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Read more about March Madness on page 10

Crown Point High School March 27, 2014 Vol. 78 Issue 7 1500 S. Main St.

Crown Point, IN 46307

inklings@cps.k12.in.us

psst ... text me #8

Technology blurs cheating lines BY KATIE SHERMAN & TINA WINFREY

Photo Illustration by Maggie Gelon

Is cheating more common with the technology now present in the learning environment? 51% say yes

editor-at-large / associate editor

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esearch used to involve a trip to the library, reading a book, highlighting and taking a crack at the Dewey Decimal System. Today, students type a word in Google. Is this cheating or resourceful? Technology has blurred the lines. According to an onlinecollege.org study of 365 students, 32.7 percent admitted to cheating in an online class. With the growing use of technology at the high school, the temptation and availability of tools used to cheat may be on the rise. “I cheat on (online tests and assignments) all the time,” a female junior said. “You can always open a new tab and close things really quickly, so you don’t really have proof unless someone sees you doing it at the exact time. (If no one sees you) nobody knows that you’re doing it.”

Business teacher Mary Bachnak believes that online classes provide an easier environment for students to cheat on assignments. “Students can email documents to one another, save it on a flash drive, edit it and upload it to the student drop box very easily,” Bachnak said. “It’s kind of obvious as a teacher when you start to see commonalities. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to tell that a document is not an original.” Through a program on her computer, she is able to track the amount of time a student has spent on their document, the name of the student who authored it and the changes that have been made. The school’s computer labs and media center are armed with a program called Vision that allows the teacher to view what a student is looking at and the windows See Cheating on page 2

36% say no 13% say no change

What is the most common method of cheating?

9%

19%

Using a cell phone Copying off one’s neighbor

36% 36%

Discussing answers with people who already took the test Other

*100 students polled

School corporation extends school day by eight minutes BY DYLAN TAYLOR

editor-in-chief

Come April 7, students will have to cut their morning routine by a few minutes. Instead of adding another make-up day in June, the school board has confirmed that eight minutes will be added to each

school day starting April 7 for the remainder of the year to make up the weather cancellation that occurred on March 12. The school day will begin at 7:20 a.m. and end at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, and start at 7:50 a.m. on Wednesdays. Principal Chip Pettit believes

that this plan is the best option possible for making up the lost day. “I think that this is the best of a number of less-than-ideal options. I think that everybody understands that in missing 8 days of school through the course of the winter, that there were going

Sports

Feature Spring Breakdown Not all spring vacations are picture perfect

page 7

“With our graduation ceremony Tuesday (June 10), I think that this is a good plan to wrap up our school year in sync with our graduation ceremony,” Pettit said. Some, however, are unconvinced of the educational worth of eight minute additions to each See Champions on page 3

A&E

Striking Scholarships Junior Noah Burkholder commits to Louisville pages

to be some challenges to getting our school year completed in a time frame (that wasn’t ridiculous),” Pettit said. Pettit attributes this plan as a means of preventing school days from continuing beyond graduation commencement, which takes place June 10.

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Great Egg-spectations Windfall brings poetry and performance art to the Sip

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news march 27, 2014

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Dance team members travel to Memphis BY BEN JASEK reporter

PHOTO BY BRITTANY PEDERSEN

Sophomores Zach Otano, Robbie Ponziano and senior Nathan McNally work on their project for the world championship in California.

VEX qualifies for world championship BY OLIVIA ELSTON associate editor

VEX Robotics is not new to qualifying for the World Championship. For the fifth year in a row, VEX Robotics once again has a team make it to the World Championships in Anaheim, California. Five teams from VEX Robotics competed in the Indiana State VEX Championship in Indianapolis with Team E qualifying for worlds. “We made it to the finals in the state competition, and the other six teams that made it to the finals qualify plus eight other teams.” sophomore Robert Ponziano said. Team E consists of four members. Senior Nathan McNally, and sophomores Michael Shields, Zach Otano and Robbie Ponziano will be representing Crown Point for the VEX Robotics Club in the worlds competition. Cheating continued from page 1 they have pulled up. Assistant principal Russ Marcinek agrees that with the use of internet and other technology based programs, it is easier for students to cheat. “We are in the information age, and everything is right there at your fingertips. You can Google practically anything,” Marcinek said. “In our culture now, we’re so used to finding things very quickly that there is a temptation to not necessarily at times read and go through the process of learning but get the quick fix by just looking it up right away on the internet.” While Marcinek believes that technology gives an invitation to students to cheat, he does not believe that online classes have

“(For the competition, we have to) build a robot, and the robot has to be able to pick up inflatable balls,” senior Nathan McNally said. “They have to then put the balls in buckets. The robots also have to go under a 12-inch pole.” Along with having to do all of the requirements, the robot also has to be constructed within the confines of 18 by 18 by 18 inches. The team uses the same robot throughout the year, so they do not need to worry about creating a new one for the competition. “We use the same robot throughout the year for all of our competitions,” Ponziano said. “We have to work on that robot to prepare (for competitions). All of us bring in various ideas to experiment on the robot with.” To prepare for worlds, Team E has to make sure that the robot they compete with is ready to perform at its highest level for the best scores, but they don’t want to over

prepare either. “(To prepare,) we just make modifications to our robot,” Shields said. “We don’t want to over practice because another group did, and it ruined their motor. We don’t want to ruin our motor.” At the beginning of the year, Team E had troubles with their robot functioning properly, and for McNally, that was one of his biggest challenge to overcome. “(The best accomplishment was) getting the robot from not working at all to finally working.” McNally said. While making it to the finals in the Worlds Championship tournament is one of the main goals for Team E, the experience with the people is the reason they chose to begin VEX Robotics in the first place. “I get to try building new robots and get to hang around very interesting people,” Ponziano said. “It’s fun being around this atmosphere.”

caused a rise in the schools cheating statistics. “Cheating is available for any student, no matter what the class, whether it’s an online class or it’s just two kids who go home and do homework together,” Marcinek said. “As far as online classes or blended classes leading to more cheating, I don’t think it’s necessarily going to happen. I don’t see it as a big hindrance in moving to a digital format.” Freshman principal Mark Gianfermi agrees with Marcinek’s views on online cheating but can also see why this online environment may cause students to believe cheating is acceptable. “With an online environment, I think what would encourage kids to cheat is when you feel like you’re by yourself, when it’s

just you and your computer,” Gianfermi said. “There’s some temptation to cheat because you feel like nobody’s watching you do it.” A male junior also agrees that by doing work online can lead to a greater ease of cheating on assignments. “(Cheating) is definitely a lot easier with online classes because they can’t really keep you on check. If you’re doing it at home, they won’t know if you’re using Google for answers,” a male junior said. The school takes certain actions if a student is caught cheating. “In the handbook, the first incident of cheating is a zero on that assignment. Further incidents would be possibly receiving a zero for the nine weeks; it would be pretty difficult to raise the grade,” Gianfermi said.

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Champions Together Soccer Camp

NHS Induction Ceremony

Members from the CPHS boys and girls soccer teams will join together with special needs students for a soccer camp. The camp will take place from 12 to 1:30 p.m. at the Crown Point indoor dome.

The ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. and will take place in the auditorium.

Student-Teacher Olympics

Sometimes, a team’s accomplishments extend off the court. For the dance team, this has proven true. Juniors Nadia Giedemann, Hanna Van Prooyen and Valerie Jones have been chosen to represent the dance team, the Universal Dance Association and also to travel to the St. Jude House in Memphis, TN. They will be flying down over spring break accompanied by their coach Debbie Bickel. For the second year in a row, the dance team was one of the top two teams in the U.S. to raise the most money for the children of the St. Jude House. “I got involved (with fundraising) because each year, we go to a dance camp at Illinois State University. The Universal Dance Association partners with St. Jude’s to try to raise money for the hospital,” Van Prooyen said. Individually, each dancer wrote and sent letters to friends and family members requesting donations, and they raised over $3,000. “With the people that you help, you don’t always get to witness the efforts,” Jones said. Other than feeling the appreciation of helping others, the dance team is looking forward to enjoying quality time with the kids and their families. “I am very excited to meet kids, hang out with them for a couple days and learn about them.” Van Prooyen said. “This will be a wakeup call and help me realize that someone always has it harder. I also think that seeing the kids so happy and optimistic when they are going through hard times will make me think about hard things differently and cherish every moment.” Marcinek hopes that these consequences will discourage kids from cheating. “We’re a high school. We have 2700 students; I’m sure cheating goes on. We’re not blind to that. We understand that it happens,” Marcinek said. “They have to know that if they do get caught cheating, there are consequences.” While these consequences are grade related, Bachnak believes that cheating in high school compromises academic integrity and can influence students to continue cheating throughout their entire life. “If you’ll cheat on small things, you’ll cheat on big things,” Bachnak said. “It’s really a matter of your character and integrity. It’s not a matter of trying to get out of an assignment easily—it more talks about who you are.”

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Prom The dance will take place at Halls of St. George at 6 p.m.


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Latin members participate in tests, activities to measure knowledge BY BRITTANY PEDERSEN reporter

Latin Club recently won the state championship at the annual Indiana Junior Classical League (IJCL) convention. They won by earning the highest amount of points in individual, team and club events. “One of the best feelings in the world is being an officer when your club takes first place overall at state,” junior Ryan Sizemore said. “At that moment, you know that your club and all the members in it are the best and every one of them is overjoyed. It is a sense of pride and accomplishment knowing that you spent the better part of a year preparing for this and seeing it come out so well.” To perform well at the event, much time is spent in organized preparation. “Crown Point has a very rigorous schedule. We expect the best from our delegates,” senior Thomas Cooper said. “We each have to go through a personal, individualized meeting where we have to present our work to the sponsors, and there, we are critiqued on our work and given enough time to fix it as necessary.” Students sign up for and create projects to compete in various individual categories. “There are three main categories of events,” Cooper said. “There is academic testing, where we take tests on language, culture, mythology, the basics of Latin. Then there is the graphic arts—multiple categories of photography, drawing, painting. Then there is creative arts, which mostly focus on speech craft and Latin memorization and pronunciation, even ability for people to write.”

Students were able to compete in all of the categories if they chose. “Personally, I did 18 graphic arts— posters, charts, catapults, et cetera—as well as wrote a story, slogan, and read Latin aloud,” president Anna Werkowski said. “I was on the advanced team for Certamen. I took on a lot this year, but it paid off. I got an individual achievement for my graphic arts, which was an amazing feeling.” Students received more than 50 first place awards in individual categories. “They put tons of time and effort into their projects. They definitely earn their placings,” sponsor Sara Robertson said. “Our goal is for them to have fun and do the best they can do. We don’t push them to be first place.” The convention functions not only as a competition, but a learning experience as well. “We learn a lot at state,” Werkowski said. “Taking tests and playing Certamen really broadens your horizons. There are also seminars at state that you can attend, where students can learn more about certain topics of the ancient world. You not only learn about the world back then, but you learn a lot about the world today. We compare our worlds and contrast the cultural differences, and the results are truly amazing.” With all of the different activities going on, Latin Club members spend plenty of time together. “There is always something going on, and it makes for a great time,” Werkowski said. “There also is a sense of family with CP Latin Club. By the end of State, we have all worked together to get our awards and have really become a family.”

Modified schedule continued from page 1 day. “I think it’s ridiculous that people think that you can make up an entire day of school by tacking on 8 minutes to a day, which is going to equate to about a minute and 30 seconds per class,” senior Patrick Stratton said. “I don’t think that that can turn into any valuable curriculum time.” Senior Alyssa Mazur, however, is relieved by the plan. “I think that adding eight minutes to the day is a better alternative than staying in school later, because everyone wants to have a (longer) summer,” Mazur said. The Indiana Department of Education issued waivers for the January 6 and 7 weather cancellations, but the remaining four missed days will be made up on June 5, 6, 9 and 10.

views on news

Elizabeth Hernandez, a 53-year-old mother of two, left her infant grandchild and her older child with Down’s syndrome in a car with the engine running in a Walmart parking lot. She faces a felony neglect charge for her actions. Further investigation shows they were there for 45 minutes.

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Chelsey Stinnett junior

PHOTOS BY SUSAN REED

Modified Schedule

*Goes into effect Monday, April 7 through Tuesday, June 10

Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.

Wednesday

Bus drop-off 6:55 a.m.

Bus drop-off 7:35 a.m.

Start 7:20 a.m.

Start 7:50 a.m. End 2:30 p.m.

End 2:30 p.m.

Student reaction to events in our world

Area Mother jailed for leaving children in car at Walmart

She should take better care of her children, but she shouldn’t be arrested so she can take better care of them in the future.

Above, senior Michael Keller congratulates junior Brennen Chaussey as the new IJCL state president. The Latin Club, pictured below, took first overall at state.

State Two Same-sex couples challenge marriage ban

Nation Harlem gas explosion devastates buildings

World Malaysian Aircraft goes missing mid-flight

Three female same-sex couples are challenging Indiana’s laws against same-sex marriage rights. “We don’t tell any other couple to leave the state or jump over any other obstacle to get married,” the couples’ attorney, Paul Castillo, told the Northwest Indiana Times.

A suspected gas leak explosion left two buildings containing a piano repair shop, Spanish Christian church and 11 floors of apartments in havoc. This tragedy left eight dead and three missing. There is no indication of this being an act of terrorism.

A Malaysian Commercial Airplane was en route to Beijing when, four hours into the flight, it went missing from radar. The plane has still not been found, although debris has been found in the southern Indian Ocean. The search continues with the help from many Asian countries and the United States Navy and Air Force.

We should take precautions to prevent gas leaks and look into the situation. My thoughts are with the families.

I think it was hijacked. I think they need to find the plane, but I don’t think anything is going to come out of it.

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Tyler Bessler freshman

I think it’s about time that people are starting to get gay marriage legalized because it should be their right to be happy.

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Elizabeth Rager sophomore

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Ryan De St. Jean senior


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opinion march 27, 2014

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speakup

Lawsuit sheds poor light on youth

How do you define academic cheating?

BY DYLAN TAYLOR

editor-in-chief

When I saw “girl sues parents” headlined on Twitter, my immediate, uninformed reaction to the now infamous situation was almost one of pride. Perhaps, I thought, she was “sticking it to the man,” so to speak; transcending the chains of her troubled upbringing to make something of herself and take what was rightfully hers. Maybe, just maybe, she was fighting back against something terrible. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Upon actually reading the article in question and researching the case, it quickly became apparent that the New Jersey plaintiff had left home due to dissatisfactions with her parents’ disciplinary methods and rules, and that she was suing her parents for college tuition money. Furthermore, the girl’s father reported that she left because she was unhappy with her curfew, having to do chores and having to be respectful. Needless to say, the media had a bona fide field day regarding this situation, and understandably so. In many contexts, adolescent rebellion is laudable, if not necessary. Countless positive social movements, cultural phenomena and political changes have been carried on the backs of young people, from the civil rights movement to Vietnam War protests to the dawn of the environmentalist movement. Young people’s dissatisfactions with the system and stubborn will have permanently altered the political fabric of America. The problem here, however, is a bloated sense of entitlement coupled with an unfortunate misdirection of energy. This is a quintessentially millennial issue; in this age of entitlement and apathy, teens seem to be acting out in markedly selfish and unconstructive ways. This girl’s fight against the supposed ineptitude of her parents was borne of spoilt, blatant and baseless disrespect and apathy. Perhaps this perception is biased and pseudo-nostalgic. But until stories of youth initiating social change are given more airtime than stories of millennial witlessness, I see no reason to perceive our societal situation otherwise. With countless concerns that young people can contribute to and initiate, one might wish that the girl who sued her parents will provide an example for the upper middle class internet generation as to the hazards of selfishness and insecure entitlement.

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Cartoon By Collin Raiser

iew:

Hannah Kish freshman

Methods of curbing cheating must evolve as technology advances

“Cheating is stealing answers from another person or source.”

A considerable number of American students admit to cheating academically. In fact, a study from the Josephson Institute (an ethics-related statistical institution) displayed that 95 percent of high school students have readily admitted to cheating at some point in their academic career, and 64 percent have admitted to cheating on a test or copying an assignment. Educators battle cheating every day, and it continues, and probably always will continue, to be a major issue in educational affairs. Enter, then, the trend of online learning. In a world in which sending a text or opening a new Google Chrome tab is far easier than passing a note across a classroom or writing answers on your shoe, it is difficult to deny that an online classroom setting has made cheating easier than ever. Search engines, web pages and any number of de facto cheating sites are clicks away from being accessed by any student devoted to facilitating his or her laziness. Even with screen monitoring systems and cautious classroom arrangements, students are frequently able to make use of reference tabs and stealthy Google searches to improve online test grade. Beyond pure testing, the assignment of online homework, online quizzes and coursework in online classes is practically an invitation for students to use any number of digital facilities when completing their designated tasks. The full extent of the world’s available information (and potential answers) is only a few clicks away on any internet-connected computer. Put together a class full of students taking tests online, and, between the gaps of supervision, this information becomes fair game. If CP 2.0 and the trend of digitalization is to continue, rule-keeping measures must evolve with the times. To keep the classroom environment honest, the blatant easiness of cheating with technology, and possibly more thorough provisions, should be taken into consideration.

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Crown Point High School, IN

1500 S. Main St. Crown Point, IN 46307 219-663-4885 ex. 11349 fax 219-662-5663 inklings@cps.k12.in.us www.crownpoint.highschoolmedia.org

Inklings is a student publication created by the newspaper and advanced journalism students and distributed monthly to students, faculty and staff of Crown Point High School. Opinions do not necessarily reflect those of CPHS faculty, staff or administration. Letters-to-the-editor are welcomed provided they are signed and submitted one week prior to publication and do not contain personal attacks. Inklings reserves the right to edit for space, clarity and legal and ethical concerns. Advertising is subject to applicable rates available by contacting Inklings. Inklings has been recognized as an Indiana High School Press Association Hoosier Star, National Scholastic Press Association Pacemaker, Columbia Scholastic Press Association Silver Crown, and Quill and Scroll George H. Gallup publication.

“Using someone else’s work as your own.”

Jacob Bough junior “I define it as looking up answers online.”

Christian Salazar senior “Going on the Internet and looking for answers or looking to the kid beside you.”

editorial Vol. 78 Issue 7 March 27, 2014

Alyssa Click sophomore

editors-in-chief Maggie Gelon Dylan Taylor editor-at-large Katie Sherman associate editors Olivia Elston Tina Winfrey managing editors Verda Mirza Shannon Rostin copy editor Maddie Adducci sports editors Alaa Abdeldaiem Kara Biernat

a&e editor Emily Best advertising editor Becca Burke online editor Paige Buelow photo editor Amy Schuch chief photographer Brittany Pedersen photographers Ben Jasek Evi Lovin Susan Reed Jack Snedden

staff Sam Barloga Lexi Berdine Kate Franklin Nadia Giedemann Maisa Nour Collin Raiser Eli Udchitz Jackie VanDerWay Dylan Wallace Micayla Watroba adviser Julie Elston

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opinion march 27, 2014

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Should advertising fund public education?

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New SAT not “new and improved”

BY KATIE SHERMAN

editor-at-large

Cartoon By Collin Raiser

Pro:

Con:

Advertisements on buses are a useful source of revenue for schools

State, not private sectors, should fully fund school transportation

BY MAGGIE GELON

BY SHANNON ROSTIN

editor-in-chief

managing editor

The wheels on the bus go round and round—until schools run out of money to keep them turning that is. School corporations across the state are being faced with tax caps, denied referendums, a still rebounding economy and all the same expectations to educate and transport students in a safe and productive manner. The equation does not add up. Money cannot be subtracted from school corporations without an element subsequently suffering. If the given options are to cut transportation, teachers or programs that will have benefitted a child’s education or place an advertisement on the back of a bus, then by all means, slap a Big Mac on the school buses. A Dallas-based firm that manages advertising on school buses estimates that 100 buses displaying ads could generate up to $100,000 in revenue. Not even the most noble of bake sales can compare to that; schools would be silly to pass up these checks. Some argue that advertisements on buses may pose a threat to students’ safety. Drivers may not pay the attention they should be if they are distracted by ads. While student safety should absolutely be a top priority at all times, 11 other states already allow advertisements on school buses and have not had increased issues with safety. These states place the ads on the sides of the buses towards the back and cannot even be seen by oncoming or following drivers. There are even concerns that the ads would take away the focus from learning and shift the spotlight to business which has infiltrated education more and more as it is. In a perfect world, business and education mix minimally, but in reality, schools need money to educate. Ads are practically inescapable in a public environment, from the logos on brand clothing to the Nike symbol on a backpack. If there are benefits to be reaped from something already in play, why not take full advantage? In comparison to businesses charging students to take major tests or a business inflating rates to use their educational software, placing an ad should be the least of our infiltration concerns.

Certain American school corporations have been weighing the option of placing advertisements on school buses as means of funding. For many, the thought of turning school transportation systems into a venue for businesses is controversial and troubling. The state should, ideally, be adequately funding every aspect of a school system, including its transportation. Advertising on school buses cedes businesses the responsibilities the State should be acting on. After all, this is supposed to be public education we are discusssing. Supporters of placing these advertisements may be of the opinion that it is harmless to place an advertisement on the side of a school bus. While this is not a direct threat to students, the prinicple of turning school transportation into business-dominated advertising is concerning for students. Allowing advertisements on school transportation blurs the lines of a school system and business corporation. The two should not be interchangeable with one another. It also is less than appealing to mix the two by allowing advertisements to slowly creep into daily school life. Specifically, local businesses support, through advertising, various high school departments. For example, local businesses advertise in sports programs, theatre playbills, even our student newspaper and yearbook. Every year, these businesses are approached and willing to advertise and support these programs. There is no problem with supporting these; in fact, it is almost a responsibility and necessity for purposes of local businesses supporting local high school departments. This type of advertising should be what schools expect; however, asking that they support transportation is perhaps aggressive. Students in this generation are accustomed to being bombarded with advertisements; they are unavoidable. What is the point in extending this to school transportation? To avoid absorbing more ads into the senses of students, and ruining the credibility of public education, school transportation should look into another way of funding.

17 Inklings staffers agree

11 Inklings staffers agree

Anna Werkowski

Kylee Stevens

junior

“I don’t think it’s a good idea. Advertising would be kind of dumb.”

“Any funds that go toward the school are good funds.”

Ryan Collier

sophomore

math teacher

“I think it’s fine, provided that it’s school appropriate advertisement.”

Dotty Johnson

English teacher

“I think that advertising should not be allowed in school. You are bombarded so much by ads anyway; I think this would be nice to be an ad-free zone.”

The mighty SAT has fallen, and with it, our young people’s ability to manufacture a coherent sentence or two has all but vanished. The SAT has long been the measuring stick for predicting college success. In many studies, the SAT has shown to be a great indicator of college success and even life success well after the college years. It’s a number that haunts students during the application process. A high score, and you’re golden. A low score, and you nervously sit on your laptop, refreshing your email hoping that your dream college looks past your really crappy essay. Making the SAT essay optional simply matches the policy for the rival ACT. Just more than 200 schools even require applicants to include the essay to begin with. But why is this? Our young people can barely string together a simple tweet that makes grammatical sense. Hardly anybody bothers to pick up a newspaper anymore, let alone the daunting amount of work surrounding a book. Literature is dying fast and this isn’t helping. Eliminating the SAT’s penalty for guessing also makes this ‘new and improved’ test look more like the ACT. Removing the impenetrable language or offering more Khan Academy test prep-videos for free, will not enhance the exam’s evaluation quality. This new SAT will not be an improved test at all. Research shows that high school grades and more so a student’s overall GPA is a bigger indicator of college and career readiness. According to National Center for Fair and Open Testing, admission decisions for students who do not submit SAT or ACT scores are just as reliable as those who submit them. Having a high standardized test score is merely just the difference of receiving that high amount of academic scholarship money or not. Maybe the reason for this ‘improved’ SAT is to help make being admitted into college a stress-free process because it may be easier for a student to do well. But with the newest trend of colleges and universities not even requiring submitting test scores, this new SAT fails to achieve its purpose. ‘Improving’ the SAT is useless. The SAT or ACT is not needed for colleges to have highquality, choosy admissions.


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feature march 27, 2014

PHOTO BY BRITTANY PEDERSEN

Sophomore Collin Campiln prepares pizza at Carriage Court Pizza. Students have begun sumbmitting applications for summer jobs, as the end of the school year is approaching.

Help Wanted

i on life

Students search for summer employment opportunities

experiencing a different perspective

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tips for landing a

summer job

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Have at least 3 references

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Do a mock interview

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Be honest

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Be prepared

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Dress for success

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Teachers, past employers and activity leaders are ideal sources

As goofy as it sounds, this will help eliminate jitters and build confidence

Do not start off on the wrong foot. Trust is important in a professional enviroment Know some background knowledge on the potential place of employment Dress appropriately in relation to the atmosphere of the work place

BY the

Facts collected from www.bls.gov, www.in.gov

50.7% of young people employed in July

BY NADIA GIEDEMANN

reporter

Although the cold temperatures have been providing false hope of warm weather ever occurring, summer is vastly approaching. With summer moving in fast, students are beginning to think about applying for summer jobs. Students may not consider getting a job because they want to be outside during the summer. There are a number of jobs available to students that involve being active and outside. Junior Alex Alessia is planning on working as a life guard, at Deep River Waterpark, this summer. “This will be my second year because it is a seasonal job,” Alessia said. “We are only employed during the summer.” Some jobs require certain skills from students. Senior Alex Swallers works both on the course

the age to get a worker’s permit

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and inside on the register at Lakes of the Four Seasons Country Club. “It takes the ability to work efficiently but quickly,” Swallers said. Alessia has already sent in his application to reapply to Deep River Waterpark. “I reapplied in January online, and I received a rehire form in the mail,” Alessia said. Applying for jobs can be hard on some students. The overall process can be tough if a student does not know what to do. “When applying for many jobs at once, it can become very tedious,” Swallers said. “However, it pays off once you actually get a job and start earning money.” When a student applies for a job, they should be prepared to be interviewed by an employer. “When applying and going in for an interview, be ready for any

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hour allowed to work until on nights not followed by a school night (16 and 17 year olds)

question and dress appropriately,” Alessia said. Mary Bachnak feels there are components of applying for a job that will benefit a student. “You should be serious about it because (employers) are going to judge you based on your appearance and overall presence,” Bachnak said. According to Bachnak, three reliable sources should be contacted to be listed as references for an interview. “You have selected three people who are not relatives, not family members and not your friends,” Bachnak said. “You want to select someone who will say good things about you.” While applying for a job, a student should consider every option before applying. A student should dress for success, have references ready and be prepared for an interview.

hours to work per non-school week (16 and 17 year olds)

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feature march 27, 2014

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Spring Broken

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ILLUSTRATION BY COLLIN RAISER

Tales from spring break vacations that took turns for the worst

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BY VERDA MIRZA

managing editor

he open breeze sways in the fresh air with dazzling sun beams twinkling on the beachside water. As the sun beats down, the wind changes. A dark,

stormy cloud descends from the sky, engulfing the sunshine. Spring vacation is, for many, one of the most anticipated breaks that students look forward to. It can often be nice break after a grueling, stressful week of midterms. Still, the perfect spring vacation can often take a turn for the worst, as it did for sophomore Doha Tebry. “I was really excited to visit my grandmother in Kuwait, but a few days before we were supposed to leave, we got a call from Kuwait saying my grandmother passed away,” Tebry said. “So what was supposed to be a fun vacation turned into a sad one.” Tebry had great expectations for the trip to Kuwait, but unfortunately, fate had different plans. The same can be said for junior Lauryn Adams, whose luggage took a vacation of its own.

Belush je welers

“We were on our way to Aruba, and our layover flight to Miami was cancelled due to fuel issues, so we had to take a flight to Atlanta instead,” Adams said. “The next day, we arrived in Aruba, but all our luggage was missing. So we were stranded in Aruba without our luggage for half the vacation.” Nonetheless, Adams was able to improvise with her misfortune. “Luckily, we had a few things in our carry-on bags, and we had a washer and a dryer in our hotel room,” Adams said. On a similar note, science teacher Kelley Nelson had planned for a nice spring break fishing trip, but that changed at the flip of a switch. “It all started when my son pulled the fire alarm at a gas station because he wanted to see fire trucks. Then, that same son fell and hit his head, and the nearest hospital was an hour away,” Nelson said. “So we had to wrap his head ourselves and take him there.” But that is not all that faced Nelson on her spring vacation. An incident with her boat made matters even more difficult. “I was sleeping and got a call from my husband saying that our boat was sinking. At first, I was thinking he was joking, but our boat was actually sinking,” Nelson said. One minute, one is anticipating a wonderful trip, and the next, the boat is sinking. Fortunately for the Nelsons, no one was hurt. Sometimes, however, break travels can end in physical injury—junior Justin Warren, for example, had his ankle run over by a wheelbarrow on a trip to Thailand. Moral of the story: even the worst break may later result in a great story.

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Springing into europe German students head to Germany, Italy Switzerland, Austria, this spring break BY EMILY DUNCAN

reaches 7,000 feet. Another destination the group plans on visitSpring break 2014 may mean Florida, Colo- ing is the Neuschwanstein Castle. It is decorated rado or sitting at home watching a marathon of to look like the year 1886 and was the inspiration Netflix. But for 25 students, Spring Break 2014 for Cinderella’s castle. It is sometimes called the ‘Fairy Tale Castle’ because of the landscape surmeans Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Austria. These German students will be traveling rounding it. “I’m most excited to visit the Neuschwanstein with German teacher Heidi Polizotto on March Castle because I’ve al30 through April 8. Evways wanted to go to a ery other year, Polizotto real castle. I can’t wait to takes students on a tour see all of the various culof Germany and nearby tures there,” junior Julia countries. Thorn said. “I’m most excited to I want to bring back memories The Swiss Alps, losee the change my stuand a taste of the culture that cated in Switzerland, will dents go through by the I have experienced which I can be toward the end of end of the trip,” Polizotto said. share with my family and friends their trip. “I can’t wait to see Polizotto further exthe Alps. That’s always plained that once the stuJulia Thorn junior been a dream of mine,” dents experience the difsophomore Alexis Faferent cultures, they have laney said. a whole new outlook on This is Falaney’s first time traveling out of life, and most of them come back more mature. Some students are ready for the six-hour the country. Most of the students have not been flight while others are a bit weary. Sophomore out of the country, making Germany, Switzerland, Jacob Yelich is one person who may be a little Austria and Italy a new experience they are counting down the days until. uncomfortable before this new journey. “I want to bring back memories and a taste “Flying on the plane is something I’m definitely nervous about. It’s just so high up,” Yelich of the culture that I have experienced which I can share with my family and friends,” Thorn said. “I said. Among the activities Polizotto has planned, hope to get a different prospective of life, since the Mount Pilatus is a visit on the list. Its top height culture in Germany seems to be more humble.” reporter

Fast

Facts

official languages in Switzerland

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98 4

airports in Germany

7,000 ft.

PHOTO BY SUSAN REED

Junior Julia Thorn decorates a backpack to take with her on her trip to Germany. The group will also visit places in Austria, Italy and Switerzland.

the top height of Mount Pilatus in Switzerland

average flight price to Berlin, Germany $1,210.05

how to say “hello” in...

Italian “Hallo” German “Ciao” “Bonjour”French

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feature march 27, 2014

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Puttin’ on the ritz

Personality key factor in prom attire I think you should be taking risks. Wear what you want. Make a statement. - Junior Justin Vandergriff BY MAGGIE GELON

editor-in-chief

Trends for girls Beaded Gowns Jewel tones Flowy silhouettes Chiffon material Illusion gowns Platform heels

Shopping Tips Stop shopping

when “the one” is found Do prior research Be decisive to avoid trying on 20 dresses Have a vision

In 20 years, our generation will more than likely laugh at many of the trends and styles worn to prom, as every generation seems to do. While the styles may change, the confidence worn with the perfect look is timeless. A perfect look for a boy or girl may seem like an unattainable ideal without a limitless budget and a personal stylist, but junior Justin Vandergriff says it’s all just a matter of personality. “Wear what you want. Make a statement,” Vandergriff said. “Find a dress that fits your personality.” Personal tastes certainly range greatly, but junior Olivia Pillar has noticed some trends in dress selection. “I would say anything sparkly. I see a lot of mermaid (silhouettes). I think poufy is out,” Pillar said. Pillar does not accredit the mermaid shape trend to the “Under the Sea” theme. Vandergriff agrees themes should not be taken literally. “With a theme, take in the color scheme. Think under the sea colors,” Vandergriff said. Color can be important beyond theme. Not only does color make a statement, but also a color that compliments skin tone will photograph best. “A silver vest may not look the

best with a pale complexion. But on (someone with) a darker skin tone, silver makes them look really nice. That’s what I’ve learned in fashion and interior design; color palettes are very important,” Vandergriff said. Even beyond the focal point of the dress or suit, Pillar feels accessory selection can go a long way. “For a necklace, it depends on the neckline. If the dress is too busy, you probably don’t need to pick a necklace. Or if it’s like a halter, you will already have some sparkle at the neckline,” Pillar said. Accessories can also help stretch a budget. Pillar suggests investing in a bold accessory to enhance and personalize a more simple dress. “If you have a black dress, then you might want to spend a lot of money on something like bright teal shoes,” Pillar said. Boys are no exception to trends in details. “Bowties and suspenders—I’ve seen that a lot. The bowties that are fake are nice because they are easy to take on and off. Having a fake bowtie is easier to give to a girl too,” Pillar said. While it may seem obvious, function is an important factor for both genders to keep in mind. “It’s always important that you put the focus on the dancing, because what you are wearing has to be comfortable while you are dancing,” Vandergriff said.

Trends for boys Slimfit suits Grey tones Matching vests and ties Square-toed shoes Bowties

Shopping Tips Take comfort into account, especially in shoe selection White tuxedos are often popular in spring, but consider personal taste before trends All trends and tips accredited to regional boutiques

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PHOTO PROVIDED BY KENNEDY TOLBERT

In between classes, students stop to watch the early rounds of the NCAA Tournament and follow the madness in the school halls.

Tourney Time

Balanced field adds student excitement to the madness BY SAM BARLOGA ELI UDCHITZ

reporters

It’s back. The 2014 NCAA Men’s Division I Basketball Championship, also known as March Madness, returns for the 76th time in the association’s history. This singleelimination tournament features 68 teams competing for the national title while drawing the attention of many across the nation as they attempt to predict the winner. Many students believe the selection committee has picked a balanced field this year, making this year’s tournament more competitive than those in recent history. “What I really like about March Madness is the competitive air and how the tournament brings out the best in athletes,”

senior Zack Lambert said. “There is a good field this year, one of the more balanced ones we have had in years.” Sophomore Brett Thomas also believes this year’s teams are evenly suited to play each other and that the field has proven challenging for some of the nation’s elite. “I think it does prove to be an even field because if there were powerhouse teams that dominate all the others, then we wouldn’t have the upsets of some of the nation’s most elite teams, including Wichita State, Kansas or Duke,” Thomas said. While no Indiana or Illinois team made the tournament this year, many students still participate in the madness by filling out brackets. Senior Michael Pimentel enjoys com-

peting against others for the best bracket each year. “I’ve filled out a lot of brackets for different types of competitions, and I put a lot of effort into my brackets because it’s the best time of the year,” Pimentel said. “Everyone has such a strong intensity towards March Madness that it is always fun to compete against my friends and to have the satisfaction of beating them with my stellar brackets.” Michigan is one team that excites students such as Thomas at CPHS with its local flare of players, one of which is a CPHS alumnus. Wolverines’ point guard Spike Albrecht made social media buzz last year during an electric performance that helped keep

Michigan in the game during the national championship game before falling to Louisville. Thomas is looking forward to watching pointguard Spike Alrecht and the Wolverines play against Tennessee tomorrow night and believes the team can make a run in the tournament. “I think Michigan definitely has a shot of going all the way,” Thomas said. “I believe that if Spike can keep his confidence up, then he should be a big part of their run.” Even without a preferred result, Thomas is looking ahead to the nearing rounds. “I’m excited for the Sweet 16 and am looking forward to the finals matchup,” Thomas said.

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sports march 27, 2014

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We’ve improved a lot this year and are looking forward to the rest of the season.

in the

huddle

- senior George Strama

From Bulldog to Cardinal

PHOTO PROVIDED BY CAROL BURKHOLDER

Junior Noah Burkholder pitches during a game last season. Finishing with a 6-0 record, Burkholder looks forward to the start of this season and his committment to play in college.

Junior pitcher Burkholder commits to University of Louisville BY KARA BIERNAT

sports editor

“Culvers,” he said. “After putting way too much thought into it, I finally decided I wanted Culvers.” Often finding himself torn between what he wants to eat for dinner, junior Noah Burkholder recently found out that the hard time he has deciding on what to eat would be the least of his problems. Burkholder has been playing baseball since he was ten years old. He’s always known that he’s wanted to play baseball as long as he possibly could. When the opportunity came along, he didn’t hesitate to take it. On October 1, Burkholder committed to University of Louisville to further his baseball career at the collegiate level. Putting the University of Louisville up against Vanderbilt University and University of North Carolina made for a tough decision on Burkholder’s part. “I stood on the field at the corner of the end-zone with Louisville’s coaching staff. We were watching the football team warm up as we talked when I realized that I had just made my decision and wanted to further my baseball career as a Louisville Cardinal,” Burkholder said. After deciding to spend his college years playing baseball at the University of Louisville, Burkholder was thankful for the opportunity to attend the college of his choice on an athletic scholarship. “I was very excited to make a decision and get it off my chest,” Burkholder said.

“I couldn’t be happier to have the opportunity of playing baseball for a nationally ranked university.” As he watched the enthusiasm grow at the football game with the baseball coaching staff, he had no doubt in his mind that this was the school for him. “The two things that won me over were easily the coaching staff and Louisville being near home. Their pitching coach, Roger Williams, is amongst the best in the nation and is known for working with tall pitchers,” Burkholder said. “It was a deciding factor considering I’m 6’6.” Under head coach Dan McDonnell, the Cardinals’ coaching staff impacted Burkholder’s decision. In McDonnell’s seven years of coaching, he was able to give the Cardinals a ninth place rank in the national rankings for wins with 309, including a school-record of 51 wins in 2013. He led the team to the College World Series in Omaha that year while being named National Coach of the Year by Rivals.com. He also contributed to 15 All-American players, 54 all-conference selections and 33 Louisville players signing professional contracts to appear in the Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft. With the excitement of playing collegiate baseball under a nationally ranked coaching staff in his upcoming years, Burkholder is keeping his focus on what is currently important—this year’s high school season. “I have high hopes for this season. I

expect to go undefeated on the mound and not give up many hits on earned runs,” Burkholder said. Going 6-0 on the mound last year with a 1.34 ERA, Burkholder feels confident that he can contribute to his team’s success this season. Head coach Steve Strayer agrees. “Our team is pretty inexperienced, but we’re hoping that we can mature quickly in the opening weeks of the season,” Strayer said. “A lot of questions are going to be answered this year. Last year, Noah was put behind the Plesacs a lot. This year, people are going to be aiming for him.” With the support of Strayer and his teammates, the Bulldogs are looking to finish the season with a winning record and go far into the postseason while keeping their biggest rivals in the back of their heads at all times. “Our goal of winning our conference will be tough this year, along with winning the sectional. It’s going to be tough facing teams like Hobart and Portage that have really strong pitching. However, I think this will be a good test to see how Noah handles his composure this year,” Strayer said. While he still plans to direct all his focus on his high school career, Burkholder is eager to further his baseball career as a Cardinal while attending the University of Louisville. “I’m pumped for this year and next year while I’m still a Bulldog. However, I’ll always be looking forward to heading down to Louisville next June and starting my college career as a Cardinal,” Burkholder said.

1.43 ERA 48 Strikeouts 7 Earned 29 BB 34 IP Runs


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Relays finish top three at state Girls track prepares for outdoor season BY DYLAN WALLACE

reporter

Cold weather may have stalled many this winter, but for head coach Adam Piaskowy and his girls track team, it in no way kept them from qualifying at the Hoosier State Relay Finals. “Although weather has been tough, the girls have done a great job getting out there everyday and training hard,” Piaskowy said. The Lady Dogs have already completed their indoor season run with success coming from their DMR, 4x4 and 4x8 relay teams, each finishing in the top three at both HSR qualifying meets. The team competed at the HSR indoor state finals last Saturday, their 4x8 shaving 14 seconds off their time from Purdue qualifying meet and placing 12th overall. Freshman Kristen Lacrosse finished second in long jump with a 18’7 jump. “I think we impressed a lot of people,” Lacrosse said. “For me, it was a good experience being only a freshman, and finishing in the top two this early in the season is a good sign for things to come.” Advancing to the HSR state meet was a big confidence booster for the girls, knowing that they can compete with some of the best in the region. “I think that when we have success during indoor season, it gives us confidence for outdoor knowing we have a solid team,” senior Jenna Arnold said. “If we can compete with some of the best indoors, then we can compete with some of the best outdoors which means we won’t be ending in early April.” The team has lost regional and state-qualifying runners over

the offseason, including Aly Carpenter, Allison Wortel, and Bailey Beckham. Despite the changes, Piaskowy believes the time is right for other girls to step up. “It is always hard to lose good runners that were here for all four years that worked hard, always improved and were strong leaders to the team,” Piaskowy said. “On the other hand, it opens up opportunities for the other girls to step up and have a chance to make an impact.” Although the indoor season was a success, the Lady Dogs now have to turn their attention to the outdoor season with tough competition including Lake Central, Portage and Chesterton.

‘‘

If we can compete with some of the best indoors, then we can compete with some of the best outdoors, which means we won’t be ending in early April. Jenna Arnold

senior

“We know what Chesterton and Portage are made of from indoors and previous seasons, but with Lake Central not competing indoors, it’s going to be hard to prepare for them,” Piaskowy said. “As long as we play it safe and recognize our strong and their weak events, then I think we can be just as dangerous as any team in our DAC.”

PHOTO BY BEN JASEK

Sophomore Amanda Komasinski practices pole vaulting indoors to prepare for the Lady Dogs’ outdoor season. The girls will travel to Portage for their first meet of the season on April 15.

LaCrosse receives much-needed wins BY ALEXIS BERDINE

reporter

PHOTO BY JACK SNEDDEN

Junior attack Tyler Harnois looks to score against South Bend Adams during the Bulldogs’ game last Saturday. The team came out with a 19-0 victory, their first of two that weekend.

After falling to Hertiage Christain, Guerin Cathlioc and Park Tudor the previous weekend, the Bulldogs made a comeback. The Dogs played two games on Saturday, defeating South Bend Adams 19-0 and Bishop Luers 17-0. Junior Alex Alessia scored two goals in the first half against South Bend Adams. Seniors Rory Packard had four and Justin Garrison had six. The Bulldogs were happy to have rebounded from their tough losses earlier in the season. “I was super happy with the outcomes this weekend. We needed those big wins after last weekend in Indy,” senior Jake Ladendorf said. The Dogs received their much needed wins after losing 10-9 to

Heritage Christian, 13-10 Guerin Catholic, and 12-4 to Park Tudor. Seniors Zack Bucci and Anthony Sirico led a comeback on Friday after facing an 8-2 deficit at halftime against Heritage Christian. They went ahead 9-8 with under five minutes left, falling short 10-9 in the end. Tough match-ups and multiple games lead to fatigue for the boys. “They played hard, so everyone was tired out by the third game,” head coach Joe Laird said. Despite the losses, the games gave the boys confidence moving forward. “Those teams have been together for around ten years, and it was actually awesome to see that we can hang with some of the best teams in the state,” Ladendorf said. The boys will face rival La-

porte Slicers Friday at home at 7 p.m. With a strong senior class, the team believes they have what it takes to defeat the Slicers. “LaPorte has lost a lot of seniors, and our senior class has been doing a great job leading the team,” senior Bryce Schwuchow said. “We should be able to give them a good run.”

bouncing

BACK Heritage Christian: L 10-9 Guerin Catholic: L 13-10 Park Tudor: L 12-4 S. Bend Adams: W 19-0 Bishop Luers: W 17-0


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ALAA’s ANGLE

Boys place seventh at indoor finals

BY ALAA ABDELDAIEM

sports editor

Real or not, “Space Jam 2” can’t fly

extra

points

PHOTO BY BEN JASEK

Preparing for the start of their outdoor season, the boys track team runs indoors for conditioning. The Bulldogs will travel to Hanover April 3.

Bulldogs close indoor season at state meet BY JACKIE VAN DER WEY reporter

After three meets, the boy’s indoor track season came to a quick close. Having only three meets before going outside, the team had a lot of work to do as their first meet of the season was the Harrison State Qualifier. “Practices this year have been twice as hard as last year’s. We have had little to no days off, but I think the increased intensity will definately be what separates us from last season,” senior Nick Faso said. The more concentrated prac-

tices this season have proved to be successful. The team qualified in many events, with victories in shotput and the 4x8 relay. “Winning shotput at qualifiers really helped me to be more confident as I prepared for indoor state,” junior Mitchell Kessler said. Following their success at the Harrison Qualifier, the Dogs competed in the IHSAA indoor track tournament last weekend. The boys took seventh place overall. Contributing to their success was the unexpected fifth place finish of the 4x8 relay.

The 4x8 relay was run by seniors Zac Seamon and Tyler Gray, and sophomores Ryan Kepshire and Matt Wielgus who finished with a time of 8:15. The team was pleasantly surprised as they had overcome their spot as an 11 seed. “We were very excited to have placed so high because we were initially ranked eleventh and ended up placing fifth,” Kepshire said. Although the team was successful during their indoor season, they are looking forward to getting outside considering they only run three meets indoors.

“The full indoor season was only three meets so it felt like it went by really quick,” Kepshire said. The team may be pleased with the outcome of their indoor season, but head coach Keith Iddings is already one step ahead as they make the move outside. “The indoor season has allowed us to gauge where we are now, but the outdoor season is longer and will provide us time for improvement,” Iddings said. The boys will travel to Hanover on April 3 to kick off their outdoor spring season.

Softball uses postseason loss as motivation BY ALAA ABDELDAIEM

sports editor

The defeat was 10 months old, but it still haunted senior baseman Amanda Rock. The Lady Dogs had committed too many errors to overcome a 3-1 deposit against Portage, finding themselves ousted one game short of the sectional title. This year, Rock said, will be different. As one of six seniors on this year’s team, Rock believes it is on her to make sure the team learns from last year’s early postseason exit. “Last season ended way too soon,” Rock said. “With this team, it will be different. There were a lot of things that we did wrong, and I think, as a leader, I

out of 102 students questioned

‘‘

If we can pull together as a group and learn from the past, I think we’ve got serious potential moving forward. Amanda Rock

senior

The Lady Bulldogs feature the return of several young veterans including Miranda Elish. The sophomore pitcher finished the season 17-1 as a freshman for the girls last year.

to be able to push runs across the plate,” Britton said. “Small ball helps. We’re making adjustments on pitcher strikes and tweaking some of their hitting stances to make those improvements.” Britton added that the team’s early match-up against Lowell will help the girls identify where further focus must be directed as they look ahead to next month’s schedule. With the motivation that comes from defeat and the right mentality, Rock is confident this year will feature a different end result. “It’s a new season,” Rock said. “I think we’re very talented. If we can pull together as a group and learn from the past, I think we’ve got serious potential moving forward.”

Games to watch

19% 21%

A. Robert Mathis

7%

53%

Despite her early success, Elish believes she can also improve upon last year’s defeat, viewing her experience on the team to be an advantage heading into the season. “I know what to expect now,” Elish said. “I’m more confident, I know my role and I’m ready for whatever the season has to throw at me.” At press time, the girls prepared for an early scrimmage against Lowell. As they looked ahead to their season’s start, head coach Ginger Britton said primary focus was placed on the team’s ability to get on base, an area that ultimately led to the end of last year’s postseason run. “We need to learn to manufacture runs a little better, and when our hitters get in slumps, we need

B. John Abraham C. Terrell Suggs D. Dwight Freeney

correct answer: B

vs.

}

The first week of free agency featured the release of DeMarcus Ware, Julius Peppers and Jared Allen, three of the four active sack leaders in the NFL. Who is the fourth?

have to make sure we learn from it and do it differently this time.”

Baseball April 21

Heat

NB

A

}

It was real. After years of rumor and speculation, production of Warner Bros. “Space Jam 2” looked like it was finally happening. Bugs Bunny was back. LeBron James, who was set to star in the original’s sequel, had another reason to be compared to Michael Jordan. It was time to slam and jam again. Just as soon as infotainment online website Deadline reported its reality, however, sources close to LeBron debunked it as a rumor again. “Space Jam 2” is a no-go for now. And hopefully for good. As much fun as it would have been to see LeBron take over Jordan’s role, it wouldn’t have been the same. Jordan was loved by all. LeBron is hated by most. What used to be a fun and enjoyable film would have been perceived with a critical eye. Forget Bugs Bunny. All the attention would be on why LeBron didn’t pass enough, why he didn’t finish in the fourth quarter and what a horrible flop that was. That is, if it’s given any attention at all. Because, as much as I wish we could bring back the old days, it’s not the early 2000s anymore. Today’s generation of kids is too busy watching “The Regular Show” and “The Amazing World of Gumball” to care about a “Space Jam” revival. It’d be a shock if any of them were familiar with the Looney Tunes to begin with. And, as much money as it might reel in, “Space Jam 2” can’t possibly be better than the original. No amount of modern effects can unseat the predecessor’s perfection. No amount of today’s popular pop or rap hits can dethrone the first movie’s “I Believe I Can Fly.” Not even Kevin Hart’s starring role could possibly overthrow Bill Murray’s performance. Too many classics have been tainted with a less-than-extraordinary sequel. It’d be a shame if “Space Jam” was one of them.

vs.

Pacers April 11

Battle for the East


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inreview “Titanfall” “Titanfall” is a compelling adrenaline rush of a game featuring 10 out of 10 graphics and a step forward in the gaming world. “Titanfall” mixes the extreme agility of parkour with futuristic warfare and features that make “Call of Duty’s” “action packed gameplay” similar to the adrenaline rush a gamer gets while playing “Cooking Mama 2.”

“Divergent” The book was one thing, but the movie was another. “Divergent” blew the audience away with its amazing plot and cast. Though many people are saying it’s a knock-off of “The Hunger Games,” the movie definitely has its own feel and look. With a dash of wit and charm thrown in, the movie was a total success.

“Not a Bad Thing” By Justin Timberlake Justin Timberlake has yet to disappoint with his latest album. His newest single, “Not A Bad Thing,” may be the best off of “The 20/20 Experience.” It has a smooth sound that puts the listener in a relaxed mood and catchy lyrics that will get stuck in one’s head. “Not A Bad Thing” is a must-hear.

“Burn Your Fire for No Witness” By Angel Olsen On her second LP, indie folk provocateur Angel Olsen fleshes out her spooky, operatic catharsis with muscular full band arrangements. The results give punch to Olsen’s feverdream poetry, but her delicate songs are often overwhelmed by the pummeling grunge.

“#SELFIE” By The Chainsmokers With the word “selfie” constantly being used, it was just a matter of time before someone made a ridiculous song about it. While the beat of the song might be fun to dance around to, the ditzy girl contemplating her selfie filter choice is overly annoying.

PHOTO BY ALYSSA SETLAK

Junior Miles Angerman performs at a Windfall open mic night at Sip coffee house in Crown Point. Angerman’s performance, a highlight of the evening, was a daring and vulgar exercise involving egg-smashing.

Windfall open mic performance BY DYLAN TAYLOR

editor-in-chief

Having booked an open mic night at Sip coffee house independently of their sponsor, it is abundantly clear that Windfall members take their work, and others’ work, very seriously. The event was MCed by Roman Ruiz, who, along with performing, lightheartedly and informally recited various quips and facts between performances. The Windfallaligned poetry event culled an interesting cast of observers, consisting primarily of alternative-leaning Crown Point High School and Valparaiso University students, passers-by

and a few adventurous parents, to witness performances of poetry, prose and performance art by Crown Point High School students. The atmosphere was reverent and quiet—when a poet spoke, the only accompaniment to be found was the ever-present espresso bubble of the coffee shop. Each work received respectful and enthusiastic (and in some cases, rapturous) applause, and the spectators appeared to display sincere regard for the statements and works of the participants. The pieces performed were variously freeverse and metered, with some taking on characteristics of cathartic, ranting emotionalism. Topics varied from performer to performer,

ranging from meta-commentaries on narcissism (Steve Bazin, for example) and anarchic, surrealistic meditations on low-culture (Miles Angerman’s work). The undeniable highlight of the evening was Angerman’s performance; after having set up a black tarp and donning a Spiderman mask, Angerman made a series of crude, absurd statements about hardship, all in a faked Bronx accent, while concurrently throwing chicken eggs at the floor of the room. Such daring and singular art from the poets and performers was refreshing, especially considering the quasi-Romantic “love and flowers” paradigm of stereotypical high school poetry.

Artist releases new album “Shakira” BY EMILY BEST

a&e editor

With hits such as “Hips Don’t Lie” and “She Wolf,” music sensation Shakira has set the standards high for herself. “Shakira,” her most recent album, was released at the end of this month and has been well-liked among her fans. The album features guest singers such as Rihanna and Blake Shelton, also music sensations, making the album appealing to all music lovers. Songs such as “Empire” and “Can’t Remember to Forget You” were released as singles before the full album was released. The songs are already generating positive feedback. “Empire” has a catchy tune and an air of originality about it. The song focuses on the motif of love, and how love can “unite an empire.” The song sounds very uplifting and

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powerful, making the listener want to get up and dance. “Can’t Remember to Forget You” (feat. Rihanna), has the potential to be the bestselling track on the album. While the song itself sounds a bit odd and weird, it is weird in all the right ways. The uniqueness of the song, along with Shakira and Rihanna’s distinct voices, makes the song the best on the album. While the other songs are good, “Can’t Remember to Forget You” has a good chance of becoming a fan favorite. Other songs such as “Medicine” (feat. Blake Shelton) and “The One Thing” are also listen-worthy songs. While all the songs are good, these songs are definitely the standouts. “Medicine” was performed by Shakira and Blake Shelton on the TV show that they are both judges on “The Voice.” The duo received

best apps

best tweets Well, I’m done double majoring in Netflix and procrastination so i don’t have to study for finals. Right? Sophomore Tiffany Curtis

@t1ffanycurtis

Everyone at the vet needs to stop filling my dogs head with lies, he’s not cute and he’s not well behaved. Junior Juliette Horn

@Juju_Horn

Ever played “hot lava” on the different shades of tiles on the floor of a department store? White Tiles, a new Don’t Step Japanese app, takes those the White reflex skills to the next level, testing a player’s speed and Tile accuracy.

I lock my keys in my car, then accidentally punch out my back window trying to get in, yay luck. Senior Tylor Worley

@tworley716

Everyone’s all upset over Ezra? Who dat Senior Bailey Jurasevich

rapturous applause from the audience. Overall, the album is a must-buy for Shakira fans and music lovers in general.

@BJurasevich

March Madness Live

For the most up-to-date notifications on the state of your bracket, download the March Madness app. It allows viewers to watch live content on-the-go and check score updates between passing periods.

best follows @realjohngreen John Green, author of “The Fault in our Stars,” has a Twitter page that all fans should follow. Keep up-to-date with his books and his personal thoughts.

@dylanobrien Teen wolf star, Dylan O’Brien, has a Twitter page where the follower can keep up with his thoughts on the current seasons.


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arts & entertainment march 27, 2014

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“Non-Stop” action starts with plane hijacking BY MADDIE ADDUCCI

copy editor

The airborne thriller “Non-Stop” lived up to its intense, action-filled trailers. Director Jaume Collet-Serra did a wonderful job of balancing suspense and a good story line. The Air Marshal Bill Marks, played by Liam Neeson, is well developed throughout the movie as his troubled past slowly becomes revealed to the audience. After receiving threatening texts from an unknown source on a secured cell phone line, Marks takes action immediately. As Marks explains that the person texting him wants a large sum of money transferred into a specific account, the pilots are alerted that the account is Marks’. This causes the pilots and flight attendants to doubt Marks’ actions despite his efforts to convince them that he is doing the best he can to understand the situation. Supporting actress Julianne Moore plays a nervous, yet humorous

woman named Jen who helps the marshal in his task to protect the passengers. Her friendliness towards Marks is light-hearted, providing comic relief to the stressful scenes prior. Suspense continues to build as the unknown number presses on with his hostile texts, promising that someone will die every 20 minutes if the money is not transferred. It seems impossible to kill someone on a crowded plane; however, the deaths continue to come on time. The audience cannot look away as they question who to trust. The passengers start waking up. Their concern grows, and they begin to watch a live newsfeed on their personal TVs. The impact of the media on the crowd is an interesting addition to the film. The newscast they watch sprouts fear, which adds depth to the anxiety of the situation. “Non-Stop” has a balance of suspense and personal touches from the characters that makes it a must-see film.

BY MAGGIE GELON

editor-in-chief

Lea Michele’s emotional album “Louder” moves audience BY ALAA ABDELDAIEM

reporter

Top Tracks “BURN WITH YOU” Track #3

“BATTLEFIELD” Track #4

“THOUSAND NEEDLES” Track #10

Lea Michele is a powerhouse vocalist. “Glee” fans already know this. Through her portrayal of Rachel Berry on the FOX hit series, Michele has proven she’s got talent. For years, she’s covered chart-topping singles and taken command of the Broadway stage, commanding audiences with her dominant voice. Michele’s debut-album does the same, only this time, the work is all hers. Eight months after boyfriend and co-star Cory Monteith’s passing, Michele’s “Louder” shares the more personal, experienced side of the artist’s life. Tracks such as

“If You Say So” and “Empty Handed” are spine-tingling and full of emotion in the wake of Monteith’s death. The debut-album also features radio-ready big beats and dramatic ballads in records such as “Louder” and “Battlefield.” The upbeat tempo and empowering lyrics in “Louder” make it exceptionally entertaining while Michele’s powerful vocal performance helps her own a track like “Battlefield.” Composed of primarily lyrics about love, “Louder” has the tendency to drag. What gives the album the extra boost, however, are stand-out singles such as “Thousand Needles” and “Burn With You.”

favorite things Kind Bars

Vinyl Record Players Thanks to antique shops and Urban Outfitters, the vinyl record player is starting to gradually make a comeback. Nothing feels classier than listening to an old classic through the likes of a vintage record player. Or, if you don’t want to go on the hunt for a true vintage one, Urban Outfitters has a lovely collection of newer styles.

Learning provides its own reward

Different, dark and haunting, “Thousand Needles” is Michele at her finest. Its intense chorus impeccably showcases her dominant voice, and with lyrics capable of leaving listeners with goose bumps, the track gives the album the diversity it needs. “Burn With You” is invigorating and, simply put, gorgeous. A beautiful, dramatic melody and compelling dynamics from Michele ensure this song as an instant hit. It’s easy to see what “Glee” fans were so hyped about. “Louder” is a solid solo-debut release, and with a little more lyrical variety, Michele is posed to be a chart-topping pop artist in the near future.

we’re so over prom panic

With 20 different types of snack bars, Kind is a nutritious treat that is quick and easy. The bars include berries, walnuts, peanuts, raisins, dried fruit and more, but they are either held together with chocolate or yogurt, making them even more delicious.

College Crewnecks A comfortable crewneck sweater lets you represent your future school with pride. Whether you’re thinking about a school, are applying, have been accepted or just like college wear, these are a great buy.

With rom quickly approaching, the panic sets in. It creeps into your mind in forms of date options, group drama, party bus meltdowns, etc. There is so much to worry about during prom season that we forget to enjoy it. Stop kicking people out of your groups, fighting with your friends and please, for everyone’s sake, don’t complain about your date’s clothes not being acceptable, and we will all survive “Prama 2014.”

From the day we walk into high school, we are under the assumption that if we follow the academic rainbow, we’ll reap the pot of gold at the end. If we take every AP class, participate in every club, study for every test and volunteer every month, we are set for success. And while we aren’t necessarily putting ourselves at a disadvantage by pursuing this course, the fact of the matter is that there are no guarantees. A college may look at two students that both did “everything they were supposed to do” and choose to accept the student that’s left-handed because they feel that individual will bring more diversity to their school. An employer may look at two applicants that both did “everything they were supposed to” and hire the one over the other because he is a distant cousin to the funny guy in accounting. A stellar summer program may accept 30 stellar students only to have 15 actually enroll because the other half simply cannot afford the bill. Is any of this fair? No. Ethical? That’s debatable. But does it happen every single day? Yes. By no means should arms be thrown up in defeat and hard work cursed for not leading us to the Promised Land like so many are blindly promised. It’s not that hard work does not reap rewards; it’s just that our idea of what the reward should be is warped. For instance, say a student takes a challenging AP class for no other reason than that it will look good on their resume. The student dedicates time, effort and a few sleepless nights to the class all in the name of what’s to come. But as many students who did “everything they were supposed to do” are finding out, the red carpet of college admissions is not guaranteed to roll out. The only thing students can guarantee themselves is education. It’s not that students shouldn’t work hard- the work should simply be redirected. If the long-term payoff is a gamble one way or another, maybe the short-term deserves a little more attention. Instead of learning something in hopes of it impressing an employer or college admission counselor, why not learn something because it sparks an interest in us? Learn for the sake of learning for ourselves rather than for a phantom down the road.


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Sophomore

Adam Golding Main Motto PHOTO BY MAGGIE GELON The Bulldog Blazers cheerleading team show their pride and support by cheering on the boy’s basketball team at a home game. “I helped them do cheers and I helped do the dance,” senior Caitlin Szymborski said.

Blazing the trail to inclusion BY SHANNON ROSTIN

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managing editor

heering with pride and spirit, the Bulldog Blazers cheer squad can be spotted courtside. “They are a special needs squad that practices and performs with the cheerleading squad here at the high school,” sponsor Liz Hanlon said. “We’re trying to promote inclusion, to promote people who have disabilities to be like everyone else in their school, community and activities.” The Bulldog Blazers cheer team is a way of supporting inclusion within extracurriculars. “I help my cheerleading team with the cheer moves, the school dance and my dance routine,” freshman Kristen Maher said. The Blazers got their start as one of the first and only special needs cheer teams in the state after the Sparkle Effect began gaining attention. “We got started four years ago. We had been thinking about it for a long time, and somebody had seen the Sparkle Effect on Oprah. The Sparkle Effect was an organization that was promoting inclusion of special needs cheerleaders with cheerleaders,” Hanlon said. “I looked up the Sparkle Effect, and at the time, they were taking applications for grants. I wrote a letter, and a parent wrote a letter and we got a $1000 grant to buy uniforms for the girls after they read our letters. For about three years, we were the only special needs squad in

What is your ideal Spring Break?

the state. Now there’s another one down state.” Students from both the varsity and junior varsity cheerleading teams help the Bulldog Blazers to learn cheers. “We practice once a month with the cheerleading squad and learn the cheers, and (the squad) made up a dance for the girls,” Hanlon said. “We cheer normally at one or two football games during the season and then basically two boys basketball games and two girls

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It promotes friendships, it promotes acceptance, it promotes social skills.

Blazer Sponsor Liz Hanlon basketball games. The girls also cheer at the home special needs games.” Senior Kathryn Foulds is a student coach, and as a member of the varsity cheer team is able to help with chants and routines. “We meet every other Thursday from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. and we just review cheers and chants and go over the dance with the girls,” Foulds said.

A motto I live by is “replacing the fear of the unknown with curiosity.”

They perform versions of the cheers performed by the cheerleading teams. “I like the ‘we want a basket’ cheer,” Maher said. Along with what the girls do on the squad, the team also allows them to form lasting friendships within the team. “What we find is a lot of friendships develop, a lot of greater acceptance and people learn more about disabilities,” Hanlon said. Being part of a team is important and beneficial for these students. “My favorite part was cheerleading; I helped with a lot of the moves,” senior Caitlin Szymborski said. The Blazers also help students to feel included and actively participate in a team setting. “It promotes friendships, it promotes acceptance, it promotes social skills,” Hanlon said. “Because of the peer tutoring program, Special Olympics, and cheerleading the kids just learn from everybody who helps them, everybody else who is participating; they model their behavior so that’s what it’s really about acceptance, friendship, having fun and being like everybody else,” Hanlon said. This benefits all students involved in the Bulldog Blazers and programs like it. “I like cheerleading in general, and I peer tutor with them already, so it’s nice for me to hang out with them outside of school and do something they enjoy too,” Foulds said.

Summer Lovin’ I am looking forward to this summer because I want to go outside and swim and hang out with my friends.

Bald Brothers I started shaving my head for St. Baldrick’s because my brother started doing it and asked me if I would do it with him, so I said yes.

Clean it Up Being unorganized is my biggest pet peeve because I can’t stand when things are messy or out of place.

Fly Away My superpower would be the ability to fly. You could get places so much faster than in the car or by walking, and I hate traffic.

“Going somewhere with a lot of sun and sand where you can just relax.”

“Visiting my brother in Washington.”

Chloe Darnell

Tiffany Dewes

Brad Kurtz

Thomas Kvachkoff

Diamond Russell

Brandon Seberger

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“Getting away “Fifty to sixty from school in degrees and not general or going to windy and spendFlorida.” ing time outside.”

“Laying out on a beach in Florida, just anticipating summer.”

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“Hanging out with friends and no supervision or rules.”


Inklings march 2014