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Vol. 4 No. 3 February 2012

SPECIAL MUSIC ISSUE FEATURED MUSICIAN: ELIZA CHILDRESS EXCLUSIVE PUNK PHOTOSTORY

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Editor’s Column ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Whether you are a fan of offthe-wall, psychedelic noise music, old-timey blue grass, or jazz-inspired pop musicians, you have to admit that 2011, and the beginning of 2012, has been an exciting time for music. Gone are the days of contrived supergroups being produced by massive record labels, while underground, DIY musicians cower in dive bars, afraid to get too popular and lose their status as indie artists. Now, thanks to the advent of technology, most music is impossible to contain, but extremely easy to share, and even the biggest of the big-name acts are demanding some freedom from labels that would squash creative control. Similarly, underground artists are being given the opportunity to reach a larger audience and actually make some money off of their music, bridging the huge divide

that used to exist in the world of popular culture. That being said, there is no better time then now to fully celebrate the diversity and depth that is music, be it the local Richmond scene, the world of female pop stardom, or your favorite extreme musical sub-genre. I am proud to present Ink’s personal celebration of music to its fullest, an issue dedicated entirely to all things musical. From the healing power of song and protest music throughout the ages, to grimy local noise shows and the popular musical stylings of Micheal Buble, this issue really does have something for everyone who enjoys entertaining their aural senses. Check out the music featured in these pages, support your local music scene, and learn something new about the way sounds affect your brain. Enjoy!

-Addison Herron-Wheeler Executive Editor

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TABLE OF CONTENTS CAMPUS LIFE ///////////////////////////////////////////////////

3-4......... The Sound of Protest Music 5-6......... Musical Healing 7............. Visual Music: Performance Art Explored CONTEMPORARY ISSUES ///////////////////////////////////////////////////

8............. Pop Stars Face Off: British vs. American ARTS AND CULTURE ///////////////////////////////////////////////////

9-10....... Richmond Venues Reviewed 11............. D.I.Y.- Face-Melting Kitchenware: Record Bowls

12-13...... Featured Musicians 14-18...... Punk and Metal photostory 19-20.... Featured Artist: Eliza Childress 21-22..... Reviews 23........... Cheap Fest

24-33... Photo Shoot

Addison Herron-Wheeler- Executive Editor Emily Eason- Managing Editor David Osnoe- Copy Editor Peter Pagan- Web Editor Rachel Kiscaden- Photo Editor Rachel Maves- Art Editor Isabella Althoff- Fashion Director

Staff /////////////////////////// Zoe Kinney Anna Shcherbakova Lena Sinanian Corey Martin Shannon Cruise-Ranson Amir Vera Margaret Amonette Hal Dockins Danielle Harvey Alena Sydnor Shelby Mertens

Designers /////////////////// Hannah Swann- Art Director Marleigh Culver Ying Cheng Hunter Nye Guest Photographer: Sarja Hassan

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The above painting and the cover image were both designed specifically for Ink by Eliza Childress, this issue’s Featured Artist.

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by David Osnoe Of music’s many functions, one that is timeless is the use of song to convey emotion. Sometimes, words alone can achieve this purpose, and protest poetry remains a vital source of dissenting literature throughout all time periods, however the combination of melody and lyrics is more effective in that it activates both hemispheres of the brain. I came into direct contact with this effect when I attended the VCU Forum entitled “Why Occupy?” which presented a panel of speakers to define the goals of the Occupation. At this forum, The Conciliation Project taught the audience the June Jordan civil rights anthem, which has a simple but intense message:

“We have come too far, we can’t turn round, we’ll flood the streets with justice, we are freedom bound.” Now, the printed word can’t express the true power of this song so I encourage you to check out the YouTube video “Why Occupy?” to hear it as sung by over a hundred VCU students. But the point is, the conference was informative and enlightening because of the panel of speakers, but was resonant and memorable because of the invitation to sing. In order to reinforce my theory about the power of music, I look to the previous century’s most influential protest songs to see if there

is correlating evidence as to the effect that music has on culture. If you knew that “Born in the USA” by Bruce Springsteen was a protest song, then you’re already more aware of contemporary protest music’s effect in politics than I was when I began writing this article. When Ronald Reagan used “Born in the USA” in his 1984 reelection, he sparked a response from Springsteen, who is quoted in that same year in Rolling Stone as saying,

“I think what’s happening now is people want to forget. There was Vietnam, there was Watergate, there was Iran — we were beaten, we were hustled, and then we were humiliated... And you see the Reagan reelection ads on TV — you know: ‘It’s morning in America.’ And you say, well, it’s not morning in Pittsburgh. It’s not morning about 125th Street in New York. It’s midnight, and, like, there’s a bad moon risin’.” Indeed the lyrics,

“You end up like a dog that’s been beat too much. Till you spend half your life just covering up,”

PHOTOS BY ANNA SHCERBAKOVA

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campus life refers to the broken down state of the American Dream. Going back in time to 1969, there’s the more obvious “War” by Edwin Steele, you know, the one that goes,

“War! What is it good for? Absolutely nothin’!” Not coincidentally, this same song was performed by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band in 1985. Here we see that the lyrical complexity of the song does not affect the power of the song’s message. In fact, “War” became such a notable protest song that it earned the praise of fellow protest-musician John Lennon. Instead of killing Steele’s career, the song accorded him more fame for his 1971 release, “Stop the War Now.” Earning praise from John Lennon seems to fulfill a rough standardization for the quality of protest music, which makes sense because Lennon’s exemplary body of work is a hotbed of alternative thought. For example, in a 1965 interview with Evening Standard reporter Maureen Cleave, Lennon remarked,

The song maintains an absurdly vulgar poetic beauty, while borrowing melodies from “We Shall Overcome,” as if to subconsciously remind the listener that the true nature of the song is about freedom through peace. This comes from my perspective, however, and is liable to be constrained by my set of experiences. The point is, there is an inherent quality that melody adds to poetry which combines to create sensationally effective music. One begins to see the true scope of protest music’s power when used to relay an emotion such as anger or exuberance. Borrowing elements from “We Shall Overcome” was a particularly effective move for Lennon, in part because of its association with the 19551968 African-American Civil Rights Movement. The title comes from a gospel song composed by Charles Albert Tindley and was adopted by Pete Seeger and Joan Baez when they toured non-violent protest rallies, festivals and concerts, which aided the songs dramatic rise in popularity in the 1960s. As if to underscore the power of this single piece of music, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. referenced “We Shall Overcome” in his final sermon, delivered in Memphis on Sunday March 31, 1968, before his assassination, when he said,

“Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink ... We’re more popular than Jesus now—I don’t know which will go first, rock and roll or “We shall overcome. We Christianity.” shall overcome. Deep in my The uproar caused by this quote heart I do believe we shall led to the burning of Beatles’ records overcome. And I believe it and threats against Lennon that because somehow the arc ultimately contributed to the band’s decision to stop touring. In 1969 of the moral universe is Lennon released his single, “Give long, but it bends towards Peace a Chance,” which was adopted justice. We shall overcome as an anti-Vietnam-War anthem that because Carlyle is right; ‘no same year. The lyrics caused a similar firestorm of controversy as capitulated lie can live forever.’ We shall by the lyrics, overcome because William “Let me tell you now Cullen Bryant is right; ‘truth Ev’rybody’s talking about crushed to earth will rise Revolution, evolution, again.’” • masturbation, flagellation, regulation, integrations, meditations, United Nations, Congratulations. All we are saying [keep talking] is give peace a chance All we are saying is give peace a chance.” 4

ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL MAVES

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MUSICAL HEALING

ART BY RACHEL MAVES

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Music has always had a profound effect on humanity. From the ancient use of drums as a form of communication to today’s trance-like dubstep, music remains crucial for human development. Recently, the medical world has begun to accept the fact that melody has the potential to drastically affect the human brain, and implementations of music as a medical tool are underway. It was important first to discover the source of music’s power over the human central nervous system, which, as it turns out, is based on the what is called neuroplasticity. The brain’s ability to rebuild connections around damaged areas stems from the moldable condition of brain tissue (i.e. it’s neuroplasticity.) Oliver Sacks, professor of Neurology at Columbia University and author of the book Musicophilia, claims that “nothing activates the brain so extensively as music.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

BY DAVID OSNOE

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MUSICAL HEALING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

So, what can we do with the fact that music has a measurable influence on brain functioning? The answer to this question lies with Gabrielle Giffords. Gabrielle Giffords has represented Arizona’s 8th Congressional District since 2007. A previous Republican, Giffords is now considered a Democrat because of her views on health-care reform and illegal immigration. On January 8th, 2011, Giffords was shot in the head at a supermarket in Tucson, immediately losing her ability to walk, speak, read and write. After the assassination attempt, Giffords suffered from aphasia, which is the inability to speak because of damaged pathways in the brain’s left hemisphere. However, her husband Mark Kelly (former astronaut and space shuttle commander) and the congresswoman herself, never entertained the idea of giving up on fully recovering her abilities. Ten months later, Giffords is not only speaking again, but singing. How did this happen? “Music is the other road to get back to language,” says Meghan Morrow, Giffords’ certified brain injury specialist

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Music is the other road to get back to language

tive skills). The therapist then designs music sessions for individuals based on clients’ specific needs. For Giffords, music therapy started with her simply humming the tune to her favorite song, “American Pie,” and from there, her brain began to reconnect pathways using melody. The end result is Giffords being able to sing the lyrics, “Bye, bye miss American pie, drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry,” followed by exponential growth in her physical, emotional and social abilities. In the end, the power of musical healing called Giffords to make a miraculous recovery. The immortalized scene of Giffords returning to congress and receiving a standing ovation is a positive affirmation of humanity’s miraculous ability to recover from tremendous injury,and creates a strong case for the necessity for music therapy in today’s medical practice.

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at TIRR Memorial Hermann Rehabilitation Hospital in Houston. ABC News reported on how music therapy played a major role in the congresswoman’s recovery In the article, “Gabby Giffords: Finding Words Through Song,” which explains that, “Whereas language is largely held in the left side of the brain, music activates visual, motor and coordination areas on both sides, as well as areas deep in the brain involved in memory and emotion.” It seems that music may have an array of miraculous healing properties, but many remain skeptical about the benefits of music therapy, and few insurance companies cover it. To comprehend the effectiveness of this treatment,however, one need only look at a before and after picture of Giffords, or hear her speak again after months of agonized silence. So how does Music Therapy work? According to the American Music Therapy Association, “Music Therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of musical interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship, by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program.” Using Gabrielle Giffords as an example of how the music therapy program operates, the process begins with music therapists assessing patients well-being (in terms of physic health, social functioning, communication abilities, and cogni-

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Performance

Art

Matthew Burtner- Former U.V.A. professor now based in New York, who creates computer software specific to each music project. The software produces or manipulates sounds made by natural processes, traditional instruments, or even random objects like squeaky toys. Performed a piece in which internet users from around the world could add their own notes as the work was being “played” by logging in to a particular website, and another that drew notes from air currents created by wind.

Dylan Mulshine Interview Miwa Matreyek: Picture by Scott Groller

Some performance artists worth checking out:

BY Zoe Kinney An all-encompassing term, “performance art” is any creative happening that uses people and revolves around the element of time. The involvement of people is key here, for without people, it would be an installation- installation pieces can also be happenings that take place over a period of time, just without the artist being directly involved as they occur. Performance art can be sound or music-based, silent, kinetic, or still. Sometimes the work is a formal “piece,” highly thought through or extensively planned. At other times, it is extemporaneous. Many musicians use elements of performance art in their work, just as performance artists often use music. Richmond’s own Gwar easily could be labeled a group of performance artists, just as drag queens and magicians could be. Most punk bands involve performance art solely by virtue of the interactions between the lead singers and the audience. It factors heavily in the noise music scene. And of course, it is a big presence in the fine arts field, as well. In many ways, performance art makes art more about what the audience feels and experiences than show-casing what the artist can do or has done.

Miwa Matreyek- Animator, Video Artist, and Performer. Uses her own body and the shadows it creates for the resulting, sometimes abstract, shapes that can be derived from both to produce mosaics of moving images. Often mixes use of her body with animation and live-action video. GG Allin- Now-deceased underground punk singer originally named “Jesus Christ Allin.” His shows often involved human excrement, nudity, destruction of the venue, wildly offensive lyrics, arrests for assault, and serious injury of audience members (by Allin) as well as Allin himself (by the violently provoked audience). Matthew Barney- Husband of the singer Bjork. Barney took over the Guggenheim Museum in The Cremaster Cycle, a piece inspired by the sexual development of a human embryo. He created special prosthetic feet and shoes for model/actress Aimee Mullins, who appeared in one of the five films composing the overall piece, and filled the museum with scenery consisting of his non-video work. Yoko Ono- Worked extensively with her own body and audience involvement. In “Cut Piece,” she allowed audience members to approach her and cut a piece of fabric off of her clothing, the size of which was up to their discretion, until there was no more to cut.

To gain further understanding, I interviewed Dylan Mulshine, a musician/artist friend of mine who has performed as part of THE RAWMONES and as Teen Dreams. What does it take to be a performance artist? I am an art performer because art comes first. I originally wanted to answer all of these questions with pictures only, it takes that kind of a judgment for me to be active in creating a concept before “Just Doing It.” This question is also weird because I don’t identify as a performance artist. I don’t know if that’s what I want to be, I feel as if “Being a Performance Artist” perverts the very idea of it. What are some funny reactions you’ve gotten to your work? Getting banned from premises…getting paid…getting interviewed. How do you go about your pieces? Is there more of a vague outline or an improvisational quality to your work? I don’t tend to call them pieces, there is barely an outline, it’s mostly just living and trying to shake up the world. Trying to expose the audience. Looking for comedy. Going into the situation completely unprepared, wanting the consequences. For most of my musical career, I have found my way into the culture of things…a made-up place where people don’t seem to realize we created the playground and we can do whatever we want in it. Life is an improvisation.

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contemporary issues

THE POP STAR PHENOMENON ON BOTH SIDES OF THE POND by Emily Eason Illustration by Corey Martin With the utterly instantaneous stardom of so many female vocalists, it is not a surprise to see such a massive influx of women belting out some serious chords and maintaining a presence that has taken the world by storm. It seems as if every month there is a new lady whose face has been devoured by the television set, and, as evident throughout this year, there is an obvious battle evolving between these fiery vixens, especially between the Americans and the Brits! Yes, it’s true everybody, we are once again fighting our past rivals, but on a more cultural and musical level. Before I rush into this theory, let me describe how these two sides have developed and how much they differ in their charismatic styles and, most importantly, in their overall message to fans. First, let us evaluate the British side of this pop movement. Aritsts like Adele, Lily Allen, and the ever-amazing Florence Welch (of Florence and the Machines) are some prime examples of British pop-stardom. All these women have completely unique vocal talents and have gained an enormous fan base in both their native island and the States, and they are all fairly similar in style. For instance, they all seem to portray a more sophisticated, ambient kind of sound, singing simple feelings of heartbreak, but utilizing epic choir-like ballads, and producing a heavenly affect. It’s as if these beautiful, British bombshells are emphasizing the importance of their voices and how they make the audience feel with their performances. Their use of sweet and heavenly tones make their music truly remarkable. There is no flash or over- whelming sexualization of their images, and their music is simply lovely, with poetic qualities that everyone can recognize and appreci8

ate. Another wonderful similarity is their musical influences, from classic artists like the timeless Aretha Franklin to the 90’s sensation Natalie Merchant. These women, whether they want to or not, are definitely considered the “good girls” of the popular female artists. On the other hand, there are the insane Americans like Lady Gaga, Kesha, and the emerging hipster-diva Kreayshawn, who all have made names for themselves as the “bad girls” of this transforming music scene. It’s no secret how sexually charged these women are, and they use this to their advantage, resulting in overwhelming success that may have more to do with looks and image then with talent. It is very obvious how obsessed these women are with self-image. Take, for example, the controversial attire of our dear Lady Gaga and the obnoxious lyrics that Kesha never gets tired of repeating. These girls all have the same message, and that is to party and live life free from conforming restraints, reflecting the cultural ideals that most Americans are attracted to at the moment. The bottom line is this, each side offers completely different images, and both have granted these talented women international fame, but who will come out on top and conquer all? Which hipster-popstar will be the new female icon, the quite, piano playing Brit, or the wild, outspoken, meat-dress-wearing American? The battle may be bitter, but that doesn’t mean sides must be taken. Let’s just sit back, relax, and revel in this phenomenon until it burns out under the pressure for number-one status. •

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arts & culture A BREAKDOWN OF RIVER CITY’S MOST NOTABLE LIVE MUSIC VENUES… THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE STRANGE. By Shannon Cruse-Ranson In a city known for tobacco and tattoos, the love of live music is symbiotic. While Richmond has many places to catch a great show, some raise the bar, while others walk smack into it. Based on this writer’s own experiences and the helpful, but brutally honest reviews from fellow Richmonders on Yelp.com, here’s what you can expect from venues around town.

The Camel 1621 W. Broad St Richmond, VA 23220 (804) 353-4901 www.thecamel.org

PHOTOS SMC ARCHIVES

The Camel is easily one of the best spots in Richmond for live music, with a variety of acts playing every night of the week, and is quickly establishing

itself as the premier venue to catch upand-coming Southern rock and bluegrass bands, acoustic singer-songwriters, and jazz/funk musicians. Boasting a large menu with tasty sandwiches and apps, a great selection of beers on tap, friendly service, and cool art on the walls, it’s a great spot to catch dinner before the show.

Cary Street Café 2631 W Cary St Richmond, VA 23220 (804) 353-7445 www.carystreetcafe.com

the remains of the Magic Bus, dear Deadheads would love to have you believe that Jerry even played there once. There’s live music almost every night featuring reggae, bluegrass, rock and alt-country, and jam bands This hippie-haven has been the of course. The food is always on point cornerstone for much of the jam band and yes, they deliver…beer and cigaculture in Richmond and beyond since rettes too! 1995. Decked out in what seems like The National 708 E Broad St Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 612-1900 www.thenationalva.com

national, and international acts of all genres. Chromeo, Minus The Bear, Foster The People, and Primus all stopped in to play this past fall. With a bar in each direction you turn, the lines are short and the bartenders work fast. A A true concert hall, through and beer will run you $5+, but there’s no real through, The National ropes in an incred- food to speak of, so grab a bite before ible and consistent lineup of regional, you head down to 7th St. or check out

Gibson’s Grill next door, though the service is spotty, especially on a busy night when The National has a sold out show. Lastly, as if your concert of choice wasn’t awesome enough, the bucket drummers are always outside banging away as you exit and hit the streets. Save a buck to toss their way, they deserve it. ink

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arts & culture Cafe Diem 600 N Sheppard St Richmond, VA 23221 (804) 353-2500 www.cafediemrva.net

Hat Factory 140 Virginia St Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 788-4281 www.hatfactoryva.com

Flickr.com/Fire at Will Photography

Czech Republic, but the blinding lasers, thumping techno and scantily clad gogo dancers can cause serious sensory overload. The 18+ policy works because of the large mezzanine/balcony available for the 21+ crowd to escape Housed in the former (and short the “X” branded teens. If faux-raving lived) Toad’s Place, The Hat Factory is isn’t your style, you can find more of holding on, thanks to the rousing success of RVAlution, the Cirque du Soleil- Richmond’s Suburbanites tearing it up esque weekly dance parties held each at The Hat Factory for other themed nights, like the ever-popular hipSummer where young Richmonders hop night. do their best to imitate a rave in the

Affectionately known by some as “Cafe Divorce,” it’s a place for 30+ singles. Painted in splashes of bright orange, green and pink to give it some island flare, it’s still a bit of a dive. The beer selection is humdrum, the staff is kind of slow and apathetic to your presence, and the food is definitely underwhelming. Their weekly schedule of performances has gotten very repetitive, with the same jazz or rock combos playing to the regular crowd on a PA that is turned up way too high for a smaller venue. However, they host stand-up comedy on Mondays, which has proved to be one of the few saving graces of the place.

Canal Club 1545 E Cary St Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 643-2582 www.thecanalclub.com

Flickr.com/Fire at Will Photography

ing straight to voicemail and no hope of a ticket refund. However, they do occasionally book big-time dubstep/ electronic acts and have had a few decent metal and punk shows, and they are usually one of the venues that If you’re looking for a dark, gritty, participate in Best Friends Day every “I think I heard gunshots” sort of night, year. If you do make your way in, exthen the Canal Club is your place. They pect overpriced drinks in dinky plastic typically have bad bookings of uncups served by forgetful, barely-trained known bands and though they claim bartenders. Frankly, many people are to have shows every weekend, there in awe of how this place hasn’t closed have been plenty of times when people down yet. show up to find locked doors, calls go-

Gabrielle Perretta/SHAFER BIRD

Strange Matter 929 W Grace St Richmond, VA 23220 (804) 447-4763 www.strangematterrva.com As a VCU student, you’ve either got to be blind, buried in your books, or hopelessly un-cool to not be familiar with Strange Matter. Known very well by the hipster scene for the rows of archaic arcade games, adequate

vegetarian food, rockin’ metal, punk, and indie shows and sweaty, steamy dance parties, this is the place where the artsy, wild, or eco-friendly kind of kids feel at home. If you don’t fall into that category, however, you’re likely to stick out like a sore thumb and occasionally be treated as such. Although this venue is certainly exclusive in some ways, they are undoubtedly catering to a very large niche in the Richmond community.

So there you have it, the real-deal scoop on Richmond’s live music venues, Good, Bad, and Strange. Other spots on the radar worth checking out are Emilio’s for amazing live Jazz on Friday nights, or The Cellar Door for an assortment of shows and dance parties. No matter what music you’re into or what type of venue suits your style, River City has something for everyone, even the divorcees. • 10

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D.I.Y.

arts & culture

decorative record bowls By Shannon Cruse-Ranson

This easy, D.I.Y. project will guide you through the steps necessary for transforming your old records into unique, decorative bowls that will dress up your coffee table. Besides looking chic, you can feel good about re-purposing this vintage technology and keeping stacks of vinyl out of the local landfill. Things You’ll Need: • Old records, duh. (Flea markets and thrift stores are great places to look) • Cookie sheet • oven-safe mixing bowl (metal) • Assorted sizes of heat-safe bowls or dishes (Pyrex bakeware or terracotta pots will also work) Before melting records, go online to check if your titles are worth anything. • Turn oven on to 200 degrees, but not any higher, or else toxic fumes from the vinyl may be released, yuck. • Place the metal mixing bowl upside-down on the cookie sheet. • Select a record, choose which side of the label you want to be visible on the inside of the bowl, and center it on top of the metal mixing bowl (if not sure, the B side is always a good default.) • Pop your record into the oven and wait 5-7 minutes for the vinyl to soften. (The record should look very droopy before coming out of the heat.) • Remove cookie sheet and melted record from the oven and peel it off the metal bowl. The record will be warm, but you can still manipulate it with your bare hands without risk of burns. However, don’t forget to use an oven mitt to take out the cookie sheet! • Smush the warped record into a heat-safe bowl and push the record into shape with another, smaller bowl on the inside. WORK QUICKLY! The vinyl cools in under a minute, so if you can’t shape the edges to your liking before the record hardens, just pop it back in the oven and try the process again. The variety of shapes and designs are endless, so keep at it and see what you can come up with. DISCLAIMER: Bowls are NOT intended for use in the microwave or dishwasher, as the heat from either will warp and ruin your creation. Also, it’s not a great choice for a serving dish because it’s got that hole at the bottom. Record bowls are best used for fruit, wrapped candies, or as a catch-all for keys and knick-knacks. Photos by Rachel Kiscaden

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myspace.com/EarTheoryMusic

arts & culture

EAR THEORY BY DAVID OSNOE

I sit listening to the band Ear Theory and the words melodic, haunting and intense immediately come to my mind as a cascade of symphonic harmonies sweep me off my feet. The members of this tightknit ensemble are all casually dressed, and when they talk about their sound they lack pretension, but not enthusiasm. The band consists of Cory Holm on keys and synth, Ben Artley on bass and vocals, Rob Szabo on drums and guitar, Alex Krall on guitar, and Will Zak on violin. The band formed in 2008, and began making fusion music (stylistically similar to bands like This Will Destroy You and Explosions in the Sky), combining elements of post-rock, electronic and instrumental sound. Ear Theory has performed at venues across Richmond such as Strange Matter, the Camel, and Canal Club. When I asked the lanky, blonde Holm how he felt Ear Theory fit into the Richmond musical aesthetic he responded, “I feel like our sound is very quirky, because we like to try new things.” I was drawn to Ear Theory because of their versatility, and I especially enjoy the way in which they use a networked synth with a midi controller (a keyboard-like device for producing synthetic sounds), to alter sounds in real time. Friendly, outgoing Artley expounded on the bands flexibility. “Some bands choose one genre and work from that, but we’re trying to avoid that. We’re doing this for the experience of making music...and that leaves a lot of doors open for us.” When I asked them which of their recent shows was the most memorable, there was a consensus that it was the show they played at Strange Matter. “It was definitely the most intimate, and we thrive on crowd presence,” said Holm. Artley added, “Strange Matter also just has a great Richmond energy to it.” So where do they see themselves in the future? Holm answers, “Hopefully still taking it one step at a time and having fun with it.” If you enjoy songs that are somehow both rollicking and mesmerizing at the same time, then check out Ear Theory at eartheory.com or soundcloud.com/ear-theory.

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If you like good music with a funky sound, then After NASA is exactly the band you need to acquaint yourself with. This band has amazing potential that shines through each of their songs, and a wonderful ability to mesh all kinds of genres, such as dance, pop, new sound, and funk into one big bowl of epic talent, which is clearly the reason they have gained so much attention. As local, hard-working Richmond folk, these guys truly know how to entertain their audience with excellent stage presence and ambient sounds. After NASA’s work is completely self-produced, and their recently released, self-titled demo is very well orchestrated yet diverse, with each song capturing a different mood. It is definitely the versatile collaboration on these tracks that make the music so interesting and fun to listen to. Their sound, to say the least, is difficult to describe, which is why it is so vital to hear their recordings or see them live. After NASA’s heavy pop charisma is more accessible when you’ve seen the band at small, intimate venues like Weezy’s Kitchen and the Tobacco Co., but don’t worry if you’ve missed them, there will still be ample opportunities to see them in your favorite Richmond hot spots. Please do yourselves a favor and check out their latest demo, which is available on the band’s site, www.afternasa.com! It’s pretty incredible!

BADWEATHER INTERVIEW BY RACHEL KISCADEN

Badweather is the musical pseudonym of the very talented Phillipe Maxwell. This dude has a flow and a way with words that I am constantly searching for in my musical choices. His lyrics speak from the heart about issues that I know most people, either directly or by association, have dealt with. Listening to his work is a refreshing step into the mind of a thoughtful and creative person, and one that makes you think just as much as it makes you bob your head. Recently, I spoke with him about his inspirations and style. When did you start writing? Was there any specific event or time period that was inspirational? I started writing in 1999, my freshman year of high school. It all started because my best friend and I decided to write a verse about something silly, like robbing a bank with bananas or something. His verse was better than mine, so I got offended, and wanted to be better than him. So I wrote, and wrote, and wrote, and wrote, and grew, and wrote, and wrote, and in the blink of an eye, I’m answering your questions! How did you develop the style you have? I can’t say for sure. I’m a fan of multisyllabic rhyme schemes. Rhyming “cat” and “hat” is cool and all, but “unexpected” and “run for the exits” requires more thought, which in turn may get more of a response out of people listening. I want to think of, and say, things people wouldn’t have thought would go to together fluidly. Were there any artists in particular that inspired you? Joe Budden is a genius, if I listen to hip hop, i listen to him, and he’s more

mopey than I am. I rarely listen to hip hop nowadays though. Bjork, Coheed and Cambria, Bonobo, Grizzly Bear, Coldplay, Andrew Bird, Circa Surive, and a few other non-hip hop artists are on heavy rotation on my iTunes. Most inspiration comes from events in my life, though. What inspires you to write? Emotion and how I feel about things is usually the main contributing factor. Sometimes I can hear a beat, and get a vibe from what the beat sounds like and create something from that. But usually it’s emotional…luckily I can write down what I feel, leave it on a piece of paper, and walk away from it. Therapy. Do you have any plans to do professional work? (you better dammit) It’s hard to say…if by professional you mean “record in an environment that’s not your closet, while you sit indian-style on top of your old navy sweaters,” then I can say, no, I don’t plan on it. But I hope to someday. myspace.com/interarmametal

AFTER NASA BY EMILY EASON

Photo Courtesy of artist

Demo Cover

arts & culture

INTER ARMA BY MARGARET AMONETTE

Signed by Richmond’s own Forcefield Records, Inter Arma deliver powerful and intoxicating metal performances. Music blogger Brooklyn Vegan describes Inter Arma as a “furious mix of black metal [and] southern, stoner-style imperial riffage”. Earlier this fall, Inter Arma lured the pretty people of Richmond into Strange Matter and put on a fantastically energetic show. Girls, guys, booze, and metal coexisted peacefully. Whether you enjoy crust, sludge, or black metal, give Inter Arma a listen or catch them playing around Richmond. You won’t be sorry.

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PUNK

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Illustration & Layout: Hannah Swann Photos: Sarja Hassan Sarja Hassan is a local photographer, VCU graduate, and graphic designer. Her compelling photography depicting the most gut-wrenching moments at metal and punk shows around Richmond has been featured in well-known underground publications like Profane Existence and Maximum Rock n’ Roll. ink

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eliza childress featured artist

By: Addison Herron-Wheeler In many cases, artists draw inspiration from the communities they live in, crafting show fliers, album covers, and murals to reflect the type of music or culture that the scene they come from is known for. In the case of Eliza Childress, however, the musicians she designs fliers, T-shirts and album covers for seek her out because they are inspired by her psychedelic, Art Nouveau style, recognize her work, and hope that they can evoke the same kind of passion and excitement in their

music. As influential and distinctive as her style is, Childress has little formal training and is extremely down-toearth, always ready to take on new projects and work with new types of people. Recently, I sat down with her to find out how she does what she does and what inspires her groundbreaking art. What got you into drawing, and how did you find your style? My interest in art began at an early age. I was fortunate to have a wonderfully inspiring art teacher in elementary school. When I was in the first or

second grade, I quit the after-school gymnastics class that I was taking to pursue after-school art classes. I haven’t stopped drawing since. How has having no collegiate “training” affected your perception of your work? Do you feel freer, or are there techniques you wish you could hone in a classroom setting? I did attend classes at VCU from 2006-2008, and I had wonderfully inspiring teachers and talented classmates to learn from. I wasn’t focused, and needed to work to save my money for supplies, books, etc. so I ended up taking time off, which led to me essentially dropping out of school. Leaving art school didn’t keep me from drawing, it actually inspired me to create even more, and I can now see that my passion for art has furthered my skills in an incredible way. I’ve had three years of nonstop practice to enhance my skills, and I feel very lucky that I’ve had the time and freedom to explore and create my style. I do want to take some printmaking courses and a perspective class. It would be very lucrative for my career to learn how to screen print, but I suppose I could always learn how to do that with a friend. Outside of school, I never stopped learning. I continued my studies with daily practice, engaging with other modern artists, collaborating, networking, doing shows. What seems to be the most important to furthering your career is your passion and your ability to network. So...I think I’m doing just fine without having a degree. Don’t jinx me. What kind of art do you do primarily, and do you work more for self-gratification or some kind of payment/compensation? I used to spend most of my time creating show fliers, which led to commissions for album art, t-shirt designs, etc. I do still create just to appease my brain, but I spend most of my time on paid commissions. Creating work for another person based on their specifications can be tricky at times, but incredibly satisfying when you hear that they enjoyed your work. You do a lot of fliers for shows around here. How did you get into designing show fliers? One of my great friends, Mark Osborne, is a local show promoter. He asked me to draw a show flier about three or four years ago. It was of some cartoon man made out of fingers standing in space. It got a good response, so I started drawing as many ink

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arts & culture fliers as I could. It felt so wonderful to hand the bands prints of a flier that I’d invested anywhere between ten to fifty hours on. Knowing someone took the time to hand-illustrate the poster for your show makes you feel very special. I loved showing people that we were grateful for their talents. What are your favorite types if music, and how do your tastes effect your art and which projects you choose to take on? This sounds contrived, but I like literally every single genre of music. I suppose that as of late I’ve been listening to a lot of international music (very broad, can range from Peruvian field recordings to African psych), jazz, soul, psych, gospel, funk, classical, the list goes on. When I’m trying to get excited or into a certain frame of mind for a project, I’ll try to listen to records that lend themselves to the style of the piece that I’m creating. When I made the Absu flier, I listened to metal...when I created the Eccentric Breaks and Beats cover for Numero Group, I listened to nothing but their recordings for 18 hours straight. Sometimes, the music doesn’t have much to do with my train of thought, instead it serves as something for my brain to focus on so that it doesn’t explode. You have a huge ‘cult’ following online and in the Richmond metal and indie scenes, how has this helped you get your art out there, and have you been approached about doing any album art? I know you recently designed a shirt for The Catalyst. A large portion of my commissions have come from creating show fliers in the past. Bands will go back home with copies of my artwork and some will consider me for projects such as LP covers, t-shirt designs, or tour posters. I also happened to get the Warner Bros. Rock of Ages commission simply because I was remembered for doing show posters. It’s pretty magical how a labor of love can turn into your career. What inspires your art? Who are some of your favorite visual artists or biggest influences? I live with very intelligent, creative, talented individuals. I feel like in my present life they are the ones that inspire me, alongside music and my dreams. I’ve always loved the work of Harry Clarke, who was an incredible illustrator in the 1900’s. I feel very inspired by 1920’s-1960’s photographs, psychedelic patterns, watching strange films, anything relating to religion, mystical themes, the occult, or sci20

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ence. I’d say the concepts behind the imagery in my pieces inspire me more than looking at other artists. When I see an amazing artists work, I end up feeling more motivated to try to make my own incredible masterpiece. How long does the average show flier or typical assignment take you to complete, and what is your workflow process like? Show fliers take me about the same time as a regular commission. If I’m going into great detail, working on a 22x30 sheet of paper, it’ll take me anywhere between 40-80 hours. If I’m doing an 11x14 or 11x17 it’ll probably take me 20 hours or so. It all depends on if I’m doing color or black and white. I just finished the Graveyard poster, which took me about 70 hours to complete. When I work, I like to take breaks to clear my mind. If I’m forcing myself to create when my mind is wandering, I tend to make mistakes. I don’t have a set schedule at home, I generally wake up, relax for a little while, start painting, take a break, continue painting, and wrap up whenever the mistakes start happening. I’ll probably work about 10 or 11 hours a day, spaced out throughout the day so it’s not too mentally or physically exhausting. I get migraines, terrible back/ neck/shoulder pains, I have a giant

callous on my finger from drawing my entire life. It’s an exhausting job! How do you feel about the music scenes in Richmond today? What is good or bad, what could be better, and what local stuff are you really into these days? I honestly haven’t been going out very much these days so any answer that I give will not be a good representation of what the music scene is actually like. It seems to me, as a distant outsider, that it’s about the same as it was when I used to be at shows every night. It does seem like there are a lot more noise shows, which is awesome. I’m not heavily into noise, but the sounds and visuals make me feel like I’m in a strange scene in a David Lynch or John Waters movie, where it’s sort of confrontational, it makes you uneasy, and you can’t tell if you’re experiencing reality or if you’re in a dream. I feel really lucky to know so many talented, creative, driven individuals, so it’s difficult to choose my favorites. I like Bermuda Triangles, Caves Caverns, Frankzig, Inter Arma, Windhand, Bastard Sapling, the list goes on and on. I feel bad giving such a short list because I really do love all of my friends’ bands for all of their unique talents. Every musician that I know has an amazing gift, the ability to create sounds and stories.

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arts & culture

ALL THINGS MUSIC

ReVIEWS

Album. In 2011, he released an album entitled Christmas, covering all of the classic Christmas songs such as “All I Want For Christmas Is You” and “Silent Night.” No matter what location someone is in or what situation, Michael Bublé’s range of songs and vocal talents won’t leave the audience disappointed. He once said about his music, “They will know it’s real because they will feel it too – and after that we are no longer strangers.” The audience can connect to his music and what his songs represent, and hopefully take away something from it.

Lights- Siberia Drake- Take Care

Michael Bublé

by Alena Sydnor

by Danielle Harvey

Fans have definitely been taken care of with Drake’s sophomore album, Take Care, which was released November 15, 2011. With only a year’s span between this and his first album, Thank me Later, the 25-year-old Canadian rapper has grown. His lyrics still have that story-telling tone to them, but his beats and creativity have blossomed. Even if you can’t relate to the lyrics, you’re sure to be consumed by the automatic, head bobbing beats. This album consist of songs that have a mellow tone, appealing to more softcore listeners, but are constructed with a hardcore edge. Not only does this album express his style as a rapper, it also highlights his talent as a singer. Drake truly expresses his vocal range on multiple songs throughout the album. One song in particular is “Doing it Wrong” (featuring Stevie Wonder, who gives a nice harmonica solo towards the end.) The lyrics express who Drake is as an artist, and the harmonica solo gives fans another side of Drake that is soft, yet entertaining. The album also features artist such as Nicki Minaj, Rick Ross, and Andre 3000, to name a few. Some standout tracks are “Take Care,” “Make Me Proud,” “Motto” and the two hit singles, “Headlines” and “Marvin’s Room.” At this pace, we can surely expect to hear great things from Drake in the future. Take Care is truly a CD to add to your collection before the year is over.

Passion, soul, and authenticity in any song could only mean one thing: Michael Bublé. The singer is known for his powerful voice and his jazz-inspired compositions. When Bublé was younger, his grandfather introduced him to the musical talents of Ella Fitzgerald and Frank Sinatra. Those artists inspired Bublé’s style of music, which he modernized and brought to a newer generation. He combines jazz and pop music with a fresh perspective. His first self-titled album was released in 2003, and featured classics such as “Fever” and “The Way You Look Tonight.” In 2005 he released his second album, entitled It’s Time, which gained him worldwide recognition. Following the success of his second album, Bublé released an additional two albums: Call Me Irresponsible and Crazy Love. His first single, “Everything” from his album Call Me Irresponsible became one of his biggest hits, reaching #46 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. “Everything” has a light-hearted jazz sound. That song, along with many others, is all about love—a common theme in his music. Bublé’s other popular hit was “Haven’t Met You Yet” from his album Crazy Love. Unlike most albums, the songs on Crazy Love were recorded live. By doing so, he allowed his fans to feel the passion and enthusiasm you can normally only get from a live show. Bublé has also won three Grammy awards for Best Traditional Pop Vocal

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by Peter Pagan Lights’ sophomore album, Siberia, strays away from her original warm, dreamy synth-pop-style songs, deviating from her normal soothing vocals and comforting lyrics. Although similar in genre to Owl City, Lights experiments in Siberia by introducing dubstep stylings and harder vocals. Lights makes progress as a new artist with the introduction of a grittier sound, proving that her vocals are quite versatile. Notable songs on the album include her lead single “Toes,” “Everybody Breaks a Glass,” and, of course, “Siberia.”

St. Vincent- Strange Mercy By Corey Martin Annie Clark’s prestige under the moniker St. Vincent has been steadily growing since her solo debut in 2007, and last year was no exception. Strange Mercy, her latest effort, continues the indiepop musical trajectory her past albums followed, but with even broader critical and commercial acclaim. This is not to say that Clark is recycling or cheapening herself, however. Strange Mercy is lyrically her most personal work. Anecdotes of situational depression and ambiguous references to Clark’s past are all wrapped Continued on page 22 ink 21

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***HUNTER arts & culture

Reviews Continued from page 21

up within a relatively upbeat sound. As far as the music goes, the album juxtaposes Clark’s sweet-yet-lunacytinged voice with gnarled guitar tones and charging synthesizers. Think Billie Holiday backed by the distortion of the Velvet Underground. The album is a roller coaster through happy-sadness and lovesick insanity. For a less gifted artist, this could translate into an incomprehensible mess, but Clark’s masterfully lurid touch guides the music to fascinating heights. Strange Mercy is one of 2011’s best albums, and hopefully a sign that more like this will follow in 2012.

The Joy FormidableThe Big Roar By: Shelby Mertens The Joy Formidable’s debut album, The Big Roar, has recently gained the spotlight in the Indie music scene. The trio hails from North Wales, and blends alternative rock, shoegaze, and dream pop to create a unique sound. Uninhibited by their status as a threepiece band, the Joy Formidable’s sound is loud and boisterous. Female lead vocalist and guitarist Ritzy Bryan is full of energy from start to finish, with some songs lasting up to five, even seven minutes. The huge crescendos, distorted guitar, and heavy drum beats makes this band sound twice its size. Bryan’s vocals range from sounding soft and tender at times to fierce and powerful the next. The Joy Formidable’s style also incorporates interweaving harmonies and melodies with mixed acoustic and electronic instrumentation. Their catchy hit single, “Whirring,” captures the epitome of their style. Other standout songs on The Big Roar include “Cradle,” “Austere,” and “A Heavy Abacus.” This band is a great listen for those who enjoy similar indie bands such as The Naked and Famous, Chapel Club, and Yuck. 22

Illustration by Zoe Kinney

Top 50 Cheesy Love Songs by Shannon Cruise-Ranson Sappy, sentimental, and oozing with cheese, love songs are central to pop music. To celebrate Cupid’s favorite holiday…and to help you craft your sweetheart a heartfelt playlist (hint, hint) …here’s a list of the 50 most popular, often underrated, guilty pleasure love songs from the last 30 years. Al Green - Let’s Stay Together  (1971) Marvin Gaye - Let’s Get It On  (1973) Barry White - You’re the First, My Last, My Everything  (1974) Peter Frampton - Baby, I Love Your Way  (1976) The Cars - Just What I Needed  (1978) Rupert Holmes - Escape (The Pina Colada Song)  (1979) Bob Marley - Could You Be Loved  (1980) John Cougar Mellencamp Jack & Diane  (1982) Modern English - I Melt With You  (1983) Cyndi Lauper - Time After Time  (1984) Tears for Fears - Head Over Heels  (1985) Madonna - Crazy For You  (1985) Janet Jackson - When I Think of \ You  (1986) INXS - Never Tear Us Apart  (1988) Proclaimers - I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles)  (1988) Cure - Lovesong  (1989) Bell Biv Devoe – Poison  (1990) Shanice - I Love Your Smile  (1991) Heavy D & The Boyz – Now That We Found Love  (1991) PM Dawn - Set Adrift On Memory Bliss  (1991) Color Me Badd - I Wanna Sex You Up  (1991) U2 - Mysterious Ways  (1991)

Vanessa Williams - Save the Best for Last  (1992) Whitney Houston - I Will Always Love You  (1992) Peabo Bryson & Regina Belle - A Whole New World (Aladdin’s Theme)  (1992) Seal - A Kiss From A Rose  (1992) Rod Stewart - Have I Told You Late ly  (1993) The Pretenders - I’ll Stand By You  (1994) Edwyn Collins - A Girl Like You  (1994) R. Kelly - Bump N’ Grind  (1994) Boyz II Men - I’ll Make Love to You  (1994) Mariah Carey -  Fantasy  (1995) The Cardigans - Lovefool  (1996) Oasis - Wonderwall  (1996) Aerosmith - I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing  (1997) Goo Goo Dolls - Iris  (1998) K-Ci and JoJo - All My Life  (1998) Common - The Light  (2000) John Mayer - Your Body Is a Wonderland  (2002) Norah Jones - Come Away With Me  (2002) Kylie Minogue - Love At First Sight  (2002) Alicia Keys - Fallin  (2002) Beyonce featuring Jay-Z - Crazy In Love  (2003) Yeah Yeah Yeahs - Maps  (2003) The Postal Service - Such Great Heights  (2003) Justin Timberlake featuring T.I. - My Love  (2006) Snow Patrol - Chasing Cars  (2006) Plain White T’s - Hey There Delil ah  (2007) Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - Home  (2009) Drake - Best I Ever Had  (2009)

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CHEAPFEST By Zoe Kinney

Photos coutesy of Radio Shock www.radioshock.org

Kinney

Cheapfest has been an annual noise/experimental music festival held at Strange Matter for three years now. It’s always cost $2, and usually has a long line-up of artists, which often vary in style and ability. It’s a good event for people who want a sampling of music and maybe enjoy filtering in and out of shows, and there are always some great artists performing. I arrived late, but just in time to see probably the best act of the night. Zak Kouns’ performance was intensely heartfelt and maintained interest throughout. Backlit by a video piece vaguely inspired by Hindu imagery, he produced aching, animal-like sounds with his saxophone and seemed to fall into a trance while playing. Things got surreal for a moment when, seemingly unaware of his surroundings, he sank to the floor and started slowly removing his clothes. But he came back to Earth just enough to start some truly impressive primal yelling. It was good enough to be presented as a formal performance piece. Also in evidence through the night were people who had cleverly rigged their sound equipment to pick up and warp vibrations from an array of unexpected objects. One artist, who I couldn’t match with a performance name and will call Metal Detector Girl, used a metal detector to create piercing, screeching notes and feedback whenever she held it near a metallic object. Another group amplified sounds created during the destruction of a guitar with a saw and some other tool used for the purpose of bludgeoning the instrument. Guitars are of course made to be resonant, so that was a good choice for a vibration source. Thirdly, Justin Marc Lloyd of Pregnant Spore

head-banged in front of his sound equipment, causing periodic rushes of noise whenever the wind from his movements was picked up. There was visual interest in Pregnant Spore’s set as well- Justin created an intriguing scene as he whipped his hot pink hair back and forth. Retarded Genius played a primarily vocal set with lots of strident yelling. He stripped down to a tiny gray vest and a v-string, and then splattered worryingly realistic mock-blood all over the audience, rolling around on the floor in the spillage. Some showgoers were not pleased by this element of his performance. He had a lot of energy, however, and it was all done in good fun. The fake blood came out of my clothing really easily, but did leave stains on my arms and neck for a couple of days. Heavy Breathing made a big impression. Last.fm.com identifies his music as fitting the post-mortem genre. I would call it thoroughly angry and militant. Dressed in impeccably clean clothing and perfectly shined black boots, he carried out a set reminiscent of a frenzied, strident orator’s speech, raging at the audience. He got very close to people’s faces and shoved a few audience members during the set. It was an impressive and intimidating performance. Drums like Machine Guns wrapped up the show. Unfortunately, they didn’t have all their equipment working, which they appologized for.. They recited and projected on the screen behind them a wise mantra, however, which was the simple “Just be the best possible person you can be.” Even if their performance couldn’t fully happen because of technical problems, it was a useful message to express, and ended the show on a good note.

Cheap Fest III Line-up. (Oct 22, 2011 smatter) 7:00- 7:157:307:458:008:158:308:459:009:159:309:4510:0010:1510:3010:4511:0011:1511:3011:4512:0012:1512:3012:451:001:151:30-

Flood Beast Champagne Of Rats Monolith Zero Broadcaststatic Teen Dreams Vveed Vvulf Sacajaweeda Microwave Windows Dave Smolen / Hairloss Suicide Magnets Zack Kouns HNY Frailty Of Angels Reverse Baptism Contortionist Jazz Exotica Head Molt Sex Complex Pregnant Spore Heavy Breathing Tinitustimulus Fun Drums Like Machine Guns Cheezface Abiku Radio Shock Mutwawa Shams ink

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FOR THE

RECORD

THIS SEASON, IT'S ALL ABOUT MIXING AND MATCHING. STRIPES MEET FLORALS. NEONS MEET BLACK AND WHITES. PRINTS MEET SOLIDS. CLASSY MEETS CRAZY. LET THE CHAOS PLAY.

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FASHION DIRECTOR & LEAD STYLIST ISABELLA ALTHOFF ASSISTANT STYLIST JENNIFER MAWYER PHOTOGRAPHER BREE DAVIS HAIR & MAKEUP CARLY CHILDERS AT BLACKBIRD SALON MODEL RACHEL BRADY SPECIAL THANKS TO DAVID LEE AT STUDIO 8 WEST

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arts & culture ORANGE SATIN POINTY TOE FLAT BY EXPRESS, $34.90, AT EXPRESS CALISTA PRINT LONG SKIRT BY BB DAKOTA, $72, AT BEVELLO GREEN SLEEVELESS COLLARED TOP BY SPARKLE & FADE, $49, AT URBAN OUTFITTERS CHAIN NECKLACE, $28, AT LEX'S OF CARYTOWN FUSIA PINK PONY HAIR THIN BELT BY ETRO, PRICE BY REQUEST, AT BAGGIO

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BLUE SLEEVELESS COLLARED TOP BY SPARKLE & FADE, $49, AT URBAN OUTFITTERS ORANGE CROP SWEATER BY TCEC, $42, AT LEX'S OF CARYTOWN PRINTED MID-RISE SHORT BY FREE PEOPLE, $78, AT SOUTH MOON UNDER TEAL SILKY WOVEN SKIMMER BY KIMCHI BLUE, $19.99, AT URBAN OUTFITTERS MULTI-COLORED COLLAR, $39, AT LEX'S OF CARYTOWN MULTI-COLORED CUFF BY KATE SPADE, $128, AT NORDSTROM

MIXED PRINT SKIRT BY DESIGUAL BY LACROIX, $124, AT EUROTRASH MULTI-RASPBERRY EARL TOP BY EQUIPMENT, $129.90, AT NORDSTROM WHITE AND BLACK TUXEDO BLAZER BY H&M, $59.95, AT H&M METALLIC COLLAR, $39, AT LEX'S OF CARYTOWN BLUE SUEDE PUMP BY ALDO SHOES, $70, AT ALDO SHOES

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CORAL COLLARED SILK BLOUSE BY CREATIVE COMMUNE, $89.75, AT SOUTH MOON UNDER BRIGHT PATTERNED SHIRT BY TORY BURCH, $125, AT NORDSTROM LIME PENCIL SKIRT BY J. CREW, $110, AT J. CREW ORANGE FLATS BY EXPRESS, $34.90, AT EXPRESS APPLE SUNGLASSES, $5, AT LEX'S OF CARYTOWN

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VERMILLION BLAZER BY BB DAKOTA, $96, AT SOUTH MOON UNDER ASHBURY FLORAL BUTTON-DOWN BY J. CREW, $88, AT J. CREW BLUE DRESS PANT BY ANN TAYLOR, $88, AT ANN TAYLOR PONY HAIR DALMATION SLIPPERS BY ALDO SHOES, $90, AT ALDO SHOES ink 29

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NUEDE MARBLE SUNGLASSES BY CHANEL, PRICE BY REQUEST, AT BAGGIO BRIGHT SILK SCARF BY RALPH LAUREN, PRICE BY REQUEST, AT BAGGIO MULTI-COLOR BUTTON-DOWN BY ESSAY, $8.99, AT GOODWILL 30

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SOFT TEAL SATEEN BLAZER BY STOOSH, $48, AT NORDSTROM SILK PATTERN DRESS BY CABI, PRICE BY REQUEST, AT CABIONLINE.COM METAL SPIKE FAN NECKLACE, $34, AT URBAN OUTFITTERS COLOR-BLOCK PUMP BY STEVE MADDEN, $49.00, AT SOUTH MOON UNDER

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GET A FREE CHILI’S AT VCU ‘BRINGING FOOTBALL TO CAMPUS’ MUG WHEN YOU COME IN ON GAME DAYS WEARING YOUR TEAM’S FOOTBALL GEAR Present this coupon to receive a Chili’s at VCU mug when you wear your NFL Fan Gear on game days. Offer only valid at Chili’s at VCU. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Limit one per person. Excludes tax and gratuity. Expires 02/28/11 or while supplies last. See store for details. CC73

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