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Logics of Canadian T Television

his year, the Cinema Studies Institute at Innis College moved in a bold new direction with the introduction of INI 387, “Logics of Canadian Television”, a new course designed to give students an opportunity to compare the principles and practices of the small and silver screens. Through lectures and readings, the class explored the complex network of interrelations between technological innovation, aesthetics, public policy, and cultural affairs, which has governed the development of the Canadian television industry. Moreover, through regular in-course screenings, the class followed the development of the Canadian television industry from CBC’s first broadcasts in September 1952 to the vast panoply of offerings now available in the 500-channel universe. Along the way, students discovered and rediscovered classic Canadian dramatic anthologies like Scope and Festival; the legendary public affairs show, This Hour Has Seven Days, groundbreaking docudramas like The National Dream, Riel, and The Boys of St. Vincent; and shows aimed at younger demographics like The Littlest Hobo and The Forest Rangers, not to mention the runaway hit series Degrassi Junior High and Degrassi High.

Volunteers Recognized For Outstanding Commitment to Innis College.

Congratulations to volunteers Ann Atkins, Jim Dunn, and Atom Egoyan on receiving the

Mania

nominated by Innis College

College and the University.

Winter 2010

Maddin

The recipients were

for their outstanding

Innis College

January was a big month at Innis. Working in conjunction with the

Award recipients Ann Atkins and Jim Dunn with Principal Paterson (middle). Absent: Atom Egoyan.

its alumni! Several distinguished alumni and media celebrities

Studies Institute brought Winnipeg filmmaker Guy Maddin to Innis

have brought excitement, culture, and knowledge

College for a week of screenings, lectures, and round-table discus-

to Innis College over the past few months. Jessi Cruikshank, host of MTV Canada, dazzled

rently working in Canada (or anywhere), Maddin also proved himself There are many different volunteer opportunities at Innis College. For more information, please email alumni.innis@utoronto.ca.

with

Jackman Humanities Institute, the University of Toronto’s Cinema

sions. Easily one of the most audacious and inspired filmmakers cur-

Interested in volunteering?

Message from the Principal Janet M. Paterson

2009 U of T Arbor Award.

personal service to the Course guest speakers, Linda Schuyler and Moses Znaimer, offered the class the perfect complement to an intense curriculum of lectures, readings, and screenings. Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: The Next Generation, provided a wealth of insight into both the aesthetics of creating a hit series and the business of producing and distributing it. Canadian media mogul Moses Znaimer, Co-Founder of City TV and now President of MZMedia, graciously responded to students’ questions at a special interactive class open to the public. Students were also invited to the MZTV Museum, giving them useful insight into the development of television broadcast technology.

INNIS COLLEGE NEWS

Filmmaker Atom Egoyan has dedicated countless hours of mentorship and guidance to the students of Innis College as a guest lecturer in the College’s Cinema Studies courses, and as former Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in Theatre, Film, Music and Visual Studies

incoming students during orientation week with

effortlessly funny as he dazzled packed crowds in Innis Town Hall on

her humorous presentation. Jared Bland,

four nights from January 12th to 15th, 2010.

Managing Editor of The Walrus

Principal’s Luncheon Series:

Toronto the Good: Economic development prospects and priorities.

Shaping the Next Generation of Leaders

Figure out what you love and what you are passionate about, and success will follow. This was the message that resonated with students who attended the 2009 Principal’s Luncheon Series with guest speakers Stanley Zlotkin in October 2009 and Tamara Farber in November 2009. Hosted by Principal Janet Paterson, the Principal’s Luncheon Series invites distinguished alumni back to Innis College and offers students the opportunity to learn from the success and advice of alumni.

On January 19th, 2010, the students of Urban Studies’ INI 437Y: “Experiential Learning in Toronto and the GTA” welcomed a group of panellists for an informal discussion about economic development prospects and priorities in Toronto. Guest speakers Julia Deans, Executive Director of the Toronto City Summit Alliance, Brent Gilmour, Director of the Canadian Urban Institute, and Dr. Kevin Stolarick, Research Director at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the Rotman School, joined the class to engage in a conversation about the current state of economic development initiatives taking place in the city. The focus of the conversation ranged from traditional definitions of economic development (such as building

physical infrastructure and attracting international business) to reflections on more contemporary perspectives of economic development, which take into account the importance of social and creative capital. The panellists were unanimous in their support for the City of Toronto, with Deans referring to herself as “Toronto’s economic development poster girl.” Gilmour focused his comments on looking at Toronto’s strengths, particularly its varied neighbourhoods, as well as touching on some of the problems that plague Toronto at present. Finally, Stolarick reminded the urban studies students that the city is not comprised solely within Toronto’s political boundaries; but rather when we plan for the city and for economic development within the city in terms of transit, housing, investment, etc., we need to take into account the larger context, the region with which the city has an interdependent relationship.

Dr. Stanley Zlotkin (BSc 1971 Innis), U of T professor of paediatrics, and nutrition specialist and researcher at the Hospital for Sick Children, conveyed the importance of studying what you enjoy, and finding a career that you are passionate about. He also stressed that it is critical to learn how to learn rather than fussing about trying to learn everything. Ms. Tamara Farber (BSc 1990 Innis), partner in Miller Thomson’s Environmental and Litigation departments, offered the students similar advice on finding a career that you are passionate about. She also stressed the importance of one’s self and encouraged students to be sincere and to have integrity. Peace and Conflict Studies Student Rini Rashid found great value in the Tamara Farber luncheon: “As a fourth year student preparing to graduate in just a few months, the event was a relaxed and welcomed reprise.” She continues: “It was a delight to be in the company of an Innis alumna, whose fierce work ethic and drive were more than apparent and a testament of the successes that await us after our graduation if we’re willing to work for it.”

Entitled “Guy Maddin: Confession and the Cinema of Uninhibition”

Spring Reunion 2010

(unofficially dubbed “Maddin Mania” by event organizer Professor

For information on Spring Reunion 2010, please visit www.utoronto.ca/innis/alumni/springreunion.

Stephanie

Kay Armatage), the series had Maddin presenting clips from his

Savage, Executive Producer of Gossip Girl

favourite films, speaking to the artistic and narrative capacities of the short film medium, narrating his 2007 feature My Winnipeg, and

INNIS COLLEGE NEWS Editor Karen Papazian Contributors Karen Papazian Bibian Aguire Janet Paterson John Semley Paul Babiak Shauna Brail Zannah Matson Cynthia Messenger

Our thanks to Kay Armatage Charlie Keil Roger Riendeau Brian Corman Rini Rashid

Design: PRM Inc. www.prm-design.com

cionados.

Print: Maud Street Printing Services

that two of the University’s most vibrant young members,

Keep in touch and stay involved. alumni.innis@utoronto.ca

.. .. In the news: You .. .. Email us your news and stories. . .. Stay E-Connected .. Send us email address updates .. .. to receive event invitations and . e-newsletters. .. .. Return to Sender .. Moving? Update your .. . mailing address. .. .. 9 to 5 .. .. Update your work information. . Alumni office:

fielding questions from a panel of academics and lay Maddin afi-

Dr. Stanley

“The Maddinfest was an outstanding tribute to the contributions

Zlotkin

the Jackman Humanities Institute and the Cinema Studies Institute, are regularly making to the larger community,” says Brian Corman, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. He continues: “The response to Guy Maddin’s visit clearly marks it as a highlight of the 2009-10 year.” Known for films that combine bizarre humour, psychosexual melodrama, and the recuperation of bygone film forms, Maddin has emerged as one of Canada’s premier filmmakers. But apart from his contribution to Canada’s snow-swept cinematic landscape, Maddin has grown into the rarest kind of artist: one capable of harmonizing the deeply personal with the universal, and one whose style is truly peerless. Given his reputation and the laundry list of honours his films have received (most notably the Best Canadian Feature Award at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival for My Winnipeg), Maddin revealed himself to be humble, sincere, and extraordinarily witty as he held

Intelligent, insightful, and naturally gregarious, Guy Maddin’s stint at Innis College proved an unqualified success. He not only exceeded the expectations of his eager fans but also endeared himself, and his work, to many curious converts

court at Innis. The event was also distinguished by the screening of Maddin’s latest short. Entitled “The Little White Cloud That Cried,” the film presented an apocalyptic pansexual bazaar, evoking the erotically-charged shorts of American underground filmmakers like Kenneth Anger and Jack Smith. While “Cloud” may have had some viewers stewing uncomfortably in the seats of Town Hall, it gave a glimpse into the filmmaker’s ever-evolving preoccupations with sexuality, sadness, and the economical art of the short film.

Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: the Next Generation, and friend Moses Znaimer, President of MZ Media and Co-founder of City TV


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Message from the Principal Janet M. Paterson

Innis connects with its alumni! Several distinguished alumni and media celebrities have brought excitement, culture, and knowledge to Innis College over the past few months. Jessi Cruikshank, host of MTV Canada, dazzled incoming students during orientation week with her humorous presentation. Jared Bland, Managing Editor of The Walrus magazine, inspired Innis scholarship recipients with his memories of friendships and learning at the College. Stephanie Savage, Executive Producer of Gossip Girl, gave excellent career advice to upper year students: work hard, keep focused, and put away that cell phone! A group of life science students had the good fortune to have lunch with Dr. Stanley Zlotkin, Professor of Paediatrics at U of T, who demonstrated, by dint of personal example, the impact of one person’s research on thousands of people. Cinema Studies students taking a new course on the history of Canadian television, had the privilege of learning first-hand about the medium that transformed the world from Innis alumna Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: the Next Generation, and friend Moses Znaimer, President of MZ Media and Co-founder of City TV. Many other alumni and friends of the College touched the lives of our students by increasing their donations to scholarships at a time of economic turmoil. I thank everyone who has “come back” and contributed to the vibrant community of students, faculty, and staff at Innis College.


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Alumni Jeff Rubin and the End of Globalization

Don’t tell me I can’t! I don’t believe you! Together we can!

L

ife after graduation is not always easy. The Backpack to Briefcase series co-hosted by the Cinema Studies Institute and the Departments of English and History, provides soon-to-be graduates essential advice needed to navigate the working world. Alumni from each program are invited to share their experiences and professional advice with students. The 2009/2010 Backpack to Briefcase series offered upper year students 3 different events each designed to ease the transition from U of T student to life as a young professional.

A

Spotlight

Jeanny Bolloré Bachelin (HBA 2002) Innis College

J. Michael Tomczak graduated from Innis College

alumna is currently working in New York City as a Production Director for a leading digital capture and retouching company specializing in the fashion industry.

in 1974 with a BA. He also earned an MA and MBA from U of T. Tomczak is a Managing Director of Scotia Capital, working in Derivative Products, and has over 30 years of experience in international finance and capital markets. In March 2010, he returned to New York City after working in Mexico City for over 2 years. A long-time supporter of Innis and the University, Tomczak established the J Michael Tomczak Ontario Graduate Scholarship in support of students at the Department of Geography.

What do you do as a Production Director?

How did you end up working in Mexico?

A Canadian in Copenhagen: Diary from the COP15 Innis College student Zannah Matson shares her experiences and thoughts on the December 2009 COP15 climate negotiations in Copenhagen.

The Power of A Promise:

Screen Real -Oct 2009 with alumni speakers: Ron Mann, Director, Know Your Mushrooms; and, Stuart Coxe, Producer, Dragon's Den.

Zannah Matson is a third-year student studying Peace and Conflict, Urban Studies, and Environment and Society.

Skills for the Real World -Jan 2010 with alumni speakers: William Morassutti, Managing Director, Blank Angus Media, Toro Magazine; Susan Courtney, V.P. Group Media Director, Starcom MediaVest Group; and, Lisa Khoo, Senior Producer, CBC News: Live Desk. Three Things –Feb 2010 with alumni speakers: Aamer Haleem, Radio and TV Personality; Sharon McAuley, VP, Group Publisher, St. Joseph Media, Toronto Life; and, Stephanie Savage, Executive Producer, Gossip Girl.

News from the Writing and Rhetoric Program

The Writing and Rhetoric Program and the Department of English will be offering a new course in the 2010/11 academic year. JEI 206H, “Writing English Essays”, is a jointly developed course drawing on the strengths in curriculum design and teaching. “Writing English Essays” will teach students how to write clear, compelling, research-informed English essays. The course aims to help students recognize the function of grammar and rhetoric, the importance of audience, and the persuasive role of style. Not only will students be taught both written and oral communication skills, but they will also learn to analyze argument, write position statements, and defend their positions orally, in a manner that reflects the ancient roots of oral rhetoric. Conventional mastery learning (lectures) and small-group learning (tutorials) will be integrated with the intensive learning that occurs in one-on-one sessions with instructors.

Being a Canadian in Copenhagen was hard. There is not a strong culture shock, and almost everyone speaks English; but our policies on climate change single us out in this Scandinavian environment. I was one of 12 students who participated in the University of Toronto COP15 delegation charged with the mandate of engaging the student body in the seminal climate negotiations taking place in Copenhagen in December 2009. While I am a proud Canadian and love this nation in innumerable ways, our perspectives on carbon emissions are not one of them, and I watched in shame as our negotiators repeatedly blocked the discussions from advancing. Internationally, the world is starting to notice that we are not just a country full of environmentalists who canoe on the weekend amidst the wilderness of rocks and trees that define our landscape; they are starting to notice that the image we have had for a longtime does not match our rhetoric. Our years of inaction with respect to this global environmental problem, and our more recent years of negative policies towards a global climate regime, have finally caught up with us. The COP15 climate negotiations were a watershed for many reasons though, and the failures of nations to commit to strong targets that were broadcast across the world only tell part of the story. Although I was hesitant about identifying my nationality, I was more than happy to consider myself a citizen of Toronto, which shone as a bright light amidst the local actors present. Seeing our city take a strong stance against climate change, through various outlets from deep water cooling systems to chairing the C40 at the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors, was an inspiration throughout my time away. So if you are feeling a little down about the outcomes of Copenhagen, look no further than to the municipal policies of Toronto to find some hope.

Making a Difference ....today. M

aking the world a better place for all is a task Innis College student Michael Beeler takes very seriously. At 22, Beeler has not only achieved academic excellence while pursuing his Honours BA in Economics, Math, and Peace and Conflict Studies, but he has also become an instrumental part of the success of Students for International Development


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Faculty & Alumni Recent Book Releases Jeff Rubin and the End of Globalization

Don’t tell me I can’t! I don’t believe you! Together we can!

The Innis College Alumni Network hosted a book launch for alumnus Jeff Rubin’s new book,

Why Your World Is About To Get A Whole Lot Smaller: Oil and the End of Globalization. Over 200 alumni, friends, and students attended the event with former CIBC World Markets Chief Economist and bestselling author. Rubin shared his thoughts about his new book and welcomed questions from moderator economics professor Don Dewees, as well as from the audience. He argued that the rising price and diminishing availability of oil will lead to a reversal in globalization and a return to local economies. According to the maverick economist, there will be winners as well as losers as the age of globalization comes to an end. Distance will soon cost money, and so will burning carbon: both will bring long-lost jobs back home, and local economies will be revitalized, as will cities and neighborhoods. Rubin was the Chief Economist and Chief Strategist at CIBC World Markets where he worked for over 20 years. He was one of the first economists to accurately predict soaring oil prices back in 2000 and is now one of the world's most sought-after energy experts. Why Your World Is AboutTo Get A Whole Lot Smaller became a #1 bestseller, was selected as a Heather's Pick at Indigo Books and Music, and was long listed for the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award.

CSI Professor Corinn Columpar Unsettling Sights: The Fourth World on Film (2010)

There She Goes: Feminist Filmmaking and Beyond (2009)

Alumni Jeanny Bolloré Bachelin

What do you do as a Production Director?

for his portrayal of Carter and was nominated for an

Excerpt from Lesra Martin’s Innis College speech:

Don’t tell me I can’t! I don’t believe you!

Together we can!

I can dream of the day when every child has access to a good and decent education. I dream of the day that everyone has a safe place they can call home. I dream of the day that food is a right instead of a privilege. I can dream of the day that we all have the time to give someone else time. I can dream of the day when we can truly say “I am my brother’s keeper”. I can dream of a community where our compassion compass is set permanently on a place of understanding. I can dream of the day that our society is guided by our hearts.

Academy Award.

I can dream that if we are disciplined and determined in our approach, and if we believe in our own human spirit then we will make it to our goals. I know that there are naysayers out there who doubt just about everything but I have hope. Hope is what enabled me to get out of a ghetto community, inch by inch, step by step, book by book, hand by hand!

in 1974 with a BA. He also earned an MA and MBA from U of T. Tomczak is a Managing Director of Scotia Capital, working in Derivative Products, and has over 30 years of experience in international finance and capital markets. In March 2010, he returned to New York City after working in Mexico City for over 2 years. A long-time supporter of Innis and the University, Tomczak established the J Michael Tomczak Ontario Graduate Scholarship in support of students at the Department of Geography.

I started my career in trade finance, so I had early exposure to international business. I later had the opportunity to move within Scotiabank to New York where I contributed to the early growth of the derivatives business line in the United States. As business opportunities began to emerge in the Caribbean and Latin America, I shifted my efforts there – given my interest in international business. I contributed to the establishment of the product platform in Mexico and eventually was asked to base myself in Mexico, where I have been for almost two and a half years.

to students, friends, and fellow alumni on February 9, 2010. Innis College was an important stop on Martin’s book tour promoting his latest book, The Power of A Promise: Life Lessons Encountered on My Journey From Illiteracy to Lawyer. Martin attended Innis College only a few years after battling illiteracy, and found the support he needed within the Innis community.

won a Golden Globe

J. Michael Tomczak graduated from Innis College

How did you end up working in Mexico?

An emotional Lesra Martin (HBA 1988 Innis) delivered a passionate speech

Martin’s story is a remarkable one. He did not learn to read until he was 16 and the first book he purchased was a used copy of The 16th Round written by boxer Rubin ‘The Hurricane’ Carter who had been wrongfully accused of murder and sent to prison for life. Martin knew what it felt like to be imprisoned, and found he The Norman Jewison had immediate affinity film, “The Hurricane” with the boxer. Without hesitation, he wrote to Carter, and chronicled the story thus begins the odyssey that led to a promise to of Carter’s wrongful help release him from prison. imprisonment and Martin has made many promises since then; the fight for release getting a college degree, followed by a law by Martin and the degree, followed by marriage vows with his sweetheart. However, no promise was more three Canadians. important than his pledge to battle illiteracy. Denzel Washington

Spotlight

A Canadian in Copenhagen: Diary from the COP15 Innis College student Zannah Matson shares her experiences and thoughts on the December 2009 COP15 climate negotiations in Copenhagen.

Zannah Matson is a third-year student studying Peace and Conflict, Urban Studies, and Environment and Society.

What is the most rewarding part of your job? Interacting with clients and colleagues. In particular, I get a lot of satisfaction from bringing people up the learning curve as I share what is rather specialized financial product knowledge with them.

Staying humble, having an open mind, and being patient.

What do you see as one of the biggest challenges that recent graduates face when entering the workforce? The infamous scenario of employers demanding more experience but no one offers you the opportunity to gain that experience. It is never easy when you start out but you have to persevere and be willing to intern (even without pay) to eventually climb the ropes. In fashion (unlike more lucrative industries such as Finance) this is particularly common as there is an association of prestige and excitement when working for the pretty world of la mode -so much so that it blinds most people into thinking it is ok to just work for la gloire (glory, as the French put it). My advice: don’t get caught up to the point where you lose perspective and self worth.

How did your education or experience at U of T influence who you are today? I started off pursuing an International Relations degree and realized by 2nd year the importance of focusing on the program courses that I really loved (such as languages, history, philosophy, and cultural studies). As a result, my grades went up and my university experience was much more enjoyable. Stick to what you're good at and you'll succeed!

You have moved around, at least geographically, in your career. Do you have any advice to share with recent graduates and current students? Since starting my career in the late 1970’s, the pace of change in the world, and jobs and job markets, have clearly accelerated. It is really important to be prepared for change and to embrace it. This is reality, but it does make for opportunities. .

Why have you been an annual donor to U of T, including Innis College, for so many years? (Michael has been an Innis College Annual Fund donor since 1986) During my 20 years or so of working in New York, I was impressed by the enthusiastic support of Americans for their universities. Not only did they continue to be strong supporters of their college sports teams, but they were also very generous with their financial support. This made me realize the importance of acknowledging the contribution of one’s higher education to career success, and giving back by helping the university educate younger generations of students and remain globally competitive in higher education. I encourage Innis College News readers to think about this.

Being a Canadian in Copenhagen was hard. There is not a strong culture shock, and almost everyone speaks English; but our policies on climate change single us out in this Scandinavian environment. I was one of 12 students who participated in the University of Toronto COP15 delegation charged with the mandate of engaging the student body in the seminal climate negotiations taking place in Copenhagen in December 2009. While I am a proud Canadian and love this nation in innumerable ways, our perspectives on carbon emissions are not one of them, and I watched in shame as our negotiators repeatedly blocked the discussions from advancing. Internationally, the world is starting to notice that we are not just a country full of environmentalists who canoe on the weekend amidst the wilderness of rocks and trees that define our landscape; they are starting to notice that the image we have had for a longtime does not match our rhetoric. Our years of inaction with respect to this global environmental problem, and our more recent years of negative policies towards a global climate regime, have finally caught up with us. The COP15 climate negotiations were a watershed for many reasons though, and the failures of nations to commit to strong targets that were broadcast across the world only tell part of the story. Although I was hesitant about identifying my nationality, I was more than happy to consider myself a citizen of Toronto, which shone as a bright light amidst the local actors present. Seeing our city take a strong stance against climate change, through various outlets from deep water cooling systems to chairing the C40 at the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors, was an inspiration throughout my time away. So if you are feeling a little down about the outcomes of Copenhagen, look no further than to the municipal policies of Toronto to find some hope.

Making a Difference ....today. M

aking the world a better place for all is a task Innis College student Michael Beeler takes very seriously. At 22, Beeler has not only achieved academic excellence while pursuing his Honours BA in Economics, Math, and Peace and Conflict Studies, but he has also become an instrumental part of the success of Students for International Development (SID), a grassroots, student-run, humanitarian organization based at the U of T. As President of SID, Beeler organizes and leads volunteer international projects in Kenya and Peru. The projects are aimed at reducing poverty and offer students valuable opportunities to contribute to their world. Beeler’s passion for world issues has been a part of his core values since he can remember: “I want to help build a sense of global identity. I want people

only continued as a hands-on volunteer but also became SID’s main organizer and engaged new interns in a variety of meaningful projects in Kenya and Peru, including microfinance projects, renovations to a polytechnic, and Before moving to Toronto the re-opening of a from Halifax, Nova Scotia, community library. The University Beeler studied in the of Toronto recognized “I can make a difference International Michael Beeler’s now. I don’t have to wait Baccalaureate Diploma Program alongside some outstanding contributions until I’m 28 because and volunteer work by change can happen right of the world’s most honouring him with a now and I can be part of promising students at 2010 Gordon Cressy it.” This is the message Pearson College in British Student Leadership that Beeler wants to Columbia. He then began Award. He was also award- share with his fellow his U of T studies in 2006 ed with the Faculty of students not only by and quickly found his example and action but calling with SID. Arts and Science Dean's also through the success Student Leadership During the summer of Award. In Fall 2010, Beeler of SID’s projects abroad 2008, Beeler volunteered and at home, and by will pursue a Masters of with SID to help build a fostering awareness of Applied Science in hospital for an impoverglobal poverty and the Healthcare Operations ished village in Kenya. need for action. Research at U of T. A year later, Beeler not to identify as human first and with their nationality second, and I want them to genuinely care about the welfare of other people no matter where in the world they live.”


INNIS News 2010 prod v2.qxd

3/8/10

10:26 AM

Page 1

Logics of Canadian T Television

his year, the Cinema Studies Institute at Innis College moved in a bold new direction with the introduction of INI 387, “Logics of Canadian Television”, a new course designed to give students an opportunity to compare the principles and practices of the small and silver screens. Through lectures and readings, the class explored the complex network of interrelations between technological innovation, aesthetics, public policy, and cultural affairs, which has governed the development of the Canadian television industry. Moreover, through regular in-course screenings, the class followed the development of the Canadian television industry from CBC’s first broadcasts in September 1952 to the vast panoply of offerings now available in the 500-channel universe. Along the way, students discovered and rediscovered classic Canadian dramatic anthologies like Scope and Festival; the legendary public affairs show, This Hour Has Seven Days, groundbreaking docudramas like The National Dream, Riel, and The Boys of St. Vincent; and shows aimed at younger demographics like The Littlest Hobo and The Forest Rangers, not to mention the runaway hit series Degrassi Junior High and Degrassi High.

Volunteers Recognized For Outstanding Commitment to Innis College. Filmmaker Atom Egoyan has dedicated countless hours of mentorship and guidance to the students of Innis College as a guest lecturer in the College’s Cinema Studies courses, and as former Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in Theatre, Film, Music and Visual Studies at the Faculty of Arts and Science. In 2009, Atom established a scholarship in support of graduate students enrolled at the Cinema Studies Institute.

Award recipients Ann Atkins and Jim Dunn with Principal Paterson (middle). Absent: Atom Egoyan.

Course guest speakers, Linda Schuyler and Moses Znaimer, offered the class the perfect complement to an intense curriculum of lectures, readings, and screenings. Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: The Next Generation, provided a wealth of insight into both the aesthetics of creating a hit series and the business of producing and distributing it. Canadian media mogul Moses Znaimer, Co-Founder of City TV and now President of MZMedia, graciously responded to students’ questions at a special interactive class open to the public. Students were also invited to the MZTV Museum, giving them useful insight into the development of television broadcast technology.

Ann Atkins and Jim Dunn are longstanding members and volunteers of Later Life Learning (LLL), a non-profit organization run almost entirely by volunteers. In partnership with U of T and Innis College, Later Life Learning offers university-level courses for learners in their later years. Atkins and Dunn served as co-presidents of LLL, providing outstanding leadership and direction. Under their leadership, the LLL Scholarship Fund in support of Innis College students reached $812,000, well on the way to the group’s $1 million fundraising goal.

INNIS COLLEGE NEWS

Winter 2010

Janet M. Paterson

Maddin

Mania

Innis College

January was a big month at Innis. Working in conjunction with the

Innis connects with its alumni!

Jackman Humanities Institute, the University of Toronto’s Cinema

Several distinguished alumni and media celebrities

Studies Institute brought Winnipeg filmmaker Guy Maddin to Innis

have brought excitement, culture, and knowledge

College for a week of screenings, lectures, and round-table discus-

to Innis College over the past few months.

sions. Easily one of the most audacious and inspired filmmakers cur-

Jessi Cruikshank, host of MTV Canada, dazzled

rently working in Canada (or anywhere), Maddin also proved himself There are many different volunteer opportunities at Innis College. For more information, please email alumni.innis@utoronto.ca.

Message from the Principal

incoming students during orientation week with

effortlessly funny as he dazzled packed crowds in Innis Town Hall on

her humorous presentation. Jared Bland,

four nights from January 12th to 15th, 2010.

Managing Editor of The Walrus magazine, inspired

Principal’s Luncheon Series:

Toronto the Good:

the Next Generation of Leaders

Spring Reunion 2010 For information on Spring Reunion 2010, please visit www.utoronto.ca/innis/alumni/springreunion.

Editor Karen Papazian Contributors Karen Papazian Bibian Aguire Janet Paterson John Semley Paul Babiak Shauna Brail Zannah Matson Cynthia Messenger

Dr. Stanley Zlotkin (BSc 1971 Innis)

On January 19th, 2010, the students of Urban Studies’ INI 437Y: “Experiential Learning in Toronto and the GTA” welcomed a group of panellists for an informal discussion about economic development prospects and priorities in Toronto. Guest speakers Julia Deans, Executive Director of the Toronto City Summit Alliance, Brent Gilmour, Director of the Canadian Urban Institute, and Dr. Kevin Stolarick, Research Director at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the Rotman School, joined the class to engage in a conversation about the current state of economic development initiatives taking place in the city. The focus of the conversation ranged from traditional definitions of economic development (such as building

The panellists were unanimous in their support for the City of Toronto, with Deans referring to herself as “Toronto’s economic development poster girl.” Gilmour focused his comments on looking at Toronto’s strengths, particularly its varied neighbourhoods, as well as touching on some of the problems that plague Toronto at present. Finally, Stolarick reminded the urban studies students that the city is not comprised solely within Toronto’s political boundaries; but rather when we plan for the city and for economic development within the city in terms of transit, housing, investment, etc., we need to take into account the larger context, the region with which the city has an interdependent relationship.

Our thanks to Kay Armatage Charlie Keil Roger Riendeau Brian Corman Rini Rashid

Innis scholarship recipients with his memories of

(unofficially dubbed “Maddin Mania” by event organizer Professor

INNIS COLLEGE NEWS

Economic development prospects and priorities.

physical infrastructure and attracting international business) to reflections on more contemporary perspectives of economic development, which take into account the importance of social and creative capital.

Entitled “Guy Maddin: Confession and the Cinema of Uninhibition” Kay Armatage), the series had Maddin presenting clips from his

friendships and learning at the College. Stephanie

favourite films, speaking to the artistic and narrative capacities of

Savage, Executive Producer of Gossip Girl, gave

the short film medium, narrating his 2007 feature My Winnipeg, and

excellent career advice to upper year students:

fielding questions from a panel of academics and lay Maddin afi-

work hard, keep focused, and put away that cell

Design: PRM Inc. www.prm-design.com

cionados. “The Maddinfest was an outstanding tribute to the contributions

good fortune to have lunch with Dr. Stanley

Print: Maud Street Printing Services

that two of the University’s most vibrant young members,

Zlotkin, Professor of Paediatrics at U of T, who

the Jackman Humanities Institute and the Cinema Studies

demonstrated, by dint of personal example, the

Keep in touch and stay involved. alumni.innis@utoronto.ca

.. .. In the news: You .. .. Email us your news and stories. . .. Stay E-Connected .. Send us email address updates .. .. to receive event invitations and . e-newsletters. .. .. Return to Sender .. Moving? Update your .. . mailing address. .. .. 9 to 5 .. .. Update your work information. . Alumni office: Karen Papazian, Associate Director, Advancement, 416.978.3424

Institute, are regularly making to the larger community,” says Brian Corman, Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. He continues: “The response to Guy Maddin’s visit clearly marks it as a highlight of the 2009-10 year.” Known for films that combine bizarre humour, psychosexual melodrama, and the recuperation of bygone film forms, Maddin has emerged as one of Canada’s premier filmmakers. But apart from his contribution to Canada’s snow-swept cinematic landscape, Maddin has grown into the rarest kind of artist: one capable of harmonizing the deeply personal with the universal, and one whose style is truly peerless. Given his reputation and the laundry list of honours his films have received (most notably the Best Canadian Feature Award at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival for My Winnipeg), Maddin revealed himself to be humble, sincere, and extraordinarily witty as he held

phone! A group of life science students had the

Intelligent, insightful, and naturally gregarious, Guy Maddin’s stint at Innis College proved an unqualified success. He not only exceeded the expectations of his eager fans but also endeared himself, and his work, to many curious converts

court at Innis.

impact of one person’s research on thousands of people. Cinema Studies students taking a new course on the history of Canadian television, had the privilege of learning first-hand about the medium that transformed the world from Innis alumna Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: the Next Generation, and friend Moses Znaimer, President of MZ Media and Co-founder of City TV. Many other alumni and friends of the College touched the lives of our students by increasing their donations to scholarships at a time of economic turmoil. I thank everyone who has

The event was also distinguished by the screening of Maddin’s latest short. Entitled “The Little White Cloud

“come back” and contributed to the vibrant

That Cried,” the film presented an apocalyptic pansexual bazaar, evoking the erotically-charged shorts of

community of students, faculty, and staff at

American underground filmmakers like Kenneth Anger and Jack Smith. While “Cloud” may have had some

Innis College.

viewers stewing uncomfortably in the seats of Town Hall, it gave a glimpse into the filmmaker’s ever-evolving preoccupations with sexuality, sadness, and the economical art of the short film.


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Alumni Jeanny Bolloré Bachelin (HBA 2002) Innis College

J. Michael Tomczak graduated from Innis College

alumna is currently working in New York City as a Production Director for a leading digital capture and retouching company specializing in the fashion industry.

in 1974 with a BA. He also earned an MA and MBA from U of T. Tomczak is a Managing Director of Scotia Capital, working in Derivative Products, and has over 30 years of experience in international finance and capital markets. In March 2010, he returned to New York City after working in Mexico City for over 2 years. A long-time supporter of Innis and the University, Tomczak established the J Michael Tomczak Ontario Graduate Scholarship in support of students at the Department of Geography.

What do you do as a Production Director? I produce and co-ordinate photo shoots and the postproduction (retouching) process for magazine editorials (Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, etc.) and for advertising campaigns (Louis Vuitton, Prada, Gap, etc.). We ”manipulate” the image as it is being shot and further perfect it in photoshop. It is a rewarding job in the sense that the projects are ever-changing and I am lucky to work with some of the industry’s finest creatives and photographers. Downside: crazy hours, deadlines, and egos!

L

ife after graduation is not always easy. The Backpack to Briefcase series co-hosted by the Cinema Studies Institute and the Departments of English and History, provides soon-to-be graduates essential advice needed to navigate the working world. Alumni from each program are invited to share their experiences and professional advice with students. The 2009/2010 Backpack to Briefcase series offered upper year students 3 different events each designed to ease the transition from U of T student to life as a young professional.

What attracted you to New York City and your current job? There are only a few true fashion capitals in the world: Paris, New York, Milan, and London. After spending 6 years working in the Paris fashion industry, I was up for a new challenge and different experience. An opportunity presented itself in New York, and I could not refuse! Paris and New York could not be more different, but both are fueled by an exciting, creative energy.

Screen Real -Oct 2009 with alumni speakers: Ron Mann, Director, Know Your Mushrooms; and, Stuart Coxe, Producer, Dragon's Den. Skills for the Real World -Jan 2010 with alumni speakers: William Morassutti, Managing Director, Blank Angus Media, Toro Magazine; Susan Courtney, V.P. Group Media Director, Starcom MediaVest Group; and, Lisa Khoo, Senior Producer, CBC News: Live Desk.

Having worked in Toronto, Paris, and New York City, what helped you adapt to the cities’ different cultures and customs?

Three Things –Feb 2010 with alumni speakers: Aamer Haleem, Radio and TV Personality; Sharon McAuley, VP, Group Publisher, St. Joseph Media, Toronto Life; and, Stephanie Savage, Executive Producer, Gossip Girl.

Staying humble, having an open mind, and being patient.

What do you see as one of the biggest challenges that recent graduates face when entering the workforce? The infamous scenario of employers demanding more experience but no one offers you the opportunity to gain that experience.

News from the Writing and Rhetoric Program

It is never easy when you start out but you have to persevere and be willing to intern (even without pay) to eventually climb the ropes. In fashion (unlike more lucrative industries such as Finance) this is particularly common as there is an association of prestige and excitement when working for the pretty world of la mode -so much so that it blinds most people into thinking it is ok to just work for la gloire (glory, as the French put it). My advice: don’t get caught up to the point where you lose perspective and self worth.

The Writing and Rhetoric Program and the Department of English will be offering a new course in the 2010/11 academic year. JEI 206H, “Writing English Essays”, is a jointly developed course drawing on the strengths in curriculum design and teaching. “Writing English Essays” will teach students how to write clear, compelling, research-informed English essays. The course aims to help students recognize the function of grammar and rhetoric, the importance of audience, and the persuasive role of style. Not only will students be taught both written and oral communication skills, but they will also learn to analyze argument, write position statements, and defend their positions orally, in a manner that reflects the ancient roots of oral rhetoric. Conventional mastery learning (lectures) and small-group learning (tutorials) will be integrated with the intensive learning that occurs in one-on-one sessions with instructors.

How did your education or experience at U of T influence who you are today? Unsettling Sights: The Fourth World on Film (2010)

There She Goes: Feminist Filmmaking and Beyond (2009)

Spotlight

I started off pursuing an International Relations degree and realized by 2nd year the importance of focusing on the program courses that I really loved (such as languages, history, philosophy, and cultural studies). As a result, my grades went up and my university experience was much more enjoyable. Stick to what you're good at and you'll succeed!

A Canadian in Copenhagen: Being a Canadian in Copenhagen was hard. There is not a strong culture shock, and almost everyone speaks English; but our policies on climate change single us out in this Scandinavian environment. I was one of 12 students who participated in the University of Toronto COP15 delegation charged with the mandate of engaging the student body in the seminal climate negotiations taking place in Copenhagen in December 2009. While I am a proud Canadian and love this nation in innumerable ways, our perspectives on carbon emissions are not one of them, and I watched in shame as our negotiators repeatedly blocked the discussions from advancing. Internationally, the world is starting to notice that we are not just a country full of environmentalists who canoe on the weekend amidst the wilderness of rocks and trees that define our landscape; they are starting to notice that the image we have had for a longtime does not match our rhetoric. Our years of inaction with respect to this global environmental problem, and our more recent years of negative policies towards a global climate regime, have finally caught up with us.

How did you end up working in Mexico? I started my career in trade finance, so I had early exposure to international business. I later had the opportunity to move within Scotiabank to New York where I contributed to the early growth of the derivatives business line in the United States. As business opportunities began to emerge in the Caribbean and Latin America, I shifted my efforts there – given my interest in international business. I contributed to the establishment of the product platform in Mexico and eventually was asked to base myself in Mexico, where I have been for almost two and a half years. Zannah Matson is a third-year student studying Peace and Conflict, Urban Studies, and Environment and Society.

What is the most rewarding part of your job? Interacting with clients and colleagues. In particular, I get a lot of satisfaction from bringing people up the learning curve as I share what is rather specialized financial product knowledge with them.

You have moved around, at least geographically, in your career. Do you have any advice to share with recent graduates and current students? Since starting my career in the late 1970’s, the pace of change in the world, and jobs and job markets, have clearly accelerated. It is really important to be prepared for change and to embrace it. This is reality, but it does make for opportunities. .

The COP15 climate negotiations were a watershed for many reasons though, and the failures of nations to commit to strong targets that were broadcast across the world only tell part of the story. Although I was hesitant about identifying my nationality, I was more than happy to consider myself a citizen of Toronto, which shone as a bright light amidst the local actors present. Seeing our city take a strong stance against climate change, through various outlets from deep water cooling systems to chairing the C40 at the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors, was an inspiration throughout my time away. So if you are feeling a little down about the outcomes of Copenhagen, look no further than to the municipal policies of Toronto to find some hope.

Making a Difference ....today. M

Why have you been an annual donor to U of T, including Innis College, for so many years? (Michael has been an Innis College Annual Fund donor since 1986) During my 20 years or so of working in New York, I was impressed by the enthusiastic support of Americans for their universities. Not only did they continue to be strong supporters of their college sports teams, but they were also very generous with their financial support. This made me realize the importance of acknowledging the contribution of one’s higher education to career success, and giving back by helping the university educate younger generations of students and remain globally competitive in higher education. I encourage Innis College News readers to think about this.

Students for International Development

The University of Toronto recognized Michael Beeler’s outstanding contributions and volunteer work by honouring him with a 2010 Gordon Cressy Student Leadership Award. He was also awarded with the Faculty of Arts and Science Dean's Student Leadership Award. In Fall 2010, Beeler will pursue a Masters of Applied Science in Healthcare Operations Research at U of T.


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Faculty & Alumni Recent Book Releases Jeff Rubin and the End of Globalization

L

ife after graduation is not always easy. The Backpack to Briefcase series co-hosted by the Cinema Studies Institute and the Departments of English and History, provides soon-to-be graduates essential advice needed to navigate the working world. Alumni from each program are invited to share their experiences and professional advice with students. The 2009/2010 Backpack to Briefcase series offered upper year students 3 different events each designed to ease the transition from U of T student to life as a young professional. Screen Real -Oct 2009 with alumni speakers: Ron Mann, Director, Know Your Mushrooms; and, Stuart Coxe, Producer, Dragon's Den. Skills for the Real World -Jan 2010 with alumni speakers: William Morassutti, Managing Director, Blank Angus Media, Toro Magazine; Susan Courtney, V.P. Group Media Director, Starcom MediaVest Group; and, Lisa Khoo, Senior Producer, CBC News: Live Desk. Three Things –Feb 2010 with alumni speakers: Aamer Haleem, Radio and TV Personality; Sharon McAuley, VP, Group Publisher, St. Joseph Media, Toronto Life; and, Stephanie Savage, Executive Producer, Gossip Girl.

News from the Writing and Rhetoric Program

The Writing and Rhetoric Program and the Department of English will be offering a new course in the 2010/11 academic year. JEI 206H, “Writing English Essays”, is a jointly developed course drawing on the strengths in curriculum design and teaching. “Writing English Essays” will teach students how to write clear, compelling, research-informed English essays. The course aims to help students recognize the function of grammar and rhetoric, the importance of audience, and the persuasive role of style. Not only will students be taught both written and oral communication skills, but they will also learn to analyze argument, write position statements, and defend their positions orally, in a manner that reflects the ancient roots of oral rhetoric. Conventional mastery learning (lectures) and small-group learning (tutorials) will be integrated with the intensive learning that occurs in one-on-one sessions with instructors.

Don’t tell me I can’t! I don’t believe you! Together we can!

The Innis College Alumni Network hosted a book launch for alumnus Jeff Rubin’s new book,

Why Your World Is About To Get A Whole Lot Smaller: Oil and the End of Globalization. Over 200 alumni, friends, and students attended the event with former CIBC World Markets Chief Economist and bestselling author. Rubin shared his thoughts about his new book and welcomed questions from moderator economics professor Don Dewees, as well as from the audience. He argued that the rising price and diminishing availability of oil will lead to a reversal in globalization and a return to local economies. According to the maverick economist, there will be winners as well as losers as the age of globalization comes to an end. Distance will soon cost money, and so will burning carbon: both will bring long-lost jobs back home, and local economies will be revitalized, as will cities and neighborhoods. Rubin was the Chief Economist and Chief Strategist at CIBC World Markets where he worked for over 20 years. He was one of the first economists to accurately predict soaring oil prices back in 2000 and is now one of the world's most sought-after energy experts. Why Your World Is AboutTo Get A Whole Lot Smaller became a #1 bestseller, was selected as a Heather's Pick at Indigo Books and Music, and was long listed for the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award.

CSI Professor Corinn Columpar Unsettling Sights: The Fourth World on Film (2010)

There She Goes: Feminist Filmmaking and Beyond (2009)

An emotional Lesra Martin (HBA 1988 Innis) delivered a passionate speech to students, friends, and fellow alumni on February 9, 2010. Innis College was an important stop on Martin’s book tour promoting his latest book, The Power of A Promise: Life Lessons Encountered on My Journey From Illiteracy to Lawyer. Martin attended Innis College only a few years after battling illiteracy, and found the support he needed within the Innis community. Martin’s story is a remarkable one. He did not learn to read until he was 16 and the first book he purchased was a used copy of The 16th Round written by boxer Rubin ‘The Hurricane’ Carter who had been wrongfully accused of murder and sent to prison for life. Martin knew what it felt like to be imprisoned, and found he The Norman Jewison had immediate affinity film, “The Hurricane” with the boxer. Without hesitation, he wrote to Carter, and chronicled the story thus begins the odyssey that led to a promise to of Carter’s wrongful help release him from prison. imprisonment and Martin has made many promises since then; the fight for release getting a college degree, followed by a law by Martin and the degree, followed by marriage vows with his sweetheart. However, no promise was more three Canadians. important than his pledge to battle illiteracy. Denzel Washington won a Golden Globe for his portrayal of Carter and was nominated for an

Excerpt from Lesra Martin’s Innis College speech:

Don’t tell me I can’t! I don’t believe you!

Together we can!

I can dream of the day when every child has access to a good and decent education. I dream of the day that everyone has a safe place they can call home. I dream of the day that food is a right instead of a privilege. I can dream of the day that we all have the time to give someone else time. I can dream of the day when we can truly say “I am my brother’s keeper”. I can dream of a community where our compassion compass is set permanently on a place of understanding. I can dream of the day that our society is guided by our hearts.

Academy Award.

I can dream that if we are disciplined and determined in our approach, and if we believe in our own human spirit then we will make it to our goals. I know that there are naysayers out there who doubt just about everything but I have hope. Hope is what enabled me to get out of a ghetto community, inch by inch, step by step, book by book, hand by hand!

Alumni Jeanny Bolloré Bachelin (HBA 2002) Innis College

Spotlight J. Michael Tomczak

alumna is currently working in New York City as a Production Director for a leading digital capture and retouching company specializing in the fashion industry.

Diary from the COP15

What do you do as a Production Director? I produce and co-ordinate photo shoots and the postproduction (retouching) process for magazine editorials (Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, etc.) and for advertising campaigns (Louis Vuitton, Prada, Gap, etc.). We ”manipulate” the image as it is being shot and further perfect it in photoshop. It is a rewarding job in the sense that the projects are ever-changing and I am lucky to work with some of the industry’s finest creatives and photographers. Downside: crazy hours, deadlines, and egos!

How did you end up working in Mexico?

What attracted you to New York City and your current job? There are only a few true fashion capitals in the world: Paris, New York, Milan, and London. After spending 6 years working in the Paris fashion industry, I was up for a new challenge and different experience. An opportunity presented itself in New York, and I could not refuse! Paris and New York could not be more different, but both are fueled by an exciting, creative energy.

Having worked in Toronto, Paris, and New York City, what helped you adapt to the cities’ different cultures and customs? Staying humble, having an open mind, and being patient.

What do you see as one of the biggest challenges that recent graduates face when entering the workforce? The infamous scenario of employers demanding more experience but no one offers you the opportunity to gain that experience. It is never easy when you start out but you have to persevere and be willing to intern (even without pay) to eventually climb the ropes. In fashion (unlike more lucrative industries such as Finance) this is particularly common as there is an association of prestige and excitement when working for the pretty world of la mode -so much so that it blinds most people into thinking it is ok to just work for la gloire (glory, as the French put it). My advice: don’t get caught up to the point where you lose perspective and self worth.

How did your education or experience at U of T influence who you are today? I started off pursuing an International Relations degree and realized by 2nd year the importance of focusing on the program courses that I really loved (such as languages, history, philosophy, and cultural studies). As a result, my grades went up and my university experience was much more enjoyable. Stick to what you're good at and you'll succeed!

A Canadian in Copenhagen: Innis College student Zannah Matson shares her experiences and thoughts on the December 2009 COP15 climate negotiations in Copenhagen.

Zannah Matson is a third-year student studying Peace and Conflict, Urban Studies, and Environment and Society.

What is the most rewarding part of your job? Interacting with clients and colleagues. In particular, I get a lot of satisfaction from bringing people up the learning curve as I share what is rather specialized financial product knowledge with them.

You have moved around, at least geographically, in your career. Do you have any advice to share with recent graduates and current students? Since starting my career in the late 1970’s, the pace of change in the world, and jobs and job markets, have clearly accelerated. It is really important to be prepared for change and to embrace it. This is reality, but it does make for opportunities. .

Why have you been an annual donor to U of T, including Innis College, for so many years?

Being a Canadian in Copenhagen was hard. There is not a strong culture shock, and almost everyone speaks English; but our policies on climate change single us out in this Scandinavian environment. I was one of 12 students who participated in the University of Toronto COP15 delegation charged with the mandate of engaging the student body in the seminal climate negotiations taking place in Copenhagen in December 2009. While I am a proud Canadian and love this nation in innumerable ways, our perspectives on carbon emissions are not one of them, and I watched in shame as our negotiators repeatedly blocked the discussions from advancing. Internationally, the world is starting to notice that we are not just a country full of environmentalists who canoe on the weekend amidst the wilderness of rocks and trees that define our landscape; they are starting to notice that the image we have had for a longtime does not match our rhetoric. Our years of inaction with respect to this global environmental problem, and our more recent years of negative policies towards a global climate regime, have finally caught up with us. The COP15 climate negotiations were a watershed for many reasons though, and the failures of nations to commit to strong targets that were broadcast across the world only tell part of the story. Although I was hesitant about identifying my nationality, I was more than happy to consider myself a citizen of Toronto, which shone as a bright light amidst the local actors present. Seeing our city take a strong stance against climate change, through various outlets from deep water cooling systems to chairing the C40 at the Copenhagen Climate Summit for Mayors, was an inspiration throughout my time away. So if you are feeling a little down about the outcomes of Copenhagen, look no further than to the municipal policies of Toronto to find some hope.

Making a Difference ....today. M

aking the world a better place for all is a task Innis College student Michael Beeler takes very seriously. At 22, Beeler has not only achieved academic excellence while pursuing his Honours BA in Economics, Math, and Peace and Conflict Studies, but he has also become an instrumental part of the success of Students for International Development (SID), a grassroots, student-run, humanitarian organization based at the U of T. As President of SID, Beeler organizes and leads volunteer international projects in Kenya and Peru. The projects are aimed at reducing poverty and offer students valuable opportunities to contribute to their world. Beeler’s passion for world issues has been a part of his core values since he can remember: “I want to help build a sense of global identity. I want people

only continued as a hands-on volunteer but also became SID’s main organizer and engaged new interns in a variety of meaningful projects in Kenya and Peru, including microfinance projects, renovations to a polytechnic, and Before moving to Toronto the re-opening of a from Halifax, Nova Scotia, community library. The University Beeler studied in the of Toronto recognized “I can make a difference International Michael Beeler’s now. I don’t have to wait Baccalaureate Diploma Program alongside some outstanding contributions until I’m 28 because and volunteer work by change can happen right of the world’s most honouring him with a now and I can be part of promising students at 2010 Gordon Cressy it.” This is the message Pearson College in British Student Leadership that Beeler wants to Columbia. He then began Award. He was also award- share with his fellow his U of T studies in 2006 ed with the Faculty of students not only by and quickly found his example and action but calling with SID. Arts and Science Dean's also through the success Student Leadership During the summer of Award. In Fall 2010, Beeler of SID’s projects abroad 2008, Beeler volunteered and at home, and by will pursue a Masters of with SID to help build a fostering awareness of Applied Science in hospital for an impoverglobal poverty and the Healthcare Operations ished village in Kenya. need for action. Research at U of T. A year later, Beeler not to identify as human first and with their nationality second, and I want them to genuinely care about the welfare of other people no matter where in the world they live.”


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Logics of Canadian T Television

his year, the Cinema Studies Institute at Innis College moved in a bold new direction with the introduction of INI 387, “Logics of Canadian Television

Volunteers Recognized For Outstanding Commitment to Innis College.

Congratulations to volunteers Ann Atkins, Jim Dunn, and Atom Egoyan on receiving the Scope and Festival; the legendary public affairs show, This Hour Has Seven Days, groundbreaking docudramas like The National Dream, Riel, and The Boys of St. Vincent; and shows aimed at younger demographics like The Littlest Hobo and The Forest Rangers, not to mention the runaway hit series Degrassi Junior High and Degrassi High.

2009 U of T Arbor Award. The recipients were nominated by Innis College for their outstanding personal service to the

Course guest speakers, Linda Schuyler and Moses Znaimer, offered the class the perfect complement to an intense curriculum of lectures, readings, and screenings. Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: The Next Generation, provided a wealth of insight into both the aesthetics of creating a hit series and the business of producing and distributing it. Canadian media mogul Moses Znaimer, Co-Founder of City TV and now President of MZMedia, graciously responded to students’ questions at a special interactive class open to the public. Students were also invited to the MZTV Museum, giving them useful insight into the development of television broadcast technology.

College and the University.

Filmmaker Atom Egoyan has dedicated countless hours of mentorship and guidance to the students of Innis College as a guest lecturer in the College’s Cinema Studies courses, and as former Dean’s Distinguished Visitor in Theatre, Film, Music and Visual Studies at the Faculty of Arts and Science. In 2009, Atom established a scholarship in support of graduate students enrolled at the Cinema Studies Institute.

Award recipients Ann Atkins and Jim Dunn with Principal Paterson (middle). Absent: Atom Egoyan.

Ann Atkins and Jim Dunn are longstanding members and volunteers of Later Life Learning (LLL), a non-profit organization run almost entirely by volunteers. In partnership with U of T and Innis College, Later Life Learning offers university-level courses for learners in their later years. Atkins and Dunn served as co-presidents of LLL, providing outstanding leadership and direction. Under their leadership, the LLL Scholarship Fund in support of Innis College students reached $812,000, well on the way to the group’s $1 million fundraising goal.

Message from the Principal

Winter 2010

Janet M. Paterson

Mania

Innis College

J

Innis connects with its alumni! Several distinguished alumni and media celebrities have brought excitement, culture, and knowledge to Innis College over the past few months. Jessi Cruikshank, host of MTV Canada, dazzled

Interested in volunteering?

incoming students during orientation week with

There are many different volunteer opportunities at Innis College. For more information, please email alumni.innis@utoronto.ca.

her humorous presentation. Jared Bland, Managing Editor of The Walrus magazine, inspired

Principal’s Luncheon Series:

Toronto the Good: Economic development prospects and priorities.

Shaping the Next Generation of Leaders

Figure out what you love and what you are passionate about, and success will follow. This was the message that resonated with students who attended the 2009 Principal’s Luncheon Series with guest speakers Stanley Zlotkin in October 2009 and Tamara Farber in November 2009. Hosted by Principal Janet Paterson, the Principal’s Luncheon Series invites distinguished alumni back to Innis College and offers students the opportunity to learn from the success and advice of alumni.

On January 19th, 2010, the students of Urban Studies’ INI 437Y: “Experiential Learning in Toronto and the GTA” welcomed a group of panellists for an informal discussion about economic development prospects and priorities in Toronto. Guest speakers Julia Deans, Executive Director of the Toronto City Summit Alliance, Brent Gilmour, Director of the Canadian Urban Institute, and Dr. Kevin Stolarick

Dr. Stanley Zlotkin (BSc 1971 Innis), U of T professor of paediatrics, and nutrition specialist and researcher at the Hospital for Sick Children, conveyed the importance of studying what you enjoy, and finding a career that you are passionate about. He also stressed that it is critical to learn how to learn rather than fussing about trying to learn everything. Ms. Tamara Farber (BSc 1990 Innis), partner in Miller Thomson’s Environmental and Litigation departments, offered the students similar advice on finding a career that you are passionate about. She also stressed the importance of one’s self and encouraged students to be sincere and to have integrity. Peace and Conflict Studies Student Rini Rashid found great value in the Tamara Farber luncheon: “As a fourth year student preparing to graduate in just a few months, the event was a relaxed and welcomed reprise.” She continues: “It was a delight to be in the company of an Innis alumna, whose fierce work ethic and drive were more than apparent and a testament of the successes that await us after our graduation if we’re willing to work for it.”

Spring Reunion 2010

Innis scholarship recipients with his memories of

For information on Spring Reunion 2010, please visit www.utoronto.ca/innis/alumni/springreunion.

friendships and learning at the College. Stephanie Savage, Executive Producer of Gossip Girl, gave excellent career advice to upper year students:

INNIS COLLEGE NEWS Editor Karen Papazian Contributors Karen Papazian Bibian Aguire Janet Paterson John Semley Paul Babiak Shauna Brail Zannah Matson Cynthia Messenger

Our thanks to Kay Armatage Charlie Keil Roger Riendeau Brian Corman Rini Rashid

work hard, keep focused, and put away that cell

Design: PRM Inc. www.prm-design.com

phone! A group of life science students had the good fortune to have lunch with Dr. Stanley

Print: Maud Street Printing Services

Keep in touch and stay involved. alumni.innis@utoronto.ca

.. .. In the news: You .. .. Email us your news and stories. . .. Stay E-Connected .. Send us email address updates .. .. to receive event invitations and . e-newsletters. .. .. Return to Sender .. Moving? Update your .. . mailing address. .. .. 9 to 5 .. .. Update your work information. . Alumni office: Karen Papazian, Associate Director, Advancement, 416.978.3424

Zlotkin, Professor of Paediatrics at U of T, who demonstrated, by dint of personal example, the

Intelligent, insightful, and naturally gregarious, Guy Maddin’s stint at Innis College proved an unqualified success. He not only exceeded the expectations of his eager fans but also endeared himself, and his work, to many curious converts

impact of one person’s research on thousands of people. Cinema Studies students taking a new course on the history of Canadian television, had the privilege of learning first-hand about the medium that transformed the world from Innis alumna Linda Schuyler, Executive Producer of Degrassi: the Next Generation, and friend Moses Znaimer, President of MZ Media and Co-founder of City TV. Many other alumni and friends of the College touched the lives of our students by increasing their donations to scholarships at a time of economic turmoil. I thank everyone who has “come back” and contributed to the vibrant community of students, faculty, and staff at Innis College.

Innis College News - Winter 2012  

IN THIS ISSUE: - Maddin Mania - B2B - News from Writing and Rhetoric - Jeff Rubin - Lesra Martin - Jeanny Bollore Bachelin - J. Michael Tomc...

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