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Contents JANUARY 2020 70

84

86 78 Features

Departments

70

84

IN CONVERSATION WITH QUINTON LUCAS The Mayor discusses his goals for his mayorship, his avid support of the Chiefs, 2020 politics, and the difficulty of dating while mayor.

COCKTAILS, SANS ALCOHOL Kansas City bartenders’ alcohol-free drinks make a night out more accessible.

74 RETHINKING RESOLUTIONS Sustainability + Accountability add up to lifelong health.

78 TRANSITIONAL, TRADITIONAL, CONTEMPORARY No matter what your style, there’s a kitchen for you.

86 IN THE BAG The best bags of the season swing from allchained-up to soft touches.

WOMEN IN BUSINESS IN KC

32

ENTERTAINING IN KC

38

OUR MAN IN KC

44

ARTS & CULTURE IN KC

52

BEHIND THE MUSIC IN KC

56

LOOK IN KC

62

LIVING IN KC

68

MY ESSENTIALS IN KC

110

92 A VIEW OF THE PARK Generous floor-to-ceiling windows are just one of the ways this Loose Park contemporary makes the most of its stunning location.

On the cover A fabulous Sunset Hill house is also a comfy home for the couple’s three dogs. Photo by Aaron Leimkuehler.

JANUARY 2020

28

| 18 | INKANSASCITY.COM

FLAVOR IN KC

IN EVERY ISSUE 22

EDITOR’S NOTE

24

INKANSASCITY.COM

26

THIS MONTH IN KC

124

FACES IN KC

128

FOUND IN KC


Modern Art Modern Art

design | cabinetry | lifestyle

design| |cabinetry cabinetry | |lifestyle design lifestyle

Portf Portfolio olio

Portfolio K i t c h e n

K i t c h e n

&

&

h o m e

h o m e

215 W. Pershing Road Kansas City § Missouri § 64108 Kansas City § Missouri § 64108 816.363.5300

K i t c h 215 e W. n Pershing & hRoad o m e

816.363.5300 215 W. Pershing Road Kansas City § Missouri § 64108 816.363.5300 www. por tfoli o- ho me. co m

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design | cabinetry | lifestyle

Modern Art

Modern Art


Editor’s Note

Be the Best You (for your bestie)

Vol. 3 | No. 1 January 2020 Editor In Chief Zim Loy Art Director Alice Govert Bryan

J

anuary—the month when selfcare becomes more than just a buzzword (or hyphenated buzzwords, as the case may be). We tackle plenty of self-care practices in this issue, from intuitive eating to sans-alcohol cocktails (it may be a mouthful, but I abhor the word “mocktails”) to skincare, but our cover offers a clue to another self-care tip which might not have occurred to you. Adopt a dog. You may have noticed the trio of pups on the cover of this issue. Kevin Westrope and Jason Holmes, the owners of the home featured on page 92, are the proud papas to Stella, Kody, and Cabo. Kody, the toy poodle, may be the eldest and the smallest but he still rules the roost. And why would having a dog (or two, or …) be self-care, you ask? If you’re stressed, you cannot beat the unbridled joy of happy dogs greeting you when you come home from a long day at the office. It happens to me every day, and it’s still a thrill. Their exuberance is transferable. I can feel the sag in my shoulders lessen. Dogs love a walkie more than anything in the world. Just the word makes our two dogs wriggle with uncontained excitement. Oddly enough, walking is the very best exercise for you, too. Thirty minutes at each end of the leash and everybody’s more fit. Lack of sleep is a real issue these days. Most specialists recommend at least seven hours a night, and less than that can lead to many health problems. But a recent study found that cuddling with your pups at night is beneficial for your own health. Fact: we sleep more soundly with our dogs next to us. They also serve as an excellent alarm clock. Our own dogs won’t let me sleep past 6:30 a.m. The oldest, our yorkie Max, is 12 and can no longer hop on and off the bed. So come morning, he softly whines until I lift him off, then he scampers to the door to go outside. He may be old, but he still reaches the door in half the time it takes me. There’s research that shows that canine companions may actually lead to longer, healthier lives for their owners. Cats have their charms, I’m sure. I love a good cat meme as much as the next person. But for my husband and me (and Jason and Kevin), our pups are our built-in self-care experts. So, adopt a dog. Your health and happiness will be better for it.

photo by aaron leimkuhler

Digital Editor Michael Mackie Contributing Writers Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian, Kelsey Cipolla, Stacy Downs, Judith Fertig, Timothy Finn, Cindy Hoedel, Cody Hogan, Merrily Jackson, Damian Lair, Patricia O’Dell, R. Murphy Contributing Photographers Cameron Gee, Rose Duong, Aaron Leimkuehler, Brian Rice Design Intern Eva Tucker Copy Editor Craig Magnus Managing Director Michelle Jolles Publisher Chad Parkhurst Digital Director Brittany Coale Senior Media Consultants Daisy Chavez, Katie Delzer, Nicole Kube, Krista Markley Editorial Questions: zloy@inkansascity.com

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cparkhurst@inkansascity.com

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JANUARY 2020

| 22 | INKANSASCITY.COM


Faced with serious health conditions, these people chose us.

Whether your condition is common or complex, where you go first is critical. At The University of Kansas Health System, we see things other doctors may not look for. That’s why hundreds of people who were not expected to live came here and survived. As the region’s premier academic medical center, we have more specialists working together to solve your problem. That’s a crucial difference. Why trust your life to anyone else?

ADVANCING THE POWER OF MEDICINE®

Choose the right care first. Your treatment begins by connecting with our care coordinator at 913-588-1227. © The University of Kansas Health System


EXPLORE OUR WEBSITE AT

INKANSASCITY.COM ENTER TO WIN

Restaurant Week 2020 is coming! It’s time to get out and about to enjoy all the local eateries you’ve been dying to try. We scoped out some of our fave dishes for you to enjoy during Restaurant Week. Even better? We’ve procured the recipes so you can later make them at home—including: Brussels sprouts from Pressed Penny Tavern, jumbo shrimp with fried polenta cakes in Cajun cream sauce from Smoke Brewing Company, and oatmeal cream pie from Harvey’s at Union Station. They’re tasty, chef-tested, and chef-approved! Find the recipes at inkansascity.com.

Need a social roster refresh in the new year? Discover

the most comprehensive calendar in the metro—art galleries, dance, theater, social events, and music, music, music at inkansascity.com/events

The best home bars in the metro? We’ll drink to that!

the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival’s Romantic Revels Black & White Ball held at the Intercontinental Hotel. Break out your best black-and-white cocktail dress, formal gown, or tux for this creative black-tie event on February 15! Even better? Our friends at HASF are also throwing in a $150 gift card to White House Black Market to grab something new to wear and a $50 gift card to Parlor: A Beauty Bar to get that perfect blow out beforehand. Enter by January 30 at inkansascity.com/ the-magazine/enter-to-win. Good luck!

Hungry? Of course you are.

Fortunately, we’ve got the city’s most comprehensive dining guide. Check out some fab restaurant suggestions at inkansascity.com/eat-drink/dining-guide.

JANUARY 2020

FACEBOOK @inkansascitymagazine

TWITTER

It’s Wicked Cold Out! Good thing we’ve got a killer cocktail recipe to celebrate Hot Buttered Rum Day on January 17. It will warm you from the inside out—and then some! Find it at inkansascity.com.

@inkansascitymag

INSTAGRAM @inkansascitymag

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER subscribe at INKANSASCITY.COM (under The Magazine tab)

| 24 | INKANSASCITY.COM

brussel sprout photo by anna petrow

Let’s get all dressed up—and for a good cause! This month you can enter to win two tickets to

From impressive man caves to bad-ass boozefilled basements, we’ve got an array of some of the metro’s most spectacular in-house drinkeries. Find it at inkansascity.com.

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M O D E R N L I V I N G I S C L A S S I C D E S I G N I N CO LO R S O F CO M F O R T.

8 510 M a r s h a l l D r i v e | L e n e x a , K S | k d r s h o w r o o m s . c o m


This Month IN KC

January

WHERE YOU NEED TO BE AND WHAT YOU NEED TO SEE by

Michael Mackie

Kansas City Restaurant Week January 10-19 kcrestaurantweek.com

ReCharge Opening this month recharge-kc.com RECHARGE AT RECHARGE Opening this month in the Crossroads, ReCharge is Kansas City’s first recovery studio and your new self-care oasis—with state-of-the-art technologies to help you relax, increase energy, and relieve pain. Clients can work up a sweat in one of ReCharge’s infrared saunas or relax in a recliner with Normatec compression boots and the NuCalm sleep system. Eager to heal an injury, relieve chronic pain, stress, or help with sleep deprivation? ReCharge can help. Bonus— Hermanos Design (the architects behind the Crossroads’ coolest spots) dreamt up the sleek, spa-like environment, which includes a lounge and retail space.

Symphony Designers’ Showhouse Preview Weekends of January 11–12 and 18 –19 kcsymphonyalliance.org

EAT YOUR WAY THROUGH THE METRO Just when you thought it was safe to ditch your fat pants, Kansas City Restaurant Week is back for its 11th consecutive year. More than 200 restaurants from across the metro—including more than 40 first-time participants—will create special, multi-course lunch and dinner menus, offered at $15 and $35, respectively. Ten percent of Kansas City Restaurant Week menu sales will benefit three local charitable beneficiaries—The Don Bosco Centers, Visit KC Foundation and the Greater Kansas City Restaurant Association Educational Fund.

WHAT’S NEW IN KC Panache Chocolatier 11555 Ash St., Leawood chocolatekc.com

SNEAK PEEK The Kansas City Symphony Alliance recently announced the 51st Symphony Designers’ Showhouse—located in Central Hyde Park. The home was designed by the famous architect Louis Curtiss in 1909 for attorney Frank Brumback and his wife, the noted artist Louise Upton Brumback. It is a whopping 8,000-square-foot Foursquare Georgian Revival. For two weekends this month, the Showhouse will be open for a public preview before it is redecorated.

CHOCOHOLICS CAN NOW UNITE IN JOCO! Panache Chocolatier is taking their act down the road—literally. Kansas City’s famed chocolate emporium has moved to a sleek, stunning store in Leawood. If you’re a chocoholic (and who isn’t, really?)—you’ll appreciate their new tasting bar. The 1,512-squarefoot shop will showcase Panache’s signature handcrafted chocolates and artisan truffles. The new digs also offers Panache’s sought-after house-made pastries and desserts, coffee and ice cream. (And stay tuned—they’re planning to include specialty chocolate-infused cocktails at their intimate bar.)

For Kansas City’s most comprehensive calendar of events, go to inkansascity.com JANUARY 2020

| 26 | INKANSASCITY.COM


Women in Business

IN KC

Laura Norris

2019 WAS THE RESTAURATEUR’S ANNUS HORRIBILIS TURNED ANNUS MIRABILIS

F

by

Michael Mackie

or the first few months of 2019, the date of Ragazza’s Food & Wine’s always-imminent reopening in Midtown was one of the great mysteries of life. Ever since owner Laura Norris and her Westport staff uprooted themselves for new, more spacious digs at 43rd and Main, there were a slew of construction hiccups, building woes, and a mind-numbing amount of rogue paperwork. And let’s not forget the car that crashed right through Ragazza’s front door just as construction really ramped up. Now Norris and her team have been open nearly ten months and business at the Italian eatery is booming. She’s mercifully starting to breathe a sigh of relief. “It’s surpassed my expectations for sure,” she says. “A lot of people were nervous for me because it was so hard to reopen. But it’s been ridiculously good. At first, I was conservative in case guests didn’t show up. But I built it—and they came,” she says with a laugh. When Norris opened her original Ragazza Deli & Wine seven years ago, it only took a few months for it to take off. She jokes that her family and friends’ healthy appetites kept her afloat until word of mouth spread like wild mushrooms, er, wildfire. At the time, she was one of only a handful of women restaurateurs in the metro. Despite a packed house (and meatballs the size of your head), Norris still struggled. She knew it was time to go big or go home. The gamble paid off—and then some.

JANUARY 2020

photo by

Rose Duong

“The Main Street visibility has been really beneficial. People perhaps didn’t know we existed hidden away in Westport, but they know us now—because they see us.” Despite all her recent success (and stellar reviews), Norris still remembers how many hurdles she actually overcame. “The last year was the hardest year of my life. People told me I was just on a ‘break.’ I, meanwhile, was working so hard for no money,” she admits. “I feel like I’ve been struggling for five years. I have breathing room now.” Norris, meanwhile, hasn’t just expanded her wine list, she’s also upped the ante with her catering business as well. The new Ragazza Food & Wine now seats 96—up from 33 at her old digs. But Norris swears it’s still a friendly, neighborhood joint. “I’m amazed. I have so many regulars— and so many new regulars,” she says. “Everybody knows everybody. There are moments when I look around and see everyone having a great time and eating great food and I think, this is so awesome.” And speaking of regulars, many of those guests are colleagues who have helped nurture Norris along the way—long before she decided to pursue her culinary dreams. “What’s cool about it is the women I’ve worked with for 20-plus years support me so well. And so does the LGBT community,” she says. “What an asset it’s been to my business. But that thread has been a part of my whole life— women supporting women.”

| 28 | INKANSASCITY.COM


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SPONSORED CONTENT

By Katy Schamberger

PLANNING A KITCHEN PROJECT? START HERE Understand the latest kitchen trends and how to get the most out of your project budget PRESENTED BY

KarinRossDesigns.com

R

ich, dark navy infused with a touch of purple. Eye-catching mixed metals. Warm, glowing rose gold. No, these aren’t the latest fashion or cosmetic trends. Instead, these are just some of the colors and materials that you can expect to see in kitchens near you, according to Karin Ross, owner of Karin Ross Designs. Whether you’re interested in making a few aesthetic updates to your kitchen or are in the market for a complete overhaul, it helps to pay attention to annual trend reports to guide your design. Approach a kitchen remodel as you would your wardrobe. You don’t need to only splurge on trends. Instead, strike a balance between trendy and timeless. Ross recently shared how to do just that. Let’s start with a look at the coming year’s top kitchen trends. Navy—the darker, the better. Ross says gray kitchen islands are being replaced by rich, dark navy tones. “People love a graceful, navy pop for their kitchen,” she says. Mix your metals. Can’t decide between sleek silver or stainless steel, chic gold or striking, oil-rubbed bronze? You don’t have to! It’s perfectly acceptable to mix metals in your kitchen, including faucets, cabinet pulls, and other fixtures. And if you prefer to view


SPONSORED CONTENT

• Add open shelving • Change your kitchen island • Update your backsplash • Swap out cabinet fixtures and repaint or install new cabinets

your kitchen through rose (gold)-colored glasses, Ross says the warm champagne hue of rose gold is becoming more prevalent throughout Midwest homes. Bold backsplashes. Ross says she’s “pleasantly surprised” by how clients are embracing bold backsplashes. Coordinate with a navy island or create exciting contrasts—a white kitchen with a green backsplash, for example. For those with a larger budget to work with, extending quartz from the countertops to the backsplash makes for “an elegant look,” Ross says. “The backsplash makes the kitchen your space and shows off what you like.” Two islands are better than one. Brace yourself—kitchen islands are getting a big makeover, according to Ross. Instead of one large, central island, there’s more of a tendency to create two islands. “They’ll both be smaller, but one will have a sink and the other acts as a table or prepping area,” Ross says. “This configuration is helpful for mealtimes with kids or for those who love to cook and want plenty of space. It’s mimicking the look of cooking shows where everyone has their own stations.” Smart appliances with a retro feel. “Appliances have come a long way,” Ross says. “Unfortunately, they can’t cook for us yet!” Check multiple goals off of your kitchen wish list with brightly colored smart appliances that give you an efficient, tech-forward kitchen with the visual appeal of a retro aesthetic. You know what they say—what’s old is new again! Now that you have a solid grasp of upcoming kitchen trends, let’s talk the remodeling process itself. Not surprisingly, your budget is one of the most important parts of your project planning, as it will dictate what you can (and can’t) do. Be sure to put some thought into your kitchen project plan, too. Do you want to make some aesthetic updates or are you looking to overhaul the space for improved functionality and design? This is when working with a designer like Ross becomes especially important. “It’s more cost-effective to get my opinion and evaluation of what there is to do,” she says. “Every space is custom because of angles and other considerations you can’t predict.” If you’re on a budget yet still want to change the look of your kitchen, Ross suggests the following ideas:

Another way you can approach your kitchen as you would your wardrobe is to decide on a strategic investment. Opt for a more timeless feature, then embrace trends with easy-to-swap items like countertop décor, place settings and dishware. Ross says worthwhile kitchen investments include your countertops. “Nothing works as well as quartz,” she says. “It’s proven to be non-porous and easy to maintain. Anything else you use will have scratches and can also harbor bacteria. Countertops are a worthwhile investment and quartz is here to stay for a long time.” You can also consider a quartz composite sink, which won’t scratch or stain. A kitchen island is also an effective investment and focal point. Opt for the two-island configuration that Ross mentioned earlier to add functionality to your space while also immediately updating the look of your kitchen. If you’re looking for a more dramatic update of your kitchen, a worthwhile part of your investment is a designer. It’s easy to want to simply replicate the look of a kitchen you’ve seen in a television show or movie, but Ross says it’s impossible to know the true configuration of those spaces and their features, including size and lighting. “Use common sense, trust your gut, and work with a professional who knows what they’re doing,” Ross says. “You can quickly spend a lot of money in the kitchen, and it’s important that you have the help you need to make your investment count.”


Entertaining

IN KC

Email me with your entertaining questions, dilemmas, or triumphs at mjackson@inkansascity.com

ALL THE LEAVES ARE BROWN AND THE SKY IS GRAY. OUR ACE OF ENTERTAINING OFFERS IDEAS FOR KEEPING WINTER AT BAY BY PARTYING UP A STORM

photo by aaron leimkuehler

I

t’s cold in Kansas City, but that doesn’t mean we should hibernate. Winter, in fact, is an excellent season for entertaining. Consider the advantages: you don’t have to get your outside areas dolled up, or worry about having a Plan B for inclement weather—you know it will be cold, so you can focus on making your house as cozy and inviting as possible. You can serve hearty, comfort food (stews, chili, lasagna, fava beans and a nice Chianti yukyukyuk), most of which are not only less pricey, but taste better made ahead. Here are some easy-to-execute ideas for parties to have in the winter months.

I Heart Wintertime Parties! by

FIRST, LET’S TALK ABOUT VAL That’s what they call Valentine’s Day at my esteemed former employer, Hallmark

Merrily Jackson

JANUARY 2020

| 32 | INKANSASCITY.COM


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Entertaining

IN KC

Next Time You Bring an Appie, Bring This! February 22

STACEY KENT

March 7

LUCIANA SOUZA April 24

JOHN PIZZARELLI

CAROLE JAMES MANGO CHUTNEY SPREAD My dear friend Grace Thompson discovered this treasure of a recipe attached to a jar of Carole James’ Mango Chutney Spread. The recipe became a favorite of hers; she shared it with me and now it’s my new boyfriend. It’s so delicious! It’s fun to watch it disappear—people go nuts (pun intended) over it. 11

ounces cream cheese

3

tablespoons sour cream

8

ounces bacon, cooked crispy and crumbled

1

cup golden raisins

1

bunch green onions, chopped

2

cups cocktail peanuts

1

cup Carole James Seasonal Sensations Mango Chutney* or other mango chutney

2–3

teaspoons curry powder

Soften cream cheese with sour cream. Blend cream cheese mixture with chutney, bacon, onions, raisins, and curry powder. Stir in one cup of peanuts. Don’t use a food processor! On a serving plate, form the spread into a mound. Top and surround with peanuts and serve with plain-flavored crackers (Bremnar’s Wafers are best).

Richard J. Stern Foundation for the Arts, Commerce Bank, Trustee

* You can find this seasonally at Trapp and Co, RSVP in the Village and the Kappa Kappa Gamma Holiday Tour gift shop or order it by calling 402-245-3098

JANUARY 2020

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Cards, Inc., where, as you can imagine, February 14 is serious business. Val falls on a Friday this year, so why not celebrate, even if you say “ick” to the visual of cuddling sweethearts whispering sweet nothings over crimson roses and stuffed animals. Here are some suggested formats for celebrating Val. Cupid is Stupid party, for the discerning singleton. Collaborate with a couple of friends from different circles to host a Val mixer/cocktail party for singletons. Encourage guests to bring other single friends. Invite people for two or three hours only—don’t stretch it out over the evening or you’ll never get the kind of crowd that makes a party feel electric. And don’t have the emphasis be on people finding a love connection (way too much pressure!), but rather on broadening your social circle and finding interesting new friends to hang with. Email me and I will send you my list of pointers for how to throw a cocktail party. Celebrate Your Homegirls. Men may come and go, but good girlfriends are with you for life. Invite your inner tribe of sistahs to come over for an elegant Val champagne luncheon. Set your table with pink linens and your prettiest dishes and glassware and serve something girly, such as Ina Garten’s lobster and potato salad (google it or email me and I’ll send you a link). Play all-girl music, like Joni Mitchell, Diana Krall, and Eva Cassidy. Romantic Revels. Here’s an elegant and philanthropic way to celebrate with your beloved. The Heart of America Shakespeare Festival sponsors a black-tie, Val-themed gala every year, called “Romantic Revels.” It’s Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Intercontinental Hotel and the evening features a martini bar, silent auction, gorgeous ambience, dinner, and dancing, with lots of little surprises here and there. Tickets start at $200 a person and proceeds support HASF’s mission of making the Bard’s works available to the public through free professional theater and education programs. My valentine and I will be there; this year’s gala has a black-and-white dress code. Check out their website, shakespeare.org, for more info. SPAGHETTI NIGHT A CASA TUA Spaghetti with meatballs is comfort, comfort, comfort food, perfect to serve at a casual, winter dinner party. Invite people www.classickitchenskc.com for spaghetti and it automatically conveys to them a wealth of information: Dress casual. Bring red. Come hungry. www.classickitchenskc.com For the host, spaghetti answers the question of what else to serve: Prosciutto-wrapped melon, figs, or pears; a simple green salad, garlic bread. And lots of freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano. Email me for my “Spaghetti and Meatballs for a Crowd” recipe. I make the sauce in www.classickitchenskc.com a crockpot, using store-bought marinara to which I add “country-style” pork ribs, which add amazing depth of flavor. The recipe serves eight to ten, denow featuring pending on appetites and what else you are serving. You could whomp it up for a bigger crowd by offering another pasta variety and sauce or two—perhaps a Bolognese sauce, a meatless sauce (if you’re feeding a vegetarian) and/or a

JANUARY 2020

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now featuring now featuring


Entertaining

IN KC

white clam sauce—and calling it a pasta bar. OH, THE OSCARS! Show Biz fakery. Questionable fashion choices. Political speeches from spoiled actors in tuxedos. What better way to enjoy them than with friends? Oscar night is Sunday, February 9, and if you invite your own rat pack to an Academy Awards party right now, they will like you, they will really like you. And a remarkable thing will happen: they will actually make an effort to see the nominated pictures. The most important Oscar party requisite has to do with televisions and seating. The ceremony is long, so make sure everyone has a comfortable seat and a view of the telly. It’s best to have at least two televisions and viewing areas, because you will have two kinds of watchers: the die-hards who are glued to the telecast and the more casual viewers, who attend mainly to socialize. Rearrange your furniture into lounge-like vignettes to create a cozy atmosphere. Provide floor cushions or drag in soft chairs from other parts of the house if you need additional seating. People will want to graze, so a buffet table is the obvious serving tactic. I recommend serving a spiral-cut ham with tiny rolls and gourmet mustards, or a beef tenderloin, sliced and served at room temperature with baguette slices and horseradish sauce. Set up a separate dessert table if you have room, with bite-size brownies, cupcakes, and cookies. Consider offering cinematic nibbles like Junior Mints, Milk Duds, and Twizzlers.

Download Oscar ballots from oscar.com, print them out and distribute them before the broadcast. Give a prize to the guest who predicts the most winners. IT’S SOUP SEASON, SWEETIE! There is nothing so inviting on a cold winter day as a bowl of soup, and the smell of it simmering on the stove makes your house a wonderful place to be. What better reason to invite friends for dinner? There are several advantages here, an obvious one being soups are best made in advance. When soup is the main course, it frees you to indulge in other little flights of culinary fancy that you might not otherwise have time for: homemade biscuits perhaps, or a salad made with roasted beets, or a cranberry-pear sorbet for dessert. (Yes, I have recipes!) If you don’t want to bother with making stock, it’s okay to use canned. I especially like a brand called College Town, available in some Kansas City grocery stores. The flavor of any canned stock can be vastly improved by simmering it for 20 or 30 minutes with browned onion, carrot, and celery—which you then strain out before using. The possibilities for a soup dinner are limitless. I especially like corn and crabmeat chowder, split pea soup, gumbo, and lentil soup. And my friend Terry Anderson’s white chicken chili. So many options! Email me and I’ll send you my favorite soup recipes.

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Our Man by

IN KC

Damian Lair

dlair@inkansascity.com

: @damianlair #OurManINKC

HOT GOSSIP: What society divawhisperer had to warn a primo patron that there would be no flowers at the gala?

Steak Night

M

y friends Damian Lair with Gordon Ramsay. frequently joke that I will show up for the opening of an envelope. My counter: the opening must be at least as significant as for a new Walgreens. After all, I have limited time. True story: I can vividly remember being first in line with a former neighbor at the opening of the Downtown Cosentino’s Market on a frigid winter day. A grocery store! In short—I love an opening. So it is with much, well-earned credibility in this arena, that I can say… the opening of the new Gordon Ramsay Steak, inside Harrah’s North Kansas City, was the most extravagant and well-executed I have ever been to. How’s that for an endorsement? We were ushered inside, where we immediately encountered a woman clad in a metal, Victorian-style crinoline, sheathed in bubbling glasses of Champagne. Waiters nearby refilled with my absolute fave orange-labeled Veuve Clicquot. Nice. We wove through a generous array of passed hors d’oeuvres (beef tartare on kettle chips was tops) to the raw bar, which featured Osetra caviar and fresh blinis, oysters, lobster, and giant prawns.There were even deviled quail eggs, the most delicate, adorable things ever. After maxing on Champagne, I moved to the bar, where I’d spotted a line of brightly colored accouterments—dehydrated blood-orange slices, blueberries, pomegranate seeds—basically begging me to try one of the signature cocktails. So I did—a flame-singed rosemary gin and tonic. It was essentially a mobile incense goblet whose lit rosemary sprig wafted its smokiness around as I roamed. Creative, and incredible. I was given an overview of the personal meat lockers lined in bricks of Himalayan sea salt, and of course, got to meet the 16-Michelin-starred man behind it all: Gordon Ramsay. He ticked through everything making this restaurant so special—one of only ten in the U.S and the only location between the vastness of Baltimore and Las Vegas; its partnership with Harvester’s Community Food Network; and the impressive 3,800 reservations they booked within 24 hours of opening the booking line. Eventually we all made our way to the very British dining room where we were treated to a full meal featuring Ramsay’s most signature dish—classic Beef Wellington. It is rarely on menus and just happens to be one of my most favorite dishes. It was superb. The mac and cheese and sticky toffee pudding were noteworthy as well. And I’d be remiss if I didn’t fawn over how meticulously trained, attentive, and friendly the staff was. Likely the best service I’ve experienced in KC. This coming from a man who dines out nearly every evening. Ramsay said one of the reasons he chose Kansas City was because the people here are real. Well, Gordon, I couldn’t agree more. SPOTTED: Matt Besler, Jeff Montgomery, Mitchell Schwartz, Graham Zusi, Russo Fernandes, Joel Goldberg, Mitch Holthus, Rex Hudler, Lottie & Michael Halpern, Valerie Nicholson-Watson

JANUARY 2020

KC CHORALE CAROLING CONCERT AMIDST the hustle and bustle of the holidays and the constant stream of parties, I’ve found that The Kansas City Chorale’s annual Winter Song performance at The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art always arrives at the time I most need a moment of respite and clarity. Held in the 15th-century Italian courtyard—Rozzelle Court—it is a holiday concert that transfixes. Grammy-award-winning conductor Charles Bruffy led an 11-part movement written in Middle English and Latin—Benjamin Britten’s A Ceremony of Carols, accompanied by harp. Other primarily English works followed, including more contemporary favorites like Vince Guaraldi’s Christmas Time is Here. It was the perfect gathering of friends, wine, and spine-tingling chorale. SPOTTED: Shirley Helzberg, Michael Fields, Maurice Watson, Robin & Scott Boswell, Ursula Terrasi, Nancy & Michael Thiessen, Trudy Gabriel, Don Loncasty, Sean Gallagher, Nancy Lee & Jonathan Kemper, Charlotte Kemper, David Kemper, Jackie & John Middelkamp, Jerry Katlin, Dan DeLeon, Karen & John Jungmeyer, Heather & Tim Pluard, Bernie & Scott Ashcraft, Darlene McCluskey

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COME TO THE CABARET, OLD CHUM SAVE INC held its annual Homecoming party at Studio Dan Meiners, themed this year as “Wilkommen: Leave Your Troubles Outside.” It was a trip back in time to the outlandish and fantastical underground world of cabaret, where life’s worries could be left aboveground. Inspiration derived from one of the most iconic songs in the musical Cabaret, whose themes of political indifference, activism, and social change still resonate today. Homecoming “candidates” raised funds via pre-events, with the most successful, Dr. José Rodriguez and Jonetta Stewart, crowned as King and Queen. This event continues to reinvent itself, and this year’s cabaret lounge format was no exception. Ron Megee hosted and played ringleader to performances by Boi Boy, Daisy Buckët, Widow Von’Du, and E2 Dance Company. Thanks to Mike’s Wine & Spirits and Tom’s Town, we all watched the show with full drinks in OVERHEARD hand. And while “If it’s comfortHomecoming is able, you’re not such a fun party, looking cute.” it’s important to note the overarching theme’s origin: providing affordable housing solutions for those homeless and transitioning in our community. Because if there’s one thing many of us take for granted, it’s that nice feeling of coming home. SPOTTED: Anna Knutson, Krissie Spitcaufsky, Kelly Bower, Ryan Fagan, Lindsey Ingle, John McAnulty, Amanda & Travis Sitzman, Blaine Proctor, Jenny Kincaid & Tim Julian, Kevin Bryant, Tom Suther, Denise Delcore, John Green, Megha Ramaswamy, Carnez Williams, Colby Oberbroeckling, Ron White, Blake Worland, Josh Strodtman, Belinda Manos, Justin Campbell, Bruce Thurman, John Fulton Adams, Trevor Karasek, Eric Thomas, Jonathan Gregory, Chris Redlich, Barry Eisenhart, Curtis Woods, Matt Anderson


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Our Man

photo by Aaron Leimkuehler

Milking It

T

hree years in the making, and one night only—friends and art aficionados gathered at the always-chic Crossroads Hotel for MILK, an art exhibition featuring a collection of black-and-white works by Jennifer Janesko. The assemblage was constellated with charcoal drawings, paintings, and mixed media pieces based on photos from shooting a nude female model in a bathtub filled with milk. In homage to that shoot, a bathtub filled with warm milk was brought in for the occasion—mostly nude model included. The charcoal drawings on display were so incredibly realistic I initially mistook them for photographs. I was also particularly attracted to the collages of printed mylar, woven to recreate original drawings—still on my wish list. In addition to the artworks, Jennifer commissioned a handful of silk scarves printed with one of her lace-mask paintings, evoking a very Alexander McQueen vibe (one of my all-time fashion loves). Snag one of the remaining few scarves (or artworks) by reaching out: janeskofineart.com, instagram.com/janeskoart

SPOTTED: Noel & David Manica, Josue Montes, Cori & Matt Culp, Katie & Jared Campbell, Mark Mazzarese, Kimberly Marney, Rita Janesko, Heidi & Gavin Heathcock, Tracy & Ernie Peterson

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PORTFOLIO HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS

HOT GOSSIP: When did asking guests to wear all black become all the rage? Four such requests in the past month. Getting dressed has never been so easy!

ONE PARTICULAR annual holiday party I always love attending is Geri Higgins’ for Portfolio Kitchen & Home. Hosted at their expansive showroom, with views of Union Station across the street and the downtown skyline, it’s a great way to kick off the holiday party circuit. One thing Geri definitely gets right is the guest list. But with any party (this being the eighth consecutive year in this space), you’ve gotta keep it mixed up. (I learned this from fellow columnist, Merrily Jackson.) That’s when you call your pal (me!) for coffee and brainstorming. So I added a motley crew of friends and KC up-and-comers for just the right kick. After all, what’s more fun than stirring the pot? We meandered through the maze of gorgeously designed rooms, noshing and gabbing as we went. The state-of-the-art Thermador culinary demonstration kitchen was manned by chef Kyle Jakobi, in from California, where he turned out fare such as ado vado shredded beef empanadas with ancho chipotle cream and smoked salmon rillette with pumpernickel frosting. Geri put on her mixologist hat to concoct a menu of signature holiday cocktails. Christa Collins dazzled us with her Motown singing and dancing, including a Diana Ross finale. And last but not least—we marveled at the enormously scaled gingerbread house replicating the historic Pershing Road building Portfolio occupies. I left dreaming of sugar plums and designer kitchens of Christmas future. SPOTTED: Councilman Eric Bunch, Liesl and Joey McLiney, Dan Meiners & Dave Brinkerhoff, Laura Greenbaum, Renee & Dan McDougal, Roseann & Joe Mandacina, James Dyer, David & Christine Gerson, Jill Opelka, Chris Dollar, Kevin & Amy Lampo, Andy & Pat Brown, Monica Chala & Ray East, Ruth Prentice, Lohn Weber & Jennifer Workman, Shelby Herrick, Jeff Albright, Chris Zebley, Pam & Connor Schmidt, Lauren Lane, Kendall Seal, Katie Van Luchene & Jerry Foulds, Jake Buchheit, Cody Miller, Elisabeth Ingraham, Tyler Chapman, Jordan Borrell

JANUARY 2020

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JANESKOMIL PHOTO BY KEVIN MARSH

NOBLE DESIGNS

IN KC


JANESKOMIL PHOTO BY KEVIN MARSH

OVER THE TOP I HAD HEARD over the years that Crescendo is one of the top parties in Kansas City. Until this year, its date always conflicted with another philanthropy event I’m personally involved with, so I was annually foiled. Thus, I was excited the stars aligned for 2019. The event is hosted by the UMKC Conservatory and raises funds for scholarships benefitting Conservatory students pursuing interests in composition, music theory, musicology, dance, instrumental studies, keyboard studies, jazz studies, music education, music therapy, and vocal studies. The event itself is unique: half gala, half concert. We arrived at the gleaming Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, unprepared for the visual spectacle that would tantalize us all evening. In lieu of traditional décor and centerpieces, visionary co-chairs Marylou Turner and Michael Henry turned the idea of a gala on its head. The soaring Brandmeyer Hall was consumed by a suspended, acresized “cloud” of varying-sized white balloons, which changed colors throughout the night. We dined on filet mignon and salmon under this othOVERHEARD er-worldly creation (h/t to its creator, “Is that a cough drop? Do Molly Balloons), eventually making you have a cough?” our way into Helzberg Hall for the concert portion of the evening. The “No, I just eat them to keep my immune system up.” Conservatory assembled a blockbuster showcase highlighting its various “You know that’s now how disciplines, including piano, orchestra, they work, right? They’re jazz trio, interpretive dance, ballet, and not vitamins.” a scene from The Italian Straw Hat. It was an hour-long whirlwind of artistic talent. Afterward, we gathered outside the theater and were treated to a flashmob dance performance as we exited. Hats off to the organizers for a truly incredible evening. SPOTTED: Chancellor Mauli and Sue Agrawal, Sen. Jason Holsman, Tim Van Zandt, Chris Beal, Julie Quirin & Teri Miller, Mark Sappington & David McGee, Terry Anderson, Julia Irene Kauffman, Anita & Gary Robb, Sharon & John Hoffman, Barbara & Jack Spilker, Amy Embry, Mary Leonida, Katherine DeBruce, Gretchen and Dr. Larry Jacobson, Mike Sigler, Jim Blair, Kevin Hancock, Ann McCray, Julie Anderson Clark & Vince Clark, Lee Page, Gloria Rudd, Marcio Reis, Chris Hernandez & Paul Monteil, Wayne Long, Craig Sole, Crissy Dastrup, Kathleen Kunkler, Holly Post, Carolyn & David Fulk, Lillis Beal, Linda Lighton and Lynn Adkins, Siobhan McLaughlin Lesly, Carl Bennum, Candice Brooks, Justice Horn, Troy Lillebo, Makini King

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Arts & Culture

IN KC

Selective Poppies by Kevin Sink.

by

Judith Fertig

Kevin Sink THE NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER ANSWERS FOUR QUESTIONS

I

n Kansas City caught up with Kevin Sink, a nature photographer whose work combines art, interior design, and emotional therapy. His photographs hang on the walls of cancer centers, hospitals, and doctors’ offices all over the country, where you can feel like you’re in the middle of a forest rather than a waiting room. Breathe. Just breathe. Sink’s work is available through Henry Domke Fine Art (henrydomke.com), founded by a former family health physician in 2003. “We specialize in making artwork for healthcare institutions, based on evidence-based design principles,” says Sink. “Essentially, it’s nature photography that is calming, uplifting, and stress relieving for patients, family, and staff.”

JANUARY 2020

INKC: Tell us a little about yourself and how you got interested in nature photography. Sink: I grew up in Prairie Village and spent most of my time outside roaming the neighborhoods. I was always getting into trouble for wandering too far and not coming home on time! My interest in nature and photography grew directly from my experiences on my grandparents’ farm in south Johnson County. I spent many days hiking the rangeland, letting the sounds, smells, and sights form an indelible foundation for my lifelong pursuit to make nature relevant and of great importance to people. I went to Pembroke Hill and first was introduced to photography in a mini course there taught by Mrs. Nancy Lewis… a very patient and encouraging teacher. My family took vacations, almost always to

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Sanibel and Captiva Islands in Florida. It was here that I became interested in bird watching at the marvelous Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge. My parents got me a very inexpensive camera and a $63 telephoto lens. Combining photography and birding became my passion. I did a science-fair project that was a collection of my bird photographs with notes on each species’ behavior, distribution, etc. I was fortunate to receive several awards, including one from Hallmark, which included a tour of their photography department. All that was a big boost to my confidence. A love of science steered me into pre-med at KU, and I ended up getting an M.A. in Physiology and Cell Biology before applying to med school. On the way to take the entrance exam I was driving on K-10 and saw a Great Horned Owl on a rocky outcrop and it seemed to be staring right at me as I passed. Somehow that owl made me think, “I don’t want to spend the rest of my life indoors in a hospital!” Instead, I started my photography business 28 years ago.

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INKC: You’ve said, “I’m always thinking of how my photo-

graphs can bring the contentment of beautiful places into high-stress environments.” How did you first blend art and emotional therapy? Sink: My dad was a very fine painter, as a hobby, and he had an impressive library of books on master painters. Every time I would get home with a roll of film he would critique the shots and bring down a book of Degas, Cézanne, or someone and show me how they approached scene rendering. So I grew up totally enamored with art and a great respect for painters and the necessary sensitivity they must have for the scenes they portray. I’ve worked very hard to bring those compositional and emotional lessons to bear on my work, and the process itself is quite calming. Just being out scouting for scenes and practicing a mindful approach and listening to what the landscape is saying is a great stress reducer. INKC: What are you working on now? Sink: I continue to travel all over the U.S. and abroad. I just got back

from a three-week shoot in England photographing gardens, and will be shooting in Wisconsin and then for two months in Montana, near Glacier National Park. Conceptually, I’m trying to work on a “less is more” idea. With our lives so complicated, I think people yearn for simplicity. I’ve started a collection of scenes that are very compelling, yet simplistic in content, inspired by the color-field painters like Frankenthaler, Diebenkorn, and an exhibit by Sean Scully I saw in the National Gallery in London.

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INKC: What is it about Kansas City—full of beautiful places, but “scenic” is not the first word that comes to mind—that nurtures your artistic self? Sink: Ever since I can remember, I’ve visited the Nelson-Atkins Museum. To me it’s the crown jewel of our city and we should be immensely proud of it. Not only does it have incredible art and superb direction by Julián Zugazagoitia, but the strong philanthropic support by the community speaks volumes about the character of our city.

JANUARY 2020

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Arts & Culture BY

IN KC

Judith Fertig

PUZZLE ME THIS

IT’S JANUARY. It’s cold. And we’re still recovering from the season of too-much everything. It’s time to slow down, sip some hot chocolate, and get lost in the intricacies of contemporary puzzles on a winter afternoon. The Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art heard our wish. They’re hosting their first-ever Puzzle Party for ages 3 to 103. You will quickly find out if you’re really smarter than a fifth grader. Or you can create your own puzzle inspired by the symbolism in the art of Hew Locke, a celebrated contemporary visual artist based in Britain. Join in from 12:30 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 11. The event is free, but you need to register. kemperart.org

Concerts are held in Helzberg Hall, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.

(816) 471-0400 / kcsymphony.org

FEEL-GOOD MUSIC FOR THE NEW YEAR!

BEETHOVEN, BRAHMS and PIRATES of the CARIBBEAN: MENDELSSOHN’S VIOLIN THE CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL IN CONCERT CONCERTO Friday, Jan. 10 at 8 p.m.

CHICAGO — THE MUSICAL IN CONCERT

Conner Gray Covington, guest conductor Kansas City Symphony Chorus, Charles Bruffy, chorus director

Rob Fisher, guest conductor

Film + Live Orchestra

Saturday, Jan. 11 at 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 12 at 3 p.m.

Come along for a swashbuckling adventure with Captain Jack Sparrow, his motley crew and the Kansas City Symphony! Tickets for the full-length film start at $40 for adults and $25 for children. Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts.

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Friday, Jan. 17 at 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 18 at 8 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 19 at 2 p.m.

Peter Oundjian, guest conductor Nancy Zhou, violin BRAHMS Variations on a Theme by Haydn MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto VIVIAN FUNG Dust Devils BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 1 Beauty and warmth! Nancy Zhou performs Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto, together with Brahms plus Beethoven’s powerful Symphony Number 1. Tickets start at $25

JANUARY 2020

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Friday, Jan. 24 at 8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25 at 7 p.m. New Saturday time! Sunday, Jan. 26 at 2 p.m.

TICK ET S ARE SE LLING FA ST !

The musical Chicago is a sensational tale of sin, corruption and all that jazz with a story about fame and scandal that features one showstopping song after another. Experience Broadway’s longest-running American musical like never before, celebrating the original tunes you know and love. Amazing guest vocalists play the roles of Roxie, Mama, Mary Sunshine, Velma and Billy Flynn. Tickets from $40.


ROLL OVER, BEETHOVEN

PHOTO BY KRISTIAN SCHULLER

ANNE-SOPHIE MUTTER, one of the greatest violinists of our day, kicks off the 250th birthday celebration of Ludwig van Beethoven on Tuesday evening, January 21 at the Folly Theater, part of the renowned Harriman-Jewell series. As you might well expect, this will be an all-Beethoven recital surprisingly resonant with our times. In his life and career, Beethoven longed to bridge widening gaps in society as well as music. In life, the poor musician fell in love with a countess, but could not marry her; his Moonlight Sonata is the musical love letter that resulted. It takes a great violinist to do justice to The Kreutzer Sonata, technically difficult and an emotional rollercoaster. Anne-Sophie Mutter is more than up to the task. In her elegant, strapless gown while holding her priceless Stradivarius violin, Mutter will be joined by her longtime collaborator, pianist Lambert Orkisa for a memorable evening. hjseries.org

JANUARY 2020

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Arts & Culture by

IN KC

Judith Fertig

Delilah Rose Pellow portrays Small Alison in KCRep’s production of Fun Home.

FUN HOME

AS SOON AS YOU READ the title, you know this musical promises to be a lot more than just fun. Inspired by Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir, it will be interesting. The New York Times describes Fun Home as a “heart-gripping and cathartic” musical that delivers a deeply satisfying emotional wallop. The original Broadway cast album was nominated for a Grammy. Winner of five 2015 Tony Awards including Best Musical, Fun Home makes its Kansas City debut on Friday evening, January 24 at KCRep’s Spencer Theatre on the UMKC campus. With book and lyrics by Lisa Kron; music by Jeanine Tesori; and directed by Lisa Rothe, this relatable and moving story involves a daughter reliving her tragicomic upbringing in a Gothic revival mansion. With a family funeral home as a backdrop and a Sunbeam bread truck as an agent of change, what could possibly go wrong? You’ll have to see. It’s a journey marked by honesty and humor and filled with memorable songs. kcrep.org

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JANUARY 2020

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ASK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN

AS PART OF the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s ongoing Queen Nefertari: Eternal Egypt exhibit, four Kansas City-area Egyptologists are here to answer your questions. They might include: What is the mystery of Nefertari’s mummified knees? What is the deal with those dung beetles? Was Nefertari, the beloved Great Royal Wife of Pharaoh Ramesses II, really as beautiful as history claims? Was she merely eye candy, or someone who wielded greater power? On Thursday evening, January 30, Stacy Davidson, Lisa Saladino Haney, Patrick Salland, and Julia Troche will each give brief presentations on objects in the exhibition, before opening up the floor for your questions. Interestingly, current Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art director Julián Zugazagoitia worked on the restoration of Queen Nefertari’s tomb in Egypt in the early 1990s as a consultant with the Getty Conservation Institute, which gave the young Zugazagoitia his first major curatorial experience. nelson-atkins.org

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L I G H T I N G


Join Join thethe Harriman-Jewell Harriman-Jewell Series Series forfor its its fabulous fabulous 55th 55th season season of of performances performances held held at landmark at landmark venues venues in downtown in downtown Kansas Kansas City! City!

MARK MARK MORRIS MORRIS DANCE DANCE GROUP GROUP PERFORMING PERFORMING THE THE BEATLES BEATLES INSPIRED INSPIRED PEPPERLAND, PEPPERLAND, FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 8, 2020 8, 2020 Anne-Sophie Anne-Sophie Mutter, Mutter, violinist violinist 01/21/20; 01/21/20; Mark Mark Morris Morris Dance Dance Group Group 02/08/20; 02/08/20; Bill Bill Frisell: Frisell: HARMONY HARMONY 03/04/20; 03/04/20; TheThe Siberian Siberian State State Symphony Symphony Orchestra Orchestra 03/05/20; 03/05/20; Daniil Daniil Trifonov, Trifonov, pianist pianist 03/12/20; 03/12/20; Pianist Pianist Mitsuko Mitsuko Uchida Uchida andand Mahler Chamber Orchestra Mahler Chamber Orchestra 03/22/20; 03/22/20; Keith Keith Lockhart Lockhart andand thethe Boston Boston Pops Pops On On Tour 04/06/20; Tour 04/06/20; Angela Angela Gheorghiu, Gheorghiu, soprano soprano 04/26/20; Joyce DiDonato, mezzo-soprano, 04/26/20; Joyce DiDonato, mezzo-soprano, andand Il Pomo Il Pomo d’Oro, d’Oro, chamber chamber orchestra orchestra 05/29/20. 05/29/20.

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See See complete complete details details for season for season performances, performances, including including freefree Discovery Discovery Concerts, Concerts, at HJSERIES.ORG. at HJSERIES.ORG.


Behind the Music

IN KC

Give us some details of your childhood: where you were born/ raised; where you went to school; what your family life was like. Michelle Bacon: The first few months of my life were spent in an orphanage in Taichung, Taiwan, before being adopted and finding my family and home in Independence, Missouri. I was an extremely reserved, studious kid who attended Catholic schools and was grounded in two cultures: that of my mom, who emigrated from Malaysia eight years before I was born; and the surroundings of my dad’s/Harry Truman’s all-American hometown. It made for a unique, well-traveled, sometimes socially disjointed childhood. My family unit was small and tight-knit, as most of the relatives—save my parents and grandma, mainly—lived all over the globe. When did music become an interest? What provoked that interest? MB: I don’t remember this, but my parents talk about a trip we took to New Orleans when I was a wee one. I was very shy, but as we walked through the French Quarter, they tell me I couldn’t quit gleefully bopping through the streets. I was instantly addicted to all the lovely melodies orbiting around me, and I guess that hasn’t stopped. Did you play an instrument growing up? Were you in school bands? MB: I took private piano lessons from the ages of 4 through 12. No

music programs were offered at either of my schools, the arts weren’t prioritized. Part of why I quit piano was because I struggled with fitting in—as many pre-teens do—and nobody else in my school really played an instrument that I knew of. So outside of a few short-lived guitar and drum lessons along the way, I didn’t start playing anything in earnest until I was about 20.

Michelle Bacon by

Timothy Finn

M

ichelle Bacon entered the Kansas City music scene years ago as a novice and an outsider. She has since become one of its mainstays, a go-to musician capable of filling a variety of roles. Among the current roster of bands of which she is a member: Other Americans, Katy Guillen & The Drive, The Nathan Corsi Band, and the Una Walkenbhorst Trio. Bacon also founded and organized The Band That Fell To Earth, a David Bowie tribute band that played its first show a few weeks after Bowie’s death in January 2016. That show has since become an annual event. This year it will be presented Jan. 24 and 25 at RecordBar. Bacon recently answered questions from IN Kansas City about her childhood, about her gradual but steady involvement in the Kansas City music community, and about this year’s Bowie tribute.

JANUARY 2020

Who were the first bands/musicians you started listening to as a child? What was the first album you owned? The first album you bought? MB: As a kid, I probably listened to classical music more than anything else. One reason: I learned the Suzuki piano method, which involves a lot of ear training, so there was often some Beethoven or Bach rolling in the background at home. My affinity for popular music came a few years later when we got cable and I finally discovered MTV. My first cassette tape was Boyz II Men II. (Bonus: I recently found old sheet music for On Bended Knee in my piano bench). My first CDs: Green Day’s Dookie and Weezer’s Blue Album. Outside of music, what other artistic discipline influenced you most and why?. MB: Definitely writing. My grandmother spent her entire life writing as a hobby, but it wasn’t until her 80s that she published her first novel and began winning awards for her poetry. This happened in the years she took care of my dementia-stricken grandfather, and it was the most inspiring thing to watch while growing up. She encouraged me to find my voice through writing because she believed that my voice could add value to the world. I don’t consider myself a naturally gifted writer, but her sentiment stuck with me, and it’s a craft I’ve loved developing over the years.

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When did you first join a band? Who was that band, what was your role, and what did they sound like? MB: I think I was in my mid-20s and barely knew how to play drums at that point, but I started a band with my lifelong best friend and his cousin. We were called Mach Rocket 3000!. We wore ridiculous sparkly/spandex-y outfits, the boys did jump kicks and split kicks, and the music was a frenzied mash-up of AC/DC and KISS. It was as silly as it was entertaining. What was your first live performance with a band and what do you remember about it? MB: I played one “show” on electric guitar with an ’80s cover band in front of Californos in my early 20s. I think a friend of a friend told me about these guys, and I thought I’d give it a go. I had no real idea how to play that instrument, and none of us knew each other outside of our two rehearsals, I’m still not sure if it was a sanctioned event. A couple days later, the bassist called to tell me the drummer died of a heart attack. I never heard from any of them again. What was the first significant band you were part of and what was so significant about it? MB: Playing drums in Deco Auto was significant for me, because it was the first time I felt like music could be, and perhaps had to be, more than a hobby. I had started writing album reviews for Ink and The Kansas City Star around that time and became much more familiar with the local indie scene as a result. Hearing and then meeting all these great musicians sparked something within me. So that’s kind of when I jumped into about every band I could and started learning from so many of these artists I looked up to. You are content manager at the Bridge (90.9 FM). In 2018 you produced a series in conjunction with an NPR series called Turning The Tables. It focused on the experiences of women in music in our region. As a woman of Asian ancestry working in our music world, what did working on this series reveal to you and what did it confirm? MB: Music is a male-dominated industry that has historically minimized the accomplishments of women. I wanted to look at that from a local perspective, in a music scene where I’ve generally felt welcome and

JANUARY 2020

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Behind the Music

IN KC

treated like a professional. After hearing the experiences of dozens of women, the series confirmed that many of us felt that same inclusivity from local promoters, sound engineers, media and fellow musicians. But it also confirmed the fact that gender disparity exists. Sometimes women have to work harder to be treated as equals, and sometimes we’re exalted for the wrong reasons. It revealed the subtleties of “otherness” and the challenges women face being viewed as anomalies in the music business. As a queer Asian-American woman living in the Midwest, I’ve encountered this throughout my life, and it can be tough to speak up about because the damage is often not severe or even intentional. I really wanted the series to facilitate more conversations about how we could move past those perspectives, and I hope it has done that in some small way. This month, you will present the fifth annual tribute to David Bowie performed by The Band That Fell To Earth. The first installment of this event was scheduled months before Bowie’s death in January 2016. In the wake of his death, it took on such a greater weight and gravitas that it had to be moved to a much larger venue. What do you remember about going into that first show, knowing full well that all of the 1,000 or so people who attended would still be grieving over his death? How did that change the dynamics? MB: Our band was enthusiastic to play together from the start, and to

share our interpretations of Bowie’s canon with fellow fans. That enthusiasm immediately turned to catharsis when he died, and the sheer

timing gave us a huge sense of urgency and responsibility. His death felt personal and profound to so many of his fans, all of us included. We knew that show would be a place for his fans to congregate, celebrate, and grieve. But the energy in that room felt enormous and unifying in a way we didn’t quite anticipate, and a lot of people have told me that it helped bring them some closure. So this has become a meaningful time of year for the entire band; we love getting together to perform these songs and try to make each show feel as special as that first one. How has learning his music so in-depth affected you? MB: Bowie’s music has been with me since I was a teenager, but even more so since this event began. The familiarity I have with the songs goes beyond learning lyrics and chord progressions; it has become more about digging into the language of all of his musical phases, preserving his art, and honoring his spirit of innovation. It has also helped me sharpen the intent of the annual show, making it as much about community engagement as it is about the music. Bowie championed outcasts throughout his career, so one main goal for me has been to spotlight marginalized populations in the city through our charity donations. The other is to expose people to the original artists who work tirelessly to create, innovate, and entertain. Give us some details about this year’s show, which is Jan. 24 and Jan. 25 at RecordBar. MB: We’ve got a pretty hefty arsenal of songs now, so each night will feature varying set lists and different guest vocalists, which will include

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some of the strongest soul, pop, and blues voices in the city. As always, we’ll have American Sign Language interpretation and video projection. A few local makers (Kitschup Creations, Lost & Found Design and Two Tone Press) are creating special items for the event. A portion of ticket sales will benefit Kansas City Anti-Violence Project—an organization that advocates, educates and supports the LGBTQ+ community, often those affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and hate crimes. What are your favorite Bowie songs and/or albums? MB: Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars was my first introduction to Bowie, so it holds a particular place in my heart and feeds my glamrock proclivities. With all of its beautiful symphonic swells and Bowie’s whimsical turns of phrase, Hunky Dory is a long-time favorite. For more than one reason, Blackstar is my album of the decade, and I think it’ll endure as one of his most brilliant works. I go through different phases with his music—and there’s so much of it! So lately I’ve been stuck on Scary Monsters and Station to Station.

time I started working as a musician, she was in her late 90s and had almost no short-term memory. But I know she’d be proud because it brings me so much fulfillment and purpose. I’d hope it could inspire somebody to follow their own path too. What are the best things about the Kansas City music community? MB: There are a lot of dedicated, talented artists in Kansas City, but I think that the inclusivity is unparalleled. I entered the music scene while going through a major life change and found sanctuary in it. I also learned so much about being a musician and a music professional through the mentorship of others. I often return to that spirit of community, but it seems crucial to have a system of support and connectivity to share with one another. It drives us to create and instills the confidence to put our passions out to the rest of the world.

Your grandmother had a profound influence on your life. How did she inspire you most? MB: Every aspect of my life has been inspired by my grandma and her devotion to finding beauty and joy in all things. She was adventurous, luminous, and benevolent. She was that rare person who knew how to make anybody she came into contact with feel valuable and treasured. I’ve always struggled with my self-worth, and she was the one person who made me feel like I could actually make a difference. By the

WANT MORE TIMOTHY FINN? Check out his weekly online-only content at inkansascity.com. Every Wednesday the website publishes his list of Top 5 Notto-Miss Concerts in the metro. Every week you’ll find his revered, rollicking, reasoned reviews and commentary. Email Timothy Finn at tfinn@inkansascity.com

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Look

IN KC

Fashion

BAA BAA BLACK SHEEP

All Bundled Up

A

BY

If you’re headed out to experience the Lyric Opera’s ...When there are Nine, channel RBG herself in a luxe cashmere poncho. Trimmed in Tibetan lamb fur, this 100 percent cashmere poncho will be cozy and stylish. Poncho, $695, at Alaskan Fur (Overland Park).

R. Murphy

re you heading south for the winter? No? We aren’t either, which begs the question: how do you survive the Midwestern winter in style? Bundle up with these chic outerwear options and you won’t even be envious of your snowbird friends. Well, maybe a little.

POM SQUAD

Going on a Target run? Pop on this cable-knit pom-pom stocking cap to show a little KC pride. Hat by 1KC Shop, $40, at Frankie and Jules (Overland Park).

SPLIT DECISION

If you love options but don’t want to confine yourself to just tech jackets, think a little more south of the equator. The Jaden alpaca coat is completely reversible, complete with a lapel scarf to keep out even the slightest chill. Go from cream to taupe heather in a flash. A truly versatile investment piece. Jaden reversible alpaca coat, $798, at Peruvian Connection (Crestwood Shops).

TEDDY BEAR VIBES

If cozy and cool are your goals, grab the Blitz jacket in soft beige. This teddy-bear fleece bomber jacket is fully lined with luxe leather trim that adds just a bit of edge. The Blitz jacket, $349, at BLDWN (Country Club Plaza).

JANUARY 2020

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BEAUTIFUL TEETH... MY FAVORITE ACCESSORY “I cannot imagine having competed at Miss USA 2019, without the beautiful smile Dr. Headley designed for me. The added confidence on the runway and in close-up camera shots was golden! My smile will always be my favorite accessory.” – Triana Browne

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Look

IN KC Beauty

New Year, New You by

R. Murphy

H

ey there, 2020! It’s a new year and with it comes a fresh start—a clean sweep as it were. There’s no better place to begin than with your skincare routine. Cleansing is always important but taking a gentler tactic in the winter months is wise. The frigid Kansas City wind is already doing plenty of stripping for you. Try these gentle cleansers to reveal glowing, healthy skin in the new year.

LESS IS MORE Sometimes what’s missing from the label is just as important as what’s printed. Such is the case with Native Atlas’s Exfoliating Facial Cleanser. The boutique skincare brand works with organic and wild-crafted (foraged) ingredients, such as the carrot seeds and rosehips, in this gentle exfoliating cleanser. What it doesn’t work with is parabens, petrochemicals, or synthetic fragrances. So all skin types, especially dry and aging skin, have some soothing relief. Native Atlas Exfoliating Cleanser, $69 at Made in KC.

OIL AND WATER

LATHER UP We all love the feeling of lathering up with a foaming face wash but many commercial products strip down the skin using soap. Not so with the SKIN Naked Face Foaming Face Wash. Using skin-friendly ingredients like coconut oil, olive oil, and aloe vera, this foaming cleanser leaves skin fresh but not tight and dry. SKiN Naked Face Foaming Cleanser, $10-$28, available at SKINKC.com or at their flagship store in Brookside.

JANUARY 2020

Not all cleansers have to bubble. For those particularly dry days, turn to the Living Libations Best Skin Ever. This cleansing oil infuses irritated skin with moisture from botanical oils while whisking away dirt and grime. Use as a cleanser or as an exfoliator, on your face or body. Living Libations Best Skin Ever (50 ml) in Rose, $43, Sea Buckthorn, $31, or Sandalwood, $57, available at Welwythn at the Prairie Village Shops.

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Look

IN KC

Wellness

No Sweat by

DOES IT SEEM LIKE EVERYONE AROUND YOU IS SWEATING? SURE, JANUARY IS UNOFFICIAL CARDIO MONTH BUT EXERCISE DOESN’T HAVE TO BE QUITE SO—BOISTEROUS. CHECK

R. Murphy

OUT SOME OTHER OPTIONS FOR HOW TO TACKLE YOUR FITNESS GOALS WITHOUT EVER SWEATING TO THE OLDIES

YOGA. Of course, most people think of yoga as the antithesis of cardio but given the myriad of different styles, there’s plenty of opportunity to get your heart rate up. Try the CorePower Yoga 2 at CorePower Yoga on the Plaza for a challenge as you complete your asanas in a room heated to 93-100 degrees. Want Madonna’s killer bod? Try Ashtanga yoga at Maya Yoga. For a gentler approach, try the yoga levels series at Body and Soul KC. Start with touching your toes and get more bendy from there. TAI CHI AND QI GONG. No, tai chi isn’t just for the elderly at rec centers. It is great for anyone that wants a gentle, no-impact workout that remains standing. Technically a martial art, tai chi is a moving meditation, using postures to focus the mind and body. Qi gong is a connected discipline that focuses on the breath to power the body. Explore these flowing, gentle practices in strength at Inner Space KC with Master Yoa Li. BARRE. If you’ve ever thought that ballet looked easy, try a barre class. Sure, you may not be hanging out in the ‘Iron Paradise’ with the Rock, but barre emphasizes that every motion matters, especially when completed perfectly. Precision is key here and this modality will transform your body by building your stabilizing muscles, improving posture. Try a class at Barre 3 in Brookside. PILATES. If you’ve ever suffered through the ‘100,’ you know what a good workout Pilates can be. Pilates mat classes are plentiful at gyms but if you want to up the ante, try a reformer class. The apparatus uses springs, leverage, and body weight to gently transform your body. Try private sessions to get the hang of it before joining group reformer classes at Pilates Co-Op KC.

JANUARY 2020

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Ask an Egyptologist Thursday, 1.30.20

Join four Egyptologists for an evening of inquiry and discovery.

Tickets & Information at nelson-atkins.org/inkc

#NefertariKC Votive Statue of a Cat,, Unknown provenance. Late Period, 26th–31st 26t dynasty (about 664–332 B.C.E.) Bronze, 8 ¾ x 3 x 4 ½ inches. Museo Egizio, Turin.


Living

IN KC Global Views channel-back sofa in moss, Seville Home.

FURNITURE. More sofas and chairs will be channel back—or tight back—with a lounge-y, modern edge. You’ll spot more traditional details, too, such as furniture with skirting and trim. COLOR. The palette is turning warmer—lots of cream vs. gray as the dominant neutral. Red will make more of a showing vs. the cooler blues and greens that have been popular. LIGHTING. Speaking of col-

or, you should see more of it in light fixtures. For example, lanterns in different hues. “One of the most effective ways to give your home a facelift is to update the lighting,” Noble says. On that subject, we look forward to seeing her new collection for Wilson Lighting that will debut this year.

Robert Abbey pendant from the Williamsburg Custis collection, Wilson Lighting.

Highland House Chair upholstered in “Tobacco Leaf,” Maddan-McFarland.

The warm palette of the “Play” collection from Sherwin-Williams’ Colormix Forecast 2020 is energetic and playful.

2020 Vision Stacy Downs

FABRIC. Large-scale patterns with lots of color will be

o get a glimpse of what lies ahead for the new year in home design, we talked to Sara Noble, owner of Noble Designs in Kansas City. As a featured design blogger at High Point Furniture Market, she caught a sneak preview into the upcoming year. The tone overall, according to Noble: “fresh and fun.”

more prevalent. For example, “Tobacco Leaf ” by Highland House, featuring blue, yellow, green and pink. There also will be more stain-resistant options using Crypton and InsideOut performance fabrics. Noble watched a demonstration of a smiley-face drawn with a highlighter on white fabric, and it disappeared shortly after it was wiped off. “The fabric feels like it should to the hand, so why not?” she says.

BY

T

JANUARY 2020

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WELCOME IN THE NEW YEAR TIME TO STEP IT UP IN 2020

CHANCES ARE your mats have outworn their welcome inside and out. We found a few best-foot-forward options that can be personalized with your name, message, or address.

VINTAGE-STYLE TILE IN VINYL

This mosaic tile option looks timeless. The floor cloths are made with two-ply vinyl that has a latex-padded backing. The material lays flat and has a non-slip surface. Available in multiple sizes at Jorjy (Brookside).

PAINTED COIR

Made with personality by Megan Nelson of Urban Owl Home Décor in Kansas City, the doormats are coir, a natural material made of coconut fibers. They feature non-slip latex backings. Available in multiple sizes. urbanowlco.com

JANUARY 2020

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Living

IN KC

3 Interior Design Books We Can’t Wait To Put on Our Shelves This Year

Shelf Love by

Stacy Downs

Evocative Style by Kelly Wearstler (Rizzoli). It’s been ten years since her last book, and it’s always fascinating to see what combinations the fearless American designer pulls together.

Bibliostyle: How We Live at Home with Books by Nina Freudenberger offers a peek at the private libraries and bookshelves of passionate readers all over the world.

Axel Vervoordt: Portraits of Interiors by Michael Gardner (Flammarion) The book was released to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Belgian designer’s company, and focuses on 18 of his projects around the globe.

W

hen it comes to the first home-organizing project of the new year, people often prioritize the spice cabinet or closets. Design junkies who are also bibliophiles start with the shelves. Here’s a three-step process:

Curate. If a book doesn’t spark joy a la Marie Kondo, put it in the giveaway pile. Offer them to family and friends, donate them to a library fundraising sale, or trade them for cash at a used-book store like Half Price Books. Systematize. Arrange by your preference—by genre, by alphabetical order, or even by hue. Personalize. Add in art and framed photographs et voila! Snap a shelfie. JANUARY 2020

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Rooms With a History: Interiors and Their Inspirations by Ashley Hicks (Rizzoli) British designer Ashley Hicks details his design work and his relationship with his late father, the famous decorator David Hicks.


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ou can’t help but notice the gleaming glasswork on the shelves of the Kemper Art Museum Store. The graceful silhouettes are as much sculpture as they are drinking carafes and table lamps. The shining objects are by Kansas City artist Tyler Kimball, owner of Monarch Glass Studio in the 18th and Vine District. The studio offers classes, events, and a gallery with gifts, artwork, and modern light fixtures. Kimball shows his work in museums and galleries internationally, and pushes the boundaries of glass art. He is nicknamed the “Rondel King,” producing thousands of the round glass pieces for stained-glass artists and architectural studios around the globe. Installations include 25-inch diameter crown bullion rondels for the Masters Clubhouse in Augusta, fine lace-like ones for artists in Japan, and brilliantly colored ones for a private residence in Manhattan. “I’ve continued to marvel at the material and try to capture what intrigued me about glass from the very beginning,” Kimball says in the Kemper Art Museum Store biography. “The ability to bend and color light, refract and reflect and bring out the natural beauty of glass.”

JANUARY 2020

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My Essentials

IN KC

AUDREY KUNIN ENTREPRENEUR, DERMATOLOGIST by

Michael Mackie

A photo by aaron leimkuehler

udrey Kunin isn’t just a doctor—she also plays one on TV. Not only is she a board-certified dermatologist and founder and chief creative officer of DERMAdoctor, you’ll often find Kunin touting her skincare know-how on Dr. Oz and Fox & Friends. When she launched dermadoctor.com more than 20 years ago, Kunin had a smattering of products from which to choose. Now her formulas—which she whips up right here in the metro—are so extensive and well-known, she recently appeared on QVC-UK in London and is revered in Dubai. (Our absolute fave? Her Kakadu C Eye Souffle Cream.) We caught up with the maven of clinical skincare recently at her shiny new warehouse in Riverside to find out her must-have essentials.

Audrey ’s essentials... SHOP LOCAL:

FAVORITE KANSAS CITY SPOT:

I’d have to say Nell Hill’s. Design work for product development is something I do daily—and wandering through their gorgeously detailed decor speaks to my creative side.

Loose Park. Walking the park or simply throwing down a blanket, people watching and absorbing the surroundings is incredibly peaceful and brings me incredible joy. FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOOD:

DATE NIGHT:

COCKTAILS, ANYONE:

The Hope Diamond at Eddie V’s. It’s purple, decadent, and an interactive drink experience.

My husband and I love to attend concerts and live performances. Our favorite venues are the Kauffman and Starlight. Most recently we saw Hugh Jackman, and the show was magnificent.

FAVE PRODUCT FROM MY LINE:

Life in the Midtown area is a daily dose of history, culture, and beauty. It’s a visual wonder.

My Kakadu C Intensive Vitamin C Peel Pads with Ferulic Acid and Vitamin E make my skin feel alive and refreshed. And my complexion looks radiant. It’s two treatments in one—which saves time and amps up my anti-aging regimen.

HIDDEN GEM:

Christopher Filley Antiques is a real-life treasure hunt. Years ago I found a vintage painting hidden in a stack against a wall. It still hangs in my living room. JANUARY 2020

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GUILTY PLEASURE:

Chips, guacamole, and a margarita on the patio of Brookside Barrio.


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words by

Cindy Hoedel

photo by

Cameron Gee

IN CONVERSATION WITH

Quinton Lucas

H

e looks bigger in person than on TV, and that’s not the only surprising thing about Kansas City’s 35-year-old mayor, Quinton Lucas. His strong, athletic frame sports a well-tailored navy suit and ruby red tie, yet he drapes himself diagonally into a conference chair with the languor of a teen in joggers. He’s got the standard politician’s quick-draw smile, to be sure, but he’s just as loose unfurling a grimace, wince, or furrowed brow. His face is a livestream of authentic reactions, neither poker-faced nor overly animated. “Mayor Q” as some constituents call him wears both parts of his biography easily: an impoverished, fatherless childhood in the urban core and an elite scholarship-fueled education at The Barstow School in Kansas City, Washington University in St. Louis, and Cornell Law School in New York. He embraces the criticism that he is an “East Side guy” when it comes to policy priorities and also makes no apologies for “talking white.” Lucas’s career began clerking for a federal judge in Kansas City, practicing business law, and joining the University of Kansas law faculty at age 28. Leaders of inner-city nonprofits such as Operation Breakthrough say his volunteer work is tireless and from the heart. Lucas served as a City Council member before becoming mayor Aug. 1, 2019. Single, he lives in an apartment in the historic 18th and Vine jazz heritage district. Over the years, Lucas has conducted 25 marriage ceremonies. In an in-depth conversation in his 29th-floor City Hall office, Lucas talks about his goals for 2020; early successes he’s proud of; his impressions of the Democratic presidential primary field; the challenges of dating while mayor, and his abiding passion for the Chiefs. (During the season, Mayor Lucas shares his take on the Chiefs on 610 Sports Radio at 8:20 a.m. on Mondays and on KPRS Hot 103 Jamz on 6:55 a.m. on Fridays.) As an avid fan, were you able to watch the Chiefs’ major victory over the Patriots in Foxboro? Oh my gosh, yes. I watch every game. Indeed, my staff after the Patriots game actually tried to talk to me and get me to do stuff, I was like, “Not in any way close to a Chiefs game.”

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The Chiefs have been a passion of mine since childhood. When I was in law school in upstate New York, I would listen to the Chiefs games on streaming wifi in the Cornell Law School library. I would shout every now and then, and people were like, “What is he doing?” and “Who goes to the library for that?” What were your takeaways from the Patriots game with regards to the Chiefs’ chances in the postseason? If you can go to Foxboro and defeat Tom Brady and the Patriots on their home field, that means you can beat anyone in the AFC. So as we continue to work towards getting back to the Super Bowl, my thought is: the defense was firing on all cylinders, especially special teams, and certainly the offense, Patrick Mahomes and all the guys, are exceptional. I have great hope for what lies ahead. You’re not new to city politics, having served on the City Council, but how is being mayor different in ways you didn’t expect? [laughs] I think the volume of information, activity requests, and pressure is more significant than I thought it would be. It’s a lot cooler in some ways. How? I have a chance to go anywhere in the city and talk to folks of all different walks of life. That has really been a great joy. And not just in Kansas City. I’ve had the chance to go all around the region. I was in Iowa recently visiting with presidential candidates. Why? The US Conference of Mayors put together a presidential candidate forum. It was organized by Eric Garcetti, the mayor of Los Angeles, and we interviewed the candidates. I interviewed billionaire Tom Steyer. He was an interesting character. After my interview all these mayors were coming up to me and a reporter from the Atlantic, and they were saying, “You did a great job. You pulled out more of his personality than anyone ever has.” What were you able to pull out? Something that has challenged him as a candidate, and may doom him

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ultimately, is the relatability question, you know: “You were a successful hedge-fund executive, what gives you the qualifications to be president of the United States?” I asked him, “You went to Phillips Exeter Academy, you went to Yale, then Stanford. Your life has been in New York City and San Francisco. How do you relate to somebody from Kansas City or Waterloo?” I gave him a chance to talk about his family background and some of the passions that he has been working on for decades and I think it was interesting. I don’t know if he left with more votes, but he left with more people saying, all right, that’s a neat guy. Seeing mayors interview the candidates is really quite interesting. Senator Amy Klobuchar was interviewed by the mayor of Hartford, Connecticut, and I learned a lot about her. Like what? Mmmmmm, her progressive substance. If you watch the large debates, her role has usually been the realist, to say, “We can’t pay for your program, Bernie or Elizabeth. And instead I have to be the practical Midwesterner.” What I heard her talking about was more funding to build affordable housing. Looking at concrete solutions to violent crime problems, particularly gun violence—things that are good, core Democratic issues that I don’t know a lot of people have heard her express. How do you see the dynamics of the race? Bernie Sanders has always had his attention and his thing. Elizabeth Warren is known as this brilliant woman with these outstanding plans, which she is. And then Pete Buttigieg has been this kind of lightning-in-a-bottle exciting person, where Amy Klobuchar has just kind of gone a middle way. Another thing that is interesting for me is, we’ve seen people kind of drop out of the race, and it’s mostly been these talented women: Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris. We’ve got a lot of male politicians. There are tons of us—too many in some ways—and I hope voters at least take a chance to say, “She is very sharp. There is a good, reasonable option for us to consider before we just say, we’d have to go back to Joe Biden or something of that sort.” What the field also lost with Kamala Harris was one of only two black candidates on the debate stage. What is your impression of Cory Booker? You know, I’ve talked to him a few times. He’s been to Kansas City on occasion. He is a dynamic senator. I think he was an outstanding mayor, and I hope he can gain traction. There is something to be said for the fact that none of our candidates of color have been able to gain the amount of traction one might have otherwise thought. It makes you ask why. Does it bother you that the predominantly white states of Iowa and New Hampshire play an outsize role in winnowing the field? You know, so, I’m from very close to Iowa. I like Iowans, because so many of them move down here at a certain point. [laughs] I think both parties have made some strides, particularly looking at the importance of South Carolina and Nevada, two [early voting] states that are a good deal more diverse. Frankly, I would like to see the timeline shrink a bit, so that perhaps Iowa remains first in the nation to caucus and the New Hampshire primary is right after, but I’d

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like South Carolina and Nevada to be in that same first-two-weeks conversation. I think it is very troubling seeing folks get almost starved off because of a poor performance in Iowa. And I’d say this: Particularly if you look at the Republican side, Iowa is important, but it isn’t everything. Senator Cruz won the Iowa caucuses in 2016. Mike Huckabee has previously performed very well in Iowa, and it didn’t have a long-term impact on our 2012 race, with Mitt Romney winning the nomination. Iowa is important, and I like the retail politics, but I wish it was in a slightly more diverse place. I think the way we can do that is allowing South Carolina and Nevada to increase in influence. As the mayor of a large Midwestern city, what are you looking for in a president? What can be done in the White House that would support your work in Kansas City? Lots. You always hear people say, a mayor doesn’t have much power, the mayor is the pothole person. Do you think it can be more? Yeah. If you look at my mayoralty, I think we’ve shown that the mayor is more. Right? From dealing with housing, to gun violence to transit, there are big, substantive things we can do. So where does federal policy help us? One, our agencies, how they work with local governments is key. So I would want to know, is there someone who understands that the Department of Housing and Urban Development does vital work every day in big cities and small towns throughout our country. I want somebody who understands that when we are dealing with organizations like the Environmental Protection Agency that they have a real impact of quality of life for people here in Kansas City. I want someone who is a person of ideas but also somebody who can get along with folks and somebody who has an interest in knowing how government works. I think too often we have folks that may just be flamethrowers, maybe looking to flip the table over in a system, but we’ve still got work to do the next day. Right? We’ve still got people who are waitin’ on the bus. And we need a president who understands the Department of Transportation and funding for things like TIGER [Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery] grants helped us fund rapid transportation in Kansas City. And have helped us change lives and wait times and business opportunities in Kansas City. Race continues to be an issue nationally and in the presidential primaries. There have been conversations about whether problems of poverty and crime in communities of color are caused by structural barriers or by insufficient role modeling or inadequate parenting techniques. Where do you come down on that question? I think there is nothing more important than addressing longterm, systemic inequality in our country and in our city. One of the things that inspired me to run for mayor was the fact that I’ve lived here for most of my life, and things happen, right? There is a buzz in Kansas City now, and that’s great. But the problem is that you go a mile or two to the east, and that fervor is lost. How do we make sure that we have lending institutions that are open in east Kansas City? How do we make sure that the public-school conversation doesn’t just surround a few nice charters, but that we

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care about our core districts? That we worry about our friends in Hickman Mills, who are having significant funding issues. Those are the sorts of things that I think are important. When I decide to endorse a presidential candidate, that is what I will be looking at: Is there someone that understands that long-term issue? I care less about one’s cool factor. I care a lot more about whether somebody understands that each day in America, the choices that we make— from how we’re funding the Department of Transportation to how we’re looking at infrastructure to finally prioritizing and caring about housing—will make a key and important difference. Your family and friends were already used to you having a supercharged schedule as a city council member. Has it gotten even harder as mayor to carve out time for a private life? It has. It’s one of those things where you realize that this is an outstanding opportunity, and I’m proud to do it, but you realize that the opportunity doesn’t come without some sacrifice. You lose anonymity. Being out to dinner, people walk up and say hello. That part’s nice but then there are others that want to hold the conversation for another five to ten minutes and that becomes a little troubling sometimes.

You know one thing that’s been cool? I’ve been mayor for about four months, and we’ve done so many things that people said we couldn’t do. We’ve taken key, substantial steps to getting free transit in this city. And I was running this morning with my police detail, which annoys them. [laughs] I was at about the intersection of Truman Road and The Paseo, and I was looking at this family, a black family, parents with two young kids. They’re putting coats on and bundling up. And I thought, “How cool is that that we can put money back in their pockets, that we can make a little step in life easier for them?” Everybody’s heard my story before, but I grew up with challenges, and some days, if you’re going through struggles, one thing just being a little easier can make a world of difference. Maybe that’s $80 more per month…

I’ve been mayor for about four months, and

That’s just rude. [laughs] Right. Particularly when, look, I’m trying to take my mom to dinner or catch up with friends. I’m not a married man, and that adds an intriguing dynamic of having the fortune or misfortune of dating while holding this position. Showing up somewhere with two police officers and people stopping you to talk just changes it. Dating while mayor has got to be a nightmare. I would not recommend it. [laughs] Most of the time, people are nice, but there’s a lot of pressure. There are other pressures as well. A couple of weeks ago I was sad because I was reading about more homicides in our city. And there are these issues that end up being something where there’s this great pressure because you really do feel the weight of it all on you. I have never found it persuasive when somebody who’s got an important job says something to the effect of, “Well, it was this way for three years and it’s a whole system” and all of that. That’s bull. People see their mayor and they want that person to have solutions and ideas, and when I don’t have them, I feel like I’m disappointing people and letting down our community. That’s why I work like hell and why I get disappointed like hell when it seems like we’re not being as productive as we need to be. Do you have any pets? No. Weird thing: You can probably tell by looking around the office, but I’m a plant guy. I have lots of plants in my apartment. Petting a dog or cat would be nice, but I tend to just sit back and stare at my plants sometimes if I’m at home and have a really chill moment. One plant of mine is like seven feet tall. I’ve watched it grow from baby plant stage, and it gives me great joy. Some people might think that’s weird, but if you’ve got a green thumb, I’m your guy. Kansas City’s bold move to become the first city to provide free bus service—a plan you spearheaded—exploded across the national media. What other initiatives are you excited about jumping into in the new year?

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we’ve done so many things that people said we couldn’t do. We’ve taken key, substantial steps to getting free transit in this city.”

That’s a lot when you’re trying to buy food and pay the electric bill. That’s right. That’s a lot. Maybe it’s realizing that if you’re a survivor of domestic violence that your abuser can’t walk around with a gun. And maybe it’s recognizing that if you’re a tenant who’s mad that for two weeks your hot water’s been out, and you called the landlord and nothing happened, and there’s a number you can call and there’s somebody there to help you. That’s the sort of thing that I’m excited about. In terms of the next step, I’ve said that local criminal justice reform is important to me. There are thousands of people walking around our city with marijuana convictions on their record, just for municipal ordinance violations, that I would like to see expunged. I want to continue to address the system of incarceration at the local level, because that’s where most people start a career in and out of incarceration. I want to see that there’s more treatment for people that need it, that we are not using our jails as mental-health facilities. I want to help people get out of that cycle of arrests that pulls you in, especially if you’re poor. You get a ticket, and then you can’t pay it, and a warrant is issued, and it escalates. I want to see us address that situation. It’s something I’m very, very excited about.

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Interview condensed and minimally edited for clarity.


Rethinking Resolutions SUSTAINABILITY + ACCOUNTABILITY ADD UP TO LIFELONG HEALTH

words by

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Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian


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t’s absolutely cringeworthy—the number of absurd New Year resolutions we’ve made over the decades to lose weight and get fit. Some of them never got traction and were but a memory by Valentine’s Day. Others were embraced whole-heartedly—we lost the weight and ran our first 5k—but then the whole shebang went off the rails. By Labor Day, we’d gained it all back and returned to our stressed-out, sedentary habits. Clearly, the word “sustainability” needs to apply as much to our lifestyles as it does to the environment. Another word that might help? Accountability. It’s time to rethink approaches to “healthy” living that do nothing but foster deprivation, frustration, and shame, and instead, focus on lifestyle changes that will set us up to succeed. Small adjustments built upon over time that are based on common sense, mindfulness, and expert advice tailored to our individual needs have a far better chance of taking hold. Take Paul Conrad for instance. Five years ago, the Kansas City native (now living in Valencia, Spain) was 80 pounds heavier. “My weight had been the major factor in every aspect of my life for as long as I could remember,” Conrad says. “I had gone to see my doctor, and she was starting to suggest medication for things like blood pressure and diabetes. When I asked her, ‘This is only temporary right? You don’t think I’ll need to take this forever?’ she just sort of looked at me and replied ‘probably.’ I was in my mid 20s.” Then he signed on with Josh Feagans, owner of Fitness Unlimited in Westwood Hills. The first thing Feagans did was encourage Conrad to make one change, outside of their gym workouts. “The first two weeks to a month, he just had me focus on eating clean, with no restrictions on how much I ate or counting of calories,” Conrad recalls. “From there he would slowly introduce new things like counting calories, hydration, meal planning, and a higher protein diet. “My key to success was a combination of actually

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seeing results and developing an understanding for exercise and nutrition. With the amount of misinformation and crazy dieting out there, it’s really no surprise that many fail or give up,” he says. “To this day, I still enjoy peanut M&Ms and KitKat bars. I just have to ensure that I don’t go hog wild with my indulgences.” Whether he knows it or not, Conrad is practicing intuitive eating, an approach to food that focuses on ending the cycle of chronic dieting and emotional eating, while adopting more mindful eating habits. Or as Ariel Johnston puts it, finding a balance between food and life without stressing over food or restrictive diets. “A lot of fad diets aren’t healthy for you long-term,” says Johnston, owner of The Tasty Balance Dietitian of Kansas City. “There isn’t necessarily a correlation between losing weight and becoming healthier. It’s about losing weight in a healthy way and replenishing your body with what it needs.” With intuitive eating, a nutritional philosophy that’s growing in popularity among dietary experts, the focus is often on adding to the diet. “Sometimes it’s more whole grains or more fruits and vegetables. You

Just because you eat unhealthy food doesn’t make you a bad person. It’s how we feel about ourselves when we eat that food.” — Ariel Johnston

should be adding rather than taking away,” says Johnston. The clients she’s had success with have changed their relationships with food and the way they think about it. “If I have a client who doesn’t want to allow herself ice cream or any candy or cookies or whatever, and then she gives in and has it, it starts a shame spiral, and she feels bad. Like she doesn’t have any willpower. The shame comes when you break that diet, and it’s harder to get back to eating healthy.” The shift toward truly healthy and sustainable eating, she says, comes when you stop categorizing food as good or bad. “Just because you eat unhealthy food doesn’t make you a bad person,” Johnston says. “It’s how we feel about ourselves when we eat that food. With high-protein, low-carb diets a lot of people think they’re going to cut it out forever. But how is that going to be sustainable and what happens when they start adding carbs back in. Is that going to create anxiety around the food?”

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ne Overland Park doctor, James Mirable, an obstetrician/ gynecologist, offers a way to lose weight quickly with a keto-style diet that transitions into a more intuitive eating approach once his clients reach their goal weights. His clinic, Mirabile M.D. Beauty, Health and Wellness, offers a

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three-stage, physician-supervised, program called Medi-Weight Loss that’s specifically tailored to each client via blood tests and a thorough physical exam. It begins with the acute stage—a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet to put clients into ketosis, a metabolic state during which the body lacks sufficient glucose for energy and burns fat instead. Clients are given a list of foods they should eat, recipes and meal ideas and have weekly appointments with staff nutritionists for accountability and diet modifications. They also get vitamin and fat-burner injections. Clients typically lose between 5 and 10 pounds the first week of the program, then, 2 to 3 pounds each week after that during the first month, according to Britni Briney, a nutritionist at the Mirabile clinic. Once they reach their goal weight, clients move on to a short-term maintenance phase during which calories are increased and carbohydrates are reintroduced and the body is kicked out of ketosis. This is the point where they’re learning a new lifestyle that can be sustainable. “These are things people are going to be eating the rest of their lives so we want them to be aware of how big servings should be when they do start incorporating these things back in,” Briney says. “So we go over portion sizes. A lot of patients do plan to keep a low-carb diet because they tend to feel better. But they don’t have too. We do stress a diet with not so much sugar and excess carbs.” The final step is the wellness phase where clients check in once a month to ensure they’re not falling back into old habits. Still, a piece of chocolate or a reasonably sized dessert are allowed now and then. Sustainability and accountability are just as important for the way we move our bodies as they are for what we put into them.

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eagans, owner of Fitness Unlimited, gets twice as many new clients each January than he does other months of the year, and they’ve all made resolutions, which is fine, but... “They should plan on it being a lifestyle change rather than a resolution, and easing into it,” says Feagans. “Maybe eating better or just starting a walking program—something you like doing, not something that is for a month and is difficult to sustain and, ‘I don’t have the time’ and ‘I don’t have the money.’ “It’s more, ‘I want this for a lifetime—the long-term better me, the stronger me, being able to see my kids grow up and my grandkids grow up,’” he adds. “That’s where, for me, as a personal trainer with one-on-one training, it’s a better way to go, because you’re held accountable—the appointments are set, you’ve committed to the financial aspects.” Feagans says his clients range from semi-pro and Division I college athletes to people over 50 who want to get back into shape because they consistently feel bad and don’t like having to be on medications. He creates radically different types of programs for each of those types of people. Whereas the athletes can jump right into hardcore, high-intensity programs, that’s not the case for most of his other clients “It’s amazing some people who come in here, they haven’t moved in a really long time,” he says. “They sit at a desk all day, and when we start our first session, within ten minutes, they’re spent. A big percentage of the population is really sedentary and not moving at all.” Feagans starts with an assessment of each client to pinpoint their physical strengths and weaknesses. Typically, he says, they have poor core strength and upper-body posture from sitting at a desk.

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“It’s strengthening those and incorporating cardio and strength training,” he says. “It’s really judging where they are—what they’ve been doing and not doing, then getting them to their goals.” He does it by tailoring a program to each of them that’s not so grueling that they hate it and want to quit. “We start with baby steps. You have to walk before you can run,” he says. “Within the first 30 days it’s amazing the results we see. Their energy levels are up, they’re sleeping better, they’re eating better. And then it gets better in subsequent months.” He’s also noticed that their confidence spikes, and they change the way they carry themselves.

My life is completely different now. It’s hard for me to even understand my former self and how much the weight was really holding me back.” — Paul Conrad

Conrad thinks there’s a big misconception that an effective workout and diet means being miserable. “Trainers at commercial gyms know this and will work people like dogs, even if it’s not optimal, so they feel like they’ve gotten their money’s worth,” he says. “Josh started me off with some light High Intensity Interval Training and plyometric, stuff that he knew I could do and later transitioned it to more core and strength exercises.” Conrad lost another 20 pounds after working with Feagans because he was able to incorporate and continue what he learned from their time together. “My life is completely different now. It’s hard for me to even understand my former self and how much the weight was really holding me back,” he says. “When I was heavy, I really couldn’t do anything that didn’t involve sitting for prolonged periods. Now I’m working and studying abroad, simply enjoying life. I’m happily in a relationship for almost three years, and we both find the time to go to the gym and workout together.”

Meaningful Mindfulness

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ne other lifestyle change that’ll help you get healthier is mindfulness. Not only does it force you to slow down a bit and eliminate stress, but it can also help you lose weight. In fact, mindful eating is the first thing that pops to mind for Shane Ledford, co-founder and mindfulness teacher at Meditate KC. “A lot of times while we’re eating, we have the TV on or are sitting at a desk and inhaling whatever it is,” he says. “With mindful eating, hopefully you’re not eating as much. Rather than gorge on a whole bag of chips, you’ll eat just 10 chips and really savor them.” Weight Watchers is now promoting mindfulness as part of a lifestyle, he adds, noting that it also helps with stress in general. “If you’re stressed you might tend to use drugs or alcohol,” he says. “But if you’re more internal and more mindful you might say ‘Yes, I’m having a bad day today, and I need to take a couple of breaths,’ and not reach for the wine or whatever it may be.” While there is scant scientific data on the health benefits of mindfulness, studies have shown that meditation boosts brain volume, memory, and satisfaction in relationships while decreasing depression, anxiety and blood pressure. Preliminary studies have also found that it might boost your immune system. So who’s to say some of these benefits don’t carry over to mindfulness, meditation’s less-intense offshoot, which can easily be incorporated into daily life. “You can wake up in the morning and sit with yourself for a couple of minutes before reaching for the phone or turning on the TV and saying, ‘Ok, I have a big day at work ahead’ then take a couple of breaths and go over what you have to do.” He definitely sees an uptick in people wanting to meditate and be more mindful at the beginning of each year. “There is a form of meditation where you can sit for four or five minutes, but it can also be a lifestyle, where when you’re cutting up vegetables you’re aware that you’re cutting up vegetables,” he says. “Or when you’re sitting at a traffic light, rather than reach for your phone and send a text because you have 30 seconds to kill, you sit with yourself. That’s what a mindfulness lifestyle is.” Ledford believes that humans were not designed to be constantly engaged— that we’re supposed to be taking breaks, but we’ve gotten away from it because we’re wired all the time. “People say they don’t have time to meditate, and I say ‘Ok. When you turn on your coffee pot, it takes about two minutes to brew. There are two minutes you can just sit rather than checking Facebook or turning on the TV and getting into all those distractions.’”

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The backsplash tile behind the cooktop is both classic and contemporary. The range hood is paneled to match the look of the cabinetry and emphasizes the room’s height.

Transitional, Traditional, Contemporary NO MATTER WHAT YOUR STYLE, THERE’S A KITCHEN FOR YOU

WORDS BY

Judith Fertig

PHOTOS BY

Aaron Leimkuehler

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Townhouse Living

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om Swenson’s “I want a kitchen island” prompted a major shake-up. To get that island and the open space it required, Swenson and his wife, Deb, sold their Prairie Village home and moved to the new Meadowbrook Park community nearby. They enlisted the help of Arlene Ladegaard of Design Connection, Inc. to make their open-plan kitchen work beautifully. The island, topped with a gray-veined Cambria Ella quartz, now allows for creating pizzas or rolling Swedish meatballs, a family favorite. It’s also where the couple enjoys weeknight dinners and entertaining guests. “I wanted all pull-out drawers in the lower cabinets,” Deb says. Pull-outs on either side of the Thermador cooktop hold cooking

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utensils and seasonings. Small appliances await the call to duty in their “garages,” pantry items can be found behind frosted glass doors, all out of sight. Deb sidestepped white cabinets in favor of Ermine, a Sherwin-Williams color that changes with the light. The walls in an up-tempo blue, Let It Rain, also by Sherwin-Williams, help create a look that is “transitional rather than traditional,” she says.

Design Connection, Inc. | designconnectioninc.com

Above: The frosted glass door to the pantry enlarges the space, but keeps the kitchen tidy. Top right: Special stainless-steel cubbies hold everyday utensils. Bottom right: The Swensons like their kitchen to feel clean and uncluttered. After morning toast and coffee, countertop appliances can be tucked back into place.

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Recessed lighting above the cabinets “illuminates the details and helps lift the ceiling,� says designer Lisa Otterness. Custom-designed corbels flanking the range are another Tudor detail designed by Otterness.

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T Above, top: The maple-wood island is stained “dark lager” to contrast with the cream-colored cabinetry. Above: The custom-crafted hutch repeats the island finish and is topped with the same quartz as the countertops. LED lighting highlights family treasures.

Trad Home

he 1935 Tudor tucked into the slope of a hill needed a refresh when Mark and Lorie Concannon arrived in 2017. “You get this feeling when you know it’s the right one,” says Lorie, not only about the house, but the kitchen inspiration photo she found on Pinterest. After talking with several designers, the Concannons connected with Lisa Otterness of Classic Kitchens Design Studio in Leawood. “We wanted to stay as close to English Tudor as possible,” says Lorie, and Otterness helped them make it live for today. Lorie was able to find the exact barley-twist hardware she wanted, and Otterness sourced the perfect Wood-Mode cabinetry in a creamy finish. The pale, custom backsplash continues the Tudor wainscoting except for the beveled tile behind the sleek Bertazzoni six-burner stove. The quartz

countertop lets the blue-and-white china tureen, antique-silver teapot lamp, and small paintings take center stage. The island adds a little bling with Silestone Mediterranean. “Living surfaces like marble or copper that can stain, scratch, or develop a patina can drive some homeowners nuts,” says Otterness. Lorie didn’t want the maintenance, which is also why she chose the barley-twist metal pendants—with no glass to clean— from the Ballard Designs catalog. With a ceiling painted Market Square Shell and the great room’s Palladian blue Pearl, both Benjamin Moore colors, the custom hutch designed by Otterness stands out. Its Gothic-arched glass front holds family heirlooms, while the buffet top showcases desserts at family gatherings. And everyone comes back for seconds when Lorie dishes out her famous biscuit-topped, deep-dish chicken pot pie.

Classic Kitchens | classickitchenskc.com JANUARY 2020

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The kitchen area marries a contemporary feel with comfort and intimacy. The custom-stained and glazed slab-front Portfolio cabinetry and the sleek Italian Futuro vent hood contribute to the drama.

D

A Chic Downtown Condo

ominic and Deni Cerasi met when they both worked for a company in Bonner Springs. Now retired, they recently blended their families of children and grandchildren with roots in two places. “We have one foot in Kansas City and the other on the East Coast,” says Dominic. They also fell in love with a kitchen they saw at a model home outside of Philadelphia, where they have a second home. At first glance, the kitchen in this new Kansas City condo didn’t exactly measure up—or spark joy. That’s when the Cerasis called in Geri Higgins at Portfolio Kitchen & Home. “She inspired us to build the kitchen of our dreams,” he says.

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They wanted a gourmet kitchen with a Wolf range. Because of venting restrictions in the condo, it needed to be a flat-top induction, which necessitated new cookware. But they love it. Dominic is an avowed “fish guy” and loves to cook salmon, mussels, and blue crabs. Custom cabinetry shines next to countertops of Polarstone Calacatta Vagli, a white quartz with veining that resembles marble. Bar stools from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams pull up to the island, while a glass-topped table with leather-and-chrome chairs anchors the end. “We didn’t want a formal dining room,” Cerasi explains. Deni’s workstation sits below glass-front stainless-steel cabinets

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and the espresso maker/coffee bar is never far away. When they’re in town, they’re flipping blueberry pancakes for the grandkids in the morning, watching the sunset towards the river in the evening. After living in the suburbs, city life agrees with them. “We can hop on the streetcar and go wherever we want to go,” he says, with plenty of goodies to bring back to their kitchen.

Portfolio Kitchen & Home | portfolio-home.com

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Top, left: A statement tile, Spanish porcelain with a dimensional metallic sheen, runs from countertop to ceiling on one wall. Above, top: Stainless steel-and-glass upper cabinets define the desk cubby. Above: The Wolf range features an induction cooktop.


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them feel like they’re part of the party. “One of my biggest fears with stopping drinking was that I would be disconnected from everyone and everything, and I actually found connection through my sobriety,” she explains.

Cocktails, Sans Alcohol

BEYOND THE BOTTLE

KANSAS CITY BARTENDERS’ ALCOHOL-FREE DRINKS MAKE A NIGHT OUT MORE ACCESSIBLE

words by

Kelsey Cipolla

After

Melissa Saubers stopped drinking three-and-a-half years ago, she had a realization: Social events are not designed for the sober.

“Part of the thing that kept me drinking, probably longer than I wanted to, was that I’m a very social person—I’m out and about a lot,” she explains. “I would go to events and parties and there were no alcohol-free options.” The founder of Cowork Waldo, Saubers and her entrepreneurial spirit set out to change that with Sans Bar KC, a company focused on handcrafted alcohol-free drinks. The Sans Bar concept originated in Austin, but when Saubers came across it on Instagram and reached out to founder Chris Marshall, he was all for bringing the idea to a new market. Saubers hosted her first booze-free bash New Year’s Eve 2018. Since then, Sans Bar popped up at spaces around Kansas City for events that show forgoing alcohol doesn’t mean saying farewell to fun. In fact, it allows more people to comfortably join in. Saubers notes that people opt for alcohol-free beverages for a variety of reasons, from their health to religious beliefs to wanting to get an early start the next day. Her goal is “to create a social situation for people who don’t want to drink for a night or for life.” In addition to her own pop-up events, Saubers helps facilitate alcohol-free spaces at events like the Plaza Art Fair where people can enjoy a refreshing sans alcohol cocktail in a space that also includes alcoholic choices. Sans Bar also caters private parties and charity functions, which has been the most well-received aspect of the business. People have been “genuinely appreciative” for providing an option that still makes

JANUARY 2020

Saubers isn’t alone in recognizing the power of alcohol-free cocktails. A growing number of bars and restaurants are also adding the drinks to their menus. “First and foremost, it’s our goal to provide the same level of hospitality to all of our guests, and that’s impossible to do for us unless we consider all of our guests’ different needs,” says Ça Va general manager Sarah Hogan. “It’s often not a lot of fun to be out with your friends and have no choice but water to drink.” The Westport favorite’s offerings are updated seasonally along with the rest of the menu and designed with the same attention and care. Some of Ça Va’s favorite regulars actually don’t drink at all, Hogan notes, and instead come in to experience the different booze-free cocktails. “I always try to encourage people to be mindful of the fact that if it sounds delicious, you can have it even if it doesn’t have alcohol,” she says. “I steer a lot of people who would drink and do drink toward some of our alcohol-free options because they’re delicious and they’re really thoughtful.” Adam Chase, Corvino Supper Club and Tasting Room’s lead bartender, has a similar philosophy. “Non-alcoholic cocktails have always been an important part of my cocktail program,” he says. “I think the non-alcoholic game needs to be just as dynamic as the regular cocktail menu.” One of his current favorites is the Low Tide, a tiki-style libation that uses alcohol-free aperitif syrup, passion-fruit purée, lemon juice and sugar. Another of the bar’s offerings, the Whoo Ha, Cherry Soda, is a throwback to soda fountain drinks with amarena cherry syrup. Non-alcoholic cocktails aren’t formally on the menu at The W in

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in the

BAG THE BEST BAGS OF THE SEASON SWING FROM ALL-CHAINED-UP TO SOFT TOUCHES photos by

LIGHT AS A FEATHER

Aaron Leimkuehler

INZI pearl-clasp feather clutch, $112.50; Trapp & Co. (Midtown)

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CHAIN OF COMMAND

Gucci Dionysus velvet shoulder bag, $2,490; Halls Kansas City (Crown Center)

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SPOT CHECK

Sondra Roberts plaid and pouf chain-link bag, $120; Webster House (Crossroads)

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BUCKET LIST

Neely & Chloe two-toned fringed bucket bag, $298; Halls Kansas City (Crown Center)

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WARM AND FUZZY

Leo Collective Yin Yang bag, $1,495; Market Assembly (Crossroads)

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MIGHTY PYTHON

INZI python-print crossbody with rhinestone fringe; $145; Trapp & Co. (Midtown)

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GENEROUS FLOOR-TOCEILING WINDOWS ARE JUST ONE OF THE WAYS THIS LOOSE PARK CONTEMPORARY MAKES THE MOST OF ITS STUNNING LOCATION

A View of the Park

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Left, top: A custom crystal pendant accents the double-height windows of the living area. Left, bottom: The walls opposite the windows are filled with art by Kara Walker, Sergio Suarte, and Brady Legler. Opposite: In the dining room, the Abbott table from the Douglas Jennings collection features a handcrafted metal base and a polished zebrawood top. Flower arrangement is from Studio Dan Meiners.

words by photos by

Patricia O’Dell Aaron Leimkuehler

E

ntrepreneurs and philanthropists Jason Holmes and Kevin Westrope were living complex and busy lives with homes in Dallas, Puerto Vallarta, and Union Hill, when they decided to simplify. Kansas City would remain their home base, but they were ready to create a spacious, light-filled home that would meet all of their needs. “We really wanted a place where we could entertain,” Holmes says. “We wanted easy, open spaces.” Their aesthetic is modern, but the look isn’t cold. Clean, sculptural lines, warm woods, and colorful fabrics and rugs create a space that is rich and relaxing, rather than sleek and sterile. When an empty lot


Above: In the family room, a pair of Christian Liaigre sofas upholstered in a rich, green mohair flank a vintage Charles Hollis Jones acrylic and glass coffee table. Holmes found the vintage Murano vase and had it converted into a lamp. Flowers by Studio Dan Meiners.

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Above, top: Easily accessible from any room on the first floor, the kitchen is a mix of warm walnut wood and sleek white cabinetry. Above, left: Windows line the hallway to the master bedroom. A Michael Eastman photograph of a Havana, Cuba, interior hangs on one wall. Above, right: The couple’s trio of dogs, from left: Stella, a mini goldendoodle; Kody, a toy poodle; and Cabo, a German shepherd.

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The lower level is home to a casual seating area, a workout room, and a sizable wine cellar. A contemporary wool and silk rug from Knotty Rug Co. softens the concrete floors.

near Loose Park became available, the couple decided to build. A few years ago, Westrope suffered a stroke that resulted in his needing a wheelchair. They wanted the home to be easy for him to navigate without taking on a sterile, hospital feel. They worked with Generator Studio to design a home that would incorporate their favorite pieces of furniture and art from previous residences, provide ample space for entertaining, and be sensitive to Westrope’s needs. The architects stepped up for the job. The house is sited to face a quiet residential street, but still has generous views of Loose Park. Double-height windows in the living room create a statement inside and out, while providing natural light throughout the public spaces on the first floor. A custom sputnik-like crystal fixture—that adds stunning sparkle day and night—hangs over an intimate seating area. The 1929 Steinway welcomes enthusiasts as well as accomplished performers. A large painting by the couple’s friend, artist Brady Legler, hangs nearby. Holmes and Westrope are enthusiastic and accomplished art collectors. Besides Legler’s work, the public spaces of the house include a Kara Walker painting, an Andy Warhol Marilyn Monroe lithograph, and photographs by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Herb Ritts, and Michael Eastman. The formal dining table, situated in front of the oil-rubbed steel two-story fireplace, is open to the living room. A glass canopy separates the first and second floor and lends an intimacy to the dining space. Joseph Jeup chairs

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Above: Walls in the master bath are clad in quartz Polarstone Calacatta Manhattan. Luxe surfaces are offset by warm, walnut wood custom cabinetry. Left: Black-and-white photos by Herb Ritts line the walls leading to the master bath. Opposite: In the master bedroom, the upholstered channel-back bed is adorned with linens from Terrasi Living.

upholstered in platinum velvet surround the zebrawood-topped table. The streamlined kitchen, which opens to a patio that overlooks the Loose Park rose garden, is an easy set up for cooking at home or hosting a large crowd of friends. A caterer’s kitchen nearby gives chefs and guests the space they need when Holmes and Westrope entertain. Deep, rich green mohair-upholstered Christian Liaigre sofas provide the perfect space for relaxing and watching television or visiting with friends. The entire house is oh-so-smart with lighting, sound, and security available by a touch of the screens on the men’s phones. An open stairwell encased in glass is an exercise in form and function. It’s steel and wood construction is sculptural and airy, despite the

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weight of the materials. An elevator is tucked discreetly behind. Holmes’s office is on the first floor. Rather than an opulent altar to work, it seems the epitome of efficiency. Its rich navy walls are made lively by orange leather chairs and a pillow sporting a jaunty Sig Lindberg print. A distinctive Hunt Slonem rabbit painting of a similar hue leans nearby. The first-floor master bedroom is comfortable, yet serene. It is a retreat from the men’s busy lives. Here, too, they have surrounded themselves with art both on the wall and underfoot. Legler’s final project for art school hangs by the bed and one of his rugs is underfoot. The second floor is home to four guest bedrooms, each with a private bath and a view of either the park or the courtyard. Two open-air second-floor decks offer even more views. The backyard is terraced toward the house with stone walls and natural plantings. This design, coupled with large windows in the basement, creates a room that has not only ample light, but a view

Above: A cozy seating area on the second floor leads to an outdoor balcony overlooking the park. The painting is by Lisa Grossman. Opposite: A custom, velvet-upholstered bed takes center stage in one of the guest rooms. Brass accents from the vintage lamps and photograph frames warm up the space.

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A VIEW OF THE PARK CONTINUED

WED WE EDD DDIN DING DI NG GS S Corporate Retreats | Private Dining | Events WWW.FIREHOUSEKC.COM

The home’s facade, a mix of materials—including Kansas limestone blocks, metal, and glass—is a cohesive backdrop for the contemporary landscaping by Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects.

of trees and plantings, which negate all unpleasant connotations often associated with “finished basement.” The couple also asked the architects to design a wine cellar that would accommodate Westrope’s wheelchair. “Kevin’s the oenophile,” Holmes says. “It’s his passion. I wanted him to be able to move easily and be comfortable in here.” While the basement has a utilitarian— and chic—polished concrete floor, there is also a home gym and a steam shower that provide a spa element and also enable Westrope to do his rehabilitation work at home. While Holmes sometimes wonders how the couple ended up with a little more square footage then they were planning, overall the house has suited their needs. “We love art and wine,” Holmes says. “We wanted to incorporate the pieces from our other homes, which we were able to do. We have fresh flowers brought in once a week, which we love. It’s all working.”

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Dine often and dine well.

THE IT LIST Architect Generator Studio generatorstudio.com Contractor Homoly Construction homoly.com Flowers Studio Dan Meiners danmeiners.com Rugs Knotty Rug Co. knottyrug.com

250

OF THE BEST KC RESTAURANTS

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Dining Guide

For the city’s most extensive restaurant guide, head to inkansascity.com/ eat-drink/dining-guide


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BIG 12 WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IS BACK! The Phillip’s 66 Big 12 Women’s Basketball Championship is coming back to Kansas City!! Featuring the Reading & Fitness Challenge presented by evergy, a Youth Night Celebration and fun ticket offers such as Brunch & Basketball presented by Veracity and the Lift As You Rise mentor event presented by Advent Health - there will definitely be something for everyone. Exclusive VIP Packages are available while they last!


cocktails, sans alcohol continued from page

85

Lee’s Summit, but bartenders embrace the opportunity to get creative when guests request them, says bartender Taylor Dumsky. “We go through essentially the same process for building a mocktail that we would a cocktail, which I think is really important—you don’t want to take away from that experience at all,” she adds. “Just because the drink is without alcohol doesn’t mean we can’t make it exclusively tailored to that guest.” The thirst-quenchers they end up crafting are influenced by what types of drinks the patron typically enjoys, what they’re in the mood for and any dietary concerns. Sometimes that might mean utilizing syrups and juices they have on hand for other cocktails or a trip downstairs for coffee or tea from sister bar and coffee shop Hand in Glove. One of Dumsky’s recent creations was a Gin Fizz, without the gin but otherwise using the same high-quality ingredients. “You essentially get the same product,” she says. “The wow factor is still there.”

NOW TRENDING Alcohol-free cocktails are a natural fit for Enjoy Pure Food + Drink, which caters to health-conscious diners and drinkers, many of whom may be trying to limit their alcohol consumption, says owner Staci Cross. When the Mission Farms spot expanded last winter, its bar program grew with the space and now includes a lineup free of refined sugar and syrups, relying instead on spiked fresh-pressed juices and sustainablyfarmed, low-sulfite wines. That ethos extends to the alcohol-free offerings, which currently include The Green Rose, made with cucumber, mint, ginger, coconut, rose water and agave, and the Rosemary Paloma, a blend of fresh grapefruit juice rosemary-infused agave and Enjoy’s metabolizing cold-pressed juice. “I wanted to make them as clean and as healthy as possible,” Enjoy mixologist Pressley Green says of the drinks. He experimented with a number of recipes and whittled the

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featured alcohol-free cocktails down to two for now, although more may make their way onto the menu over the summer. Green and Cross see people moving toward a healthier, more self-aware lifestyle as the reason for the growing popularity of alcohol-free cocktails around KC, whether that means drinking only on the weekends, participating in Dry January— an increasingly popular movement to ditch alcohol for the first month of the new year— or eliminating alcohol all together For Sans Bar’s Melissa Saubers, the decision to stop drinking was multifaceted. “I got to the point where alcohol was too centered—it was too much of a focus in my life,” she explains. “And when I started realizing that was causing anxiety and it was really interrupting me being focused and being productive and taking the best care of myself, I realized it needed to go.” These days, she sees a much greater sense of awareness about the benefits of sober living or being sober-curious taking root in our culture. For her, those benefits include an

improved immune system, increased energy, and renewed focus and clarity, along with some very simple upsides. “Waking up every morning without a hangover for the rest of my life is the best thing ever,” she laughs. Still, Saubers sees plenty of room for improvement when it comes to the social scene in Kansas City. Her goal is to get people thinking about alcohol-free accessibility, which she defines as “raising the awareness that alcohol-free options are needed everywhere, all the time.” She wants to help bars, restaurants and event planners understand the value of sophisticated alcohol-free options and how to present them in a way that gives them the same weight and dignity as traditional cocktails. In the meantime, she’ll keep mixing drinks and providing a safe, fun space around town at Sans Bar pop-ups. “I’m not sure about a permanent location,” she says, “because I think the benefit and the real magic of this is having alcohol-free options everywhere.”

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Flavor

IN KC

In the Kitchen BEANS AND GREENS BY

Cody Hogan

PHOTOS BY

A

fter an indulgent and overwhelming holiday season, I like to begin the new year with a little culinary simplicity. One of my favorite dishes at this time is a comforting bowl of braised beans and greens. At its most basic—cover dried beans with water and simmer until tender, adding greens (or not) at any point desired, season and serve—the restorative properties of this dish can seem nothing short of miraculous. In addition to being loaded with protein, soluble and insoluble fiber, and assorted vitamins and minerals, the dish is easy on the wallet and absolutely delicious. As a friend of mine says, it hugs you from the inside. I cannot count the pots of beans and greens I have prepared over the past two-and-half decades or the variations on this theme that I have experienced in assorted locales. The refinements that can elevate these two exceedingly versatile ingredients are expressed in countless ways from culture to culture, household to household. There are just a few tips to remember for preparing your own steaming bowl of comfort. First, not all dried beans are created equal, nor do they perform the same way. Second, beans don’t have to be soaked before using, but it does significantly speed up the cooking process. Really fresh dried beans—like the ones you collect from your own garden and use within a few months—sometimes sprout if soaked for more than 6 hours. You can toss or keep the soaking water for cooking the beans. (Some swear you lose nutrients when you toss the soaking water, others say you alleviate the flatulence factor—I’ve never noticed that much of a difference either way, but I usually change the water.) Don’t be afraid to experiment with different types of beans. Countless varieties have been bred throughout the centuries, each for particular uses. If your local market doesn’t have much of a selection, Rancho Gordo, an heirloom bean purveyor from Napa Valley has a stunning assortment (ranchogordo.com). The type of greens you use is a matter of personal taste and the seasons. Go with your gut.

JANUARY 2020

Aaron Leimkuehler

And lastly, I never cook just enough beans and greens—I always cook too many. Intentionally. Once cooked, you can take them out of the braising liquid and have an entirely new ingredient to work with (the liquid can be served on its own, or used as a soup base). I love beans at room temperature, dressed with oil and vinegar in a salad, perhaps with tuna or poached shrimp, seasonal vegetables or salad greens. They can be puréed and seasoned like hummus to use as an appetizer or dip, or the purée thinned into a creamed side dish in place of mashed potatoes, or turned into refried beans. And that is just the beginning. Did I mention they freeze beautifully? I love having a delicious quart or two of beans and greens in the freezer for an impromptu meal, or one that is easy to take to a friend who may need a little comfort. Braised Christmas Lima Beans and Escarole Rinse the beans (Christmas limas or giant Peruvian lima beans are a favorite of mine) and pick through them, discarding any irregular specimens. I usually cook anywhere from a half to full pound. Place them in a bowl and cover by at least two inches of water (use warm water if you’re trying to hurry things along a bit). Soak the beans, preferably around six or so hours, but even an hour or two will help. Discard the soaking water and place the beans in a spacious pot. Cover them by an inch or two of water and bring to a simmer. I like to add a bay leaf or two, but sage or savory would work as well. The beans, depending on size, variety, and age—the longer dried beans are stored, the longer it takes them to cook—will be done in as little as 45 minutes or could take as long as three full hours. I find one-and-a-half to two hours generally does the trick. When the beans have reached the desired tenderness (or just a little before if you want them to have more bite), remove them from the heat, season with salt, drop in a big rosemary sprig or two and finish with a glug of extra-virgin olive oil. Allow the beans to sit and absorb the seasonings for about 30 minutes. You can stop there and have a simple and delicious pot of

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Be IN the Know

beans, or continue with the greens as follows. As for the incorporation of the greens, that depends on the variety you have to work with, and the desired outcome. Sturdy or bitter greens like mustards, dandelion, chicories, collards, kale, and cabbage all benefit from long braising with the beans. An alternate approach to use with more tender greens—and my favorite technique—is to combine the beans and greens right before serving which yields a finished product with a bit more texture and freshness. To do this, wash and roughly chop the greens—escarole is absolutely perfect this way, but spinach is good, too. In a wide skillet with a generous pour of olive oil, sauté a few cloves of sliced garlic until golden, then add a big pinch of crushed red pepper flakes and briefly toast. Then add the still-wet greens and cover the pan with a lid so they steam a little bit. Uncover and toss the greens and season well with salt. Ladle as many of the beans as you want and some of their cooking liquid into the skillet with the greens and bring back to a simmer. You’re done. Serve immediately, drizzling with more flavorful extra-virgin olive oil and possible a grating of Parmesan, pecorino or other hard cheese. Serve with grilled bread or crackers—or just a spoon. Loaded with satisfying flavors, texture, and goodness, everyone is sure to appreciate this warm and nourishing expression of simplicity.

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In Your Pantry UNUSUAL BEANS Cranberry Beans AKA borlotti beans, these velvety wonders are thin-skinned, making them wonderful for cold-weather soups. Similar in appearance to pinto beans, they are the traditional bean in the classic Pasta e Fagioli. Available at Clearly Nature’s Own in Westport or online.

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Purgatory Beans

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Try these tiny, tender, Italian beans when you’re in a hurry and don’t have the time or patience for cooking other dried beans. Just skip the soaking step and simmer these little beauties with sage and broth or water until tender, then finish with a little sea salt and a drizzle of good olive oil. Available online.

Yellow Eye Beans Not-completely-white white beans. Meltingly tender and smooth textured, these are wonderful used for New England baked beans—or any baked bean dish for that matter—or refried beans. Great for absorbing other flavors. Available at Clearly Nature’s Own in Westport or online.

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THIS WEEK

Christmas Lima Beans AKA calico beans, described as having a more meaty “chestnut texture.” This variation on the traditional lima (its place of origin) is delicious cooked with a ham bone and a little rosemary for hearty soups or for use in salads. Available at Planters Seeds in the River Market or online.

Become an INsider JANUARY 2020

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Flavor

IN KC

T In Your Cocktail P.S. by

Kelsey Cipolla

JANUARY 2020

hanks to the well-preserved Art Deco charms of Hotel Phillips, stepping into the Kansas City landmark always feels a bit like traveling to a different, more elegant time. It doubles down on that throwback appeal with P.S., a speakeasy-style bar housed in a long-forgotten basement mail sorting room. Hotel employees lead you through a secret door and down hidden steps, delivering you to a dimly lit lounge filled with velvet and leather. The space feels secluded in a good way—after all, it’s not true to the speakeasy spirit if you could be easily discovered. Bartenders are happy to discuss the history of the place, but there’s also plenty to explore on your own: P.S.’s dark walls are decorated with nods to Kansas City’s rowdy prohibition past. The carefully controlled entry process ensures the bar is never too raucous. Ample seating makes it a cozy date night destination or a preor post-dinner cocktail. P.S. is especially lively on Thursdays, when A La Mode Trio or Alex Abramovitz & His Swinging Kansas City Jazz Band can often be found performing, adding to the sense you’ve slipped through the years to a clandestine jazz club. Although the look and feel may evoke the past, the cocktails never feel stodgy. Even the classics get an interesting twist. The house old fashioned

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deviates from the tradition recipe with Amaro Nonino, a grappa-based Italian digestif, honey simple syrup, and black-walnut bitters. The PS Margarita is similarly full of surprises with the addition of a frothy egg white. The bar’s original cocktails are equally fearless, willing to take a swing with big, potentially polarizing flavors. The El Lobo is the rare cognac-based cocktail, partnering the brandy with mezcal, spicy Ancho Reyes liqueur, honey chili simple syrup, and mole bitters. On the other side of the flavor Venn diagram, Beyond the Tuscan Wind is a lighter, more streamlined drink, with gin and roasted balsamic pear purée. P.S. also serves up a small selection of beer and wine, and a substantial list of bourbons, but the focus is undeniably on mixed drinks. In that vein, while there are a few snack options, you’re better off making a reservation at the hotel’s Tavernonna. Brent Grinder, Hotel Phillips’ director of food and beverage, offers some insight

into the cocktail creation process. Grinder has lately been drawing inspiration from an adage that comes to mind during the hotel’s many weddings: “Something old, something new, something borrowed...” (Something blue, it seems, will not be making its way into any recipes.) “When it comes to this time of year, I think of spirits and cocktails that remind me of tradition, comfort, family and friends— spirits like American bourbon and island rum infused with aromas of baking spice, pipe smoke, and wood,” Grinder explained. “I also think of incorporating ingredients such as egg, dried fruits, tropical fruit, baking spices, and citrus.” Those flavors come together in the Forbidden Mai Tai, a cocktail currently on P.S.’s menu prominently featuring Batavia Arrack, a classic punch building block made from fresh sugar-cane juice and fermented red rice, alongside Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum.

Forbidden Mai Tai

1 ounce Batavia

1 ounce Smith & Cross

¾ ounce Dry Curacao ½ ounce orgeat

1 ounce mai tai blend (3 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part lime juice)

Shake the ingredients together and serve in a Collins glass. Top with a grapefruit peel for extra flair.

hotelphillips.com/ps-speakeasy.html

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Flavor BY

IN KC

Kelsey Cipolla

CAFE CORAZON

In Culinary News

EVEN IF YOU haven’t yet stepped into Café Corazon, you’ve probably taken note of the striking, richly colored mural outside the Westport spot (1721 Westport Road). The artwork is a fitting calling card for the café, a celebration of Latin culture inspired by owners Miel Castagna-Herrera and Curtis Herrera’s own families. Café Corazon specializes in Latin American coffees, showcased in classic coffee beverages and specialty drinks such as the Spicy Mayan Mocha and Horchata Latte. The couple also shines a spotlight on yerba mate, an herbal tea made from the leaves and twigs of the Ilex Paraguariensis plant. For maximum authenticity, the café sources from brands in Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and southern Brazil. Relatively uncommon in the U.S., the brew combines the strength of coffee with the health benefits of tea. Drink up! cafecorazonkc.com

Pomp and Ceremony: Inaugurations, First Families and Beyond Pomp and Ceremony: Inaugurations, First Families and Beyond looks at what we wore to those political events: the inaugurations, balls, parties, and campaign rallies. Everyone has a garment they have kept because of its relationship to a political event or belief. For many years, the Museum’s auxiliary The Women’s Division was intent on collecting the best pieces of fashion worn to “big” events, paying particular attention to ceremonial wear. Some of the items acquired by the Women’s Division have belonged to a few 20th Century First Ladies.

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Kansas City Museum at the Historic Garment District* 800 Broadway Blvd. Kansas City, MO 64105 Open Wed-Sat: 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Special Exhibition Fee: $5 per person Pomp and Ceremony: Inaugurations, First Families and Beyond is on view through April 25, 2020

kansascitymuseum.org *satellite location while Kansas City Museum at Corinthian Hall is closed for restoration and renovation

#inkansascity JANUARY 2020

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WOMEN’S SPORTS AWARDS CELEBRATION PRESENTED BY

Join us!

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2020

GRAND BALLROOM | KANSAS CITY CONVENTION CENTER The WIN for KC Women’s Sports Awards Celebration presented by Burns & McDonnell recognizes local girls and women for their contributions and achievements in sports in our community. We celebrate barrier breakers, recognize female high school state champions, and honor passionate proponents in our community.

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WITH SPECIAL GUEST

Elena# Della Donne AND EMCEE, DANI WELNIAK (KCTV 5)

Purchase tickets and tables at winforkc.org


Flavor BY

IN KC

Kelsey Cipolla

SONE ZE YA SWA DIT AND MEE NGE had a long road to open

In Culinary News

their Burmese comfort food restaurant last spring. The couple fled Myanmar as Rohingya refugees and eventually settled in Kansas City, where they became part of the New Roots for Refugees program, which helps refugees with agricultural experience adapt their skills for Kansas City’s climate and business landscape. Their hard work paid off. Dit and Nge’s restaurant in Northeast KC (4432 St. John Ave.), Sone Ze Ya, serves up Mohinga, Burma’s national dish comprised of a lemon-grass infused fish broth with noodles and a crispy bean topping, along with an array of fried rice dishes, sambusas (think of them as samosa’s flakier cousin) and some unforgettable fried chicken with sticky rice, all at prices low enough to encourage seconds.

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JANUARY 2020

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How New Year’s Resolutions Sabotage Health Goals—and What to Do Instead By Katy Schamberger

3 WAYS YOU CAN MAKE LASTING, HEALTHFOCUSED CHANGES

The end of a year—and the start of a new one—always brings with it a focus on making New Year’s resolutions. And typically, at least one of those resolutions is health-focused. But what if setting these supposedly helpful intentions is actually backfiring? What if these so-called goals are inadvertently impeding your progress? First, let’s look at why so many New Year’s resolutions turn into roadblocks instead of stepping stones. Then, we’ll look at some subtle yet impactful changes you can make to set yourself up for success that lasts more than a few weeks or months.

1) Set goals, not resolutions. If you already think of resolutions as goals, you’re not alone. “Yet New Year’s resolutions—especially if they’re health-focused— and inadvertently feel limiting or confining. You’re focusing on what you can’t eat or do,” says Priest. Instead, frame your intentions as a goal or a promise. Dr. Priest recommends breaking your goal down and asking yourself the ‘why’ behind the promise so you can set smaller, actionable goals that will keep you focused along your journey. 2) Understand your health—all of it. Your health is made up of so much more than numbers like weight, blood pressure, and BMI, although those (and other) numbers are certainly important. Before you set your goals, ensure you have a comprehensive understanding of your health. Then, you’ll also ensure you’re addressing the root causes behind the health changes you want to make. “Let’s say you want to lose weight,” Priest says. “Is

• Why are your goals important to you?

• How will achieving your goals positively influence your life?

• Do you have someone

who can assist and hold you accountable? Or do you need someone in that role?

3 REASONS NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS SABOTAGE YOUR HEALTH GOALS 1) They’re too big. The clean-slate feeling that comes with a new year can make it tempting to make several significant lifestyle changes at once. Yet trying to make too many changes at once can be overwhelming, says Corey Priest, DC, founder of Overland Park-based In2Great Functional Medicine. “Be careful of a big resolution,” he says. “Stats prove year-after-year that only eight percent of people actually accomplish their resolutions, which can lead to feeling depressed, stuck or defeated.” 2) There’s more to health than food and exercise. What you eat and how much you move undoubtedly play a significant role in your health and wellness. But there’s so much more to consider. “Living your healthiest life has many components to it—spiritual health, nutrition, movement, mindset, community and social connections are all areas that can have a dramatic influence on your immediate and long-term health,” Priest says. That’s why it’s so important to start with a holistic view of your health, then use that information to create personalized goals. More on that in a moment! 3) Quick fixes are a trap. Anyone who’s worked toward a health goal knows the key word is “work.” It’s difficult to make long-lasting changes because they require us to change habits. Instead, it’s tempting to get drawn into a quick fix—a magic pill, drink, or diet that purports to solve all of your health challenges in mere days or weeks. Spoiler alert: There’s no shortcut for hard work. It’s going to take time, commitment—and some sacrifice—to reach your destination (and stay there). So tell those magic solutions to take a hike!

Here’s some bonus advice in the form of a few questions to ask yourself as you set your health-focused goals:

• Be honest: are you

ready to make a change in your life?

• Are you working on a realistic timeframe?

the weight gain due to poor diet or lack of exercise? Maybe it is and those changes for the better won’t be harmful. But what happens when you’re addressing those aspects yet not losing weight? There could be hormonal imbalances, GI or digestive complications, or perpetual toxic exposure from the environment. Maybe you’re dealing with a chronic infection, or are unable to appropriately manage your stress. When you understand what’s happening in your body, you’ll also know the why—and then you can define how you’ll get there.” 3) Prepare to break habits. No matter your health goals, it’s likely you’re going to have to break yourself of longtime habits to see lasting success. Candidly, this isn’t easy to do. “Breaking a habit can feel impossible because we have to actually change our brain structure to change our habits,” Priest says. “The neurons in our brains work together to form connections over time. When we repeatedly perform a task, those connections get stronger, forming a habit. Recognizing that interaction is a critical step toward making desired changes.” in2greatkc.com

If you’re struggling to answer any of these questions or looking for a way to get a comprehensive understanding of your health, good news— In2Great Functional Health is ready to help. They can run a complete diagnostic so that you have the data you need to set goals designed for your health, your body, your journey. And they’ll support you every step of the way. As 2020 approaches, forget the resolutions. Instead, it’s time to make—and keep—a promise to the most important person in your life: yourself.


Flavor BY

IN KC

Kelsey Cipolla

DUCK & ROLL

In Culinary News

WHAT DO an Australian bakery and a Cantonese-style eatery have in common? Co-owners Rob and Kate Joseph and Erika Viktor, who opened Australian bakehouse and café Banksia in 2018, are now branching out with Duck & Roll. The concept is inspired by Rob’s years of doing business in Hong Kong, where outdoor food stalls famously cook up delicious dishes. The restaurant aims to combine several specialized food stalls into a single location where diners can indulge in Chinese barbecue meats and a wide selection of dumplings and take advantage of a wok bar serving up rice and noodle dishes made to order. The new Main Street location (4800 Main St.) is next door to a second Banksia outpost, letting your palate hop between two continents in no time. duckandrollkc.com

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IN KC

Reservation for One PIRATE’S BONE by

Kelsey Cipolla

I

photos by

n a city where cooking meat is elevated to an art form, the plant-based food at Pirate’s Bone feels radical. The Crossroads restaurant spun out of Pirate’s Bone Coffee, a Brookside shop run by Zaid Consuegra that eventually evolved into a vegan eatery. While experimenting with different dishes, he found a hit in his plant-based burgers and decided to fo-

JANUARY 2020

Aaron Leimkuehler

cus on the concept at this new space with business partner Lydia Palma. Pirate’s Bone sits on the corner of 20th and Main, the side of the building swirling with a funky mural. It’s the restaurant’s most distinctive design element—inside, the aesthetic is low-key hipster diner, with a smattering of plants and one long mint-colored counter running the length of Pirate’s Bone where visitors sit on stools that offer a view of

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the open, bare bones kitchen. It would be easy for Pirate’s Bone to come off as hipperthan-thou, but friendly service and a laid-back vibe make it feel welcoming. Whatever your day-to-day diet may look like, there’s an overwhelming sense of acceptance and compassion for devoted vegans to curious carnivores and everybody in between. As a strangely alluring mix of music play (ABBA’s One of Us followed by a norteño track), a heavily tattooed guy can be heard telling his friend, “No vegan restaurant has better fries than this place.” This might seem like a strange thing to latch onto at a vegan restaurant—after all, aren’t most fries vegan by nature? But the guy is not wrong. Although the fries could be crispier, they’re packed with flavor. The truffle fries are tossed with just the right amount of truffle salt and chives, while other variations top the dish with Pirate’s Bone chunky, satisfying guacamole or melted “cheese.” It makes sense that fries are done well—they’re half of the menu. The other half is dedicated to the restaurant’s signature sliders served on activated charcoal buns. The sesame seed-speckled black buns don’t have a particularly distinctive flavor to match their striking look, but they get the job done all the same. Pirate’s Bone offers several sliders that mimic the texture and flavor of meat, including a classic burger with a Beyond Meat patty and a breakfast burger with faux sausage, egg and cheese. But it really shines when it leaves the idea of meat alternatives behind and fully embraces plants. The beet burger is a riot of colors and flavors with a vivid magenta grilled-beet patty topped with guacamole and pickled cabbage. The earthy sweetness of the beets, which stay together surprisingly well, is an ideal base for bolder flavors, like the tangy pickled cabbage. The black bean burger features a patty of grilled black beans and carrots, again topped with guacamole, plus jalapeños, which threaten to dominate the slider with spice, but stop just shy of crossing the line. Pirate’s Bone also offers a few other culinary odds and ends, such as a vegan hot dog, plantains two ways, and a popular “Waffle Wednesday” special, starring activated charcoal waffles. True to its roots, the restaurant still serves up java, including its signature coffee with Mexican spices, cane sugar, and a shot of milk, as well as nitro coffee and matcha tea. The horchata, made with plant-based milk, is on the sweeter side but not sickly, with flecks of the generously doled-out cinnamon clinging to the sides of the glass as you sip. Diners can also grab a Jarritos Mexican soda in one of a rainbow of colors from a case that sits next to a cooler full of paletas, ice pops made with fresh fruit that serve as a refreshing, bracing dessert. (Flavors rotate, but the chili-mango shouldn’t be missed if it’s available.) Food is speedily prepared—eliminating meat will have that effect—and each item rings in at under $5. Funny how after a quick, satiating meal that costs less than $20, life without animal products suddenly seems a lot more appealing. plant-based-burgers.com

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Faces

IN KC

Rightfully Sewn Golden Gala THE BIENNIAL fundraiser supports Rightfully Sewn’s seamstress training program and fashion designer residency program. The gold carpet was rolled out for guests, and opulence was the trend in attire. Attendees enjoyed DJ Christian Noni and live music by The Phantastics. Pierponts at Union Station provided a sumptuous culinary buffet and The Roasterie sponsored the coffee bar. For more photos go to inkansascity.com/events.

photos by brian rice

JANUARY 2020

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13th Annual

CHALLENGE YOUR FASHION PRESENTED BY:

Join us for a special night filled with fashion and fun — for a great cause.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 2020 6 p.m. at the Kansas City Marriott Muehlebach Downtown This event benefits the YMCA Challenger program, which provides children with diverse abilities the opportunity to play sports, learn new skills, build confidence and make new friends. Event highlights include: • Cocktails and dinner • Fashion show with Challenger athletes and buddies, plus current and former professional athletes from your favorite teams • Live and silent auction • Live music from Lost Wax

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Faces

IN KC

IN Kansas City’s December Issue Release THE IN KANSAS CITY crew threw an

issue release party for the December “Holiday Issue” edition of the magazine at Industrious, the glam new coworking office space on the Country Club Plaza. We were joined by some of the metro’s influencers and innovators for a night filled with socializing and a bevy of phenomenal food from the Savoy at 21c, plus Riax Baixas wine and handcrafted cocktails from Lifted Spirits. For more photos go to inkansascity.com/events.

photos by brian rice

JANUARY 2020

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IN KC

BURNING DESIRE

CAPTURE THE SCENT of the Southwest in winter. From Incausa, a collection of incense with a warm and woody fragrance handcrafted from makko, a Japanese cedar, and Palo Santo in four scents—Cedarwood, Sandalwood, Sage, or Piñon. Find it in the apothecary at Sage Center for Yoga & Healing Arts. Seven incense sticks per box; each stick burns for approximately 50 minutes. Incausa Incense, $16, available at Sage in the Crossroads.

JANUARY 2020

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Profile for KC Media

IN Kansas City January 2020  

Kansas City's new mayor, Quinton Lucas, sits down for an exclusive interview and discusses his plans for 2020. January is the month to pract...

IN Kansas City January 2020  

Kansas City's new mayor, Quinton Lucas, sits down for an exclusive interview and discusses his plans for 2020. January is the month to pract...