pensacola Library, 239 N. Spring St. mywfpl.com OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS 1 p.m. $7 (cash only). Studer Community Institute, 220 W. Garden St. pensacolacinemaart.com HARRIET 4 p.m. $7 (cash only). Studer Community Institute, 220 W. Garden St. pensacolacinemaart.com FLIGHTS AND BITES 5-7 p.m. $20 per person. Thursdays. Wine and food pairings. The District, 123 E. Government St. districtsteaks.com AWM WINE TASTING 5-7 p.m. Free. Aragon Wine Market, 27 S. Ninth Ave. facebook. com/aragonwine YAPPY HOUR 5-10 p.m. Through Feb. 27. 5% of proceeds benefit Escambia County Animal Shelter. Red Fish Blue Fish, 5B Via De Luna Drive. redfishbluefishpensacolabeach.com DOMESTIC ARTS 101: THE RASPBERRY TART

5:30-6:30 p.m. Studio South, 955 E. Nine Mile Road. studiosouthon9mileroad.com

CAFÉ ISRAEL: THE WONDERING IRAQI JEW 6 p.m. Shirley’s Café and Bakery, 1014 616 1

Underwood Ave. facebook.com/shirleyscafepensacola MOLINO MELODIE S 6 p.m. Thursdays. Molino Branch Library, 6450-A Highway 95A. mywfpl.com DEATH CAFÉ 6 p.m. Ever’man, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org MEDITATION AND ENERGY HEALING 6 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org ZUMBA WITH SHANNON AND FRIENDS 6-7 p.m. $4. Homestead Community Center, 7830 Pine Forest Road. END OF THE LINE THURSDAY DINNER 6-9 p.m. End of the Line Café, 610 E. Wright St. Sign up for the newsletter for menu. eotlcafe.com

FRIDAY 2.14

THE BACKYARD BOHEMIAN: 30-MINUTE MEALS 11 a.m. Ever’man Educational Cen-

ter, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org

HAPPY HOUR COOKOUT 5 p.m. Seville

Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com ACOUSTIC SONGWRITERS NIGHT 6 p.m. Every Friday through March 27. Frazier’s Country Wines, 3130 Barrancas Ave. fromthegroundupgardenpensacola.com COMPASSIONATE CUISINE VEGAN COOKING 6 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center,

327 W. Garden St. everman.org

SILENT SKY 7:30 p.m. $7-$18. University of

West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Parkway, Bldg. 82. uwf.edu/cfpa

PARKRUN/WALK MEETUP 7:30 a.m. University of West Florida, Rec Plex North Field, 11000 University Parkway. parkrun.us/ recplexnorth OCEAN HOUR CLEAN-UP 9-10 a.m. Come join Ocean Hour’s clean-ups at Wayside Park and Bartram Park. Wayside Park is located at the Pensacola Visitor Center, 745 Bayfront Parkway; Bartram Park is at 211 E. Main St. behind the Fish House restaurant. oceanhourfl.com SANTA ROSA FARMERS MARKET 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Fresh local produce, honey, baked goods and live music. Pace Presbyterian Church, Woodbine Road. PALAFOX MARKET 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fresh produce, live plants, baked goods, fine art and antiques. Items originate directly from participating vendors, including dozens of local farmers, home gardeners and area artists. Martin Luther King Jr. Plaza, N. Palafox. palafoxmarket.com YOU SELL IT HERE FARMER’S MARKET 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. Every Saturday. 8600 Pensacola Blvd. facebook.com/yousellithere LEAPS 10 a.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org $1 OR LESS WINTER BOOK SALE 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Open Books Bookstore and Prison Book Project, 1040 N. Guillemard St. facebook.com/openbooksbookstore LET’S EAT: INTRO TO HERBAL COOKING WITH MARNI 11 a.m. $33. Asher & Bee

Apothecary and Tea House, 3014 N. Ninth Ave. facebook.com/asherandbee HERBAL MEDICINE 101 Noon. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org FEBRUARY DAY BAY CRUISES 1-3 p.m. Select Saturdays and Sundays. $20 per person. Pensacola Bay Cruises, 750 Commendencia St. pensacolabaycruise.com FEBRUARY SLOW RIDE 2 p.m. Alabama Square, 401 W. Gonzalez St. facebook.com/ bikepensacola KIDS AND KRITTERS PARADE 2 p.m. $5 entry fee for pets, free for kids to join. Casino Beach parking lot. pensacolabeachmardigras.com CHESS CLUB 2 p.m. Saturdays. All levels welcome. Pensacola Library, 239 N. Spring St. mywfpl.com O’RILEY’S OYSTER BASH 2-4 p.m. O'Riley's Irish Pub, 321 S. Palafox. HAVE MERCY BOULEVARD 2:30 and 7 p.m. $20. Pensacola High School Auditorium, 500 W. Maxwell St. pcaraonline.com GIRL SCOUT COOKIES & CRAFT PAIRING 3-6 p.m. $13-$15. Gary’s Brewery and Biergarten, 208 Newman Ave. facebook.com/ garysbrew FOURTH ANNUAL ST. PRACTICE DAY PUB CRAW L 5 p.m. Free. O'Riley's Irish Pub, 321

S. Palafox.

ELITE CHAMPIONSHIP WRESTLING 6-8 p.m.

$15. Tiger Point Community Center, 1370 Tiger Park Lane. PENSACOLA ICE FLYERS VS. MACON MAYHEM

7:05 p.m. $15 and up. Pensacola Bay Center, 201 E. Gregory St. pensacolabaycenter.com SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 7:30 p.m. $14-$20. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. pensacolalittletheatre.com SILENT SKY 7:30 p.m. $7-$18. University of West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Parkway, Bldg. 82. uwf.edu/cfpa CHRIS THOMAS KING 8 p.m. $10-$30. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. vinylmusichall.com SATURDAY SWING OUTS 8 p.m. $5. Saturdays. Breathe Yoga Studio, 505 S. Adams St. GLOW BOWL 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Every Friday and Saturday. $12 per person. Strikerz Entertainment Center, 3200 N. Palafox.

SUNDAY 2.16

THEMED BRUNCH AT PERFECT PLAIN 10 a.m.

Perfect Plain Brewing Co., 50 E. Garden St. facebook.com/perfectplainbrewingco

TRANSMISSION MEDITATION WORLD SERVICE 10:30 a.m. Ever’man Educational

Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org

BIERGARTEN YOGA WITH TINA SCHLAUDER

10:30 a.m. $12. Gary’s Brewery and Biergarten, 208 Newman Ave. facebook.com/ garysbrew BRUNCH WITH LIVE MUSIC 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Café Single Fin, 380 N. Ninth Ave. facebook.com/cafesinglefin VEGAN BRUNCH 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sign up for the newsletter for menu. End of the Line Café, 610 E. Wright St. eotlcafe.com SUNDAY BRUNCH AT H20 11 a.m. $28.95 for adults. Free valet parking and 15% off with local ID. H20 Hilton, 12 Via De Luna Drive. facebook.com/hiltonpensacolabeach FEBRUARY DAY BAY CRUISES 1-3 p.m. Select Saturdays and Sundays. $20 per person. Pensacola Bay Cruises, 750 Commendencia St. pensacolabaycruise.com CARD PLAYERS CLUB 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Pensacola Library, 239 N. Spring St. mywfpl.com KING CAKE, RED BEANS AND RICE, CRAWFISH AND BLUES 1-6 p.m. $15-$20. Frazier's

Country Wines, 3130 Barrancas Ave. PUBLIC ICE SKATE 1:30, 3 and 4:30 p.m. $9$12. Pensacola Bay Center, 201 W. Gregory St. pensacolabaycenter.com SACRED GEOMETRY: MAGICK 2 p.m. $18. Asher & Bee Apothecary and Tea House, 3014 N. Ninth Ave. facebook.com/asherandbee SILENT SKY 7:30 p.m. $7-$18. University of West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Parkway, Bldg. 82. uwf.edu/cfpa SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 3 p.m. $14-$20. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. pensacolalittletheatre.com TRANSGENDER ALLIANCE 4 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org SAMANTHA FISH 7 p.m. $20. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. vinylmusichall.com

MONDAY 2.17

MAKE HEALTHY HAPPEN 11 a.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org inweekly.net


calendar

Valentine's Day Calendar

Pensacola Opera's Easy to Love / Photo by Meg Burke Whether you want to eat a special meal or see a special show (or both, really, if we're talking a proper date night), here's a roundup of events to pick from.

THURSDAY 2.13

GALENTINE’S AND FAMILY DESSERT EVENING 4 p.m. Henny Penny’s Patisserie, 4412 W. Jackson St. facebook.com/ hennypennyspatisserie CREATIONS WITH CHRISSY: DIY HEART FELT FLORALS 6-8 p.m. $25. Perfect Plain Brewing Co., 50 E. Garden St. facebook.com/perfectplainbrewingco VALENTINE’S DAY CELEBRATION 6-8 p.m. $15-$20. First Dance Ballroom Studio, 913 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #35A, Harbourtown Village. GALENTINE’S DAY 6-9 p.m. Donation drive for I Support the Girls. Bring a box of pads or tampons, or suggested donation of $10. Dolce and Gelato, 2050 N. 12th Ave. facebook.com/dolcegelatopensacola LOVE AND CACAO 6:30 p.m. $35-$45. Chocolate-making class. Asher & Bee Apothecary and Tea House, 3014 N. Ninth Ave., Ste. B. facebook.com/asherandbee EASY TO LOVE 7:30 p.m. $25-$50. Onenight only concert from Pensacola Opera and Pensacola Children’s Chorus. Saenger Theatre, 118 S. Palafox. pensacolaopera.com COLLEGE NIGHT TRAFFIC LIGHT PARTY 10 p.m. Show your marital status February 13, 2020

with red, green, or yellow signs. Phineas Phogg’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

FRIDAY 2.14

VALENTINE’S DAY AT FISH HOUSE Lunch from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Dinner from 3 p.m. Fish House, 600 S. Barracks St. greatsouthernrestaurants.com VALENTINE’S DAY AT JACKSON’S STEAKHOUSE Lunch from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner from 5 p.m. Jackson’s Steakhouse, 400 S. Palafox. greatsouthernrestaurants.com VALENTINE’ DAY AT ANGELENA’S Lunch from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner from 5 p.m. Angelena’s Italian Ristorante, 101 E. Intendencia St. greatsouthernrestaurants.com VALENTINE’S DAY AT FIVE SISTERS BLUES CAFÉ Lunch service from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. with dinner service following. Five Sisters Blues Café, 421 W. Belmont. greatsouthernrestaurants.com VALENTINE’S DAY LUNCH AND LEARN Noon. $25. So Gourmet 407-D S. Palafox. sogourmetpensacola.com VALENTINE’S DAY DINNER + WINE 4-10:30 p.m. $45 per person, $95 per couple, includes bottle of wine. South Market, 232 E. Main St. facebook.com/ eatsouthmarket VALENTINE’S DINNER AT V. PAUL’S $49. Fixed-price four-course meal. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com DINNER AT HILTON PENSACOLA

5-8 p.m. $75 per person, $120 per couple. Hilton Pensacola, 12 Via de Luna Drive. facebook.com/hiltonpensacolabeach VALENTINE’S DINNER AT SEVILLE QUARTER 5-9 p.m.$55 per person. Three-course dinner with wine pairings available. For reservations, call 434-6211. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com VALENTINE’S DINNER AT RED FISH BLUE FISH 5-10 p.m. $50 per person, $80 per couple. Red Fish Blue Fish, 5 Via de Luna Drive, Unit B. facebook.com/redfishbluefishpensacolabeach VALENTINE’S DAY SPECIAL AT UPH 5-10:30 p.m. Union Public House, 309 S. Reus St. facebook.com/unionpensacola VALENTINE’S DINNER FOR TWO 6-8:30 p.m. Frank and Lola Love Pensacola, 165 Ft. Pickens Road. 934-8670 for reservations. VALENTINE’S MURDER DINNER THEATER 6:30-9 p.m. $40. Frazier's Country Wines, 3130 Barrancas Ave. frazierscountrywines.com SHORT ATTENTION SPAN THEATRE 7:30 p.m. $14-$20. Pensacola Little Theatre, 400 S. Jefferson St. pensacolalittletheatre.com BIG DEAL BURLESQUE VALENTINE’S DAY SHOW 8 p.m. $12-$35. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. vinylmusichall.com EMO PROM: PENSACOLA FOR LOVERS EDITION 10 p.m. Free. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. vinylmusichall.com 17


calendar RESTORATIVE PILATES 5:15 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org THE ODDLING TROT 6 p.m. Mondays. Join Odd Colony running club for a three-mile run and enjoy $2 off pints after the run. Odd Colony Brewing Co., 260 N. Palafox. facebook.com/oddcolony SEVILLE QUARTER MILER S 6 p.m. Runners meet in front of Seville Quarter for a run around downtown Pensacola. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com HANDS-ON COOKING: CAST IRON PIZZA 6 p.m. $45. So Gourmet, 407-D S. Palafox. sogourmetpensacola.com CROHN’S AND COLITIS SUPPORT GROUP

6:30 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org

TUESDAY 2.18

YOGA WITHIN REACH 9-10 a.m. Free. Commu-

nity Health Northwest Florida, 2315 W. Jackson St., Room A. healthcarewithinreach.org JOHN APPLEYARD TALK: FUNERARY, ART AND CEMETERIES 9 a.m. Free. Pensacola

Visitor Center, 1401 E. Gregory St. OPEN

STEAM LAB 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays. Pensaco-

la Library, 239 N. Spring St. mywfpl.com ASTARA’S STUDY GROUP 1:30 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org COMPLIMENTARY WINE TASTING 4-6 p.m. Bodacious, 407-D S. Palafox. sogourmetpensacola.com

FUNKY YOGA 6 p.m. Free. Ever'man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org ZUMBA WITH SHANNON AND FRIENDS 6-7 p.m. $4. Homestead Community Center, 7830 Pine Forest Road. COUNTRY TWO-STEP DANCING 6:30 p.m. $12. Whiskey Runners Saloon, 610 E. Nine Mile Road. dancecraftstudios.com WISHBONE ASH 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR

8 p.m. $30-$70. Vinyl Music Hall, 2 S. Palafox. vinylmusichall.com BARS > BS: NO LOVE EDITION 8 p.m. $5 chizuko, 506 W. Belmont St. facebook. com/chizukopensacola

WEDNESDAY 2.19

BEGINNER YOGA WITH JOHN 11:15 a.m.

Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org

COOKING WITH CHEF IRV MILLER: AUTHENTIC NEW ORLEANS 5 and 7:30 p.m. $45

per person. Jackson’s Steakhouse, 400 S. Palafox. greatsouthernrestaurants.com VINYASA YOGA 6 p.m. Ever’man Educational Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org WINE DINNER 6 p.m. $86. So Gourmet, 407D S. Palafox. sogourmetpensacola.com WEST COAST SWING DANCING 6:30 p.m. $12. Whiskey Runners Saloon, 610 E. Nine Mile Road. dancecraftstudios.com

TRANSMISSION GROUP WORLD SERVICE MEDITATION 7:15 p.m. Ever’man Education-

al Center, 327 W. Garden St. everman.org

Arts & Culture

≥Events

TAG STEAM 2020 EXHIBITION RECEPTION 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 13. TAG, University of West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Parkway, Bldg. 82. uwf.edu/ steam2020 AUTHOR TALK: JEFF VANDERMEER 6

p.m. Friday, Feb. 14. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org STEAM2020 COLLOQUIUM 10 a.m.-3

p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org FAMILY SUNDAY: MARBLE PAPER HEARTS 1-4 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 16.

$6 per participant. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org

CORNERED On view

QUAYSIDE ART GALLERY: MEET THE ARTIST BOB BURRIDGE

GALLERY 1060’S GREATEST HITS

3-4:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16. Quayside Art Gallery, 17 E. Zaragoza.

PMA GALLERY TOURS

2:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Free with museum admission. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org

≥Current Exhibits

PENSACOLA STATE STUDENTS SUNSET PHOTO EXHIBIT On

view through Feb. 13. Jaco’s Bayfront Bar & Grille, 997 S. Palafox. 2020 On view through Feb. 27. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. artelgallery.org

through Feb. 27. Artel Gallery, 223 S. Palafox. artelgallery.org

On view through Feb. 28. First City Art Center, 1060 N. Guillemard St. firstcityart.org

66th ANNUAL YOUTH ART FOCUS On view

through March 1. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org

TAG STEAM 2020 EXHIBIT On view

through April 1. TAG, University of West Florida Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 11000 University Parkway, Bldg. 82. uwf.edu/ steam2020 CONTEMPORARY EXPRESSIONISM On

view through May 1. Anna Lamar Switzer Center for Visual

Arts at Pensacola State College, 1000 College Blvd. pensacolastate.edu DOCUFLORIDA 3 On view through May 3. Pensacola Museum of Art, 407 S. Jefferson St. pensacolamuseum.org COTTON FIELDS TO CONGRESS: THE LIFE AND CAREER OF EARL HUTTO On

view at the T.T. Wentworth, Jr. Florida State Museum, 330 S. Jefferson St. historicpensacola.org

GALLERY DAYS

Noon-4 p.m. Saturdays. Featuring local artists. To be featured, contact Angel at 941-7354586 or call the restaurant at 4770035. TGI Fridays, 1240 Airport Blvd.

≥Workshops & Classes

THE GLASS CHARM

12:30-1:30 p.m.

Who are you voting for? Seriously, we want to know. Florida’s Presidential Preference Primary is less than a month away, and we are looking for a few strong, informed and engaged voices to tell us and our readers why their candidate of choice is actually the best choice. So if you’re fully in for Warren, Biden, Sanders, Buttigieg, Yang, heck, maybe even Bloomberg, and think you can write well enough to convince others,

we want to hear from you.

Email your most impassioned and persuasive 1,000 words to info@inweekly.net, and we will publish the best of what we get in our upcoming primary guide. The deadline to be considered is Tuesday, Feb. 25. 818 1

inweekly.net


calendar Saturday, Feb. 15. Studio South, 955 E. Nine Mile Road. studiosouthon9mileroad.com MACHINE SEWING 101: THE PATTERN

5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 17. Studio South, 955 E. Nine Mile Road. studiosouthon9mileroad.com FIBER FREESTYLIN’ AT STUDIO SOUTH

5:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Open to all knitters, crocheters, weavers and more. Studio South, 955 E. Nine Mile Road. studiosouthon9mileroad.com QUILT, STITCH AND SEW OPEN SESSION

1-3 p.m. Thursdays. Pensacola Library, 239 N. Spring St. mywfpl.com POTTERY ON THE WHEEL Six-week

workshops are held Tuesdays from 6-9 p.m., Wednesdays from 9 a.m.-noon, Thursdays from 6-9 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m.-noon at First City Art Center, 1060 N. Guillemard St. Cost is $157.25 for members and $185 for non-members. For more information, visit firstcityart.org.

INTRODUCTION TO POTTERY ON THE WHEEL Every Mon-

day from 6-8:30 p.m. at First City Art Center. Classes are $40. For more information, visit firstcityart.org. CLAY HAND BUILDING Six-week

workshops are held Tuesdays from 6-9 p.m. and Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon at First City Art Center. Cost is $157.25 for members and $185 for nonmembers. For more information, visit firstcityart.org. CLAY SCULPTURE

Six-week workshops held Saturdays from 9 a.m.February 13, 2020

noon at First City Art Center. Cost is $157.25 for members and $185 for non-members. For more information, visit firstcityart.org.

≥Call for Artists

JAZZ FEST Jazz Pensacola invites fine artists/graphic designers to submit renderings for the official 2020 Pensacola JazzFest poster. The commission is $300. The poster design should reflect the deep, rich, diverse jazz music heritage of Pensacola and communicate a sense of place. Submissions should conform to a vertical orientation using a ratio that will fit, with margin, on a final poster size of 18 inches wide by 24 inches high. All content must be the submitter’s original creation and must be unpublished. The submitter must have all rights to images and graphics used in the final artwork and during the design process. The poster must include the name of the festival—2020 Pensacola JazzFest. The submission deadline is Jan. 6, 2020. If selected, the completed art deadline is Feb. 28, 2020. For more information, call Jazz Pensacola administrator Alice Crann Good at 433-8382, Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., or visit jazzpensacola.com. PMA MEMBER SHOW

The UWF Pensacola Museum of Art invites artists from its member community to submit mural ideas for our public art space along the

museum’s Jefferson Street entrance. Two muralists will be selected to paint two wooden panels, totaling 4 feet by 16 feet. Muralists will begin their work the weekend of March 7, culminating in a live-painting block party during the Members Show Opening Reception & Awards Ceremony on Friday, March 13. For more information, visit pensacolamusem.org.

Bars & Nightlife

≥Bar Games Thursdays

HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6

p.m. Half-off house wine, bar drinks and domestic beer. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com LADIES NIGHT 5 p.m. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com MUSIC BINGO AT GARY’S 7 p.m.

Gary’s Brewery and Biergarten, 208 Newman Ave. facebook.com/ garysbrew

BREW IQ TRIVIA NIGHT WITH JERRELL HENDRIX 7-9

p.m. Perfect Plain Brewing Co., 50 E. Garden St. facebook.com/perfectplainbrewingco POKER 8 p.m. The Ticket 1, 7250 Plantation Road. ticketsportsbar.com POOL TOURNAMENT

8 p.m. The Ticket 2, 2115 W. Nine Mile Road. ticketsportsbar.com COLLEGE NIGHT 10 p.m. Drink specials, beer pong tournament starts at 10 p.m. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com. Fridays HAPPY HOUR AT CAFÉ SINGLE FIN 4-7

p.m. Café Single Fin, 380 N. Ninth Ave. facebook. com/cafesinglefin HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6 p.m. Half-off house wine, bar drinks and domestic beer. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com WINE TASTING 5-7 p.m. Informative wine tasting in Seville Quarter Wine and Gift Shop. No charge for the tasting. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com POOL TOURNAMENT

8 p.m. The Ticket 1, 7250 Plantation Road. ticketsportsbar.com Saturdays

HAPPY HOUR AT CAFÉ SINGLE FIN 4-7

p.m. Café Single Fin, 380 N. Ninth Ave. facebook.com/ cafesinglefin MEMBERSHIP APPRECIATION NIGHT 8

p.m. Seville Quarter Membership Card Holder Appreciation Night at Phineas Phogg's. 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com Sundays BAR AND RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE (B.A.R.E. NIGHT) 7

p.m. Special prices for B.A.R.E. Card membership holders. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com Mondays

PINT NIGHT 4-10

p.m. Purchase any 16 oz. brew and take home a limited edition Perfect Plain glass. (limit two per customer). Perfect Plain Brewing Co., 50 E. Garden St. facebook.com/perfectplainbrewingco

TEXAS HOLD ‘EM FOR FUN AND TRIVIA

7 p.m. Sandshaker Lounge, 731 Pensacola Beach Blvd. sandshaker.com

www.radiofreepensacola.com 19


calendar TRIVIA NIGHT 7-9 p.m. World of Beer, 200 S. Palafox. wobusa.com/ locations/palafox B.A.R.E All day. Culverts, 3102 E. Cervantes. calvertsintheheights.com BAR BINGO 8 p.m. Apple Annie’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

Plain Brewing Co., 50 E. Garden St. facebook.com/perfectplainbrewingco HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6 p.m. Half-off house wine, bar drinks and domestic beer. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com CORNHOLE NIGHT WITH ECC 6 p.m.

a.m. Pelican’s Nest, 15 E. Intendencia St.

Gary’s Brewery and Biergarten, 208 Newman Ave. facebook.com/ garysbrew

MONDAY NIGHT TRIVIA 9:30-10:30

SOCIAL DANCE NIGHT 6:30-10 p.m.

DRAG-O-RAMA TALENT SHOW 9 p.m.-1

p.m. Mugs and Jugs, 12080 Scenic Highway. facebook.com/ mugsjugs 11:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Pelican’s Nest, 15 E. Intendencia St.

$5 a dance lesson, $10 for three. Free social dance from 8-10 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s, Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

Tuesdays

GAME ON! DIGITAL TRIVIA NIGHT 8

DRINK AND DROWN

CROWLER NIGHT

4-10 p.m. Buy three crowlers, get one free. Perfect

p.m. Apple Annie’s, Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

TUESDAY TRIVIA 8

p.m. The Bridge Bar and Sunset Lounge, 33 Gulf Breeze Parkway. facebook. com/thebridgebargb BAR BINGO 8 p.m. Ticket Sports Bar, 7333 N. Davis Highway. Play to win up to $100 in gift cards. TICKET TEAM TRIVIA

8 p.m. The Ticket 1, 7250 Plantation Road. ticketsportsbar.com POKER 8 p.m. The Ticket 2, 2115 W. Nine Mile Road. ticketsportsbar.com TEAM TRIVIA 9 p.m. Hopjacks. 10 S. Palafox. hopjacks.com Wednesdays WINE DOW WEDNESDAYS 11 a.m. Half-

priced bottles of wine every Wednesday. Jackson's Steakhouse, 226 S. Palafox. jacksonsrestaurant.com

HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6

p.m. Half-off house wine, bar drinks and domestic beer. V. Paul’s Italian Ristorante, 29 S. Palafox. vpauls.com

LADIES NIGHT ON THE DECK 5 p.m. $2

drinks and music. The Deck Bar, 600 S. Barracks St. fishhousepensacola.com TRIVIA NIGHT 7 p.m. Gary’s Brewery and Biergarten, 208 Newman Ave. facebook.com/ garysbrew SEVILLE SHOWCASE

7 p.m. Open mic night. Sign up at 6 p.m. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

PUB TRIVIA NIGHT

7-9:30 p.m. Goat Lips Beer Garden, 2811 Copter Road. goatlips.com WEDNESDAY QUIZ TRIVIA 8 p.m. The

Cabaret, 101 S. Jef-

ferson St. cabaretpensacola.com BLACKED OUT BINGO 8 p.m.

World of Beer, 200 S. Palafox. worldofbeer.com/ locations/pensacola

PUB TRIVIA WEDNESDAYS 8-10

p.m. O’Riley’s Irish Pub, 321 S. Palafox. orileyspub.com TICKET BAR BINGO

8 p.m. The Ticket 1, 7250 Plantation Road. ticketsportsbar.com BAR BINGO 10 p.m. Play, 16 S. Palafox, Ste. 200. iplaypensacola.com

≥Live Music

THURSDAY 2.13 ALCANIZ BAND HAPPY HOUR 5 p.m.

Lili Marlene’s at Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com BOBBY VAN DEUSEN

5:30 p.m. The Dis-

trict, 123 E. Government St. districtsteaks.com LIVE MUSIC 6 p.m. Five Sisters Blues Café, 421 W. Belmont St. fivesistersbluescafe.com DONNIE 7 p.m. Hub Stacey's 312 E. Government St. hubstaceys.com OPEN COLLEGE JAM WITH MIKE BOCCIA

7:30 p.m. Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse, 2811 Copter Road. DUELING PIANOS

8 p.m. Rosie O' Grady's Dueling Piano Show. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com OPEN MIC/JAM 8-11 p.m. Goat Lips Brewhouse, 2811 Copter Road. Use our instruments or bring your own. NATHAN MULKEY BAND 8 p.m. Sand-

shaker Lounge, 731

Pensacola Beach Blvd. sandshaker.com TYLER LIVINGSTON AND THE ABSOLUTES

9 p.m. End O’ the Alley Courtyard, Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

LIVE DJ: MR. LAO

10 p.m. Phineas Phogg’s, Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com

FRIDAY 2.14

LIVE JAZZ WITH JOE OCCHIPINTI Noon.

The Drowsy Poet Coffee Co., 655 Pensacola Beach Blvd. MIKE QUINN 5 p.m. End O’the Alley, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com LIVE MUSIC 6 p.m. Five Sisters Blues Café, 421 W. Belmont St. fivesistersbluescafe.com

BRUCE KATZ BAND 6 p.m. Paradise Bar & Grill, 21 Via de Luna. paradisebar-grill.com RAY ‘BIG DOG’ COLEY

6-9 p.m. Cazadores Mexican Restaurant 8183 W. Fairfield. JOHN RIPLEY 6:30 p.m. The District, 123 E. Government St. districtsteaks.com MIKE BOCCIA 7:45 p.m. Goat Lips Chew and Brewhouse, 2811 Copter Road. DUELING PIANOS 8 p.m. Rosie O' Grady's Dueling Piano Show. Seville Quarter, 130 E. Government St. sevillequarter.com MIKE & FRIENDS 8 p.m.-midnight. Goat Lips Brewhouse, 2811 Copter Road. THE BLENDERS 8 p.m. Hub Stacey's 312 E. Government St. hubstaceys.com

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BURGERS AND BORDEAUX EVERY TUESDAY NIGHT AT UPH SPECIALTY BURGER AND A GLASS OF BORDEAUX FOR $18

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February 13, 2020

21


free will astrology WEEK OF FEBRUARY 13 ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19): Now

that she's in her late 40s, Aries comedian and actress Tig Notaro is wiser about love. Her increased capacity for romantic happiness has developed in part because she's been willing to change her attitudes. She says, "Instead of being someone who expects people to have all the strengths I think I need them to have, I resolved to try to become someone who focuses on the strengths they do have." In accordance with this Valentine's season's astrological omens, Aries, I invite you to meditate on how you might cultivate more of that aptitude yourself.

TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20): Taurus

artist Joan Miró loved to daub colored paint on canvases. He said he approached his work in the same way he made love—"a total embrace, without caution, prudence thrown to the winds, nothing held back." In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to invoke a similar attitude with all the important things you do in the coming weeks. Summon the ardor and artistry of a creative lover for all-purpose use. Happy Valentine Daze, Taurus!

GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20): In 1910, Gemini businessman Irving Seery was 20 years old. One evening, he traveled to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City to see an opera starring the gorgeous and electrifying soprano singer Maria Jeritza. He fell in love instantly. For the next 38 years, he remained a bachelor as he nursed his desire to marry her. His devotion finally paid off. Jeritza married Seery in 1948. Dear Gemini, in 2020, I think you will be capable of a heroic feat of love that resembles Seery's. Which of your yearnings might evoke such intensely passionate dedication? Happy Valentine Daze! CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22): I've been

married twice, both times to the same woman. Our first time around, we were less than perfectly wise in the arts of relationship. After our divorce and during the few years we weren't together, we each ripened into more graceful versions of ourselves; we developed greater

By Rob Brezsny

intimacy skills. Our second marriage has been far more successful. Is there a comparable possibility in your life, Cancerian? A chance to enhance your ability to build satisfying togetherness? An opening to learn practical lessons from past romantic mistakes? Now is a favorable time to capitalize. Happy Valentine Daze!

your unique beauty. Amazingly enough, Libra, doing this exercise will magnetize you to further outpourings of love in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21): [Warning—

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22): In 1911, the famous Russian poet Anna Akhmatova and the famous Italian painter Amedeo Modigliani were in love with each other. Both were quite poor, though. They didn't have much to spend on luxuries. In her memoir, Akhmatova recalled the time they went on a date in the rain at the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris. Barely protected under a rickety umbrella, they amused each other by reciting the verse of Paul Verlaine, a poet they both loved. Isn't that romantic? In the coming weeks, I recommend you experiment with comparable approaches to cultivating love. Get back to raw basics. Happy Valentine Daze!

Poetry alert! If you prefer your horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyperrational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Scorpio! I invite you to copy the following passage and offer it to a person who is receptive to deepening their connection with you. "Your healing eyes bless the winter jasmine flowers that the breeze blew into the misty creek. Your welcoming prayers celebrate the rhythmic light of the mud-loving cypress trees. Your fresh dreams replenish the eternal salt that nourishes our beloved song of songs. With your melodic breath, you pour all these not-yet-remembered joys into my body." (This lyrical message is a blend of my words with those of Scorpio poet Odysseus Elytis.)

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22): [Warning—

SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21):

Poetry alert! If you prefer your horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyperrational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Virgo! I hope there's someone in your life to whom you can give a note like the one I'll offer at the end of this oracle. If there's not, I trust you will locate that person in the next six months. Feel free to alter the note as you see fit. Here it is. "When you and I are together, it's as if we have been reborn into luckier lives; as if we can breathe deeper breaths that fill our bodies with richer sunlight; as if we see all of the world's beauty that alone we were blind to; as if the secrets of our souls' codes are no longer secret."

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22): In the

course of your life, how many people and animals have truly loved you? Three? Seven? More? I invite you to try this Valentine experiment—Write down their names on a piece of paper. Spend a few minutes visualizing the specific qualities in you that they cherished, and how they expressed their love, and how you felt as you received their caring attention. Then send out a beam of gratitude to each of them. Honor them with sublime appreciation for having treasured

The poet Virgil, a renowned author in ancient Rome, wrote three epic poems that are still in print today. His second was a masterpiece called the Georgics. It took him seven years to write, even though it was only 2,740 lines long. So on average, he wrote a little over one line per day. I hope you'll use him as inspiration as you toil over your own labors of love in the coming weeks and months. There'll be no need to rush. In fact, the final outcomes will be better if you do them slowly. Be especially diligent and deliberate in all matters involving intimacy and collaboration and togetherness.

CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19): [Warning—Poetry alert! If you prefer your horoscopes to be exclusively composed of practical, hyperrational advice, stop reading now!] Happy Valentine Daze, Capricorn! I invite you to copy the following passage and offer it to a person who is ready to explore a more deeply lyrical connection with you. "I yearn to earn the right to your whispered laugh, your confident caress, your inscrutable dance. Amused and curious, I wander where moon meets dawn, inhaling the sweet mist in quest of your questions. I study the joy that my imagination of you has awakened. All the maps are useless, and I like them

that way. I'm guided by my nervous excitement to know you deeper. Onward toward the everfresh truth of your mysterious rhythms!"

AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18): Aquarian author Derek Walcott had a perspective on love that I suspect might come in handy for you during this Valentine season. "Break a vase," he wrote, "and the love that reassembles the fragments is stronger than that love which took its symmetry for granted when it was whole." I urge you to meditate on how you could apply his counsel to your own love story, Aquarius. How might you remake your closest alliances into even better and brighter versions of themselves? PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20): Piscean poet Saul Williams wrote a meditation I hope you'll consider experimenting with this Valentine season. It involves transforming mere kisses into SUBLIME KISSES. If you choose to be inspired by his thoughts, you'll explore new sensations and meanings available through the act of joining your mouth to another's. Ready? Here's Saul—"Have you ever lost yourself in a kiss? I mean pure psychedelic inebriation. Not just lustful petting but transcendental metamorphosis, when you became aware that the greatness of this other being is breathing into you. Licking your mouth, like sealing a thousand fleshy envelopes filled with the essence of your passionate being, and then opened by the same mouth and delivered back to you, over and over again—the first kiss of the rest of your life." THIS WEEK'S HOMEWORK: Want to get married to yourself? The ritual's here—https://tinyurl. com/youcanmarryyourself

freewillastrology.com

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com Rob Brezsny © Copyright 2019

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news of the weird ANNALS OF HYGIENE The Times of India reports that Soni Devi, 20, of Vaishali district, petitioned the state women's commission on Jan. 9 for divorce from her husband of two years, Manish Ram, 23, complaining, "My husband stinks as he won't shave and bathe for nearly 10 days at a stretch. Moreover, he doesn't brush his teeth. He also doesn't have manners and follow etiquette. ... Kindly get me rid of this man; he has ruined my life." Commission member Pratima Sinha told the Times, "I was taken aback by her silly reasons," but nonetheless, the commission will give the husband "two months' time to mend his ways. If his behavior is not found satisfactory even after that, we will ... refer the matter to the family court for separation." Manish reportedly promised to mend his ways. IRONY Sauntore Thomas, 44, of Detroit, presented three checks at his bank on Jan. 21 that he had received as settlement in a race discrimination lawsuit against his former employer, according to the Detroit Free Press. Instead of accepting the checks, TCF Bank in Livonia, where Thomas was an established customer, summoned police and initiated a fraud investigation. Thomas' attorney, Deborah Gordon, told the Free Press, "Obviously, assumptions were made the minute he walked in based on his race." Thomas finally closed his existing accounts, left the bank and deposited the checks at a different bank without any trouble. The next day, Thomas filed a lawsuit against TCF Bank alleging race discrimination and asking for unspecified damages and an apology from the company. OVERREACTION The moral of this story: Don't hog the bacon. Gregory Seipel, 47, of Ludlow Falls, Ohio, was arrested on Jan. 30 after being accused of attacking a man with a knife during an argument over bacon, WHIO-TV reported. The unnamed victim told Miami County Sheriff's officers he had made bacon that morning for breakfast, and Seipel took issue with the amount he had eaten. The argument escalated until Seipel allegedly grabbed the victim by the back of the head and held a razor blade to his neck, cutting him. Seipel was charged with felonious assault and was held on $50,000 bond. VALENTINE'S GREETINGS If you'd like to get a special gift for an ex this Valentine's Day, Centre Wildlife Care in Port Matilda, Pennsylvania, has just the thing. In exchange for a donation to a fund for restoring local bat populations, the rescue organization will name a mealworm after your ex, and Betsy the large brown bat will eat it. Donate more than $45, and you'll receive a personalized video of Betsy devouring the treat. "Essentially, people will

By the Editors at Andrews McMeel

be naming the mealworms after someone they don't like," Executive Director Robyn Graboski told WTAJ, "and we will feed them to the bat." •If you have lifetime commitment on your mind this Valentine's Day, Domino's Australia wants to help out. The pizza chain announced a contest on Feb. 3 in which the winner will receive a diamond-encrusted engagement ring in the shape of a pizza slice worth $9,000, Fox News reported. Fans can enter with a 30-second video detailing "how you will involve pizza in your proposal," according to the company. Good luck! LIFE IMITATES A TV DRAMA Two chemistry professors at Henderson State University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, were formally charged on Feb. 3 with manufacturing methamphetamines and possession, KTHV reported. Terry David Bateman, 45, and Bradley Allen Rowland, 40, both associate professors, were arrested on Nov. 15 and had been on administrative leave since Oct. 11, after the science center on campus was closed because of a chemical odor. It reopened on Oct. 29 after testing, but in the meantime, according to court documents, faculty members reported to the Clark County Sheriff's Office the two were acting in a way that indicated "these persons were involved in some type of illegal activity." The suspects had also lost weight and were "extremely guarded" about who was in their laboratories and when. (Should have sprung for the RV.) UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES In the fall of 2018, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement launched Fortify Florida, an app intended for students to anonymously report suspicious activity. Since then, more than 6,000 tips have been received statewide, but school officials are feeling mostly frustration, reports WFTS in Tampa. Indian River County Superintendent Dr. David Moore said students will "talk about the flavor of the food in the cafeteria." Pasco Superintendent Kurt Browning said, "The number of kids entering bogus tips is consuming a great deal of resources. ... There's a coyote in my front yard," was one example. Indian River Country authorities spent hours investigating a report of a student planning to shoot up a high school, only to find out it was a revenge report for a recent breakup. Florida lawmakers are considering a bill to allow authorities to track tipsters' IP addresses and prosecute those who submit false information. {in}

From Andrews McMeel Syndication News Of The Weird © 2019 Andrews McMeel

Send your weird news items to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com February 13, 2020

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