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October 2017 A guide to finer living in Connecticut & abroad.

publicationsÂŽ

www.inkct.com

Vol 13 Issue 142 2017

Complimentary ­C omplimentary


THE SMARTER CHOICE FOR

CT’s Only Accredited Comprehensive Breast Care Center Offering Dual-head Molecular Breast Imaging middlesexhospital.org/breastcare


SEVEN CONTINENTS. SEVEN SEAS. BUT MORE THAN SEVEN WONDERS. Experience the Last Frontier by land and sea— an Alaska Cruisetour. See the bears roaming, whales breaching, and glaciers thundering to the sea. Then travel aboard a glass-domed train—as luxurious as your ship—on a multinight adventure to Denali National Park. We’ll indulge you in stunning accommodations, globally inspired cuisine by our Michelin-starred chef, and intuitive service. Visit CelebrityCruises.com, call 1-800-CELEBRITY, or contact your travel agent.

©2017 Celebrity Cruises. Ships’ registry: Malta and Ecuador.


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Charming country cape nestled on 4.25 private acres in the historic town of Hadlyme.

This home boasts 2799 sq ft of living space. Perfect floor plan for entertaining your guests in a updated kitchen with custom granite countertops. Granite Center island with seating. open to dining room, living room, and post and beam great room with airy vaulted ceilings, floor to ceiling masonry fireplace with 2 french doors leading to sun filled deck. This 4 bedroom 3 full bath home has the unique quality of first or second floor master bedroom option. Upstairs master bedroom features 2 walk in closets, Private master bath with jacuzzi tub. This home enjoys hardwood floors throughout, central air conditioning, Oil heat, a fireplace and 2 wood burning stoves. Generator and hookup included. All of this on a professionally Landscaped large level yard perfect for outdoor entertaining, gardening, or horse property. Spacious 2 car garage with wood burning stove and stairs leading to second floor storage area. This is a must see home. Only minutes to center of town and major highways. $ 369,000. For more photos go to : www.107HemlockValley.com Contact Joel Lucas 860.304.9150 bankerbuddy@hotmail.com


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www.inkct.com

Features

OCTOBER 2017

Lulu’s Boutique Evolving: From Haiti to Chichi and Everything In Between!

pg. 10

Columns, Reviews, Events

ISSUE CONTENTS

Music, Mirth & Mojo Rhythm & Roots, Music & Dance Festival Recap Cardinal Points Standing Bear “Comes in Peace” The Cheesemonger Cutting the Cheese On the Vine Australia October Events Upcoming events in Connecticut

pg. 44 pg. 58 pg. 68 pg. 70 pg. 75

Closet Dreams A Little Girl “Branches Out” to Peppergrass & Tulip

pg. 18

Calling all Dolls The Connecticut Doll Hospital

pg. 30

Astromythos… the Mythic World of Jon Sideriadis

pg. 40

Get your ink online at www.inkct.com! On the Cover this Month: An illustration from the Jon Sideriadis’ series called “Athromythos”

INK staff Contributors:

Advertising:

Jeffery Lilly- founder/publisher/webmaster

Contact us to receive our media kit complete with detailed advertising information including ad rates, demographics, and distribution in your area.

Stephanie Sittnick - publisher/sales/design

Intersecting Our Worlds

Carolyn Battisa - editorial

Immigrant Artists Tell Their Stories

Laurencia Ciprus - editorial

pg. 50

Caryn B. Davis - editorial/photography

Sarah Crisp - editorial Charmagne Eckert - editorial Mark Seth Lender - Cardinal Points Nancy LaMar-Rodgers - editorial Barbara Malinsky - editorial

The Mekong River

Rona Mann - editorial

Journey of a Lifetime

Paul Partica - The Cheesemonger

pg. 62

Please direct your advertising inquiries and questions to: Stephanie Sittnick - Director of Advertising advertising@ink-pub.com - 860-227-8199 Cheryl Powell - Greater Connecticut cheryl@ink-pub.com - 860-608-5749 Rona Mann - Clinton, CT - Rhode Island six07co@att.net - 401-539-7762 Jacki Hornish - Litchfield jacki@inkct - 401-539-7762

Tyler Plourd - A Brothers Guide

Submit Events Listings to:

A. Vincent Scarano - photography

Angela Carontino - events@inkct.com

Every issue is printed using 100% Soy based ink.

We encourage the public to submit stories, poems, photography, essays, and all things creative. If you know of a person or place of interest, please submit your ideas to: submissions@ink-pub.com We will do our best to put your ideas in INK.

All content of INK Publications including but not limited to text, photos, graphics and layout are copyrighted by INK Publishing, LLC. Reproductions without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. Ink Publishing, LLC is not responsible for images or graphics submitted by advertisers which are not copyrighted or released for use in this publication.

INK PUBLISHING, LLC 107 Hemlock Valley Rd., East Haddam, CT email: info@ink-pub.com www.inkct.com


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Start your n... holiday seaso with us. Shop. Dine. Stroll through over 40 unique shops and eateries.

Olde Mistick Village | Exit 90 off I-95 | 27 Coogan Blvd. Mystic, CT 860.536.4941 | oldemistickvillage.com

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Make Us Your Home For The Holidays A general store in 1790. The town’s first pharmacy in 1877. Later, a soda fountain where the town would gather. Now, this historic building has been lovingly re-purposed into an elegant B&B, serving Italian gelato. Come stay with us for the holidays. 860.395.1229 | 2 Pennywise Lane, Old Saybrook JamesPharmacyBnB.com | Like Us On

We are now accepting fine jewelry consignments for the upcoming holiday season.

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A tiny slice of Italy. We serve the simple recipes and fresh flavors of the Marche region. Palate pleasers like handmade pasta, locally sourced artisanal cheeses, and daily specials that keep travelers and locals coming back for more. Join us for breakfast or lunch — or let us host a private event. 860.581.3878 | 2 Pennywise Lane, Old Saybrook CaffeMarche.com | Like Us On

24 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT efwatermelon@aol.com (860) 434-1600


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Evolving: From Haiti to Chichi and Everything In Between! By RONA MANN Photos by Stephanie Sittnick Look up the word “chichi” in the dictionary, and you’ll find “elaborate” or “over the top.” Other sources define “chichi” as “elegant,” “trendy,” and “chic.” Look through the well dressed windows of Lulu’s, A Chichi Boutique in Guilford, and you won’t need that dictionary any longer. For when you open the door and enter Lulu’s, you’ll fully understand just how unique, attractive, and downright delicious this place can be. Elegant, trendy, chic...yes, Lulu’s is all that, while also being a model of evolution. It doesn’t take long after meeting Kim Mangs that you hear the world “evolve”...she peppers her conversation frequently with the word

because Kim Mangs soundly affirms that any business must evolve if it is to grow and flourish. She believes that to be successful you need to constantly make changes based on what your customers are looking for and what’s selling. And that’s precisely how Mangs has made a smashing 23 year success out of Lulu’s, a thriving enterprise that is part of the diverse patchwork of Guilford businesses dotting the Town Green. Lulu’s is also the product of a passionate love affair with a talented man, a town that is thoroughly adored, the country of Haiti, and three very special young men, all rolled into one. To begin at the beginning. Kim grew up in

Guilford, always appreciating the small town closeness, the beauty of the Town Green, the friendliness of its residents. She had initially worked as a secretary in a real estate office and as a bartender in a high end establishment, professions which prepared her for a successful career serving the local community. When she met and fell in love with her future husband, Tim Mangs, he quickly introduced her to one of his other loves: the country of Haiti, situated on an island in the greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean. It didn’t take long before Kim

Left to Right: Tessia Henry- sales associate, Kim Mangs - owner, Michele Platt - sales associate


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understood her business. “If I only carried sleepwear, I never would have made it.” So next she added exquisite handmade jewelry, pieces not found elsewhere. When Mangs hired some younger employees, she also added inventory that would appeal to their demographic: UGGS, kicky socks, chunky jewelry, fun pajamas, and more. “They are very knowledgeable about what we sell,” Kim reports. “They can answer all questions; and when we’re not here, I feel completely comfortable knowing they will carry the store in our absence.” She also wisely adds, “If I were to gain 10 pounds, I’d go into a different style of clothing, so Lulu’s also features clothing lines for the more mature figure and taste.” also fell in love with the country, its people, its art and artifacts...so much so that the couple now maintains a second home there to which they retreat three months of the year. As someone for whom multi-tasking is not a hindrance, but a way of life, Kim chose to open a store in downtown Guilford shortly after her third son was born. Expecting to finally have a daughter, the couple had prematurely picked out the name “Lulu.” However when “Max” came upon the scene to complete the masculine hat trick, Mangs was not willing to let the cherished name go, so she

named her first store Lulu’s; and it’s never changed, even though she moved a few times until she found just the right “sweet spot,” but oh how it’s evolved! “I started with West Indian antiques that we imported, supplying many decorators with these prized pieces.” But when Kim moved from “down the street,” Lulu’s began to evolve, adding some luxurious bedding to the furniture already displayed. Seeing that her customers were responding favorably, she next augmented her inventory with robes and high-end sleepwear. They also were a hit, but Mangs


15 glasses, jewelry, hats, lingerie, tops, bottoms, and wearable whimsy. Very chichi indeed. When you meet Kim Mangs you’re meeting a woman who is very much at peace with herself. She has a husband she absolutely adores, three wonderful successful sons, a true affection for the town in which she works, a real kinship with the country of Haiti and its people, and is forever grateful for a successful business ardently supported by long-standing customers and employees she not only likes, but completely respects and trusts. “I feel very fortunate. I had a lot of help in life, but I believe in karma. It all comes back to you.”

Mangs is cognizant of the fact that today many people do their shopping on the internet, but finds her customers want to come in to Lulu’s to “see what’s here, to try things on, to touch and feel. I have great lines and invest heavily in my brands, so our customers really appreciate what we have.” Mangs readily admits that her prices are not cheap, but not over the top either. A customer who is at the register checking out chimes in to the conversation adding, “It’s quality, so the prices are very reasonable for the quality you get at Lulu’s.” Lulu’s is not a big store, but so well designed and planned. Mangs gives full credit to Tim “who comes from a design and build family. He designed all my stores, and I’m his biggest fan.” The lighting is superb, directing the eye to the soft, luxurious loungewear and sleepwear, steering attention to the sun-

These are the words of a woman who is happy and fulfilled, but not entirely content. Kim Mangs will always be seeking new ways to improve, to make things better in her store and in her world. She will

continue to evolve and grow. There are two primary languages in Haiti: French and Creole. A quick glance at the Creole word for “happy” is “kontan.” It means a state of contentment and therefore goes hand in hand with the Creole greeting, “Mwen kontan rekonet ou,” or “I’m happy to come to know and be associated with you.” Sounds a lot like Kim Mangs; a lot like Lulu’s. Lulu’s, a Chichi Boutique is located at 75 Whitefield Street, right on the Green in downtown Guilford (203) 453-6887 Facebook.com/lulusguilford


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How long will it take to experience everything StoneRidge senior living offers? A 3-month trial might about cover it. Relax in our indoor, heated saltwater pool. Take classes in our state-of-the-art fitness center. Give our fine dining menu a thorough once-over. Explore your creative side in our arts studio and woodworking shop. Make new friends at our cultural and social events.

And that’s just the beginning! Call 860.245.9972 for more details.

*Some restrictions apply. Talk to a residency counselor to discuss the rental option and fee associated.

STONERIDGE 186 JERRY BROWNE ROAD I MYSTIC,, CT 06355 WWW.STONERIDGELCS.COM


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The same pair of shoes works for everything, right? Neither does the same pair of eyeglasses...

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Closet Dreams A Little Girl “Branches Out”to Peppergrass & Tulip by RONA MANN Photos by Stephanie Sittinick It was just a childhood dream...an activity to perhaps occupy rainy days. But she loved it, so little Mary Ellen would spend hour upon hour in her closet playing with her wardrobe and accessories, even making clothes for her dolls. She loved playing “shop” and told her father, “one day I will have my own shop.” But life changed things for a while as it often does, and Mary Ellen went off to school and became a Licensed Practical Nurse. Once graduated, she worked and worked hard, in a hospital setting, a nursing home, and as a private duty practitioner. Always work driven, Mary Ellen Grills even waited tables at a popular Stonington restaurant, paying the bills for herself and her daughter following an earlier divorce. Then one day she injured her back waiting tables and spent several weeks recuperating at home, wondering what she would do next. That’s when her very precocious 11 year old daughter asserted, “Don’t wait for a man to come along to take care of you. If you want to do something, go do it yourself.”

Mary Ellen took notice. During this period of healing she read an article in a magazine about two women in New York City who created a successful business fashioning gift baskets. “I said to myself, ‘I can do that!’ So I went to New York City with just $9000, all the money I had in the world. I spent every bit of it on gifts, came back home; and using a hair dryer to shrink wrap the cellophane over the items, I put together basket after basket.” Next Grills took her wares to the Crystal Mall in Waterford and started selling them at holiday times from a cart. “I had specialized baskets: for chocoholics, new babies, weddings...they all sold. People were constantly asking where they could find me; I realized the answer was ‘nowhere,’ since I was operating out of my apartment.”

again, as soon as space downstairs became available, she moved into it. Then there was the matter of a name. “I took at least six months until I found what I liked,” Grills said. What she liked was found in a friend’s gardening book: “Peppergrass.” It was unique and compelling, but it needed to “go” with something else. “So I kept looking at the book until I found ‘Tulip.’ That goes.”

It was time to grow, so Mary Ellen found a place “upstairs on Main Street” in 1985. She sought, and received, solid business advice from SCORE (part of the SBA); but although her adviser told her to wait at least another year before moving

Owner Mary Ellen Grills and Manager Cindy Graham

In March of 2000 there was a devastating early morning fire in downtown Mystic that destroyed half a block of shops. It was the fourth time since 1863 that fire had struck the same building on West Main Street. Unfortunately, Mary Ellen’s beloved and very successful shop was one of the eight. The fire not only left a hole right in the heart of downtown, but in the hearts of the affected shopkeepers who now had no place to go. Fortunately Mary Ellen Grills did. The owner of the pharmacy was planning to move on and had previously offered her this larger space. But her decision needed to be imminent, since other shopkeepers were now vying for the same spot. “I decided after just a couple of days to take it, and once again we were moving.” Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Grills once again branched out, this time


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adding clothing to her gifts and antiques. Mary Ellen loved the new space, always adding merchandise, changing displays, tweaking this and that. “The first ten years I spent hours and hours here. Sometimes the police would come by at night to find out if I were alright,” she laughed. But Mary Ellen Grills was more than alright; she was flourishing, as was Peppergrass & Tulip. Even another temporary move forced by deteriorating beams that structurally affected the building, could not daunt this woman. She was more than a shopkeeper; she was a survivor, determined to continue bringing her love of beautiful, unique, and whimsical things to customers of every demographic. Today her shop is a true reflection of who this woman is, grabbing the visitor’s attention right from the first with hats of all stripes. There are hats to match an outfit, hats to wear to the Kentucky Derby, hats for fun, and right now, wildly popular witches hats...delightful bejeweled toppers for the inner hag in you. Love socks? Peppergrass & Tulip has them, but not the ordinary. Matter of fact, nothing here is

the “ordinary.” You won’t find these socks anywhere else. And there are racks of cards for every occasion, bought and skillfully arranged by “Marge,” the 93 year old employee Mary Ellen happily “inherited” from the pharmacy.

Clothing runs the gamut from stylish and fun sweaters, to flowing dresses and skirts, with scarves to mix and match. Grills does all the buying herself, trolling the gift shows in Atlanta and New York to bring back such treasures as Art Hearts ornaments, charming frames, and Ayala Bar jewelry, a handmade line straight

from Israel. Soaps in crazy animal shapes, lotions, books, flowered jewelry, baby gifts, night lights...everywhere you look, there’s something unique and appealing, and Mary Ellen Grills has put her distinctive stamp right on it. Best of all, the merchandise, the displays, and the “finds” change frequently as Mary Ellen continues to redesign Peppergrass & Tulip at whim. “I always say, expect the unexpected here;” and indeed, that’s what customers have come to love. It’s not just another gift shop...it’s a delightful treasure hunt. Upon examination of a standard gardening manual, one finds that initially peppergrass begins as a slow growing rosette, but as it grows, the stems bolt upward and branch out. Not unlike the little girl who shyly played “shop” in her closet so many years ago, slowly growing and maturing, until like peppergrass, she bolted upward and branched out, finding exactly what she wanted to do all along...and along the journey, finding herself. Peppergrass & Tulip is found at 30 West Main Street in downtown Mystic (860) 536-1516


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think outside the box

R I V E R FRAMES Art Framing & Gallery Opens October 3rd 860 526 1137 the red barn at 25 maple street, chester ct wednesday - saturday 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

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Calling all Dolls The Connecticut Doll Hospital By Caryn B. Davis

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o say that Renee Silvester loves dolls is an understatement. Her personal collection consists of over 200, with the oldest dating back to 1860. “This doll is called a wax over doll. Her arms, legs, and feet are hand-carved wood, and her eyes are glass. Her shoulder plate and head are papier mache. In those days they poured wax over the papier mache to preserve it. She’s in pretty good shape, but I have to restore the body,” says Silvester, proprietor of Calling All Dolls, a Doll Shop and Doll Hospital in Cobalt, Connecticut.

Wax dolls were fashionable during the late 1700s to the early 1900s and were prized because of their realistic faces, which could be tinted to match human skin tones. But while they had the advantage of being unlike shatter-proof, porcelain, they were easily crushed or scratched; and when subject to extreme temperatures, could melt. Needless to say, they did not last long; although today, an antique wax figure in good condition can cost a collector anywhere between five hundred to two thousand dollars. Most wax dolls are not simple to repair. But Silvester, who has restored numerous houses including the 1800s Italianate home where she, the doll shop, and hospital reside, can fix practically anything. “I bought the house nine years ago, and the shop has been open for seven. It took me two years to restore both the interior and exterior, but I always wanted to save an historical home. I used to come here when it was an antique store and thought it would be a perfect spot for

the dolls. I felt the house calling me but had to wait three years until the owner got realistic with the price,” says Silvester. The original owners of the house had mined metals on the Connecticut River they transformed into pewter and silver plate goblets called Britannia Ware. Later, after the Civil War broke out, they made hardware for coffins; and their business took off, enabling them to add onto the front of the house in 1860. Silvester uses this area to display all the dolls, stuffed animals, doll furniture, shoes, and clothes she has for sale, while the back is the hospital, lined with small beds and shelves


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containing some of the rarest and oldest dolls in her collection. Calling All Dolls is part store, part hospital, and part museum; and Silvester knows the history, construction, and provenance of nearly every doll in the place. She sells a wide variety that include American Girl; vintage dolls; baby dolls; dolls dressed in elaborate costumes and clothing; antique dolls; and porcelain dolls. She has famous dolls like the Kewpies, designed by cartoonist Rose O’Neill in the early 1900s; and from TV shows in the 1960s and 1970s like Mrs. Beasley from Family Affair. Crissy with the retractable long red hair and Chatty Cathy, a pull string talking doll, were also very popular during this period. However, Barbie has never graced Silvester’s store or personal collection. Barbie came onto the scene in the 1960s selling in drug stores for five dollars, but simply never piqued Silvester’s fancy. “Every 10 years there seems to be changes in

the industry. I can always tell how old somebody is by the dolls they had. There is always one special doll they remember,” says Silvester. Silvester grew up in the great doll era of the 1950s. She started out playing with baby dolls,

pretending they were real babies; but when the Toni doll came out, everything changed. That’s the one she remembers most. “Toni was a little girl doll and a big hit. I got one, and that

just did it for me. She had the prettiest face in the world,” recalls Silvester. Other dolls with beautiful faces in Silvester’s shop are a series of high-end dolls from Germany made by Annette Himstedt and Nicole Marschollek, the top doll artists in the world. Each are cast in vinyl and resemble actual people. Himstedt traveled the globe taking photos of children in each country she visited, and then copied their clothing and faces to create a series of dolls that are extremely realistic. “If you have worked with clay before you can’t even comprehend how hard that is,” says Silvester. “They are simply gorgeous. The eyes are either mouth blown glass or human prosthetic eyes. Women buy them and dress them up for the holidays. They are very expensive and retail for three hundred to one thousand dollars.” Himstedt retired in 2008, and Marschollek took the designs one step further.


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“Nicole doesn’t believe all people are beautiful, so why do we have all these beautiful dolls? You will see this difference in the faces of her dolls,“says Silvester. In the back of the building is the doll hospital with pieces from Silvester’s collection. She used to host birthday parties in that room before the hospital superseded the retail business, and decorated it with her American Girl dolls and her Skookum dolls, which are handmade Native American dressed souvenir dolls from the 1920s and 1930s. “These dolls were patented by Mary Dwyer McAboy. It was a cottage industry. They would put kits out to housewives who wanted to work from home, and each decorated the dolls in her own way,” Silvester says.

Silvester also has a collection of antique composition dolls on display that are very old. Although production on these dolls ceased in 1949, she possesses quite a few from the 1920s including a Patsy doll. They are crafted from wood pulp and are among her favorites. They were often modeled after famous figures such as Skippy (a cartoon character), Shirley Temple, and Pinocchio. A lot of the repair work Silvester undertakes is on composition dolls. “Composition doesn’t hold up unless it’s in a proper temperature. A lot of people don’t know that. They store the dolls in the attic, and they crack. I sand them down and then use different clays to remold the doll. It’s a lot of work, but I have saved many and brought them back to life,” she says. The Internet has really changed the doll business. Years ago, people had to search high and low for certain dolls, whereas today they can access pages full of once hard-to-find dolls at their fingertips. “It’s taken the thrill out of collecting; but in

other ways it’s a wonderful thing because I never would have found these beautiful black composition dolls, for example, if I did not find them online. Now we can get dolls we could never get before, so for those of us that still want to collect, it’s a good thing,” says Silvester. Silvester has known since the age of twelve that she would one day own a doll shop and hospital, although when she first opened her doors in 2010 she had no idea if she would be successful because girls today spend more time playing on their smart phones than they do with dolls. Still, Silvester was undeterred. “It’s been a lifelong dream. I knew I loved dolls and wanted to show people beautiful dolls they have never seen,” she says. For more information logo onto www.callingalldolls.com


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“Astromythos…the Mythic World of Jon Sideriadis” by Laurencia Ciprus / photos by Paul Gobell

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lose listening to illustrator, poet, educator and visionary Jon Sideriadis is a passport into Astromythos, his own mythological world projected eons into the future, although firmly planted in the ancient tradition of classical art and story telling. The title is Sideriadis’ own creation, and is a combination of the Greek words for star and myth. Sideriadis spent a lifetime in preparation for this expansive work, and set out on his own personal odyssey as a young man and perennial student. During this extensive journey, he absorbed a vast mix of astrophysics, Joseph Campbell and the Classics, an ongoing immersion in his ancestral Greek culture and traditional art, Sci-Fi, Shakespeare and J.R.R. Tolkien. A stint in Hollywood designing creature effects, makeup and range of commissioned work for television and film, along with years of international travel, laid the foundation for an unparalleled vision. Sideriadis’ first volume in his multi-volume series is presented as an epic poem comprised of twelve myths containing “anthropomorphic” treatment of the stars, planets, meteors and other heavenly bodies in the celestial world;

i.e. giving human characteristics to animals or inanimate objects. Astromythos is the refinement of eleven years of dreams, adventures, observational notes and a library of the

artist/poet’s meticulously illustrated sketchbooks. The sketchbooks are intrinsic to Sideriadis’ creative practice and he has carried one with him since he could remember. He encourages his illustration students at both Lyme Academy and UCONN to follow his example and record all of their impressions as they occur.

Sideriadis invites you into his deeply illustrated and most definitely ambitious world. If the written work feels somehow familiar, it intentionally runs parallel with Homer, the Iliad and the Odyssey – and is crafted in rhyming hexameter, the identical meter as the Hellenic epic. With a vast store of folktales and myth from other cultures he also blends Norse mythology into the storyline. He takes his time explaining the romantic stuff of his own multi-generational odyssey. There is his maternal Grandmother who was a shepherdess tucked into a remote mountain village in Greece and the Grandfather who came back to his homeland to find a suitable wife. His parents settled in Rocky Hill and once he arrived in school, his natural artistic talents emerged, were discovered and nurtured with travel, education and limitless enrichment encouraged. His interests in heroic adventure, Dungeons and Dragons, and Star Wars also staged the proving ground for his future work and unlimited imagination. As his work matured and expanded, there is also a nod of admiration to Hudson River School artist Thomas Cole, as well as, painter John Martin. Sideriadis is mindful of the positioning of man


40 picture frames that intentionally decompose and rusticate to mimic an ancient quality. His choice of metal leaf also reflects a temporary and organic quality that will age over time and transform. The work has transformed as well since he began, and he had to rewrite the entire first half of the book when he revisited it.

in relation to nature and feels, “the figure is subordinate to the environment.” Visiting his studio in late afternoon, the original gilded artwork is a soft glow of gold and silver, even in the dim light. The spare worktable is always in process and Sideriadis talks animatedly about the selection of his

The galley copy and detailed illustrations – beautifully gilded illuminated manuscripts, which are easily mistaken for ancient Byzantine works – consume a solid ten-foot span of wall in his workspace. His attention to detail and authenticity in this epic is confounding. Look twice at the incorporation of an actual meteorite set directly into the gilded letterform “B” in one illustration. It was a Guilford based blacksmith who encouraged Sideriadis to reshape the meteorite. “The nickel and iron content will cause it to melt poorly…

you’ll have to shape it.” A stickler for detail – and tools – he used his father’s 30-pound press to flatten the meteorite and a Dremel to further refine the shape. All of this effort to incorporate the element of gravity into the story and animate it on the page! Gravity factors heavily into the plotline, and Sideriadis explains that, “…it is a powerful influence and can be viewed either as destructively dark, or, as a catalyst for a new beginning.” He cites the positive pull as, “the first two stars meeting together in the void”.


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When he travels back to Greece each year, he stocks up on the metal leafs and paints that enhance the work. The trip has expanded in scope, and as of last summer, Sideriadis – who is bi-lingual in both written and spoken Greek ¬– has joined the leadership team for an immersive educational trip for artists. The adventure leads travellers throughout the Greek Islands while retracing the steps of ancient thinkers and transforming spirits at the foot of Mount Olympus or while painting in a Greek castle. The longer you take time to view his work, you want to ask more and stay longer. There is an eagerness to see what happens next to the meteors, the brown dwarf stars and the dark forces of worm and black holes. There is also the love story of the two stars Arnikos and Nevma, who are caught up in a tragic push pull; the bravery of the wisest of the stars – the nomadic white dwarf stars – in search of a home; and the humor in the whimsical inset illustrations of the natural elements which remind you of Tolkien. There is Lithium, the volatile trickster, Oxygen and the levity of Helium. Always the instructor, Sideriadis is purposeful to make his work relatable to our current social climate and adds in recognizable metaphors and kind lessons as the takeaway.

foreign in their scope and attention to detail. This may be a lifelong pursuit to finish the entire work, but this commitment is at the root of a mythic quest. The words and visuals are oddly classical while exciting and futuristic. The language encourages the reader to slow down to ancient ways – before the urgency of pop culture – to read and re-read each passage and look again at the detail embedded in each illustration.

The dedication to his process is infectious and his students fill his classes each semester. Teaching a course called, “World Building” for artists, proves an intricate and exciting exercise in thought and creativity for establishing the foundation for their own mythical works. In the course, he encourages his students to live inside of their imaginary worlds and “eat, sleep and breathe” inside them to make the story, characters and details believable enough to be effectively shared with others. He asks tough questions of his students and begins the class with “How say you now” to provoke fresh thought and be inspired in different ways.

With the current emphasis on instant gratification and fleeting ideas, Astromythos and the years spent planning and creating it may initially feel For more information on Astromythos and other works of Jon Sideriadis: https://astromythos.com/ Facebook: Jon Sideriadis

There are a handful of pieces in progress in the studio and carrying them out to the car we talk further about technique and the small details that make a difference in the slightest change of tone and feeling: how the little female white dwarfs wear their wings; the slightest dusting of silver powder into the oil paint to create just enough moon dew and the little clutch of gold rings in the palm of the birdlike gas giant used in hope of wooing the first star. There is a snatch of an epic poem of the Finnish people – the Kalevala to think about as the streetlights go on and the modern world trips over the evening and the characters of Astromythos are just over the horizon and you drive off knowing you’ll dream of hydrogen fireflies.


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Music, Mirth & Mojo by Ali Kaufman

Summer's Last Hurrah By Ali Kaufman Happy Rock-tober! The change of season brings to a conclusion the burgeoning summer festival schedule. Many in our area flock to Rhythm & Roots Music & Dance Festival, held over Labor Day Weekend in Charlestown, Rhode Island to say goodbye to summer year after year. I again had the pleasure of being part of the emceeing team as they celebrated their 20th anniversary with a stellar line up that catered to lovers of music, zydeco dancing, and celebrating life. I've attended as a day guest for many years, but this was the first time I've camped and got to experience the fest all weekend. I am glad I did. The camping sites run the gamut from pop-up tents to the most elaborately decorated RVs, complete with light shows, and big enough to have their own zip code. All must be self contained, as there are no hookups at Ninigret Park. I fall somewhere in the middle, hitting the field with my teardrop camper and making a very respectable attempt at displaying my festival spirit. My bike made the trip as well this year; and while you cannot peddle around inside the gate, it was a terrific help getting from my site on "Ripple Road" to the mainstage, as well as a fantastic way to meet other campers. The Mavericks have been having another successful festival run in 2017 and continued the streak by delivering the headlining performance to a large crowd on Friday night. They took the stage right after it had been set aflame by the two acts that led up to them. The Squirrel Nut Zippers led by Jimbo Mathus came for a revival, not a reunion. They have been on the road from Honolulu to Kalamazoo, celebrating the release of their re-mastered 20th anniversary edition of "Hot.” Not resting on

their laurels, this American Swing Band is gearing up to release a brand new album coming in January. I was surprised to learn from Jimbo that he had history with Buddy Guy and recorded the 2001 Grammy winning "Blues Singer" with him, in addition to lending his talent to Guy's "Sweet Tea.” A big surprise to many, including our emceeing team of Peter Rost, Ed McKeon, and myself, was the band Shiny Ribs. If we didn't know them going in, we are never going to forget them. Larger than life Texan, Kevin Russell belted out the most surprising of covers and made them his own. His booming voice, backed up by the animated Shiny Soul Sisters, the Tijuana Trainwreck Horns, drums, keys, and a bass had everyone sitting up and taking notice. If you are a fan of the sound that bands

Squirrel Nut Zippers - Jimbo Mathus

Bad Voodoo Daddy

ently published in 2010, took hold of me and wouldn't let go. Trahan's band is a perfect example of how Rhythm & Roots gives Zydeco artists a chance to reach live audiences here in the Northeast that might otherwise not be exposed to this deep, uplifting music of hardworking, hard playing people. It’s a win/win. Horace Trahan and The Ossun Express also released "By Special Request" in 2013 and are gearing up to share a brand new album in early 2018. Saturday night wrapped with a band that is part circus, part marching band, and all fun. Fifteen members strong, March Fourth took the stage as a fine mist began to fall, as if balancing on one hand atop a stack of chairs isn't challenging enough. The crowd was on their side and riveted from the first note to the last...definitely a theatrical experience for sure.

like Nathaniel Ratecliff and the Night Sweats put out, look up Shiny Ribs and find your next favorite song. Shinyribs.org. "Louie, Louie, Louie" is the name of The Big Bad Voodoo Daddy's 2017 album that pays homage to the great Louies that inspire this band of dapper daddies, Armstrong, Jordan, and Prima. The band appeared after dark, and the two giant screens flanking the main stage really benefited the audience. I first saw BBVD over 20 years ago, and they just keep getting better...they are terrific ambassadors of America's proud tradition of Jazz Swing Music. I have been playing Horace Trahan on air for years. His "Keep Walking," which he independ-

The mist that began to fall the night before turned into some real liquid sunshine, but it did nothing to dampen the enthusiastic vibe that began Sunday morning with a goosebump inducing gospel set by Rhode Island's own fiercely talented, Sarah Potenza and the Beehive Queen herself, Christine Ohlman. The set was moved into a tent and drew a large crowd

Sarah Potenza, Ali Kaufman, Christine Ohlman


Photos by:: Rick Farrell, Mojo Photography

Christine Ohlman

Shinyribs - Ken Russell

despite the rain we dodged to get there. Sarah and Christine looked every inch the divas. Swirled in chiffon, silk, and sparkles they took us to church with “Hallelujah, If You're Ready” ( “Come Go with Me”), and many others that had the appreciative audience swaying and grateful to be in that number. Our hometown favorite, Christine Ohlman was just revving her engines and appeared twice more on Sunday, once guesting during Rosanne Cash's poignant set to sing Ray Price's "Heartaches by the Number" with her Grammy winning friend and Rosanne's husband, John Leventhal on guitar. Immediately following that, she upped

Sarah Potenza

the bar during the funkalicious final set of the festival with The New Orleans Suspects. The band, made up of some of the most respected players in New Orleans, was also joined by Paul Barrere and Fred Tackett of Little Feat. Miss Christine had all her Tennessee Lambs working hard during Dixie Chicken and drove the crowd wild with her walk-ons. Thank you to all the organizers, crew, artists, and new friends that made this another terrific summer of live music! This one is in the books, but we are one day closer to starting it all over again next year!

The Mavericks with the lead singer Raul Malo

March Fourth

Hot off the Press new music to look for in October: 10/13 Robert Plant - "Carry Fire" 10/27 Bootsy Collins - "Worldwide Funk"

Shows to look for in October: Wolf Den Mohegan Sun - Free Shows 10/6 James Hunter Six 10/12 Willie Nile Infinity Music Hall – Hartford 10/15 JJ Grey & Mofro 10/22 Melvin Seals & JGB The Knickerbocker Cafe - Westerly, RI 10/20 Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band

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Intersecting Our Worlds Immigrant Artists Tell Their Stories by Nancy LaMar-Rodgers / photos by A. Vincent Scarano

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e are a land of immigrants. This is the sentiment that has been at the heart of a political maelstrom since the inauguration. For the artists who are contributors to Intersections, A Benefit for IASC, this idea is central to what they hope the public will take away from this show. For Mohamed Hafez, an architect who designs skyscrapers all over the world, the refugee experience is now part of his family heritage. His contribution to the immigrant art show is important because for Mohamed the current crisis cuts deep. It is his family members, it is his home, and it is his culture that is currently being eradicated. Hafez meets us in his studio space in New Haven. The walls are covered with Time

Magazine’s coverage of the Syrian refugee crisis. Below the photos are the shelves that hold Mohamed’s tools of the trade - salvage yard scraps with a dose of plastic figurines and dollhouse furniture Mohamed, pieces. whose home is Damascus, hopes to bring the humanitarian plight of his people to the world through his art.

What we are now trying to do is both humanize the crisis and defy the current narrative regarding refugees.”

Bombed out buildings, an abandoned tricycle tipped against half a stone wall, cars burnt and hollowed, and a family’s art work singed and blackened by smoke, are just some of the miniature models nestled inside old leather suitcases, which, for the artist represent the fleeing of a people, taking only what they can carry. “My family has left Syria, and my sister and her husband have become refugees in Sweden. As a middle class family, this is the last thing I could ever imagine happening.

Guido Garaycochea, an abstract painter, originally from Peru, splits his time between New London and Queens, New York. As an immigrant who is now a U.S. citizen, he has experienced first hand the fear of his neighbors in New York. “For weeks after the inauguration, people were not even going outside. Everyone was locked away in their homes for fear that they would be swept up and sent back. It was so scary; and even though I am a citizen now, I understand what it is like to live


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52 with that fear. It seems that fear of what we don’t know or understand is at the core of our current situation when it comes to immigrants. No human is illegal, and this country has always been a place for immigrants to reinvent themselves and bring our talents to this country.” Intersections, A Benefit Exhibit, seeks to show the world through art, that despite the differences in our races, our religions, and our cultures, we are more alike than we are different; and as Americans we have always prided ourselves on the diversity of our people. David Tedman Martinez, an artist who works in abstract, says that the exhibit is a way for the artists to come together to illustrate the immigrant experience using art as a way to express the emotional rollercoaster that is currently felt by undocumented people in our country. The idea for the exhibit stemmed from a conversation between Martinez and the

Immigration Advocacy Support Center, or IASC, an organization that began as a way of helping the growing population of underserved Hispanic families in the New London area. The artists have all signed on to donate

half of the proceeds from any artwork sold to IASC to support their ongoing effort to help assuage some of the fears felt by current undocumented workers. Getting Connecticut College onboard has

been the bridge that brought it all together. Chris Barnard, an art professor at Conn, brought the project to his department because he understands the imperative nature of having these conversations now.“We were told of Martinez and the fact that he is a painter as well as an educator in New London. The idea of combining not just a show of artists who are all immigrants, but being able to use the show as an educational tool, was a very powerful idea; and we wanted to make it happen.” Barnard was eventually able to get the green light from his department, and the process of inviting the artists began. Corina S. Alvarezdelugo, currently calls Connecticut her home, but she is originally from Venezuela. These days when she sees what is happening in her beloved country, it is heartbreaking; and she fears that the current unrest in this country creates the fear that causes such destruction. She has contributed work that represents her current emotional


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Mohamad Hafez, Damascus, Syria “Architect and Artist”

Corina S. Alvarezdelugo, Valencia-Venezuela “living uncertain times”

Guido Garaycochea, Peru "In my work freedom is presented as a utopia where life is an intricate creation of chances".


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Nadine Renazile, Haiti “abstract expressionist painter”

Tedman David Martínez Onofre, Arecibo, Puerto Rico “a painting shouldn't be”

Rafael Colon, Puerto Rico “Skateboard pyrography paintings”


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state regarding her homeland. “The work I selected is about the political situation in Venezuela. It is about the loss of freedom and what the regime is doing to people in my country. For Corina, having this show at Connecticut College is hugely important. “For it to be happening in a college is personally very important for me because right now in Venezuela students are being imprisoned, tortured, and killed for demanding what it says in our constitution. I want students here to understand how important it is to take care of the things that they have, like freedom, because very easily it can go the other way.”

Nadine Renazile, an abstract and mixed media painter, was part of the Haitian diaspora, and her artwork tells her story of the feeling of being an outsider. She explains her passion about the topic. “The act of immigration offers an opportunity to remake oneself, even as one is in the throes of a profound sense of loss for leaving behind home and community. I was thrilled to offer my art in support of those going through that process while engaging with the public through the lenses of a longtime observer of American life. Showcasing immigrants from different backgrounds, different countries, and our contributions to this great nation is very important for me. I work

with young people and artists to help encourage and build their confidence through art.” Nadine’s words ring true for Rafael Colon, an artist who came from Puerto Rico at the age of eight to live in the Bronx with his mother. Having come from a poor community where neighbors took care of each other to land in a new world whose language he did not speak and where neighbors avoided each other, Colon knows all too well what it feels like to be an outsider looking in. He uses his art as a universal language and hopes that those who see the exhibit will understand the healing power of art. “I would like people to see that no matter where you come from or where you live, art can transcend that. Art can make you feel familiar, make you feel inspired, and make you understand the power of creativity no matter your heritage. A Picasso for example, can transcend countries. A Japanese person will know it as well as a Swedish person. Art pierces and breaks barriers and can unite like-minded humans for one cause.” Intersections,

A

Benefit

Exhibition for IASC will run through October 12th. https://www.conncoll.edu/artsculture/art-art-history-architectural-studies/art-exhibitions/


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SOLD ABOVE LIST PRICE Essex | $599,900 3 Beds | 2.1 Baths | 2441 sqft

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Through each sale, I proudly support The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp which is dedicated to providing “a different kind of healing” to seriously ill children and their families.

An Agent is a lot like a television news anchor . . . Knowledgeable, Prepared and Organized. Let Janet get you to the closing table.

Janet Peckinpaugh, Realtor® 860.985.3659 JPeckinpaugh@wpsir.com janetpeckinpaugh.williampitt.com

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A Humpback Whale Logging beside her Calf Stellawagen Bank, off Cap Cod Photos and editorial © Mark Seth Lender Wide of the planet Humpback Whale, goes, and dives, and rises up to feed rolling upon her fins, the fishes leaping amongst the black baleen in the cavern of her mouth. And when she roves, her flukes footprint the water like the heel of a giant ocean striding. And when she breaches, broad jumping high and long, the sea rumbles like kettle drums when she falls down! And when her water breaks and the life she bears is born, the tides rise higher on the distant shore. The ragged sheets of rain weaving the spiny sea when the waves roar, the smooth cloth of the sea in calm, the ruffled blanket of the sea in steady wind, these are the weathers Whale knows, all these, and more:

In the grey of the deeps no color shines, sound rules over the eyes, the touch of currents is the only wind against your face and water the only air; where cold inclines and warm subsides and water falls within water, there Humpback glides, and speaks, and listens for the voices of her Kind through the unaccustomed, the invidious clamor. She surfaces for silence and for sleep… Whale, and the baby born to her in the winter of the year doze and drift on a soft bower of water. Their eyelids droop and close. They are so still; cradled in the calm before the storm. And when they draw, and blow, their breath becomes Whale Bows, violet, crimson, sintered green. It vanishes as quickly as it blooms. And when they sound, fathoms and fathoms below, the water like fresh blue paint covers over the place where they have been.

And when they race, like a miller’s wheel, head then back then tail, great currents are moved upon their way. And when they look they see you: The Whale – Feels! The Whale – Breathes! The Young Whale, born tethered to his mother by the hawser of the cord, like all of us bound to the fate of the sea... As the sea goes so goes the Whale. As Whale goes… so, does life, on earth.


Field Note: Humpback Logging Calf Stellwagen Bank in Massachusetts Bay has the kind of sandy bottom that provides excellent habitat for a small, eel-shaped fish called the sand lance. Shallow depth and large numbers of sand lance make Stellwagen an ideal summer habitat for humpback whales. They come in droves. It is my favorite place for whale watching. The whales are big, the sanctuary actually quite small, and the protection afforded problematic. Whales are wide-ranging, inhabiting virtually all of the world’s oceans. I have watched, listened to and photographed whales throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Iceland and Greenland to Alaska, and from the

Broughton Archipelago all the way down to the Southern Ocean. In every local, despite ostensible protections, whales continue to be under assault. Ship collisions, overfishing and pollution and the consequent loss of habitat all take a heavy toll. As does the Japanese industrial whaling fleet. Norway, Greenland, and now Iceland also conduct whaling operations but virtually all their whale meat is sold to Japan. While the Japanese claim they themselves are only killing and marketing “non-endangered” whales, tests in Japanese markets regularly turn up humpback whale meat, and on occasion, the flesh of blue whales.

die. Oil companies, ever voracious, likewise hurt whales through seismic exploration. They also destroy ocean and coastal habitat through the many and ongoing spills for which they are responsible. Yet we do not hold them accountable for the costs. Meanwhile industrial fishing particularly by unregulated Asian fleets strip mines the sea entire.

An entirely different threat comes from the US Navy’s high-energy LFA sonar, and the staunch refusal of the US National Marine Fisheries Service to enforce existing regulations or to honor court rulings in a meaningful way. The sonar continues to blare, whales and dolphins continue to

We need to leave the whale alone.

We need more sanctuaries not less. We need less industrial fishing not more. We need to prohibit profit from being taken at our expense.

Mark Seth Lender is a producer for wildlife content at Living on Earth ( LOE.org ), the only program on US Public Radio exclusively dedicated to wildlife and environmental reporting.


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Photos and profile by Dante Scarano

S

ince the 1950’s, the regions connected by the Mekong River uphold a perception of people hardened by war, an “unstable environment” that most Baby Boomer’s would shudder at the thought of visiting. These ideas may have held true throughout the 60’s and 70’s, but these concepts could not be more false in the 21st century. During the Vietnam War the most information westerners received about the Mekong River was: troops fighting with the Viet Cong, supply routes, or a daring story of how Martin Sheen sailed up the river to find Colonel Kurtz. While the Vietnam War ended 42 years ago many people still hold the same perceptions of the region, and often think twice about visiting. However, weeks before leaving to South East Asia, my friends Nick, Jeremy, Kyle, Mike and I were on Skype chatting about our upcoming trip, throwing around ideas, and arguing over routes on the map. When entering Laos and to a further extent Laung Prabang (a large port city in Northern Laos) came into question. The overland route into the country included a 17-hour bus ride through the winding countryside, and the airfare was wildly overpriced. Soon the Mekong River came into topic, “We should just get on one of these long boats” Nick commented, “Looks like it’s a two or three day river journey down the Mekong, am I reading that right?” sad Mike begrudgingly. Thoughts came flooding into my head about how unsafe, life threating, and boring that a boat ride could be. Though one after another we all came to an agreement, “Hey, why not it could be an adventure,” later that night we’d plan a trip down one of South East Asia’s most infamous waterways. The boat, though more of a wooden bus that glided down the river, was an old and creaky ship fairly similar to a European canal boat. The seats were repurposed minivan bench seats still equipped with unusable seatbelt slots. The stains and rips in the fabric eerily reminiscent of a friend’s mom’s van from high school. Towards the back, the engine laid fully


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exposed. Belts whirled and pistons pumped, all for everyone to hear making it extremely tough to get any shuteye. Upon further inspection towards tail of the boat a smiling woman set up a makeshift convenient store. She sold anything from toilet paper, knock off brands of Pringles, store bought Oreos, to a couple cans of the local lager, Beer Lao. The air was hot and heavy, thick enough to cut with a knife, and without the boat moving there was no comforting breeze. In a flash travelers came spilling out of nowhere, people from all over the globe creating a dysfunctional and halfdrunk United Nations. The motors kicked on and with a swift push of the dockhand’s foot the boat set off cruising down the river in no time. The boat was filled with mostly weary travelers looking for a more scenic route, but there were some locals on board as well. It became an area of excitement and debauchery, as an old Chinese woman stole and then wore a Scotsman’s hat; a roar of laughter came from travelers aboard and the Scotsman blushed. A bottle of a cheap imitation of Red Stag was passed around for

anyone to take a swig of, as the mood quickly turned jovial. In the back of the boat, smoke came billowing out like a chimney fire, folks smoking a mix between the locally sold banana leaf cigars, and hand rolled cigarettes.

The perfect quiet spot was in the middle section of the boat, between the rowdy seating area and the slowly mellowing smoking area, right next to the engine. Strangely enough, the drone of the engine could carry almost anyone to a meditative state.

This area was majestic in every sense. Hills sprawling endlessly colored the landscape emerald green, filling the canvas of this area and creating vast jungles untouched by the horror of previous wars. Silted water rushed endlessly around the edge of the boat, forming a dirty brown color contrasting to the regular blues and greens one would associate with water, swirling and crashing up against every rock formation that came in its way. Mountains stuck through the mist gave the impression the clouds themselves were being cut in twain by cliff faces. Chiseled into one of these faces a staircase leading up to a temple shrine to Buddha. Locals and travelers ferried across the water to pay their respects, and gaze in awe of the dedication required to make such a shrine. These incredible sights could make traveler feel that they had floated down a river, to only arrive at the mythical lost city of Shangri-La. Thinking of all those warnings of how dangerous this area could be, and how false they were, there is not a more peaceful place on this entire planet.


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their sons casting out long nets, going about their daily lives to provide food. Occasionally a long boat or a motorboat passed bringing just locals back up the river towards Thailand. They smiled and waved as if to greet us into their country, a sight As the day rolled on into the evening the sun was finally setting swirling the sky a mixture of coral and purple as the boat reached its first stop. Everyone excitedly exited the boat into Pakbeng, a village strictly based around the tourism of the stopping over for the night. Guesthouses lined the streets as their owners stood outside offering tours of their rooms and a “fair” price to rent. The restaurants served a wide range of food to accompany any tourist: pad thai, curries, or burgers and fries. While the only nightlife in the town consisted of a dimly lit dive called, “Happy Bar” which every traveler on the boat flocked to and enjoyed until the wee hours of the morning. The cry of the rooster meant it was the crack of dawn, and when everyone boarded began its departure. The vessel had a sort of hush about it, everyone who passed around the local knockoff hooch and spending late hours of the night at the “Happy Bar,” now slumped silently holding their throbbing heads as hangovers set in. Though despite their ailment some travelers could tolerate it more than others, and a soft chatter began again throughout the boat. In the distance, children sang and danced in the morning sun as the boat motored past. The commerce on the water was booming, fishermen and

that is not easily forgotten. People genuinely happy, not living in a preconceived notion of their violent past, but rather moving forward. The sights and the smiling faces of locals instantly proved wrong any perception of

the Mekong River. This area was now bursting with happiness and beauty. Hours quickly melted into minutes, and conversations with fellow travelers flowed from travel sickness to future plans of travel into Vietnam, eventually the boat came into docks of Luang Prabang. Though the traveling was monotonous and at times boring, being confined in one spot for eight hours a day, but I would never trade it for a cushy bus or plane ride. True this area of the Mekong River was muddled in conflicts for much of its recent past. However, the riverboat journey made clear that these people have put the past behind them, not any easy feat by any means. Which begs the question, “Why can’t the western world do the same?” A task many American’s specifically would think impossible, but land with such sprawling majesty and rich culture should not be stereotyped for a part their of history. Rather it should be remembered for the smiling faces giving a welcoming wave of the local people on the boats passing by.


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The NEXT CHESTER FIRST FRIDAY - October 6th, 2017 - 5 - 8 pm THE NEXT CONCERTS IN THE GARDEN - SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8TH, - 4 - 6 pm “Johnny Martorelli - Solo Acoustic” November 12th - 4 - 6 pm “The Lost Acres String Band” December 10th - 4 - 6 pm “Ramblin Dan and the Fiery Band” Arrowhead strings along on most Sunday afternoons. Find out about the Concerts in the Garden, First Fridays, Leifs paintings and more at

www nilssonstudio com


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That is why we can use Vermont slates for cheese trays. Slates, however, will not work for bread boards because bread needs to be sliced, and slate will dull any knife, regardless of quality.

Paul Partica, The Cheese Shop, Centerbrook CT

Cutting the Cheese Ok, those of you with a smirk on your face, wipe it off and read further. First off, one does not really cut cheese, and that is why a sharp knife is seldom needed. If you think about it, with almost any cheese, you are wedging it and a dull butter knife will do the trick.

There are three basic ways to cut cheese: Cheese Knives A huge assortment of cheese knives exists in all shapes, colors, designs and materials such as metal, plastic, wood, porcelain, bone, ceramic and more. As I first mentioned, there is no need for sharpness when cutting cheese. In fact, for safety sake, a very dull, smooth, and full-rounded tip, is best. This is particularly helpful when children are involved.


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Many knives have round holes drilled into their sides. These can be helpful because they stop knives from sticking to the cheese after it has been cut. They also have a nice Swiss cheese appearance, in my opinion. As with any quality knife made with rivets in the handle, you should always hand wash. Machine washing, with its expansion and contraction due to the use of extremely hot water followed by a cooling process, will eventually loosen handles, and deem knives useless.

Cheese Wires Cheese wires can be a great tool for cutting and, in many cases, work better than knives. Particularly in the case of cheeses that are very soft or very hard, one will find them not only neater and cleaner, but easier to work with. At the Cheese Shop, we use commercial wires for cutting and they are used hundreds of times per day. In fact, the bigger and the harder the cheese, the more the need for a wire exists. We can break down an eighty-pound wheel Reggiano, or even a two-hundred-pound wheel of Swiss Emmentaler, with a short 18-inch wire fitted with two handles. There are modern plastic-handled wire cutters available today, but we often find that the old-fashioned homemade ones work best. A combination of wooden dowels, stainless steel washers and piano wire will do the trick. We can make them in assorted lengths to accommodate that large wheel of Swiss, or maybe that tiny three-pound blue cheese. We can even slice frozen cheesecakes and desserts with a good wire. Be careful when buying small retail wire slicers. They usually come with a small board and a handled wire that you pull over and down in to the cheese. They look clever but do not last long. The wires on these boards break easily and replacements can be almost non-existent, so be sure to ask about replacement wires at time of purchase. If they do not have an answer for you, avoid that purchase.

Cheese Planes or Slicers One of the most popular cutting tools is the cheese plane or slicer. These are what we use to sample cheese in the Cheese Shop. They work extremely well, and if not placed in the dishwasher will last for many years. I have a few that are over thirty years old and still in great working condition. They never need sharpening. There are a couple of tricks you might find useful. The first one is to bend your slicer to the proper angle. They always come flat when new, but a quick bend at the cutting line will make slicing much easier. Note the difference in the photo of the two cheese planes. The correct one has the higher degree of angle. The second trick is that you need a large enough piece of cheese for it to work properly, and you need to cut across the width, not the length of the cheese. Use the slicer to trim back the rind often so you can keep slicing the center. Sometimes removing the rind will help. Please notice the photo showing proper direction in relation to the piece of cheese.

Congratulations to Award-Winning Harbison We were happy to hear that a long-time favorite we sell has placed third in The Best of Show awards in this year’s National Cheese Society’s annual conference. Harbison is certainly at the top of the list of the many cheeses that I can describe as truly extra special. It is perfect and festive for that special occasion. It is the cheese to pair with that vintage bottle of wine you have been storing in your cellar. Harbison is a soft-ripening cheese with a bloomy rind. It is made from pasteurized cow’s milk and available all year long. Its roots come from Vacherin, a cheese made in Switzerland and France that is only available certain times of the year. Harbison also comes with a unique package surrounded by Spruce bark. This bark not only adds to the flavor but it helps the cheese to keep its shape. When served at room temperature it will get very soft and run like honey. The best serving suggestion is to leave the cheese in the bark, peel back the top skin, don’t cut the cheese but scoop it out like a perfect fondue. That is what festive is to me.

Paul Partica, The Cheese Shop www.cheeseshopcenterbrook.com

ofCenterbrook

LLC

Specialty Foods & Espresso Bar


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By Art LiPuma, General Manager, SeaSide Wine & Spirits, Old Saybrook, CT

AUSTRALIA Australia has become the forgotten country for wines. In the mid 80’s to late 90’s there were great wines produced and purchased, then along came Yellow Tail Wines. This was by far one of the fastest growing Australian wines. In the late 90’s and early 2000’s this wine over shadowed most Australian wines and became available in 1.5lits (mags). This wine was somewhat of a lower quality than the previous wines that were produced, but had the right price for parties and large gatherings. The pristine wines of the region were soon somewhat forgotten. The new concentration was on the inexpensive wines and developing many selections in this category to compete with Yellow Tail. This in turn discredited the quality wines from Australia, however they were still producing top quality wines from houses such as Penfolds. Penfolds produces one of the highest shelf wines in Australia called ‘Grange’ which sells for over $700.00 a btl.

The most widely grown grapes for a white are Chardonnay and Semillon and for a red, Shiraz and Cabernet. Other whites include; Riesling, Viognier, and Roussanne. For reds there are also Grenache, Mouvedre, Merlot, Pinot Noir .Incidentally, the grape Shiraz is the same grape as Syrah from France, California and other parts of the world. The main Australian wine producers are located in Barossa Valley, Clare Valley, McLaren Valley and Coonawarra. The wines produced in these areas are of great quality whether they are Big blends such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz or a “GSM” Grenache, Shiraz, Mouvedre. As the decline of these large Australian bottles continues, I wholeheartedly recommend you revisit these Australian wines and pick up a great treat. You might be amazed by all of the new selections that are now available. With over 2000 wineries there many styles of wine which will provides you with choices to pair with any dish. So let’s raise our glass to Australia and enjoy some great wines! Art LiPuma Seaside Wine & Spirits Old Saybrook CT


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October 1 - 29 Middletown Selected works from the Clinton Art Society at the Valentine H. Zahn Community Gallery located at Middlesex Hospital Shoreline Medical Center. The Gallery is open during regular business hours and is located at 250 Flat Rock Place, Westbrook, CT. For more information, contact Middlesex Hospital at 860-358-6200 or zahngallery@midhosp.org.

October 1-15 Ivoryton I HATE MUSICALS: THE MUSICAL. Simpsons’ television writer and producer Mike Reiss is back in Ivoryton with his hilarious world premiere! Mix an LA earthquake with a little Sigmund Freud and some nifty dance moves and set it to songs you know and love and you’ve got a musical like nothing you’ve ever seen before! info@ivorytonplayhouse.org Ivoryton Playhouse, 103 Main Street, Ivoryton, CT 06442 Box Office Phone: 860.767.7318

FINE ART EST.

2016

curated & L UXUR Y GOODS

October 1 Mystic Zentangle class for Oct First Friday event, 5-7.There are 12 spots available only. Rsvp to pam@curated.world to reserve spot.More info: www.curated.world/events. 29 W. Main Street, Mystic, CT www.curated.world FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @ CURATED.WORLD

October 6 - November 11 Madison Vincent Giarrano-New Paintings. Please join us for the Opening Reception on Friday, October 6, from 5-9 pm. Meet the artist, wine and appetizers will be served. We are pleased to present Vincent Giarrano's 9th annual solo show. Vincent's city women, New York street scenes and interiors, have become a focal point for collectors. His powerful, unique images capture the many sides of the city with uncanny detail, perspective, and beautiful rich color. From gritty spray-painted walls to classic, old building facades, and unforgettable portraits of New York life, he feels the pulse of the city and transcends it onto canvas. We are thrilled to present 30 new paintings in this exciting exhibition.   “My work has a narrative element to it, there is a certain amount of mystery and history about each person and place. What I love about the City is that it is constantly changing, providing endless inspiration.” -Vincent Giarrano. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Saturday, 11 am to 5 pm, and anytime by appointment. For more information, please call (203) 318-0616, visit www.susanpowellfineart.com to see works in the show. Susan Powell Fine Art is located at 679 Boston Post Road, near the Firehouse, in Madison, CT 06443

OCTOBER EVENTS

Month of October October at the Courtyard Gallery, Mystic's Hidden Treasure. Creature Feature II, our fall exhibit includes creature-inspired pieces from 40 acclaimed contemporary artists working in a wide variety of media and styles, from contemporary realism to elegant abstraction. You'll find paintings by Sheila Barbone,, Christopher Zhang, Sunil Howlader, Del-Bourree Bach, Sarah Stifler Lucas, Liz Magee, Ralph Acosta, Kim Muller-Thym, Charles Liguori and Pamela Gordinier alongside sculpture by Jillian Barber, whose fanciful ceramic "Sphinx" is shown here, Serena Bates, Susan Van Winkle, Lori Rembetski, Robert Scutt, Renee Rhodes and David Madacsi among others. During the exhibit, the gallery will be partnering with organizations dedicated to rescue and care of other species as well as our own including Mystic Aquarium Animal Rescue and Mystic Area Shelter and Hospitality. A portion of proceeds from sales will be donated by the gallery. Come celebrate the diversity of contemporary fine art and the Courtyard and the creatures that inspire it and "adopt" some to enhance your collection! We hope you'll join us on Sundays for our Meet the Artists Sunday Salons each week from 3-6PM. Wine, noshes, conversation and creativity! Fall hours: Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat 11-6, Sun 12-6 and by appointment or chance. 12 Water Street. Mystic, CT 06355 860.536.5059 - courtyardgallerymystic.com


OCTOBER EVENTS

78 October 7 November Old Lyme The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe & Ernst von Maydell October 7th – November 12th, 2017. Gallery talk with Maureen McCabe and Jeff Cooley, Wednesday, October 11th at 5:30. The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe and Ernst von Maydell will include several of von Maydell's original watercolors alongside Maureen’s reinterpretations as well as some of Maureen’s unique boxed assemblages. Ms. McCabe has had several solo exhibitions at The Cooley Gallery in the last 25 years but this exhibition is unusual as it focuses on her focusing on the work of another artist who is not only deceased but somewhat obscure. The gallery hopes this exhibition shines a light on collaboration, craftsmanship and the notion of other realities. The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe & Ernst von Maydell asks if we envision a world does it exist? These works invite you to choose a path to wander as far as you care to go. The Fantastical Art of Maureen McCabe & Ernst von Maydell opens at The Cooley Gallery, 25 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, Connecticut opens Saturday, October 7th with a reception from 5-7 p.m. and runs through November 12th. There’s a gallery talk with Maureen McCabe and Jeff Cooley on Wednesday, October 11th at 5:30. These events are free and open to the public. The Cooley Gallery, 25 Lyme Street in Old Lyme and runs through July 2nd. Gallery hours are Thursday through Saturday 12 - 5 and Sunday 12 - 4 or by appointment. For more information, www.cooleygallery.com. Jeff Cooley’s cell: 860304-2386 or the gallery: 860-434-8807.

October 8 Westbrook End of Season Pig Roast. We're gearing up for a great pig roast on Columbus Day Weekend! Join us at the Westbrook Town Beach on Sunday October 8 (rain or shine) starting at 1:00 to celebrate our end of the season. We'll be serving expertly smoked pigs, house made cole slaw, potato salad and baked beans, and corn on the cob with freshly sliced watermelon to finish. Tickets are $20 per person or $25 at the door and includes one plate of food and one soft drink. Please contact John Annello at 860.662.3081 for more details and to purchase your tickets.  Hog Wild, 392 Seaside Avenue, Westbrook, CT

October 8 Chester Please join us at the Leif Nilsson Spring Street Studio & Gallery at 1 Spring Street in Chester Center for a Concert in the Garden on Sunday October 8th, 2017 from 4pm to 6pm featuring Johnny Martorelli! Born and raised by a drummer and singer, music was never far out of reach. Alfonso, Johnny's father, played drums with his band at the Cove Road Inn with former Mayor, Bob Blair. After the gig, you would often find them flipping burgers for their patrons at the Al-a-Bob in Chester center. In his teens, Johnny showcased his talents on guitar fronting bands such as Rush Hour, Wired for Sound and Velocity. In New York City, he joined the John McEnroe band touring the world with this tennis legend. Back in the River Valley, Johnny tours the shoreline playing gigs (with UHF, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, or solo) at venues such as Chamard Vineyards, Bill's Seafood, Donahue's, Water's Edge, Cuckoo's Nest, and a variety of private affairs. Johnny also makes time for younger talents, teaching lessons out of his home in Chester. For more information on upcoming gigs or lessons, contact johnnystrings@comcast.net.$20 suggested donation - BYOB, Inside the Gallery if inclement weather. Sorry no pets. For more info log onto nilssonstudio.com or call 860-526-2077.

October 14 Clinton Come join Clinton artists Bruce Lighty and Cindy Stevens for their third annual show together, Coastal Colors 2017. The show features their new work, with many local shoreline area scenes and other coastal places. Bruce Lighty does beautiful, colorful watercolors of local venues, sometimes historical scenes. Cindy paints vibrant oil paintings mostly with a palette knife, and will have new work from Monhegan Island in Maine. The opening reception is Saturday, October 14th, from 5-8 at Cindy Stevens Fine Art, 30 East Main Street, Clinton, and refreshments will be served.For more info and gallery hours call 860-304-1666, or www.cindystevensfineart.com. The show runs through December.


Profile for Ink Magazine

Ink Magazine - October 2017  

Connecticut's Premier Art, Culture, and Lifestyle Magazine.

Ink Magazine - October 2017  

Connecticut's Premier Art, Culture, and Lifestyle Magazine.