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Live Like aLocal OCTOBER 2018 | INKANSASCITY.COM

15 OF KC’S

MOST ICONIC EATERIES YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF

AN INTERVIEW WITH KC NATIVE GILLIAN FLYNN OUR LITTLE BLACK BOOK OF SHOPS & SERVICES


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Designer Rich Lippincott has an affinity for historic preservation and adaptively re-using spaces. His design philosophy is rooted in the belief that each room should tell a story. Discover a story for your home with a designer at Madden-McFarland.


We speak diamond.

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Live Like aLocal | INKANSASCITY.COM OCTOBER 2018

AN INTERVIEW WITH KC NATIVE GILLIAN FLYNN OUR LITTLE BLACK BOOK OF SHOPS & SERVICES

15 OF KC’SIC

MOST ICON EATERIES YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF

IN Kansas City magazine is now available at The Roasterie Cafe. Purchase a copy at any of our eight area locations and The Roasterie will donate a portion of the sales to Variety Children’s Charity of Greater Kansas City. visit us at theroasterie.com


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Contents October 2018 68

106

90

82 Features

Departments

68

82

IN CONVERSATION WITH GILLIAN FLYNN The Kansas City native and bestselling author reminisces about growing up in Coleman Highlands and how her childhood affects her fiction.

LOCAVORE LOOKS Eight KC-based fashion designers pose alongside their latest looks.

72

90

IN KANSAS CITY’S LITTLE BLACK BOOK Those in the know share their secrets on some of the best shops and services in KC.

EDITORIAL EDITION Building a new home on the Westside gets personal.

78

30

ENTERTAINING IN KC

36

OUR MAN IN KC

42

ARTS & CULTURE IN KC

50

BEHIND THE MUSIC IN KC

54

MY ESSENTIALS IN KC

56

LOOK IN KC

62

LIVING IN KC

66

SHOP IN KC

106

KANSAS CITY’S CULINARY TREASURES A sampling of some of the most-loved, under-theradar eateries in KC.

FLAVOR IN KC

IN EVERY ISSUE 24

On the cover A perfectly photogenic slice of avocado toast from Wheat Neighborhood Table. Photographer: Jenny Wheat

October 2018

| 20 | INKANSASCITY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE

116

FACES IN KC

126

THIS MONTH IN KC

128

FOUND IN KC


Unique

D EL I CI O USLY

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The Mazzarese that Kansas Citians know is rich with history and tradition, but it goes far beyond the first store in Oak Park Mall. It travels back in time to the Mazzarese’s first shop in the heart of Rome during the induction of brand names into fashion history. The first store was right next to the first Gucci store, on the main shopping avenue in Rome, just around the corner from The Spanish Steps an iconic tourist destination. The store sat perched among designers such as Armani, Bulgari, and Gucci. Tony Mazzarese knew Guccio Gucci by name. Tony Mazzarese, grew up watching his family create one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry for Royalty in Tunisia. He dreamed of having a shop of his own where he too, could create wearable works of art. Unlike most dreamers, he had the tenacity to make his dream a reality. Like his fathers before him, he knew the importance of location and came to Kansas City to start his very own jewelry store in the heart of the country.

Tony and his wife met in Kansas City 50 years ago. They opened their first jewelry store with the aspirations to continue the legacy the Mazzarese family had set before them. Kansas City was rapidly growing into a hub for commerce and innovation. Mazzarese Jewelry quickly became known as an expert for custom jewelry and artistry of precious gems. The store had a humble beginning, only through persistence and boldness was Tony and his wife Tosca’s dream a reality. “My father started out owning a jewelry repair shop here in Kansas city. Over 30 jewelry stores in the area brought their repair work to his tucked-away shop. He had his eye on a store with a prime location in the mall. For Tony this meant he could finally display his handmade jewelry under the Mazzarese name and not hand it off to be sold by another jewelry store, giving life to his dream.” Veronica said.

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Each piece of jewelry the Mazzarese family produced was designed and created by hand with the utmost care and precision. The Mazzarese family worked together to create a legacy of craftsmanship that would outlive their lifetime and that of their children. Mazzarese Jewelry quickly outgrew the single location and expanded to have three separate locations across Kansas City. In the time these stores were open, Tony and his family discovered their propensity toward luxury watches and designer jewelry. This revelation led to the consolidation into the single Leawood location. Here, they introduced new lines such as John Hardy and Omega. On moving to Leawood, Veronica said “We found our niche creating and selling luxury jewelry. That was how we were able to return to our roots in Rome with the luxury fashion jewelry.”

“Unlike most dreamers, he had the tenacity to make his dream a reality. ...he knew the importance of location and brought his family to Kansas City to start his very own jewelry store in the heart of the country.”

Trunk Shows JOHN HARDY October 11th & 12th TODD REED October 26th & 27th HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE December 8th Today Mazzarese continues to introduce new and exciting designers that inspire their clients and become a part of their family. Each designer creates works of art with elements unique to their designs. From oxidized silver, raw diamonds, fingerprint embossed gold to handcrafted sculpture pendants there is a style for everyone and the milestones in their life.

135TH & ROE Parkway Plaza | 4850 W. 135th Street Leawood, KS 66224 | 913.491.4111 800.735.5112 | mazzarese.com

Parkway Plaza | 4850 W. 135th Street Leawood, KS 66224 | 913.491.4111


Editor’s Note

Livin’ La Vida Local Vol. 1 | No. 3 October 2018

W

Editor In Chief Zim Loy Art Director Alice Govert Bryan Digital Editor Michael Mackie Contributing Writers Susan Cannon, Charles Ferruzza, Judith Fertig, Timothy Finn, Kathryn Greene, Cindy Hoedel, Cody Hogan, Merrily Jackson, Damian Lair, Patricia O’Dell Contributing Photographers Ron Berg, Heidi Jo Brady, Aaron Leimkuehler, Jenny Wheat Design Intern Eva Tucker photo by jenny wheat

orking on this October issue has been truly fun. One of the best things about being a magazine editor is that I meet a lot of Kansas City folks in the know—influencers, if you will. And those influencers love to share their favorites. Otherwise they wouldn’t be influencers, would they? Which leads us to this “Living Like A Local” issue. We’re sharing their best suggestions with you. No matter how long you’ve lived in Kansas City, even if you’re a native, you’re still always on the lookout for favorable references on a multitude of matters. We asked contributing writer Kathryn Greene to suss out some oh-so-practical recommendations for those word-of-mouth services that you normally go to neighbors and friends for. Starting on page 72, these are practical suggestions for things as mundane as window washing or exotic as acupuncture. Tear out those pages and save them. You’ll be glad you did. Charles Ferruzza has been writing about the local foodie scene for quite a while. And he put that to good use in assembling his list of culinary treasures—under-the-radar eateries you’ve never heard of, beginning on page 78. Well, you probably know about a few of these, otherwise they wouldn’t be culinary treasures. But how fun is it to have a list this long? I can’t wait to try the fried chicken at Portia’s Home Style Cooking. Or, since I’m a root beer fanatic, how did I never know about the fresh root beer served up at Mugs Up Root Beer Drive-In? Fashion design has a storied history in Kansas City. At one point, the garment industry was second only to New York City’s in size. While it’s not that large anymore, there’s still a thriving band of designers crafting their wares right here. For our fashion feature, starting on page 82, we asked several designers to pose alongside model Kristen Jadlow dressed in their latest looks. If you see something you love, buy it. In the years I’ve lived in Kansas City, I’ve built up my own list of go-to services and shops and craftspeople that my husband and I have used again and again over our many renovations (and one new-build), which I share with you, along with photos of our Westside house, beginning on page 90. And did you know that best-selling author Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl and Sharp Objects) was born and raised in Kansas City? Coleman Highlands to be specific. Talking with contributor Cindy Hoedel, Flynn shares her best memories of growing up here and how that has influenced her writing. It’s a great read. From first-rate insider tips to first-hand advice on entertaining, decorating, beauty, and more, we aim to be your source for Living Like A Local.

Copy Editor Craig Magnus Managing Director Michelle Jolles Publisher Chad Parkhurst Digital Director Brittany Coale Senior Media Consultants Katie Delzer, Krista Markley Client Relations Manager Betsy Lucas Editorial Questions: zloy@inkansascity.com

Advertising Questions:

cparkhurst@inkansascity.com

Distribution Questions: blucas@inkansascity.com

Subscription Questions:

Mail: In Kansas City, PO Box 92257 Long Beach CA 90809 Phone: 888-881-5861, M–F, 8–4 PST Email: inkansascity@psfmag.com

IN Kansas City is published monthly by KC Media LLC

118 Southwest Blvd., 2nd Floor Kansas City, MO 64108 816-768-8300 | inkansascity.com Annual Subscriptions are $19.95

Zim

OCTOBER 2018

| 24 | INKANSASCITY.COM


EXPLORE OUR WEBSITE AT

INKANSASCITY.COM Have you heard? Sponsored by UMB, IN Kansas City is front and center at many of the opening-night theater performances around town. Our resident theater critics Lonita Cook and Brandon Tietz will have their take on everything from the ballet to the symphony and beyond. Want us at your show? Let us know! Read the reviews at inkansascity.com/arts-entertainment

All the stats that are semi-fit to print.

Each week in our “By The Numbers” feature we pepper some of Kansas City’s finest with some fun (and nearly impossible to answer) who/what/when/where questions. You’d be surprised with some of the astronomical numbers they come up with. For instance, how many times has Gail from Gail’s HarleyDavidson overheard Sweet Home Alabama? Or how much caffeine does Danny O’Neill from The Roasterie consume before he even leaves the house for the day? The answers are just as quirky as the questions. It’s become one of our most popular online columns. Find it at inkansascity.com/innovatorsinfluencers/people.

Trying to decide where to eat? For

the city’s most extensive restaurant guide, head to inkansascity.com/eatdrink/dining-guide

ENTER TO WIN

Want to win a fall wine tour for you and seven of your closest friends? We love giving away free stuff as much

as you like winning it! To enter for a chance to win a Kansas City wine country tour, head to inkansascity. com/the-magazine/enter-to-win

Deliberating what to do tonight? Discover the most

comprehensive calendar in the metro—art galleries, dance, theater, social events, and music, music, music at inkansascity.com/events

FACEBOOK @INKANSASCITYMAGAZINE

TWITTER @INKANSASCITYMAG

House hunting? We’re excited to launch our new real estate section on

our website this month. We’ll clue you in on some of the most unique houses on the market. Even better? We’re tying in with some of Kansas City’s top agents to keep you in the know. To find your dream home, go to inkansascity. com/home-design/real-estate

OCTOBER 2018

| 26 | INKANSASCITY.COM

INSTAGRAM @INKANSASCITYMAG


H BIG U GE G ST S E AL E C OF GO L EA THE IN G YE ON R AR NO W AN CE

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Entertaining BY

IN KC

Merrily Jackson

Let’s Talk Shop OUR ENTERTAINING MAVEN LISTS HER FAVORITE PURVEYORS FOR COOKING AND ENTERTAINING

Email me with your entertaining questions, dilemmas, or triumphs at mjackson@inkansascity.com

OCTOBER 2018

I

Clockwise from top left: Merrily shops for her favorite white serving pieces at Pryde’s. A few of her “Live Like A Local” recommendations: Costco shrimp cocktail platter; Villa Manodori balsamic vinegar from The Better Cheddar; Rigaud candles from The Little Flower Shop.

bought a pair of white porcelain butter dishes last month when I was in Deauville, France. I mention this purchase in a bold and desperate attempt to impress you with my international travel habits, which really aren’t all that habitual. A secondary reason is to incite you to acquire as many white serving pieces as your cupboard has room for. Classic, unadorned white serving pieces never go out of style, and food looks best on them. You don’t need to travel to Deauville to buy them. I like to snap up white serving bowls and platters when I see them at Tuesday Morning or T.J. Maxx (read: for

| 30 | INKANSASCITY.COM


here and very now ... a total design immersion

MODERN INTERIOR DESIGN + URBAN EVENT SPACE 3 6 0 1 M A I N S T R E E T · K A N S A S C I T Y, M O 6 4 1 1 1 · 8 1 6 . 4 2 1 . 1 0 3 0 · A L E J A N D R O D E S I G N S T U D I O . C O M


Entertaining

IN KC

A Honey of a Drink Recipe

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OCTOBER 2018

Don’t you just adore a cocktail you can make in big batches? This one, developed by the gifted hooch masters at Tom’s Town Distilling Company, is tangy, refreshing and surprisingly complex. It would make a great signature cocktail at your next gathering.

THE BEE’S KNEES

1 part raw honey

2 parts freshly squeezed lemon juice

3 parts Tom’s Town McElroy’s Corruption Gin*

Mix ingredients together and pour over ice in a rocks glass. Garnish with a lemon peel. This drink is boozy. To make it less so, add water. *I normally don’t recommend a specific brand of liquor in a cocktail recipe, but this gin is what makes this recipe hum. It’s available at most Kansas City liquor stores.

cheap). Then, when I bring food to a gathering (for example, The Barefoot Contessa’s Outrageous Brownies—email for the recipe), I can just leave the serving dish as a little prezzie for the host. For this, the “Live Like A Local” issue of IN Kansas City, I offer you my highly personal list of local resources for party-giving—and party-attending. Some are hidden, others not so much. Most are near my midtown stomping grounds, but even if you live in the ’burbs, these places are worth the drive. | 32 | INKANSASCITY.COM


THOSE DARLING LITTLE SHOPS Located at 50th and State Line Road in Westwood Hills, The Little Flower Shop and its conjoined sister shop, The Little Shop Next Door, are my favorite destinations for hostess gifts. It takes me about 30 seconds to pick out a hostess gift, because there isn’t one thing there I wouldn’t want for myself. Then I spend another hour shopping for me, me, me. You’ll find chic-looking objets, scented candles (they have Rigaud!), witty cocktail napkins. They also have gorgeous grab-and-go “Baby Bloom” bouquets for $25. HERE’S WHY I CAN’T SHUT UP ABOUT PRYDE’S These days, Mojitos are a standard cocktail, but there was a time not so long ago when no one outside of Havana had heard of such a thing. It was during this era that a friend returned from an exotic vacation and told me about sampling his first Mojito. Keen to try one myself, I researched the recipe and learned that an authentic Mojito requires use of a muddler. I’d never heard of it. So I headed to Pryde’s Kitchen and Necessities in Westport. Sales associate: May I help you? Me: I’m looking for something called a muddler. Sales associate: You mean like for a Mojito? Me: Well, yes! Sales associate: Would you like silicone, stainless steel, or hardwood? This illustrates exactly why Pryde’s is my go-to place for all things kitchen. They have everything and they know everything. They never disappoint. Speaking of muddlers and Mojitos, I have a terrific recipe for Mojitos for a Crowd—email me and I will send it to you!

When you're ready to have fewer clothes, but better clothes, we can help.

MY FAVE FOR FISH AND MEAT Need beef filet sliced paper thin for carpaccio? Berkshire pork cut for kebobs? Great lump crabmeat for crab cakes? Take thee to McGonigle’s, at Ward Parkway and 79th Street. The butchers are extremely knowledgeable and will never look at you like you are daft if you ask for tenderloin tips because you’re making Julia’s Saute de Beouf (email me for the recipe) The rest of the store is serviceable, too, with enough general grocery items that you probably won’t need to make another stop on the way home. FOODIE NIRVANA It’s so easy to drop a couple hundred bucks at The Better Cheddar, the best specialty food shop in the city. For vinegar snobs like me, it’s a particularly dangerous place. They have my Villa Manodori Aceto Balsamico for $52 a bottle—the tiniest drizzle makes anything taste good. As one would expect, their cheese assortment is massive,

OCTOBER 2018

Mens. Womens. Timeless Style. www.hudsonandjane.com

| 33 | INKANSASCITY.COM


Entertaining

IN KC

with many pricey selections. But it’s a better deal than you might think—they will re-cut any piece into smaller bits, so you buy only what you need. My current favorite, Pierre Robert, might sound steep at thirty-five dollars a pound, but a quarter pound is manageable. It’s like eating butter mixed with crème fraiche. Smeared on a slice of ripe pear, you have the perfect fall appie. I shop at the Plaza location. If you get there between nine and ten in the morning, you can park right out front. WINE, ROSES AND EMERGENCY DINNERS Why do I love my midtown Costco? Because the wine deals alone are worth the price of membership: (I challenge any wine snob not to like The Kirkland Signature Napa County Cabernet Sauvignon, at thirteen bucks a bottle.) Because Kirkland brand olive oil is cheap and fabulous. Because if you get there by noon you can buy coral-pink roses—two dozen stems for about seventeen bucks. And because, in an emergency, you can always find all the makings for a perfectly respectable dinner party. Buy the shrimp cocktail platter and re-plate it to a pretty serving dish for the hors d’oeuvre. Then, serve their Caesar salad (from the deli, not the kit) followed by Kirkland Signature lasagna with Italian sausage and beef. For dessert, fresh berry cream pie. Dinner. Boom. Done.

WHILE WE’RE ON THE TOPIC OF LAST-MINUTE DINNER PARTIES At his glammy Midtown studio/event space, my friend Alejandro Lopez assembled an impromptu dinner for ten to honor the artist Hunt Slonem, in town for his show at Weinberger Fine Art. Alejandro served a scrumptious buffet of take-out Indian food. I tell you this in another attempt to impress you because, yes, I got to go, and as a way to assert that Indian takeout is a great dinner party solution, and Taj Mahal on Wornall Road, Alejandro’s choice, is a dependable source for it. Alejandro has graciously agreed to share his brilliant menu—email me and I’ll send it to you. A FINAL SHOUT-OUT TO KC TAKE-OUT With the emergence of UberEats, DoorDash and Grubhub, you can have amazing food delivered in about 45 minutes; many Kansas City restaurants have special menus to accommodate this new market. Even my favorite “hidden” restaurant, Jarocho Authentic Mexican Seafood in Kansas City, KS, is available via DoorDash. The Fish Filet Veracruz is perfect for a dinner party. It comes with rice, salad and tortillas. Don’t forget to order everything in bulk.

C E L E B R AT I N G T H E R E N E WA L O F A N I C O N I C T H E AT E R An evening with renowned vocalist Oleta Adams R e s e r v e y o u r O l e t a Ad a m s t i c k e t s t o d a y !

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OCTOBER 2018

| 34 | INKANSASCITY.COM


HATS!

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details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, details, 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Our Man BY

IN KC

Damian Lair

dlair@inkansascity.com : @damianlair #OurManINKC

Flower Power

Dan Meiners

A

n annual event formerly known as “Trends” got a new breath of freshness this year as “Focus on Flowers.” After all, what’s “trendy” about recycling an event name? Studio Dan Meiners was transformed to spotlight and inspire those movers and shakers at the helm of planning some of our city’s most glittering events. Guests were greeted by “living,” waving palms and soaring floral towers grouped by color family. There was a garden path wandering amongst what looked the sea of poppies leading up to the Emerald City. Other “rooms” were inspired by color blocking, a bohemian potting shed, and a metallic winter holiday. Lon Lane’s Inspired Occasions showcased a unique sliders bar including steak, lamb, and grilled chicken. And the interactive, tunnel-like photo booth room from Icon Event Group, was so new the concept doesn’t yet have a name. For those whose floral coma wasn’t complete, upon exiting, guests were invited to pluck blooms-to-go from the trash bins full of flowers. You can officially call yourself a master when even the garbage is gorgeous. SPOTTED: Lindsey Rood-Clifford, Andy Robertson, Vince & Julie Clark, Rachel Sexton, Anthony Magliano, Lisa Lala & Robert Harris, Kristi Templeton, Dee Dee Adams, Vicky Kulikov, Josh Dampf, Kimberlee Ried, Mica Thomas, Mimi Kippes.

DO GOODERS

PARTY CODE

HOT GOSSIP: for everything (October 19 is ‘Evaluate Your Life Day’), we can now add a day of Which KCto-Las Vegas transplant celebration linked to KCMO’s area code recently purchased a on 8/16. That’s right—816 Day is an vintage Rolls Royce opportunity to celebrate civic pride and, on eBay? well, party. Organized by the Downtown Neighborhood Association, Do816 and other community partners, this year’s celebration was a sizable expansion of what began last year as a modest gettogether at a local pizza shop. I joined the festivities at the de facto hub, John’s Big Deck, where the discounted Pendergast Punch was flowing alongside beats from DJ Mike Scott. Elsewhere, pop-up parties were happening all over downtown, including The Polished Edge, Posh KC Blow Dry Bar and Garment House. Artist Michael McQuary drew instant portraits of lucky streetcar riders, and the rock band Thunder Jacket kept the party going for a free evening concert at City Market. Mark your calendars for next year (you know the date!), as this celebration is sure to grow even larger.

JUST when it seemed like there’s a holiday CALLING Do Good

Co. a thrift shop would be a crude disservice; after all, how many of those do you know that have parties with valet? Yeah, none. The one-year-old shop on the quirky stretch of 39th Street recently lauded its anniversary with a cocktail party celebrating friends and donors. Hosts Sharyn Blond, Newell & Cameron Brookfield, Lynne Gilbert, Janet & Pat Curran, and George Terbovich packed a full house for an evening of imbibing and shopping. The cozy store features a revolving collective of special, donated apparel, accessories, and home furnishings, with all proceeds benefiting KidsTLC and KC Pet Project. The invitation coyly noted (without address) “late-night drinks” following the, well… earlier night drinks… at Jim Blair’s nearby Frank Lloyd Wright home. Cheeky way of saying—if you can’t make your way there from memory, you’re not invited! SPOTTED: Amanda & Pat Dunn, Don Loncasty, Tom Suther, Kevin Bryant, Katherine & Joe Gregg, Allie Shondell, Kevin Hancock, Emily & Aaron Confessori.

OCTOBER 2018

FIREBALL I PUT on my most aquatic-

looking pants (there were multiple contenders!) and dove out to Night at the Museum: Enchantment Under the Ancient Seas—the 5th annual gala at the Museum at Prairiefire. Funds raised support KC Urban Advantage, a collaborative

between underserved schools and local cultural and learning institutions, via student scholarships and professional development training for educators. We went into full nerd-mode while trying the immersive Stonehenge 360° Video VR Experience (so cool!) and checking out the newest prehistoric fish specimen in the current exhibit, Savage Ancient Seas. (Fun fact: many of OVERHEARD the featured aquatic fossil creatures were found “Having phone locally, dating back to when this prairie was chargers is now beneath an ocean.) Benny Lee later lulled us away a given, but what with his clarinet. And dining under the watchful self-respecting eye of a T. rex? It’s an experience unlike any other. Uber driver doesn’t also have emergency hand lotion?!”

| 36 | INKANSASCITY.COM

SPOTTED: Candy & Fred Merrill Jr., Edith Lee, Angela & Neal Sharma, Amy & Jeff Hargroves, Edith Lee, Suze & John Holt, Patty & Chip Corcoran, Becky & Brett Gordon, Wanda & Steve Wilkinson, Jill and Mayor Carl Gerlach, Jan & Ed Eilert, Marilyn Salomon & David Renner, Lee Page, Sarah Page.


Be IN the Loop! Like us on FACEBOOK @inkansascitymagazine

Our Man

IN KC Kim Klein & Sharon Hoffman.

OVERHEARD “The goods at Whole Foods may be natural, but the sea of synthetic-fibered workout leggings most certainly is not. Make pants great again!”

K

ansas City’s BIG 9-week contemporary arts experience/exhibition/festival, Open Spaces, officially kicked off in a commensurately big way with ARTPARTY. More than 900 guests eagerly filled downtown’s Municipal Exhibition Hall at the invitation of Hosts Mayor Sly James, Scott Francis and Susan Gordon and chairs Christy Gautreaux, Sharon Hoffman, Kim Klein and yours truly. The space was activated by multimedia installations created by artist Barry Anderson, with guests dressed in “black and white with a splash of color” complementing the live video walls. The event itself was inspired by similar artist gatherings in New York and San Francisco, with no element lacking an artistic treatment. Feasting tables of meats, cheeses and desserts were carefully assembled by Brancato’s Catering— almost too beautiful to touch—and various performance art pop-ups dotted the night. Though the party is but a memory, you have through October 28 to soak up the numerous Open Spaces art installations canvassing our city. SPOTTED: Dianne & Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, Ursula Terrasi, Debby Ballard, Ratana Tshibanda, Toma Wolff, Dan Cameron, Helen & Frank Wewers, Michelle Roberts, Lisa Garney, Brady Legler, Barbara & Jack Spilker, Frances Baszta, Ann McCray, Darlene McCluskey, Tammy & James Edwards, Sharon & Richie Orr, Carolyn Arnold, Sean Gallagher, Shelby Herrick, Jeff Albright, Jan Kyle, Ann Hickok.

Drip, Drip, Drip HAVING just touched down from one heck of a friends-

trip to Ibiza (read: mind, body, and spirit broken in every way imaginable), I called in the professionals at DripIV Therapy to hook me up. Literally. Like watching the battery meter on my iPhone inch its way up, I could feel myself gradually repair, as their intravenous bag of hydrating essential nutrients gave me renewed life. Two weeks abroad (amidst the Euro heat wave) had also left my skin looking like the heaps of leather handbags I maneuvered among on the sidewalks of Barcelona. Fortunately, forced downtime with an IV attached presents the ideal schedule opening for a facial. DripIV specializes in the “red carpet” hydrafacial—aptly named for its gentle approach that doesn’t require a multi-day gap between treatment and heading to a special event. Though I typically go for facials coupled with a dose of aggressive extraction, my skin hardly felt shortchanged. The magic wand slides across your face, vacuuming up everything your pores would like to keep buried, while simultaneously filling the void with a series of serums. My skin instantly felt like silk—an awakening that lasted several days. And did I mention they’re mobile, so all of this can be had in the comfort of home or office? Now that’s what I call therapy.

OCTOBER 2018

Party Hearty

| 38 | INKANSASCITY.COM

ARGH, MATEY SOMETIMES it’s cool to be a tourist in one’s own city. On a recent Saturday, before firing up my Open Spaces app and checking off various installations on my to-see checklist, I headed to a super cool, little coffee shop in the Morningside neighborhood, Pirate’s Bone. Needing caffeine and a full stomach for the journey ahead, I knocked down one of the cold-brew nitro coffees (infused with pressurized nitrogen) and a cranberry-stuffed, activated charcoal waffle (yes, you read that correctly—charcoal to absorb my previous evening’s indiscretions). Revved and ready for a day of recharging via art!


YOUNG at heART

OVERHEARD “She’s a really good friend of Jim Blair’s.” “Oh well, who isn’t?”

MOCSA [Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault] held its annual Young at Art event at The Gallery Event Space in the KC Power & Light District. The evening kicked off with a VIP reception at the next-door Kill Devil Club that was hotter than Hades. (No, really—the AC went out.) Not missing a cheeky opportunity to improvise, Co-Chairs Susannah Sotos and Cathy Wear-Ferguson greeted guests with open arms, giant smiles and battery-powered LED fans. Well done. Fortunately, the main event was plenty cool, but quickly heated up with the live auction, full of incredible vacation getaways, jewelry and sporting experiences. Every winning bid was celebrated with confetti canons, and we all toasted to playing a small part in helping MOCSA provide critical services to children and adults in the metro. SPOTTED: Stephane Bradley Cooch, Elle & Greyson Clymer, Gina & Jeff Stingley, Lauren & James Sotos, Bobby & Anne Grant, Amy & Neil Atha, Denise Delcore, John Green, Lynn & Lance Carlton, Janda Nielsen, Hunter Scott.

HOT GOSSIP: Which One Park Place couple sold their penthouse condo (didn’t they just move in?!) in favor of a charming, reno-needed “Old World” home in bucolic Mission Hills?

So, KC—where do you want to go? XO

OCTOBER 2018

| 39 | INKANSASCITY.COM


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Arts & Culture Charles Ferruzza

Eric Rivier

THE HOST OF CREATIVE MORNINGS IN KANSAS CITY ANSWERS FOUR QUESTIONS

C

reative Mornings is, according to its local host Eric Rivier Jiminez (he’s better known locally simply as Eric Rivier, the director of communications for a non-profit organization called Made to Flourish), “one of the largest gatherings of the creative community in the world.” The concept of Creative Mornings—an early morning breakfast meeting of like-minded people (in this case, the creative community) with a featured speaker sounds vaguely familiar to anyone who has ever attended a Rotary Club or Sertoma meeting, although with a very different focus. The accent at Creative Mornings is on the creative life of a city or town and to “foster a community that sees and values creativity in all of life.” Creativity covers a pretty swath of people here. The “creative community” isn’t limited to the obvious choices (artists, writers, graphic designers), but to any part of industry that has an interest in the “creative life.” The organization was started in 2008 by New Yorker Tina Roth Eisenberg as an easy and inexpensive way to bring New York’s creative community together on a regular basis. The Kansas City chapter was created in 2015; Eric Rivier revived the chapter two years ago when it began losing steam. Rivier moved with his wife and four children from Louisville to Kansas City to take a position with Made to Flourish, a national religious-based network of pastors and churches. “Through a friend,” Rivier says of Creative Mornings, “I was asked to take over the Kansas City chapter.”

Rivier: That was a challenge. I had been very connected to the creative

community in Louisville, and suddenly I was living in a city where I knew almost nobody! I wanted to make connections but started out with just a skeleton team of volunteers compared to the active group of a 14-member team of volunteers today.” When I started we were getting, maybe, 90 people at our breakfast meetings. Now we’re averaging about 200 people. INKC: What kind of speakers are you getting to participate at the meetings? Rivier: We’re getting many suggestions for speakers who cover a wide range of topics that have a connection to the creative community. This month we’re having a successful watercolor artist, Rob Schamburger. His worker is very nontraditional: He has done work for the WWE, for example. INKC: What would be one word to effectively describe the Kansas

City creative community? Rivier: The first word that came to mind was “welcoming,” because this

is one of the most welcoming creative communities I’ve ever seen. But I would also have to say hard working. I feel we’ve really been accepted with open arms here in Kansas City.” INKC: What’s the demographic attracted to Creative Mornings? Rivier: I’d say that the average age of people coming to our meetings is

INKC: What was the biggest challenge for you in bringing Creative

35-40. I see lots of younger people. But our committed core group tends to trend a bit older. People are still discovering us.”

Mornings back to life after moving to a city where you knew so few people?

creativemornings.com/cities/kc

OCTOBER 2018

| 42 | INKANSASCITY.COM

creative mornings photo by samantha levi. eric rivier photo by jeff evrard

by

IN KC


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Arts & Culture BY

IN KC

Charles Ferruzza

JAPANFEST BETWEEN THE TIME that Commodore Matthew

RAKSY BH/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Perry opened the country of Japan to trade with the West in 1853 and today, relations between the United States and the Land of the Rising Sun have had its highs and lows. But the culture, beauty, and history of Japan continues to fascinate and one of the best local venues to celebrate America’s appreciation of all things Japanese is the annual Japan Festival held each year on the campus of Johnson County Community College in Overland Park. This year’s festivities will be held on Saturday, October 6 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and feature a wide variety of entertainment and educational offerings, from anime movies to the traditional tea ceremony, demonstrating all of that art’s delicate nuances. The event will include ample opportunities for shopping (both a cultural village and bazaars) and displays of physical prowess. Aikido, anyone? jccc.edu

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OCTOBER 2018

| 44 | INKANSASCITY.COM


YOU’VE NEVER BEEN TO THE ANNUAL APPLEFEST IN WESTON, MISSOURI? TWO PIECES OF ADVICE: Don’t go over the speed limit by

even a single mile (the local police force is aggressive at enforcing the laws). Eat a light snack before traveling to the charming former river town (the town is still there, but the river changed course after a flood in 1881); the fragrance of apple butter cooking in copper kettles wafts over the entire small town like a fruity perfume, making visitors to the two-day celebration almost ravenous with hunger. There are plenty of delicacies to cure that hunger once you’ve arrived (including the most delicious old-fashioned apple dumplings ever), but if you must park a distance from the festivities, you may be tempted to go zombie on an unsuspecting passerby long before you get to the food. Saturday, October 6 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, October 7 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. westonmo.com

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Arts & Culture Charles Ferruzza

SMILE! IT ISN’T EVERY DAY that one of the most celebrated photographers in

a city takes powerful photographs of the people who inhabit a city instead of the movers and shakers that run the city. But for Kansas City’s Open Spaces event, photographer Tom Styrkowicz will train his lens on the people that breathe life into Kansas City using a portable location studio and the ability to quickly capture someone’s unique life essence. For two days—Saturday, October 13 and Sunday, October 14 from noon to 5:45 p.m.—Styrkowicz will take a series of “One by One Community Portraits” in a temporary studio in Swope Park. The visitor to the exhibition can have his or here portrait taken and will receive one free copy of the photograph as a souvenir. The other photos taken on those days will be featured as part of a “Community Portrait Wall” expected to have as many 1,400 individual portraits of the men and women who make Kansas City a great place to be. openspaceskc.com

OCTOBER 2018

| 46 | INKANSASCITY.COM

photo by natalie dameron

by

IN KC


GLORIOUS GERSHWIN IF JACOB BRUSKIN GERSHOWITZ of Brooklyn, New York hadn’t

died—young, tragically, at the peak of his fame—at age 38 on July 11, 1937, his life, if not just his illuminating legacy, might have extended through many more decades. But the light that was the composer and pianist that most of us know and love as George Gershwin was extinguished far too early. This year, only 30 days after the 120th anniversary of his birth, the Kansas City Symphony will share the stage with pop superstar Patti Austin (Every Home Should Have One, Baby Come To Me) in Helzberg Hall in the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts; Jason Seber, the David T. Beals III associate conductor of the Kansas City Symphony, will oversee the “Glorious Gershwin” concert, also featuring Kenny Broberg (a Park University graduate student and the 2017 Van Cliburn silver medalist) on piano, playing the breathtaking Rhapsody in Blue. Performances are scheduled for Thursday, October 25 at 7 p.m., and Friday and Saturday, October 26-27 at 8 p.m. The highlights of the program include the Grammy-winning Miss Austin singing standards The Man I Love, Someone to Watch Over Me, and Summertime as well as the beloved It Ain’t Necessarily So from Gershwin’s masterpiece, Porgy and Bess. It will be a celebration to remember. kcsymphony.org

It’s actually time for both! Now is the time to plan late-autumn bulb plantings for fabulous spring color next year. And with offerings of classic roofline, tree and shrub lighting, natural evergreen entries and seasonal container plantings, call now and we’ll install in time for you flip the switch on Thanksgiving day.

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OCTOBER 2018

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ANGELA DUFRESNE

Ticket Line (detail), 2018, oil on canvas, 84 x 132 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, New York.

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BEETHOVEN’S SEVENTH and GRIEG’S PIANO CONCERTO Friday & Saturday, October 5-6 at 8 p.m. Sunday, October 7 at 2 p.m. Michael Stern, conductor George Li, piano MICHAEL KURTH A Thousand Words GRIEG Piano Concerto BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7

From the unforgettable opening to its brilliant finale, Grieg’s Piano Concerto abounds with soaring beauty and virtuoso fireworks, especially in the gifted hands of pianist George Li. Tickets from $25.

E N O Y R E V E R O F N U F E L B A F FO R DA

Pops Series begins!

Silent Film + Live Organ

Kansas City Symphony presents

Thursday, October 25 at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, October 26-27 at 8 p.m. Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor Patti Austin, vocalist & Kenny Broberg, piano

HALLOWEEN - Wednesday, October 31 at 7 p.m. Dorothy Papadakos, organ Christopher McLaurin, percussion

Thursday, November 8 at 7 p.m. Jason Seber, David T. Beals III Associate Conductor

GLORIOUS GERSHWIN featuring PATTI AUSTIN

From irresistible musicals to iconic works for piano and orchestra, George Gershwin endures as one of America’s most beloved composers. Enjoy the exuberant An American in Paris as well as Grammy® Award-winner Patti Austin singing “The Man I Love” and “Someone to Watch Over Me,” plus “Summertime” and “It Ain’t Necessarily So” from Porgy and Bess. Park University graduate student and 2017 Van Cliburn silver medalist Kenny Broberg performs Gershwin’s groundbreaking favorite, Rhapsody in Blue. Tickets from $40.

ORDER NOW

THE HUNCHBACK of NOTRE DAME CLASSICS UNCORKED: in CONCERT BACH, BLUEGRASS and BOURBON

Our amazing guest organist Dorothy Papadakos revives the 1923 silent horror film “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” with a completely improvised score. The program also features Christopher McLaurin, the Symphony’s principal percussionist, on orchestral chimes as Quasimodo. Starring Lon Chaney in the title role and featuring a 19-acre set filled with thousands of extras, “Hunchback” is a visual spectacle on a grand and spooky scale. Note: the Kansas City Symphony does not perform during this presentation. Sponsored by Russell Stover Chocolates. Tickets from $25.

Ready for some toe-tappin’ fun? Come hear some bluegrass pickin’ and pluckin’ plus Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3. After the concert, enjoy a complimentary glass of wine while mingling with Symphony musicians in Kauffman Center’s Brandmeyer Great Hall. A special selection of bourbons also will be available for tasting. Most tickets $25

HANDEL’S MESSIAH

December 7-8 and 9 at the Kauffman Center Nearly 200 amazing musicians and powerful voices bring this choral masterpiece to life!

(816) 471-0400 / kcsymphony.org


Behind the Music

IN KC BY

Timothy Finn

Wild Weekend OPEN SPACES CULMINATES IN A THREE-DAY MUSIC CELEBRATION AT THE STARLIGHT

The Soul Rebels

Marcus Lewis

Janelle Monáe Hermon Mehari

Vijay Iyer

The Roots

The McFadden Brothers

O

pen Spaces, a two-month, citywide celebration of visual and performing arts, draws to a close at the end of October. Among the final events of the ten-week celebration: The Weekend, a three-day music bonanza that features a lineup as diverse as it is stunning. It includes an artist from our metropolitan area who has become one of the brightest stars in the music world’s vast constellation. Here’s a look at the lineup. The Weekend runs Oct. 12-14 at Starlight Theatre. Tickets are $39.50 to $99.50. A weekend VIP pass is available for $350.

OCTOBER 2018

FRIDAY, OCT. 12 Red Baraat / 6 p.m. Their sound is a melting pot, an exuberant fusion of bhangra, psychedelia, hip-hop, jazz, and other inspirations, including Chutney music. This 10-year-old Brooklyn septet is led by founder and dhol player Sunny Jain, he of Punjabi heritage. Their lyrics are politically/socially charged and as dynamic as the music in which they are immersed.

The Soul Rebels / 7:30 p.m. The Rebels are a brash and brassy

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eight-piece horn band from New Orleans that draws from a colorful and diverse music pallette: soul, hip-hop, jazz, funk, R&B, pop, rock. They have collaborated live and in studios and shared live bills with dozens of artists from virtually every genre across the music spectrum, from Metallica, Lauren Hill, Jack White, and Marilyn Manson to Alabama Shakes, John Mayer, George Clinton, and Kanye West. In July, they headlined the Louis Armstrong Wonderful World Festival in New York, where they threw an after-party show that included Talib Kweli and Wu Tan Clan’s GZA, and jazz trumpeter Keyon Harrold. The Roots / 9:15 p.m. They are household names now for their residency on the The Tonight Show, but long before they were drafted into late-night TV stardom, the Roots were stalwarts and legends in the world of jazzy, socially/politically conscious hip-hop, renown for applying their live instrumentation to their diverse style. Their lineup is a list of hall-of-famers, including drummer Questlove and MC Black Thought. No matter where they play, the Roots are always an eminent, headlining band.

SATURDAY, OCT. 13 Sankofa Danzafro / 4:30 p.m. They are from Colombia, the South American country that celebrates its vast and colorful African heritage through many cultural facets, including its music. From its website: “The Sankofa Danzafro has sought to build a bridge between Afro-Colombian peoples and the African continent. The company uses Afro-Colombian’s ancestral roots in the creation of works, which results in work that begins with the root of African dance yet develops through the framework of the daily, traditional, and contemporary.” In other words: Prepare to dance along and be highly entertained. The McFadden Brothers / 6 p.m. They have been crowned “world-class triple threats” for

a good reason: Lonnie and Ronald McFadden are virtuoso singers, dancers, and musicians with a witty comic flair. They remain in Kansas City but have performed in venues and at festivals all over the world. As their Facebook page rightfully proclaims: “The McFadden Brothers are the legitimate link between the generation of Gregory Hines and Savion Glover.” The Marcus Lewis Big Band / 7:30 p.m. As a sideman, this native Georgian and worldclass trombonist has performed in some esteemed environments: at the Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, the Grammy Awards, the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Fest, the White House (for President Obama), the 2011 Glastonbury Festival, the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Concert and the 2012 North Sea Jazz Festival. And for a good reason. He has also played alongside legends and superstars like Janelle Monáe, Bruno Mars, Prince, and Aretha Franklin. When he fronts his Big Band, Lewis leads a troupe that deftly mixes jazz, R&B and hip-hop into a lively, heady brew. Kansas City jazz critic Bill Brownlee calls the band’s latest album, Brass & Boujee, “a poised dispatch from the intersection of jazz and hiphop” with sounds “aligned with ’70s-era R&B and ’80s pop.” Janelle Monáe / 9:15 p.m. This Kansas City, Kan., native is poised to become one of the most decorated and respected artists to ever emerge from Kansas City and for more than just her provocative music. A six-time Grammy nominee, Monáe has won several awards for film roles, including as Mary Jackson in Hidden Figures. But what sets this singer-songwriter, actress, model, and producer apart from most of her peers are her live shows, where she exhibits the thrilling flair of greats like James Brown, Prince, Janet Jackson, and Bruno Mars. Don’t miss what is likely to be the best live show of 2018. Monáe has performed only three times in Kansas City, and only once as

OCTOBER 2018

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Behind the Music

IN KC

a headliner: November 2013 at the Uptown Theater. Her other two performances were in 2011, as an opening act: at the Independence Events Center, opening for Bruno Mars, and at the Sprint Center, opening for Katy Perry.

Hermon Mehari Quartet / 7:30 p.m. Mehari, a graduate of the UMKC Conservatory of Music, is a decorated and acclaimed trumpeter in the jazz world. In 2014, he was a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk Jazz Competition; in 2015 he won the Carmine Caruso International Trumpet Competition. He also performs all over Europe.

SUNDAY, OCT. 14

Vijay Iyer Sextet / 9 p.m. Iyer is a composer/keyboardist who was hailed by the Guardian as one of the world’s most inventive new-generation jazz pianist. About the sextet’s Far From Over recording, a critic raved: “The music ranges from the thrillingly explosive (Down to the Wire, Good on the Ground) to the cathartically elegiac (For Amiri Baraka, Threnody), with melodic hooks, entrancing atmosphere, rhythmic muscle and an elemental spirit all part of the allure.”

Innov Gnawa / 5 p.m. This Grammy-nominated troupe hails from New York, but their music celebrates traditional Gnawa music of Morocco. From the band’s website: “The music is ... played on an array of unique instruments, from the lute-like sintir ... to the metal qarqaba (castanets) with which the kouyos (chorus) keep time and pound out clattering, hypnotic rhythms.” Prepare to be enthralled and entranced. DakhaBrakha / 6 p.m. This quartet blends a variety of sounds and styles, including pop, punk and traditional Ukranian folk songs. In a review of a live performance, NPR praised the band’s “incredible stage presence that transcends its eclectic repertoire and instrumentation—which includes spacious vocals, accordion, bass drum, mouth harp, and cello.”

WANT MORE TIMOTHY FINN? Checkout his weekly online-only content at inkansascity.com. Every Monday the website publishes his list of Top 5 Not-to-Miss Concerts in the metro. Every week you’ll find his revered, rollicking, reasoned reviews and commentary. Email Timothy Finn at tfinn@inkansascity.com

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My Essentials

IN KC

TYLER ENDERS KC’S MOST VISIBLE ENTREPRENEUR SHARES WHAT HE LOVES MOST ABOUT OUR TOWN

W PHOTO BY AARON LEIMKUEHLER

e couldn’t do a “Living Like A Local” issue without acknowledging Tyler Enders, whose launch of the Made in KC empire since 2015 has been nothing short of phenomenal. In addition to being one of the owners of Made in KC, Enders is a partner is other retail concepts ranging from contemporary furniture to women’s clothing. The Kansas City native raves about his hometown: “We’re a city full of passionate people who strive for their dreams and goals,” Enders says. “It’s wonderful to be part of a community that builds each other up; a community that believes in taking action to realize the change they seek.”

Tyler’s essentials... PLAZA’S MADE IN KC STORE:

There are so many incredible characteristics of the Marketplace, but one of my favorites is our ability to allow artist and maker entrepreneurs to have their own shop without having to worry about payroll, utilities, marketing, maintenance, etc. We’ve tried to create a turn-key space that allows brands to best represent themselves while keeping their focus on their core business of making.

SATURDAY DAY OUT: My

FAVORITE COCKTAIL: While

biased, I am absolutely obsessed with our cocktail menu at Made in KC. Our beverage director, Ozzie Louis Mendoza, created cocktails that are uniquely Kansas City as all of our base spirits are local. Take our Kansas City Old Fashioned: it’s made with J. Rieger Whiskey, the whiskey that invented the category of “Kansas City Whiskey” due to its unique blend of sherry. Then we use black walnut bitters, a local flavor that blends beautifully with the whiskey, and garnish with both a lemon and orange peel.

OCTOBER 2018

perfect Saturday starts in my Brookside neighborhood. I’ll probably walk to the shops. Then I’ll likely head down to the Crossroads, stopping off at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and the Nelson. Once in the Crossroads, I’ll embark on a tour de food and drink that inevitably ends at the Green Lady Lounge. A FAVORITE LOCAL PRODUCT:

I love all of Stephanie Simkins’s SKiN products. Her all-natural apothecary skincare line has been a part of my daily regimen for the past few years and I can’t imagine ever trying to replace it.

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FAVORITE RESTAURANT:

It’s getting more and more difficult for indecisive eaters in KC. Our options just keep increasing. My current go-to choice, though, is Freshwater. I’m in love with their approach, their bar, their ever-changing menu. MOST ADMIRED POL: Despite the

ever-present room for improvement, I’m continually pleased with our city’s elected officials. From Jolie Justus to Quinton Lucas to Mayor Sly James. And I’m a pretty big fan of this Jason Kander guy as well. I’m more likely to stop any of them for a picture or a handshake than anyone else right now.


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Look

IN KC

Fashion

Michaela Knittel A CLOTHING DESIGNER AND VINTAGE COLLECTOR WITH A QUIET APPEAL by

Susan Cannon

photos by

Michaela Knittel

W

hen you meet someone with a sophisticated aesthetic and an unusual sense of privacy, you know she’s one to watch. Clothing designer Michaela Knittel, a 2015 graduate of RISD and a KC native, focuses on lightness and sensuality in her Michaela line. Her graduate collection received Teen Vogue coverage for “a young designer to watch.” Knittel expresses herself in visual narratives that place her, say, in 1930s Paris, yet she’s squarely rooted in modern times. Since moving back home, she has built her eponymously named business, designing made-to-order women’s pieces and developing a focused collection of vintage clothing, accessories, design objects, furniture, and art books for e-commerce and to sell at Urban Mining. While her vintage business has taken off, she’s also producing a small run of holiday ready-to-wear, including standouts such as a sinuous satin dress with an open back and waist that wraps and ties, and a uniquely soft, semi-sheer turtleneck with a delicate tortoise buckle at the nape of the neck. Her vintage collection is displayed in her airy West Bottoms design studio. There are softly tailored pieces (favoring Giorgio Armani’s early ’90s suits), ’20s lingerie, sweet blouses, and unique outerwear. Her accessories lean toward Deco Lucite handbags, modern shoes, sterling-silver midcentury jewelry and decor that brings to mind Eileen Gray, Milo Baughman, and the Bauhaus. Knittel’s cohesive vision has sparked the imagination of her followers and clients from as far away as Australia and South Korea. michaela.co

Clockwise: Self portrait. Michaela vintage accessories. Sketch of a dress from Michaela 2018 Holiday. Michaela vintage booth at Urban Mining.

Contact Knittel for private studio appointments at info@michaela.co.

OCTOBER 2018

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Safehome_WYS_INKC_ad_rev_082218.indd 1

8/22/18 12:25 PM


BY

IN KC Beauty

Susan Cannon

At the Helm

A FULL-SERVICE SALON OPENS EARLY NOVEMBER IN THE HISTORIC RIVER MARKET

‘‘T

he word helm is commonly referred to in the steering of a boat,” says Helm salon owner Shanna Austin. “To me, the word signifies taking the wheel and moving forward.” It also means Austin and her team of six stylists and one aesthetician steer their careers down a path where cultivating space for an individualized approach to each of their crafts is vital. Helm will offer a wide range of women’s and men’s hair services: cuts, coloring, extensions, and perms (or waves as they’re now called) as well as lash extensions, facial waxing, eyebrow and eyelash tints, and spray tans. “I want Helm to be for everyone,” Austin says. “Each stylist has the freedom to be their own creative self as we all

ANTI-AGING CREAMS BANISH YOUR LINES WITH THIS LINEUP IT SEEMINGLY happens overnight. One minute your skin is smooth as silk (or at least not noticeably offensive, in my case) and the next you’re yelling expletives into the mirror. To be honest, I’ve almost learned to accept the lines on my face. Operative word, almost. I think of iconic women I admire like Diane Keaton, Michelle Pfeiffer, and Charlotte Rampling, and I feel empowered. Still, I won’t live without a good anti-aging cream. Of course, there are effective face serums, acids and oils in my rotation, but I’ll leave those for another conversation. Here’s a small lineup of all-natural creams meant to aid aging woes.

specialize in different looks and services. From organic and natural-looking color and styles, to vibrant texture and cuts that push the norm. I’ve recently gained a loyal following of men who are wanting texture too, and it’s a great way to make their style a little edgier and a lot more fun!” Helm’s busy licensed aesthetician, Taylor Triano, offers beauty services, including labor-intensive lash extensions. “It’s completely addictive,” Triano says, “if you like this kind of tedious thing.” Seeing her artisanal work, she clearly does. Indeed, a community of supportive women with Austin at the helm. 122 W 5th St. KCMO • 816-533-5026 • helmsalon.com

“Seaberry Anti-Aging Face Cream is a wonderfully healing and restorative cream rich in the natural antioxidants, sea buckthorn oil, and essential fatty acids that make up an anti-aging dream team. Use day or night to aid in treating wrinkles, sun damage, dry skin, eczema, hyper pigmentation, and age spots.” Stephanie Simpkins, owner + founder of KC-made SKiN, $42

“Drunk Elephant Lala Retro Whipped Cream is a true all-purpose rescue cream, whipped into an airy blend of six rare African oils that effectively recover and lock-in intense moisture. Plantain extract helps visibly brighten skin, while antioxidant-rich fermented green tea helps combat signs of aging.” Tiffany Masterson, creator of Drunk Elephant, Sephora, $60

OCTOBER 2018

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GLOBAL BEAUTY IN A HAND TOWEL ADD QUALITY TEXTILES TO YOUR BEAUTY REGIME AN ULTRA-SOFT cotton towel to use on your face after cleansing, or to put out for guests is a treat. These undyed, hand-spun cotton towels

are handwoven by a small group of women artisans in Ethiopia. Subtly decorative with hand-knotted fringe ends, they are timeless and elegant with a worldly, handcrafted vibe. Golden & Pine owner, Stephanie Agne, uses them daily. “I love them. They machine wash and dry well and get softer with each use.” Available at Golden & Pine Prairie Village Shops, $32 each

“Lacreme Beaute Bee Venom is truly nature’s alternative to Botox. It is amazing at renewing and restoring skin’s collagen structure—the skin becomes noticeably lifted and facial lines are significantly reduced. Dry skin becomes a thing of the past thanks to tamanu oil, baobab oil, and shea butter.” Gina Holmberg, owner of Within Apothecary, $198

“Zum Face Under Eye Butter, made by hand in small batches with only plant-based ingredients, allows essential oils, organic shea butter, macadamia nut oil, beeswax, and vitamin E to work their natural magic, giving your skin an aromatherapy pampering while nourishing an often-neglected area.” Emily Voth, founder of KC-based Indigo Wild, Zum Factory, $16

HELM PHOTO BY KELLI BEBERMEYER. PRODUCT PHOTOS BY AARON LEIMKUEHLER

Look


Look

IN KC

Wellness

Yoga Nidra INSTRUCTOR PAIGE SUTHERLAND FOCUSES ON THE LITTLE-KNOWN YOGA PRACTICE OF NIDRA WITH A TARGET TOWARD HEALING TEENS Susan Cannon

Y

oga Nidra is a meditative practice that takes you into a yogic sleep while in the shavasana posture—lying on your back with your arms and legs out to the sides. According to Paige Sutherland, a Kansas City Yoga Nidra instructor, “it ever so gently peels away the layers of illusion until all that’s left is the most innocent, connected part of yourself that you’ve been longing to know intimately. When you meet yourself there, it all starts to make sense. You have access to insight, inner vision, subconscious programming and self-love.” In technical terms she explains that it’s extremely helpful in counteracting stress by altering the circulating levels of stress hormones—adrenaline and cortisol. This allows the body to be able to relax on a mental, emotional, and physical level. We isolate the brain and become introverted while maintaining a degree of external awareness by listening to and mentally following a series of instructions. The psychological dimension is the superconscious mind, the hypnagogic borderline between awake and sleep. The brain-wave pattern switches from beta to alpha, and the

OCTOBER 2018

realm of the experience is deep relaxation, visionary states, conscious dreaming and archetypal imagery. In 2014 Sutherland received her yoga teacher training at Yandara Institute in Hawaii, where she was briefly introduced to Yoga Nidra. She taught restorative and Yin Yoga for three years, but felt that her heart was not in it, so she decided to turn toward meditation. “Plenty of people in Kansas City were already teaching Asana, and I realized that Yoga Nidra was the right path for me to take, as it is lesser known and not practiced as much here,” she says. She completed the Institute of Integrative Nutrition program last year and went to Norway in June of this year for Yoga Nidra training with Jana Roemer. Currently, Sutherland instructs Yoga Nidra for adults at Fusion Fitness at 2323 Grand Blvd. every Tuesday from noon to 1 p.m., and she offers private classes for groups, but she’d like to expand her teen practice. “I began holding teen workshops at Fusion this summer and am planning upcoming workshops in October and December. I feel that Yoga Nidra is vital in helping prune away negative and limiting beliefs about ourselves,” Sutherland says. “I am deeply concerned about the increase in mental health issues and suicide among teenagers. I want to help schools implement stress-reducing activities to support emotional, mental and physical health. After studying and practicing Yoga Nidra, I believe it’s the best way to help our youth who are constantly plugged into their phones and social media. Also, children and teens are less tense and preoccupied than adults. This makes them more open and receptive to Nidra.” Additionally, Sutherland will be holding sessions each Tuesday night from 5:30 pm to 6:30 p.m. through October 23 at the Lutheran Church of the Resurrection at 9100 Mission Rd. in Prairie Village. Contact Paige Sutherland at sutherland.paige@gmail.com or through Instagram @wellensswithpaige.

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photo of paige by shanley cox

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Living BY

IN KC

Patricia OʼDell

Snuggle Up

T

Cotton Luster Pillows While it may be a good idea to go big or go home (or go big at home) with velvet, it’s easy to toss in an accent that lends a bit of luxe. West Elm’s Cotton Luster Pillows come in subtle Stone, Dusty Blush and dramatic Slate, but Regal Blue is a royal standout. West Elm (Country Club Plaza)

PHOTO BY AARON LEIMKUEHLER

he beauty of a banquette is that it not only lets you lean back, but also cozy up if that is the direction the evening—or day—is going. Better still when the upholstery is velvet, as it is at the Monarch Bar on the Plaza. Soft, dense and luxurious, velvet provides the ultimate cushion. Because of the pile of the fabric, velvet has a rich look—and also a rich reputation. Its complicated weaving process makes it more expensive to produce than a flat weave. This is why velvet often has an appearance in high-end interiors. (Not that that is a bad thing.) Silk velvet is the ne plus ultra of the velvet family; its softness, or “hand,” cannot be beat, but linen and cotton velvets are also lovely. While it may require a more significant investment, velvet wears like iron and can easily last generations. (Yes, even with the wear and tear of little darlings, be they two legged or four.) A damp cloth or a soft brush will go a long way to keeping things clean, but as with all precious things, professional cleaning is recommended. As we head into the cooler months, why not cozy up?

Paul McCobb Brass Stools

Two is always better than one and doubly so in this case. The rich blue wool velvet of these stools with their brass frames are the perfect jewelry for in front of the fire or the end of the bed. Taking off your shoes at the end of the day will never be the same. Retro Inferno (Crossroads)

OCTOBER 2018

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John Robshaw Bahari Coverlets and Shams

What could be more luxurious than snuggling into bed under a velvet coverlet? Lying your head on a velvet sham at the same time. John Robshaw created this coverlet in velvet instead of the traditional linen or cotton for a casually sophisticated take on this classic look. Terrasi Living (Country Club Plaza)


A SINKING FEELING KANSAS CITY continues to add local makers and manufacturers, and Morgan Tap & Basin is sure to lead the list of shiny newcomers. The company, which combines founders Nathan Davis’s expertise in manufacturing and Michelle Zak’s marketing savvy, is launching a collection of stainless-steel sinks and faucets. Handmade from a heavier gauge metal than industry standard (14 gauge of 316 stainless steel for those who need to know) the sinks’ subtly rounded corners are easier

to clean than a sharp corner and the offset drain makes way for better storage in the cabinet below. The company is launching with three standard sizes, but has larger sinks with custom accessories in development. Faucets will follow, but the pair is not in a rush. “We want to make sure that everything we sell is the quality we want it to be,” says Davis. 21983 W. 83rd St., morgantapandbasin.com

OCTOBER 2018

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Living BY

IN KC

Patricia OʼDell

Cool and Comfortable

G

olden & Pine is like the girl who’s popular in middle school because she’s nice to the new kid but keeps rolling up the waist of her uniform skirt even though she ends up in detention. Owner Stephanie Agne, whose look leans toward handmade and ethnic with a focus on ethical, has created a shop that is comfortable yet fresh, appealing to singletons, young marrieds and established families alike. “We look for products that are durable, but soft and comfortable. Even better, washable,” says Agne. “We have a whole line of indoor/ outdoor rugs that are perfect for families with kids and dogs, but people can hardly believe they can go outdoors because they have such great texture.” Agne recently moved the shop from East Brookside—where they had outgrown their space—to the shops at Prairie Village. In the new location she has been able to add more lines—including togs for baby—many of which are exclusive to Kansas City. “We try to avoid ‘trendy’ and bring our clients along so they can see how vintage adds texture to a space.” Prairie Village Shops, goldenandpine.com

OCTOBER 2018

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MOD SQUAD There’s a jazzy spot on the north side of the horseshoe in Westport that houses a quiet—yet admirable—collection of modern furniture. Owner Dakota Hale has been in the business since 2014. “It started as a hobby. I needed furniture and I started going to garage sales and it grew from there. I developed a taste for midcentury, retro, vintage, and modern. I bought some things that were in poor condition and learned to refurbish,” he said. As is not unusual for people who become passionate about something (or obsessed), Hale acquired more furniture than he could house and started selling on Craigslist. His current spot offers a nice selection of pieces that have good lines from those without pedigree to well-known makers such as Paul McCobb and Danish Modern designers Kai Kristiansen and Svend Madsen. Even as his business grows, Hale can still have trouble letting go. “I’ve had items that I wanted to hang on to. There was this De Sede DS 600 sofa...” he said wistfully like a man remembering a lover who got away. “But it is a business.” Open by appointment. modkota@gmail.com

OCTOBER 2018

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Shop

IN KC

Above: Collapsible strainer, $36. Left: Kanso storefront.

Jason Duke, proprietor of Kanso.

PHOTOS BY AARON LEIMKUEHLER

A tightly edited collection of wares on display. Left: The Crossroads alley is home to several shops.

Menu Sweeper and Funnel, $60. Normann Copenhagen Tumbler Alarm Clock, $95.

KANSO

E JWDA Lamp by Jonas Wagell, $250

ighteenth Street between Baltimore and Wyandotte is a hive of creative, independent retail, including a string of shops down the alley. At the last door on the left, you’ll discover Kanso. Lest you think it’s a creative misspelling of Kansas, the website informs that it’s a Japanese zen principle meaning “Simplicity or elimination of clutter. Things are expressed in a plain, simple, natural manner.” Kanso is the brainchild of Jason Duke, to satisfy his desire for a store of curated, well-designed objects that reflect his love for contemporary Japanese and Scandinavian design. Walking into the diminutive store is a breath of fresh

OCTOBER 2018

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air. Tall ceilings, crisp white walls, a large window with sun streaming in, and objects artfully displayed on spare wooden tables or white shelves that line the room. Each exquisitely designed item is functional, timeless, and unique. Coffee cups that can be cradled in your hand. Something as mundane as a strainer resembles a piece of abstract art. And sweeping would be almost a pleasure using the dustpan and ash-wood brush from Denmark. Duke’s obsession for timeless design that enhances everyday life is evident. And Kanso is an excellent reflection of that. shopkanso.com


OCTOBER 2018

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IN CONVERSATION WITH

Gillian Flynn

L words by

Cindy Hoedel

photo by

Heidi Jo Brady

Like another famous Missourian, Mark Twain, Kansas City native Gillian (hard “G” like “girl”) Flynn has achieved international fame by gathering strands of memory from her childhood hometown and spinning them into highly entertaining tales. Flynn’s novel Gone Girl spent more than 100 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and was turned into a film, which Flynn wrote the

OCTOBER 2018

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Coleman Highlands had giant, massive trees. I was constantly climbscript for, starring Ben Affleck and Rosamund Pike in 2014. ing trees. There was a wonderful park that now has a bench named A year later, Charlize Theron starred in Dark Places, adapted after my parents because I grew up going down there so much. It has from Flynn’s second bestseller. a swayed sycamore tree that I would always try to run up sideways— This summer’s hit mini-series from HBO, Sharp Objects starring (laughs) sooner or later I knew I was going to get up it. Amy Adams, was adapted from Flynn’s debut novel. Less than two And there were mulberry bushes everywhere—I would conweeks after the Sharp Objects finale aired, Flynn was on the red carpet stantly jam mulberries in my mouth (laughs). There were crookat the Toronto International Film Festival Toronto for a screening ed old-fashioned sidewalks I remember playing hopscotch on, and of Widows, a big-budget heist thriller she co-wrote with acclaimed learning how to ride my bike, and every bike I got I would name it British director Steve McQueen, director of 12 Years a Slave. after a horse. Next, Flynn will jet over to London, where Widows was chosen I just remember the joys of being a free-range to be screened at the opening-night gala of the kid of the ’70s. And always feeling very safe and BFI London Film Festival Oct. 11. getting to go to the very end, which is this lookFlynn’s life moves at the same breathless pace out where you can see over downtown and hear as her writing, but she was able to talk to IN Kanthe trains go by and watching the sun go down. sas City for 18 1/2 minutes in-between meetings from her current home base in Chicago. How did that place, Coleman Highlands, Flynn speaks at a languid pace in a smoky I particularly like shape the person you became? voice punctuated by soft, low laughter about her It made me independent. There weren’t a lot of childhood home in Coleman Highlands, the novels that stake out other kids, so I was looping around, playing by midtown neighborhood where her parents still a certain town and myself a lot, and being able to be alone and be in live, the place she still calls “home,” even though my head a lot. she lives in Chicago authors that write I think it helped make me a writer. I kind of about a certain place had a Huckleberry Finn kind of childhood, because my parents trusted me to explore all over What was Coleman Highlands like when over and over again Kansas City. you were growing up? and who seem very I was a kid who was always walking around It was this little, tucked away place that absoand seeing what there was to see and poking lutely no one knew about (laughs). You would attracted to the city around all over the place. I was very interested in say “Coleman Highlands” and people would what was out there, always observing. give you this blank look. When I was growing they live in or the city up there were not a lot of kids there. they grew up in. How do you think about place as an element Now, it’s a whole pack of kids that are growin your novels? ing up there, and it’s much more of a place to Place is incredibly important in my novels, as in raise families. It’s great because now we bring every novel. I don’t much want to read a novel our kids back home—our kids are four and that doesn’t have a sense of place. That doesn’t eight—and it’s the greatest place in the world. interest me very much, it feels very antiseptic. They run out the door and there are kids all up I particularly like novels that stake out a certain town and auand down the street. It looks like this little Norman Rockwell neighthors that write about a certain place over and over again and who borhood. seem very attracted to the city they live in or the city they grew up in. We always come back for the Fourth of July, and there’s this All my novels come back again and again to Missouri [she progreat little neighborhood parade where all the kids have their little nounces it “Missourah”] and Kansas. Those are just landscapes that wagons and dress up—my daughter has a little red, white and blue interest me and places that interest me. I love writing about it. And dress that she always wears and they march around the neighborcertain dark places, you have the Kansas City Bottoms that becomes hood in a parade and we have a big neighborhood picnic. It really is its own character in Gone Girl on the other side of Missouri, and a special place. again and again it’s a place I return to. We lived on this kind of loop-de-loop spot that you just wouldn’t go to [if you didn’t live there], so I could ride my bike all around, You had this idyllic childhood, so why did you grow up to write and my parents walked to work over at Penn Valley [Community such dark novels and screenplays? College], and there were these cool old houses. Oh, just ’cause that’s what I like. I have always liked scary stories. I was one of those kids that grew up watching Kansas City’s Friday Were there special landscape features that you remember beFright Night on Channel 41, no matter what. I think there are two ing drawn to as a child?

“ ”

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Elizabeth Debicki,Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez, and Cynthia Erivo star in Widows.

20th century fox

kinds of people in the world: people that like to look under the rock, and people that don’t. And I’ve always liked looking under the rock. I like to be scared, I like to make people scared, and I like exploring the dark side of nature and life, like why people do bad things. It’s always been part of my makeup since I was a very young kid. You’ve been criticized for writing female characters that are evil and dark. Why do you make that artistic choice? Well, number one, I like to point out that I write female characters that are good, too. It’s just that people like to point out the characters that are bad. I believe very strongly that women should be portrayed in all the variations that exist. Men can be good and bad, and women can be good and bad. We all know

that there are bad women out there. We all know women who are bad. And it’s extraordinarily dangerous and actually misogynous to represent only women who are good. Because that puts us in this very small and constricting box. I think you need to show women as human. And being a human means you have this full range of emotion good and bad, and you have this full range of ability to do good and bad things. I think it’s scary that in 2018 we still think it is shocking that there are bad women. And certainly, I’m not saying these fictional bad women are admirable. I’m saying these women are villains (laughs). m

Interview condensed and minimally edited for clarity.

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I believe very strongly that women should be portrayed in all the variations that exist. Men can be good and bad, and women can be good and bad.


TEAR OUT THIS STORY AND KEEP IT. YOU’LL BE GLAD YOU DID

WORDS BY

Kathryn Greene

WHEN in search of a service, whether it is getting a car detailed or calling someone in to help organize your closet, there are Yelp and Google Reviews—it’s 2018, after all—but nothing beats word-of-mouth from someone you trust. We’ve rounded up recommendations in home, auto, food, fashion, and health and wellness from those in the know. So the next time you find yourself wondering “Where’s the best shoe repair?” and which friend to ask, look no further than these pages.

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Personal Shopper Set up a shopping date with stylist Abby Wood of Abby Wood Wear, who will have you looking your best in no time. Wood also offers closet audits, where she’ll organize, colorize, and coordinate your current wardrobe, creating looks and uploading them to a custom Pinterest board for future reference. Afterward, she’ll provide a custom shopping list and style guideline to help you complete your looks. abbywoodwear.com

Tailor “When you put down money for good clothing, you want it to fit perfectly. And regardless of whether it cost a little or a lot, chances are favorable that what you just bought could use a little scissor love,” says IN Kansas City magazine columnist and local tastemaker Damian Lair. “I have no idea where I’d be without weekly visits to Larissa’s Plaza Tailor Shop.” larissasplazatailor.com

Shoe Shine & Repair “The shine at Renner’s Fine Boots & Shoes is one that could only be dreamed of duplicating,” says Lair. And here’s a pro-tip from Lair himself; for a couple of bucks, drop off your shoes for a polish—Lair does so en masse after every season with touchups in between as needed. And if your favorite pair needs something a little more than surface-level, the shop can fix a heel or sole, too. rennersbootsshoes.com

FASHION

in kansas city’s little black book


FOOD in kansas city’s little black book

Farm Fresh Eggs

Creamery & Dairy

It depends on availability, but those eggs on the side of Rye’s burnt-end hash and inside Bluestem’s béarnaise sauce are typically sourced from Campo Lindo Farms, a family farm that raises free-range, all-natural chickens in Lathrop, Missouri. campolindofarms.com

There’s an old cheesemakers’ saying, “Cow’s milk is for butter, goat’s milk is for drinking, and sheep’s milk is for cheese.” Kansas City’s Green Dirt Farm adheres to the old adage and uses sheep’s milk as the basis of their cheeses. Try their Woolly Rind, named for the bloom of edible mold on the rind with a buttery, earthy flavor. Or the Dirt Lover, a bloomy rind cheese that sports a light coating of vegetable ash. greendirtfarm.com

Spices Get a taste of the world at Al-Habashi Spice Market, tucked into the corner of the River Market’s shops. Since 1992, proprietors Tawfiq and Salha Al-habashi have been sourcing high-quality spices, dried fruits, and other imported goods, including cheeses and olive oils. habashihouse.com

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Mixers If you’ve got an upcoming party or soirée at your home, you’ll want to make sure your guests have the best of everything. If you’re serving cocktails, pick up unique mixers and shrubs, such as the Meyer Lemon Lavender Shrub cocktail and soda syrup from Kansas City Canning Company. Check out their website for multiple shops around the metro that carry the products. kansascitycanningco.com


HOME in kansas city’s little black book

Carpet Cleaning Milton Belzer has been operating his business, M.D. Belzer Carpet and Rug Cleaning, for 40 years. Thanks to a combination of the best equipment on the market and consistently great service, Belzer is fortunate that most of his business comes through word-of-mouth. His company does carpet, rug, and upholstery cleaning. 816-942-3197

Organic Mattresses When you think organic, groceries usually come to mind. But what about sleep? Eagle’s Rest in Lawrence carries an inventory of organic mattresses, created with organic cotton, wool, and other fibers. Brands include Coyuchi, Holy Lamb Organics, Naturepedic, Spink & Edgar, Savvy Rest, and Suite Sleep. eaglesrestnaturalhome.com

Carpentry and Custom Furniture What started as a hobby for Paul Serrone, transforming pallets into coffee tables, snowballed into a full-time business after family and friends saw his work. Pistachio Approved comes from Serrone’s dog, who jumped onto one of his pieces after completion, leading to the phrase “Serrone Made, Pistachio Approved.” From kitchen tables to wine racks, Serrone creates custom furnishings for his customers, a hobby that turned into a beautiful vocation. “It’s always a good feeling at the end of the project when I don’t want to sell the piece,” says Serrone. pistachioapproved.com

Unique Home Goods On Instagram, Kate McConnell sources objects both new and old from around the area, selling them at pop-ups throughout the city. Keep an eye on her Instagram page for details to discover the next unique find for your home. @_c_o_l_l_e_c_t_i_o_n_

Upholsterer Estate Sales Kansas Citians have been attending estate sales held by Pence Auctions for 36 years. They’re a great way to find vintage furniture and accessories. Rick Pence has absolutely the best pricing of any estate-sale vendor. (And don’t forget—always go back after 11 a.m. on the last day. What’s left will be half price, at least.) penceauctions.com

“Pay for the best, and you’ll only cry once,” reads the slogan on the business cards for Gearhart’s Upholstery. It’s an honest reflection of you get what you pay for, and the esteem local designers have for upholstery company founded by Barbara Gearhart almost 47 years ago reflects why they’ve been in business so long. 816-650-3194

Window Washing Fabric Resale There are two sides to Fabric Recycles, a unique textile consignment shop. Bring in your fabrics, ribbons, and trims that you’ve never gotten around to using and Fabric Recycles will purchase them from you. Or browse their one-of-a-kind inventory and buy it if you love it—chances are if you see it there, you won’t be able to find it again. fabricrecycles.com

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This is the finishing fillip for a sparkling house. Clean windows make everything look brighter. All-Bright Services specializes in residential window washing. According to the owner and operator Dave Bergmann, he has kept a steady stream of customers for 35 years thanks to a combination of inertia and practice. “If you do a good job, why would people want to change?” he says. 816-966-1070

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AUTO in kansas city’s little black book

Detailing Victor Makris might have not have a website, but thanks to word-of-mouth we know how to get in touch with the best car detailer around. Photographer Jenny Wheat makes no secret of her favorite service, who will come to you, wherever you are. 816-359-9661

Service Anytime you need your automobile serviced, it’s most likely not going to be a fun time, but at Vee Village, they do their best to ensure everyone has a pleasant experience whether you’re there for major repair or a simple oil change. veevillageauto.com

Wash Straddling the line between Kansas and Missouri, Waterway Gas & Wash starts off with an automatic wash that will be hand-finished and dried by their team. waterway.com

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Beauty & in kansas city’s little black book

Wellness Natural Products The tightly edited apothecary was founded with a dedication to sourcing the cleanest and most natural products available. Within stocks local favorites including Native Atlas as well as Sun Potion, RMS Beauty, and Hope Gillerman oils. withinapothecary.co

Acupuncturist It takes one wellness guru to know another, and the founder of Within Apothecary, Gina Ciaccio-Holmberg, visits Larisa Schabel, a chiropractic physician at Schabel Performance Health & Wellness, for all of her acupuncture needs, which can aid in pain relief and help to promote overall well-being. schabelperformancehealth.com

Massage Therapist Kristen Thomas at Glowing Massage specializes in women’s care and what she calls “deep healing touch.” Thomas is so good at what she does, that she is often booked weeks out for appointments, but sign up and be patient—her services are worth the wait. glowingmassagetherapy.com

Event Makeup Rachel Naster of Rachel Naster Studio specializes in airbrush makeup to enhance her client’s natural beauty, perfect for events from parties to weddings. Naster is also an esthetician, so she can get your skin glowing prior to application. rachelnasterstudio.com

Tai Chi Instruction Combine your meditation, exercise, and martial arts in one fell swoop practicing the ancient art of tai chi at Center States Tai Chi Chuan. They invite you to “be still like a mountain, move like a great river.” Classes range from beginner to advanced, with special retreats and workshops scheduled regularly. centerstatestaichi.com

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KANSAS CITY’S

CULINARY TREASURES HERE’S A SAMPLING OF SOME OF THE MOST-LOVED, UNDER-THE-RADAR EATERIES IN KC. SHHH, DON’T TELL ANYONE WE TOLD YOU WORDS BY PHOTOS BY

Charles Ferruzza Aaron Leimkuehler

W

hen a young, lanky serviceman from Kansas—Robert Trapp— moved to the metropolis of Kansas City to start his sophisticated new life as a designer in 1964, he was eager to sample everything the big city on the Missouri River had to offer. That included restaurants, although he had been raised on a Midwestern meat and potatoes diet. He recalls asking his new Big City friends where they like to go out and eat. “There was really only one in those days,” he says. “Maybe two. There was Putsch’s 210 on the Country Club Plaza where everyone would go on a Saturday night. The regulars would all have their own tables reserved. The food was delicious and there were three musicians: a piano player and two men on violins. “The other restaurant that everyone talked about was

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Clockwise, from right: The cozy interior of Shio Ramen Shop; Doro Tibs at Mesob is served in a clay pot, surrounded by sides and injera; banh mi sandwich and spring rolls from Bun Mee Phan; El Camino Real street tacos; Humdinger Drive In; A plateful of Slap’s BBQ most requested dishes, including the baked potato casserole.


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Bretton’s, the Jewish restaurant downtown on Baltimore. It was very exotic for a kid from Kansas. I loved it.” Trapp also learned a surprising secret: Kansas City residents cling to their restaurant secrets, preferring to keep their favorite little spots and bistros selfishly to themselves. As the legendary broadcaster Walt Bodine told me decades ago, no one likes to find their favorite restaurant too busy for them to get a table. Bodine said: “People would dismiss a restaurant’s popularity by saying, “No one goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.’ That was enough to turn public opinion against it.” But the common touch was often the magic that kept a new restaurant open when the economy suffered a downturn.

O

ne of Kansas City’s least exotic restaurants opened about the same time that Bob Trapp was eagerly discovering the more glamorous culinary offerings in his new hometown’s restaurant scene. The neon-bedecked Humdinger Drive-In on the city’s unfashionable East side glowed and flashed at dusk, serving a menu that was offbeat and somewhat trashy—even by 1961 standards: burgers and shakes, pork tenderloins and chili dogs, beef or ham barbecue, tacos, and grilled cheese sandwiches. The irony, of course, is that the freestanding Humdinger well outlasted Putsch’s 210, Bretton’s, and nearly every cutting-edge saloon-with-food created over the next decade by the legendary local restaurateurs Joe Gilbert and Paul Robinson (Houlihan’s, The Bristol, Annie’s Santa Fe). If you’ve been living in Kansas City long enough to stumble into the red-and-white building at 2504 East 9th St. (once a solidly middle-class neighborhood, now with crumbling front stoops leading up to long-razed shirtwaist homes), you already possess much of the secret knowledge that separates the clueless tourists from the incrowd. The biggest difference between opening day in the 1960s and today? Not the quality of the food or the many flavors of milkshakes but ordering from behind thick safety glass. Anyone with the most modest awareness of Kansas City culinary history can give a compelling argument for Stroud’s, the city’s most iconic fried chicken restaurant (Helen Stroud’s roadhouse sold beef barbecue during the Depression until she realized that fried chicken was cheaper and her customers liked it better); but it’s the rare bird—no pun intended—who can rattle off the name of the 32-yearold diner, Portia’s Home Style Cooking, which serves some of the best fried chicken in town. The location at 3840 East Truman Rd. is so obscure and unmemorable that many diners pass the building assuming that it’s been abandoned for decades. The iron bars at every window don’t exactly add to the décor, which manages to be homestyle without being homey. Portia Kilburn’s diner boasts two rooms: one with a counter and nine stools, the other with fold-out plastic tables and heavy metal lawn furniture. The place is only open from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday-Friday and only serves her celebrated chicken dinners on Thursdays (“It’s the meal that keeps the light on,” she says), although

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there’s some kind of special on all the other days of the week, including hamburger steak, fried shrimp and spaghetti on Mondays. Homestyle refers to the kind of cooking that used to be made at home (or diners) but is increasingly hard to find. Portia Kilburn grew up cooking and serving this kind of fare as the granddaughter of one restaurateur, Adele (who owned a diner on Hospital Hill) and the daughter of Joyce, who ran her own namesake diner. Those were “working man’s cafes,” she says, not unlike her own tiny restaurant which serves a predominantly male clientele. Only a true local culinary connoisseur can quickly rattle off the name of the other homestyle diner that’s even smaller than Portia’s but has a lot more historical cachet: Kitty’s Café, a venue that really doesn’t have a single table, just a brief stretch of counter and a few stools. Kitty’s, 810 ½ East 31st St., has limited hours and an abbreviated diner menu (burgers, catfish sandwiches, grilled cheese, egg sandwiches) but is best known for one specific creation: a pork tenderloin sandwich breaded in a light, tempura-style batter. You’ll never eat a better pork loin in the city. You can eat at one of the picnic tables adjacent to the tiny eatery but take it home instead. The food here travels well—even the tater tots. You order at a counter—chicken only—at El Pollo Rey, the incredibly aromatic venue at 901 Kansas Ave. in KCK, just across from Carniceria y Tortilleria San Antonio, the combination butcher shop, grocery store and tortilla factory (where all the stylish artists hold court on Sunday mornings). El Pollo Rey serves only one dish and it’s spectacular, a roasted, smoky whole or half chicken, served with soupy beans, rice, cilantro, and soft tortillas. The meat is soft and moist, and you’ll be satisfied for hours. Tortillas generously filled with a variety of tender grilled meats (tongue, carne asada, al pastor) are the drawing card at 903 N. 7th St., where the family-owned El Camino Real serves the finest street tacos—simply garnished with onion and cilantro—in the city, just a hop, skip and jump from the 7th Street Casino, although the El Camino Real tacos are a lot more addictive than all those clanging slots. An absurdly small storefront restaurant, El Camino Real is positively spacious compared to another Midtown taqueria in a former shop (in this case a part of the former Lamar’s doughnut flagship store), Hamburguesas Los Campas, which does for the lowly hamburger—among other things—what Salma Hayak does for rosewater face wash. It looks very, very nice. A grilled burger at this venue might also be topped with a thin slice of grilled ham and fresh avocado slices, tomato, onion, lettuce. Unusual for a burger, but tasty. There are a few more burger choices, several street taco offerings, and at least one delicious burrito. There have been almost a half dozen restaurant concepts that have quickly opened and closed in this tiny space—across Linwood Boulevard from Costco—and anything that lasts longer than an I Love Lucy re-run is worth a visit, if only for compelling cocktail party conversation. There are some restaurant ideas that evoke more enthusiasm in Kansas City than others. And even if the empanadas at this unlikely venue housing Empanada Madness, 906 Southwest Blvd., since

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2013 hadn’t been so light and flavorful, the place would have still caught on for the excellent choice of arepas, Venezuluan-style empanadas, pastellitos (puffier, Cuban-style empanadas) and salsa concoctions. It was almost immediately successful, proving that a good location is a blessing, but a good product is a miracle. Long before Ann Liberda began running restaurants, the lithe former hairstylist from Vietnam was working in them, spinning her experience and considerable charm to create a small empire of Thai Place restaurants, frequently employing her children as staffers. She expanded a lot in the early days—a case of too much, too soon said her detractors. But Liberda is, if nothing else, a force of nature to be reckoned with and if some of her locations fell faster than Saigon, she simply dusted off her form-fitting ao ngu than and moved on to the next project. Liberda’s latest restaurant, like some of her past projects, is a reclamation event: turning an unassuming neighborhood saloon (in this case a convivial, but unglamorous joint in Waldo) into a sleek operation that opened under the Thai Place banner. The transformation took place in July, turning the former Swagger space into a tasteful dining room in shades of black, cool gray, and turquoise napkins with the invariable formal portraits of Thailand’s royal family. Jonathan Justus—the celebrated chef-owner of Justus Drugstore and Black Dirt—gives the new Thai Place (operated by Ann Liberda’s son, Teddy, and his wife, Pam) high points for its imaginative and offbeat menu, which leans away from the traditional Thai Place restaurant choices (Phad Thai, King and Ann Chicken) to showcase more flamboyant offerings like a hoison brisket stir-fry or beef short ribs in a coconut Mussaman curry.

I

f Kansas City’s top culinary subject remains barbecue—no one seems to agree on which of the iconic smokehouses is officially the “best” —the newest player in town, Slap’s BBQ, breaks a lot of rules: it’s located in Kansas City, Kansas, instead of the heart of the city, the playful title is a reference to the disturbing “Squeal like a pig” scene in the 1972 John Boorman thriller Deliverance, and the smoked meats and side dishes frequently sell out early. Since the restaurant was introduced by a successful meat-smoking team several years ago, it’s become the worst-kept barbecue secret in the metro by ‘cue fanatics, who don’t like sharing their favorite places—even with friends. That’s why you don’t hear the word Mesob—the combination Ethiopian and Caribbean restaurant located across the street from the Uptown Theater bandied about that often. The small restaurant has plenty of devotees, but they don’t willingly share the glories of a Treasure Island Sampler Platter (Caribbean fritters, crab cakes, jerk shrimp) with just anyone. It’s a bit easier to be secretive about a favored restaurant when it’s located well off the beaten path, like restaurateur Jimmy Phan and Kaylee Nguyen’s casual Vietnam boite, Bun Mee Phan at 4011 North Oak Trafficway, which pays culinary homage to their home

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country’s fusion of Asian and French influences. The banh mi sandwich, which uses familiar Asian ingredients on a crusty, chewy baguette (baked for the restaurant by Jef Dover, who still operates the beloved Le Monde bakery in North Kansas City even though the actual café by that name on Armour Road closed). Jimmy and Kaylee opened their shop in a tiny, quixotic strip center two years ago before moving to somewhat grander quarters in a former nightclub earlier this year. The menu still includes wonderful plump spring rolls, grilled meat and rice dishes and those irresistible banh mi sandwiches. Patrons remain equally secretive about the dim sum restaurant on the other side of the metro with a deceptively simple name: The ABC Café in Overland Park at 10001 W. 87th St. It has succeeded spectacularly in a tiny location (also in a strip center) with oddball hours (the restaurant is closed on Tuesday and Wednesdays) and unusual dishes. The patrons are nearly as exotic and seductive as the cuisine. One night a table of unbelievably handsome young Asian men, in expensive tailored suits, would get up from their table to step outside, sweep back their shiny long hair and smoke imported French cigarettes, like a tense scene from a Ridley Scott film. The 1960s exterior and those haunting yellow lights of the venerable Mugs Up Root Beer Drive-In at 700 East 23rd St., would make an incredibly evocative setting for a different kind of movie— perhaps a remake of American Graffiti or The Last Picture Show, since it’s one of the last local fast-food restaurants to still use carhops and to make its own root beer. A relic of those days when the young Bob Trapp was holding court at the old Putsch’s 210 restaurant sipping chilled daiquiri cocktails, the Mugs Up Drive-In never had an ounce of social cachet, but if you were craving a loose meat sandwich—no one gave a damn. And a half-century later, the root beer in those heavy glass mugs and the Whiz burgers are still there, unlike the snobby cuisine served at Putsch’s 210. But the half-century that followed those days of wine and roses in Midtown Kansas City continues to be filled with surprises and that’s what makes dining in the fabled River City so endlessly delightful. Only a handful of people can still describe, in detail, the juicy steak and potato dinners once served in the well-appointed restaurant in the old Hyde Park Hotel (a nearly forgotten hostelry that once catered to the sheltered unmarried daughters of Kansas City movers and shakers) that’s still just around the corner from the trendy new Shio Ramen Shop at 3605 Broadway Blvd., serving scrumptious ramen noodle bowls to the bright young hipsters moving into the lofts in the Congress Building. Then there’s the tiny Wheat Neighborhood Table at 128 W. 18th St. in the Crossroads that photographer Jenny Wheat recently opened just because she hated seeing the empty space left by YJ’s Snack Bar when it moved down the street. A breakfast and lunch spot only, locals have already claimed it as their own, and the avocado toast and tomato basil soup are already the stuff of legend. The more things change in Kansas City—right down to the food on the plates—the more they don’t. And most people living here wouldn’t have it any other way.

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o ocaVre

L photos by

Ron Berg

hair & makeup by

Molly McPheter Roots & Branches Salon

Looks

HAND-PICKED, LOCALLY GROWN FASHION IS FRESHEST. KC-BASED FASHION DESIGNERS POSE ALONGSIDE THEIR LATEST LOOKS

AMINA MARIE HOOD On Amina, left: Amina Marie Millinery fur felt boater, $300. On Kristen, right: Amina Marie Millinery straw boater with feathers, $375. aminamariemillinery.com OCTOBER 2018

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SARAH NELSEN On Kristen, left: Wrap jumpsuit in copper, $498. On Sarah, right: Juliet dress in black laser-cut knit, $298. sarah-nelsen.com. All accessories by Enve Designs. envedesigns.com


WHITNEY MANNEY On Kristen, left: WM denim dress, $145; necklace, $32. On Whitney, right: WM collared shirt, $185, denim jumper, $215. whitneymanney.com


TOM PAOLINI On Logan, left: Paolini wool and silk basket-weave sport jacket, $1,595. On Tom, right: Paolini club check sport jacket, $1,100; spread collar dress shirt, $225; Italian knit tie, $125; custom navy wool trouser, $495. paolinigarment.com

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LAURA McGREW On Laura, left: Tomboy Her favorite T-shirt, $85; Hung shrug, $121; leggings, $98. On Kristen, right: Tomboy assymetrical crop top, $85; Ivory tunic, $95; Spa pant, $135. tomboydesign.net


CHRISTIAN MICHEAL SHUSTER On Christian, left: cM FASHION hat, $35. On Kristen, right: sHe black quilted gaucho pants, $250; sHe black lace top, $65. christianmicheal.com


HEIDI HERRMAN On Heidi, left: Midi shift dress, $395. On Kristen, right: Layered organza blouse, $395; Peacock pencil shirt, $295. heidiherrman.com

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ANGELA CANDELA AND ELIZABETH WILSON On Angela, left: Asiatica Paris wool pant, $495; Japan shirt, $595; vintage silk bowtie, $125. On Kristen, center: Asiatica Party jacket, $1,995; Poet blouse $595; short wrap skirt, $495; Monies earrings, $595. On Elizabeth, right: Asiatica Tunnel dress, $895, Filipino brass earrings, $695. asiaticakc.com


Editorial Edition BUILDING A NEW HOME ON THE WESTSIDE GETS PERSONAL words by photos by

Zim Loy Aaron Leimkuehler

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lathe, Prairie Village, Hyde Park (twice), Sunset Hill, Country Club District, Downtown, Crossroads, Fairway, Roanoke, Kansas City, KS, and now the Westside—all neighborhoods and towns I’ve lived in and around Kansas City. Although I grew up in Iowa, I’m nothing if not local. In every one of those homes, I did some sort of renovation. Sometimes a lot (my husband and I lived in a garage for six months while we renovated the Sunset Hill house); sometimes a little (a coat of paint will do wonders for even the worst room). All those renovations left me with a taste for something new. As in a new-build. What would it be like to design a house around how we live instead of trying to fit how we live into a house? So, dear reader, we did. When people ask me what it’s like to design and build a new house, my go-to line is that it’s a lot like giving birth: miserable pain that you happily forget once it’s all over. Now, I have never given birth, but I can verify the painful contrac-

In the living area, an Art Deco English mahogany armoire anchors one wall. The vintage wood-framed sofa, an estate sale find, has been recovered and repainted many times. Flowers from The Little Flower Shop. Photograph over mantel is by Tom Parish.

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Above: A view of the great room. The vintage Moroccan rug-draped table separates the casual space from the more formal space. Left: A live-edge counter crafted by Matt Castillega holds a granite vessel sink in the powder room. Phillip Jeffries “Enchanted Woods” wallcovering available through designers from KDR Showrooms. Opposite, clockwise from top left: A collection of onyx is displayed in the foyer.Vintage rugs from The Knotty Rug line the hallway; wroughtiron staircase designed by Asheer Akram. Max and Major pose on the one piece of furniture they’re allowed to sit on. The antique French pearwood table is from Steve Nuss Ltd. Large antique Chinese jar is from Christopher Filley Antiques.

tions I felt when the hardwood floor was delivered, and it was not at all what I was expecting when I selected it from a 1-foot by 2-foot sample. It’s grown on me, thankfully. We started with finding the perfect lot. We both knew we wanted either a view or a wooded lot in our much-loved Roanoke neighborhood. The view won. The first thing I learned is that you can’t have everything you want. My dream house in my head has always been U-shaped, with rooms opening onto a central courtyard. Our Westside lot had a fabulous Downtown/Crossroads/Union Station view, but it was a slender 50-feetwide. So I began sketching a floor plan that would work on our lot, oriented toward the view, and still fit our life. The finished house remarkably could be dropped into that very first rough draft, down to the little side courtyard for our dogs. Now I’m no fool; we hired an architect. He’s a long-time friend who was happy (I think) to work with my vision. And when it came to details like the master bath and closet layout, he skillfully designed something

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In the library, the Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams sofa faces the TV. Wrought-iron coffee table is an estate-sale find. Large gray abstract drawing is by Buffy Rath Quegg. What you don’t see is an entire wall of bookshelves stuffed to the brim with books.

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Antique fern prints from Christopher Filley Antiques are displayed over a vintage console that serves as a bar.

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Custom kitchen cabinetry is from Portfolio Kitchen & Home. The Bertazzoni range holds pride of place. Integrated GE Monogram refrigerator from Factory Direct Appliance. Dining table and light pendant from Restoration Hardware.


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to fit in the box I labeled “master bath and closet here.” People are sometimes surprised to find that I designed the house from the inside out. The floor plan was fashioned around furniture we already had, so every sofa, chair, table, armoire, and credenza had to be measured to the inch. Art received the same treatment. I tucked in-floor outlets under chairs and sofas, so lamps could float in the space. I made sure we had the perfect space for everything we owned (and a couple of new pieces). Our budget was tight, but everything we really wanted was right there on the plans, including the small “martini pool” in the back courtyard. (In my case you might call it a “white-wine pool.”) We wanted a small house (under 2,000 square feet) that lived big, and I think we succeeded. The great room toward the view is the living, dining, and kitchen, with a small pantry just to one side. A mud-

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Above, left: Antique Louis XV bergere is upholstered in vintage African mud cloth from Christopher Filley Antiques. Paper collages by A. Cort Sinnes. Above, right: Black-and-white ticking covers a settee. Cabinets display years of estate-sale vintage-silver finds. The tulipiere atop the cabinet is from Pryde’s Kitchen and Necessities. Opposite: Brass library sconces from Barbara Cosgrove Lighting are centered over the stainless-steel sink.


room connects the garage and that previously mentioned doggie courtyard. The library—where we live most of the time because besides all our books it also holds the TV—is a small, cozy, dark chocolatey-brown room. Our master bedroom is the exact same size as our Roanoke bedroom because the size worked so well. The main hall provides a dramatic enough entrance, and the guest bedroom and bath are tucked upstairs. Imagine our excitement, when after months of delays, they finally began digging the basement in November of 2015. That first day I got a call from the contractor: the ground was so porous that they needed to install 36 piers to support the house. Well, there went the pool. Even with all the setbacks and upsets, we love living on the hill. At night as we’re heading to bed and all the lights are off, the view from the great room still thrills. But by now I know better than to say it’s our forever house.

Above: In the master bedroom, a John Robshaw coverlet from Terrasi Living and Scandia Down adorns the Room & Board stainless-steel bed. Flowers are from The Little Flower Shop. Opposite, top: The antique canopy bed in the guest bedroom is a family heirloom. Opposite, bottom left: Brassand-glass sconces in the master bathroom are from Barbara Cosgrove Lighting. Teak stool is from Wisteria. Opposite, bottom right: The vintage tub in the guest bath is sited for the perfect downtown view.

continued

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>>>


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editorial edition continued

THE IT LIST

Architect Craig Shaw Shaw Hofstra shawhofstra.com Contractor Design Build Services cnichols@dbpartner.net Floral Design The Little Flower Shop Thelittleflowershop.com Furniture Maker Castilleja Furniture | Objects mattcastilleja.com

International Materials of Design TILE

STONE

Kitchen Cabinetry Portfolio Kitchen & Home portfolio-home.com Landscape Design Arcadian Design patrick@arcadiandesignkc.com Lighting Barbara Cosgrove Lighting barbaracosgrovelamps.com Rugs

4691 Indian Creek Parkway (i-435 & Roe) Overland Park, KS 913.383.3383

Knotty Rug Co. knottyrug.com

www.imdtile.com

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The loggia off the great room is oriented to the downtown view. Below: Abutting the driveway is a stone wall that’s original to the 1800s house that once stood there.

www.rsvpinthevillage.com 913.432.7787 3934 West 69th Terr. Prairie Village, Kansas 66208 @rsvpinthevillage

one stop pet favorite

Wallcovering KDR Designer Showrooms kdrshowrooms.com Windows and Doors Kansas City Building Supply kcbuilding.com Wrought Iron Fabricator Kansas City Metalworks Kansascitymetalworks.com

6772 W. 135th Street Overland Park, KS 66223 4021 Somerset Drive Prairie Village, KS 66208

www.landofpaws.com OCTOBER 2018

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Wheat Photography | 115 W. 18th St. Suite 200, Kansas City, MO 64108 | www.WheatPhoto.com


Flavor

IN KC

In the Kitchen BY

Cody Hogan Aaron Leimkuehler

PHOTOS BY

A

s we quietly slide into autumn, sweet and savory squashes like Delicata, butternut, acorn, and Hubbard find their way to the farmers markets, restaurants, and my home table. This year, in addition to the butternut I always cultivate, I grew Delicata. Its name is literal—it is a more delicate squash in both flavor and storability than most of the longer keeping “winter” squashes—I’ve kept and used butternut squash up to a year after harvesting it. But Delicata’s nature makes it a perfect vehicle for accentuating flavors and textures. If you garden, or over-purchase squashes at the market (because they are all so beautiful and make great seasonal displays), keep in mind that the Delicata is the one you want to use up first. If you can’t find it, acorn squash is a perfect substitute. This is a recipe to make your own by varying ingredients and technique to fit your palate and your lifestyle. For the sweet-sour element of the hon-

ey-lime drizzle, you could substitute balsamic vinegar or a maple syrup and lemon reduction. Different herbs could be used in place of the mint, such as basil, sage or cilantro. Instead of sautéing in a skillet, the squash could be roasted until tender on a parchment-lined sheet pan to achieve similar results. For the cheese, you can approach it from different directions: a tangy fresh sheep or goat’s milk cheese as a counterpoint to the sweetness, or something nutty and mellow like a local cheddar-style cheese that goes with the almonds and provides textural contrast. You be the judge. If you can wait, the dish improves with a few hours (or day or so) of marinating. Just remove the squash from the refrigerator and allow it to return to room temperature before serving, or quickly heat it if you prefer it warm. Just before serving, garnish with the cheese and almonds. I think it is an excellent accompaniment to almost anything, but it is especially lovely with grilled fish or quail.

In Your Pantry

CHEESE, PLEASE Green Dirt Farm “Plain” Fresh Sheep’s Milk Cheese

“Plain” is probably the last word to describe this cheese from Weston, MO. It has a mellow quality that haters of goat’smilk cheese might just love. Served at room temperature or slightly warmed, this is like velvet. Available at better grocery stores everywhere.

Cottonwood River Cheddar

Hailing from the Jason Wiebe Dairy in Durham, KS, this beautifully aged raw-milk cheddar has a nutty complexity and granular texture that keeps you coming back for more. Nibble with nuts and a nice beer. Available at Cosentino’s Markets.

OCTOBER 2018

Baetje Farms “Bloomsdale” One of the most celebrated cheeses of Missouri, this fresh flat-topped pyramid of goat cheese is an earthy delight that, if you allow it to age to the point of an almost runny texture, reveals deep notes of blue cheese. Delicious at any age, always allow it to come to room temperature before serving. Available at Whole Foods.

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Flory’s Truckle

Another delicious cheese in the cheddar style made by the Flory family in Jamesport, MO. Aged in lard-coated cheesecloth, this 12-month-aged cheese has notes of butter and dark caramel and a lingering finish. Pair with friends and a glass of your favorite wine. Available at The Better Cheddar.


DELICATA SQUASH WITH ALMONDS, HONEY, LIME AND CHEESE 2-3 large Delicata squash (about 2 pounds), or an equivalent amount of acorn squash 2 jalapeño peppers (optional), sliced eighth-inch thick, stem end discarded 3 tablespoons butter 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, or as needed ¼ cup lime juice (or lemon, or apple cider vinegar) ¼

cup honey

3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced ¼ cup sliced almonds, toasted A few sprigs of mint leaves (or other fresh herb) Salt and pepper to taste ¼ cup cheese of your choosing (I like fresh goat or sheep’s-milk cheese)

Wash the squash and lightly peel the skin from the ridges (it is not necessary to remove all of the skin—the “valleys” are almost impossible to reach and it gives an attractive contrast to the color of the squash). Slice the squash into half-inch thick rounds, discarding the tough end pieces. With a small spoon or melon baller, scrape out the seeds. Preheat a large skillet with half of the butter and olive oil. When it is sizzling, begin adding the slices of squash, until the skillet is filled, cooking over medium high heat. As the squash begins to brown and caramelize on the first side, turn the slices over, and add half of the jalapeño slices to the skillet. Meanwhile, combine the honey, lime

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juice and garlic slices in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer. Reduce by half, being careful not to over-reduce the mixture. It should not darken. Remove from heat. As the first round of squash is browned on the second side, begin removing it to a plate. Continue with the remaining squash and jalapeño until all of the squash is cooked on both sides. Turn off the heat. Return all of the squash to the skillet and drizzle with the reduced syrup, add the mint leaves, and toss to coat evenly. Allow the squash to rest for at least 30 minutes before serving. To serve, toss again, reheating if desired, then sprinkle with the toasted almonds and crumbles or shavings of cheese.


Flavor

IN KC Cody Hogan Aaron Leimkuehler by

photos by

In Your Cocktail

THE STOWAWAY According to Jessica Devon McClanahan, The Ship’s front-of-the-house manager, this cocktail is based on a popular drink called the Whiskey Rebellion, of which there are numerous variations. After many taste tests, she decided on this recipe.

I love Templeton Rye Whiskey and was looking to showcase it in a drink that fell outside of typical choices. This recipe seemed to fit and the staff loved it. The Stowaway has turned out to be one of our most popular drinks because everyone loves whiskey, but the Pimm’s is sort of an unexpected ingredient, hence the name. - Jessica Devon McClanahan

‘‘J

ust sit right back and you’ll hear a tale, a tale of a fateful trip, that started from this Bottoms port aboard a not-so-tiny ship...” Well, sort of. Shortly after the repeal of Prohibition in 1935, a grand ship-themed lounge opened in downtown Kansas City on East 10th between Oak and Locust Streets. Dubbed The Ship, it was always known for having a “diverse” clientele, both respectable and not, from every stratum of society. It operated continuously until 1995. After it closed, the contents of the sinking lounge were salvaged, the building demolished, and a park sprang up in its place. In 2004, the contents were rediscovered by Josh Mobley and Bob Asher, and ideas of the reconstruction of The Ship began. In 2014 The Ship was recommissioned and launched in the West Bottoms. Hidden away at 1217 Union (use your GPS), you have to get there before 9:00 p.m. if you want to go in the obvious way. After 9:00—well that’s when the front door closes and you have to go around the block and enter from the alley—which is more of a partially paved, pot-hole ridden

afterthought of a parking lot. It’s kind of fun. A friend of mine, who told me it was her favorite bar, called the whole experience “other worldly.” I can see that. Once inside, the present-day Ship is a well-stocked bar and lounge with classic and contemporary cocktails. It also serves a variety of drink-friendly and comfort-food favorites, such as sandwiches, salads, fried things, meat loaf and baked pasta. They even have “Night Breakfast” featuring biscuits and gravy and pancakes. Live music also plays a significant role (see their website or Facebook page). The clientele today is surely as diverse as it was during The Ship’s previous incarnation. I noticed people from age 21 to 70, from every corner of Kansas City and from every economic and social background. If you want to get your Tiki-freaky on, don’t feel afraid to dress the part—a few people were wearing Hawaiian floral-print shirts, leis, and life preservers. Gilligan and the Skipper wouldn’t appear out of place. It’s certainly easy enough to imagine how your “three-hour tour” could be extended. 1217 Union Avenue theshipkc.com

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Note: Choose your ingredients with care. This drink, in all of its simplicity, is brutally transparent. The Templeton Rye Whiskey, with warm and silky caramel and butterscotch, its toffee and allspice, is complemented by the herbal notes of Pimm’s caramelized orange hints and spices. Everything is balanced by the acidity of the lemon and simple syrup, made refreshing and cool by the shake over ice. You’re going to love this.

1 ounce Templeton Rye Whiskey

1 ounce Pimm’s No. 1.

½ ounce fresh lemon juice ½ ounce simple syrup (equal parts water and sugar heated together until dissolved, forming a syrup) Combine all of the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake, strain and serve in a martini glass of some sort. Serve immediately. Be prepared for round two.


bread & butter concepts new event space


Flavor

IN KC

OUR DAILY NADA READING goes hand-in-hand with a good cup

In Culinary News

of coffee, glass of wine, or cocktail. Maybe a nibble or two. A thought-provoking book can be savored alone, shared with a friend, or discussed with a group. The latest venue to open on the westernmost edge of the River Market at 304 Delaware St. can fulfill all of these needs. Our Daily Nada (an Ernest Hemingway reference in case you were wondering) is a wonderfully curated collection of books, bites, and beverages for a sophisticated, contemplative experience. Every book you pick up is guaranteed to delight, even those in the kids’ nook. And with menu selections like avocado toast, charcuterie, and chili lime cashews, both body and mind will be sated. ourdailynada.com

UNTIL THERE’S A

cure

, THERE’S GSP.

Good Samaritan Project provides inclusive, holistic, and integrated health and wellness services to individuals living with HIV & other STIs, LGBTQ communities, and those seeking

gsp-kc.org

a welcoming and affirming health and community center.

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Good Food.

FLAVOR! G re a t C a u s e.

EVENTS ARE SELLING OUT FAST. GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY.

LLooking ooking

to add some FLAVOR! into your

world? Tickets are on sale now for FLAVOR!, a series of culinary events taking place in some of the city’s most fascinating residences and spaces. The region’s newest signature event, FLAVOR! raises critical funds to support Good Samaritan Project’s programs and services for people living with HIV. Visit flavorkc.org for

www.flavorkc.org

more information and to purchase your tickets.

www.gsp-kc.org


Flavor

IN KC

FREESTYLE POKÉ FANS of “build your own dish,” like lovers of

In Culinary News

Chipotle and Pizzeria Locale, are going to rave over Freestyle Poké, located at 509 Delaware St. Virtually unheard of a few years ago, Poke is a traditional Hawaiian dish of diced raw fish, typically tuna or octopus, served with any number of other ingredients. Pick from a signature bowl or assemble your own freestyle bowl from a selection of healthful and delicious base (like quinoa, zucchini noodles, or forbidden rice), a protein (Ahi tuna, salmon, chicken, or tofu), plus additions of vegetables, marinades, toppings, and sauces. It’s as if you have your own personal chef to prep and assemble your meal. And they’re really friendly! freestylepoke.com

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BANKSIA—AN AUSTRALIAN BAKEHOUSE & CAFÉ FEELING an urge to visit the Outback but don’t

In Culinary News

have 20 hours to fly there for lunch? Banksia Bakehouse & Cafe can take you to the land down under in a flash. Located in the historic Cosby Hotel Building (just west of the corner of 9th and Baltimore), this Australian-infused outpost boasts an in-house bakery and a diverse internationally influenced menu. Open for breakfast, brunch, and lunch, they also offer outdoor seating, an event space and catering. More reasons to visit: delicious Aussi-style coffee (there is a difference), a huge selection of pastries, and you can tell your coworkers you had kangaroo sausage for breakfast. banksiabakehouse.com

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Flavor

IN KC

Reservation for One A THYME FOR EVERYTHING

Judith Fertig photos by Aaron Leimkuehler by

F

or some parts of Kansas City, the Grandview Triangle might as well be the Bermuda Triangle. There’s the fear of being stuck in traffic or getting lost to never return. So, the area east of the I-435 loop remains hidden in plain sight. But this intrepid adventurer left her home in Overland Park during the height of rush hour traffic and washed up on distant shores in under 30 minutes. Here in charming downtown Lee’s Summit, there’s a delicious meal where many might not think to go. It’s a Wednesday evening, and people are streaming into a cookware shop. They’re bringing insulated containers of wine. At the cash register, eager people say the magic word and are admitted into a back room.

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Is this some kind of speakeasy? A private party? No, says owner Marilyn James of A Thyme for Everything. It’s a tapas cooking class, this one a small-plates dinner with built-in live entertainment. By day, the second retail space displays kitchen gadgets, cookbooks, and giftware; a few nights a week, this back room transforms into a restaurant where every table has a good view of the chef and you can bring your own wine. Guests are offered a Reidel-style glass and a wine opener, along with a handout of all the recipes. Soon corks are popped on Francis Coppola pinot grigio, Temptation zinfandel, and other tapas-friendly wines. Tonight’s instructor, Lana Bellah, a personal chef and caterer, starts us off with bacon-wrapped dates stuffed with gorgonzola.


Dine often and dine well.

The savory bite starts off as a sugary date, followed by smoky bacon, and then pungent blue cheese. Next up, the Mediterranean skewers display every hostess’ secret of success—make-ahead ability. “You cannot over-prepare,” emphasizes Bellah. She threads colorful cherry tomatoes, basil leaves, green and black olives, and other goodies onto skewers, then drizzles each with reduced balsamic vinegar. Aromas fill the air as Bellah starts on the shrimp and grits, small-plate portions flavored with Cajun spices and sundried tomatoes. She makes and cools the grits first, then cuts them with a cookie cutter. The buttery, spicy, succulent shrimp go on top. It’s the hit of the class, although the mini crab cakes (made in a mini-muffin tin) with Sriracha aioli are a close second. The toothsome desserts might look like chocolate truffles, but they’re actually green tea-flavored matcha balls made with dates, cashew butter, dried fruit, chia seeds, and a secret herb combination. The verdict? We ate well and drank well. And we learned something. athymeforeverything.com

OCTOBER 2018

250

OF THE BEST KC RESTAURANTS

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Dining Guide

For the city’s most extensive restaurant guide, head to inkansascity.com/ eat-drink/dining-guide


Faces

IN KC

photos by j. robert schraeder

Open Spaces ArtParty KANSAS CITY’S celebration of the arts,

Open Spaces, kicked off 10 weeks of arts immersion with the ArtParty, held August 24 at Municipal Exhibition Hall. The 900plus guests were entertained by multi-media installations and performance art pop-ups. More photos on page 118.

OCOTBER 2018

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Kansas City Friends of Alvin Ailey is proud to honor Michele Norris with the Race, Place & Diversity Award. Norris is an award-winning reporter, journalist, author, and former host of NPR, All Things Considered. She also co-created the Race Card Project, which encourages people to express their experience of race in six words. In 2014, this project was honored with a Peabody Award. Mayor Sly James and his wife, Licia Clifton-James, are this year’s honorary chairs, which aligns with the Mayor’s Race and Inclusion Initiative unveiled in his recent “State of the City” address. Thank you to this year’s Race, Place & Diversity Dinner Event Chairs - Dr. Lisa Klein and Jamie Allen.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT KCFAA.ORG/RPD-DINNER Race, Place & Diversity Symposium

Race, Place & Diversity Dinner Ticket Options Table Sponsor - $1,500 • Ten (10) complimentary tickets to Diversity Dinner • Two (2) tickets to Patron Reception • Two (2) tickets to Symposium • Mention in program Patron Ticket – $250 • One ticket each to Patron Reception with honorees, Diversity Dinner AND Diversity Symposium Combined Ticket – $185 • One ticket to Diversity Dinner AND Diversity Symposium Dinner Ticket – $125 • One ticket to Diversity Dinner

Alexander and Andrea Alford Jamie E. and Chuck Allen Lynn and Lance Carlton Dianna and Joe Carter Pati and Steven Chasnoff City of KCMO Copaken Family Fund

TICKETS

FOR THE

Karren and Dr. Thomas T. Crouch Friends of Laura Welch Brad and Lindsey Heinz Sharon and John Hoffman Ward and Julie Holmquist Husch Blackwell Lisa and Jim Klein

Please also join KCFAA for the most candid discussion on Race, Place & Diversity in Kansas City at The Race, Place & Diversity Symposium beginning on October 30 throughout the 18th & Vine district. Our presenters will discuss the impact of racial inequality and the opportunity for change through strategic collaboration. Please visit KCFAA.org/rpd-symposium for additional information.

Laura Welch and Mike Lundgren Miller for Mayor Charles and Jane Olsen, & John and M Wood Pat Konopka Fred and Jami Pryor Bob and Carolyn Reintjes

RACE, PLACE & DIVERSITY DINNER

Saint Luke's Health System Travois Everlyn and Roger C. Williams, Jr. Ed.D.

ARE AVAILABLE AT KCFAA.ORG/RPD-DINNER


Faces

IN KC

More Open Spaces ArtParty

OCOTBER 2018

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Join us for a night of the finest wine and cocktails, a beautiful private dining experience, and dancing before a spectacular view of the KC skyline. Honorary Chairs

The Bernstein Family Event Chairs

René and John Meara Madison and McLean Kistner Kindness begins in Kansas City and your support allows us to spread it worldwide. To join Just Like You Films as a sponsor for the 2018 Power of Film, please visit www.justlikeyoufilms.org or contact Betsy Lindsey, Director of Development, at betsy.w.lindsey@gmail.com or 913.240.4269.


Faces

IN KC

photos by j. robert schraeder

Renovation Sensation Patrons Party REN SEN 2018 was celebrated at the lovely home of Shannan and Aaron McKee on September 11. The homes tour raises funds for the Shawnee Mission East SHARE program. More photos on page 122.

STAY CONNECTED 24/7

INKANSASCITY.COM OCOTBER 2018

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Are you an INnovator or INfluencer? Do you know someone who is?

Presented by IN Kansas City

We want your INput. Nominations begin early next year. Interested in becoming a sponsor? Please contact Chad Parkhurst, In Kansas City publisher, at cparkhurst@inkansascity.com or call 816-768-8306.


Faces

IN KC

More Renovation Sensation Patrons Party

OCOTBER 2018

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drew butera MLB Catcher, Kansas City

apparel | home | gifts

SHOP SMALL. SUPPORT LOCAL. A Locally Owned Men’s Apparel & Lifestyle Store www.UlahKC.com | 4707 Rainbow Blvd. | Westwood, KS 66205 Phone: 913.777.8734 | Facebook: UlahKC | Instagram: UlahKC

OCOTBER 2018

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Faces

IN KC

photos by j. robert schraeder

Art as an Asset NOTED ARTIST Hunt Slonem was in town September 6 for the opening of his fall show at Weinberger Fine Art in the adjacent Drawing Room. The evening cocktail reception and book-signing also celebrated the release of Slonem’s new book, Gatekeeper, World of Folly.

OCOTBER 2018

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COMING SOON! We’re excited to launch a new real estate section on our website this month. We’ll clue you in on some of the most exciting houses on the market. Even better? We are working with some of Kansas City’s top agents to keep you in the know.

Check it out at inkansascity.com/home-design/real-estate real-estate

OCOTBER 2018

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This Month IN KC

October

WHERE YOU NEED TO BE AND WHAT YOU NEED TO SEE

WaterFire October 6

Carved October 25

waterfirekc.org

crestwoodshops.com

On the Waterfront. The dazzling visual arts installation lights up the night at Brush Creek on the Country Club Plaza. Brush Creek serves as the stage for live music, dance, performance art, and sparkling bonfires. Artist Barnaby Evans was inspired to create WaterFire as a new civic ritual. Also performing are Quixotic, Rhythmic Flames, StoneLion Puppet Theatre, Kansas City Aerial Arts, and Trio Forte. It’s an evening to remember and it’s all free!

Making the Cut. It’s definitely fall when the pumpkins come out, and the Crestwood Shops celebrate the season with Carved. From 5 to 8 p.m., Kansas City Art Institute students will display their carving prowess by turning pumpkins and gourds into intricate art. These are not your typical jack-o-lanterns. The resulting creations will be available for a $50 donation. Café Europa and Aixois Bistro will feature special menu items for the evening, and all the retail shops will be open.

WHAT’S NEW IN KC

Kemper Gala October 13 kemperart.org

Parlor

1707 Locust St. parlorkcmo.com

It’s Electrifying. “Body Electric: Color the Night. Ignite Your Soul” is the theme for the 2018 Kemper Gala . The annual fundraiser for the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art is in its 23rd year, supporting the world-class exhibitions and education programs for the museum. To match the surrounding, party attire is encouraged to be electrifying, bold color. Men, look beyond your basic tux.

Parlor Picks. The popular food hall scene comes to Kansas City in the Crossroads at 1707 Locust St. It’s the perfect place to go if you can’t decide where to dine. Seven restaurants occupy Parlor’s 18,000 square-foot building, while two full-service bars accommodate the

clientele. Up-and-coming chefs can test concepts that expand their options, such as Krokstrom Klubb & Market owners Katee McLean and Josh Rogers trying out their Scandinavian street-food stall approach, Vildhast; or bringing Nashville-style hot chicken to KC, as Derrick Foster’s Mother Clucker does; or expanding a pop-up dinner series, like Sura Eats by chef and owner Keeyoung Kim. Other eateries include Providence Pizza, Farm to Market Sandwich Co., Yaki-Ya, and Karbón.

For Kansas City’s most comprehensive calendar of events, go to inkansascity.com

OCTOBER 2018

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WHAT’S NEW IN KC Tuft & Needle

4411 W. 119th St. tuftandneedle.com Once Upon a Mattress. A company that six years ago disrupted the mattress business by taking the experience online is now branching out to brick-and-mortar stores. Tuft & Needle co-owners John-Thomas Marino and Daehee Park wanted to design a mattress and a company that was built on exceptional, honestly priced products. Their recently opened Leawood store in the Town Center Crossing shopping center, designed by Hufft, a local architectural firm, is unlike any mattress store with which you’re familiar. A contemporary wood and concrete interior, where linen-swathed beds float on platforms, and no hard sales pitch or ugly florescent lighting—they’re designing a new experience.

ART GALLERIES | DANCE |THEATER | SOCIAL | EVENTS | MUSIC

THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE CALENDAR IN KC

INKANSASCITY.COM/EVENTS OCTOBER 2018

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Found photo by

IN KC

Aaron Leimkuehler

TOTE THAT BAG IT’S CALLED an Urban Tote but it would certainly work as well in suburbia. Handcrafted of deadstock Cone Mills selvedge denim with leather trim, it’s sturdy enough to schlep a laptop to the office or vegetables from Saturday City Market visits. It’s locally made by Foxtrot Supply Co. and it’s available at their Crossroads shop or online at foxtrotsupply.com. Urban Tote, $82

OCTOBER 2018

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LIMOS | TROLLEYS | BUSES Affordable Rates | Unmatched Service | Uncompromised Quality

www.LimoKC.com | 816.295.2000


THE START OF SOMETHING BRILLIANT THE ASHOKA® DIAMOND RING COLLECTION Available exclusively from Kwiat

Profile for KC Media

IN Kansas City October 2018  

"Live Like a Local" is the theme of the October issue of IN Kansas City magazine. It features local fashion designers and their creations, i...

IN Kansas City October 2018  

"Live Like a Local" is the theme of the October issue of IN Kansas City magazine. It features local fashion designers and their creations, i...

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