Page 1


Table of Contents September 2014

Welcome to Issue Seven of INK & ARROWS. Thank you to everyone that submitted their work for this issue. Also, thank you for your patience on getting this issue out. It was a lot of work and I’m so happy that I can finally share the issue with everyone. I hope everyone enjoys this issue and that it inspires you in someway. - Alexandra Lucas

06 14 20 26 34 42 50 56 60 72 78 86 94 98 106 113

Kim Wells Lucien George Katherine Miller Lottie Woolnough-Rai Elliot Phillips Carmel Debreuil Kelsey Arrington Hari Lualhati Nikita Kaun Olivia Walthall Marija Avramovic Jared Tuttle Bree Henderson Ophelia Mercedes Beka Creative’s Index


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre. I’m an 18 year old illustrator based in the US. I enjoy illustrating pretty much anything, but lately food has been the main theme.

What makes you want to create? It’s sort of hard to explain, but I just always have an itch I need to scratch when it comes to just doodling something or creating another illustration.

When did you become interested in illustration? I’ve always loved doing art ever since I was a kid, so it was a constant passion of mine and I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.

Tell me about your creative process. It starts with sitting down and watching Netflix, and then I get a random idea for something that I think would look cool on paper. Usually whenever I think of an idea it stems off of the title of the print I have in my head. I like to dive head first into a project because I find that as I’m working on something other ideas pop

Where do you get your inspiration? Inspiration comes in many forms to me whether its movies, music, food, or what I see in my surroundings.

inkarrowsmag.com // 7

into my head that I would’ve never thought of adding to a work. It’s all about going with the flow and seeing where your mind takes you. What is the most difficult thing about illustration and watercolor painting? The easiest? I would say the difficulty about illustrating and incorporating watercolor is that I often want to add so many details to a piece and I can’t always get the exact look that I’m going for. However, I love the fluidity of watercolor and how easy it is to work with.


What is the most challenging project you have ever taken on? I think with any artist the most challenging part about creating is getting over that constant voice inside of your head saying that your work isn’t good enough. I often have to power through illustrations constantly wanting to just give up, but I often find that the work I struggle on the most ends up being my absolute favorite.

artists’ like me a platform to share our work to people and hopefully have it serve as an inspiration to other’s who also aspire to create. What are your favorite mediums and tools to use and why? Watercolor paints are fantastic the whole process is really soothing to me for some reason and I love how the paints can really transform your canvas.

What are some things you Describe your most couldn’t live without? rewarding experience you’ve My art supplies definitely, family, friends, (insert had because of you work. Honestly, your magazine is cliché response here). pretty high up on my list. It’s nice to know that there Do you have a set place are people like you who where you always work? If want to draw attention so, what does that space to artists that have these looks like? amazing talents. Your hard I use every space that I work in putting together Ink can really; if it has great and Arrows Magazine gives lighting I’m going to work it.

Do you listen to music or watch movies/tv shows when working? If so, what do you usually listen/ watch? All the time. I’m usually listening to my Pandora on shuffle with a sprinkle of Kendrick Lamar, Sam Smith, Arctic Monkeys, 80’s music… just to name a few. Also, I love watching high school films from the 90’s and I’ve recently started watching this show called The Bridge. What would be a dream project? It would have to be something that lends itself to art, so I would love to do an album cover of some sort.

Random Questions: Who are some of your favorite creative’s? I really love artists Julian Callos, McKay Felt, Heather Mahler, Kemi Mai, Hellen Jo, Cameron Garland, Natali Martinez, Alex Scott, Jimmy Marble, the list really goes on and on.

Favorite places to go where you live? I really just like to wander around my own city there’s not really a set place because I love everything about where I live.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 8

Favorite book and quote. Favorite book has to be Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane and a favorite quote would have to be everything that Tom Haverford has ever said.


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about your creative genre. I am a photography student situated just outside of London. With no real niche, I photograph emotional portraits, beautiful scenery and anything in between. What do you think is the most challenging aspect of photography? Photography presents it’s challenges in it’s own photograph. The dilemma is in staying true to nature of the sight before you. What is your favourite subject to photograph? For me, i would have to say capturing the female form in natural light. When photographing girls, they usually tend to be tense initially which can sometimes provide you with some slightly awkward looking shots. As the photo-shoot goes on, they ease up and a natural glow comes out. It is only at the highest point of serenity, can you capture the most natural looking and yet vibrant shot. The adventure to that moment is amazing. What would be your dream project? Although i consider myself a photographer, i find myself loving cinematography. Finding myself constantly dreaming up concept videos for songs and albums on a regular basis, i think it is about time i venture down that route or at least draw influences from it.

What do you hope people will see when they look at your work? Emotion. Emotion from my subject. Emotion from my scenery. Emotion from my colours. My emotion. My work from now through to tomorrow and beyond needs to highlight the one universal human quality of emotion. All i want to do as an artist is to present empathy and sympathy. What inspires you most? The past and the future. As a creative, my work will become the talk of the future as well as the talk of the past. The idea of past and future excites me, as it is the subjective behind any question that can be asked about my art. What part of photography do you find most rewarding? There is not a prouder moment in photography then setting up a photoshoot off the back of a vision or dream and capturing the shoot, looking at the monitor of your DSLR and seeing your vision in the screen exactly how you envisioned it without the need for Photoshop or post-editing. I live for self-satisfaction.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 14


ink & arrows // issue seven // 16


ink & arrows // issue seven // 18


inkarrowsmag.com // 19


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre.

MY NAME IS KATHERINE MILLER AND I’M CURRENTLY PURSUING A BFA IN PRINTMAKING, GRADUATING DECEMBER 2014. AT ITS MOST BASIC, PRINTMAKING IS TRANSFERRING AN IMAGE FROM ONE SURFACE (A WOODBLOCK, METAL PLATE, SCREEN, STONE, ETC.) TO ANOTHER SURFACE (PAPER, FABRIC, ETC.) WITH INK. THAT SAID, THERE IS AN INCREDIBLY WIDE RANGE OF WORKS CLASSIFIED AS PRINTS AND INFLUENCED BY THE PRINT THAT GO BEYOND THESE TRADITIONAL BOUNDARIES. When did you become interested in printmaking?

IN HIGH SCHOOL I DID AN EXTREMELY BASIC LINOCUT THAT INTRODUCED ME TO THE CONCEPT OF PRINTMAKING, BUT IT WASN’T UNTIL COLLEGE THAT I REALLY BEGAN TO KNOW AND LOVE IT. What is your first memory that you have of being an artist?

I REMEMBER MAKING A LOT AS A KID. NOT ALWAY “ART” IN THE FORMAL WAY. ALSO LOTS OF OUTDOOR CHALK DRAWINGS AND IMAGINARY SECRET ROOM FLOORPLANS AND CHRISTMAS ORNAMENT PAINTING.

Where do you get your inspiration?

I GET EXCITED ABOUT MAKING WORK WHEN I’M AROUND OTHER PEOPLE WHO REALLY LOVE TO MAKE WORK. ENVIRONMENT, IT CRUCIAL FOR ME. WORK MADE BY INSPIRED PEOPLE MAKES ME INSPIRED! What is your creative process?

MY WORK TENDS TO EVOLVE ORGANICALLY, DESPITE MY BEST EFFORTS SOMETIMES TO BE DIRECT. A LOT OF WHAT I MAKE FLOWS OUT OF ACCIDENTS OR MINDLESS CREATION. I FEEL LIKE I AM CONSTANTLY UNEARTHING MY WORK AND CONCEPTS RATHER THAN SELF-GENERATING THEM. IT’S AS IF I AM SLOWLY BECOMING AWARE OF WHAT WAS THERE ALL ALONG.

What is the most difficult thing about printmaking? The easiest?

PRINTMAKING CAN BE A STRANGE WAY OF WORKING BECAUSE IT IS SO INDIRECT. AS YOU ARE WORKING ON YOUR MATRIX (BLOCK, PLATE, ETC.), YOU KNOW THAT THE SPECIFIC MARKS YOU ARE MAKING ARE PRECURSORS TO THE ACTUAL INK MARKS THAT WILL BE ON THE FINISHED PIECE. SO YOU NEVER KNOW EXACTLY WHAT YOU’RE GOING TO GET UNTIL YOU ACTUALLY PRINT YOUR MATRIX. THAT REALITY IS EQUAL PARTS EXCITING POTENTIAL AND FRIGHTENING UNKNOWN.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 22

What is the most challenging project you have ever taken on?

I’VE UNDERTAKEN A COUPLE REALLY LARGE COLLABORATE PRINT INSTALLATIONS WITH FAIRLY SHORT DEADLINES. LOTS OF ALLNIGHTERS ENSUED. COFFEE, 2AM TACO BELL, MORE COFFEE, ROTATING 20-MINUTE POWER NAPS, THE WHOLE NINE YARDS. THE COLLABORATIONS TURNED OUT GREAT THOUGH AND I’M REALLY PROUD OF THEM! Describe your most rewarding experience as a printmaker and artist.

I MOST VALUE CREATIVE EXPERIENCES THAT HAPPEN WITH OTHER PEOPLE. RECENTLY I RESTORED A MID-CENTURY CHANDLER & PRICE LETTERPRESS AT THE FIRECRACKER PRESS IN ST. LOUIS, MO. THE EXPERIENCE OF BRINGING AN OLD, RUNDOWN PRINT MACHINE BACK TO LIFE WAS MADE SO MUCH MORE REWARDING BY WORKING AROUND THE OTHER PEOPLE IN THE SHOP! I’VE ALSO REALLY ENJOYED GOING TO ANNUAL PRINTMAKING CONFERENCES AND PARTICIPATING IN SEVERAL WORKSHOPS. ALL OF THESE EXPERIENCES ARE EXTRA VALUABLE TO ME BECAUSE OF THE PEOPLE I WAS WITH.


inkarrowsmag.com // 23


What are your favorite mediums and tools to work with and why?

OF THE TRADITIONAL PRINT MEDIA, INTAGLIO PROCESSES ARE MY FAVORITE. LATELY THOUGH I’VE BEEN APPROACHING PRINTMAKING AS A CONCEPT RATHER THAN TECHNIQUE. I AM USING LAYERING, REPETITION OF MARK, TRANSPARENCY, STENCILS, AND MATERIAL ELEMENTS OF PRINTMAKING TO CREATE NONPRINT WORK. THE RESULT HAS BEEN A SERIES OF SMALL ENCAUSTICS AND SCULPTURES THAT HOUSE COPPER, DRY PIGMENT, ETC. BETWEEN STRATA OF WAX; A LARGE REPETITION-BASED INSTALLATION THAT INVITES THE VIEWER INTO A SPACE FOR BEING, ALLOWING THE MIND TO WANDER PAST THE WORK ITSELF; AND OTHER PIECES BORN FROM A PRINTMAKER’S UNDERSTANDING OF CREATION.

What are some things you couldn’t live without?

SKETCHBOOK, COFFEE, HANDS. Do you have a set place where you always work? If so, what does that space looks like?

I HAVE A SMALL STUDIO SPACE ON THE CAMPUS OF MY UNIVERSITY THAT I’VE BEEN DOING MOST OF MY RECENT WORK IN. IT’S PRETTY MESSY, THERE’S STUFF TAPED TO THE WALLS AND I ALWAYS HAVE MULTIPLE PIECES GOING AT ONCE. TRADITIONAL PRINT WORK HAPPENS IN THE UNIVERSITY PRINT STUDIO, WHICH IS DECKED OUT FOR A PARTY. STREAMERS, 2-D SCREEN PRINTED BALLOONS, PAPER CHAINS FROM OLD PROOFS (AND THE OCCASIONAL THREATENING POSTER TO STUDENTS WHO DON’T CLEAN UP AFTER THEMSELVES.) AIN’T NO PARTY LIKE A PRINT PARTY!

Do you listen to music or watch movies when working?

MUSIC, YES. MOVIES, NO. I GET TOO DISTRACTED BY THE VISUALS OF A MOVIE. What would be a dream project?

ANYTHING INVOLVING INTERDISCIPLINARY COLLABORATION, THAT IS MORE THAN I COULD HANDLE ON MY OWN.

RANDOM QUESTIONS: Who are some of your favorite creative’s?

AT THE MOMENT, WOLFGANG LAIB, MARGARET KILGALLEN, KOICHI YAMAMOTO, ANNA KUNZ, LESLEY DILL, KARLA HACKENMILLER, AND ESTHER PEARL WATSON, AMONG OTHERS. If you could travel anywhere in the world for free, where would you go?

AS LAME AS THIS SOUNDS WITH THE WORLD AT MY PROVERBIAL FINGERTIPS, THERE’S ACTUALLY A LOT OF THE UNITED STATES I’D LIKE TO SEE. I’VE LIVED IN THE SAME STATE MY WHOLE LIFE AND THUS ALWAYS RELISH CHANCES TO SEE NEW PARTS OF THE COUNTRY.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 24

What are your favorite colors?

IN MY WORK I’M REALLY DRAWN TO NEUTRALS AND REDS. AND I GUESS EVEN MY WARDROBE HAS A LOT OF BLACK AND GRAYS. What are your favorite books?

“SONG OF MYSELF” FROM WALT WHITMAN’S LEAVES OF GRASS, ART & FEAR BY DAVID BAYLES & TED ORLAND, TRAVELING MERCIES BY ANNE LAMOTT, AN ILLUSTRATED LIFE BY DANNY GREGORY, BRAVE ON THE ROCKS BY SABRINA WARD HARRISON, THE FEATHER ROOM BY ANIS MOJGANI


inkarrowsmag.com // 25


ink & arrows // issue seven // 26


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about your creative genre.

Hello! I’m Lottie and I’m an illustrator, animal lover and movie enthusiast. I’m from Cheltenham, and currently studying in Plymouth, UK. I mostly enjoy drawing animals and lettering with pens, ink and watercolour paint to create cute and commercial illustrations. I also hand make a lot of products such as zines and stickers that feature my designs.

How did you become interested in illustration?

I’ve loved drawing since I was a kid and it’s the one thing I’ve consistently been very passionate about. I also watched a lot of cartoons growing up and I really think that this was the start of my interest in illustration. I’ve always known that I wanted to have a career in art, but it wasn’t until I did my Art Foundation year that I discovered the appeal of illustration and decided to specialise in it.

What inspires you to not just make art, but to be a better artist?

The main things that inspire me to make art are movies, music, nature, books and people around me. I currently live with three other illustration students and we’re all very good at giving each other constructive criticism. It can also get a little competitive at times, but I believe that this is healthy because we

are constantly pushing each other to produce work at a higher standard.

What do you find most difficult about illustration?

I sometimes get a bit stuck at the beginning of a new project when I’m trying to come up with ideas to get me started. Once I get that spark and have a few ideas that I like, I feel much more confident and just run with it, but getting past that wall right at the start can be quite difficult.

What advice would you give to someone looking to go into illustration? I’d say go for it! It is the most amazing feeling when you create a piece of work that you are truly proud of and having the chance to make a career out of a talent and a passion that you have is pretty great too!

Describe your most rewarding experience as an illustrator.

So far, the most rewarding experience I’ve had as an illustrator was the first time that I received a commission from someone who I don’t know personally. It was really nice to know someone had stumbled across my website and appreciated my work enough to ask me to create something original just for them.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 28


What do you hope to accomplish as an illustrator once you’ve finished school?

I’d really like to be a freelance illustrator and work for a variety of clients in order to expand my creative skills. I’d also like to develop “Lottie Draws” as a brand and create more products that feature my designs to sell.

How would you describe your style?

My artwork is usually a combination of detailed, concise line work and bold colours, inspired by nature and popular culture.

What are your favorite tools to use?

For the majority of my work, I use Uni Pin fine line pens, Winsor & Newton watercolours, my Wacom tablet and a lightbox. Posca pens are super fun too.


Off Topic Questions: What are your favorite songs/bands at the moment? Your Graduation - Modern Baseball Constant Headache - Joyce Manor Navy Blue - The Story So Far This Lonely Morning - Best Coast Vitamins - Milk Teeth

Favorite website?

I know I’m behind, but I finally got round to getting a Pinterest account recently and it’s so good for finding inspiration and other awesome artists.

What is your favorite place to go? Aquariums.

Favorite app?

I’m pretty addicted to playing Monster Dash at the moment.


ink & arrows // issue seven // 32


inkarrowsmag.com // 33


ink & arrows // issue seven // 34


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre. my name is elliot phillips, i’m a recent graphic design graduate from plymouth college of art. i guess that makes my creative genre design although like a lot of people

I don’t like to limit

myself by that, it’s all about experimenting.

When did you become interested in graphic design & printmaking? i was completely clueless about graphic design until i walked into a college open day at cross keys in wales when i was about

16

with the intention of signing up for product design. the course

leader talked me round to sign up for graphic design instead and

I’ve never looked back.

Do you think knowing printmaking and illustration helps with your design work? definitely, the more skills that you practice the more well

rounded your work becomes. things like drawing and sketching should always be a part of any creative process. knowing

printmaking means you get to print everything yourself, see it through to the end and as a result make it your own.

inkarrowsmag.com // 35


What do you find yourself getting inspired by?

everyday stuff really, i own a lot of books (photography/

illustration/design) but if i hit a creative block that’s not where i turn. getting out of the house is always a good idea, actually seeing things rather than on a screen or a page makes all the difference.

What makes you want to create?

i just really enjoy it, i always have. over the years i’ve had a lot of support and encouragement from my family and teachers and now it’s something that just comes to me naturally i guess.

Tell me about your creative process. How do you go about starting a project? nine times out of ten the first idea that i have for a project is scribbled down very poorly on the back of a flyer or napkin.

ideas always come to you when you least expect it and one of my biggest flaws is not being in the habit of carrying a sketchbook

as often as i should. my desk is always cluttered with scraps of paper and then from there piece of work.

I develop the idea until it’s a finished

What is the most difficult thing about graphic design? The easiest?

one of the most difficult things is dealing with people that don’t

give credit to your profession, resisting the urge to lash out at

people that say things like “all you do it drawing though, i could do that.” you get used to it but it’s still my least favourite thing about design. i’m not sure what the easiest thing is, maybe there isn’t one.

What is the most challenging project you have ever taken on? one that comes to mind is a group project that i was part of last year, the idea was to create a campaign that raised awareness of the cuts being made by the government that affected art funding.

As part of the promotion we made colourful origami out

of our flyers and spread them around the city, i can remember making something ridiculous like

200

origami cranes in about one

and a half days. i didn’t sleep much and developed some pretty bad blisters.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 36


ink & arrows // issue seven // 38


Describe your most rewarding experience you’ve had as a designer.

probably my most recent project “roaring south” as i got to

work with a lot bands that i really like. putting out a record was something that was on my bucket list and i got to finally do that and pull it off so that was something of an achievement.

What are your favorite mediums and tools to use and why?

at the moment i’m trying to use my wacom tablet a lot more to

get my digital drawing up to scratch and i’m really enjoying that. i can draw something out very roughly, scan it in to my laptop and then draw over it with my tablet and get really nice and clean sketches.

What are some things you couldn’t live without? materialistically and family.

- my music collection. realistically - my friends

Do you have a set place where you always work? If so, what does that space looks like? i’m not fortunate enough to have a studio or anything like that

so all my work gets done in my bedroom, at my desk. as for what it looks like, in a word

- chaos.

Do you listen to music when working? If so, what do you usually listen to? i always have music playing, it’s the one thing that really

motivates me to work. recently on my turntable i’ve had a lot of really heavy and aggressive hardcore, it’s a good way to wake

yourself up and get your blood pumping. my most recently played have probably been expire, totem skin, pariso, abolition and backtrack.

What would be a dream project?

probably collaborating on a deathwish inc. release, that record label never puts a foot wrong musically or aesthetically. or

maybe starting a clothing line, that’s something else i’ve always wanted to do but it is a very competitive market especially for start up brands.

inkarrowsmag.com // 39


ink & arrows // issue seven // 40


Who are some of your favorite creatives?

jacob bannon. he is the coolest guy that i’ve had the pleasure of meeting and his work ethic and style are really something to be admired.

What is the most important thing you’ve learned at college/ university? that your degree and the prospect of working for a design

agency in london is not the be all and end all of your career.

Favorite places to go where you live. tiki bar

&

diner, it’s the local venue and it’s always full of

friendly people. going down to the hoe (seafront) is always good to chill out as well, there’s some great views.

Favorite drink?

i’m a sucker for energy drinks but they’re so bad for you, i’m trying to cut them out of my diet.

inkarrowsmag.com // 41


ink & arrows // issue seven // 42


INTRODUCE YOURSELF. I am, Carmel Debreuil, a Canadian Australian artist from New South Wales. I live in a small north coast village with my rockstar husband and two sons. I paint at least five days a week unless I’m child wrangling or sneaking drinks from the band’s rider backstage. Painting keeps me sane, but not serious.”

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR INSPIRATION? My original inspiration came from going through old family photos. I found this photo booth strip of my two older brothers when they were kids. The younger of the two had these horned rimmed glasses and a stripy t-shirt. He always used to wear cowboy boots and shorts and crazy hats. I remember him being a real crazy kid, always teasing me and wrestling and being a real larrikin. I totally loved hanging out with him even though he was a bit of a terror. I sat there looking at a few of these photos and wished that there had been more.

I found an old pair of horned rimmed glasses and put them on my youngest son and suddenly he looked just like my brother. I dressed him up and took photos and off we went! Now I have a whole cast of muses. Now I come up with an idea that I want to try, generally before bed or when I’m driving, and then think of which of my muses suit it. All of them have big boisterous personalities, although I have a couple now, who have a bit more of a reflective side too. Sometimes I’m inspired by a play on words, sometimes by a place I’ve visited, and sometimes it’s just the piece of wood. I never really am at a loss for ideas or inspiration because I write down ideas and can go back to my list if I’m feeling like I don’t know what to do. But mostly I just wish I could clone myself so I could get more done!

WHAT IS YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS? I start by going to the hardware store and picking out specific sheets of plywood. I drive the old

inkarrowsmag.com // 43

men that work there crazy because they always have to take the whole stack down with a forklift and they are baffled as I go through each piece one by one looking for beautiful knots and patterns. Then I cut the sheets to certain sizes and shapes according to the grain and frame them with a backing frame to prevent warping. I sand and seal all the pieces so even getting ready to paint is a bit of a process. Then I sketch out an idea and go for it. I live on the east coast of Australia so mostly I paint out on our big deck listening to the ocean, although I’m building a studio in the backyard at the moment. I generally start painting at about ten in the morning and work non stop till about four or f¬ive. Then it’s time to make dinner and hang with the kids. In the evening I do research and PR and emails with clients. Even though it’s a really creative life, it’s really disciplined. I think the more you do, the more creative you become. Creativity breeds creativity!


WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PROJECT TO WORK ON? My favorite project? Hmm, that’s a tough one. I guess one of my all time faves was one of my son riding a giant squirrel. Australians pronounce squirrel like skweeril and I keep telling them it only has one syllable. So on the top of the painting it says SKWERL. Just like it sounds. I loved the sense of humour and the story and how the kid was so casually riding a squirrel. It was really the painting that defined my style and it was the first one where I felt I was doing something really original and really me.

WHAT DO YOU FIND MOST REWARDING ABOUT PAINTING? I really get a buzz out of finishing a piece. I like starting them and seeing them evolve but there is something really nice about standing back and knowing it’s done. It’s cool to see what was an idea in your head turn into something someone can hang on a wall. I also love that this is how I support my family and that somehow being an artist has become a way of life. I love that I can work from home whenever I want. In the winter here I live in my PJ’s and in summer I live in my bikini. Not many jobs have that dress code!

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST CHALLENGING PROJECT YOU’VE TAKEN ON? I suppose commissions are the most challenging projects because you are trying to incorporate someone else’s ideas into your own work. I love doing commissions and I love the input, but often they will mean that I’m using the client’s children or old

photos of them as children as the muse. I always want the character to look like the subject the client has given me because for them it makes the piece really personal. Luckily I used to do portraits in Paris for a living so I’m pretty good at getting a likeness and working under pressure. I don’t get too stressed though, really, because if it doesn’t turn out, I can just stick it on a bonfire and start again. Challenges are more often trying to figure out how to work with a “mistake” and make it happen. I’ve had a few paintings that I was really unhappy with and then got a bit experimental with because I was ready to chuck them. Then I tried a few things, changed a few colours and they sold straight away. So now I look at any challenging work as an opportunity to push my self a bit further.

WHAT DO YOU ULTIMATELY HOPE TO ACCOMPLISH WITH YOUR ART? I just want to keep producing and evolving and tweaking my style. I want it to be instantly recognizable as mine. I’m very ambitious and hard working and prolific. Painting is like a creative compulsion. I used to have to be “in the mood” to want to pick up the brushes, but now I think about it before I go to sleep and I can’t wait to get started every morning. I think the kids in the paintings are going for world domination! I guess the biggest goal is to just keep the ball rolling and continue doing this forever!

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE MEDIUMS AND TOOLS TO USE? COLORS? I only paint on wood. I started years ago on masonite circles, then did a bit on canvas but now it’s ply or nothing. I find canvas

ink & arrows // issue seven // 44

kinda boring and delicate. I love the plywood being so solid and coming to the party with some character. It’s definitely an integral part of each piece that I do. I love working in acrylics because they are so quick drying. I’ve got a bit of ADHD so I’m very impatient and can’t handle the slow drying time of oils. I love love love my poscas too. They are Japanese acrylic paint art markers. They make these beautiful clean lines and I love things looking crisp and tidy. I’ve always drawn and painted with lots of lines and I love that I can just go and go and go. With a brush you always have to add more paint and it interrupts my flow! I have a stack of brushes but no particular favorite one. I prefer them fairly firm though. I’m not super fussy, as long as the tool does the job. My favorite colour is red and I use it a lot in backgrounds, although yellow and orange are very popular with my Australian clients. It’s tropical and warm here most of the year so bright colours seem very natural. When I was in Canada visiting my family last year I did a series of paintings that were inspired and influenced by the landscape there. It was a really cold winter with heaps of snow and all the paintings were whites with pastel pinks and blues - like a sunrise on a snow covered prairie. People in Canada could really relate to them because the are really familiar with an all white landscape but here they have a harder time fitting in. Many Aussies have never even seen the snow so they don’t relate to them the same way, I think. I loved doing them but I love colour so I tend to naturally want to paint big bold backgrounds. I also love gold. I would paint myself gold if I could. I’m like a magpie and I love things all shiny and sparkly!


ink & arrows // issue seven // 46


WHAT WAS THE GREATEST THING YOU’VE LEARNED FROM STUDYING WITH YOUR FATHER? (CANADIAN ARTISTS MARCEL DEBREUIL?) My family is all really artistic, especially my dad who taught me all my basic skills. He passed away a couple years ago and came to me in a dream not long after telling me that I had to get back into painting, that I should be teaching art, find a group of other artists and go for it. I hadn’t been producing much of anything for about five years when the kids were little and had been using that as an excuse. So after that dream I got into it again and it’s just gotten bigger and bigger. Dad taught my sister and I how to do portraits when we all lived in Paris and we worked six days a week from morning til dark drawing faces. We learned little tricks and techniques to make the portraits beautiful, but also how to draw a crowd, how to market our work and how to deliver a professional product. I think I did over three thousand portraits and in that time had only one refusal. You just take it on the chin and move on. We learned how to please a client but also to be confident in our skills. Dad always encouraged our creative side but I feel what he gave me was this foundation in realism that isn’t taught much anymore. No child is just told to express themselves on the piano. They do scales. You learn the alphabet and spelling and punctuation before you write your novel. I think teaching kids portraiture, the colour wheel, perspective, proportion, and things like that is integral to freeing their imagination. Even Picasso was a master of realism before he evolved into his trademark style.

I see so many artists drawing naked women with no arms, legs or heads and if you get an honest answer out of them, it’s often cos they can’t draw the rest. These things can and should be taught so that when people only draw one eye on a face it’s because they chose to, not because they can’t get the second one to match! I always appreciate that dad taught me like an old master would teach an apprentice. Practice, discipline, study - those things are the keys to creativity and freedom!

DO YOU EVER GET ARTISTS BLOCK? IF SO, WHAT DO YOU DO TO OVERCOME THE BLOCK? I don’t really get artists block. I used to but that was because I was not producing much at the time. I’d get some free time without the kids and just stare at a blank canvas. I had ideas and feelings in my head but it seemed hard to start. Now I get heaps of ideas and write them down. My house is littered with little bits of paper with words jotted down. I also email my self so I’ve got an inbox full of unread messages. If I’m ever feeling bored or like trying something new, I just refer to those and off I go. If there is ever a day that I’m not feeling really creative, it’s often because I just need a break. I can go for a walk down the beach or go camping or hang out with friends. Painting is quite solitary for me, so sometimes it’s good to socialise and let loose. I also get inspired by new muses. I’m always keeping an eye out with the neighbourhood kids for the one who is turning into a bit of a brat. I love the ones with a big attitude and a funny character. Finding a new little fairy like girl who talks like a trucker is magic!

inkarrowsmag.com // 47

MOST OF YOUR PAINTINGS INCLUDE PEOPLE – WHY IS THAT? I’ve always drawn people. I have a drawing that I did when I was three and it was of a prince and princess holding hands. I’m a very sociable person and I love being with people. I really don’t get inspired by drawing apples or trees. I love that people have character and personality and expression. I don’t feel the same passion for abstract work. I want things to have a level of reality but a sense of fun too. I feel that by drawing people, especially little people, it’s like telling a funny, quirky little story.

WHAT MAKES YOU WANT TO CAPTURE THE INNOCENCE OF CHILDHOOD IN YOUR WORK? I had a great childhood. We grew up in a hippy commune, then a Native Canadian reservation, then in a seedy part of a city, a small western town and on a big rural property. We didn’t have a tv so we read books and played outside and had a dress up box.

WHAT WOULD BE A DREAM PROJECT? My dream project would be to turn my little characters into an illustrated book and then an animated movie. I have the plot outline completed and am working on the story chapter by chapter. It’s a bit dark and twisted, but it’s a great little adventure story and is all about the journey of this little boy and his ugly dog. I am hoping to get book finished this year. I’ll create heaps of paintings to go with it and they will become the illustrations. I’m super excited about it, but it all takes time. Invent cloning please!!


RANDOM QUESTIONS:

FAVORITE ARTISTS?

DREAM VACATION?

I love so many artists old and new. My top ten would be Mucha, Audrey Kawasaki, Sylvia Ji,Gerhard Demetz, Koralie and Supakitsch, Toulouse Lautrec, Tamara de Lempicka, Gabriel Moreno, Natalie Rak, and David Lozeau. They are all really different but very inspiring in different ways.

Put me on a tropical island in a grass hut. If I had the internet and painting supplies I could live there all my life. 5 things you can’t live without? Family and friends, laughter, music, my computer, and perogies.

WORDS YOU LIVE BY? (FAVORITE QUOTE) I like “The earth with out art is just eh.” I saw it on the internet and it’s true.

TEA OR COFFEE? Sweet milky Earl Grey or a can of coke.

TWO PEOPLE YOU WOULD LOVE TO TALK TO DEAD OR ALIVE. My dad firstly cos I would just love to have a conversation with him. He died of an aneuryism and by the time I flew from Australia to Canada he was already in a coma. I know we had this conversation in the dream, but I would love to sit around and talk to him about art

ink & arrows // issue seven // 48

and maybe get him to teach me to use oils properly! And the second was a toss up between Wes Anderson, JeanPierre Jeunet or Baz Lurhmann and Catherine Martin. Can I pick them all? I just love their movies and his art direction. I would one day love to have my kids come to life in an animation. I already have the story half written. It’s and adventure kind of like the Wizard of Oz but with giant pigs and squirrels. Maybe one of them could make it! Now that would be cool!


inkarrowsmag.com // 49


INTRODUCE YOURSELF; TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE GENRE.

My name is Kelsey Arrington. I am a photographic and mixed media artist. I currently attend the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, MI. I started off with an interest in fashion photography. When I entered college, I wanted to be a commercial artist but the deeper I dove into the world of fashion, the more I discovered that it wasn’t for me. I opted for work in the conceptual realm of photography instead; often drawing inspiration from dreams, psychedelia and research of various cultures.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE PROJECT YOU’VE WORKED ON.

My favorite project to date has been my senior thesis. This project focuses on the Maasai tribe who reside in Kenya and Tanzania. For my thesis, I studied the Maasai culture, their customs and beliefs. Using Barbie

as a foundation, I customized dolls to look like Maasai women and built miniature sets to express what I have learned about the Maasai. This project has been incredibly rewarding; allowing me to become immersed in an African tribe and giving me the opportunity to create miniature worlds. I’ve spent 6 months working on it so far and will be continuing the project through December.

WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO ACHIEVE WITH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

I want people to be inspired by work, to learn from my research­based art and be in awe at my more surrealistic projects. Career­wise, I would love to travel the world showing my work at various galleries and museums. Eventually, I want to attend grad school to study the history of photography and start a career as a curator.

inkarrowsmag.com // 51


WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO NOT JUST MAKE ART, BUT TO BE A BETTER ARTIST?

I have many sources of inspiration but the greatest has probably been my friends. I love to surround myself with other creative people. My boyfriend has influenced me tremendously over the last two years. He is a graphic designer. One of my best friends is a musician and pop artist and the other is an art director. I have friends who paint, dance, sing, tag, etc. They all inspire me to be better and to look at things from a different perspective. I continue to grow and thrive because of the creative energy that encapsulates me when I am around other artists.

WHEN DID YOU KNOW YOU WANTED TO BE A PHOTOGRAPHER?

When I was 10 years old, I received a Polaroid 600 camera for my birthday. That gift had a profound impact on me. It has been 12 years and I still shoot with the same Polaroid camera. I didn’t know that I wanted to be a photographer at age 10. I was more interested in being a ballerina/fashion designer extraordinaire (even though I can’t dance or sew at all). Although my decision to pursue photography didn’t come until my high school years, I certainly fell in love with it at age 10. Photography always felt so “freeing” to me...so liberating. When I was bored, I’d take pictures. When I was sad, I’d take pictures. It seemed to be the cure for any emotion I was experiencing.

WHAT IS IT LIKE TO SEE THE WORLD THROUGH A CAMERA LENS?

Without my camera, I am oblivious to details. My camera allows to be break

down the world into small pieces and analyze those pieces individually. I feel naked without my camera sometimes, vulnerable. Photography has become a voice of confidence allowing me to express my thoughts. Simultaneously, it is also a shield of protection. My camera allows me to observe the world without having to be in direct contact with it. It’s a beautiful experience.

HOW DO YOU COMBINE CULTURAL CONTEXT WITH YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

My cultural upbringing and experiences influence my work a lot. I am an African American artist who is often intrigued by the rich history of African tribes, mythologies, masquerades and folklore. I am also influenced by the psychedelia/ hippie culture as well; using artwork of the 70s and my bohemian lifestyle as a source of inspiration for more surrealistic art. Random Questions:

WHAT IS ONE PLACE YOU WOULD LOVE TO TRAVEL TO?

I would love to go to any country in Africa.

FAVORITE MUSIC AT THE MOMENT? I’ve been obsessed with FKA Twigs, Coco Rosie and Deastro lately.

COFFEE OR TEA?

Herbal/non­caffeinated tea. Caffeine makes me super anxious.

FAVORITE PLACE TO GO? I don’t have a favorite place to go in the physical world. My dreams are wondrous though...

inkarrowsmag.com // 55


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about your creative genre. I am Hari Lualhati, born year 1985 in the Art Capital of the Philippines, Angono, Rizal. At an early age, I’ve showed a lot of interest in painting and have joined and won several painting competitions (became consistent school representative). I’ve obtained a Degree in Fine Arts in University of the Philippines, Diliman year 2006 and graduated with honors (Cum Laude). After my studies I started working in Manila, Philippines and later in Hong Kong and Shenzhen China as graphic artist and product designer. Now, I’m based in South Africa. Since 2012 I have received numerous awards from different international competitions like: The Palm Art Award Certificate of Excellence 2012 in Germany, “Art Takes Miami: 1001 Artist Project 2012” in Miami USA, have been selected for the 1st Biennale of Art of Palermo 2012 in Italy and was shortlisted on Ken Bromley Art Supplies Cover Competition 2012 in the United Kingdom, one of the Top Ten Winners of Vivid Arts Network “Conscious Creation” 2012 International Fine Art Competition in New York, to name but a few. I have also been featured and have been on the Cover of different International Art Magazines. 
 My art is heading towards passionate figurative compositions built up by expressive line strokes and bold brush techniques necessary for certain emotions to shine through. Together with this is my rich devotion to details that elevates the artwork’s aesthetics. The profound visual narrative and the techniques used

aims to reveal the invisible within the visible. 
 Though I take into consideration the use of different techniques, I give more value to the feelings that I put into my work. I paint with my heart. For me, a painting is successful if it can make anyone who would look at it feel the emotion that it’s intended to give. It is like delivering a clear message by touching the hearts of the viewers.

What inspires you? I’m inspired by the Beauty of Emotion that can be felt in whatever form; for example: a story I’ve heard, personal experience, a beautiful sight or a taste of food that reminds me of a significant event in my life. For me, the greatest power of an artist is his capability to influence the emotions and touch the hearts of the people through his artworks.

What has been your favorite project to work on? I use the human body or to be more specific naked figure as the subject matter for most of my paintings as it represents raw beauty. For me, like music, it delivers a universal message.

What is your greatest hope for your artwork? My greatest hope for my artwork is for it to make a good connection to whoever will look at it, to touch the hearts of as many people as possible. I also hope my artwork could be seen by a wider number of people from all over the world.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 56


How do you combine emotion with each piece you work on?

What do you ultimately hope to accomplish with your art?

I choose subjects that I can relate to so that it will be easier for me to know the core feeling its supposed to give. During the process, the most important thing is that I paint with my heart.

I dream to exhibit my artworks to different parts of the world. Also to continue creating and developing my craft.

How do you believe your style has evolved over time? Ever since I was in Primary school up to my University days, I’ve always strived to capture the subject in a realistic style. But now I can say I’ve become more open by expressing myself through painting. Combined controlled and expressive brush strokes can be seen on my recent artworks.

What has been the most challenging project you’ve taken on? Capturing the right emotion is the most challenging part in doing any project.

What do you find most rewarding about painting? It gives me indescribable happiness whenever I finished a painting. I believe it is my destined purpose in life.

What is your creative process? I mostly use oil on canvas. The creative process starts with conceptualization. Once I’ve visualized my idea, I start painting. More often than not I find myself lost in my art as I go with the flow of passion running through my paintbrush. I call it: “Love made visible through Art.”

Random Questions: What are your favorite colors? Black and white

What words do you live by? Follow your heart.

Dream vacation? My dream vacation would be to go back to Europe and have painting exhibition there.

inkarrowsmag.com // 59


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre.. My name is Nikita Kaun, I was born and live in Saint-Petersburg, Russia. I’m 21 years old.

How did you become interested in this type of drawing?

I work in my present genre since February 2013, before that, for about 2 years I trying to become a concept artist. But this trying ended in autumn 2012 with depression and I had no will to ever draw again. But then I saw an artwork for a 2007 album called Deliver Us by the band Darkest Hour, drawn by John Dyer Baizley. This cover art totally blew my mind and I decided that I wanted do something as cool as this. In next month I received my first payment, earned by my art.

What inspires you? Who are some of your favorite artists? On an emotional level - something that I can’t say or that I feel deeply for. I let it go by drawing. Art therapy. About visual art - I always searching for new art blogs, tumblr pages, pinterest boards, at the same time trying not to stuck in swamp of clichés that live there. A few artists - Vania Zouravliov , he is totally number one, Baizley , Takato Yamamoto , David Choe , William Bouguereau , Alphonse mucha. I don’t find pop culture and politics really inspiring - Banksy and his followers leave me feeling indifferent. I’m not saying that he is bad artist and I actually really love his performances in NY.

What is your creative process?

Pretty simple - drawing sketch, then finishing it in graphic editor. 30 minutes of art and then 10 hours of work, Basically. Now, I start drawing actual paintings, and yes – it’s a lot harder. It gives you less control, costs more, requires all your attention, but it lets you feel yourself as a creator, who is doing real physical [tangible] things.

What is the most difficult thing about illustration? The easiest?

The most difficult part – trying not to break the laptop when the client wants you to make some changes in the artwork that will obviously spoil [change] the final result. The easiest? The start of the work, when you are unconsciously creating borders of concepts and techniques.

What is the most challenging project you have ever taken on? Trying to make something new in every new artwork. It’s kinda hard to answer, but emotionally - my collaboration with MetroOrangeArt Gallery for New York Comic-Con. That was my first work with Gallery and I am really proud for the final result.

Describe your most rewarding experience, as an illustrator.

Feeling that you are an artist. That you are creating something, that people appreciate. In Saint Petersburg there was a local exhibition that was showing street culture of the city, and my artwork was a part of this. So I’m not just a consumer, I create what people will consume, that’s cool.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 62


What are your favorite mediums and tools to work with and why? For commercial artworks - graphic editor, because you can change everything in any minute and there is no risk to ruin all work. Right now, I’m starting to paint with acrylic, it’s only for personal works for now. But, I hope that in the future I will be able to sell my paintings. There are some local galleries, who interested in this.

Do you have a set place where you always work? If so, what does that space looks like?

Wacom Bamboo Tablet, Laptop, sketchbook, pens and pencils, any flat horizontal surface.

Do you listen to music or watch movies/tv shows when working? If so, what do you usually listen/ watch?

Yes, mostly I listen to podcasts or my favorite music albums: bands like Deftones and all Chino Moreno side projects, Burial, Matt Elliott, some Pink Floyd, REM, Doors albums. I try not to listen to new tracks while drawing really distract from work. Movies - no, but some non-action tv series like Louie - why not?

What would be a dream project?

Take part in some big exhibition, Maybe have a solo exhibition, not now, but some day.

Favorite Books?

Darkness at Noon by Arthur Koestler, Omon Ra by Victor Pelevin, 1984 by Orwell, The Luzhin Defense by Nabokov, Moby Dick by Herman Melville, A Farewell to Arms by Hemingway, The Reserve by Dovlatov. Mostly modern literature, in the 20th century authors understood that they could break standard plot structure.

inkarrowsmag.com // 65


inkarrowsmag.com // 67


ink & arrows // issue seven // 68


inkarrowsmag.com // 69


inkarrowsmag.com // 71


DO YOU FIND IT EASY TO CONSTRUCT A NARRATIVE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY? I usually do, yes. One of my favorite aspects of photography, as stated above, is the ability to communicate with others. Storytelling is a beautiful part of communication. Narrative can take so many forms, whether short or long, ambiguous or obvious. DOES THE NARRATIVE COME BEFORE YOU CONSTRUCT A PHOTOGRAPH OR AFTER? It usually comes before! If I have a story in mind, the narrative comes first, usually

followed by a concept and a stronger story line. WHAT KIND OF NARRATIVE DO YOU HOPE TO CREATE AS YOU CONTINUE ON IN YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY CAREER? I hope to create a narrative of self, if that makes sense. I want my work to always reflect where I am in life and what is important to me at that moment. For example, I’ve been working on a series about social constructs of beauty and what lengths women go to in order to achieve such standards of beauty.

inkarrowsmag.com // 73


HOW DID YOU BECOME INTERESTED IN PHOTOGRAPHY? My first instinct to photograph something came when I was overseas. I was crossing a bridge in Prague an I saw a couple embrace and kiss – they were perfectly framed by people on both sides and it was super cinematic. Cheesy, I know. WHAT INTERESTS YOU ABOUT ADVERTISING? Social awareness is perhaps the biggest inspiration for me to pursue advertising. I enjoy educating people, whether the work is jarring or simple. My aspiration

is to shoot social awareness campaigns for ad agencies and later become an art director who specializes in them. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO AN ASPIRING PHOTOGRAPHER? I’ll be super cheesy and say what everyone else tends to say because it’s very true: don’t ever stop shooting. Also, learn as much as you can, whether you’re in art school or not. Intern, shadow, take as many classes as you can. You’ll be amazed at how much you can learn in a short amount of time.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 74


ink & arrows // issue seven // 76


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre. Hi, my name is Marija, I am an 25 year old artist from Belgrade, Serbia. My work is mostly oriented toward different approaches to drawing and painting. However, I often work in other medias, such as sculpture, photography, video and installation. When did you become interested in fine art and art in general? As I can recall, art was always present. In my early years, beside children drawing, it was present in form of dance, fashion shows and theatre I organized with my friend, jewelry making and other stuff kids do. Later, when I entered Faculty of fine Arts, for the first time I was completely sure that I should make visual art. What do you find yourself getting inspired by? I find inspiration a bit overrated as a phrase, but of course, I can’t neglect things that

provoke creative process. For many of my projects, film, dance, literature and Slavic mythology were very important. Also, my art is sometimes very introspective. I tend to depict my personal and intimate nature, with intention to bring it to one universal and transparent level for the observer. I often use symbols and archetypes to make communication easier. What makes you want to create work based on the human body and nature? The fact that I am very interested in human body and nature. In my works in the past few years I made some projects where I was explaining and analyzing the body - Its carnal nature and sensibility, trying to escape from literal and banal presentation. As I said before, dance was one of important methods for understanding the body. Yet now, in my latest works, communication is in the first place.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 80


Tell me about your creative process. How do you go about starting a project? When I get the idea, I usually do a lot of sketches. When I start a project, I work fast and with impatient expectancy. It surely is one of the best feelings in creative process. It is also common for me to talk through the idea with some of my friends or colleagues. Describe your most rewarding experience you’ve had. I’m sure every success is rewarding in one way or another. For me, it was very fulfilling when I became aware of the relation between my work and observer; at one point it had nothing to do with me personally, it was just a thing between a person and something that I created. What are your favorite mediums and tools to use and why? Lately, I was impressed by relation between handmade papers and sewing thread. It is

very sensitive and tactile, and in the same time strong and effective. In this series I use a lot of real objects, such as textile, buttons, stockings, instead of just painting them on canvas… That’s how I think to achieve more direct communication with observer, and make my statements, declaration and questions clear and distinctive. What are some things you couldn’t live without? At this point – delights of chocolate, body motion and art. Do you have a set place where you always work? If so, what does that space looks like? For now, I am changing my working (and living) space every few months. It is often messy and full of ‘necessary ‘ things ‘I could use one day’.


Do you listen to music or watch movies/tv shows when working? If so, what do you usually listen/watch? I don’t watch films while I’m working, but I watch a lot of them generally. Some of the directors I really like are L.V. Trier, Haneke, Kim Ki Duck, Cronenberg, Nicolas Winding Refn, Parajanov… Regarding the music, I like so many different things, but while I work I used to listen a lot Nick Cave and some movie soundtracks. What would be a dream project? Full - time- artist life.

Random Questions: Who are some of your favorite artists/creatives? There are a lot of artist that I found inspiring and interesting. For now, the first ones in my mind are Cy Twombly, Claude Viallat, Christopher Wool… What are some of your favorite books? Favorite authors? ‘The Sun Also Rises’ – E. Hemingway, most likely everything from Kafka, a lot of Serbian poetry starting with Vasko Popa… Coffee or Tea or something else? Coffee, Tea and everything else. Favorite memory? I guess - adventure- role playing games from childhood.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 82


inkarrowsmag.com // 83


ink & arrows // issue seven // 84


inkarrowsmag.com // 85


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about you and your creative genre.

design because I thought it was a good “back up plan” to tattooing. Then I realized how ridiculous that was… it didn’t allow me to draw and it wasn’t fun. So I found a major that translated pretty well with tattooing, and that I’m Jared Tuttle and I live in Minneapolis, MN as was illustration. Best decision I ever made! a freelance illustrator, graphic designer for LSE Now I love illustration as an art form. Architects, and tattoo apprentice at Wingnut Tattoo. I just graduated this spring from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design with a degree in illustration. I’m now 22 and I like to draw cool shit ;) The obvious answer is tattoos, but vintage packaging design, sign painters, calligraphers, old etchings, and renaissance paintings heavily influence my work. I actually went to Rome this summer and got a chance to see some renaissance work in person and it was fucking crazy to see… absolutely mesmerizing. Those paintings and sculptures to me are an example Well when I went to MCAD my freshman year of pure mastery. I intended on getting my degree in graphic

Where do you get your inspiration?

When did you become interested in illustration?

ink & arrows // issue seven // 86


inkarrowsmag.com // 87


What is your creative process? My creative process is very similar to the way most tattoo artist’s work. 1. Research imagery or subject 2. Thumbnails 3. Sketches 4. Refining the best sketches

Describe your most rewarding experience as an illustrator. Receiving awards from the Society of Illustrators of New York, and L.A. as a student was very rewarding for me. But as a professional and seeing the reaction from clients when they look at what you can do with their initial idea is by far the best feeling.

My refinement stage is usually the step that sets my process apart from others, mostly because it is so time consuming. I refine and refine my sketch with 3-7 layers of tracing paper until it’s pretty much fully figured out. Then I trace that to my paper and ink away! After I will either color digitally or traditionally with watercolor. I love ink and graphite because of how much control I have over them. I don’t know if it’s apparent in my work, but I tend to be a control freak when it comes to my artwork. But to be fair I think that comes from the tattoo industry… you can’t really make mistakes when you’re putting permanent ink into someone’s The most challenging project I ever took on skin! I am however working towards becoming was designing a book cover for the ‘Minnesota looser within my work. Private College Council’. The reason it was difficult was because I had to make my style for that piece less dark visually and conceptually, but as well as more saturated with color. I’m just more drawn to de-saturated colors, and subject matter that is more organic or historical with some edginess to it. Working on a project that is Music! It motivates me to get shit done, or targeted to a larger demographic was definitely completely separate myself from reality to relax difficult, but I’m always up for a challenge! and enjoy the moment.

What are your favorite mediums and tools to work with and why?

What is the most challenging project you have ever taken on?

What are some things you couldn’t live without?

inkarrowsmag.com // 89


Do you have a set place where you always work? If so, what does that space looks like? For the past year yes, my current apartment has an office, so I have my own studio set up in there. It’s great but pretty messy, ha. Tracing paper and tape everywhere, piles of eraser shaving and random ink stains cover my desk.

Do you listen to music or watch movies/ tv shows when working? If so, what do you usually listen/watch?

I also love doing album covers, t-shirt designs, skateboards, and projects like that. I guess I’d really love to be hired to make a series of work to display in a gallery as well. :)

Random Questions:

Who are some of your favorite artists/ creatives? William Adolphe Bouguereau (painter), Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (painter) Jeff Gogue (Tattoo artist), Brandon Holt (Tattoo artist), Richey Beckett (illustrator), Sam Weber (illustrator), James Jean (illustrator), and Teagan White (illustrator).

Absolutely, it’s something I look forward to every time I work! I love Minneapolis’s music scene, so I listen to a lot of underground hip-hop type stuff like Atmosphere, Brother Ali, Doomtree, P.O.S, Prof, but Grieves is definitely my favorite Dam, I honestly rarely read, but when I do it’s normally researched based. I wish I read more… artist. but I don’t, ha.

What are some of your favorite books?

When I’ve got a long day of work I love listening to podcasts. For me it is most definitely the best thing to listen to…it’s entertaining but not too distracting, yet at the same time it’s not just background noise. When I listen to podcasts I “Be the hero of your own story” – Joe Rogan sometimes really get into the conversation and end up flying through my work as I think about I love that quote because who doesn’t want to do the discussions that are taking place. The best something everyday worth mentioning, living way to put it is that it is a perfect in-between for life like you’re in a movie… movies and music to me.

What is your favorite quote?

What would be a dream project? I can’t think of a ‘perfect project’ but I love what I’m doing right now, which are alcohol labels. They’re really fun to do, and my style just seems to work pretty well within that industry.

What is a talent you wish you had?

Ha that’s a good question, humm…. I don’t know what kind of talent would have the biggest impact…. Tooooo hard to decide!

ink & arrows // issue seven // 90


INTRODUCE YOURSELF; TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE GENRE.

I am Bree Henderson an art director who mutates generic thoughts into bizarre and fantastic ideas.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE ASPECT OF ADVERTISING? My favorite aspect of advertising is creating a solid campaign that is clever. One that makes the viewer go “YASSS” they get me.

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR INSPIRATION? Much of my inspiration comes from every day life. That may sound silly, but when I look at the world I see patterns and color pallets. I see ways to communicate ideas through design.

WHAT IS YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

My creative process is chaotic. It consists of TONS OF THUMBNAILING, late nights with (a few tears), and red bull. After the initial “I need to get an idea stage” is through I usually like to go out for a hike to clear my mind, or visit a museum. I feel that helps clear my head. by the time I return to do MORE thumbnails I have an idea.

WHAT DO YOU THINK MAKES A SUCCESSFUL ADVERTISEMENT?

A successful advertisement communicates the benefit of the brand to the target audience with clean design and clever thinking.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY PHOTOGRAPHING THE MOST?

I really enjoy photographing fashion photography as well as product shots.

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR FAVORITE PROJECT TO WORK ON?

My favorite project to work on was my PRESERVES gain ad. I had a lot of fun sculpting noses and I used my friends’ noses as references, so I was able to make it a personal piece as well as an advertisement.

WHAT DO YOU WANT PEOPLE TO SEE WHEN THEY LOOK AT YOUR WORK? When people see my ads I want them first and foremost to understand them. If I haven’t communicated with my audience the brand benefit then I have failed as an art director. Secondly I want them to think WHAT THE hell did I just look at... how did somebody come up with that idea.

inkarrowsmag.com // 95


HOW DO YOU COMBINE YOUR STYLE WITH WHAT A CLIENT WANTS?

Most of the time you don’t really get to combine your style with what the client wants. It is really important to have good brand representation. My ads are not about me. They are about what the client needs. From there I represent myself by coming up with bizarre and fantastic ideas and by executing them well.

Random Questions

FAVORITE ADS?

My favorite ad is a tv spot that BBDO worldwide created as a Halloween spot. “Mrs. Jensen” – Snickers [the candy]. It is eerie and comical at the same time.

FAVORITE CREATIVE’S?

Alex Pardee, Tim Burton, Kurt Cobain, and Don Draper.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 96


inkarrowsmag.com // 97


ink & arrows // issue seven // 98


Introduce yourself; tell us a little about your creative genre.

My name is Ophelia Phelps, a lot of people know me as Ophelia Mercedes, my design and illustration name. My creative genre of work is a cross between illustration and design.

How would you describe your artistic style?

My artistic style is mix of hand drawn pieces with modern technology. I manipulate a lot of my work within Photoshop and Illustrator. I feel doing this I still keep the originality of the rugged lines create when drawing but also using the precision of photoshop to keep a it neat and tidy.

What inspires you to create all the patterns within your artwork?

Various things inspired me to create patterns within my work. I look through a lot of websites and books get inspired and get ideas flowing. I begun to create this type of work just out of boredom one day and ever since then it stuck as my style and what people know me by. I am constantly thinking of ideas and various ways to create new, exciting pieces to grab my followers attention and new ones.

inkarrowsmag.com // 99


How did you get the idea to manipulate photographs to create such interesting art pieces?

My ideas behind manipulating photography to create illustrations came about when I was taught of ways to do so in University and college. We were taught various techniques on drawing things specific ways and I elaborated on that to create my own style of drawing that I now have. I am continuously growing as an artist and love to try new drawing techniques to create more exciting, grabbing artwork. I also create print pattern designs using photographs of my own and manipulate them to create textile prints for various things from clothing down to stationary. I like to make the most of my resources and work my skills into them whether it is my illustrations or designing.

What is your creative process?

My creative process varies on the type of work I’m working on. When creating my illustrations I will select a variety of photographs I could work from and analyze them in how could create pieces with them, then draw them up in pencil before I finally draw the outline in fine liner, once all the illustration is done I would add in the patterns or colours, then scan into my computer and manipulate in places that I feel would work. Same process with my design work I photography various things and then will manipulate them in Photoshop to create exciting prints.

What would be your dream project?

My dream project would be to work with a clothing line or an art gallery to create specific pieces just for them. I would love to be able to create one of large paintings/drawings and have them exhibited in one of the biggest galleries in the world.

ink & arrows // issue seven // 100


RANDOM QUESTIONS:

What inspires you to draw?

A lot of things inspire me to draw, it could be as simple as seeing a cat walk past me or sat on the wall, it could spark new ideas. I find I have various ideas at once and have to note them down straight away to keep for future projects and ideas.

As an artist, where do you hope your work will take you?

As an artist I hope my work will take me to higher levels. I would love to feature in art galleries around the globe, even if they are small galleries, to get recognition for my work and know people appreciate it is the best feeling an artist can get. At the moment I am creating a series of colouring books that will be downloadable for both children and adults. Who said adults can’t have as much fun as children hey?

What aspect of illustration do you find most challenging?

Favorite food?

This is a hard question. I love all foods. I would say my favorite food would be Paella!

Favorite drink?

My favorite drink would be Guava Rubicon, the best drink ever!!

Coffee or Tea?

Tea, I drink soo much every day, it’s become apart of my daily routine.

Favorite places to go?

My favorite place to visit would be France, I have been there many times since I was about 5 and it’s such a lovely place. I plan on moving there in the future, hopefully.

The most challenging part I feel of my illustrations is creating something the person would like. It’s easy to get ideas off them but to put there ideas onto paper just as they want is a challenge in itself. You have to become that person while you draw them or something for them to understand the final illustration they want.

What part of creating portraits do you enjoy most?

The best part about creating portraits whether it’s celebrities or just everyday people. I love to find out the backgrounds to the photographs and the people I’m drawing before hand. So I get to add a bit of them within the drawings. Whether it will be their favourite colour or the feelings they felt that moment in time.

inkarrowsmag.com // 101


ink & arrows // issue seven // 104


inkarrowsmag.com // 105


INTRODUCE YOURSELF; TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR CREATIVE GENRE. Hi! I am Rebekah, most call me Beka or Bex. I am 17 and I live in New Mexico. I like to paint and procrastinate.

AS AN ARTIST, WHAT DO YOU HOPE PEOPLE WILL SEE IN YOUR WORK? My world. I have so many beautiful scenarios in my mind that I just love to share with people. My little paradise. I want people to find an escape and getaway in my stuff.

BETWEEN ALL THE DIFFERENT ARTISTIC MEDIUMS YOU WORK WITH, WHICH IS YOUR FAVORITE? Oils definitely, I barely taught myself how to use them this year and they’re magical. The blending, the room for error. Everything about them is perfect.

HOW DO YOU DEAL WITH ARTIST BLOCK? Sleep it off! Dream of something new and start again. I’m good at that, starting over.

WHAT SUBJECTS INSPIRE YOU? Anything, overly glamorous. Or really intimate. I like the subjects of “paradise” and “getaways” mainly because I wish I were in those places most of the time. I love Moody ambience and lots of romanticism. For some reason I also have this weird obsession with Las Vegas and Beverly Hills. WHAT DO YOU FIND MOST DIFFICULT TO CAPTURE WITHIN A SKETCH? I’m sort of terrible at sketching. So overall sketching is tough for me. I don’t have the hand for it! But probably sketching out details in my mind is tough because sketching is so tedious. I prefer paints to this! But sketching I find is great for conceptualizing. WHEN DID YOU DISCOVER YOUR PASSION FOR ART? When I was a wee little lass, about 3, I was starting to use crayons and stuff. I loved to create even if it wasn’t anything specific just scribbling and making “e’s” and “o’s” was my thing. But when I really started to study it was about 5th grade. I wanted to be a fashion designer.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO BECOME A BETTER ARTIST? Just to keep up my skill because I love it. I like challenging myself and pushing my work to be better mainly for my personal satisfaction.

RANDOM QUESTIONS: WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR FAVORITE ARTISTS/CREATIVES? I’m currently obsessed with Pin Up art again. So Adam Braun, Jon Hul, Olivia De Berardinis, But Christina Mrozik, Kemi Mai,

Charmaine Olivia, Dan Quintana, and Joram Roukes along with many others! WHAT ARE 5 THINGS YOU COULDN’T LIVE WITHOUT?

Oil paint, my bed, food, Internet, and my mom FAVORITE WEBSITES?

Pugsofinstagram.tumblr.com, pornhubcommentsonstockphotos.tumblr.com, Oddee.com

inkarrowsmag.com // 107


ink & arrows // issue seven // 110


inkarrowsmag.com // 111


ink & arrows // issue seven // 112


Kim Wells tumblr: kim-wells.tumblr.com email: therealkimwells@gmail.com facebook: facebook.com/KimWellsIllustration Instagram: @ kimtenenbaum Lucien George Flickr: flickr.com/photos/lucien_george/ Twitter: @lucien_george Katherine Miller website: katherine-miller.com Instagram:@ kemillers email: kemiller5s@gmail.com Lottie Woolnough-Rai tumblr: lottiedraws.tumblr.com facebook: facebook.com/lottiedraws etsy: etsy.com/shop/Lottiedraws Elliot Phillips tumblr: elliotphillipsdesign.tumblr.com/ behance: behance.net/elliotp91 Carmel Debreuil website: carmeldebreuil.com email: carmel@debreuil.com facebook: facebook.com/carmeldebreuilartist Kelsey Arrington website: kelseyarrington.net Instagram:@ kelseyarrington email: karrington@collegeforcreativestudies.edu Hari Lualhati website: harilualhati.yolasite.com/paintings email: harilualhati_artist@hotmail.com facebook: facebook.com/HariLualhati.Artist BLog: harilualhati.blogspot.com

Nikita Kaun tumblr: sunturnsintowater.tumblr.com behance: behance.net/kaun_nikita facebook: facebook.com/sunturnsintowater Instagram: @ nikitakaun Olivia Walthall website: oliviawalthall.4ormat.com Twitter: @ wandrlusty Marija Avramovic BLog: marijaavramovic.blogspot.com Jared Tuttle website: jared-tuttle.com tumblr: jaredtuttle.tumblr.com Society6: society6.com/jaredtuttle Instagram:@ jaredgraytuttle Bree Henderson website: breehenderson.com behance: behance.net/breannh Ophelia Mercedes website: cargocollective.com/opheliamercedes Twitter: Merci_xox email: ompsdesigns@gmail.com behance: behance.net/ompsdesigns Society6: society6.com/opheliamercedes Beka website: bekarti.com Twitter: @ bekarti facebook: facebook.com/bekartiparty Instagram: @bexrubalcava

inkarrowsmag.com // 113


ISSUE SEVEN - INK & ARROWS MAGAZINE  

Issue Seven of Ink & Arrows magazine. Features interviews from, our cover artist, Nikita Kaun, Jared Tuttle, Kim Wells, Elliot Phillips, Oph...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you