Page 1

publicationsÂŽ

www.inkct.com

Vol 15 Issue 167 2019

A guide to finer living in Connecticut & abroad.

October 2019


INFORMED + EMPOWERED We’re

nding and treating breast cancer earlier.

Our Comprehensive Breast Center is the only one in Connecticut using dual-head molecular breast imaging to detect cancers mammography alone may miss. And our team works closely with patients to nd those at higher risk due to genetics or other factors. So, we can give closer attention, personalized support and peace of mind to women who need it most. Together, it all adds up to the smarter choice for breast health. MiddlesexHealth.org/empowered


October 2019 Vol. 15 Issue 167

10

Features

Departments Alforno: Trattoria – Bar - Pizza

“The Scratch Kitchen in the Shopping Center”

The Perfect Pup

20

visit inkct.com

Training Both Ends of the Leash

48

74

52

72

78

76

Crusty Old Diver - A Conversation With Tom Jennerwien 48

28

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

at Old Sturbridge Village

Cardinal Points - Gotta Getta Fish!

52

Music Mirth and Mojo - Dustbowl Revival's Liz Beebe

72

The Cheesemonger - Family-Washed Rind

74

On the Vine - South Africa

76

Food Thoughts from Italy - Chicken Under A Brick

78

WELCOME to our October issue of INK magazine. Anyone who knows me is aware that I look forward to this installment. It’s my opportunity to cover the off the beaten path stories that we save up all year. As summer has now drifted into a camera phone full of images. We head towards what is

40

The Titan of Typewriters

@ Antikey Chop

many that I have spoke to’s “favorite time of the year.” We have creativity in spades in this issue. A typewriter collector, a fellow who cuts up magazines (the horror) to create beautiful art., and an entire illustrated neighborhood in Salem MA. Grab your favorite fall beverage and enjoy!

J. Lilly

ink publications

founder / publisher

54

64

Punto Urban Open Air Museum

Art as the Bridge

Contributors Jeffery Lilly - photos/design Laurencia Ciprus - editorial Caryn B. Davis - editorial/photos Charmagne Eckert - editorial Lisa Fatone - editorial design Alison Kaufman - Music Mirth & Mojo Mark Seth Lender - Cardinal Points

Art LiPuma - On the Vine Rona Mann - editorial Carolina Marquez-Sterling - design Paul Partica - The Cheesemonger Vincent Scarano - editorial John Tolmie - Crusty Old Diver Bob Zemmel - Food thoughs

Advertising

Contact us to receive our media kit with detailed advertising information.

Paper Artist Brian Shaw

“Meaningful Media”

Jeffery Lilly - Advertising Director advertising@inkct.com 860.581.0026 Cheryl Powell - Greater Connecticut cheryl@ink-pub.com - 860.608.5749 Rona Mann -Greater Connecticut six07co@att.net - 401-539-7762

Jacki Hornish - Litchfield jacki@inkct - 860.488.0393 Richard Malinsky - Shoreline richard@inkct.com - 215.704.9273

Submit Events Listings to:

Angela Carontino - events@inkct.com

Cover Image: “Kaupoku” by Hula All content of INK Publications including but not limited to text, photos, graphics and layout are copyrighted by Inkct LLC Reproductions without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. Inkct LLC is not responsible for images or graphics submitted by advertisers which are not copyrighted or released for use in this publication.

Inkct LLC - 71 Maple Avenue, Old Saybrook, CT 06475 - email: submissions@ink-pub.com - visit www.inkct.com

3


4

In our idyllic setting near the Connecticut shoreline, hospitality and refinement merge to perfection. Here’s a place designed to cultivate your interests, your activities and the bounty of your well-tended lifestyle.

VEM. 860-581-4881


5


Experience

THE BEST OF THE LAST FRONTIER There’s no better way to discover the wonders of Alaska than with the best premium cruise line. Embark on a journey where luxuriously designed suites, distinctive dining, and seamless service are the perfect complement to one of the most aweinspiring places in the world. With three award-winning ships, including the newly modernized Celebrity Millennium®, we offer unforgettable vacations for every explorer. Go even deeper into the heart of the wilderness on an Alaska Cruisetour—a complete vacation that combines your cruise with a land tour that features a glass-domed train, authentic lodges, and in-depth experiences along the way.

CELEBRITY.COM 1-800-CELEBRITY CALL YOUR TRAVEL ADVISOR ©2019 Celebrity Cruises. Ships’ registry Malta and Ecuador.


8


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

WOODY SEZ: THE LIFE AND MUSIC OF WOODY GUTHRIE WRITTEN BY

PAUL PORTNER

SEPTEMBER 18 - OCTOBER 6

PAINTING BY CHARLES

BANKS WILSON. COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND THE OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL PRESERVATION FUND.

DEVISED BY DAVID M. LUTKEN WITH NICK CORLEY AND DARCIE DEAVILLE, HELEN J. RUSSELL & ANDY TEIRSTEIN

FOR T I C K ET S , V I S I T I VORYTONPLAYHOUS E. ORG

OCTOBER 23-NOVEMBER 10

FO R TICK ETS, VISIT IV O RYT O N PLAYH O U S E.O R G

103 MAIN STREET | IVORYTON, CT 06442 | 860.767.7318 103 MAIN STREET | IVORYTON, CT 06442 | 860.767.7318 SPONSORED BY:

October 31, 2019 at 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

T

EXIT

27 Coogan Blvd. Mystic, CT 860.536.4941

95 90

oldemistickvillage.com

9


10


11

“The Scratch Kitchen in the Shopping Center”

Alforno: Trattoria – Bar - Pizza by RONA MANN

You probably wouldn’t expect it. If you didn’t know to look for it, you might just drive right by. But once you do find it, you’re never going to let it go. “It” is Alforno, all at once a trattoria, a well stocked, welcoming bar, and a place that has been serving the best pizza on the shoreline for the last 28 years. For many it’s a must-stop every few days; for others it’s the best kept secret in this part of Connecticut, yet it’s one that when revealed, shares something very special where good food, good spirits, and good people regularly come together to enjoy a unique experience.

“It’s a scratch kitchen in a shopping center,” owner Bob Zemmel says, clearly enjoying his tongue-in-cheek understatement, for Zemmel, his wife, Linda, and son, Ben have done what few restaurant owners ever do to ensure success...they have proceeded slowly, cautiously, purposefully, investing not just their finances, but their time, education, and sweat equity as well. Yes, this is Alforno, the product of a man’s insatiable appetite for pizza, his wife’s 30-plus years as a professional food writer, and their son’s realization that his attraction to the family business was too great to ignore.

Michele, Robert, and Benjamin Zemmel

Bob Zemmel grew up in New York, studying both economics and chemistry in college. As a young student with little money, he found a couple of slices of pizza and a Coke to be an easy solution to the quest for inexpensive, filling daily fare. Upon graduation, Zemmel went into business designing sport luggage, but still relishing his favorite food. “By the time I turned 30, I had eaten 10,000 slices of pizza,” Bob reports with a sly smile, revealing this was no exaggeration. Zemmel’s gustatory horizons widened, however, when he met and married Linda Giuca, Food Editor for the Hartford Courant and an


12

“Sometimes they come in just to buy our bread, and we’re out of it in less than an hour, even though we bake 100 loaves a day,” relates Alforno’s very affable and equally engaging bartender, Tim. “They get the saddest look on their faces when that happens.”

accomplished Italian cook in her own right. Moving to Connecticut and frequently accompanying Linda to a myriad of restaurants as she wrote and reviewed the local scene for the newspaper, opened Bob’s eyes wide. This foray also marked his introduction to the famous Connecticut legend, Pepe’s Pizza, and soon Zemmel became obsessed with recreating and perfecting the Pepe’s pizza crust. His chemistry background served him well as he explored “the enzymatic reaction that takes place through slow fermentation.” For decades enzymes had been used in bread making of all types, including pizza

crust. Enzymes are catalysts that increase the speed of a chemical reaction and may be used to replace additives, which appeals to today’s health conscious consumers. Enzyme applications in baking become more intrinsic and more difficult to understand, but Bob Zemmel’s schooling led to his understanding of how this played into making not only a superior pizza crust, but also loaves of bread that locals and regulars cannot wait to wolf down.

Zemmel says it takes “fully three days to make a loaf of our bread, which begins with a starter and ferments overnight.” The loaves sit regally in a basket at the bar seducing customers and are the perfect complement to a glass of wine, a mug of beer, or a specialty cocktail, in addition to accompanying lunch or dinner at Alforno. Initially, creating the best pizza on the shoreline was Alforno’s primary business. Then Bob and Linda made the first of many trips to Italy and were fortunate enough to meet famed Florentine born chef, Giuliano Bugialli. Bugialli stressed tradition in all Italian cooking, but championed Tuscan cooking above all else. Bob Zemmel said, “Giuliano felt that if it wasn’t 400-500 years old, the recipe was not authentic.” The three became fast friends and soon began going back and forth to learn from, and work with, Bugialli.


13

Each time the Zemmels returned to Old Saybrook they added more and more dishes…. House made pastas, meatballs, veal dishes, “and the best chicken in Connecticut,” Bob said. “Some women didn’t want a fatty cheese pizza, so we experimented with all kinds of chicken until we settled upon Bell and Evans, the very finest, freshest product.” They have incorporated Giuliano’s pastas into their growing menu, renovated their space, and soon, according to Bob, “we flipped our business from mostly pizza to just 25% pizza.” They also added and are now well known for four or five specialty dinners a year when they close Alforno for the evening and have a lavish tasting dinner, complete with special wine pairings. “These sell out almost as soon as they’re advertised,” Zemmel

said, who added, “We even had famed chef, cookbook author, and nearby Madison resident, Jacques Pepin at one of them. He hung his art right here and signed his books. It was wonderful.” Although having grown up in his parents’ restaurant, son Ben Zemmel was initially reticent about joining the family business. After college in Boston and working in the hospitality business following graduation, he changed his mind, spent some time honing and perfecting his craft in Italy, and the kitchen is now his. Eventually, Bob said, Alforno will be solely under his stewardship. Bob’s new passion, in addition to his family and the restaurant they built together, are his Italian water dogs, known as lagotta romagnolo. These curly haired loveable animals are known for truffle hunting and are very popular in Italy. It was shortly after 911 that the Zemmels had a planned trip to Italy, but the pain was still too great, and Linda did not want to fly after the horror that had recently occurred. Bob went without her nevertheless, but returned with his first Italian water dog...now he breeds them and opens other eyes to these wonderful animals. So, Alforno has come full circle in 28 years,

leaving Bob Zemmel to remark, “I’m pretty contented. Still, there are those who walk by or drive by and think we’re still just a pizzeria, even some local people. Then the word of mouth gets out.” So, take this word of mouth to heart because now you do know, now you won’t drive right by, and now you probably can expect it...the most authentic Italian food on the shoreline, each dish containing ingredients concocted from history, education, and love in...well, you know the place. It’s that little scratch kitchen in the shopping center. Alforno is open seven days a week where they’re waiting to host you at 1654 Boston Post Road (Rt. 1) in Old Saybrook (860) 399-4166 www.alforno.net


14

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n


RingsEnd.com DARIEN

BETHEL

BRANFORD

LEWISBORO

800·390·1000

NEW MILFORD

NIANTIC

NORWALK

WILTON


P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Palate to Palette Thursday, October 17, 2019, 6–9 pm Fine Food and Fine Art Silent Auction Currently on view: New England Landscape Show & Sale thru November 15

Art: Debbi Goodman, Guernsey Girls, oil.

T h e

www.LymeArtAssociation.org

17


18

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

Vi n c e n t G i a r r a n o

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

city scenes

October 4 to November 9 2019 Opening Reception Friday, October 4, 5-8 pm

Susan Powell Fine Art 679 Boston Post Road Madison CT 203.318.0616 www.susanpowellfineart.com Vincent Giarrano At the Patisserie in Tribeca Oil, 18 x 24�


20


21

–Training Both Ends of the Leash It’s

All About Focus, Optimism & Relationship at The Perfect Pup by RONA MANN

S

o you got a new puppy, or maybe you are one of those wonderful souls who rescued and adopted an older dog. Either way, congratulations. Now it’s time to do something beneficial for both you and that dog...something that will ensure a good life for both of you for many years to come. You already know that he or she is “the perfect pup,” bragging like the Dog Mom or Dad you have just become, now cement that with a visit to The Perfect Pup in Deep River for professional, loving, compassionate training that will serve you both for a lifetime.

When you contact The Perfect Pup you are not merely receiving training, you are getting Janice Liscinsky, and that’s more than just the owner of a business...it represents a lifetime of ongoing training, a fierce commitment, and hey, the lady also happens to be nuts about dogs! Liscinsky was born and raised just down the highway in Bridgeport where she begged her mother to have a dog even though they lived in a small two family home above a meat market. Her persistence, even as a young child paid off, and her first dog came to live in the cramped quarters, enjoying the benefits of bones from the business below. Liscinsky started her career in corporate America as a computer programmer, “But I liked people

Janice Liscinsky & Friends

too much, and I liked to talk, so I moved into management.” Once again that patience and persistence paid off, leading to becoming Vice President of the company. Mergers and acquisition eventually took her to a larger firm in Manhattan, which meant an exhausting daily commute that ended abruptly September 11, 2001 when America was attacked. “I just remember getting on the train with a crowd of others all piling in, dazed, bloody, dusty, and I realized, this was the end for me. I wasn’t going back.” Where Janice and her husband did go, however, was to Deep River, a town she clearly


thing as “No!” No prong collars, no harsh words nor punishment, no negative responses to commands and behaviors missed. She bases everything on rewards...”first we train with treats so the dog realizes, ‘I must have done something good because I’m getting a treat;’ eventually as the dog matures and progresses, the treats can go away. Then they get life rewards,” Janice adds. She also believes “what we teach inside, you have to take outside,” so the dog learns positive behaviors at the dog training center, then goes outside where the same lessons are taught and reinforced. “It’s the same with what you teach at home. What you teach at home, you have to take on the road.” It really all comes down to common sense, and Licinsky has it to spare, both personally loves because it’s small, accessible, and “is filled with wonderful people.” She decided it was now time to do something for herself. She always loved dogs, now it was time to put that love and knowledge to the test. First, she

became fully educated and certified. That involved a rigorous program from Animal Behavior College in California (she graduated with honors) that included working at a shelter, training with a mentor, teaching classes, and then receiving her CPDT-KA certification (Certified Professional Dog Trainer) from the State of Connecticut. She is also a Canine Good Citizen Evaluator. Her dog training center, conveniently located just off Rt. 9 at Exit 4, is large, clean, bright, and welcoming. In one word, it is a POSITIVE place, both for you and your best friend. Liscinsky’s mantra never waives. It is positive reinforcement at all times, and she claims to be the only “positive dog trainer in the area.” There is no such


and professionally. Training a dog for life is not rocket science, but it involves focus, positive reinforcement, repetition, and consistency. These are not just words, but the cornerstone upon which The Perfect Pup is built and something Janice insists she get from both her animal and human clients. Each dog is evaluated thoroughly before beginning any classes. “You have to really know and study the breed. A Jack Russell learns differently than a German Shepherd,” she advises. Janice offers both private classes done right in the client’s home, or group

classes held at the dog training center. Almost all the training centers around games, first for the humans, then interactively with their dogs. The games serve to give focus to reinforcing the behaviors, and dogs respond well to this. Classes may begin as early as six weeks for puppies and have names like Perfect Puppy I and II, Perfect Family Dog I and II, Not-So Perfect Pup, etc. They are geared for age, level, experience, and behavior,, and Janice makes sure all dogs get a fair shake. “The focus is always optimistic, with a puppy you have to build optimism in order for them to function in our world. It’s a relationship. Training is first and foremost about building a relationship,” the trainer says. “You are there to protect them, and they have to know that at all times.” Heavy emphasis is given to the games and to a client learning how their dog thinks, why they think what they think, and how they react to the myriad of stimuli in the great big world at the end of their leash, outside their window, across the street, and with other dogs. Janice Liscinsky is a woman who loves dogs, who has always loved dogs, and loves the process of training any dog to be the very best they can be for themselves and for the humans with whom they share their lives. It’s what powers her to look a dog in the eyes and only say, “Yes!”

Pet shop, breeder, shelter, rescue organization...however you acquired this new member of your family, from the moment you laid eyes on each other, you have an investment. An investment in that dog’s future, in their well being, in their interaction with your family and the outside world; and perhaps most important of all, an investment borne out at both ends of the leash. Protect that investment! Contact Janice Liscinsky at The Perfect Pup and let her determine what is the perfect training for both of you. (203) 943-2579 www.theperfectpupllc.com 500 Main Street, Unit 30, Deep River


24

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Join The Children’s Heart Foundation at the first Red Tie Gala in New England! This is a semi-formal evening where guests will dress in their best “red attire” and enjoy delectable food, drinks, auctions, and live entertainment in an unforgettable backdrop of an elegant former bank. The event will honor Dr. Lisa Begersen, of Boston Children's Hospital, for her work in the field of Pediatric Cardiology. Funds raised benefit The Children's Heart Foundation to help fund the most promising congenital heart defect (CHD) research. We hope you will help us make a meaningful difference in the lives of those living with CHDs and can join us on November 1st!

6 - 10 PM AT THE SOCIETY ROOM IN HARTFORD, CT Purchase Tickets online at: bidpal.net/RedTieGalaCHFNewEngland

25


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

27


28

Lose Your Head

“You Might Just


29

Don’t Miss The Sleepy Hollow Experience in Sturbridge by RONA MANN “All these, however, were mere terrors of the night, phantoms of the mind that walk in darkness; and though he had seem many specters in his time and been more than once beset by Satan’s diverse shapes in his lonely pre-ambulations, yet daylight put an end to all these evils; and he would have passed a pleasant life of it, in despite of the devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was - a woman.” ...Washington Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Yes, it’s October once more, and how are you going to celebrate Halloween this year? Carve a pumpkin or two...again? Buy those sickening sweet candy corn tri-color treats...again? Rent a costume? Bob for apples? Eat too many mini chocolate bars...again?

Over This!”

Or perhaps you’d like to meet Ichabod Crane, Katrina Van Tassel, and the Headless Horseman up close and personal outdoors, on a chilly fall night, when you can almost feel icy fingertips on your neck, and shiver against the chill left in the wake of a headless Hessian’s wild gallop, created as it streaks by you in the darkness. Remember reading The Legend of Sleepy Hollow when you were in school? The grade you were in doesn’t matter, where you were raised doesn’t matter either, for when you speak of

that scrawny school teacher, his unrequited love, and the terrifying hoof beats of the Headless Horseman, there is a shared nod common to us all, no matter when and where it raised the goosebumps on your arms. Theatrical genius, Brian Clowdus, artistic director of the Serenbe Playhouse, the nation’s premiere site specific outdoor theatre in suburban Atlanta and named Top Artistic director in the Atlanta area, never took a story at face value and never took mounting a production for granted. Rather, he has been breaking boundaries, c r e a t i n g oohs and ahhs, and making the impossible possible across the USA for years with his company, Brian Clowdus Experiences. Clowdus has created environmental theatrical experiences nationwide that have won major awards and high praise from Playbill Magazine, American Theatre Magazine, an Obie Award, and more. The Sleepy Hollow Experience, an immersive, outdoor musical theatre walking experience that re-imagines Washington Irving’s famous tale, is now playing Wednesday through Sunday nights through November 3rd at the easy to reach Old Sturbridge Village; and if you love Halloween, an extraordinary theatre experience, and want a bit of a scare, you don’t want to miss it. Rhys Simmons, Director of Interpretations and Program Manager for the museum in Old Sturbridge Village tells us that this is the fourth year The Sleepy Hollow Experience will be presented in Sturbridge. “It is a way to engage an audience,” he says adding,“since there are fourstages as part of the outdoor production, and the audience moves inter-actively with the production.” Continued on page 30


30


31


32

32

For those for whom accessibility is an issue, just call ahead, and a wheelchair can be provided, if desired. Make no mistake, however, this is no amateur production. Brian Clowdus Experiences employs all professional actors, sound people, and lighting, so all they ask of the audience is to become an integral part of the story through the use of their own imagination and wonder The performance is staged nightly, Wednesday through Sunday and lasts approximately 90 minutes, according to Marketing Manager, Nathan Hardt. He also notes that 300 people can be accommodated at each show, a performance which is strictly geared for audience members age 14 and up, so please leave the little ones home. Simmons says, “Of course there are some scary moments in the piece, but also a lot of humor, songs, and a strong plot thread to

f ol l ow . We are an outdoor living history museum, and this experience just adds to it.” While it’s a reasonably short ride from most Connecticut locales (we checked, and it’s just an hour and a half or less from Middletown, Old Saybrook, the Mystic-New London area, and

New Haven), Simmons and Hardt also urge people attending The Sleepy Hollow Experience to consider spending a day or two in Old Sturbridge Village. “You can experience New England’s largest living history museum by day, while this outdoor production gives the whole area a different feel at night,” says Simmons.


33 minutes, according to Marketing Manager, Nathan Hardt. He also notes that 300 people can be accommodated at each show, a performance which is strictly geared for audience members age 14 and up, so please leave the little ones home. Simmons says, “Of course there are some scary moments in the piece, but also a lot of humor, songs, and a strong plot thread to follow. We are an outdoor living history museum, and this experience just adds to it.”

and libations available at intermission as well. You may contact Old Sturbridge Village for information, further overnight accommodations, dining options, and more at (800) 7331830. Consider this option, so you can truly take in everything this Living History Museum has to offer. Then suspend all belief, open yourself to the dark, and come experience what thousands have already witnessed across the country. You will never forget The Sleepy Hollow Experience.

Both men strongly suggest that those attending The Sleepy Hollow Experience should come earlyand have dinner at any number of restaurants and pubs. A hearty beef stew, chowder, or soup and bread meal is offered at Ichabod’s Tavern prior to the start of the production, and there are additional sweets

“Certain it is, the place still continues under the sway of some witching power that holds a spell over the minds of the good people, causing them to walk in a continual reverie. They are given to all kinds of marvelous beliefs, are subject to trances and visions, and frequently see strange sights and hear music and voices in the air.” ...Washington Irving The performance is staged nightly, Wednesday through Sunday and lasts approximately 90

While it’s a reasonably short ride from most Connecticut locales (we checked, and it’s just an hour and a half or less from Middletown, Old Saybrook, the Mystic-New London area, and New Haven), Simmons and Hardt also urge people attending The Sleepy Hollow Experience to consider spending a day or two in Old Sturbridge Village. “You can experience New England’s largest living history museum by day, while this outdoor production gives the whole area a different feel at night,” says Simmons. Both men strongly suggest that those attending The Sleepy Hollow Experience should come early and have dinner at any number of restaurants and pubs. A hearty beef stew, chowder, or soup and bread meal is offered at Ichabod’s Tavern prior to the start of the production, and there are additional sweets and libations available at intermission as well. If You Go: Please note, shows begin 7:30PM Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays; Fridays and Saturdays there are shows at both 7:30PM and 9:30 PM. (Please arrive at least a half hour before). All performances generally sell out, so get your tickets in advance by visiting their website: www.osv.org….Click on events. You will be asked to select the week you wish to experience The Sleepy Hollow Experience at Sturbridge, and ticket prices and times will then appear for you to choose what will best fit your schedule.


34

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

BE ORIGINAL Original Art | Original Gifts | Original Lifestyle Come see “Abstracts” in the Gallery thru Oct. 13! Original Fine Art Silks & Textiles

Local Pottery Woodworking

Soaps/Candles

Journals/Cards

Tables/Benches

Earrings/Jewelry

Needle Felting

Artistic Frames

Custom Mirrors

Turned Bowls

Woolen Goods Cool Handbags

Local Authors Forged Iron Segmented Turning by Kip Lockhart

22 Darling Road, Salem 860.608.6526 Thurs-Sun 10am-7pm

Stop by and check it out – we’re right behind Salem Valley Farms Ice Cream!

GALLERY • GIFTS • CLASSES Visit online at salemredhouse.com to view or register for upcoming classes

••• Complete Menu • Salads & Appetizers • Wine & Beer • Pizza Housemade Bread Baked Daily • Full Bar and Bar Seating See our website for daily entree, wine & dessert specials ••• 1654 Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook | 860-399-4166 | www.alforno.net

35


36

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Eat, Drink, and be Merry this Holiday Season!

GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF MORE TIME, LESS STRESS, AND LET US CREATE A PERFECT MENU AND MEMORABLE EVENT! AT YOUR HOME, OFFICE, PREFERRED VENUE, OR OUR COZY ‘SISTER’ SPACE,

ththe RiRiverv the ere ew RRoom ervi Ro Roo

at the historic Lace Factory Overlooking the river & steam train! TAKEOUT AND DELIVERY CATERING MENUS ALSO AVAILABLE!

www.cloudninecatering.net (860)388.9999

256 Boston Post Rd. Old Saybrook, CT


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Invitation to Consign JEWELRY | ASIAN WORKS OF ART PAINTINGS | PRINTS | PHOTOGRAPHS

Tuesday, October 8, 10AM–3PM Old Lyme, Connecticut Reservations required: 508.970.3000 info@skinnerinc.com

For buyers, consignors, and the passionately curious F I N D W O R T H AT S K I N N E R I N C .C O M

37


38

@


P

oet-for-hire GennaRose Nethercott dashed off a few stanzas about a fella and me. She busks for work on Brattleboro’s Main Street...a red lipstick smile and a 1952 Hermes Rocket typewriter. With a few details and a tendollar bill she click-clack pounded out pretty words on the little manual. We wait 15 minutes for the goods – dancing on the sidewalk to Pink Floyd streaming from a curbed car radio. GennaRose presents the poem on soft ragged-edged paper in a cellophane sleeve. Each feathered letter pushed into the page forms imperfect inky words you can close your eyes and run your fingers over. A laptop can’t touch this level of romance...only a typewriter. GennaRose isn’t the only scribe typing out award-winning work. Dozens of authors, poets and screenwriters agree. Actor, writer, and collector Tom Hanks, and screenwriter Quentin Tarantino; Danielle Steele’s 100 novels created on a 1946 machine plus brilliant work from late Gonzo journalist Hunter Thompson; play-

39 wright Sam Shepard and songwriter John Mayer – all fiercely loyal to the typewriter. Poet Laureate Maya Angelou’s electric Adler lives in the Writer’s American Museum in Chicago. Richard Poult – the editor of online ETCetera, the magazine for the Early Typewriter Collectors’ Association – talks about the trend in his book The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century. Poult is also known for The Typewriter Manifesto – a wry and satirical ode to the tactile and anti-tech. Inside this tightly knit world of typewriter culture, there are originals like Connecticut’s Greg Fudacz. Infectiously passionate, the keyboard crusader, collector and brilliant historian has dedicated the past fifteen years preserving the romance and magic of this

icon of American industry. From his first humble tag sale find – a Royal portable bargained down from $10 to $5 – Fudacz evolved from a hobbyist into a respected professional and authority. Just back from Dublin, Ireland he is over-the-moon having secured a gorgeous and highly sought-after Waverly typewriter to add to his private collection of about 75 rare machines. Advertised as "An English made typewriter for Englishmen," the circa 1889 Waverly with high sweeping curves and an ingenious chrome paper roll – an innovation, that makes words visible on the face of the page – is a bril-

Facing Page: The Gorham Corona, ca.1931. Promotional typewriter with a Gorham Sterling Silver housing. Top right: Hammond No.1, ca.1884. Made in New York City. Above: Collector Greg Fudacz in his studio demonstrating his Chicago No.3.


40

Above left top shelf, left to right: Crown Index Typewriter, ca.1888. Made in New York City. Burns Typewriter, ca.1890. Made in Buffalo, NY. Top left, bottom shelf: Keystone Nos.1 & 2, ca.1898. Made in Harrisburg, PA. Above right: The Noiseless Standard No.1, ca.1909. Made in Middletown, CT

liant example of the Art Nouveau period in industrial design. At the turn of the 20th Century, Hartford was both the Insurance Capital and the epicenter of typewriter manufacturing – employing a huge industrial workforce at both the Royal and Underwood factories. Initially, the key players Royal and Remington were the contenders and Underwood strictly a ribbon supplier. Remington began to make their own ribbons; pulling the lucrative contract from Underwood and the tables turned. Buying the Remington patents, Underwood started to make their own typewriters and the

company – along with Royal, became the Fords of the robust typewriter industry. The New England riverfront city was a manufacturing hub, with a wealth of talent and expertise and pros turning out industrial, munitions and military products. Companies such as Colt Firearms and Pope Manufacturing of Columbia Bicycles. Demand was high, and typewriters became mass-marketed to feed this new technology – mainly to corporate consumers and only the wealthiest of private citizens. Hartford icon Samuel Clemens – aka Mark Twain – was the most prominent author of his time to try out this new equipment. He

had a love-hate relationship with his 1874 Sholes and Glidden Type-Writer – acknowledged as the first official widely manufactured machine. Twain’s typewriter was the equivalent of $2,500 in 2019 numbers – a huge status symbol for a private citizen. (Old postcards from the era show people crowding around the typewriter in their parlors the way a state-ofthe-art home theatre would claim bragging rights today.) Money be damned – Twain wasn’t happy wrestling this new beast cramping his literary style. In Twainian style, he reportedly dashed off a letter to Remington stating that "he was abandoning the machine" and "it made him want to swear."

Above left: Diskret Cipher Machine/Typewriter, ca.1898. Made in Berlin, Germany. Above right: Pocket Index Typewriter, ca.1887. Made in Bradford, England.


41

Fudacz loves the history of the choice and rare pieces in his ogle-worthy collection. Twenty-one of his prized machines were chosen for their own exhibition at the New Britain Museum of American

Art. The exhibit elevated them beyond function and focused on their beauty and design. Many of these gorgeous oneof-a-kind contraptions were simply prototypes and never made it past go commercially. There are early indexing machines that slowly punch out words from a turning disk one tantalizing letter

at a time. Small typing machines which were able to create encrypted messages during World War 1 cycled through the roster. The Lambert is one of Fudacz's favorites, a 101-piece compact machine in a domed wooden case. It holds the surprise of a full keyboard and featured the RCA Spokesdog Nipper in early advertising. This Steampunk stunner Franklin is elegant with an open half arc keyboard and tall enameled shield. It’s an early design by innovator and inventor Wellington Parker Kidder whose advanced technology later brought the Noiseless Typewriter to market.

glammed-up version of this well-known and humble machine. It was a presentation piece by the Edsel Division of the Ford Motor Company; honoring San Francisco Chronicle Journalist Leon J. Pinkston at the National Press Meeting. Edsel’s specifications were precise: each metal component of the typewriter was to be gold plated – screws, levers, and every surface. It was tricky business down to the millimeter, for the machine was required to function correctly. It did, and the gilded machine is a stunner. No detail was missed – from Pinkston's

The collection also boasts some improbably extravagant stunners that are sure attention grabbers. The gold plated – yup – 1957 Remington Quiet-Riter is the

Top: Crandall New Model, ca.1886. Made in Syracuse, NY. Center left: The Waverley Typewriter keyboard Bottom right: McCool No.2, ca.1909. Beaver Falls, PA.


42

Chicago No.3, ca.1903. Made in Chicago, IL.

Gold Plated Remington Quiet-Riter, ca.1957. Made in Ilion, NY.

Sholes & Glidden, ca.1873. Made in Ilion, NY. First commercially successful typewriter.

Merritt Index Typewriter, ca.1889. Made in Springfield, MA.

Minerva Braille Teaching Typewriter, ca.1928, Made in Leipzig, Germany.

The Waverley Typewriter, ca.1889. Made in London, England.


43 nameplate on the front and the Edsel brand mark emblazoned on the paper table; even the hinges and hardware on the case. Two others of these golden goose machines are in circulation, presented to two other writers at the time. There is one more which steals the limelight and belonged to James Bond Writer, Sir Ian Lancaster Fleming. This machine fetched $48,000 due to its provenance. The antipole of this machine is a pure sterling silver flat-topped Smith Corona popular during the Great Depression. Gorham Silver was commissioned by Smith Corona to create 184 of these luxe typewriters and promotional pieces. They were all to bear the Gorham hallmarks of a rampart, an anchor, and an Old English "G." Despite the dark times, the luxury market survived, and over 1,000 of the machines sold at $125 each, along with a “Sea Robin” grained leather case. (This trans-

lates into $1,800 in 2019 dollars; amazing to grasp considering the times.) Many of these machines disappeared from circulation – likely for scrap during WW II. Author and journalist Gwen Barstow

received lots of press after a 1935 photo of her writing at her own Gorham Corona circulated, a costly and romantic gift presented to her by her writer husband, Bruce Manning. Greg Fudacz continues to collect, with a

warehouse of models patiently waiting refurbishing and ultimate re-entry into grateful hands of faithful keyboarders. There’s also a passel of young converts – like GennaRose – buying into the romantic non-technology. A subculture has emerged. Austin based Typewriter Rodeo wrangles a team of national popup writers-on-demand and broadcasts the work the airwaves. over Typewriters are everywhere: at flea markets, and swap meets; college campuses and indy bookstores. (Even Urban Outfitters was selling vintage Olivetti portables for a stretch!) Fifteen years ago, when Greg Fudacz bonded with that little tag sale portable, he already knew a retro revolution was brewing and makes it an adventure! In uncertain times often, the certainty of the past can make the future brighter. To start your own collection, contact Greg Fudacz at Antikey.Chop @gmail.com or, 860.729.2252

Center: The writer with the collector's wife in the background, Linda Mare, operating an Urban Spirograph, the first movie player. Made in New York City, ca.1921 Bottom: Keystone Nos.1 & 2, ca.1898. Made in Harrisburg, PA.


PLEASE JOIN US FOR CHESTER FIRST FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4th, 2019 FROM 5 - 8 pm FOR AN EHHIBIT OF NEW PAINTINGS FROM HIS HOME & TRAVELS BY LEIF NILSSON WITH LIVE MUSIC BY ARROWHEAD. SPECIAL CONCERT IN THE GARDEN Saturday, October 12th, 2019 from 7 - 10 pm with Tiny Ocean and Daniel Rodriguez Arrowhead strings along on most Sunday afternoons. Find out about the Concerts in the Garden, First Fridays, Leifs paintings, prints and more at

www nilssonstudio com


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

45


46

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

RELAX at SANNO SPA Plan your day spa package or overnight spa package at Saybrook.com.

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

PLAN A SEASIDE ESCAPE AT SAYBROOK POINT INN Overnight packages available Learn more at: Saybrook.com 2 Bridge Street, Old Saybrook, CT 06475|(860)395-2000


47


48

A Conversation with Tom Jennerwien By John Tolmie I walk down to a large wooden outbuilding nestled at the bottom of a rolling grassy hill and knock at the door. A handsomely fit gentleman with a friendly smile silhouetted by a white mustache greets me with a firm handshake and invites me into his studio. Tom Jennerwein’s smiling eyes peak over his spectacles as he laughs, “Please excuse the mess! It’s been awhile since I’ve had a chance to organize, but this is where the magic happens!” His words drift a bit as I take in the eclectic surroundings. Two easels display ongoing works, stacks of masterpieces are piled in haphazard mounds, paint brushes and various mediums clutter the desks and fascinating set-props dot the walls of the interior. As I take in the studio I ask what guided

him to the artist’s life. “I used to watch my grandfather paint when I was 3 or 4 years old. It was mesmerizing! I loved the smell of turpentine and paint! ” Tom recalls, “He would exhibit in Washington D.C. when I was a kid and even donated many of his works to the Smithsonian.” At an early age it was instilled in Tom that being a professional artist wasn’t a far reaching goal and he was encouraged to start painting in his teens; a passion that he has dedicated himself to for the past forty years. He joined the Air Force out of high school and served as a lineman for four years during the Vietnam era. He then served five years in the Army reserves as a nurse and has continued on in the medical profession

ever since. “Painting is my greatest therapeutic outlet. The line of work that I do as a nurse is critical to life. Most patients that I see have a procedure done, and most go well, but then


49 there are those emergencies when they are in a critical state and close to death. I deal with that a lot. So with that kind of stress, I deal with it through my art. It’s a channel to diffuse the pressures that I’m up against during those two hours with that patient.” We discussed his subject matter; shorelines, peaceful landscapes, still-life paintings of fruit, portraits, nudes, and the like. None struck me as a product of stress. But Tom explains that, “The paintings don’t have to come out as gory or dramatic but rather something that’s appealing to the viewer. I’ve been given a good balance. I carry a lot around from my job but my art gives me a great outlet to deal with it.” Tom works in various mediums as an oil painter, watercolorist and plein air painter. “Most of my oils are finished in

the studio and are usually still-life’s, figures or nudes.” Tom explains, “But most are stilllife’s. Still-life’s have a certain genre that people

like to have in their dining room or kitchen area. So they really are timeless.” What drew me to Tom were his seascape paintings; both his watercolors and his oils. “The sea is my greatest inspiration, my biggest draw being near the water. It’s almost like meditating. Once I decide on a subject matter, I go into a sort of zen mode and focus on a particular scenery.” Tom brightens, “Everything seems to fall into place so to speak. It’s an ongoing process, and there are always mistakes. But that’s how I learn. And sometimes those mistakes become an integral part of the painting.” He digs for an old Bob Ross saying. We both chuff, “Happy Accidents!”, and start to laugh. “Yes mistakes continue to help me mature as an artist!” I ask Tom what he feels is his greatest accomplishment as an artist. Tom contemplates and looks up, “Anyone who has bought my art, they have a piece of me on their wall. They get to experience over and over what I experienced. It’s a compliment to me that they are enjoying it in their home.” He smiles, “I guess it just feels good to feel appreciated.” I mention

getting paid is a great way to be appreciated. He laughs and says, “The money is good. Yes. But I would say that being accepted as a member of the International Marine Artists (Guild) at the Mystic Seaport was a huge deal. I’ve been painting there for the past four years and it’s really been an honor.” We discuss being grouped in with other artists there and his eyes brighten. “I’ll be having my first sole exhibit at the Hartford Fine art Gallery through the end of October! It’s Exciting news. My own show for the first time at an incredible venue!” To purchase one of Tom’s pieces visit jennerwein.pixels.com or visit Tom on Instagram @tomjennerwein or email Tom at h2oclr1@Yahoo.com


50

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

If you must break apart, do it together. With a focus on mediation for divorce, custody and financial matters, I help my clients successfully resolve issues in a private, less costly setting, thus avoiding the financial and emotional costs of litigation.

Law Offices of

Miriam Gardner-Frum 860-440-3933 | ctdivorceandmediation.com

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

*4:063%&/5*45"40-&"%&/5*45 /0/FFEMFTt/0%SJMMJOH /0,JEEJOH $BMMGPSBDPOTVMUBUJPOUPEBZ

#PPLBOBQQPJOUNFOUUPEBZBOEXBUDI ZPVSOFXUPPUICFGBCSJDBUFE


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

51


52

to the lee and the sea will be smooth as waxed stone. A place he will see for the first time all in the glow of the knife-edge line. Where he has tasted from. And known, against his feathered skin, by weathers coursing over the dune front and between the houses that stand a ruined phalanx all along the shore. And heard, in the waves’ roar. Beneath a sun dull as molten iron ore he cannot hear it anymore, only the blood, hammering in his ears: fish - fish - fish - fish - fish - fish

Osprey of Long Island Sound Gotta Getta Fish! Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge © 2019 Mark Seth Lender All Rights Reserved Fog, drifts. A knife-edge divides the dawn. Above, clouds and darkness. Below, the darkling sea, at rest. Quiet remnants of a storm that came in the night and left in the night. How the lightning must have terrified him, the young osprey, on the nest on his own. Where he slept alone. The first time in his life. And the night was long. And woke alone also to the terror that is hunger.

Gotta catcha fish, Gotta catcha fish, Gotta catcha – fish -fish - fish Tipping of the tail, Flashing of the scales Gotta catcha - Gonna getta - Gonna find a fish, fish - fish - fish - fish - fish DIVES! - and Rises - DIVES! - and Rises Shaking, the water slaking, a rain of his own making, taking, his life’s force away from him a drop at a time all, for nothing. He circles then hovers the ocean covered granular and dark as emery cloth; he must see through. fish, fish, fish Till I finda fish Till I catcha fish PLUNGES!

The fog lifts. Now Young Osprey makes for the Bight. Where the eddies churn all along the sand bar and to the left and the right menhaden feed on silversides, and the clinker blues feed on them. And him to take big and small as and if he can, written in the circle of life. The signs are good. The water is cool. The bait will rise. The outflow is running

Osprey struggles, falls back pulls up, up, to his neck and shoulders wings outspread around him and the weight of the wet keeping him bound. To give in is to drown (like so many come before him). While the gray of the sky and the blinding eye of day both ignore him. It is all will, he is all in, it is never, or it is NOW:

One! Last! Thrust! - And in his talons …FISH! …FISH! …FISH! …Gotta FISH! …Gotta FISH! I GOTTA FISH!!!


Field Note: On the day he was abandoned the young male osprey called and called to be fed. The “feed me” is a rapid high-speed call, easy to discern in its specificity but also because it is one of an osprey’s few vocal routines, each with little variation. As compared to other birds of prey (and predators in general) they are actually quite talkative. Their quarry, underwater, is not going to hear their landward noise. Nevertheless, their vocal repertoire is limited, obviously so as compared with the corvids (crows, ravens, blue jays, etc.) and certainly in comparison with herring gulls who are loquacious and whose language is highly nuanced and complex. Verbosity is something we correctly associate with intelligence but we also tend to confound the ability to experience emotions. And this may be a mistake.

I have been present when fledgling osprey took their very first flight, several times. It was always the female fledglings that flew first. The males were always behind. In August of 2019, at a well-established nest on a tidal river I watched a typical instance, this time

a slow, measured version of his territorial challenge call. Both that flight pattern and the call that went with it were a warning: “The space wherein this fledgling flies belongs to me. Come near her, I will hurt you.” All the while until she landed he watched over her, then landed alongside her. It might seem cruel that osprey parents abruptly leave, resigning the young to their fate and without first teaching them to fish. But I now think that interpretation of abandonment is a function of our ignorance, not their indifference.

with a striking difference. Both parents and their two fledglings (a female and a male) were on the nest. The moment the young female osprey flapped her wings and actually took flight, her father went with her. They made a wide arc around the nest, his great circle just outside hers and just behind her. All the while he gave

Mark Seth Lender is a producer for wildlife content at Living on Earth ( LOE.org ), the only program on US Public Radio exclusively dedicated to wildlife and environmental reporting.


54

Punt0 Urban Brings Color to Life in Salem Massachusetts


55

By Angela Carontino

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has.” - Margaret Mead Something is happening in Salem, MA. Something exciting. I admit I had never thought to visit Salem. Witches just are not enough to get me to visit a town. But, stunning painted murals on buildings, AKA public art installations, now that excites me! I may be the only visitor to beeline it directly to the Punto “the Point” area of Salem in lieu of Halloween and witches, but I certainly will not be the last. Truth be told, every popular city has its gentrified areas, the cultured regions, full of

photo by Angela Carontino

museums, cafes, restaurants and picturesque parks and gardens that tourists love to roam. Then there are the areas you may avoid, where the socio-economic differences become apparent, the dining options fewer and cafes seem to disappear. The sidewalks may require repair, and buildings may need a coat of paint. Yet, these areas are the homes to hardworking men and women, with beautiful children who like to play and who have all the same hopes and dreams as any tourist visiting that town. Every city struggles with having the “rising tide lift all boats” together. Salem is home to citizens that are committed to just that and are doing it in a most beautiful and inspiring way. The North Shore Community Development Coalition (NSCDC) is a community development non-profit that invests in neighborhoods to create thriving communities. They are just one part of a

collaboration of many to execute “The Point Neighborhood Vision and Action Plan." By their very essence, barriers divide, whether they are invisible or physical. David Valecillos is Director of Design at the NSCDC and described for me the action plan created in 2013 with the City of Salem to break down the invisible barriers in Salem. 1. Improve the quality of life in the neighborhood 2. Bring more private and public investments to area improvements 3. Reduce and eliminate the negative stigma regarding the Point area of Salem First, the NSCDC started by buying the most distressed housing in the area and rehabbing it. They have invested 60 million dollars in affordable housing, and rents are restricted for the residents. They now own almost 300 units, with over 200 of them that needed rehabilitation.

Clockwise from top left: “Villa Alegra” by Antonyo Marest, “Super Dali” by Sipros, Spiral is Untitled by Hoxxoh- 8 Peabody Street, Above: “Le Quedo Bufeaito” by Don Rimx, “The Chrome Dog” by Bikismo, “Colorín Colorado” by Silvia Lopez Chavez, Center: “Life’s Short, Cake First” by Meg Zany


56

Untitled by Pixel Pancho

Next, a concerted effort was launched to reduce crime, create better parks, that were well lit, fenced, and safe for kids to play in as well as efforts to reduce littering. New trashcans were placed in the city, street sweeping was added to more roads, flowers were planted; all increasing the sense of pride local residents had for the Point area. Improvement of the sidewalks in the area was completed, and the necessary removal of some trees was completed. A few streets were paved, and additional lighting added. The rehabilitation of housing also aided in these efforts. The Punto Urban Art Museum is one of the many art projects that was created to remove the negative stigma regarding the Point neighborhood. The open-air museum contains 75 Large-scale murals featuring 40 worldrenowned and 25 local artists, and growing! Art as the Bridge. Turning left onto Peabody Street and you are greeted by “Super Dali," by international artist Sipros, which depicts Dali as an oversized superhero complete with a yellow and blue cape and face mask. Further down the lane, a courtyard on the right is home to four enormous murals on the various brick building walls. “The Chrome Dog” by Puerto Rican artist Bikismo will make you grin from ear to ear, while the mosaic pieces of “Le Quedo Bufeaito” by Don Rimx

The Picasso like wall mural is Untitled by Belin

will have you transfixed as you continuously discover new elements. “Love Child” by Chor Boogie has a fantastical quality hard to describe, but quickly felt as you stand to look up at the towering, colorful work of art. If you stay and study it long enough, you are rewarded by discovering hidden images of birds, clouds, and mountains. “Cat Witch” on Congress Street by Spanish artist Okuda is colorful, geometric and bursts with exuberant color. His style is evocative of great graphic art, a mix of street and glossy catalog all in one. As you journey further down Peabody Street, you encounter the “Local Emerging Artists Wall Project." The murals here feature art and images as varied as the people who created them. The NSCDC website explains, "Every year, there is a call for artists, 25 New England based artists get selected to paint an 8 x 8 feet panel.” This is a real treat as each panel is so different, and each artist is exceptionally talented. It is like being at open mic night for artists! “So Pretty it Hurts” by a local artist features a cat with a bad hair day, looking entirely frazzled. I think we can all relate! “The Queen of the Block” is an extremely impressive mural by Mr Cenz, an artist from the UK. His arresting image has motion and electric color, and you can feel the strength in the woman he has painted. It also evokes a futuristic video game quality, while conveying joy at the same time.

“Eternal Vibrations” by Trek6

“Boogie Bird” by Chor Boogie

Much of the street art and murals are not readily revealed, you will need to hunt down alleys, turn corners to discover the hidden places. Turn a corner, and there is the Strawberry Shortcake cartoon character. You had no idea she was going to make an appearance, but you sure are

photo by Angela Carontino Foreground “Untitled” by CZR PRZ Background “Untitled” by Edward Granger


57

“Cat Witch” by Okuda “Love Child” by Chor Boogie

“Garden Boy” by Pixel Poncho

“Golden” by Spiros

“Migrar” by Felipe Ortiz & Ivan Salazar

“Police Bots” by MTO


58

photo by Angela Carontino

Above: “Untitled” by CPWon Below: Local Emerging Artists Wall Project- closest one shown of woman in blue and white is “Areta” by Local Artist

photo by Angela Carontino


59

happy she did! This is art not just for curious visitors, but for the people who call the Point home. The pride of the residents and families can be felt as they watch you explore unbridled creativity.

and hopeful. The collaboration of so many artists and residents for a common cause to create positive, sustained results is beautiful indeed. Although you can see the partnership, it is what you feel that will move you.

The North Shore CDC is located at 96 Lafayette St, Salem, MA. Murals pepper the buildings and walls of the surrounding neighborhood. Follow them at @urban.art.museum on Instagram and learn more about the Punto Urban Art Museum at http://puntourbanartmuseum.org. To learn more about The Point Neighborhood Vision and Action Plan, visit http://northshorecdc.org.

Beauty comes in so many forms, and a walk down many streets can bring you to tears. A walk down the streets of Punto is inspiring

“So Pretty it Hurts” by Local Artist “The Queen of the Block” by Mr Cenz


60

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Delivered every month!

12 great issues

$29.95

one low price

only

annually ( just $2.49 per month!)

subscribe online at:

inkct.com

DO YOU KNOW SOMEONE WHO LOVES INK?

Mail payment to:

GIVE A GIFT SUBSCRIPTION! T

h

e

m

e

d

T o r e c i e v e c o n t a c t

u

i

o u r u s

m

i

s

m o s t a t a

t

h

e

r e c e n t d s @ i n

InkCT/Subscriptions 71 Maple Avenue Old Saybrook CT. 06475

m

k

e

s

s

m e d i a c t . c

a

g

o

e

k i t m


IT’S A FAST WORLD BUT SOMEBODY NEEDS TO WIN THE RACE...

SLOW MEDIA

3 - 4 PEOPLE TAKE TIME TO LOOK AT EVERY ISSUE WE PRINT

PUT YOUR AD IN INK AND BE SEEN OVER AND OVER AGAIN!

CONTACT US: ADS@INKCT.COM TO BE CONNECTED WITH AN ADVERTISING REPRESENTITIVE NEAREST YOU

61


62

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

2: “We should definitely reallocate a portion of

our current position and begin dropping some advertising content in Ink magazine”

3: “SNAP!”

inkct.com

a

r

k

e

t

i

n

g

A r t i s a n

re:media budgets

1: “The boss thinks we’re wasting half of our marketing budget. They just don’t know which half?”

m

C o n n e c t i c u t

d

e

s

c

i

o

n

s

a

r

e

n

o

t

e

a

s

y

Contact us at: advertising@inkct.com


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

Mystic Knotwork.com A New England Tradition For Over 60 Years

Home Decor Wine Stoppers Coasters Trivets & More

Voted Best of New England 2019 by Yankee Magazine 25 Cottrell St. • 2 Holmes St. Downtown Mystic, CT 06355 860.889.3793

MysticKnotwork.com info@MysticKnotwork.com Open 7 days a week

63


64


65

The Layered Art of Brian Shaw r. Lincoln rocking Ray-Bans, super-happy-deep-sea elephants cruising under cruise ships...the mugshots of Jim Morrison and Marilyn Monroe. This is just a taste of the surrealist pieces, and we haven’t even touched on the layers of sexy textural abstracts. It’s all the brilliant, fun, artistic stuff of Brian Shaw. The real-deal-nice-guy collage and mixed-media artist extraordinaire. With 15 years of gorgeous output, Brian remains kindly modest and downplaying collective kudos for his eye-grabbing creativity. It’s clearly about the work, not the ego. There’s a personal passion for the electricity of his process-driven work – precise work shot with color and detail that draws the attention. We’re relaxing and talking art on this summer evening along with his biggest supporters: girlfriend Mykel and her young, teenaged son Jake. (Jake ¬– inspired by the stacks of Brian’s works – is already making his own collages. He shyly whispers to his mentor, “When will I be in a magazine?”) Brian unwraps years of work from a seemingly bottomless bin for us to review. He posits out loud about the way the public viewer connects with his pieces. “Small-scale work seems to challenge people. They’re dared to be drawn in closer; really examine the work and enjoy a uniquely personal experience.”


66

Clearly, there’s a provocative backstory to arrive at this career point. While Brian continues to dive and pull from his archive of color and happiness – eager to share – I put him on the spot; coaxing him to describe his process. There is a pause and thoughtful head-tip; light bulb lit. “I have a BA in Business Management, and my day job is technical and in the corporate world. That said, I’ve been drawing since I was 4 and well, I just grew tired of it.” Shaw was impatient and restless with the trite creative limits of paint and pencils. He was itching for a breakthrough. How do you short circuit the traditional artistic process for instant gratification? He found his eureka moment flipping through a National Geographic magazine about 15 years ago, unearthing a ready source of endless color on the glossy pages of monthly mags. Shaw’s signature process incubated in a flurry of torn pages and provocative images he began amassing from mountains of glossy mags and assorted ephemera. The artist finally answered his personal challenge to recreate the colors in his mind’s eye with the ready-made visuals he found in paper and magazine imagery. His highly successful first piece illustrates this idea. The vibrant Chrysler logo, a testament to the artist’s organized business mind with layer upon layer of minuscule paper bits cut with a surgeon’s precision. “Thinking about digital versus analog work, I’ve challenged myself to see if my fine cuts can beat digital accuracy.” A meticulous image of a 1953 Buick Special followed – equally detailed and assembled in four-paneled modules. Next, a 1941 Caddy in similar style; enhanced with the addition of iridescent foils. This theme took hold and more followed along in similar fashion. “I think about John Chamberlain when I consider my work.” (Chamberlain’s striking colorful sculptures were in actuality at second look, constructed of twisted automotive scrap metal.) “The way I approach art – (in sections and puzzle parts) – agrees with Chamberlain’s idea that, ‘everything has a fit.’” Gerhardt Richter’s controversial and much-debated Squeegee Paintings – yes...made with a squeegee and a scraper ¬– egged Shaw on, to keep pushing past the artistic limits of simple tools and materials. Speaking of tools, a pivotal piece was Brian’s first rendition of a Victorinox Swiss Army knife. “My original Swiss Army knife was

one of the first ten works I created. It was also the first piece I managed to sell!” Shaw reached out to the marketing gurus at Victorinox about the piece. “I sent along a few pictures, and there was a flurry of emails inquiring about me and how I created my art. I also told the Swiss executives how much I loved their knives.” A few weeks later, Shaw received a reply from the company explaining that the Elseners – the family that owns and operates Victorinox, “...loves all fan art relating to their company’s cutlery, and they were quite interested to know how


67


68

much I wanted for it.” The Victorinox folks were bowled over with the piece with one caveat. He was asked to change the date on the knife in his image from 1891 to 1884 – commemorating the exact year the company began supplying their knives to the Swiss Army. Transaction completed: the work traveled to Switzerland; hanging in one of the main meeting rooms at Victorinox Headquarters. A huge deal coup for the evolving artist! Shaw’s early representational works appear simple but are incredibly complex in their execution. The actual process is impossibly intricate. Works often consist of hundreds of minuscule half-bites of paper morsels morphing into stunning clarity. Fifteen years into his career, Shaw’s expanding body of work continues to evolve – shuttling in style between surrealism and his original signature of mixed-media abstraction. Current work is deeper and more sophisticated, with modular layers of vibrant color, full of surprises...provoking, irreverent and ingenious. The new goods are more developed; incorporating an expanded lexicon of materials used and some clever tricks with assembly. There’s also more to the color...deeper and more complex with amazing

shading and movement. With a pool of unstoppable work on the living room floor that evening, there is instant excitement in the look twice visuals, and you’re hooked. The delivery sings pitch-perfect in a rich language of innovative found media and WOW...there is all kinds of stuff embedded in the canvas! The artist started out scrounging goodies from flea markets, and everything that could be potential material was – and is – up for grabs. Found items have been plastic shards, donated stacks of long-expired magazines and even a crosshatched foil layer autopsied from the innards of a Goldfish Cracker bag. Shaw’s use of unexpected textures invites a deeper dive in. The 12” x 12” Poltergeist is small and intimate. It is designed to radiate from a central point. There’s a surprise of opalescence to stop your eye, with Shaw’s addition of a waxed paper layer, cleverly opaquing areas of the canvas into deep frosty pools. Mesh is a fascinating modular piece – created in highly dimensional sections of 100-150 pieces. The base material is a handmade paper constructed from a slurry of liquified pulp.


69

Next, a bright piece of yellow plastic was added, and then the entire confection actually built off the page in modules. Bad Day at the Beach is a retro pink polka dot, tissue paper nod to hot bikini summers. There’s the Newtown piece. Shaw’s local ties to Sandy Hook and Newtown are the catalyst for this architectural turn...an early September exhibition in mind. The artist wanted to offer locals a recognizable image to embrace. “I found a photo of Newtown’s oldest commercial building – 33 Main St. The original is black and white and based on the automobiles, I dated it from the mid to late 1940s. I’m translating it to the best of my ability and artistic license into a 16” x 20” full-color rendition.” Per usual, his latest best is superb. Brian Shaw exhibits regionally, with previous group shows at The Washington Art Association, Kent Art Association and Ridgefield Guild of Artists plus, several solo exhibits. For information on the artist’s work and upcoming exhibitions visit @brianlikespaper on Instagram.


70

T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

INSTINCTIVELY DIFFERENT>>

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n


T h e

P r e m i e r

R e s o u r c e

t o

t h e

C o n n e c t i c u t

A r t i s a n

71


72

Dustbowl Revival's Liz Beebe Is All That‌.. and a side of Tacos. Profile by Ali Kaufman Do not let her petite frame and ethereal good looks fool you, Liz Beebe, lead singer of "Dustbowl Revival," is a force to be reckoned with. This New Hampshire native has as much substance and strength as she does sugarcoat sass. Many northeast fans came to know of the band from their performances at the popular Rhythm & Roots Festival that happens over Labor Day weekend every year. They have

Lupetin out front on guitar and vocals with Liz interjecting her booming vocals, enveloped by Daniel Mark on Mandolin, Connor Vance on Fiddle, Matt Rubin on Trumpet, Ulf Bjorlin playing Trombone, James Klopfleisch on Bass and Josh "The Drummer" Heffernan banging it out on the kit.

been on the line up 3 times, twice in consecutive years, which speaks volumes about how they were received by the crowds. This year they played one of their two sets at Rhythm & Roots with The Hot Club of Cow Town in a tribute to the music of The Band. The main stage was full of performers as the 8 members of Dustbowl combined with the trio for songs like Rag Mama Rag and Cripple Creek. It was apparent the musicians were having as much fun as the fest-goers, but that is what you grow to expect after discovering, Josh

Liz came to the band via a posting she responded to in 2013 and quickly went from working full time to full-time musician. Her prior stint with "The Satin Dolls," a 1940s style singing/dancing group made her a perfect choice. Dustbowl's sound at the time was considered sort of a retro-swing, Dixieland Jazz. Her original plan of moving out to California to pursue acting was leading her down a new path, which continues to unfold before her in several directions. Dustbowl Revival has a much anticipated new album that should be

out early next year, and Liz has a cut on it that she co-wrote with Zac. Liz speaks highly of her time with DBR and collaborating on the material that gets brought to the table but sometimes, "You want to create without compromise," thus, "Hush" was born about 5 years into her association with DBR. Hush is a lovely departure, ten sweet songs, and a way to connect with family and friends that are growing their families. Not just for babies, or even kids for that matter, anyone can be soothed by Liz's softer side that she reveals on "Baby Beluga" or the Beatles "Blackbird." This first foray into solo recording has given Liz the motivation to continually look inside and write, much to her delight, (and ours), "Whole songs are in there!".

Photo by


y Becca Murray

73

Seth Jacobson Photography

Truck. Liz expressed her gratitude for her husband's unwavering support as she pursued her calling. "He has been so flexible, I was like, whatever you need, we can do this, I believe in you." Taco Cat Truck is now up and running with hopes of becoming a full restaurant location in the future, and the couple are ensconced in their new home here on the East Coast.

Those songs are now being sussed out, and a brand new solo album is taking shape with 9 songs going into Sam Kassier’s Great North Sound Studio. Liz launched an Indiegogo campaign under the title, Beebe’s Debut Solo Album to take care of the business side of making music. While Liz is excited to take this creative avenue, she wants to make it clear that she is still just as much a part of Dustbowl Revival and you will find her out on tour. Seth Jacobson Photography

Beebe’s husband, Berklee Graduate and former bass player in the band, Echoes de Luxe, took a job managing the high profile Los

Angeles eatery, “Broken Spanish” just as Liz was getting busy with Dustbowl Revival. Fast forward to May of 2018 and their visit back to New Hampshire to spend time with family. Liz's parents brought up an idea they had been kicking around, a Food Truck Pod to take up residence on a property they have in Kittery Maine. Over happy-hour, the pair made the decision to buy a friend's fully functional food truck, move to Maine and Seth Jacobson Photography start-up Taco Cat

For more details on tours, music and everything Liz, Dustbowl Revival or Taco Cat Truck, please visit these sites. Lizbeebe.com Dustbowlrevival.com TacoCatTruck.com


74

The

Cheesemonger Paul Partica, - The Cheese Shop, Centerbrook CT

Photo by Paul Partica

T

his article is a continuation of an effort to help answer the question, what cheeses should I choose for a tray selection? Once you’ve determined the amount of cheese you need based on the number of guests, other foods being served, time of day, beverage of choice, then determine the number of cheeses you want to serve. As a general rule anywhere between two to four ounces per guest will work. For example, a long party serving wine will require more cheese than an after dinner coffee affair. Then just choose a cheese from each family and your dilemma is solved. In the INK 2019 August issue, we covered the Blue Cheese family. Our current choice is the washed rind family. The washed rind family is very similar in many ways to the soft-ripening family. Both of these families are very

young, about 30 days old when shipped. They get softer and run when ripe, and should be consumed within a few weeks of delivery. A few of the aged washed rind cheeses will be discussed at the end of the following list. The major difference compared to the white mold soft ripening collection is the washed rind’s darker brownish orange outer covering. This is derived from a b-linen bacteria washed on the outside of the cheese. The cheese is then ripened in a refrigerator with a higher moisture content than most cheeses to help the b-linens growth. This causes the cheese to become a little sticky with a more pungent aroma and taste. As the cheese ages it will become even stickier and more pungent. There are many members in this family. Perhaps one of the best-known examples is German Limburger. This offering gets a bad rap because of its reputation

as a deadly knockout smelling strong cheese. In reality, if eaten at the proper time, I consider this cheese to be one of the milder washed rind cheeses and it is very enjoyable. At first one can presume by the smell and wet outer rind of this family that the cheese is overripe and should be discarded. This is not true. The following selection is a grouping of some of the more popular members in the family. I really like them because they add a totally different flavor and color to your cheese selection. I’ve tried to rate them into four categories, mild, medium, strong and aged, but because of the way they ripen and the aging process each cheese can often fit into any of the groups. So, let’s assume the following list works if all cheeses were tasted in their perfect condition.


75

Family-Washed Rind Mild Washed Rind Limburger (Germany) This is a small 6-7oz cheese from Germany that was originally created by the Belgium Trappist monks in the 19th Century. Its known for its strong pungent smell. The cheese is paired nicely with thin sliced raw onions on a dark bread or baguette. Please notice that in spite of its reputation I still place it in the mild grouping.

Diva (Connecticut, United States) This is a new favorite of mine created by Arethusa Farms in Litchfield Connecticut. The cheese weighs about seven to eight ounces, square in shape and about an inch thick. Diva has a sweet tangy nutty flavor with a slight pungent aroma. Pairs well with semi-dry red wines and Farmhouse ales.

Pont’Leveque (France) This is one of the oldest French cheeses made in Normandy which dates back to the twelfth century. I’ve seen this in both a small seven to eightounce square size similar to Diva but it is also found in a large three-pound form. Its rind tends to be a little drier than other washed rinds but this too can vary with age.

Epoisse (France) Made in the Burgundy region in France this is one of the best known and popular cheeses on any tray. In wine talk it’s the Chateau Lafite of cheese. It’s a small eight-ounce wheel about an inch thick and it can also be found in a half size half-moon offering. The cheese is creamier than most when ripe and at room temperature it will run like fondue.

Taleggio (Italy) This is a very creamy semi-soft cheese with an edible rind made in the Lombardy region of Italy. It dates back to Roman Times. The cheese comes in a square about six pounds. It is only aged for forty days and comes to market very young. The cheese ripens fairly fast so week to week its strength will alter. The cheese is often used in cooking and recommended by many chefs.

Medium Washed Rind Oma (Vermont USA) Produced by the Von Trappe family in Vermont this is a nice addition to the washed rind family. It comes in a two-pound wheel so it is usually cut to order. It’s one of the few young raw milk versions available because it is made in the USA. All imported cheeses under sixty days old need to be made from pasteurized milk to enter the country. Its been said that you will sing a little better after eating some Oma.

Fromage d’Chaumes (France) Chaumes is a very popular cheese in our store. It comes in a five-pound wheel about twelve inches in diameter and a full inch thick. It’s a little more orange in color as compared to the more brownish hews of other washed rinds. This pasteurized cow’s milk cheese enters our county just over four weeks old. Munster (France) This cheese is not to be confused with milder domestic muenster, they have nothing in common. This pasteurized cow’s milk cheese dates back to the Middle Ages. They come in small rounds as little as three or four ounces. The Munster cheeses shipped to the USA are also made from pasteurized milk.

Strong Washed Rind, (Nose plug needed) wash hands twice after handling Stinking Bishop (English) What can I say about this cheese? The name says it all. They actually have a Stinking Bishop Fan Club in England. The current cheese originated in 1972. It gets its name from the cheese making process which includes a bath in a perry made from Stinking Bishop Pears. The taste is rather nice but getting past the aroma is a challenge. Liederkrantz (United States) Leiderkranze is a domestic version of German Limburger that originated in 1891. It used to be sold in little boxes. The company was sold several times, finally production was halted in 1985. However, in 2010, the DCI Cheese Company of Wisconsin started production again and it is now available only wrapped in foil.. It’s still stronger than Limburger.

Aged Examples Gruyere (Swiss) This large eighty-pound wheel is best known for making Fondues, Quiche, French onion soup and often found on many a cheese tray. Its washed rind finish helps create the great taste this cheese is known for. You will see more of this sticky rind the older the cheese is. Ages can vary from six months to over eighteen months. Appenzeller (Swiss) One of my favorite cheeses. Appenzeller is given a bath in white wine and a recipe of herbs and spices when it is first made. It also owes its great flavor to a little washed rind on its exterior finish. This cheese is over 750 years old.

All I can say is don’t be afraid of this family. The cheeses have a wonderful flavor that adds to any cheese tray. Be sure to know what condition your cheese is in and as I always say, try before you buy. Don’t take the salesperson’s word for it or assume the best buy date is a true indication of the condition or its taste. Regardless how I rank them, just a little more time can jump a cheese into the next strength category. Paul Partica, The Cheese Shop www.cheeseshopcenterbrook.com


By Art LiPuma, General Manager SeaSide Wine & Spirits, Old Saybrook

South Africa South African wines have recently become more popular in the last decade or two, but there was not much thought of exporting wine previous to that. South Africa has actually only been growing grapes since the mid 1600’s which is when the first vines where planted. The wines were replanted in the early 1900’s due to the spread of phylloxera (a disease of the vines cause by an insect that feeds on the roots of the vines) This problem has been seen all over the world. The great amount of replanting proved to cause an over production of wine. In the mid 1950’s the government took control of the pricing and the KWV quarantine system limited the quantity of vines being planted. In the late 1990’s KWV pulled their regulations and South Africa was able to become the eighth largest wine producer in the world. From

the early 1900’s to the early 21st century production of wine has gone from 23 million gallons per year to over 200 million. The export business has grown significantly to aid in these sales. Another factor for the increase is the improvement in the quality wine that is produced. South Africa grows their grapes in the Cape Vineyards which is in the southwestern part of the country that follows the coastline. The major wine regions are Olifants River, Klen Karoo, Breede, River Valley and (Swasrtland, Darling, Tulbagh, Parral, Tygerberg, Stellenbosch, and Cape Point) All of these are considered the Coastal region. The Olifants region was once thought of the major area for producing bulk wine due to the abundance of grapes grown in the heavily naturally arrogated land. Recently they have been putting much

Photo of the Stellenbosch wine region close to Cape Town, South Africa Photo courtesy Benjamin B


more attention into the quality of the wine. Within the wine Regions are smaller wine districts. There are well over twenty district that represent the best wines from that particular region .The major grapes grown here are: Chenin Blanc, Colmbard, Cabernet Sauvignon , Shiraz, and Pinotage. The most widely grown grape is Chenin Blanc. This grape was once mostly used in making Brandy. The other grapes that are grown in much smaller amounts are: Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and Chardonnay. Over the years the red wine production has doubled. Recently they have been experimenting with other grapes that originated from countries in Europe. Most of these wines are varietal wines meaning made mostly of one particular grape but includes a small percentage of something else. By South African law it must contain a minimum of 85% of the grape that is on the label. The blended wines are slowly becoming more popular. Generally, South

African wines are low in acidity due to the low ph in the soil and the hot wet climate. They sometimes add Tartaric Acid in the wine making. Chenin Blanc is by far one of the most popular white grapes. This grape is quite dry but in other areas of the world this could be a bit of a fruity of a wine and will pair well many seafood dishes. As for the most popular red that would be Pinotage, which is a native grape of South Africa. This grape is a hybrid grape of Pinot Noir and Cinsault. This wine is a bit earthy and dry, which will accompany most barbecue meats including ribs and burgers. Next time you are shopping for wine take a peak in the South African section and try something different and unusual and the price points are generally something you can’t pass up! Cheers!


78


79

with the basic kosher salt and fresh ground pepper. But you can garnish this chicken with anything you like so long as it fits in the pan around the chicken. So here are the ingredients in this version. Feel free to substitute anything you please including the brick. If you don’t happen to have a heavy brick lying around, feel free to place a heavy pot or pan as a substitute for the brick. It works just as well.

Written and Photos by Bob Zemmel, Owner of Alforno Trattoria

Chicken Under A Brick or “Pollo al Mattone” For those of us who may be tired of ordering a hopefully well roasted, juicy chicken in one of best local restaurants for upwards of $26 to $30, this Chicken Under a Brick is a faster cooking method rather than roasting a chicken for 45-60 minutes at home. Additionally, it is a one-pan dish. This old Florentine recipe simply requires that your meat department butcher butterfly a small chicken for you. Remember your local butcher is your best friend when it comes to purchasing meat. (The same applies for your fishmonger or fish department leader.) Known as Pollo al Mattone in Italian, this modern technique allows for a lot of flexibility. Traditionally it calls for using a cast iron pan, but I have found that a thick, quality aluminum non-PTFE, nonstick pan makes for a bulletproof, never stick crispy chicken skin. The recipes vary all over the place regarding the size of the chicken, the vegetables, herbs, and miscellaneous ingredients. We have the following choices: - Poussin,- baby chicken, 4 weeks old about 16 ounces make a for a delicious single portion. A special order item and a bit on the expensive side. - Cornish Game Hen, 6 weeks old, about 2-2.2 pounds will feed two people and makes for excellent flavor as well. - A small Fryer chicken, 8 weeks old. 2.5 pounds will feed 2 people comfortably. These are hard to find, as most poultry producers now fatten the fryerbroilers to 3.5-4 pounds and that makes for a much longer cooking time, and you might throw up your hands and ask "what's the point?"

Ingredients: This chicken shown here was a free-range chicken from the meat case of a local supermarket weighing in at 2.8 pounds. It is garnished with baby, creamy potatoes, a couple of garlic cloves, some shitake and oyster mushrooms, butternut squash cubes and a couple of fresh thyme springs along

• One small chicken, whatever is available and will fit in your pan. • 2-3 TB of vegetable oil to coat the pan as needed • The weight, either a foil-wrapped brick or heavy pot/pan • A couple of cloves of garlic • Half dozen baby potatoes • Some butternut squash cut into approximately one-inch cubes. ( A lovely autumn touch) • A lemon to squeeze a bit of juice • A couple of fresh thyme sprigs • A few chopped chives or Italian parsley for garnish • A little white wine, chicken stock, or even water to create a little sauce at the end of the cooking process.

Procedure: Preheat your oven to 375 degrees if your chicken is over two pounds. Pat your chicken of whatever size thoroughly dry and season both sides generously with kosher salt and pepper. Turn on the burner to medium heat and bring the pan to temperature. Add the oil, the quantity adjusted to the size of your pan and chicken. If the little water droplets jump, your pan is ready. Slowly lower the chicken skin side down into the hot pan and listen for the sizzle. Now weight your chicken with the brick or whatever you have and fry on medium heat. At this point, you can add all of the other ingredients surrounding the chicken. Cook until the skin side looks golden. You can check this with tongs or a sharp tined fork by gently lifting the corner of the chicken, (weight off). This could go from five minutes or more depending on the size of your bird. (If your chicken is on the small size, it may cook in as little as ten minutes, you can help the potatoes and squash along by par cooking them in the microwave until they are somewhat tender before the pan-frying.) Now carefully turn the chicken over to do the interior side. You might have to temporarily remove the side items so you can set the bird back into the center of the pat to brown this side. If so, return the weight on top of the chicken and place all the side items around it. You can sprinkle these side items with a little salt and pepper, circling the chicken. If your chicken is on the larger size, after a few minutes, place the pan onto the top rack of your preheated oven. Set your timer for five minutes. Check the thicken by piercing the leg with an instant-read thermometer to reach 180 degrees, or the tines of a fork and look for the juices to run clear. When the chicken is done, remove the pan from the oven and place on a heatproof surface and allow to rest for five minutes skin side up for the juices to settle inside. Now you can cut in half or into pieces, sprinkle with minced fresh chive or parsley and serve with the assorted potatoes, squash, and mushrooms, etc. If there is any liquid left in the pan, squeeze the lemon juice, and you can add an optional pat of butter, heat, and swirl, adjust for salt and pepper, and you will have a sensational sauce to spoon over the finished chicken. This is a world-class entrée or at least top-flight Italian dish that never ceases to please.


80

OCTOBER EVENTS

OCTOBER EVENTS AT SCOTCH PLAINS TAVERN NFL Sunday Ticket: Don’t miss a game! Live Music:

Month of October - Westbrook Events at Water’s Edge Resort and Spa WINES BY THE WATER Saturday, October 5th – 2pm to 5pm Take a sip around the world and enjoy a tasting of 30 different wines from 5 regions of the world!

A TRIBUTE TO FRANK SINATRA & DEAN MARTIN Saturday, October 12th| Cocktail Hour: 6PM | Dinner Show: 7PM Cabaret Dinner Show $55++ | Performed by Echoes of Sinatra & Dino FALL FEST Monday, October 21st - 25th 50% off 50-minute Spa Treatments | Fall Food and Drink Specials

LIVE MUSIC AT SEAVIEW BISTRO Friday, October 4th – JCDC Saturday, October 5th – Trish Radil & Keith Cooper Duo Friday, October 11th – JCDC Saturday, October 12th – Nick Fradiani Sr. Friday, October 18th – Rahsaan Langley Project Saturday, October 20th – Nick Fradiani Sr. Friday, October 25th – Nick Fradiani Sr. Saturday, October 26th – Nick Fradiani Sr. REPEAT EVENTS Monday – Free Bar Trivia | Lobster Boil $25 Friday – Live Music | Prime Rib $19.95 Saturday – Live Music Sunday – Brunch $39.95++ from 9am to 3pm Water’s Edge Resort and Spa 1525 Boston Post Rd, Westbrook CT 860-399-5901 | WatersEdgeResortAndSpa.com

n us for

BYOB SUNDAY BRUNCH

Bru un nch in The Riverview R Room

The Riverview Room at the Lace Factory SUNDAYS: May - December

Enjoy Sunday brunch in the Riverview Room at the historic Lace Factory, overat Th he Lace Facto oryy overlooking the river and steam m train! looking the river and steam train! Brunch is BYOB and features a full brunch buffet,   omelet carving station, chef’s surprises, and bloody Mary and  bar,    mimosa set-ups to accompany your favorite spirits & sparklings  *Corkage fee and  beverage charges apply* from 10am – 2pm (last      seating at 1pm) $24.95++ Adults / $12.95++ Kids 10 & under For Reservations: Tel. 860-526-4445 www.thelacefactory.com 161 River St. Deep River, CT

 























Wednesday, 10/2 – Keith Cooper and Trish Radil from 5:30pm Thursday, 10/3 – Tyler Marshall from 5pm Friday, 10/4 – Paul Lussier Band from 8pm Saturday, 10/5 – Avenue Groove from 8pm Wednesday, 10/9 – Brian May from 5:30pm Thursday, 10/10 – Eric Nass from 5pm Friday, 10/11 – Sin Sisters from 8pm Saturday, 10/12 – The Leftovers from 8pm Wednesday, 10/16 – Borderline Genius from 5:30pm Thursday, 10/17 – Joe N’ Me from 5pm Friday, 10/18 – Michael Cleary Band from 8pm Saturday, 10/19 – Nightshift from 8pm Wednesday, 10/23 – 2 Cat Zoo from 5:30pm Thursday, 10/24 – Carrie Ashton from 5pm Friday, 10/25 – Mass-Conn-Fusion from 8pm Saturday, 10/26 – TBA from 8pm Wednesday, 10/30 – Dan Ringrose from 5:30pm Thursday, 10/31 – TBA from 5pm REPEAT EVENTS: Happy Hour Specials: Monday – Friday from 3pm – 6pm Mondays: Monday Night Football Specials Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday from 5pm – close Wednesdays: Ladies Nite 1/2 Price Wine Bottles All Day and Live Music from 5:30pm – 8:30pm Thursdays: Live Music 5pm – 8pm and NFL Specials Fridays: Prime Rib from 5pm – close & Live Music from 8pm – 12am Saturdays: Live Music from 8pm – 12am Sundays: Brunch from 11:30am – 3:00pm and NFL Specials Scotch Plains Tavern, 124 Westbrook Road, Essex CT Call 860.662.4032 or visit scotchplainstavern.com

SUSAN POWELL FINE ART, MADISON October 4 - November 9 Vincent Giarrano: City Scenes. Please join us and meet the artist, for the Opening Reception, Friday, October 4, 5 to 8 pm. We are proud to present this exciting new solo show of nationally acclaimed artist Vincent Giarrano's latest work. This exhibit of 30 oil paintings showcases fresh perVincent Giarrano, Felicia in Chelsea, Oil, 24 x 36 inches spectives and new textures of New York City, focusing on contemporary women of the city, who provide continual inspiration to the artist. Giarrano is well known for his high level of realism, and yet painterly style, in his depiction of fascinating women in complex interior and exterior urban settings. His paintings have been major museum exhibitions, including the Smithsonian in Washington DC and the National Portrait Gallery in London. This is our 11th Vincent Giarrano solo show at the gallery! Susan Powell Fine Art is located at 679 Boston Post Road, Madison, near the fire station. Gallery hours are Tuesday - Saturday, 11am - 5pm, and anytime by appointment. For further information, please call (203) 318-0616, email us at susanpowellfineart@gmail.com and visit www.susanpowellfineart.com to see works in the show.


81 CINDY STEVENS FINE ART October 12 – Clinton

LYME ART ASSOCIATION October 17 – Old Lyme

"Illumination" is the new art show at Cindy Stevens Fine Art in Clinton, featuring work by Bob Spooner of Middletown, and new work from Cindy Stevens who has just returned painting in from Maine. Bob works in watercolor and acrylic, and Cindy works in oil with a palette knife.

Lyme Art Association’s signature fundraising gala Palate to Palette features sumptuous fine food from top regional restaurants and caterers, a wine and beer bar in the gallery, and a silent auction of new artworks and art experiences. All proceeds benefit Lyme Art Association exhibitions and special projects. Thursday, October 17, 6-9pm. For tickets and more information, visit www.LymeArtAssociation.org or call (860) 434-7802

You are invited to the opening reception on Saturday October 12th from 5-8. Refreshments will be served! Cindy Stevens Fine Art is located at 30 East Main Street in Clinton. The show will be up from in October and run until mid-November. Call Cindy at 860-304-1666 for gallery hours and more information, or visit cindystevensfineart.com or the gallery facebook page.

FIBER EXHIBIT 2019 AT ART OF THE MAC September 19 - November 1 - Milford Opening Reception: October 3rd 5:30-7pm

MERCY BY THE SEA October 13 - Madison Poetry Reading and Original Art Exhibition - Members of CT River Poets and the Guilford Poets Guild will be holding a reading on October 13, 2019 at 4:30 pm The members of both groups include published, established poets including several area poets laureate. The inspiration for these poems will be the original artwork by Old Saybrook artist Judy Perry that is on display in the Mary C. Daily gallery located at Mercy By The Sea through November 12, 2019. The title of Perry’s solo show is "She is Water, Healing Sources, Healing Forces". The paintings include women’s faces, seascapes and marsh scenes created in watercolor and pastel. In Julie Weavers recent blog she described Judy’s work as “a combination of loose but methodical strokes forcing one to linger on the surface of the painting, marveling at the sculpted pigment. Perry is what I would call a sculptor trapped in a painters body”. Join CT River Poets and the Guilford Poets Guild as they are inspired by Perry’s artwork creating paintings with words in ekphrastic poetry. The joining of two creative venues results in a powerfully emotional experience. There will be a full moon labyrinth walk following the reading, all are invited. Mercy By The Sea 167 Neck Road, Madison, CT 203.245.0401 mercybythesea.org & Judyperryart.org

Enjoy some sips and nibbles and join us on October 3rd at 5:30pm for a special exhibit of Fiber Art at the MAC, 40 Railroad Avenue in downtown Milford, CT. Free and open to the community! Can’t make the reception? Pop in during office hours Tuesdays through Fridays 10am5pm. Call ahead 203.878.6647. This exhibit will be judged by Ruben Marroquin, an artist and textile/surface designer from the Fashion Institute of Technology. Ruben studied at the National Textile Workshop in Paris, France and started his career while studying painting at the Reveron Fine Arts School in Caracas, Venezuela in the late 90s. Marroquin works primarily with textiles, enhancing the graphic elements of linear pliable materials through a unique sculptural approach. His process has evolved over two decades from traditional hand embroidery to large scale installations with renowned interior designers. Marroquin continues to teach weaving workshops in schools, sharing his expertise and involvement with the craft with students of all ages.

Zahn Community Art Gallery Thru October 17, 2019 - Westbrook A group exhibition featuring selected works by members of the Connecticut Valley Camera Club at the Valentine H. Zahn Community Gallery at Middlesex Health Shoreline Medical Center. The Gallery is open during regular business hours and is located at 250 Flat Rock Place, Westbrook, CT. For more information, contact Middlesex Health at 860-358-6200 or zahngallery@gmail.com. Photo credit: Roger Charbonneau, Jr., Lightning Over the Amtrak Bridge


OCTOBER EVENTS

82 HYGIENIC ART Our Inheritance | Opening Reception Sat, Oct 19, 5pm-8pm Exhibtion in the upper gallery on display until Nov 2nd

of operation 11am to 7pm, 7 days a week (weather permitting). Tickets night day of event $30 *Eat Meat! Satisfyingly Sauced! It's Piglicious!*

Artist Claudia Flynn will reveal, illustrate, and elevate her view of the sancitiy of life individually lived through x-rays of the human body. Each piece in the show will illustrate an X-ray film or scan in conjunction with mixed media resulting in a combination of 2-d and 3-d works. Artist Statement: My art is rooted in human experience and intuition. I aim to bring to my craft an authentic voice and a resonant presence. It is this intensity of inquiry and discovery as emotional imperative that is the driving force behind everything that I make. My duty is to tap this reservoir, to extract and distill the numinous elements gleaned from a sentient life and in-

terpret these vestiges in archetypal and poetical form.

RED HOUSE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER – Salem

October 19

THE MAGIC OF ECO PRINTING! Learn the basics of making direct contacts botanical prints on paper. Gather plant material and experiment with different papers, metal mordants, and natural dyes. Be awed by the magic of Mother Nature as each unique print is revealed. Saturday, October 19, 10am-3pm, light lunch provided. Class fee: $95. The Red House, 22 Darling Road, Salem. Visit salemredhouse.com for more info. (860) 608-6526.

October 26 OPENING RECEPTION for “A Simpler Life” Art Show and Sale at The Red House on Saturday, October 26, 5-8pm. This is a show of artwork that suggests “A Simpler Life” in any way, shape or form. The subject matter is irrelevant as long as it evokes simplicity of mind, spirit, or lifestyle. Show runs through the end of the year at The Red House Cultural Arts Center, 22 Darling Road, Salem. Open Thursday – Sunday 10am-7pm. (860) 608-6526.

Hog Wild Smokin’ Cue Annual Pig Roast October 5 – Westbrook Come join us for our annual pig roast with a view! Located at Westbrook town beach, we will be serving up slow smoked pig, homemade sides and fresh corn on the cob. Tickets can be purchased during our hours

LYMAN ALLYN MUSEUM “Knot Theory: Sculptural Works by Gilbert Boro” Thru October 27 Gilbert Boro, whose sculptures are desired and exhibited by collectors worldwide, is featured in a stimulating and interactive show, Knot Theory, now on view at the Lyman Allyn Museum in New London until October 27. Works in copper, aluminum, and steel ranging from tabletop size to eight feet tall will be on display. Using sailing knots as his inspiration to explore the harmony between strength and grace, Boro’s knots are simultaneously powerful and elegant. “Learning to sail as a teenager taught me the importance of working in unison,” Boro says. “Sailors need to tie the right knot in the right place to navigate stormy seas. Their symmetry and beauty belies their strength. That duality creates a powerful uniformity of purpose.” Boro believes the intricate interwoven strands of his knot sculptures can help us understand our commonality and the advantages of togetherness. Unlike the tautness of sailors’ knots, the voids floating between Boro’s strands recognize that we still need space to expand and thrive. Visualization and touch are central to Boro’s exhibits. Unique to Knot Theory, Lyman Allyn visitors will be allowed to touch and spin the works to feel their texture and gain different perspectives on the interplay of form and space that Boro believes is essential to recognizing our common bonds. The show also features large format photographs by Christina Goldberg that expose intricate inner details of Boro’s knots. For more information, visit www.lymanallyn.org.


Saturday, October 5th

CABARET STYLE DINNER SHOW

2:00PM - 5:00PM

Saturday, October 12th A Tribute to

Join us for an outdoor Wine Tasting of 30 different wines from 5 regions

$20pp In Advanced

$30pp At the Door

Frank Sinatra & Dean Martin

Performed by Echoes of Sinatra & Dino

$55++ per person

Reception: 6:00pm Dinner Show: 7:00pm

CABARET STYLE DINNER SHOW

Saturday, November 2nd A TRIBUTE TO

PERFORMED BY FLEETWOOD MACKED $55++ per person

Reception: 6:00pm Dinner Show: 7:00pm

For Details & Reservations: WatersEdgeResortandSpa.com 1525 Boston Post Rd Westbrook, CT 06498 (860) 399-5901


Profile for Ink Magazine

Ink Magazine - October 2019  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded