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Inland Power is my cooperative!

January 2021

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SAFETY Stay away from downed power lines YOUR COOPERATIVE Scholarship applications

10110 W Hallett Rd. Spokane, WA 99224

CONSERVATION Surge protector or power strip?

MAIN OFFICE

(509) 747-7151 TOLL FREE

(800) 747-7151 BILLING QUESTIONS

(509) 789-4277 PAYMENT SERVICES

(855) 386-9903 ENERGY CONSERVATION AND REBATES

(509) 789-1801 EMAIL

inlandpower@inlandpower.com SOCIAL

@inlandpower

@inlandpowerlight

Inland Power Scholarships Preparing for a bright future

A

s we begin the new year, it’s time to begin thinking about funding for college. Are you the parent of a high school senior or a college student? The Inland Power Excellence Award is available for students seeking higher education at a community college, university or trade school in any state.

Each year, Inland Power offers 15 $1,000 scholarships. The program is exclusively for active Inland Power members and their children. This includes college students who are members or students who can still be claimed as legal dependents of Inland Power members. A legal dependent is defined as one who is claimed on their parent or guardian’s tax return. Scholarship recipients may reapply the following year. However, at least ten of

the 15 scholarships awarded will be reserved for new applicants. Applications have been sent to high school counseling offices in Inland’s service territory and can be found on our website at inlandpower.com. Applications are due Thursday, April 15, 2021. Once the closing date passes, the selection committee will meet in May and recipients will be chosen and notified in May or June. Funding for the Inland Power Excellence Award is made possible by the Inland Power Community Foundation. The foundation’s committee also serves as the scholarship committee. To make a donation to the foundation or for more information, please send an email to Inland Power's community foundation at communityfoundation@inlandpower.com.

Baby it’s cold outside

ENERGY Where does your energy go?

Stay warm without breaking the bank

T

he temperature has dropped outside and heaters have kicked on. When you’re feeling chilly at home, there are several budget-friendly ways you can keep comfortable without turning up the thermostat. Here are five easy ways to stay cozy this winter. 1. Whether you’re experiencing extremely cold winter temps or you simply “run cold,” an electric blanket can deliver quick warmth like a regular throw or blanket cannot. Electric blankets can include a variety of features, like timers and dual temperature settings (if your cuddle buddy prefers less heat). This winter, consider an electric blanket instead of turning up the heat, and your energy bill will thank you. 2. One of the easiest ways to stay cozy at

home is to keep your feet warm. Our feet play a critical role in regulating body temperature so invest in those slippers. 3. On winter days when the sun is shining, take advantage and harness natural warmth from sunlight. Open all curtains, drapes and blinds in your home to let the sunshine in––you’ll be able to feel the difference. 4. Another way to make your home cozier is to use a humidifier. Cold air doesn’t hold water vapor like warm air, so by adding humidity inside your home, you can feel a little warmer. A favorable level of humidity inside your home can also help clear sinuses, soften skin and improve sleep. 5. Beyond adding visual appeal to your home, area rugs can also provide extra insulation and a warm surface for your feet on cold winter days. Use large area

rugs in rooms where you spend the most time. You’ll enjoy the new colors and textures of the rug, and the additional warmth will help keep your home comfortable. These are just a few ways you can stay cozy this winter without turning up the thermostat. Don’t forget the hot chocolate!


OUR

mission

IS OUR

members.

- MISSION STATEMENT

How Americans Use Electricity The latest data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shows the combined use of clothes washers and dryers, computers, dishwashers, small appliances and other electrical equipment (noted as “all other uses” below) accounts for nearly 40% of electricity consumption in American homes.

15.8%

Space Cooling

39.0%2

12.1%

All other uses

Water Heating

5.2%

Lighting

16.3%1

Space Heating

TVs & related equipment

What’s the difference? Power strip vs. surge protector

A

s the proliferation of electronics impacts our daily lives, we realize there simply are not enough outlets in our homes. This is particularly true for older homes. As a result, we end up with a number of “outlet expanders,” more commonly known as power strips.

surge fighting components. Two, these components can fail and the strip still will provide power, all without any indication that its protective side is gone.

Power strips are generic and fulfill a very simple function. They are inexpensive, and the quality is usually on par with the price.

• Go for a significant joule (jewel) rating.

Keeping this in mind, let’s look at factors to consider when purchasing a power strip or a surge protector, the power strip’s more talented cousin.

• Cable and Internet connection protection.

Important tip: Make sure you know the amperage rating of the outlet into which you are connecting the strip and other equipment. A residential circuit can overload if you are not careful. Purchasing a power strip:

• Look for power strips with a built-in

circuit breaker. If you connect too many electronics and devices, the strip will kick out the circuit breaker rather than causing the breaker in your electric panel to trip.

• Pay attention to the orientation of the

4.2%

7.4%

Refrigerators & Freezers

Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2020

Includes consumption for heat and operating furnace fans and boiler pumps. 2 Includes miscellaneous appliances, clothes washers and dryers, computers and related equipment, stoves, dishwashers, heating elements, and motors. 1

Your Co-op Connection | Getting to know who works for you

S

cott Ferguson has been with Inland Power since 2016. Prior to joining Inland, Scott worked as a pole inspector for ten years.

“Working for Inland Power is truly rewarding,” Scott said. “At Inland you are part of a team. We have an important mission to serve our members and that is something I enjoy.” Outside of work, Scott loves being out in nature. He loves hunting, fishing and camping. Scott has a large family and loves spending time with them as well.

Scott Ferguson - Field Engineer

Downed & Dangerous

outlets. The typical design is along the length of the strip, facing the bottom or end of the strip. Inland recommends power strips with the outlets perpendicular to the length of the strip.

• Get a smart strip. These are becoming

You may want to consider this for your entertainment and computing needs as surges can enter via any wired connection. Be sure the protector is designed to handle a digital television. Otherwise, it can cause pixilation if it’s only designed for analog signals.

near the point of contact and may electrocute you. If you come upon a downed line of any kind, stay at least 35 feet away. Do not attempt to rescue a person or pet.

• The same outlet orientation as previously

and emergency personnel.

• •

• Power conditioning feature (for PCs,

more common and less expensive. With smart strips, one outlet serves as a master, receiving power all the time. The other outlets do not receive power until the master device is turned on. This is ideal for home entertainment setups. Surge protector: If you are connecting expensive electronics, you may want to consider a surge protector. Here, price is even more important because a cheap surge protector can be worse than none at all for two reasons. One, they use cheap, small VISIT INLANDPOWER.COM FOR MORE ENERGY EFFICIENCY TIPS

- Even if they’re not energized, downed Stay in your car.

- If a power line falls on your vehicle

while you’re driving, do not exit until you know for sure that the line is deenergized.

this is a nice-to-have feature but not a necessity).

Power strips and surge protectors are worth the investment when you follow these simple suggestions. Don’t get “burned” by purchasing cheap, inefficient strips and protectors.

Do not drive over downed power lines. wires can get entangled with your vehicle and cause further damage.

mentioned.

• A smart capability as mentioned above.

Call 911 and the utility serving the location. For Inland Power, call 877668-8243 (Press #4 for downed line).

- Leave everything to utility professionals

• Indicator light that shows if protection has burned out.

Assume it’s energized and stay as far away as you can.

- Energized lines can charge the ground

Like power strips, there are some key factors to consider when buying a surge protector.

This is a measure of how much energy it can withstand.

If you happen upon a downed utility wire of any kind, always do the following:

If you must evacuate, jump away and land with both feet together.

- Jump out of the vehicle with both feet together and avoid contact with both the car and the ground at the same time.

Shuffle away to safety.

- Keep your feet together and take small,

shuffling steps until you are at least 35 feet away from the lines. Taking larger steps can create a path for electricity to run through you.

Profile for Inland Power & Light

Light Reading - January 2021  

Light Reading - January 2021