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November 2018 Complimentary

publicationsÂŽ

www.inkct.com

Vol 14 Issue 157 2018

A guide to finer living in Connecticut & abroad.


THE SMARTER CHOICE FOR

A 10-minute Test Can Detect Lung Cancer Sooner middlesexhospital.org/life


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www.inkct.com

Features

OCTOBER 2018

Columns, Reviews, Events

ISSUE CONTENTS

Crusty Old Diver

Blue Water Hunting

“It’s a Gallery, Not a Jewelry Store” Deep River Jewelry Design... It’s a Destination!

pg. 10

pg. 50

Music Mirth and Mojo

The Knickerbocker for Every Rocker (Blues too BEST BUYS

pg. 66

On The Vine

Sparkling Rosé

pg. 68

Life On Sugar ThankFULL with Cake

“Always Was, Always Will Be Home”

pg. 62

The Cheesemonger

pg. 78

November Events

pg. 81

Upcoming events in Connecticut

Saybrook Country Barn is now Saybrook Home

pg. 18

Waters Edge Your Nearby Destination

pg. 26

Soul Food The Giving Garden st Coogan Farm

Happy Thanksgiving!

pg. 34

The Shakers Inspired Innovations

pg. 42

On the Cover: “Turkey Feathers” detail / photo by N. Biebach

INK staff There Once Was a Tavern in Town... A Speciel Few of Connecticuts Colonial Taverns.

pg. 54

Contributors:

Advertising:

Jeffery Lilly- originator/ founder/webmaster

Contact us to receive our media kit complete with detailed advertising information including ad rates, demographics, and distribution in your area.

Stephanie Sittnick - founder/publisher/sales design/account receivables Paul Gobell - photography Alison Kaufman - music, mirth and mojo Tracey Kroll - photograpy Nancy LaMar-Rodgers - editorial John Tolmie - crusty old diver

The Historic Thames Club, New London

Barbara Malinsky - editorial

“It’s a state of mind.”

Paul Partica - The Cheesemonger

pg. 64 We encourage the public to submit stories, poems, photography, essays, and all things creative. If you know of a person or place of interest, please submit your ideas to: submissions@ink-pub.com We will do our best to put your ideas in INK.

Rona Mann - editorial A. Vincent Scarano - photography

Please direct your advertising inquiries and questions to: Stephanie Sittnick - Director of Advertising advertising@ink-pub.com - 860-227-8199 Cheryl Powell - Greater Connecticut cheryl@ink-pub.com - 860-608-5749 Rona Mann - Greater Connecticut six07co@att.net - 401-539-7762 Jeffery Lilly - Connecticut/RI/MA/NY advertising@inkct.com - 860-581-0026

All content of INK Publications including but not limited to text, photos, graphics and layout are copyrighted by INK Publishing, LLC. Reproductions without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. Ink Publishing, LLC is not responsible for images or graphics submitted by advertisers which are not copyrighted or released for use in this publication.

INK PUBLISHING, LLC 71 Maple Avenue, Old Saybrook, CT 06475 email: info@ink-pub.com or Jeffery Lilly at: submissions@ink-pub.com


Shop Online at the NEW RingsEnd.com

REfresh YOUR HOME


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New York City Ballet Stars Sara Mearns and Jared Angle

Spectacular New Scenery!

c l o u

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Tis the season for

Holiday Parties! Whether your hosting 25 or 250‌ at your home, office, preferred venue, OR our cozy space, THE RIVERVIEW ROOM

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December 8th at 1:30pm & 7:00pm December 9th at 1:30pm

Give yourself the gi of more me, less stress and let CLOUD NINE CATERING create a perfect menu and memorable event! Takeout and delivery catering menus also available!

www.cloudninecatering.net (860)388.9999 256 Boston Post Rd. Old Saybrook, CT

For tickets visit www.gardearts.org or call 860-444-7373 Ext 1


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VAL EN T I N E H . Z AH N C O M M U N I T Y

G A L L E R Y

T H E G A L L E R Y AT M I D D L E S E X H O S P I TA L S H O R E L I N E M E D I C A L C E N T E R

Gallery

Exhibit November 1 - December 31 Reception • Thursday, November 8 • 6 - 8 p.m.

Sharol Stewart, Splendid Betta Fish, watercolor (detail)

Experience the Community Gallery at Middlesex Hospital Shoreline Medical Center

An art exhibition featuring works by members of Shoreline Artists’ Workshop Gallery open during regular business hours Sponsored by

250 Flat Rock Place, Westbrook, CT 06498 860-358-6200 • info@midhosp.org • middlesexhospital.org

SHORELINE MEDICAL CENTER

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WRITTEN BY CAROLE

LOCKWOOD

OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 18 FOR TICK ETS , VIS IT IVORYTONPL AYHOUS E.OR G

1 0 3 MAIN ST RE E T | IVO RYT O N , C T 0 6 4 4 2 | 8 6 0 . 7 6 7 . 7 3 1 8

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“It’s a Gallery, Not a Jewelry Store” Deep River Jewelry Design...It’s a Destination! by Rona Mann / Photos by Stephanie Sittnick Russell Cunningham is an honest-to-goodness traditional goldsmith, plying his trade in Deep River, not so far away that you can’t get to meet him and be privy to the sheer artistry he creates every day.

Before

After

[ˈgoʊldˌsmθ] Goldsmith.

T

hat’s it above, written phonetically. Phonetics are a somewhat old fashioned method of indicating proper pronunciation. Let’s face it, “goldsmith” is an old-fashioned kind of word. It’s also an old-fashioned kind of art...and craft. But it’s just that rarity and unique art form that makes goldsmiths so very unique and their work that much sought after.

Cunningham knew early on that this would be his world. Raised in West Hartford, as a young boy he was enrolled in a summer program offered by the local Children’s Museum. “I couldn’t have been more than about 10,” he remembers. Yet he was completely mesmerized by a field trip that taught young people from the museum’s program about gems and how to cut and work with them. “I also always loved to draw, doing watercolors, but this was really special.” Russell first experimented with metal work in

Lisa and Russel Cunningham

the family garage where his father had a large piece of scrap steel. Cunningham loved hitting it with a hammer “to see what would happen to the metal. To see what I could do with it.” What he did with it was indeed remarkable. So much so that it became his life’s work, and Russell has been designing and crafting beautiful oneof-a-kind jewelry for over 42 years. Along the way he also had the good fortune to meet a beautiful person, one whom he treasures as much as the precious Gracie stones with which he creates his wearable art - his wife, Lisa. Lisa, however, came from an entirely different background. Like Russell, she was also Connecticut born and had spent 30 years


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scraping and polishing, though not as a goldsmith. Lisa was a dental hygienist, but now it was time to retire and have a whole new life, so together, they took the plunge. The year 1992 became a banner year for the couple. Within just a few months they bought a home, got married, and started Deep River Jewelry Design. Russell adds, “Many people are surprised we can work together and be together all day and all night long, but it’s been 26 years now, and I couldn’t do it without her.” Cunningham’s deep love and obvious respect for his wife are evident. His affection is genuine; and it appears that when one breathes in, the other breathes out, so perfectly synced are they in their work and private lives. Although Lisa is not a jeweler, she does all the photography for their business, having learned it from her father, who was a professional in the field. Lisa also produces all of the CAD/Cam Design that plays such a large part in the work that Russell creates. If you’re expecting to see what you would likely see at the average mall jewelry store, then Deep River Jewelry Design is most definitely not your place. “We are a gallery, not a jewelry store,” Lisa says proudly; and it’s not just a bunch of words. It’s true. Deep River Jewelry Design is a place where every day someone’s memories are created and preserved, where generations of the same families keep returning to have Russell design and craft that special piece; be it a ring, pendant, necklace, bracelet, earrings, or even something

more exotic… but always, one of a kind. “I can do anything. I even designed a belly dancer’s chain and grips for a Colt 45,” Russell laughs. “Yet we still have customers who think we’re custom design

Visitors to Deep River Jewelry Design are more often than not greeted warmly by the store “ambassador,” a five year old Shih Tzu

Lisa is proud to feature the exquisite lines of Anna Beck, a traditional handcrafted metalwork jewelry designer, as well as luxury

named “Gracie.” This charming, yet most definitely one-minded ball of fluff, has her owners firmly wrapped around all four of her paws and frequently has the same general effect on customers.

only. Custom work is a very large part of our business, but we also have gold and silver jewelry in the case available for immediate purchase, and we restore and re-design antique and estate pieces using our state-ofthe-art microscopic laser welder.”

pieces from New Yorker, Freida Rothman.“I purchase mostly silver,” Lisa adds. The store has been as carefully designed as the jewelry, laid out much like an art gallery, with well placed lighting highlighting every facet of the pieces displayed.


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One of the more popular offerings in this unique and absolutely wonderful place is the Cunninghams’ free design service. Using both hand renderings in actual size, in concert with modern technology such as CAD/Cam Design, a customer is given a photo realistic quality rendering before they even begin. “Our technology allows us to place a ring or bracelet, for example, on a virtual woman’s hand and then rotate it, so the customer is able to view the piece from every angle,” Russell adds. It would seem that there would be no way for old world artisan skills such as those practiced by a goldsmith like Russell to be replicated by

computer assisted design. But what’s important to remember here is that the computer does not replace the jeweler, it merely makes it possible for the customer to see Cunningham’s work with more clarity than ever before. It offers the customer the added benefit of three dimensional design, which is just another tool in his amazing toolbox. To a artisan like Russell Cunningham, the CAD design complements and enhances his talents, making the customer-jeweler experience even richer. Lisa calls their gallery “a destination store,” since most people come in with a definite purpose in mind. Some customers bring their own ideas sketched on a piece of paper; others just aren’t sure, and that’s when the Cunninghams are at their best, engaging them in a conversation that reveals what the occasion is, what their budget is, what their ideas may be, and what their expectation are. Then Russell goes to work, and magic happens. This no-pressure approach to doing business is why today Russell is designing engagement rings for the children of couples whose rings he designed y ears ago. It’s a warm, comfortable, happy place where people choose to come to honor the celebrations in their lives. And if during the experience they make a lifelong connection or get a warm, fuzzy lick from Gracie on the way to getting exactly what they want to honor their special moments, so much the better. That’s why Deep

River Jewelry Design is still here after 26 years, and why they’ll be a part of the Deep River landscape for a long time to come. “We keep people happy...and so, they come back.” Deep River Jewelry Design is located at 381 Main Street. Away from other commercial businesses because they indeed stand on their own. (860) 526-9270 www.DeepRiverJewelryDesign.com


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Connecticut Distillery of the Year. - 2018 New York International Spirits Competition

The perfect gift combines exquisite craftmanship with personal significance. This holiday season, give the gift of Litchfield Distillery and share the best Connecticut has to offer. We take the finest local grains we can find and craft award-winning spirits one batch at a time. Taste for yourself why our good old-fashioned grit and determination has earned us recognition and awards from New York to San Francisco.

®

THE SPIRIT OF HARD WORK®

Try our signature cocktail, The Litchfielder. Scan code or visit LitchfieldDistillery.com. ©2018 Litchfield Distillery, Litchfield, CT Please sip responsibly.

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From left to right: Keith A. Bolles, Jane Bolles, Keith Bolles


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“Always Was, Always Will Be Home” Saybrook Country Barn is now Saybrook Home by Rona Mann / photos by Stephanie Sittnick “The magic thing about home is that it feels good to leave, and it feels even better to come back.”

they’re now on their third generation and a permanent fixture in the Old Saybrook community.

...Wendy Wunder Then, why the change of name? Well, it’s simple. Why do you repaint or redecorate every few years? Why do you change the style of your clothing? Remember when you last cut or colored your hair or got a new style...what were those words you used? “I just need a change.”

Let’s get something straight right from the beginning. Saybrook Country Barn didn’t“go”anywhere. They haven’t gone anywhere for the last 41 years, and chances are good they’re not going anywhere for the next 41 years either. So what is it? New owners, perhaps? Nope. Same Bolles family for the last 41 years; matter of fact

Well, Saybrook Country Barn did too, and as of November 1st they are now known as Saybrook Home. The owners chose this new name because it perfectly and succinctly encapsulates where they’ve been, where they are, and where they’re going...and always, always, wherever they went, it was right along with you. This re-branding, as it is called, is really all about evolution. Styles have evolved, trends have evolved, customers have evolved, and thus Saybrook Country Barn is now Saybrook Home, representing both their evolution and yours. Keith A. Bolles, son of Keith, Sr. and Jane Bolles, and representative of the third generation of the Bolles family says, “My grandmother started this business 41 years ago as a gift shop with a few

furniture items. Now we have evolved to where we are primarily furniture with a few gifts items.” But Saybrook Home is not just any furniture store. It is a true destination – a small village of shops, in fact, incorporating everything for the home from


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custom made furniture in any style with over 10,000 different fabric options from which to choose, to a rug department, full window treatment division, manned by a team of four professionals; to bedding, bath, lighting, hardware, gifts, apparel...yes, everything that defines a beautiful home. Additionally, right now, their Holiday Shop is fully dressed and ready for you to come in, get into the holiday spirit, and find whimsical and wonderful items with which to adorn your home for the happiest of seasons in the happiest of holiday places. Saybrook Home has wisely designed each individual showroom to look like the rooms in your home; yet every season they make changes, so smart customers return frequently to get new ideas and see what’s trending at the moment. The Bolles family prides themselves on always being at the forefront of what’s up and coming. “We’d rather be ahead of a wave than behind it,” Keith affirms. To accomplish this, the owners of Saybrook Home travel to and shop at least six different trade shows each year, in addition to semi-annual trips to the furniture market in Highpoint, North Carolina where they personally visit with some 40 different high quality vendors of the best made furniture in the country. This then attracts smart, savvy shoppers with an eye for quality and a penchant for good taste who come from all over New England, while in turn Saybrook Home goes into homes all over New England and beyond. “We have furnished and decorated homes that range from cottages in Maine to houses in Puerto Rico,” laughs Keith Bolles. “Our professional interior designers will go out to your home, look at what you want to do,

take measurements, recreate your room(s) on their iPad by making a blueprint, and then help you select the custom made furniture, carpeting, window treatments, and accessories that will fit your room(s) and make you happy.” And to make this even a nicer experience, interior design service never comes with a charge. Making customers happy is paramount with the Bolles family.You don’t get to be in business for 41 years if you’re not doing it right and if your customers aren’t happy. While Bolles readily acknowledges the growing popularity of buying online, he also realizes smart customers still want to come in to smell and feel and eyeball upfront what they’re investing in for their home. “Brick and mortar stores are not going anywhere,” he says firmly. This “change” to a new brand is not a spur of the moment thing. “Actually these changes have been happening right along,” says Keith Bolles. “It’s a slowly evolving journey, and our customers are now part of that journey.” One part of the journey that customers especially love is the apparel shop, an integral part of the Saybrook Home “village.” Bolles speaks in glowing terms of Donna, the Manager and Buyer, with whom they partnered some 12 years ago and are eternally grateful to have done so. “She knows exactly what to buy, how to run the shop, and the clients love her. The store runs on its own because of Donna.” Whether it’s apparel, furniture, window treatments, lighting, or gifts, the greatest compliment Saybrook Barn can ever receive is,


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“It’s exactly what I wanted.” Keith says, “It is an awesome feeling for us knowing we made a customer feel that way, to know we’ve done our job.” Keith, Sr., Jane, and Keith A. are all heavily invested in the town of Old Saybrook.“We’ve grown up in this community,” Keith A. says, “and we love it. We appreciate the terrific Chamber of Commerce we have in this town and the way all the businesses seem to work together to make Old Saybrook a real destination. A rising tide lifts all boats, and that’s what you have among the businesses of Old Saybrook.” An institution for 41 years, Saybrook Home is firmly rooted in this community. They are the gateway to its downtown, and a staple of fine, quality home furnishings throughout the shoreline and beyond. So changing the name changes nothing whatsoever inside their doors. They are still a well respected, high quality operation, they still staff every department with thorough professionals in their respective fields, they still buy at the gift shows and furniture markets with the preferences of their clients always in mind, and they always listen intently to their customer base because it is these customers who have formed the cornerstone of their success. So don’t just sit there! Hop in the car, plan a day, and see what’s new at Saybrook Home...besides their name. Quality home furnishings and apparel, the best customer service, and a strong and sincere commitment to be part of this community for a long, long time. Always was, always will be...home. The shops that make up Saybrook Home are located at 2 Main Street, right at the very start of downtown. (860) 388-0891 www.saybrookhome.com Come see what’s new with an old friend.


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t takes a Village... to get a jump on the holidays!

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Silver

Over 50 shops & eateries for nding the perfect gift!

DECEMBER 1st | Holiday Carnival DECEMBER 7th | Festival of Lights

860.536.4941 | oldemistickvillage.com Exit 90 off I-95 | 27 Coogan Blvd. Mystic, CT

orites odie Fav o F h s re F

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DENNIS SIRRINE GALLERY 155 Water Street

Stonington CT 06378

860.287.9320

www.dennissirrine.com

weekends 12 noon - 5 pm

weekdays by chance or app't

75 Main St., Old Saybrook, CT 860-661-4661 / dagmarsdesserts.com

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A “Well-Seasoned” Shoreline favorite The Water’s Edge: Your Nearby Destination by RONA MANN

If this isn’t already your go-to place, it probably should be. This is one of those places where, if the walls could only talk… That’s how much history, fun, legend, fame, good food, and memorable times are contained within the venerable bones of The Water’s Edge Resort & Spa. It’s history, it’s tradition, it’s in many ways the grand old lady of the Connecticut shoreline. And best of all, it’s right in your own backyard. To perfectly understand how delicious and diverse a venue this is and what it offers in the way of pampering, fine food, extraordinary entertainment, and perfect holiday gifts, you need to have a history lesson to know where The Water’s Edge has been and how its evolved. Bill Hahn was a sort of impresario of his era. A man of only 29 years who knew hotels and loved to mount big, flashy productions, in 1940 this visionary bought a waterfront estate in Westbrook, Connecticut, facing the Long Island Sound and set about drawing New York people away from the popular Catskill Resorts to his Hahn Hotel. He did it successfully, drawing some 400 people every night in the summer during the height of the 1950s and 60s. The showman in Hahn did everything big, including his annual birthday celebration each July. The event in 1962 was especially memorable when he brought a 19 year old virtually unknown singer named Barbra Streisand from New York, along with popular comedians of the day, Henny Youngman and Art Carney. He not only raised


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the stature of the resort that night, but also raised $54,000 for the local chapter of the American Cancer Society. Hahn died in 1979, and the hotel was then shuttered until the property was purchased in

1982 by current owner, Michael Dattilo and re-opened as the Four Seasons Resort and Health Spa. In 1986, it became Water’s Edge Resort and had the distinction of becoming Connecticut’s first timeshare resort, which now served to bring in guests from all over the world.

Fast forward to today. Although there have been improvements, renovations, and additions, the important things have not changed at all. The moment you enter the lobby you are awestruck by the sweeping views of Long Island Sound from every window in the restaurant and lounge. You are immediately greeted by the valet who offers complimentary parking, and you’ll soon find that this warm and genuine greeting is extended everywhere you go within the resort. This is not a stuffy place at all, but possesses a kind of casual elegance that makes you feel all at once pampered, yet with a genuineness of purpose. There is no one way to experience The Water’s Edge because its appeal seems universal. One thing, however, is certain. Whether you come just for lunch, cocktails and jazz, dinner, a celebration, meeting, or spa day, you are made to feel as though you are the most important person in the resort. It matters little if you order a beer and wings

in The Seaview Bistro, or a four course pairing of food and wine in Datillo Fine Italian, you will be treated the same way, and you’ll want to return again and again. The Water’s Edge, once strictly a summer resort, is now a four season destination, offering live entertainment 12 months a year, waterfront dining in the summer, year ‘round spa services, meeting rooms, 100 hotel rooms, 68 timeshares, the shoreline’s finest Sunday Brunch with a delectable menu that changes weekly, offering chef’s special touches to traditional favorites; and a wonderful opportunity for you to experience a “destination” close to home. Several years ago, The Water’s Edge began


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featuring dinner shows, encompassing everything from Broadway favorites to tributes, to some of your favorite vocalists and bands. No taste has been overlooked...just take a look at what’s upcoming in the next couple of months. You’ll find a sidebar of activities within these pages, listing events that will tempt your palate, excite your musical memories, and make for new ones with the family. What a great way to celebrate during the holidays; even better, wouldn’t this make a great gift for that hard-to-shop-for person on your list? Here’s a great idea...instead of the same old office holiday party, why not bring the gang to The Water’s Edge? They’ll have complimentary hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, a great cabaret dinner show with a full buffet at intermission, and most dinner shows are only $49. per person, plus tax and tip. You know the moment you drive through the stone fence and admire the beautifully landscaped grounds that this is going to be special. You see the genuine caring and smiles from the employees; it’s obvious they love working here and love giving you a memorable experience.

You’ll lose your breath when you first see that view from the lobby and dining areas and never get tired of gazing out over the water from sunrise to sunset. Perhaps you’ll have a facial, a manicure, or maybe the two of you might indulge in a couples massage from the spa; or just relax in the pool and let your thoughts and the exhilarating water from the hot tub transport you to a place of complete and total relaxation. Yes, Bill Hahn was indeed a visionary all those years ago. He knew that people love coming back to excellent cuisine, first rate entertainment, and good times. He knew what the

power of being together with other like-minded individuals could bring to such an enjoyable experience. Michael Dattilo knew it as well when he bought the property, added on, yet never strayed from the original intent of pleasing people and having a good time. It’s a shoreline tradition that has a long history and will have an even longer future. But for the present, The Water’s Edge Resort and Spa is right here, right in your own backyard, just chock full of activities, so why would you want to look anywhere else? Hotel Manager, Steve Jarzabek says, “It’s your nearby destination,” so check your calendar, come spend the holidays, give tribute to the greatest of bands and divas, schedule a gathering, celebrate the holidays, help trim the tree, and rock right into the summer of 2019 the way people did so many years ago. If you listen hard, you might just hear the laughter of long ago still echoing through the walls of this Great Lady. Fall in love this holiday season and right into the New Year. There’s always something going on at The Water’s Edge! 1525 Boston Post Road (Rt. 1), Westbrook www.watersedgeresortandspa.com (860) 399-5901


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Water’s Edge 2018 Holiday Events Sunday, November 11th – Cabaret Dinner Show: A Tribute to Bruce Springsteen Thursday, November 22nd – Thanksgiving Brunch Friday, November 23 – Fall Ball featuring Sugar Saturday, November 24th – Cabaret Dinner Show: A Tribute to Billy Joel Saturday, December 1st – Annual Tree Lighting free & open to the publicBring the family for pictures with Santa, tree lighting, cookie decorating, carolers, hot cocoa Saturday, December 1st – Dinner with Dickens: A Theatrical Performance of “A Christmas Carol” Meet performer Gerald Dickens, the great, great grandson of Charles Dickens Sunday, December 2nd – Brunch with Dickens: A Reprise of “Christmas Carol” by Gerald Dickens Saturday, December 8th – Cabaret Dinner Show: A Tribute to the Greatest Pop Divas Sunday, December 9th – Brunch with Santa Saturday, December 15th – Cabaret Dinner Show: A Tribute to Simon & Garfunkel and James Taylor Saturday, December 22nd – Cabaret Dinner Show: A Tribute to the Trans-Siberian Orchestra Monday, December 31st – Water’s Edge Rockin’ Eve...Come celebrate 2019 with us!


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AMERICAN VISIONARY JOHN F. KENNEDY’S LIFE AND TIMES November 2, 2018 - February 24, 2019

This exhibition commemorates the centennial of John F. Kennedy’s birth with 77 photographs that celebrate the scope of his dynamic life and career.

Image: Photo booth, portrait, 1953. (Courtesy John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum).

Lyman Allyn ART

625 Williams Street New London, CT 06320 M U S E U M www.lymanallyn.org

GIVE ORIGINAL GIFTS Original Art

|

Original Gifts

|

Original Lifestyle

Come to your senses this year and give locally-made gifts that look, feel and even smell wonderful!

Original Art • Local Pottery • Silks & Woven Textiles • Woodworking • Soaps/Candles • Journals/Cards Tables/Benches • Earrings/Jewelry • Needle Felting • Artistic Frames • Custom Mirrors • Handbags Turned Bowls • Fused/Stained Glass • Framed Photography • Forged Iron • Woolen Goods • Ornaments

22 Darling Road, Salem 860.608.6526 Thurs-Sun 10-7 salemredhouse.com We’re right behind Salem Valley Farms Ice Cream!

GALLERY • GIFTS • CLASSES

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“Farmer” Craig Floyd


Soul Food Soul The Farm TheGiving GivingGarden Garden at Coogan Coogan Farm RONA Kroll byby RONAMANN MANN//Photos Photos by by Tracey Tracey Kroll one. Among them, bringing fresh, nutritious produce to area children and families. It’s not a problem for him; he knows how to do it, but he could sure use your help. Floyd, a tall, lanky character right out of Central Casting with long white beard and Amish straw hat atop his head, is the Farm Manager at Coogan Farm, a very large, yet not widely known part of Denison Pequotsepos Nature & Heritage Center in Mystic. Floyd’s been at the farm for five years, but all his life he’s been part of its land.

“We’re killing our children, and it’s gotta stop!” Did that grab your attention? It was meant to do exactly that. Craig Floyd hopes so, because he says it often and wants to shock you out of your comfortable little world; and perhaps in the process, help him solve some of the problems in the bigger

First, a short history lesson. This farmland dates back to the 1640s when John Gallup was given a 500 acre land grant for his participation in the Pequot War. As one century melted into another there were a number of subsequent owners of the farm, the Williams family among them, ancestors of Craig Floyd. That doesn’t faze Floyd much, nor does

the fact that “Three of my ancestors signed the Declaration of Independence,“but that don’t grow a tomato.” The Farm Manager chuckles sardonically because he is all about growing tomatoes, other fruits, and a wide variety of vegetables. “We’ve got 11,800 square feet of plantable land here,” Floyd says. “The emphasis is on ‘plantable.’ I can grow anything. Just tell me what you want me to grow, and I’ll do it. I have

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100% control of all that goes in this garden,” he says proudly. Five years ago The Robert G. Youngs Family Foundation provided a grant to the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center to create a garden at Coogan Farm that would in turn grow produce strictly for donation to the Gemma E. Moran Labor Food Center connected with the United Way of Southeastern Connecticut. “We’re keeping the ‘farm’ in Coogan Farm,” says Maggie Jones, Executive Director of Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center. First and foremost, Coogan Farm is educational, not just a land preserve nor recreational space. It is wholly dedicated Jones says,” to making a difference by connecting people to the planet. There is a definite return to small farming right now, but the problem still remains: how are we going to feed our growing population?” Floyd elaborates, “Erosion and depletion of

the soil is a worldwide problem. Don’t confuse soil with dirt. Dirt is dead, only soil is alive and provides the nutrients we need to grow our food. The USDA says it will take 100 years to

build soil. Baloney! I can do it in six weeks!”It is apparent this man has a healthy respect for the stuff that enables Coogan Farm to feed thousands, and he positively delights in having visitors, volunteers, or merely the curious enter

into his domain. “Feel free to go anywhere you want here. Ask all the questions you want, help out if you’d like, just don’t step on my beds.” This 45 acre parcel of farmland on which The Giving Garden sits may appear to be Lloyd’s sole domain, but he has a lot of help. His right hand, and indeed invaluable second in command at Coogan Farm, is Emma Sutphen whose backstory is fascinating. Sutphen majored in African Studies/Anthropology at St. Lawrence University, but it wasn’t until she traveled to the African continent that her vision and scope of involvement broadened. “It was in Tanzania that I witnessed indigenous methods of natural farming,”Sutphen relates. “I became compelled by what these practices mean for social justice, of what working with the land could do to help so many people.” The facts are staggering. In New London County alone 23,000 people are food insecure; and The Giving Garden is feeding them


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healthy, delicious fruits and vegetables all year long. Volunteers are always needed at The Giving Garden, and Floyd, Jones, and Sutphen eagerly welcome them. School groups, church groups, service organizations, individuals, they all can lend a hand in some way. In 2017 alone some 169 volunteers provided 3150 hours of help. “I don’t care if you come every week or can just give a few hours or a few minutes. I can give you something to do. Bring me your hands, and I’ll teach you our way,” Floyd says. He goes on to cite a frightening study by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) that has shown that we must improve the health of the world’s soil or we will only have 56 years left to ensure our resources. “How are we going to feed the next generations?” Last year a grossly overpaid athlete started a national firestorm of controversy by “taking a knee” during our National Anthem to protest what he felt was social injustice. Maggie Jones, Craig Floyd, and Emma Sutphen have a better

idea. Why not take a short trip to Coogan Farm and see for yourself what The Giving Garden is doing to feed thousands of food insecure local residents. Then ask Craig Floyd to show you how to get your hands dirty. If

Preservation and good use of this land mattered way back in the 17th century to John Gallup, and it still matters today at The Giving Garden at Coogan Farm. It’s a true community garden that both honors its heritage and receives worldwide attention, as it is not unusual for gardeners from all over the United States and throughout the globe to call Floyd asking about how to do this, or why is that...and he willingly complies. Craig Floyd looks around, surveying the work he has done, the work that must still be done; yet he’s wholly confident he’ll do it and do it better than anyone else.“I am the only man in history to completely figure out a woman, but it’s just one woman: Mother Nature.” And to Floyd and the 23,000 local residents he feeds each year, that’s really all that matters.

working the soil doesn’t appeal, then put your clean hands in your pocket and make a donation. It’s just a small way to save our planet, erase the looming threat of just 56 years left for the soil, and feed thousands not only now, but for generations to come.

Want to visit, to volunteer, to help save the planet, and feed the next generation? www.dpnc.org Call (860) 961-0244 Like them on Facebook Come visit at 162 Greenmanville Avenue (Rt. 27) in Mystic between the Seaport and Old Mistick Village


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A n n ua l H ol i day Sh ow November 16 to December 29, 2018 Opening Reception Friday November 16 5-8 pm Kick off the Holiday Season, meet the Artists, and join us for this festive evening! Kathy Anderson, Rosa Americana, Oil, 10 x 14”

Vincent Giarrano Red Wine, Oil, 7 x 5”

Loretta Fasan, Tree of Life, Oil, 30 x 30”

679 Boston Post Rd., Madison CT

Jeanne Rosier Smith, All That Glitters, Pastel, 15 x 30”

Susan Powell Fine Art 203.318.0616

susanpowellfineart@gmail.com

www.susanpowellfineart.com

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The Shakers: Inspired Innovations By Barbara Malinsky / Photos by Guy Biechele Photography


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Simple Gifts ‘Tis a gift to be simple, ' tis the gift to be free ‘Tis the gift to come down where we ought to be… Shaker song by Joseph Brackett (1797-1882)

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he Shakers of New England impacted American society through every endeavor of their daily lives. Their passion for simplicity stems from their religious belief that everything created was an act of worship. This is manifested in the design of their architecture, furnishings, household items, industrial machinery, clothing, everyday objects, dance, and music. The Shakers were initially known as the Quaking Shakers at a time when the Quakers

were distancing themselves from frenetic spiritual expression. In 1747, escaping religious persecution in England, they came to the United States and were known as the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing. They established many communities throughout New England and later further south in Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Florida. In addition to the first community in Mount Lebanon, New York, there were others in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, and New Hampshire. Shaker theology is based on the idea of the dualism of God as male and female: "So God created him; male and female he created them." (Genesis 1:27) This passage was interpreted as showing the dual nature of the Creator. They believed that Jesus was the male manifestation of Christ and the first Christian Church

and that Mother Ann was the female manifestation of Christ and the second Christian Church. In this theological context, the door opened for women spiritual leaders within the church - a significant step in achieving equality of the sexes. They also believed that Adam's sin was understood to be sex, an act of impurity. Therefore, marriage was abolished within the community.


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regarded as "Mother's FirstBorn Son in America." He led missionaries and labored to gain converts. His most important legacy was his completion of an organizational plan for gathering and maintaining Shaker communities called Gospel Order.

Ann Lee's doctrine was simple: confession of sins was the door to spiritual regeneration, and absolute celibacy was the rule of life. The four highest Shaker virtues were virgin purity, communalism, confession of sin, and separation from the world. These religious beliefs led to independent societies that were self-sufficient but governed by rules of gospel law. Born in Enfield, Connecticut, Father Joseph Meachum, son of a Baptist minister, also became a Baptist minister who was responsible for a large religious revival in 1779 along with Presbyterian minister Samuel Johnson. Though not the first American convert, he is

Within this established order, emerged many innovations which were ground-breaking in American history. To live in Gospel Order, a Shaker community needed three core buildings which consisted of a Meeting House for worship, a dwelling house for communal celibate living, and an office to manage their many enterprises. To meet their communal demands, they chose a gambrel roof, a timber-frame structure as the architectural model for community dwellings. The Shakers embraced dance as their principal form of worship. Dancing required a large open room with no liturgical center without supporting posts but with a reinforced floor. The entire building had to be engineered to provide a square dance floor at least thirty-two feet square with seating benches built around the outside wall. The simplicity of early dances

evolved into more choreographed ones. The Meeting House also had to accommodate living quarters for its residents who needed to be separated by sex. They conceived of the idea of separate staircases for men and women and special living arrangements for four lay Shaker elders and eldresses. Each Shaker


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small "kitchen" gardens and created an entire industry to service that growing market. They were also known for their medicinal herbal preparations which contributed to their revenues. There were also newly imagined agricultural tools such as the apple peeler and corn shucker which facilitated the sale of their applesauce, baked beans, and tomatoes.

community had guiding elders – two male and two female. One of the first concepts to arise from determined self-sufficiency was a sustainable agricultural practice. They experimented with ways to improve their soils, expand crop yields, and strive to maintain a balance among woodland, pasturage, and plow land. These were progressive views which enabled them to achieve harmony between their religion and economic practices. Improving the workload of women prompted the inventions of indoor plumbing, waterpowered washing machines, hoists to lift heavy laundry into the attic for drying, special stoves for heating irons – all of which expressed equality in Shaker material culture. For the improvement of men's work were numerous innovations like the automatic seed planter and circular saw (unpatented). For all members, innovations in wood-burning stoves made life more comfortable in the colder months. In 18th century America, there was no industry for the sale of garden seeds on a retail basis. The packaging and sale of seeds in small quantities in individual paper envelopes for home use was a Shaker invention. They developed the concept for those who wanted to plant

Aspects of woodworking were also Shaker originations. The iconic basket design was carefully patterned to enable copious productions from the steamed wood, usually cherry. There were also woven baskets of various designs. Their manufacture was enhanced by the creation of a shaving device which split ash on both sides to create a smooth splint. Most well-known is perhaps Shaker furniture characterized by its minimalist design and functionality. The New Britain Museum of American Art has a substantial collection of Shaker furniture.

As they were inventive in many areas, they were experts at clothing design. A hooded cloak, which became known as the Dorothy Cloak, became the de rigueur item for fashionable women. The "sisters" of the community also made children's capes, a machine made Shaker-stitch sweater, coon fur and silk gloves, and other attire. A spool holder used by the "sisters" at Enfield, Connecticut, exhibits outstanding lathe work that has iron pins holding 27 turned spools, many of which still have their old silk threads attached.

used "top-down" hymnals, Shakers created their own compositions from the humblest believer to the highest official. The songs came from men, women, black, white, mixed-race, and recent immigrants. Early music was simple murmuring which evolved into more harmonious compositions. Older genres never fell entirely out of favor but continued to be used alongside newer ones. The Compendium Index (1845) from Russel Haskell's Enfield, Connecticut compilation reflects the wide range of musical genres which became codified and resulted into a thriving hymn enterprise. "Since the late eighteenth century, Shakers have exerted an influence on our nation wholly disproportional to the size of their communities, on everything from craftsmanship and ingenuity to the concept of communal living and work ethic. While much of our modernday fascination with the United Society centers on their unique attention to craftsmanship, it is the innovative spirit they brought to simple, Godly living that is indeed the most timeless." M. Stephen Miller Note: Appreciation to Kyle Sandler, Education Director of the Shaker Village of Enfield, New Hampshire for his guidance and hospitality during this two-day stay here, one of a handful of extant uninhabited communities.

Another aspect of Shaker democratization was the belief that everyone possessed equal potential for experiencing musical "gifts" that were integrated into a growing compendium of song. While other religious organizations Examples of Shaker built furniture


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Blue Water Hunting by John Tolmie Underwater Photos by Amanda Torrez

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s late autumn sinks in the Northern ocean temperatures plunge and the water turns into vast wasteland as the local fish hibernate or head to deeper water. The pelagics head to warmer climes and a few of us divers follow. On a brisk Thursday morning Ryan Proulx, Frank Burnett, Joe Cebula and I arrived at the airport with our dive gear and headed to sunny Florida to spear some southern fare. We booked a two day trip with Hook ‘N’ Spear Charters based out of Clearwater. Captain Frank, an exMilitary fighter pilot eases our minds with a comprehensive safety plan. We would be breath hold diving a bit deeper than we do up in the Northeast. On the first day would dive an artificial reef 30 miles offshore. In Florida the bridges between the keys degrade and the old structures are

dumped onto the sandy bottoms to create structure for fish to congregate. We arrived at the first reef, donned our gear, loaded our spearguns and went over the side. On my first drop to I speared a nice mangrove snapper at 50 feet. As I started to pull the fish out of the wreckage my shaft fouled on a piece of concrete. I did my best to free the spear but I was out of breath and headed to the surface. On the way up my reel jammed and had to

drop my speargun. Once on the surface I did my best to relax and breathe up for another drop. Joe was right behind me and saw the whole thing unfold. As he pops to the surface he laughs telling me that a goliath grouper swallowed the fish and the shaft in one gulp! So I dive back down and see the end of my shaft hanging out of its huge mouth. I did my best to pull out the shaft but the 600lb beast just turned and swam deeper into the wreck. I had to cut the line and head to the surface. I thought to myself


51 that Florida spearfishing is a whole different game and I needed to learn quickly if I was to be successful. We spent most of the day hopping form reef to reef and we did pretty well. But our meddle would be tested even more the following day as we would be diving much deeper. On our second day we would be spearfishing along a ledge at 75 feet. Again I had to put my learning cap on as the fish here behave much differently than in New England. Up north our strategy is to dive to the bottom and lay motionless. Northern fish are curious and will swim by to check you out. However the fish we were hunting in Florida scat-

ter when you hit the bottom. Captain Frank instructed me dive down and stop my descent 20 feet above the bottom and target a fish.

Once a fish was in sight the key was to shoot down at them rather than a broadside shot. Taking the Captains advice I spotted a nice gag grouper on my way down. I slowed my descent, lined up the shot and pulled the trigger. The shaft found purchase and I fought the fish to the surface. I was stoked to have landed my first grouper! The other guys were machines and filled the cooler with fish. I was humbled but grateful to be learning a whole new way to hunt underwater. On our last dive of the day we dove a shipwreck sitting at 85 feet of water. As I dove down I passed through a ball of baitfish and underneath was a huge goliath grouper. As I headed deeper I was surrounded by sharks and giant barracudas. I continued down and landed on the wreckage. There I saw a pod of schooling jacks. I was tempted to shoot one but my mind went to the gauntlet of predators above me. I knew if I speared one that I wouldn’t make it to the surface unscathed. I made a few more dives into the deep not to hunt but rather to marvel at these immense and beautiful creatures. After two days of deep diving we were exhausted. We packed a cooler full of grouper, snapper, hogfish, sheepshead and chub and lugged our tired bodies and gear through the airport. I smiled knowing my neighbors and friends in the cold north would feast on a

bounty of fresh fish harvested form the blue waters of the south. For more information on diving or fishing in Clearwater, FL visit Hook ‘N’ Spear Charters on their Facebook page


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ThereOnce was aTavern in theTown...

By Sloan Brewster / Photos by Paul Gobell

Photo by Sloan Brewster


55 some comfortable manner that such passengers or strayngers may know where to resort.”

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n colonial times, taverns were more than stops on the road...they were gathering places intrinsic to communities. Certainly they offered rooms for weather-worn travelers and customers could get drinks, but they were also places for locals to get a glimpse of happenings near and far. In 1644 the General Court sitting in Hartford, ordered all towns to have an ordinary, a tavern, or eating house that served drinks as well as meals at a fixed price to all, Ilene Frank, chief curator of the Connecticut Historical Society, said. “One sufficient inhabitant to keep an Ordynary, for provision and lodging, in

Three years later, limits were incorporated allowing nontraveling patrons to remain in taverns no more than an hour, Frank said. Constables were frequently on the lookout for “tavern haunters,” who could be fined along with the establishment’s owner. Innkeepers could Washburn Opus detail, photo Paul Gobell also be fined for their Keeler Inn, opened in 1772 by Timothy Keeler patron's public drunkenness, Frank said. and his wife Esther Keeler on what was the Taverns were important meeting and gathering Inland Postal Road in Ridgefield, is now a places from 1672 on; and every licensed museum and history center. Back in the day it innkeeper in Connecticut was required by law was a vibrant hangout. to mark his or her establishment with “some suitable Signe set up in the view of all Passengers for the direction of Strangers where to go, where they may have entertainment.” Though no such signs remain from the 17th century, the Connecticut Historical Society has a room of 18th century signs on display.

“We call it really a gathering place because this is where townspeople would meet,” Miriam Martinez, museum tour guide, said. “They would not just come because it’s a tavern, but for necessity and to exchange what was going on.” Locals could get newspapers and glean information from lodgers. Additionally, it was

Keeler Inn, photo Paul Gobell


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Customers would order drinks standing on one side of a retractable wooden shelf between the kitchen and taproom. In 1816, after a volcano erupted in Indonesia affecting weather patterns the world over, Griswold left.

the post office where folks could send or pick up mail. Drink, of course, was readily available and hard cider was the most common choice of the period. “Every resident in Connecticut over the age of 13 or 14 was more or less drunk all the time,” Martinez said. With no official drinking age, boys could get drinks if they could stand with their chins resting on the bar. Women, however, were not allowed in the tavern. Instead, according to Martinez, they gathered in the ladies’ parlor. Exceptions were made for travel weary families in need of baths. A large, highbacked booth was placed beside the fireplace to provide privacy as they cleaned themselves in a tub of shared water often black with soot by the time the last person got a turn. The inn was considered high end, a fact indicated by costly decorative nails embellishing the outside of the front door, Martinez said. However the lion depicted on the door knocker was a sign not of wealth, but welcome.

return to the tavern. The tavern was also a gathering place for local militia men. Hotchkiss organized the local militia and drilled the men on the green across from the tavern, enticing them to join with the offer of free drink.“He would tap a keg of beer and that would be the inducement,” Turick said.

“All of New England was hurting because farm- Women were not allowed to own property, ing was effected,” Turick said. “There was no Turick and Beth Salsedo, Historical Society trade, so he left Connecticut, as did hundreds of president, said. When Hotchkiss died, his Yankee peddlers.” Local blacksmith, Julius widow, Laura Hotchkiss, was given a widow’s Hotchkiss bought dower, meaning she the place and ran it had lifetime use of as a tavern, accepting one-third of the overnight requests. property. According Like the Keelers’ tavto local land records, ern, it served many she retained the eastfunctions. “Taverns erly portion and had were not the way use of the kitchen and taverns are now,” summer kitchen. Turick said. “There was a lot more going One Connecticut inn on in the tavern than has been in operaElton Tavern, photo by Paul Gobell today; the tavern was tion since the central in the community, central for Revolutionary War, and its tavern was once a information dissemination.” schoolhouse. The Griswold Inn, now a restaurant and inn, has been operating since 1776, said Young boys hung around waiting for the Karen Davison, manager of the inn’s store. newspaper to arrive and would run to a kiosk “It’s the oldest operating inn,” Davison said. on Lions Road, post the information, and “The taproom was the original schoolhouse

A candelabra hanging in the window held four candles, meaning the tavern had an available bed, drink, a meal, and stable lodging, Martinez said. Each unlit candle meant one less amenity.The inn was also known as a meeting place for planning for both sides of the Revolutionary War. In Burlington’s Elton Tavern, wealth was shown by a large ballroom on the upper floor. The tavern was built in 1810 by Giles Griswold, said Tom Turick, local historian, though for years it was believed it had been built earlier. A merchant in town, Griswold lived in the house, likely selling goods from a room in front.“It was huge, it was the biggest house in Burlington,” Turick said. “He was the biggest tax payer.” Unlike the bar at the Keeler Inn, which has not survived, the bar at the Elton Tavern remains intact. The Griswold Inn, photo by Paul Gobell


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The Connecticut Historical Society in Hartford has a huge collection of vintage tavern signs on display. photos by Paul Gobell


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Interior photos of the Keeler Inn, photo Paul Gobell


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Keeler Inn, photo by Paul Gobell

for the town of Essex; they moved it using oxen and logs.” The Washburn Tavern in Oxford, now owned by Nancy Daoud who runs Opus: Advice First, a financial advisory firm, was built in 1714. It was originally a small single story and attic dwelling. In 1741 the Washburn family purchased the property and expanded it, operating it as a tavern, said Dorothy DeBisschop of the Oxford Historical Society. For the next 125 years, the family operated it either as an inn or tavern. Like Burlington’s Elton Tavern, the Washburn had a large ballroom on the second story.

indulged, presented a problem; and an innkeeper, remembered as “Aunt Tury,” once returned at bedtime with a horsewhip to silence one such troublemaker. “Since that young man was a “giant,” his friends threatened to broadcast that he’d been punished by a smaller person, and a woman at that, if he didn’t pay for a ready

supply of alcohol at future stops on their journey,” the write-up proclaims. While most of the old tavern have long since shut their doors and candelabras no longer shimmer against the night, the light of history shines in the moonlit dark, recalling the once upon a times that were...

According to a writeup DeBisschop provided, when the Oxford Turnpike was opened circa 1794, bringing many travelers and trade to and from the Port of New Haven, the family put in a larger addition. In back of the front room was the barroom, extending the length of the house, with the bar proper at the east end and somewhat secluded by a little partition. The Washburn family lived in the house for at least four generations, successfully operating the tavern and producing cider brandy at the tavern’s own mill, selling it for six cents a glass, DeBisschop said. According to one story, rowdy teamsters who had over-

Washburn Opus, photo by Paul Gobell


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he Knickerbocker in Westerly Rhode Island has been a mainstay and a chief supporter of musicians in their community and beyond. With a rich history that pre-dates prohibition, this place with the unforgettable name, is poised to take on the future with Mark Connolly at the helm and team members that care about bringing the best musical experience they can to their guests. In 2011Mark

ness became much sweeter in1933 when they converted to a club that could now sell alcohol. Located just across from the train station where the Knickerbocker Express would pass through on its Boston - New York route, carrying many touring musicians, these artists took notice of the venue as they often spent an overnight in town and happily picked up a gig. These early bookings helped build a reputation for having great acts, and word quickly got out. Perhaps the zenith of its history to this point, was the prosperity enjoyed in the 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when a bunch of local high schoolers formed Roomful of Blues. Those kids went on to attain notoriety and blossomed into a band that found fans

came to the club from Mystic with a background as a restaurateur and took on the task of upping their game while honoring the illustrious past that had put the venue on the map.

wherever they traveled, particularly in Chicago where they befriended other fantastic acts of the day and told them all about their favorite little spot back home.

Originally opened as an ice cream shop by two local Italian brothers, the success of the busi-

Pretty soon The Knick was booking the likes of Stevie Ray Vaughan, Big Joe Turner, and

The Knickerbocker for Every Rocker (Blues too)!

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Johnny Copeland. Each time Roomful came home, they consistently sold the place out. Their "Sundays at the Knick" were shows that people still talk about, as witnessed by their recent reunion show billed as The Founders. I can attest to the packed house and familiar vibe in the room. Al Copley still as animated as ever on keys, Duke Robillard on lead guitar, alternating from sassy dance numbers to


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photo by Douglas Mason

beautiful blues ballads; Gregg Piccolo on sax, and Doug James and Rich Lataille rounded out the horn section for this legendary grouping. The journey that has taken the venue from yesterday to today has not been without struggles. There was a year that they had to shut the doors after the horrendous 2003 fire at The Station Nightclub. The state responsibly took a hard look at ALL venues and implemented strict guidelines that needed to be met. For The Knick, the changes that needed to take place were financially out of reach. Enter Westerly Blues to the rescue, raising more than 1.5 million dollars to make the necessary upgrades while keeping the look intact. This allowed a rebirth that continues to this day with the most recent reincarnation taking place in March of 2015 when the business became a non-profit. The Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra and Music school formed an alliance to shape the Knickerbocker Music Center into an entity that now puts an importance on music education. While the club is well known for its blues acts, the bookings have broadened over the years

well as generous seating with bar tops and proper tables if you prefer to sit back and take it all in. Lastly, if an acoustic performance in an intimate setting is more to your liking, their newly opened Tap Room is part of the same building, but offers a completely different experience. See yaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; at the shows! Details and calendar can be found at Knickmusic.com The facility is located at 35 Railroad Avenue, Westerly, RI (401) 315-5070

and include wonderful bands from all sorts of genres. Mark has an uncanny gift of presenting acts that are just on the cusp of hitting it big. Many can say they saw acts like Dustbowl Revival and Nikki Hill here first. There is also a wonderful spirit of supporting causes with many fundraising shows throughout the year like MitchFest, that had its 10th gathering to support Hope Hospice and Palliative Care of Rhode Island in September. Look for special dates around the Newport Jazz and Folk Festivals with visits from the likes of Jon Batiste. The dance floor is ready and waiting for folks to joyfully jump and jive as


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The Thames Club

New Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historical Jewel By Nancy LaMar - Rodgers / Photos by A. Vincent Scarano


65 the notion that for her and her husband Bill and their family, the Thames Club is exactly what they were looking for when it came to a place to share socially with friends.

“The Thames Club is a state of mind.”

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his statement is shared with the group gathered around one of the formal dining tables at “the club”. Robert Salmonsen, current president of The James O’Neil Thames Club, explains his sentiment. “You walk into this property and you feel differently. You know that you are surrounded by friends and family, but you also know that you are surrounded by history and the many lives and stories that have crossed over the threshold here and the powerful influence many of these people have had on our community.” The other members echo Salmonsen’s sentiment. Brenda Kramer, also a member shares

“We were looking for a place to join and there were other options, but I truly believe had we not joined The Thames Club, we would not have established these amazing and quality friendships that we now have.” I am intrigued by this notion that a social club and historical landmark could incite such strong emotional ties for its’ members. But for those members gathered here tonight it is simple to explain because of the history of this place. This year marks the 150tth anniversary for The Thames Club and as Salmonsen further explains, “current members enjoy the same camaraderie, the same sense of a place of belonging as did the generations that came before us.” There isn’t a member seated around the table

that doesn’t second these notions and perhaps it is because of the rich history of the club and its’ dedication to providing a place where people can meet and discuss the day’s topics, current affairs, a great film, book, or even the banality of politics. Derron Wood, Executive Artistic Director of Flock Theater and also a club member recalls the many times he has been in the club either meeting with potential supporters, auditioning parts for Flock or just having lunch, when he becomes engaged in conversation with another member or even a first-time guest. “It’s amazing the conversations you end up getting into here. You can be speaking about anything


66 from Jackson Pollock to The Battle of The Bulge and that’s the beauty of the club.” It is apparent from Wood’s statement that the club’s rich history of intellects, artists, politicians, rebels, and heads of state, all gathering in this New London space, has an ongoing history of providing members a place where the art of conversation and the exchange of ideas happens on a regular basis and is all part of this exclusive experience.

O’Neill’s play Long Day’s Journey Into Night, has O’Neill’s father in the character of James Tyrone, referring to “the club” several times in that play. For hardcore O’Neill fans, standing on the floors, in the rooms, or even at the bar that James O’Neill himself stood, can be an overwhelming nostalgic sensation.

their care. While the main floor of The Thames Club is where most people meet to gather and converse, it is the upper and lower levels that provide a distinct glimpse into the past.

“Well we definitely have a ghost or a spirit that has decided to stay on with us, explains Cami O’Donnell. “We are not quite sure who it is, but we believe it is a man and he “We recently found James can often be seen upstairs as O’Neill’s tile in the basement,” well as downstairs and I believe James O’ Neill explains Wood, “these profile tiles one of the older members has seen The Thames Club was originally were created for founding him sitting right over there on one of founded in 1869, however, the actual members and O’Neill’s tile is per- the chairs.” According to O’Donnell and building at the corner of State Street haps the club’s most some of the other members, and Washington Street was not treasured possession.” the presence, ghost or spirit, occupied until 1888. In 1904, the whatever you want to refer to original house was destroyed by a The history of the club the entity that enjoys its confire and the now, current structure can be felt in all of the tinued stay at the club, has was erected on this site. rooms. There is a been experienced by not only presence, a feeling of a few prior club members but It’s history dates back 150 years and those who walked current ones as well. Eugene O’ Neill for New London, that means a these hardwood floors Benedict Arnold great deal, as some of its’ most well-known so many years ago. It is as much Derron Wood adds that, “I personalities were either members of, or in the of a sensation as it is a wonder, a marvel. The was walking down Meridian Street because we case of Benedict Arnold, may have had a few setting and the opulent surroundings are not were going to have rehearsals and we have run ins with members. Pulitzer Prize winning just a testimony to a bygone era, but also a tes- them generally on Sundays because the club is playwright, Eugene O’Neill is perhaps New timony to the commitment by the current not often used on Sundays. I was looking up London’s most prized claim to literary fame. members to preserve what time has left in and something caught my eye as sitting in the

Former Thames Club members would gather to discuss any and all matters of the day.


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window in the library. So, I just thought that someone was here and sitting upstairs. I assumed that when I got upstairs for Flock’s rehearsal, one of the cast would have gotten there early or that I would go up and have a conversation with an unexpected Sunday guest.”

“During prohibition, they say it was not hard to get a drink here at the Thames Club and being a port city I can see why that might be the case. From what I have heard, the club being so close to the courthouse, the judges would come for lunch and the lawyers would vie to be able to talk to the judges outside the courthouse.”

What Wood found instead, was that the club was void of any club or cast members. As a matter of fact, the club was void of any other human beings and whomever he saw sitting in the chair in the window had disappeared.

These days the members are excited about the younger generation embracing the club. According to Salmonsen, “the young people could own this place.” Salmonsen is talking about the new generation of professionals, thinkers, artists and creators coming to the club and creating their own legacy. Cami O’Donnell adds that, “the current members have a responsibility to history to keep this club alive and going.”

One cannot imagine that a space with this much history, would not have the energy of those who had spent so much time within these walls. The stories of the ghosts and New London’s history continues as the members share laughs. What makes these stories fascinating is that not only are they tangible in such a place, but they have a quality of authenticity that goes beyond the usual “ghost” story. Member Bill Richmond adds another historical anecdote that captures that essence of the club’s reputation for being its’ own tucked away secret where those in the know could make things happen.

imagine the players from all walks of life, engaged in the creation of this city’s history.

The members all agree that with membership in the club comes an invaluable glimpse into not only New London’s history but America’s history and that membership in the club opens doors to conversations, connections, ideas and opportunities that one might not get anywhere else.

A Boardwalk Empire episode comes to mind, where the wheeling and dealing could go on in private and behind closed doors, especially during prohibition. Richmond’s story only adds to the allure of the club, where you can

As Robert Salmonsen had said, “The Thames Club is a state of mind.” For Membership Information: https://www.thamesclub.org


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The Cheesemonger Paul Partica, The Cheese Shop, Centerbrook CT

BeSt BuyS It is time once again for another edition of our best buys list. My definition of a best buy is simple. The cheese must be of great quality and at a good price. Some of this year’s selections have been here before and some are new. Please bear in mind that some the cheeses below may be offered by many different brands or manufacturers, and taste can vary accordingly. I always suggest that you “try before you buy,” to be certain you are taking home the right cheese for you.

The following list represents what I feel are truly great values: 1. Black Knight tilsit from Austria ($12 to $15 per pound) Tilsits were once very common cheeses throughout the world. There were versions from Poland, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Denmark, to name a few. When I first started in the cheese business, Tilsits were a major seller for us. In the 60’s, Denmark renamed their Tilsit to Havarti in an effort to give it a competitive edge over other Tilsits. They then created another variation called Creamed Havarti by adding more butterfat and removing the tasteful washed rind finish. This cheese is very commonly found in supermarkets today. The Black Knight offering from Austria is a very pleasant, mild and creamy version made from cows’ milk with 50% butterfat content. Although mild, Black Knight has a nice flavor and will enhance your cheese assortment.

2. tres Leches from Spain ($20 to $24 per pound) As the name implies, this semi-soft, pasteurized Spanish cheese is produced from three milks: cow, goat and sheep. Tres Leches is similar to another popular Spanish cheese called Manchego, which is made only from sheep’s milk. It is worth noting that Tres Leches’ sales have far outpaced those of Manchego. This cheese carries a natural rind that has been bathed in olive oil. Its blend of milks provides great flavor and a really nice finish. This cheese is also on our Top Ten list in popularity.

3. Piave Vecchio from Italy ($19 to $22 per pound) This Parmigiano Reggiano-style cheese will most likely make my Best Buys list every year. With its sharp, full flavor, Piave Vecchio works beautifully with most foods and salads. This makes it not only an ideal eating cheese, but also a great choice for cooking. Use it in place of Reggiano or Grana Padano in any dish you would normally use the former cheeses. You will not be disappointed. A cow’s milk cheese, Piave comes in a small sixteen-pound wheel and has a hard, natural rind that is similar to Reggiano. There are two varietals of this cheese. We usually carry the older and sharper one-year version. This cheese keeps very well; just be sure to wrap it properly. For a fabulous dessert, drizzle a little Acacia honey from Italy over it, or even a bit of aged balsamic vinegar.

4. Bleu d‘Auvergne ($16 to $20 per pound) Bleu d’Auvergne is a French blue named after the region in the South of France that it originates from. This young cheese ages about 30 to 60 days before export. It is made from cow’s milk and you will find it to be a little less salty than most blues. You will especially enjoy the creamy, buttery finish that comes with this cheese. Drop this fan favorite into salads, snack with it or place a generous wedge of it on your cheese tray when entertaining and watch it disappear. We also like to stuff it into olives and occasionally drop one into a Martini.

5. Fromage D’Affinois ($18 to $22 per pound) This soft-ripening double crème deserves its ongoing place in the Best Buy list, Top Ten list and every other category you can think of. Unlike so many of the stabilized Bries and Camemberts on the market today, this one remains true to what a soft-ripening cheese should be. D’Affinois arrives to us with a firm center. This core softens as we allow it to ripen right in the store. I love that I can finish the ripening process myself. This allows me to sell it at its peak flavor, which is when you will find it in its most soft, creamy and luscious state. D’Affinois is consistently one of our best sellers and usually the first cheese to disappear on a cheese tray. You can spend this amount for half the volume of many other cheeses and find yourself less satisfied.

6. english Ford Cheddar ($14 to $16 per pound) This pasteurized cheese is still one of the very best values out there. It amazes me how so many other cheddars can sell for such high prices ($20 to $30 per pound) when the bitter finish of many of these cheddars so often bites back. English Ford has a great cheddar taste and a wonderfully smooth, creamy finish. It is one of our bestselling cheddars and still worth seeking out.

7. Pico Goat Cheese from France ($10 ea.) This is a great little goat cheese from the Périgord region in France. It has the typical white mold surface that will soften with time to a luscious creamy texture. This pasteurized treat is a young cheese that arrives in our country around thirty days old. Pico pairs well with a Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc or Sauvignon Blanc. I also like it on a slice of pear with a little Acacia honey.

Paul Partica, the Cheese Shop www.cheeseshopcenterbrook.com


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By Art LiPuma, General Manager SeaSide Wine & Spirits, Old Saybrook, CT

Sparkling Rosé Sparkling Rosé is a wine that has been around for centuries but recently has grown in popularity. With many people still drinking rosé throughout the year this seems to be a good extension to the line. According to “The Drinks Business” the Champagne producer Ruinart was the producer of the first rosé sparkling wine in 1764. The Champagne region in France is one of the biggest single areas for just producing sparkling wine. There are 2 different methods that are used, depending on the Champagne house. This sparkling wine typically uses the grapes Chardonnay, Pinot Meunier, and Pinot Noir. One of the methods for getting the light and sometimes faint pink color is by leaving the skins of the red grapes on and in contact with the juice during fermentation. The other method is to add a little bit of still Pinot Noir to the wine. Many times the Rosé style is the best sparkling of the Champagne house. Of course with that they are usually more expensive than their entry level. Some of the great Champagne houses are: Billecart-Salmon, Dom Ruinart, Veuve Clicquot, Moët & Chandon and Taittinger. Although this area produces excellent sparkling rosés they are produced in other parts of France and throughout the world. Alsace is just east of Champagne, producing well made wines including Sparkling Rosé labeled Crĕmant d’Alsace. The grapes that are used for these wines are mainly Pinot Blanc, with a blend of any of these other grapes Pinot Gris, Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. They are exceptional values were you can get many for under $20.00. There are many other countries that produce sparkling rosés. Italy has some great sparkling rosés, one of the inexpensive ones is Zonin, a sparkling made from the Nerello Mascalese grape which gives it a light pink hue in color. Staying in Europe the area of Penedĕs in Spain produces the sparkling wine called Cava. The

name Cava was decided upon in the early 1970s to keep it apart from Champagne. Although it is produced much like Champagne, these wines are generally inexpensive, costing anywhere from $9.00 TO $25.00, which makes them great values. The grapes that are used for their sparkling wines are, Macabeo, Parellada, Xarel-lo and Chardonnay for white, the red grapes include: Garancha, Monastrell and Trepat for Rosé. New Zealand produces a sparkling rosé, Sophora which is a good example of a great value, full flavored wine with rich berry fruit in the middle and a dry finish. Made from grapes from Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne. This wine has been produced for over 25 years made from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. California must be mentioned for being another big producer of sparkling rosé. Most are made in the Champagne method. Schramsberg being one of the famous vineyards in California which was taken over in the mid 60’s and rebuilt by the Davis family to produce some of the finest sparkling wines in California. The Rosé is made from Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and like all of their wines is made in the Champagne method. Many other pristine vineyards that produce wines in this manner are Mumm Napa, Louis Roederer Estate and Chandon, Domaine Carneros, by Taittnger, to name a handful. A few other areas that should be mentioned are Washington State, New Mexico, where the great vineyard Gruet comes from, and Long Island. These sparkling wines could compliment any occasion including an enjoyable start to your Thanksgiving meal. Art LiPuma, General Manager at SeaSide Wine & Spirits, 118 Main St, Old Saybrook, Connecticut www.seasidewineandspirits.com


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Written by Heather Kelly, Director of Operations, NoRA Cupcake Company Photos: Winter Caplanson, Connecticut Food & Farm

thankFuLL with Cake The countdown is on...can you believe we’re back at it for the holiday festivities so soon? What better way to kick off a month of merriment and cheer than with the number one food holiday of the year. No gifts, no pressure, just gathering with the ones you love in sharing a good meal our favorite. Everyone has their job - someone to carve the turkey, that one aunt who makes the BEST twice baked potatoes, and when all else fails - there can never be too much dessert at the table. That’s where we come in - and we’ve kicked up our Thanksgiving Menu to please even the pickiest of family members this year. Pumpkin Pecan Pie - gingersnap snap crusted pumpkin cake, caramel buttercream frosting, topped with candied pecans. The mild sweetness of the caramel with the sweet crunch of the candied pecans is MELT IN YOUR MOUTH delicious. Cranberry Apple Streusel - vanilla cake, cranberry apple pie filling, cinnamon cream cheese frosting, streusel crumble topping. We all know the best part of a pie is the crumble topping - so how could we resist throwing it on a cupcake? Sweet Potato Pie - cinnamon graham crusted sweet potato cake, marshmallow fluff filling, toasted meringue frosting. Those sweet potatoes are too good to leave for just the main course. Caramel Pear - caramel pear cake, caramel buttercream, caramel drip, candied pecans. If we could, we would put a caramel drip on everything but it goes PERFECTLY with this cake. Thomas - chocolate cake & chocolate frosting. Add in some skilled frosting techniques, some googly eyes, and a candy corn tail and you’ve got sweetest little Turkey you ever did see.

Pumpkin Patch - chocolate cake, pumpkin spice buttercream filling, orange toasted meringue frosting. You’ll have to pick yours because these guys go quickly. There you go - something for everyone. Are you looking to bring it above and beyond? We have created one more option for the most serious of dessert connoisseurs. PIE-HOLE-CAKE - bourbon apple spice cake sandwiching a pumpkin pie with layers of cinnamon buttercream topped with candied pecans and a Hennessy caramel drip. Not for the faint of heart. And don’t bring it around unless you can handle your family talking about it until Thanksgiving rolls around again - it’s that magical. You can find our bakery at 700 Main Street in Middletown AND you can also find us in Blue Back Square at 38 Isham Road, West Hartford at our holiday pop up store. Thanksgiving orders can be placed for pick up thru Wednesday, November 21st - no notice required on Thanksgiving cupcake flavors, one week notice required for that massive PIE-HOLE-CAKE. Wishing you the best for the holiday season - we appreciate all you Cake Lovers! in time for trick or treat!

NoRa Cupcake Company (860) 788-3150 700 Main St, Middletown, Ct 06457 noracupcake.com


PLEASE JOIN US ON THE NEXT CHESTER FIRST FRIDAY - NOVEMBER 2nd, 2018 FROM 5 - 8 pm FOR AN EHHIBIT OF NEW PAINTINGS FROM HIS HOME & TRAVELS BY LEIF NILSSON WITH LIVE MUSIC BY ARROWHEAD. Arrowhead strings along on most Sunday afternoons. Find out about the Concerts in the Garden, First Fridays, Leifs paintings, prints and more at

www nilssonstudio com


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November 1-18 Ivoryton the Queens of the Golden Mask. It is summer, 1961, and in Celestial, Alabama, it’s hotter’n a blister bug in a pepper patch. It is especially steamy in the kitchen of the Sage household where the matriarch, Ida, has gathered her friends around her to meet the new girl in town. How will Rose from Ohio fit in with the ladies of Celestial who bake pies, sell Avon and belong to the Ku Klux Klan? This brand new play by Carole Lockwood tells a story of the complications of family and friendship and the normalizing of hate. A world premiere. Directed by Jacqueline Hubbard.Address 103 Main Street, Ivoryton, CT 06442 Box Office Phone: 860.767.7318 info@ivorytonplayhouse.org

Month of November - Branford November at Lennys Indian Head Restaurant! - Bloody Marys and turkey Dinners- November 4 & 11 @ 11:30 am 5:00 pm. Enjoy your favorite - or both! Build you own Bloody Mary with a selection hot sauces, pickled vegetables, stuffed olives, bacon and more! Also featured, house roasted turkey dinners with all the fixings while it lasts! - Monday - Night Football and trivia @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm Enjoy the game and trivia! Gather a team of up to six players and match wits with other teams. Our players arrive by 7:00 pm and settle in for six rounds of questions.  Participants enjoy $2 Bud and Bud Light Pints as well as free buffalo wings at "half-time" and prizes! - thursdays - Ladies' Night @ 5:00 am - 10:00 pm $5 House Wines, $6 select martinis and reduced select appetizers - at the bar only. - Friday - Happy Hour @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Enjoy $2 Bud Light bottles and free Buffalo wings from 4-6 pm. Lennys 205 South Montowese St (Rt. 146) Branford, CT 06405 www.lennysnow.com 203-488-1500

Month of November- Westbrook Live entertainment on the Water at Waters edge Resort & Spa. Please go to watersedgeresortandspa.com/events for our complete list of events. Sunday, 11/11/18 – Bruce Springsteen tribute Dinner Show. 6pm-10pm. $49++ Tickets available online or by calling the front desk 860-399-5901. thursday, 11/22/18 – thanksgiving Brunch. 11am-7pm. $49++ adults, $22++ children under ten, children under five complimentary Friday, 11/23/18 – the Fall Ball featuring Sugar, come dressed to impress and dance the night away! 6pm-10pm. $49++ Tickets available online or by calling the front desk 860-399-5901. Saturday, 11/24/18 – Billy Joel tribute Dinner Show. 6pm-10pm. $49++ Tickets available online or by calling the front desk 860-399-5901. - trivia and NFL Football every Monday night - Live Blues every tuesday night - Live Jazz every Wednesday night - Live music every Friday and Saturday night - Award winning Brunch every Sunday Water’s Edge Resort and Spa, 1525 Boston Post Road, Westbrook, CT For info, call 860-399-5901 or visit www.WatersEdgeResortAndSpa.com November 1- 9 Old Lyme New england Landscape exhibition. Lyme Art Association member artists and select invited artists will be exhibited in this annual exhibition of landscape paintings from around New England. 90 Lyme St. Old Lyme, CT 06371 (860) 434-7802 www.lymeartassociation.org

Nov 1-12, Madison Vincent Giarrano: City Life, Susan Powell Fine Art. Join us for nationally acclaimed realist artist, Vincent Giarrano's 10th solo exhibition at the gallery. Vincent Giarrano's new series explores contemporary women living their lives in New York City. Soho streets, hip, historic, and atmospheric cafes, restaurants and bar environments, workshops, rooftops and interiors set the scenes for his subjects. Susan Powell Fine Art is located at 679 Boston Post Road, Madison, CT, near the Fire Station. Gallery Hours are TuesdaySaturday, 11am to 5pm, Sundays by appointment. Please call 203 318-0616 for more information. View works online at www.susanpowellfineart.com

NOVEMBER EVENTS

November 1 – December 31 An art exhibition featuring works by members of Shoreline Artists’ at the Valentine H. Zahn Community Gallery at Middlesex Hospital Shoreline Medical Center. Meet the artists at a reception on Thursday, November 8 from 6 – 8 p.m. The Gallery is open during regular business hours and is located at 250 Flat Rock Place, Westbrook, CT. For more information, contact Middlesex Hospital at 860-358-6200 or zahngallery@gmail.com.


NOVEMBER EVENTS

82 November 10 Salem Book Signing & Wine tasting with author Rose young. Come meet the author of “Roses, Wine & Murder” – Vineyards, gardens, fine wine and food delight . . . but death disturbs all tranquility in this madcap Connecticut mystery! You’ll know many of the local references in this book and can enjoy tasting wines from Priam Vineyards in Colchester, one of the vineyards woven into the tale. This is a fun, free event guaranteed to be a delightfully good time. Saturday, November 10 at The Red House Cultural Arts Center in Salem from 4-7pm. For more information visit salemredhouse.com or call 860-608-6526.

November 16 Guilford Meet the Artists Soiree. Featuring recent works in oil, watercolor, mixed media, photography, prints, greeting cards, assemblage, pottery, glass, jewelry, and woodwork by our eclectic and distinguished family of talented gallery artists and artisans. Friday, 5-8PM. Light refreshments served. This event is free and open to the public. the bird next Gallery and Salon Suites, 25 Water Street • Guilford, CT 06437 • 203.689.5745 • art@thebirdnestsalon.com November 11 - Guilford 6th Annual “Soup for Good” event Benefits Guilford Art Center and the Community Dining Room. The public is invited to a warm, soup supper while supporting two important shoreline organizations-Guilford Art Center and the Community Dining Room-at Soup for Good, Sunday, November 11, 4:30-6:30 pm at Guilford Art Center. The dinner is hosted in the Guilford Art Center school, where guests can select from a variety of hearty soups, homemade breads, desserts and a glass of wine or sparkling water. Each guest can choose their own one-of-a-kind soup bowl, handcrafted by Guilford Art Center potters. Bowls will be washed for guests to take home “for good.” After enjoying the soup dinner, guests are invited to the Center’s annual holiday shop that features beautiful fine craft work made by American artists. This shopping event, called Artistry: American Craft for the Holidays, is open from Nov 1 – Jan 6, 7 days a week. Tickets for Soup for Good are $30 in advance, $35 at door. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Community Dining Room, as well as Guilford Art Center. The Community Dining Room, located in Branford, is committed to serving the shoreline community by feeding the hungry and helping with other basic human needs. Guilford Art Center is a non-profit organization established to nurture and support excellence in the arts through education, communication, and outreach. Reservations can be made online www.guilfordartcenter.org or by calling GAC at (203) 453-5947. For more information contact Guilford Art Center at www.guilfordartcenter.org or 203-453-5947.

November 16 - Dec 29 Madison Annual Holiday Show Susan Powell Fine Art Opening Reception: Friday, November 16, from 5 to 8 pm,  wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served. Join us for this festive evening to meet the artists and kick off the Holiday Season! This is our popular  10th  Annual Holiday Exhibition, featuring a select group of nationally acclaimed, award-winning artists. A varied range of painting sizes, styles, and subjects, including land and seascapes, figurative, still life, and city scenes, are offered in this exciting new show. Exhibiting artists include: Kathy Anderson, Del-Bourree Bach, Julie Beck, Peter Bergeron, Kelly Birkenruth, Dan Brown, Deborah Chabrian, Grace DeVito, David Dunlop, Eileen Eder, Loretta Fasan, Vincent Giarrano, Neal Hughes, Sarah Lamb, Sarah Stifler Lucas, James Magner, Anne McGrory, Leonard Mizerek, Deborah QuinnMunson, Larry Preston, Carlo Russo, Dennis Sheehan, and Jeanne Rosier Smith. The gallery is located at 679 Boston Post Road, Madison near the fire station. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Saturday, 11 am-5 pm, Sunday by appointment. For further information, please call (203) 318-0616, email us at  susanpowellfineart@gmail.com  and visit www.susanpowellfineart.com to see works in the show. November 16, 2018 - January 4 "Deck the Walls" Lyme Art Association. The Lyme Art Association’s annual member show and sale featuring more than 200 works of art in all themes, sizes and mediums, well priced for holiday gift giving. Opening reception on December 2, from 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and by appointment. (860) 434-7802 90 Lyme St. Old Lyme, CT www.lymeartassociation.org Lyme Art Association November 23 - December 23 Santa Special. All aboard the Santa Special for a one-of-a-kind, daytime holiday experience. Make sure you’re camera-ready for that “special moment” when Santa and Mrs. Claus visit each child! Enjoy the spirit of the season as you relax with family and friends aboard festive railway cars adorned with vintage decorations. Rudolph and Pablo the Penguin will be on board to spread holiday cheer. Plus, each child will receive a small holiday gift from Santa’s Elves! November 23-25, December 1-2, 8-9, 15-16, 22-23Essex Steam Train & Riverboat, One Railroad Ave. Essex, CT 06426 (860) 767-0103 essexsteamtrain.com/seasonal-excursions/santa-special/ info@essexsteamtrain.com November 25 - essex November Class: tower Pattern Workshop. Students will learn the Tower Pattern, and leave with a finished piece approximately 6” square. The workshop will run 1 hour, or longer if there’s interest. $20 with online registration. $25 at the door. Go to www.meetup.com/essex-square-studios to register. Ben Parker Studio 1 North Main Street, Unit 6, Essex CT


Profile for Ink Magazine

Ink Magazine - November 2018  

Connecticut's Premier Art, Culture and Lifestyle magazine.

Ink Magazine - November 2018  

Connecticut's Premier Art, Culture and Lifestyle magazine.