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Volume 6 2019

A GROUNDBREAKING ‘STONE IN THE LANDSCAPE’ DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019 FISH DON’T SEE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN NATURAL AND 3D-PRINTED CORAL ARTIFICIAL LEAF: TO CAPTURE AND STORE SOLAR ENERGY BIOBASED PRODUCTS IN PUBLIC SPACES


CONTENT Innovatieve Materialen About is een vaktijdschrift gericht op de civieltechnische Innovatieve Materialen sector en bouw. Het bericht over ontwik(Innovative Materials) is a digital, kelingen op het gebied van duurzame, inindependent magazine novatieve materialen en/of deabout toepassing material inconstructies. the fields of daarvaninnovation in bijzondere

engineering, construction (buildings, infrastructure and industrial) and Innovatieveindustrial Materialen is een uitgave van design. Civiele Techniek, onafhankelijk vaktijdschrift voor civieltechnisch ingenieurs werkzaam in de grond-, weg- en waterA digital subscribtion in 2019 bouw en verkeerstechniek.

(6 editions) costs € 39,50 (excl. VAT) Members of KIVI and students: De redactie staat open voor bijdragen € 25,- U(excl. van vakgenoten. kunt VAT) daartoe contact opnemen met de redactie.

SJP Uitgevers

Postbus 861 4200 AW Gorinchem Uitgeverij tel. +31 183 66 08 08 info@innovatievematerialen.nl SJP Uitgevers

Postbus 861 Publisher 4200 AW Gorinchem Gerard van66 Nifterik tel. (0183) 08 08 e-mail: info@innovatievematerialen.nl www.innovatievematerialen.nl

Advertizing & sponsoring Drs. Petra Schoonebeek Redactie:

ps@innovatievematerialen.nl Bureau Schoonebeek vof Hoofdredactie: Innovative Materials Gerard van Nifterik

platform:

Dr. ir. Fred Veer, prof. Ir. Rob Nijsse (Glass &Advertenties Transparency Research Group, TU Delft), Drs. Petra Schoonebeek dr. Bert van Haastrecht (M2I), prof.ps@innovatievematerialen.nl Wim Poelman, dr. Ton e-mail: Hurkmans (MaterialDesign), prof.dr.ir. Jos Brouwers, (Department abonnement inSection 2016 ofEen thedigitaal Built Environment, (6 uitgaven) kost €and 25,00 (excl. BTW) Building Physics Services TU Eindhoven), prof.dr.ir. Jilt Sietsma, (4TU.HTM/ Mechanical, Maritime Zie ook: www.innovatievematerialen.nl and Materials Engineering (3mE), prof.dr. Pim Groen, (SMART Materials Aerospace Niets uit deze uitgave Engineering mag worden (AE) TU Delft/Holst TNO), Kris verveelvuldigd en ofCentre, openbaar worden Binon (Flam3D), Guido fotokopie, Verhoeven door middel van herdruk, microfilm op welke wijze dan ook, zonder (Bondofvoor Materialenkennis/SIM voorafgaande toestemming Flanders, Prof.schriftelijke dr. ir. Christian Louter van de uitgever. Institut für Baukonstruktion Technische Universität Dresden).

1 News 10 A groundbreaking ‘stone in the landscape’

On 14 November, the 21st edition of the Betonprijs was awarded during the annual Betondag. The jury judged 65 entries, from which 17 nominated projects resulted. There are six categories in which prizes were awarded. In the ´Groundbreaking´ category, the prize went to the Natuurmonumenten Regional Office in Zierikzee: a construction resembling a ‘stone in the landscape’.

16 Dutch Design Week 2019

Every year in October the Dutch Design Week (DDW) takes place in Eindhoven. The largest design event in Northern Europe presented the work of more than 2600 designers spread over 120 locations in the city between 19 and 27 October. Around 350,000 visitors from home and abroad found their way to Eindhoven. And again this year attention for material innovations, 3D-printed materials and objects, biomaterials and especially a lot of circularity.

26 Fishes don’t see difference between natural and 3D-printed coral

Researchers across the globe are searching for ways to help endangered reefs, and the animals that live there. One idea is to use 3D printed coral models to replace or supplement coral reef systems that have been affected. New research by the University of Delaware’s Danielle Dixson and Emily Ruhl has shown that 3D-printed objects do not impact the behaviour of coral-associated damselfish or the survival of a settling stony coral. Further, the study demonstrated that fish showed no preference between materials used to 3D-print artificial corals, opening the door to using environmentally friendly materials, such as biodegradable cornstarch instead of plastic. The researchers reported their results in PLOS One, a peer-reviewed open source journal.

28 Artificial leaf: to capture and store solar energy

Solar cells have disadvantages, for instance when it comes to the coordination between supply and demand. One of the proposed solutions is a so-called solar-to-fuel device: (S2F). With this concept, solar energy is converted into a fuel that can be stored. Pramod Patil Kunturu (University of Twente) investigated S2F’s resulting in the thesis ‘Tandem Cu2O-covered silicon micropillar photocathodes for solar-to-fuel devices’.

30 Biobased products in public spaces

Sustainability is high on the agenda of governments and municipalities. There is an constant need for opportunities and initiatives to increase the sustainability profile. Biobased materials fit well with this, because they consist of natural materials and have a low CO2 footprint. Last year two Dutch companies - Gebr. Van Kessel and Circulus, specialized in the development of circular chains, introduced a new production technique that converts two residual flows, roadside grass fiber and recycled plastic, into a biobased material.

32 Smart Materials part 6: Piezomaterials for sensing applications

Smart materials are everywhere, but often invisible or simply not recognized. This is the sixth article in a series of eight, in which prof. Pim Groen will discuss the world of smart materials; this time piezomaterials are widely used for sensing applications.

35 Enterprise Europe Network: New requests for partnership

Cover: Façade museum Naturalis: sculpture (page 1)

INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019


NEWS NIEUWS

Façade museum Naturalis wins new Future award During the annual Betondag, 14 November in Rotterdam, a new prize was introduced: the ‘Future award’. MBO, HBO and WO students were able to vote for their favourite nominee and with more than 20 percent of the votes the winner was Project Kroongevel Museum Naturalis. Naturalis Biodiversity Center is one of the top five institutes in the world in the field of biodiversity. The management decided to expand due to the growth of the collection, the increase in the number of researchers and the rapidly increasing number of visitors to the museum. The new extension was designed by Architectural firm Neutelings Riedijk Architecten. The new, so-called crown façade is a special part of the design. With a height of over 40 meters, the open façade forms the partition of a special interior space. The choice was made to turn the facade support structure entirely into a hybrid construction. The collaboration between steel and concrete turned out to be the solution to summarize all requirements of the coming disciplines in one façade design. To achieve the intended appearance on the outside, prefab concrete was chosen, combined with an aggregate made of Norwegian hard stone. These natural stone parts appear to the surface through the after-treatment (blasting) resulting in a special brilliance due to light. More at Lievense (Dutch)>

Museum Naturalis, sculpture

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NIEUWS NEWS

Indus: tile-based, modular bioreactor wall Scientists from the Bio-Integrated Design Lab at the Barlett School of Architecture in London designed leaf-inspired clay tiles that clean water thanks to algae and a seaweed-based hydrogel. The concept was developed by Dr. Brenda Parker, Prof. Marcos Cruz and Shneel Malik, who gave it the name ‘Indus’. MaterialDistrict reported on it in October. The Indus-system is a tile-based, modular bioreactor wall system that cleans water through bioremediation. The ceramic tiles are inspired by the architecture of a leaf. Water flows over a series of vein-like channels containing algae prepared in a seaweed-based hydrogel. Microalgae have several mechanisms through which they are able to remove heavy metal contaminants from their environment. While they can absorb heavy metals in low concentrations, when there is severe pollution, the algae start to detoxify their environment by transforming and storing the metals as nanoparticles. The hydrogel is made from a seaweed derived polymer, which also has the affinity to capture heavy metals. The

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NEWS hydrogel allows the microalgae to continue growing and perform photosynthesis. The materials needed for the hydrogel can be supplied in powdered form, which makes them easy to prepare on site. Later on, the hydrogel can be ­treated to retrieve valuable nanoparticles like cadmium. The Indus tiles have several advantages. Firstly, they can be made locally using traditional clay making methods. The modularity enables the artisans to construct the wall depending on the site availability as well as the amount of treated water needed. Broken tiles can easily be replaced without the need to dismantle the entire system. This year the Indus-project won the A /D/O Mini Water Futures Design Challenge categoriy Future Systems and Infrastructure> More at MaterialDistrict>

HĂŠt expertisecentrum voor materiaalkarakterisering. Integer, onafhankelijk, objectief onderzoek en advies. ISO 17025 geaccrediteerd. Wij helpen u graag verder met onderzoek en analyse van uw innovatieve materialen. Bel ons op 026 3845600 of mail info@tcki.nl www.tcki.nl

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NEWS NIEUWS

Pontsteiger wins Brick Award 2019 The Pontsteiger building in The Netherlands has won the Brick Award 2019 of in the ‘Worldwide’ category. The prize was awarded for the 43rd time by the Brick Development Association based (London) for the best use of brick in the built environment. The architects, Arons en Gelauff, and brick manufacturer Koninklijke Tichelaar developed six vibrant colour glazes applied to brick-slip cladding with a profiled surface finish. In close collaboration with the architect Koninklijke Tichelaar developed six glass shades, which are applied to stone strips of 65 by 225 mm with a profiled surface. The tailor made brick slips are pre-casted into concrete elements for easy assembly. The project is was carried out by Amsterdam Arche Development Combination (Dura Vermeer/De Nijs). The brick-slip cladding panels are precast in concrete sections and then fitted as a whole. The large building consists of a six-floor

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low-rise block that wraps around a plaza on the waterfront. Two slender 60 meter towers at the open end of this block frame the river view. The towers carry a bridge spanning 48 meters rising to a

height of 90 meters above the city. The building is elevated 7 metres and set upon a base of four pavilions. The glazed pavilions accommodate lobbies, restaurants, bars and cafes. A marina for the


NEWS

residents of Pontsteiger is located at the westside. Despite its scale, the building’s elevated volume creates an light-footed presence on site and a constantly changing appearance, different from every

part of the city. The result is an impressive, clean-cut façade with an appeal that varies according to the seasons, weather conditions and angle of light.

Architect/Designer: Arons & Gelauf Brickwork Contractor: Dura Vermeer-De Nijs Brick: Koninklijke Tichelaar Brick Development Association>

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NEWS

A car made of ‘wood’

Photography: Nano Cellulose Vehicle project

At the Tokyo Motor Show, 24 October 4 November 2019 - the Nano Cellulose Vehicle (NCV) was showcased . The concept car is the result of the NCV-project launched in 2016 by the Japan’s Ministry of the Environment. The project is a study into the usage of cellulose nanofiber (CNF) materials for automotive purpose to reduce vehicle weight and achieve lifecycle carbon neutrality. CNFs are said to be one-fifth the weight of steel and five times as strong, as well as being easily recycled at end-of-life. Lead by Kyoto University, the consortium is comprised of 22 entities including universities, research institutions, and companies. According to the Kyoto University website the scientists wat to develop a next generation cellulose nanofibre material to reduce the weight in cars with around 10 % by 2020. The provisional result is a Lamborghinilike concept, with vertically-opening doors and sharp creases. The Nano Cellulose Fiber material is relatively easy to extract and to process. It’s extracted from chipped wood and plants and then treated in chemical and mechanical processes to break down the

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nano-sized fibres into a cellulose pulp. This is then combined with molten resins to create the material for application. The CNF-based materials can be injection-moulded or formed into foams just like petrochemical-based plastics, as well as substituting for metals. http://www.rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp/ncv>

Video: the cellulose nanofiber project


NEWS

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NEWS

Bioflexi ‘Bioflexi’ is a relatively new type of flexible fibreboard, made from renewable raw materials and developed several years ago by scientists from the University of Stuttgart. According to the inventors of this bio composite material, it can be a good alternative to plastic or HDF plates because they are made with renewable raw materials and harmless resins. Bioflexi is a high-density fibreboard (hig-density fibre, HDF) with a density of more than 800 kg/m3. According to the Technology Lizenz-Büro (TLB) in Karlsruhe it could be an attractive alternative to furniture constructions and architectural free moulding applications due to the low raw material price. The

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material was developed by Jun. Prof. Hanaa Dahy of the Institute for Structural Design and Design (ITKE) at the University of Stuttgart. A patent has been granted on the material. contains 80 to 90 percent annually renewable raw materials such as straw. This natural fiber is available worldwide as a residual material and therefore costs little. Moreover, straw does not compete with food production. The fibreboards can be made of wheat, maize, rice, oat, barley or rye straw fibres. Fibreboards made of rice straw have even an added benefit, i.e. their silicate concentration reach up to 20 % of the dry fibre weight. Since silicate is a natural fire-retardant material, the DIN 4102-B1 material classification ‘hardly inflammable’ is thus


NEWS already fulfilled by the addition of purely mineral additives. An environmentally compatible thermoplastic elastomer is used as a binder. As a result, the board can be produced virtually free of formaldehyde and isocyanates, which minimizes health risks throughout the fibreboard’s product life cycle. By adding different binding agents, both flexibility and stability of the boards can be varied for different applications. The boards can also be laminated with various waterproof coatings. Colouring could be achieved by a coloured lamination. At the end of its useful life, the fibreboard can be recycled and even composted. This leads to double waste prevention: Firstly, during production through the use of residual agricultural fibres, and secondly, through composting at the end of the product life cycle. More at the Technology Lizenz-Bßro>


NIEUWS NEWS

A groundbreaking ‘stone in the landscape’ On 14 November, the 21st edition of the Betonprijs was awarded during the annual Betondag. The jury judged 65 entries, from which 17 nominated projects resulted. There are six categories in which prizes were awarded. In the ´Groundbreaking´ category, the prize went to the Natuurmonumenten Regional Office in Zierikzee: a construction resembling a ‘stone in the landscape’. With the building in Zierikzee, insulating concrete was used for the first time in the Netherlands: foam glass concrete or ‘warmbeton’. This type of concrete contains glass foam granules (extruded glass pellets) instead of gravel. Glass foam

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NEWS granulate is a glass recycling product that provides the insulating effect of this type of concrete. In this type of concrete, load-bearing capacity, insulation and building physical properties are combi­ ned in one material. The extruded glass pellets give the concrete a high insulation value, in addition to the structural properties. The three functions of insulation, wearing and aesthetic finish are carried out simultaneously with one placing. This creates a monolithic façade without thermal bridges. In Germany, Austria and Switzerland, ‘warmbeton’ or ‘leichtbeton’ is already being used. In realized buildings, it is visually indistinguishable from ‘plain’ rigid concrete. For the Zierikzee-project, architects Max Rink and Niels Tilanus opted for a version in which the specific properties of this kind of concrete would also be visible on the outside and give it a natural look to the building. To see the ‘stone in the landscape’ as a whole, the architects gave the roof and the facades the same finish. The walls were therefore poured flat, so the finishing of the non-shuttered side would be identical to the roof: with the whimsical shape of the floating extruded glass ­beads. The result is a nature-like structure that merges into the salt marsh area of the Oosterschelde National Park: like a huge stone in the landscape.

To see the ‘stone in the landscape’ as a whole, the architects gave the roof and the facades the same finish. The walls were therefore poured flat Photography: www.rinktilanus.nl

More at Tektoniek (Dutch)> More about Glass Foam>

Project: Client: Natuurmonumenten Main contractor: Braspenning Aann.en timmerbedrijf vof Wernhout Glass foam concrete: Glasschuim Netherlands/ Dyckerhoff Basal Architect: Rink Tilanus, www.rinktilanus.nl Manufacturer: B2CO, www.b2co.nl Heat calculations: Coen Energie Comfort

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International edition Innovative Materials, the international version of the Dutch magazine Innovatieve Materialen, is now available in English. Innovative Materials is a digital, independent magazine about material innovation in the fields of engineering, construction (buildings, infrastructure and industrial) and industrial design. Innovative Materials is published in a digital format, although there is a printed edition with a small circulation. Digital, because interactive information is attached in the form of articles, papers, videos and links to expand the information available. www. innovatievematerialen.nl info@innovatievematerialen.nl

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Organiser

New International Conference on Cellulose Fibres, the fastest growing fibre group in textiles, the largest investment sector in the bio-based economy and the solution for avoiding microplastics

Contact

The conference will cover the entire value chain from the lignocellulosic feedstock, dissolving pulp, cellulose fibres – such as rayon, viscose, modal or lyocell and new developments, to a wide range of applications, woven textiles (clothings) and non-wovens (wipes and technical applications), as well as micro- and nanocellulose for food, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. All these sectors has gained significantly in dynamics in the last years.

Dominik Vogt dominik.vogt@nova-institut.de Tel.: +49 2233 / 48 14 49

Final programme with 30 speakers online available: cellulose-fibres.eu/programme

nova-institute.eu

cellulose-fibres.eu

• New Technologies & Applications • Cellulose Market – Status & Development • Supply and Demand – Market Trends and Data • Sustainability • Strategies • Policy Framework

Gold Sponsors

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MAKE IT MATTER

MAKE IT MATTER MAKE IT MATTER is compiled in collaboration with MaterialDistrict (MaterialDistrict.com). In this section new, and/or interesting developments and innovative materials are highlighted.

Atmospheric Wood Atmospheric Wood is a research project based on a historic contact printing technique, invented in 1842 and commonly called blueprint. Reviving and interpreting this traditional knowledge, Atmospheric Wood aims to bring back this process to contemporary architecture. The key element is the interaction between sunlight and an UV light sensitive solution. While exposed to light, the process transforms untreated wood into an assortment of blue hues. The results vary depending on the environmental conditions during production and types of wood used. More at MaterialDistrict>

Béton Picturale Béton Picturale is a process to ‘tattoo’ concrete. It was developed by Fabrice Davenne to make artist paintings suitable for outdoor use, creating an image and relief in concrete. The process transfers digital images in the material, with or without texture superimposed on the picture. It allows for entire facades of buildings, signage and communication supports to be covered in artworks, using natural pigments.

More at MaterialDistrict>

Climalife ClimaLife are concrete roof tiles that clean the air. The active ingredient in the tiles is photocatalytic titanium dioxide (TiO2). Using UV-light, surfaces coated in this material neutralise harmful particles such as NOx and particulate matter by turning them into non-toxic substances like nitrate. According to re­search in Japan and Italy, 100 m2 of surface with titanium dioxide has the same air cleaning effect as six adult broad-­ leaved trees. In addition, the tiles are self-cleaning. The remaining dirt is washed away by rain. More at MaterialDistrict>

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MAKE IT MATTER Old bricks The Danish company Gamle Mursten reclaims old bricks from demolition sites. The bricks are machine-cleaned, hand-sorted, stacked by robots and sold for new building and renovation projects where clients want to minimise the impact of un­ necessary CO2 emissions on the environment, as well as wanting brickwork with patina and character.

More at MaterialDistrict>

Novofibre Novofibre boards are construction boards made with 100 % wheat straw. This is mixed with a formaldehyde-free adhesive (p-MDI) to lower the impact on the environment. The material components are dried and glued with a special process. The mixture is continuously hot-pressed to ensure stable, quality products. Novofibre boards are available for various applications (including base sheets, sound-absorbing surfaces, flooring, plywood, and a range of decorative panels), and in various sizes and thicknesses. More at MaterialDistrict>

Poal Poal are thin porous acoustic metal sheets are made of pure sintered aluminium, which are washable, water- and chlorineproof, fireproof, and recyclable. Poal is a highly porous sound absorbing aluminium sheet, made of non-woven aluminium fibres pressed between two aluminium meshes. The material can easily be shaped and is convenient for both indoor and outdoor applications, in swimming pools and on noise barriers. It is mounted without joints resulting in a continuous, optically closed ceiling. More at MaterialDistrict>

VeroMetal: ‘metal’ applied with a spatula Shiny brass, weathered copper, stainless steel, authentic bronze, iron with or without rust, just a few examples of the many different finishes available. VeroMetal is a cold-workable liquid metal that can be applied to practically any surface by spraying, rolling, pouring or with a palette knife or trowel. After application, VeroMetal possesses all the optical and physical properties of the metal in question. More at MaterialDistrict>

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Dutch Design Week 2019 Every year in October the Dutch Design Week (DDW) takes place in Eindhoven. The largest design event in Northern Europe presented the work of more than 2600 designers spread over 120 locations in the city between 19 and 27 October. Around 350,000 visitors from home and abroad found their way to Eindhoven. And again this year attention for material innovations, 3D-printed materials and objects, biomaterials and especially a lot of circularity.

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‘Growing Design’: mushroompavillion DDW 2019 (Innovative Materials 5 2019)


DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

BARROS: 3D-geprinte bio-klei. Pagina 20

DDW design trends in ceramics: ‘Back to earth’ The Dutch Design Week - between 19 and 27 October in Eindhoven - this year presented eight design trends that, according to the organizers, mark the most important developments in the world of design. New technologies, new materials, new forms, yet innovation is often closer to home than it seems. Old existing materials are reinterpreted with the help of new technology. They are again relevant for today and for the future. The organizers of the DDW translated that into a trend: ‘Back to Earth’.

CNC-Sgraffito Digi-Terra Collection

While clay is still wet, the texture of the surface can be changed. The sgraffito technique, for example, is one in which the surface is worked by hand with all kinds of tools. Designer Heleen Sintobin employs a contemporary method here: CNC milling. Milling the wet porcelain or clay creates new patterns. They are the machine’s fingerprints as it were, with all its imperfections, characteristic for this method. The CNC milling machine almost becomes part of the craft of cera-

During the DDW designer Heleen Sintobin presented her project Digi-Terra Collection, like ‘Smokejack’ made of terracotta. These tiles were produced with a CNC-machine

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Designer Heleen Sintobin uses CNC milling as a new molding technique for ceramic objects. New patterns are created by milling the wet porcelain or clay

mics itself. Informed by pattern cutting, the robotic arm mills structural toolpaths which are then folded by hand into soft hybrid developable forms. After firing the milled structures expand and convert digital perfection into soft shapes. Heleen Sintobin showcased ‘Smokejack Tiles’, a collection of 48 terracotta tiles showing a topographical landscape of the terracotta pit ‘Smokejack’ in Cranleigh, England. Each tile is encoded with its unique GPS coordinates and milled by CNC.

Video: Smokejack

More about Digiterra at DDW>

BARROS: 3D printed bio clay

Traditionally, clay has been poured into moulds or thrown on a wheel. The addition of biomaterial reinforces the clay and it can also be printed. Cindy Valdez used this method in her project BARROS. She makes a series of ceramic construction elements using a 3D printer. This new technique enables the creation of special and complex shapes. The aim of this work was to develop 3D printed modules of natural clay mixed with biomaterial (Aloe ) as a natural additive for the clay mass, which can be used as an (complex) architectural element in indoor and outdoor areas. More about BARROS>

Wasteland to Living Room

Clay and sand, more than any other ma-

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Video: BARROS

terials, are inextricably linked to the area where they originate. Often they are associated with natural areas like riverbeds or quarries, but industry is also a producer of this raw material. In the project Wasteland to Living Room, a group of four designers from the Royal College of Art are researching how ‘red mud’, a by-product from the aluminium industry, can be used. The result: a series of functional objects such as plates and vases with a distinctive rusty brown colour. Industry today perceives little value in ‘red mud’, but this project demonstrates that the material has great potential for interior objects and for applications in architecture and construction. Wasteland-to-livingroom bij de DDW>


DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Video: Wasteland to Living Room

Ceramic innovation and artisanal skills

Ceramic innovation and artisanal skills can also work on an industrial scale. The Japanese company Arita shows an experimental collection of porcelain, made in collaboration with Japanese artisans. Eight international designers and artists, including Franciska Meijers, Florence Dwyer and Antye Guenther, showed their prototypes in this exhibition on the Hallenweg. In addition, the Dutch Cor Unum presents their Future/ History collection at Plan-B. For 66 years this company in Den Bosch has created cutting-edge collections of domestic ceramics. This year a number of Dutch designers including Kiki van Eijk, David Derksen, Studio Rens, Floris Hovers and Studio Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters will delve into the history of the company. They seek inspiration and innovation with respect for the craft. These new objects are inspired by history. Cor-unum bij de DDW>

Ott, by designer Seok-hyeon Yoon

Ronald Smits. According to DDW the three designers take a radical and critical look at existing production.

Recycle

Clay can be recycled even after it has been fired. This chamotte clay can be reused providing it is not contaminated. Glazing protects fired clay and waterproofs it. But the glass particles in this glaze contaminate the clay and make reuse very difficult. Designer Seok-hyeon Yoon, who graduated from the Design Academy Eindhoven this year and is featured in the Graduation Show at the

Campina site, explores alternative ways of protecting ceramics. He employs Ott, a traditional Korean lacquer. This natural lacquer derived from the Ott tree is used to make wooden utensils water resistant. Ott dries when exposed to air and does not need to be fired. In addition, it has the added special property of evaporating when heated. This allows the recovery of pure clay and completes the circle. ‘Back to earth’ at DDW>

Critical look

In addition to industrial applications, clay, whether artificial or not, is an excellent material to work with your hands. Designer Diego Faivre plays with this sentiment. He graduated last year with his presentation of Minute Manufacturing, a collection of furniture and objects covered with a special clay that cures when exposed to air. The basic structures are second-hand furniture and waste materials like cardboard or plastic boxes. He then applies a layer of coloured clay. The value of the object is determined by the time the designer took to make it. This is how he attributes value to his manual labour. This year Faivre presents new work as part of the Surplus collective, alongside the designers Willem van Hoof, Pierre Castignola, Tim Teven and

Red-mud-ceramics

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Sustainable concrete

Concrete has a huge CO2 footprint, while being the second most used material in the world. The ecological impact (nine percent of global CO2 emissions) is therefore enormous. The biggest factor here is the production of cement; the binding agent in concrete. However, concrete can easily be made more sustainable by replacing the cement with local binders; so-called geopolymers. Geopolymer concrete (GPC) is not a mysterious material, but visible, tangible and already usable. GPC is made from local materials. Beton-Lab is an Utrecht based design agency, specialized in aesthetic concrete product design. The company has de­ veloped a design wall tile in which geopolymer concrete could be further tested and developed. According to Beton-Lab they were able to demonstrate that a sustainable cement-free concrete is very well possible, both for interior and exterior design and for sustainable construction. Beton-Lab wants to use GPC to provide an answer to one of today’s design and architecture issues; how can we really become more sustainable? It was shown during the DDW at Piet Hein Eek | Streak T + R. More at Beton-Lab>

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According to Beton-Lab, the Summit wall tile is the first sustainable concrete wall tile made of cement-free concrete. By replacing the cement in the concrete with a binder made from river sludge and clay, a CO2 reduction of up to 90 percent is possible compared to ordinary concrete


DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Wikkelhouse Wikkelhouse is what you get when an everyday material finds a groundbreaking purpose. Using cardboard as its main building material, Wikkelhouse is a cutting-edge sustainable house with exceptional constructive strength, made up of 1.2 meter deep segments that can easily be (dis)connected. Wikkelhouse is designed and developed by Fiction Factory, a company of creative makers from Amsterdam. It was exposed during the DDW 2019 in Eindhoven. The core of Wikkelhouse is top-quality cardboard, wrapped around a unique patented house-shaped mould. Multiple layers of cardboard are bonded together with eco-friendly glue. To protect the material, the cardboard is waterproofed using breathable foil and finished with wooden cladding boards. The result is an incredibly robust sandwich structure with optimal insulation qualities. With a weight of only 500 kg per segment, Wikkelhouse doesn’t need a foundation and can be placed anywhere. Each house can be extended with a smart ‘Home’-segment including a kitchen, shower and bathroom. It can hold glass of closed facades. Wikkelhouse is sustainably produced and made of materials that have minimal impact on the environment. According to Fiction Factory it is three times more eco-friendly than traditional housing. Moreover, the segments can be reused over and over again and are 100 percent recyclabe. www.wikkelhouse.com Wikkelhouse at the DDW>

Video

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

The perfect wave A perfect wave skate obstacle for every (skate)boarder. Can it be made? 3D concrete printing (3DCP) technology allows more form freedom in design. Even natural shapes like waves can be reproduced. Much speaks for the use of 3D concrete printing to produce skate obstacles; it allows for more design freedom. Studio mo man tai explores the boundaries of 3D printing and wanted to create obstacles for Urban Sports based on the concept that nature knows best: the perfect wave, in this case created in 3D printed concrete. It was exposed during the DDW. The concept was developed by Studio mo man tai and was printed in cooperation with BAM Infra and Weber Beamix. To prevent space between the various printed layers, a special mortar was used that ensured that the layers flowed together. Once a 3D file is created the design is (parametric) scaleable. The resulting objects full fill all mechanical/physical requirements (like weather and vandalism proof, transportable and theft proof). Perfect wave at the DDW>

Ashka: ‘ash’-pottery A hudge part of Poland’s energy is still generated by fossil fuels, leaving behind large amounts of ash. This area of the economy produces massive amounts of waste, most of it is ash. Mateusz Mioduszewski of Academy of Fine Arts Katowice used this waste to develop a material with up to 70 percent ash. The material turned out to be an excellent material for the production of ceramic plates, dishes, and different pottery. The material can be formed and dyed using various natural methods.

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

New mobility

Renault EZ-GO

With the slogan ‘If not now, then when?’ Renault presented a trilogy of conceptual robo vehicles in the Klokgebouw during the Dutch Design Week. According to the company these robo vehicles are an exploration of the possibilities of future sustainable and mobility solutions. The three EZ models made their national première during DDW. According to the company, radical changes are on the horizon, for users as well as car manufacturers. In a world where urbanisation is rapidly developing and between 60 and 70 percent of the population will be living in cities by 2030, it will be a considerable challenge to transport people in an efficient, sustainable and affordable manner. Renault’s vision is that mobility will be electric, shared and autonomous in the future. The trio of concept robo-vehicles consists of the EZ-GO, EZ-PRO and EZ-ULTIMO. The EZ-GO offers an insight into the potential of shared urban mobility. The EZ-PRO reflects Renault’s vision in the area of urban distribution, while the EZ-ULTIMO has been developed as a premium service for shared mobility. Renault at DDW>

Renault EZ-Ultimo

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Tumicoffee Marek Kuźmiński of the Strzemiński Academy of Arts Lodz developed a material using coffee waste. The aim of the so-called Brew, drink and process-project was to use locally generated waste to a product with new added value. Mixing the coffee waste with resin, Kuźmiński used the material to develop tiles in various colour gradients. The created material was used to produce tiles, not only contributing to the reduction of the amount of waste, but also forming a part of the interior design of the premises from which it was taken.

Seastone Sea Stone is a cement look alike material which in reality is comprised by natural, non-toxic and sustainable materials. It was developed by newtab-22, a Korean designer duo based in London. Sea Stone features plastic hardness and aesthetic texture. The material is processed with by-products of seashells which go to landfills after the consumption in the sea-food industry. Every year, 7 million tons of seashells are discarded. The majority of them are being thrown into landfills. Seashells are non-biodegradable and thus polluting the land and water when discarded and the cost of disposing process is tremendous. Sea Stone project has a positive environmental impact as proposing a potential material which is constituted by wasted seashells. www.newtab-22.com

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DUTCH DESIGN WEEK 2019

Ecokickstarter Dutch designer Thom Bindels has developed Ecosystem Kickstarter, a honeycomb-shaped cardboard frame that can help small-scale farmers grow crops in degraded soil. The simple, modular, cardboard system was first presented at the Dutch Design Week. The approach of Ecosystem Kickstarter is based on a foldable structure made from biodegradable cardboard fibres, applied on a slope and filled with local soil to function as a terracing structure. Inside the product are both pioneer seeds and nutrients added during the production process. The rooting systems have time to develop due to the short-term protection of the biodegradable structure in the vulnerable phase of vegetation development. When there is a sufficient rooting system, the cardboard decomposes and adds carbon to the soil. The anti-erosion function will be taken over by the new vegetation, improving water

infiltration and soil structure to help the ecosystem get over the ecological threshold. This forms a terracing structure to prevent the runoff of seeds and nutrients in rainwater. https://ecosystemkickstarter.com>

Video

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INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019

Fish don’t see difference between natural and 3D-printed coral Researchers across the globe are searching for ways to help endangered reefs, and the animals that live there. One idea is to use 3D printed coral models to replace or supplement coral reef systems that have been affected. New research by the University of Delaware’s Danielle Dixson and Emily Ruhl has shown that 3D-printed objects do not impact the behaviour of coral-associated damselfish or the survival of a settling stony coral. Further, the study demonstrated that fish showed no preference between materials used to 3D-print artificial corals, opening the door to using environmentally friendly materials, such as biodegradable cornstarch instead of plastic. The researchers reported their results in PLOS One, a peer-reviewed open source journal.

The 3D coral models were made by replicating a coral skeleton using 50 iPhone images of the coral taken from all angles and a 3D printer. The researchers 3D-printed four different artificial coral models from low-cost, widely available

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filaments, including polyester and two biodegradable materials, one made from cornstarch and another made from cornstarch combined with stainless steel powder.

Behaviour analysis showed the damselfish did not display a preference between the native coral skeleton and the 3D-printed coral materials. The fish’s activity level, such as frequency of movement and distance the fish traveled


INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019 in the tank, also remained unchanged regardless of what coral habitat they were provided. According to the scientists, this was a surprise. The scientistst expected the natural skeleton would elicit more docile (that is, accepting) behaviour compared to 3D-printed objects, but then they realized the small reef fish didn’t care if the habitat was artificial or calcium carbonate, they just wanted protection. The researchers’ lab experiments also revealed that so called mustard hill coral larvae settled at much higher rates on 3D-printed surfaces compared to having no settlement surface at all, which could occur if a reef were flattened in a storm. As coral reefs degrade, they often lose structural complexity, which is a problem for reef-associated fish that rarely move more than 15 feet from home in their entire lives. Without proper habitat, coral reef associated juvenile fish don’t grow up to be bigger fish, and without bigger fish that feed on competitive algae, the algae can overgrow live corals, causing destruction and placing the whole ecosystem at risk.

Offering 3D-printed habitats is a way to provide reef organisms a structural starter kit that can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral. And since the selected materials are biodegradable, the artificial coral would naturally degrade over time as the live coral overgrows it. The researchers secured 3D-printed tiles made from different materials to mustard hill coral skeletons located on a reef in Fiji. The tiles were placed in areas that had lost complexity in hopes of learning whether the coral larvae would use a 3D-printed model as habitat to regrow. In ongoing work, the researchers are analyzing field data from Fiji where they deployed 3D-printed coral and tiles made from biodegradable cornstarch filaments after determining they were safe to use. They are analyzing what settled on the artificial tiles, with an eye toward methods that would support conservation efforts. More at Delaware University >

Video

The entire artikle is online>

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RESEARCH

Artificial leaf: to capture and store solar energy Solar cells have disadvantages, for instance when it comes to the coordination between supply and demand. One of the proposed solutions is a so-called solar-to-fuel device: (S2F). With this concept, solar energy is converted into a fuel that can be stored. Pramod Patil Kunturu (University of Twente) investigated S2F’s resulting in the thesis ‘Tandem Cu2O-covered silicon micropillar photocathodes for solar-to-fuel devices’.

Solar technology implementation has been broadly focused on electricity generation. Despite recent progress in solar electrical energy generation, important issues remain unsolved, such

as the continued need for high-power energy demand for transport, central heating, and industrial processes, and the intermittency problem, such as caused by the alternation of summer

and winter periods. One of the proposed solutions is to construct a solar-to-­ fuel (S2F) device, which describes the concept of turning solar energy into storable fuel. To fabricate a fully inte-

(a) Schematic diagram of sunlight driven hydrogen generation using photocathodes, (b) HR-SEM cross-section images of PLD-coated ZnO (20 nm) and TiO2 (100 nm) on top of the Si/ITO-Au/Cu2O micropillar devices. False-colored on figure indicates conformal layers (ITO/Au layer - yellow, Cu2O film - light red, n-ZnO- blue, and TiO2 - green)

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RESEARCH grated, efficient S2F device based on photo-electricity, a single or set of semi­ conductors must be combined with a proper electrocatalyst. In this thesis, we show various geometries and materials combinations for a S2F device, primarily based on copper-based photocatalysts with structured silicon as a base material, employing device structuring and modification.

Copper oxides

In summary, the findings presented in this thesis focus primarily on copper oxides (Cu2O & CuO) in photocathodes. Because of its band gap of 2.0 eV, Cu2O could theoretically provide a solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency of 18 % for a single junction Cu2O photocathode under established working conditions for water splitting. However, the major limiting factors are the material stability

and the mismatch between the optimal thickness for light absorption and the charge carrier diffusion length. As shown in this thesis, micro/nanostructuring is favourable for enhancing the efficiency, and can provide devices that deliver higher performance compared to planar architectures. To improve the performance of photocathodes based on Cu2O, composite materials have been used, heterojunctions have been developed, and the surface has been passivated with stable oxide materials with improved optical absorption and charge extraction properties. The tandem PEC configuration is shown to be superior, concerning aspects of high efficiency, stability, and the use of earth abundant materials. These improvements may lead to design strategies for fabricating efficient

http://hightechmaterials.4tu.nl

photocathodes and push the boundary of solar water splitting, possibly beyond the target of 10% solar-to-hydrogen efficiency. The PhD research work of Pramod Patil Kunturu was carried out in the department of Molecular Nanofabrication. His supervisor is prof.dr.ir. J. Huskens from the faculty Science and Technology at University of Twente. He successfully defended his PhD thesis on the 5th of July 2019. The title of his dissertation is ‘Tandem Cu2O-covered silicon micro­ pillar photocathodes for solar-to-fuel devices’. The thesis is online (PDF)>

Select key words and find relevant materials scientists or research groups within 4TU.

High-Tech Materials form the key to innovative and sustainable technology

www.4tu.nl/htm @4TU_HTM

4TU.HTM Research Programme New Horizons in Designer Materials | Visibility and accessibility of Materials Science & Engineering 29 | INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019 | Annual symposium Dutch Materials | 4TU.Joint Materials Science Activities | web application http://hightechmaterials.4tu.nl


INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019

Biobased products in public spaces Sustainability is high on the agenda of governments and municipalities. There is an constant need for opportunities and initiatives to increase the sustainability profile. Biobased materials fit well with this, because they consist of natural materials and have a low CO2 footprint. Last year two Dutch companies - Gebr. Van Kessel and Circulus, specialized in the development of circular chains, introduced a new production technique that converts two residual flows, roadside grass fiber and recycled plastic, into a biobased material.

Commissioned by the Dutch provinces, Van Kessel manages and maintains kilometres of roadside. A vast amount of cut verge grass is processed into compost; a process that releases a lot of greenhouse gases. So a new idea arose: would be possible to reuse this residual waste and make it appear again in the public space as a new product. Together with Circulus, a method has been developed to process roadside grass fibre and recy-

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cled plastic into biobased products. This material is particularly suitable for the production of, among other things, road furniture, bank protection and furnishing materials for public spaces.

Biobased products

Immediately after the introduction, the first hundreds of biobased roadside boards were placed in public spaces. A wide range of products can be produ-

ced through different molds. Reflector boards, picnic tables, lighting columns and benches now adorn the Dutch public space. There is also an increasing demand for ecological aids such as bats, bee hotels and bird houses. There are also opportunities for the construction sector.


INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019 Meanwhile, the municipality of Tiel opted for biobased roadside boards and the municipality of The Hague for biobased picnic tables. Recently, the municipality of Utrecht also decided to join. The municipality is responsible for the sports fields at SV Kampong Hockey, one of the largest hockey clubs in the world. Two hockey fields have been renovated here, which are equipped with circular biobased battle boards.

Other markets

Characteristics

The biobased products contain properties similar to hardwood. The use of recycled raw materials also creates a product with a low CO2 impact. In addition, the material can be reused as raw material after use. This completes the circle. Every product has its own product requirements and therefore requires its own recipe. The ratio of roadside grass

fibre and plastic in the end product is not always the same. The type of plastic can also vary. For example, a reflector should not fall over due to strong wind, but should break off if it is hit. Before production takes place, the recipe is compiled, calculated and tested extensively. The end products also differ in colour, because this also depends on the recipe.

For the time being, this biobased initiative focuses primarily on scaling up the biobased products in public spaces. According to Gebr. Van Kessel, other markets, such as materials for the construction sector, seem to have an interesting potential. In the coming years this sector faces the challenge of achieving the targets set for reducing CO2 emissions, primary raw materials and waste production. Liane Oosterkamp, Gebr. Van Kessel

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INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019

Smart Materials, Part 6

Piezomaterials for sensing applications Smart materials are everywhere, but often invisible or simply not recognized. This is the sixth article in a series of eight, in which prof. Pim Groen will discuss the world of smart materials; this time piezomaterials are widely used for sensing applications. Pim Groen is professor of SMART Materials at Aerospace Engineering (AE) at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) and Programme Manager of Holst Centre, TNO.

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INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019 Piezomaterials are widely used for sensing applications. Figure 1 shows some examples: an accelerometer, a force sensor and components for the controls of a toaster and a piezoelement in guitars. In Smart Materials part 2 was discussed that different piezo materials can be used as a sensor material. I like to show you an example where we use a piece of PZT ceramic in the d33 mode as a force sensor. This will be compared with a piece of quartz in the d11 mode (figure 2). In both cases a dynamic force is applied on the piezo. It’s important to realize that these piezo systems cannot be used for static forces. There are two ways to make a measurement: we can measure the charge output by using a charge amplifier or we can measure the voltage over the piezoelectric component with a voltmeter. Figure 3 shows on the right piezoelectric constants d for the two materials. PZT shows d33 of 400 pC/n, for quartz d11 equals 2.3 pC/N At this stage, the charge which can be generated by a disk of 1 mm thick can be calculated. This is d11 or d33 muliplied by the force. Notice that PZT generates much more charge. To calculate the voltage output, the piezoelectric constant g for both materials is required (figure 4). Notice that PZT shows g 33 of 0.025, and quartz shows a g11 of 0.058. So the voltage which will be on the sensor (which is shown in figure 5) can be calculated. The calculated value for quartz equals 0.74 Volt per Newton and only 0.32 Volts per Newton for PZT. As always there’s a restriction. For the quartz sensor, the voltage is high, but the amount of charge which should be measured is very low. This makes is necessary to use expensive equipment. Furthermore, the system appears to be very sensitive to noise and the parasitic impedance of the cables.

Figure 1. Piezomaterials are widely used for sensing applications

Figure 2. Quartz and Piezoceramics as a sensor

Figure 3

Figure 4

The frequencies at which the sensors can be used, are limited by the so-called bandwidth (figure 6). At higher frequencies the limit is at one third of the resonance frequency of the sensor. This lowest resonance frequency depends on the largest dimension of the sensor. Furthermore it

Figure 5

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INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019 depends on the frequency constant Np which is for a piezoceramics 2000 Hertz-meter. So for the piezoceramic disk we discussed before (Smart Materials part 5) the resonance frequency is Np divided by the diameter which is 200 kHz. This sensor can be used up to 60 kHz. There is also a lower limit for the bandwidth, although that is more dictated by the electronics which are used to measure the charge or voltage. There is a simple way to improve the sensitivity of a sensor, namely by adding mass to the sensor. As shown by simple formulas in figure 7, the charge is directly proportional with mass for a fixed acceleration. A disadvantage of this method is that the resonance frequency is lowered by the addition of the mass, so a certain amount of bandwidth will be lost. Another way to make a highly sensitive sensor is by using a bimorph (figure 8). The bimorph in the section on actuators was already discussed in Smart Materials part 5. The charge output of a bimorph can be calculated with some standard formula’s which fall outside our scope. This results in 55 nano Coulomb of charge per Newton: more than 100 times more comparing to the piezoelectric PZT disk which has an outout of 400 pC/N. In the past, this kind of sensors were used as airbag sensors in cars (figure 8). In the case of a bimorph as a sensor we use two piezoplates with opposite poling directions glued together (figure 9). When a force is applied the the sensor, the upper plate the upper plate will encounter a tensile stress and the bottom plate will experience a compressive stress. Both plates will generate a positive voltage because the poling directions are opposite. The plates are connected in series and the voltage output will add up. There’s another, hidden advantage. In the materials section (Smart Materials part 2) it was discussed that all ferroelectric materials are also pyroelectric. This means that if we use a ferroelectric material like PZT as a sensor, the material is also sensitive to temperature variations. When the temperature changes, a voltage is generated. This can be misleading when using this as a sensor. If a series bimorph is used as a sensor this cannot happen. Because of the opposite polarities of the plates the pyroelectric voltage will be cancelled.

Figure 6

Figure 7

Figure 8

Missed one of the preceeding articles? Click on the article for the previously published parts.

Figure 9

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ENTERPRISE EUROPE NETWORK

Enterprise Europe Network (EEN) supports companies with international ambitions The Enterprise Europe Network (EEN) is an initiative of the European Commission that supports entrepreneurs in seeking partners to innovate and do business abroad. The Network is active in more than 60 countries worldwide. It brings together 3,000 experts from more than 600 member organisations – all renowned for their excellence in business support.

Database

Every company can participate by adjusting its profile to the database. This company will be brought to the attention in the country in which it wants to become active. At the same time it is possible to search for partners. EEN advisers actively assist in compiling the profile, which is drawn up in a certain format. The EEN websites also contain foreign companies that are looking for Dutch companies and organizations for commercial or technological cooperation. The EEN advisers support the search for a cooperation partner by actively deploying contacts within the network. In addition, Company Missions

and Match Making Events are regularly organized. All these services are free of charge. There are five types of profiles:

• Business Offer:

the company offers a product

Video: How Enterprise Europe Network works

• Business Request:

the company is looking for a product

• Technology Offer:

the company offers a technology

• Technology Request:

the company is looking for a technology

• Research & Development Request:

the organization seeks cooperation for research

When a company has both a Business Offer and a Business Request (or another combination), two (or even more if applicable) profiles are created. The profile includes the most essential

information about the nature of the supply or demand, the ‘type of partner’ that is intended and the expected cooperation structure. Get in touch with your local network contact point by selecting the country and city closest to where your business is based. They can help you with advice, support and opportunities for international partnerships. For sustainable building and the creative industry, contact ir. drs. Hans Kamphuis: T: +31 (0) 88 042 1124 M: 06 25 70 82 76 E: hans.kamphuis@rvo.nl For Materials contact Nils Haarmans: T: +31 (0) 88 062 5843 M: 06 21 83 94 57 More information websites can be found at the Europe Network websites: www.enterpriseeuropenetwork.nl http://een.ec.europa.eu

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ENTERPRISE EUROPE NETWORK The Enterprise Europe Network Materials Database: Request for partnership: December 2019. Intrested? contact hans.kamphuis@rvo.nl>

Geopolymers as alternative materials for outdoor block paving POD Reference: TRIT20191204001

An Italian company with long-lasting experience in manufacturing and commercialisation of concrete products for floors and building walls, seeks partners for technical cooperation as it is interested to use geopolymers for outdoor paver and firestop blocks and RTD institutions for research cooperation through European projects.

Transparent and resistant coating to protect digital printing on outdoor concrete paver requested

An Italian company working in construction material sector is looking for a transparent coating with high abrasion resistance to protect the digital printing on outdoor concrete paver. Companies from chemical industry sector are sought for a commercial agreement with technical assistance or for a technology cooperation for the development and adaptation of such a specific coating material and process.

Extrusion/injection partners sought in ES /PT for cross partnership or joint venture

A French SME specialized in thermoplastics, composites extrusion and injection is looking for a long term partnership with a thermoplastic company in Portugal or Spain having similar or complementary expertise and relevant client references in the medical, or industrial equipment sectors. Joint venture (which could include cross production) or acquision agreements are sought

An Italian SME, specialized in high level quilting and embroideries for the most important high fashion brands, is looking for fabric manufacturers for increasing its business offer, under manufacturing or commercial agreement An Italian SME, specialized in high level quilting and embroideries for high fashion, is looking for fabric manufacturers, with high/medium level production, with no commercial distributors in Italy, to increase its appeal, proposing to its clients not just processing on client’s textile, but also textile quilted and embroidered. Commercial agency agreement or manufacturing agreements can be discussed.

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ENTERPRISE EUROPE NETWORK The Enterprise Europe Network Materials Database: Request for partnership: Decemberber 2019. Intrested? contact hans.kamphuis@rvo.nl>

Environmentally friendly packaging solution for concentrated soap detergent are sought

A SME from Northern Sweden specialized in manufacturing and selling soap detergent made of recycled vegetable cooking oil is looking for a supplier of environmentally friendly and recyclable packaging solution in EU. Package size 450 ml. The company are aiming for a long-term manufacturing agreement.

A Spanish company developing an industrial innovative material is looking for providers of cellulose moulding industrial equipment

A Spanish company is developing technologies to transform vegetable waste into biodegradable industrial materials that may outplace plastic in some applications. They are looking for companies that can provide them with cellulose moulding machinery and/or related technologies, which are relevant to their process, as they would like to build a low production, demonstrative plant. The company offers commercial agency agreements and joint venture agreements to potential providers.


EVENTS Euroguss 14 - 16 January 2020, Nürnberg

ESEF 2020 17 March 2020, Utrecht

Swissbau 2020 14 - 18 January 2020, Basel

RapidPro 2020 4 - 5 March 2020, Veldhoven

EuroTech RILEM PhD School Concrete Life Cycle: From Cradle to Grave 12 - 15 January 2020, Haifa

Fensterbau frontale 2020, 18 - 21 March 2020, Nürnberg

Swiss Plastics Expo 2020 21 - 23 January 2020, Luzern

4th Additive Manufacturing Forum 11 - 12 March 2020, Berlijn

Domain Driven Design Europe 2020 3 - 7 February 2020, Amsterdam

13 th International Conference on Coatings on Glass and Plastics 23 - 26 March 2020, Braunschwieg

Prototyping 2020 & MN Event 5 - 6 February 2020, Kortrijk

Techni-mat 2020 25 - 26 March 2020, Kortrijk

1st International Conference on Cellulose Fibres 11 - 12 February 2020, Keulen

Lijmen België 7 April 2020, KU Leuven Campus Brugge

Solids Zürich 2020 12 - 13 February 2020, Zürich

Hannover Messe 2020 20 - 24 April 2020, Hannover

Living Materials 2020 12 - 14 February 2020, Saarbrücken

Plastics Recycling World Exhibition 2020 3 - 4 June 2020, Essen

Maintenance Dortmund 2020 12 - 13 February 2020, Dortmund

Materials+Eurofinish+Surface 2020 3 - 4 June 2020, Veldhoven

Ulmer Beton Tage 2020 18 - 22 February 2020, Ulm

MaterialDistrict Rotterdam 10 - 12 March 2020, Rotterdam

INNOVATIVE MATERIALS 6 2019

Challenging Glass 18 - 19 June 2020 Gent

Kunststoffen 2020 23 - 24 September 2020, Veldhoven


NIEUWS

MaterialDistrict Rotterdam: Inspiration for designing ‘the next space’ How can you build circularly? Which materials contribute to a healthy living environment? Will we save or generate energy using smart materials? MaterialDistrict Rotterdam (formerly Material Xperience) is the only annual event in the Netherlands that brings together material manufacturers and specifiers of materials from all sectors of spatial design. The 15th edition of MaterialDistrict Rotterdam takes place from 17 to 19 March 2002 in Rotterdam Ahoy. With 7,500 expected visitors, 200 exhibitors and 9,000 m2 surface area, the material event for (interior) architects and R&D professionals will be all about material innovations for spatial design: Architecture, Interior, Garden & Landscape Architecture, Leisure, Stage & Décor Construction, and Furniture & Interior Construction.

MaterialDistrict Rotterdam 17 - 19 maart 2020| AHOY, Rotterdam

Register now for your free ticket at Rotterdam.MaterialDistrict.com>

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Innovative Materials, the international version of the Dutch magazine Innovatieve Materialen, is now available in English. Innovative Materials is an interactive, digital magazine about new and/or innovatively applied materials. Innovative Materials provides information on material innovations, or innovative use of materials. The idea is that the ever increasing demands lead to a constant search for better and safer products as well as material and energy savings. Enabling these innovations is crucial, not only to be competitive but also to meet the challenges of enhancing and protecting the environment, like durability, C2C and carbon footprint. By opting for smart, sustainable and innovative materials constructors, engineers and designers obtain more opportunities to distinguish themselves. As a platform Innovative Materials wants to help to achieve this by connecting supply and demand. Innovative Materials is distributed among its own subscribers/network, but also through the networks of the partners. In 2019 this includes organisations like M2i, MaterialDesign, 4TU (a cooperation between the four Technical Universities in the Netherlands), the Bond voor Materialenkennis (material sciences), SIM Flanders, FLAM3D, RVO and Material District.

Profile for Innovatieve Materialen

IM20196EN  

IM20196EN