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EDITORIAL

Anniversary

On a ‘greener’ note

W

hat a year 2009 was! As ‘Modern Plastics & Polymers’ completes its 5th year of service to the industry, it’s time to introspect, think ahead and act swiftly. Looking back and not withstanding the worldwide economic slump of the last year, there has been tremendous progress in the plastics & polymers space, coupled with the convergence of diverse disciplines. This phase could be an inflection point… As the industry gears up to ride on the fresh wave of investments and capex plans, here is our attempt to further boost the content offerings. Besides more rich and varied information lined up in this special edition in an all-new look, the endeavour is to make the edit sections more reader-friendly. Going forward and from a global perspective, steady signs at both macro and micro levels (especially in the emerging economies) over the recent months suggest the turnaround to be much faster than expected by most. The key question is how best one should prepare ‘now’ to meet the challenges of ‘tomorrow’. Well, this is precisely

our objective behind the theme of the ‘Business & Markets’ section, wherein 26 industry experts from several corners of the world analyse 5 key areas related to sustainable solutions. The need of the hour is to drive sustainability far beyond the CSR corridor and make it a continuous process by creating value on the three dimensions - people, planet and profit. Hopefully, it will lead to a combination of energy efficiency, faster & better machines to produce more and thin-wall products, better material grades, and faster processes. On this occasion of the 5th Anniversary, here’s a Big Thank You to all our internal and external stakeholders for this wonderful journey! Looking forward to your feedback, suggestions, etc to make it even more rewarding. Have a good read…

Editorial Advisory Board A E Ladhabhoy Plastics Technologist Dr Sushil K Verma Former Director General, CIPET Dr Swapan K Dhara Regional Technical Head, Basell Polyolefins India Pvt Ltd Mohan K Jain MD, Indoplast & past president, AIPMA P P Kharas Chairman, Ecoplast Raman M Patel Chairman, Industrial Products Mfg Co Vijay Merchant President, Polycraft

Manas R Bastia Editor manas@infomedia18.in

Editor Manas R Bastia Assistant Editor Sarita Kutty Features Writer Chandrashekhar Modi Research Desk KTP Radhika Jinoy, Sumedha Mahorey Correspondents Desk Prasenjit Chakraborty, Rachita Jha, Geetha Jayaraman Shivani Mody, Ayesha Augustine, Divya Karmakar Copy Desk Meghanadan Sudhakaran, Marcilin Madathil, Priyadarshini Basu, Swati Sharma Products Desk Michael Anthony, Sudheer Vathiyath, A Mohankumar Group Photo Editor & Creative Head Shiresh R Karrale Design Sharad Bharekar Production Pravin Koyande, Dnyaneshwar Goythale,Vikas Bobhate, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar, Kalpesh Dhanmeher, Lovey Fernandes, Pukha Dhawan, Varsha Nawathe, Abhay Borkar Marketing & Branding Jagruti Shah, Ganesh Mahale Chief Executive Officer Lakshmi Narasimhan

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14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Ltd. Infomedia 18 Ltd reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Ltd nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or

omission. Further, Infomedia 18 Ltd does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. No part of this publication June be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Editor: Manas R Bastia

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June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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CONTENTS

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Anniversary

BUSINESS & MARKETS

46

Sustainable Solutions 46

Novel Polymers

52

Process Technologies

56

Innovative Designs

60

Production Economy

65

Recycling & Reuse

Leaders Speak 70

Diane Gulyas, President - Performance Polymers, DuPont

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Nicholas Smith, Head - Coatings, Adhesives and Specialties (CAS) Business Unit - India, Bayer MaterialScience

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Facility Visit 78

LANXESS SCP Wuxi Compounding Plant: Integrating innovation with performance

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Plastics in construction: Building blocks of the future

92

Blow moulding for bottles: A ‘green’er package

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Design optimisation in mould making: Going with the flow

Sector Watch Market Trends Know-How

82

Manoj Mehta, Country Manager - India and SA ARC Operations, Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp

Performance Metrics 100

Fatigue strength: Standing the test of time Dr Werner Wilhelm Kraft, Dr Stefan Glaser, Sven Wenigmann, Kai Beringer, Jochen Huber, Dr Anka Bernatt, responsible for product development of engineering plastics within Business Management Automative, BASF SE

102

Management Mantras 102

Sustainable manufacturing: Towards a green economy Sandip Badgujar, Consultant, Savoir Faire Management Consultancy Pvt Ltd

Report 109

Chinaplas 2010: Setting the pace for future growth

REGUL AR SECTIONS Editorial......................... 17

Events Calendar........... 107

National News............... 20

Product Update............. 112

Asia News ..................... 24

Product Inquiry............. 127

World News................... 28

Advertisement Inquiry........ 131

Tech Updates ................ 33

Product Index............... 133

Design Innovations.......... 38

Advertisers’ List ............ 136

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

Highlights of Next Issue Sector Watch : Thermoforming Market Trends : Plastics in home applications Note: $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise


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NATIONAL NEWS

Anniversary

TRADE FAIR

Plasto Fair taps the potential of plastics

Anand Sharma delivering his inaugural speech

The Union Minister for Commerce and Industry, Anand Sharma, recently inaugurated the North-East International Plasto Fair, 2010 at Maniram Dewan Trade Centre in Assam. It unleashed opportunities for small and medium entrepreneurs dealing in plastic raw material, machinery, finished products and allied sectors. Inaugurating the four-day event, Sharma applauded the organisers and hoped that the fair would go a long way in exploring the prospects of plastics industry in the state. GROWTH

BASF India’s FY10 sales rises 24 per cent yoy

Prasad Chandran

EXPANSION PLANS

Gas cracker project in Assam beckons the plastics industry

A joint venture (JV) agreement for the Assam Gas Cracker project was signed recently between GAIL (India) Ltd, Numaligarh Refinery Ltd (NRL), Oil India Ltd (OIL) and Assam government. These entities are also the promoters of the JV company implementing the project. The integrated petrochemical complex being set up in Lepetkata, Dibrugarh, at a cost of Rs 5,460 crore will be implemented by a JV company Brahmaputra Crackers 20

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

The fair witnessed participation from over 120 plastics-based industries from across the country. Organised by Plastindia Foundation and the Federation of Industry & Commerce of the North East Region, the fair was an initiative of the stakeholders of Gas Cracker Project, including Assam government, GAIL, Numaligarh Refinery Ltd, Oil India Ltd and Department of Chemicals and Petrochemicals and Fertilizers, Government of India. The objective of the four-day event was to create awareness in the industry of the forthcoming opportunities in the region both in the petroleum and polymer-plastics sectors. There were demonstration of machinery and equipment as well. A series of discussion on various aspects of plastics industry also took place during the course of the event. The state government is also setting up a plastics park at Gelapukhuri area in Tinsukia district. A special-purpose vehicle will be set up in the next three months to run the park where the private sector will be the main player. The government has earmarked Rs 20 crore for acquisition of land. During the 2009-10 fiscal year, BASF India Ltd registered substantial growth over the previous year. Sales reached Rs 13.82 billion and profit before tax (PBT) reached Rs 1.51 billion during the year ended March 31, 2010, respectively, representing an increase of 24 per cent and 41 per cent over the previous year. This significant increase in PBT was mainly on account of higher capacity utilisation, along with improved operating results in the agricultural solutions, performance poducts and plastics businesses. and Polymers Ltd (BCPL) promoted by GAIL with 70 per cent equity. The remaining 30 per cent equity is shared equally among OIL, NRL and the Government of Assam. The project will be completed in 2012. Sixty per cent of the work has already been completed. The feedback for the petrochemical complex is 6.0 million standard cubic meter of gas per day (mmscmd) from Oil India Ltd, Duliajan, and 1.35 mmscmd from Oil & Natural Gas Corporation up to March 31, 2012 and 1.00 mmscmd, thereafter. The petrochemical complex would also

EVENT

Bookings for Plastivision India 2011 in full swing

To be held at the Bombay Exhibition Centre, NSE Complex, Goregaon, Mumbai from the January 20-24, 2011, bookings for space in Plastivision India 2011 are in full swing. The eighth edition of this international trade fair organised by The All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association (AIPMA) has till date confirmed national bookings of 300 exhibitors with an area booked for 12,800 sq m and is fast filling up. Besides, overseas exhibitors from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong & the UK, have provisionally booked their space in the international pavilion. Countries like Italy, Korea, USA & Germany are awaiting finalisation of procedures with their respective associations and would soon register. “In 2009, we created strong results, despite the crisis, through our discipline and focus on cost management,” said Prasad Chandran, Chairman & Managing Director, BASF India Ltd. “While the world was still grappling with the impact of recession, India managed to overcome the crisis faster than the others,” he added. “The integration of Ciba companies into BASF will further augment business growth. Additionally, the state-of-the-art technical laboratory at Chandivali in Mumbai will also add value,” he observed.

utilise 1,60,000 tonne per annum (tpa) of petrochemical grade naphtha from NRL. The complex will comprise a gas separatiori plants. The complex has been configured for a capacity of 2,00,000 tpa of HDPE and LLDPE and 60,000 tpa of propylene.


NATIONAL NEWS

ACCREDITATION

Hemetek Techno Instruments gets ISO Certificate

The Mumbai-based Hemetek Techno Instruments, testing laboratory partner of MOCON Inc, has been accredited by India’s National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories (NABL) under the ISO/IEC 17025:2005 standard for oxygen and water vapour permeation testing of plastic barrier materials. About the certification, Viraj Devasthale, director, Hemetek, said, “It is a significant achievement for a private laboratory to receive this accreditation.

COLLABORATION

LANXESS India signs MoU with ICT

LANXESS India, the specialty chemicals company, has entered into a collaboration with Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, for industrial research and scientific projects, whereby both the parties signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU). The subjects, around which LANXESS projects could be undertaken by ICT, would include process improvement of existing production lines, process development of

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Typically, the accreditation process is not economically viable for a nongovernment owned facility due to the significant investment in technical staff, instruments and the process.” The other testing procedures offered by Hemetek include barrier & headspace analysis, leak detection and burst testing for food, beverage & pharmaceutical/medical packaging. The testing services are also intended for manufacturers and converters of rigid & flexible packaging containers and films. The new lab at Mumbai will also be targeting multinational brand owners who want to ensure that the testing standards they have established in other parts of the world can be replicated in India. NABL, which operates as an autonomous body under the Ministry of Science and Technology, is a government authorised accreditation body for testing and calibration laboratories.

new products, equipment design, and development of catalysts. Dr Joerg Strassburger, Managing Director & Country Representative, LANXESS India, said, “We are eager to collaborate with a renowned institute like ICT in the space of chemical technology. This is a first-of-its-kind collaboration for us at LANXESS India and we are convinced that this association will be beneficial for both parties.” Prof G D Yadav, Director, ICT, said, “We are glad to be working with the globally-renowned specialty chemicals company LANXESS. We are convinced that we will substantially contribute to the further growth and success of LANXESS in India.”

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

STRATEGIC MOVE

Reliance inks Russian firm

pact

with

Reliance Industries Ltd (RIL) has formed a joint venture with Russia’s leading petrochemical firm SIBUR to make butyl rubber. RIL, which signed a memorandum of understanding with the Russian company, said butyl rubber would be produced at its integrated petrochemical site at Jamnagar in Gujarat. SIBUR will provide proprietary technology for butyl rubber polymerisation and its finishing, while RIL will supply monomers and its infrastructure and utilities, a company release said. SIBUR, which is a leading player in Russia and Eastern Europe, operates across the entire petrochemical value chain, from gas processing to the production of monomers and plastics, synthetic rubbers, mineral fertilisers, tyres and industrial rubber goods.

MILESTONES

Indian Oil begins commercial sale of polymers

Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) recently commenced its first commercial dispatch of polypropylene from its petrochemicals complex at Panipat. On the occasion, B M Bansal, Chairman, IOC, said, “With the completion of our petrochemical complex in Panipat, we have touched a major milestone in our ambitious journey towards emerging as an integrated and diversified company. It is perhaps our biggest investment at one location. With this, Panipat will emerge as a major hub and the primary driver behind an unprecedented industrialisation spree in Northern India, triggering off massive investments in a range of downstream plastic processing and allied

industries in the region. IOC has reaffirmed its capability to offer to customers a full product slate covering all segments of petrochemicals, viz, LAB, PX-PTA and polymers.” IOC plans to expand the capacity at Panipat by October with an investment of $ 226 million to meet the growing fuel demand. There are plans to shut down a crude distillation unit of 1,20,000 bpd capacity, a hydrocracker unit, and a delayed coker unit for 45 days for requisite alterations, during the monsoons in August.


MPP (June 2010) 1Tab-31


MPP June 2010) 1Tab-32


ASIA NEWS

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Anniversary

NEW FACILITY

Borouge to develop its own R&D centre in Abu Dhabi

Officials from Borouge during the ground breaking ceremony

Borouge, the Abu Dhabi chemicals enterprise that makes plastics from natural gas, is developing its own research and development (R&D) capabilities after decades of relying on its European partner. The joint venture between Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) and the Viennabased chemicals producer Borealis is preparing the ground for an innovation centre in the capital, which should be completed by the end of next year. With a total investment in excess of $ 70 million in equipment and facilities, Borouge’s Innovation Centre in Abu Dhabi will work together with the European innovation centres of Borealis as well as with local and international educational institutions such as the Petroleum Institute of Abu Dhabi, to further develop the competence of polymer science in the United Arab Emirates. It is expected EXPANSION

Qatar to expand ethane plant, start polyethylene unit

Qatar, holder of the world’s third largest natural gas reserves, may expand the capacity of a new ethane cracker by 23 per cent as the country ramps up production.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

to be completed at the end of 2011. More than 50 international researchers and engineers will focus on innovations for compounding as well as innovative plastics solutions for the pipe, automotive and advanced packaging industries in close co-operation and partnership with Borouge’s customers throughout the value chain, ensuring that specific customer requirements are met. “This will be a new function in Borouge. It will be our first R&D centre. We have laboratories for quality control, but so far innovation was done by Borealis,” said Dr Petri Lehmus, who has been seconded to the company from Borealis to head the initiative. Borouge will be carrying out its own R&D because it has undertaken a huge expansion that is expected to turn the company into a major international exporter of polythene and polypropylene plastics by 2014. Its annual production capacity is expected to increase almost sevenfold to 4 million tonne of plastic from about 6,00,000 tonne last year. Borouge’s innovation centre, which will be located near the southern tip of Abu Dhabi island, will focus on developing long-life plastics that vehicle and white goods makers particularly need. Other potential applications are in advanced food packaging, plastic pipes and cable coatings, Dr Lehmus said. He further added, “The pipe, wire and cable industries are very big markets for us in the Middle East and also in China & India.” Output will be raised to 1.6 million metric tonnes a year at the Ras Laffan Olefins Co cracker that began operation earlier this year producing 1.3 million tonnes, said Mohammed Yousef al Mulla, general manager, Qatar Petrochemical Co during the inauguration of the plant. “The cracker may also be altered to process a mix of gases,” he added. Speaking in Ras Laffan, Qatar, al Mulla said, “We are having a study now. In the future, we may process propane and ethane.” The cracker, which makes ethylene, is currently running at about 64 per cent capacity and is not expected to reach full output until August or

TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Sinopec-SABIC JV to use Dow process for EO/EG plant in Tianjin Sinopec, SABIC JV in China - SinopecSABIC (Tianjin) Petrochemical Co Ltd (SSTPC) - is using METEOR process technology from Dow Chemical Co to produce ethylene oxide (EO)/ethylene glycol (EG) at its recently started Sinopec Tianjin complex – the largest single EO reactor in China. METEOR EO/EG process uses a single-reactor design and a unique EO catalyst, which combines both high activity and high selectivity to offer an efficient route to EO/EG production. Commercialised in 1994, the technology is said to allow manufacturers to produce ethylene oxide and ethylene glycol with few steps, less equipment and smaller plot size. NEW PRODUCT

Arkema and Toyobo to develop bio-based resins

French chemical company Arkema Group has joined is working with Toyoba Co Ltd of Osaka, Japan, for creating a new generation of high temperature resins made from renewable resources. Philippe Bussi, a spokesman for Arkema said that the new polyamide resins contain 30-70 per cent renewable resources derived from castor oil. The companies are initially working on two product range with melting points around 250°C and 315°C. September when Qatar Chemical Co’s high density polyethylene plant, known as Q Chem II, starts operating, al Mulla said. Qatar, the world’s biggest producer of liquefied natural gas, plans to start pumping 23 billion cubic feet of gas a day by 2014. The Ras Laffan cracker will supply ethylene to both Q Chem II and Qatofin Co’s linear low density polyethylene plant, which started operation last year. The ethane cracker and a pipeline that supplies ethylene to the polyethylene plants cost $ 1.37 billion. Polyethylene is used to produce plastics that are used in cars, washing machines and bags.


ASIA NEWS PRICE TRENDS

PET prices in Asia register decline

Low feedstock costs have put pressure on PET prices n Asia, particularly in China, where low domestic prices have been observed. Retreating crude oil prices have moderated feedstock costs amid sufficient stock levels with traders. Crude oil prices have retreated below $ 80 for the first time since the middle of March. In Asia, spot PX prices declined by arbout $ 30/tonne to $ 1035-1040/tonne CFR Taiwan/China as spot PTA offers recorded decrease of $ 40/tonne at $ 945-950/tonne

SEMINAR

Latest compounding systems unveiled

Under the title ‘Compounding of highlyfilled polyolefins’, Maag Pump Systems, K-Tron, OMYA and Reimelt Henschel recently held a one-day seminar in both Singapore and Shanghai. In several presentations, the latest technologies, methods and components were unveiled for improving existing processes and operating new compounding systems as efficiently as possible. The seminar met with considerable interest from its target audience. Up to 130 trade visitors attended

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CFR China in line with weaker market sentiment and sufficient stock levels. MEG markets have lost $ 40/tonne this month due to high inventory levels and the not so optimistic news regarding the global economy to $ 850/tonne CFR China. However, despite lower feedstock costs, export PET offers for South Korean origins held steady over the past week at $ 1320-1350/tonne FOB Busan, cash basis. Most major South Korean producers elected to stand firm on their offer levels, pointing to their lack of sales pressure as well as their expectations of seeing better demand in the upcoming days in line with the improving weather conditions. Inside China, domestic PET offers recorded Chinese Yuan 100/tonne ($ 14/tonne) decreases this week at both ends of the range at Chinese Yuan 10,650-11,000/tonne ($1334-1377/ tonne without VAT) on ex-warehouse/FD China, cash including VAT basis.

the seminars. It focussed on various topics, such as advanced minerals, material handling guide lines for pneumatic transportation & gravimetric feeding systems, dosing systems, extruder technology and the use of gear pumps to boost the efficiency of the compounding system. The speakers helped the customers to gain a comprehensive overview of compounding processes. “The brisk discussion between and during the presentations showed that these seminars truly met the needs of the market,” said Stefan Kalt, Director - Product Management and Innovation, Maag Pump Systems, echoing the positive mood of the event. The event organisers have understood the market’s wishes, and are planning similar seminars in the future.

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

AGREEMENT

China in a $ 23 billion MoU with NNPC China’s State Construction Engineering Corporation (CSCEC) has signed a $ 23 billion agreement with Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) for the construction of three refineries and a fuel complex in Nigeria. Three new refineries will be built in Bayelsa, Kogi and Lagos states, but the location for these is yet to be confirmed. The project will add extra refining capacity of 7,50,000 bpd and will require financing and credits from Chinese authorities and banks to complete. Despite being the world’s twelfth largest producer and the eighth-largest exporter of oil, Nigeria imports about 85 per cent of its fuel needs due to neglect and inefficient management of its four state-owned refineries. Construction of the new refineries is expected to help reduce the influx of refined product imports into Nigeria.

PROJECT ON STREAM

Shell’s largest integrated petrochemicals hub comes onstream in Singapore

Royal Dutch Shell’s largest integrated petrochemicals manufacturing hub, including a new cracker at the refinery on Bukom Island and other Shell facilities on Jurong Island, has come onstream recently in Singapore. With this new capacity, Shell will be in a position to serve the Asian market and also spur a new wave of high-value downstream investments in the chemical industry. The company has planned a capacity revamp that will enable it to operate its Singapore oil refinery at 5,00,000 bpd. Along with the two new units, the revamped ones will widen feedstock choices for its new ethylene

cracker. The cracker has the options to use a range of feedstock other than naphtha like liquefied petroleum gas and heavy liquid hydrocarbon such as hydrowax. A high-vacuum unit has been added to provide feedstock to the refinery’s hydrocracker that will produce hydrowax for the new ethylene cracker. Shell has built a new sulfurrecovery unit, which allows the refinery to process more sour crude. The project also includes a 7,50,000 tpa monoethylene glycol unit on nearby Jurong island, which started in December 2009.


WORLD NEWS

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Anniversary

MERGER

Battenfeld and Cincinnati unite to form extrusion machinery brand

Battenfeld Extrusionstechnik, Cincinnati Extrusion and B+C Extrusion Systems (Foshan) Ltd, formerly operating as independent entities, have now combined their strengths under the new brand of Battenfeld-Cincinnati. Together with American Maplan Corporation, also a member of the group, they form one of the largest global supplier of extrusion lines for the NEW MATERIAL

Audi relies on LANXESS’ material

production of pipes, profiles, film and sheet, with manufacturing plants on three continents. Customer benefit is a top priority at battenfeld-cincinnati. This is manifested in the formation of three central divisions: the Construction Division headed by Rainer Kottmeier; the Infrastructure Division led by Walter Häder; and the Packaging Division headed by Dr Henning Stieglitz. These divisions would pool in the core competencies of all predecessor brands, bringing to the customer, expert knowledge from a total of around 120 years of experience in the extrusion industry. An outstanding international production company will emerge from the co-ordination of battenfeldcincinnati’s five production sites. Together with a number of additional sales subsidiaries and agencies, this will result in an all-encompassing network with global service and closeness to customers worldwide.

Automatik teams with Leistritz Extrusion

28

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

ASTM International announces new proficiency testing programme The ASTM International Proficiency Testing Programme recently announced a new Proficiency Testing Programme (PTP) on Elemental Analyses of Thermoplastics by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry utilising compression moulded specimens. This ASTM PTP will utilise polyolefin samples and analysis according to ASTM D6247, Standard Test Method for Analysis of Elemental Content in Polyolefins by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, or alternative XRF methods. The PTP will be conducted twice annually - in January and June - starting from January, 2011.

material is then supplied to organic sheets manufacturer Bond-Laminates (another development partner). The

organic plastic sheets are used alongside an aluminium sheet to reinforce the complex front-end. Unlike conventional metals, these organic plastic sheets can be formed into virtually any shape by heating. The use of this innovative LANXESS technology makes the component lighter, thereby reducing the overall weight of the vehicle and its fuel consumption, as well as cutting CO2 emissions.

Automatik Plastics Machinery GmbH, and its subsidiary in the US, Automatik Inc, have teamed up with American Leistritz Extrusion Co, and helped place a state-of-the-art compounding line at the Polymers Center of Excellence (PCE) in Charlotte, North Carolina, the only one of its kind in the US. The extruder is a Leistritz Extrusiontechnik GmbH ZSE-50 MAXX, vented, co-rotating, twin screw, 1200 rpm, with 300 hp motor. The Automatik pelletiser is a SPHERO 70

with a CENTRO 150 integrated water system and dryer. The new system is rated at 2,000 lbs/hr throughput. The system is controlled so as to permit PCE to perform both small batch trials, as well as longer experimental production runs. Both, American Leistritz as well as Automatik expressed optimism at the prospect of continuing to work with PCE given the positive exposure the institution has provided the plastics industry in North Carolina and the southeast.

A plastic-metal composite technology developed by the specialty chemicals group LANXESS is being used by German car-maker Audi in the front end of its new top-of-the-range flagship A8 model. LANXESS produces the hightech plastics material - Durethan - used to make organic plastic sheets. This TIE-UP

NEW PROGRAMME


WORLD NEWS

MARKET TREND

BOPA film industry on an upward growth curve

A recent study from PCI Films Consulting has revealed that the serious over-capacity that has faced the bi-oriented nylon film (BOPA) industry in the recent years appears to be nearly over. Rationalisation of production coupled with growth in demand served as major factors in driving this excess capacity from the market. Simon King, Managing Director, PCI, stated, “The massive increase in capacity that occurred in the past has

STUDY

LDPE-market on road to recovery According to a recent study made by Ceresana Research, the start of 2011 will see a growth in LDPE demand despite the decline registered during 2009. The Asia Pacific region in particular, already the largest consumer of LDPE, will see growth and an increase in its share of global consumption to more than 39 per cent. LDPE production is particularly being expanded

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finally been absorbed into the market, and our projections for demand growth over the next five years suggest that the new capacity is required to satisfy world demand.” Between 2004 and 2006, capacities for BOPA film production grew at high rates. The entry of new producers and capacity expansion by suppliers to meet local and export needs made the over-supply situation worse. This excess capacity intensified competition caused world production utilisation rates to fall by 20 per cent, thereby putting pressure on prices and margins and expanding the market horizons of most suppliers as they sought business to fill their plants. The solution was to idle capacity, re-engineer some lines to produce other films and to run lines at reduced speeds. Some producers even exited the industry.

in the oil-rich countries of the Middle East with capacity increases of around 3.5 million tonne planned to take place by 2014. Accordingly, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iran and the other countries that make up the region will be the world’s largest plastic exporters. “The trend of substituting LDPE with other polymers is declining again throughout the industrialised nations. Opportunities for LDPE can be seen, for example, in the application of coatings and packaging for medical products. These applications will recover relatively quickly from the effects of the economical crisis,” says Oliver Kutsch, owner, Ceresana Research.

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

JOINT VENTURE

DuPont and Tate & Lyle JV to increase production of Bio-PDO

DuPont Tate & Lyle Bio Products LLC, a joint venture (JV) between DuPont and Tate & Lyle, will be expanding its London facility to increase production of bio-based 1,3 propanediol (BioPDO) by 35 per cent. Construction is scheduled to start in June, and the expansion is expected to be complete by second quarter of 2011. The JV produces Bio-PDO from corn instead of petroleum-based feedstock using a proprietary fermentation process. Bio-PDO is sold under the brands Zemea and Susterra. These novel renewable products have met strong demand,” said Steve Mirshak, President, DuPont Tate & Lyle Bio Products. Craig Binetti, President, DuPont Applied BioSciences, said, “This expansion is an important milestone in how superior performing, cost-effective products that reduce reliance on fossil fuels are creating a viable bio-based business.”

PRODUCT LAUNCH

Shrinkable plastic material launched

Shrink Nanotechnologies Inc has announced the launch of its proprietary advanced shrinkable plastic material, which is being branded under the name NanoShrink. “NanoShrink has been designed with a flexible multi-format architecture for use in the biological, biomechanical and alterative energy generation (solar) industries, which eliminates the need for clean rooms and other highly complex & expensive robotics or tools in order to design devices which function on a nano-scale,” said Mark L Baum, CEO, Shrink Nanotechnologies Inc. This innovative material uniformly compresses and naturally ‘shrinks’ during

heating, enabling complex structures to be designed at a macro-level, and then to be reduced with the same integrity and stability on a micro- or nano-scale.

The adoption of NanoShrink and its related products and technologies is expected to create a paradigm shift in the production of microfluidic, biological and diagnostic chips, likely leading to accelerated production times, improved quality & quantity of output, and reduced manufacturing costs for multiple industries.


TECH UPDATES

Replacing steel in battery electric vehicles SABIC Innovative Plastics has announced a new portfolio of advanced Noryl and Valox automotive resins designed to help customers create alternative power train solutions by displacing weight and increasing performance for hybrid, plug-in hybrid (PHEV), and battery electric vehicles (BEV). These new materials offer OEMs superior impact strength, toughness, hightemperature resistance and other high-performance properties vs competitive materials to give these manufacturers a huge edge in the high-stakes global automotive arena, according to SABIC officials. Noryl, polyphenylene oxide (PPO) and Valox, polybutadiene terephthalate (PBT) resins from SABIC are good choices for battery components, including frames and housings. These resins also offer significant weight reduction, chemical & temperature resistance, dimensional stability and flame retardance, according to company officials.

Pushing the boundaries of stereolithography In a quest to stretch the limits of stereolithography (SL) performance for additive manufacturing, DSM Somos has introduced Somos® NeXt for approaching true thermoplastic performance. Somos® NeXt produces parts that demonstrate a combination of stiffness and toughness which typically characterises thermoplastics, yet with all of the high feature detail, dimensional accuracy and aesthetics offered by stereolithography. “This is a material one needs to hold in hand in order to fully appreciate. The stiffness/toughness combination produces a look and

Polyamide for reducing carbon footprint Rhodia recently announced the launch of Technyl® eXten that complements its Technyl and Technyl Star™ ranges. Further, it broadens the use of polyamide to technically advanced applications while reducing their ecological footprint. Rhodia’s Technyl eXten solution using polyamide 6.10, produced in part from castor oil, is environment-friendly and offers users high-performance and economically attractive solutions along with a reduced ecological footprint, according to the company officials. Technyl eXten’s benefits include excellent mechanical and thermal performance, similar to that of PA 6.

New blend of thermoplastic starch and biodegradable co-polyester

A new blend of thermoplastic starch (TPS) and biodegradable copolyester (PBAT) degrades more rapidly than the copolyester alone. This finding made by the Teknor Apex Company has broadened application possibilities for blown & cast film, sheet, and thermoformed and injection moulded parts intended for composting. With TPS content ranging up to 40 per cent, Terraloy™ 20000 series compounds have passed the ASTM D6400 test for plastics intended for composting in aerobic facilities.

feel that is so similar to a thermoplastic, people are really surprised that it’s actually stereolithography. The unique combination of mechanical properties is what gives Somos®NeXt its key advantage compared with all previous SL resin options,” said Vince Adams,

Marketing Manager, DSM Somos. Parts produced from Somos® NeXt are ideal for use in functional testing applications as well as low-volume manufacturing applications where exceptional toughness is required. Applicable market segments for Somos® NeXt include aerospace, automotive, consumer products and electronics. It is also compatible for producing functional enduse performance prototypes including snap-fit designs, impellers, duct work, connectors, electronic covers, automotive housings, dashboard assemblies, packaging and sporting goods.

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TECH UPDATES

Energy saving injection moulding machine EcoPower, the new injection moulding machine series launched by the Wittmann group features a compact, beltless injection unit and a clean clamping unit with direct drive. The braking energy of the drives, which is normally either lost or recovered by an elaborate, costly system, is utilised by the EcoPower within the machine itself. This series comes with a modular concept and is preconfigured. Variety of machine parameter combinations is available, depending on customers’ requirements. The machine concept consists of a basic platform that can be supplemented by comprehensive extension packages according to individual needs.

Tie-bar-less machine with increased clamping force The tie-bar-less Engel machine series now offers a new size with a maximum clamping force of 1600 kN. This machine replaces the current Engel victory and e-victory 150 with its improved technical specifications and modern design. Besides the increased clamping force, the new machine size also offers many other developments .

LASER-gauge heads for advanced diameter measurement SIKORA AG recently presented its latest LASER series 6000 and opens up a new age of precision diameter measurement. These devices expand SIKORA’s current range of diameter gauges. They unite industrial design with high precision and reliability and are advanced with regard to handling, safety and flexibility, according to company officials. The 2,500 measurements per second provide high single value precision, ensure an optimum line control and provide reliable statistical data. With the new gauges the product diameter is measured up

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Fast and economic ultrasonic welding of thermoplastics Ultrasonic welding delivers excellent quality at high-production speed and is therefore a preferred joining method for injection moulded parts made of amorphous or semi-crystalline polymers. Herrmann Ultraschall has introduced advanced equipment for the process. The advantage of this process is that a high-strength, gas-and watertight bond is produced within seconds, without any additives. Because the ultrasonic welding process requires low energy consumption, the thermal impact on the parts is minimal. Hard, amorphous plastics such as PC, PS, SAN, ABS and PMMA have good transmission characteristics for ultrasonic waves. Semi-crystalline plastics such as PA, PP, PE and POM are best welded in the immediate near field of the sonotrode. Welded parts can be processed immediately after joining, so that ultrasonic welding units can be integrated easily into automation lines.

to 0.2 micrometers precisely. In addition, the company has integrated a number of practical improvements. Increasing the opening of the gauges to twice as big as the measuring range ensures an easy and safe product feed through. Another highlight is a pluggable universal interface module for all connections integrated directly into the gauge head. An innovative feature carried over from the larger LASER Series 2000 gauges is the swivel gauge head

design. This allows for the gauge head to be easily moved up, out of the extrusion line. The measuring axes are arranged in such a way that the gauge is open at the bottom to prevent dirt and water from falling into the measuring area, according to the company officals.


DESIGN INNOVATIONS

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Anniversary

Every organisation, at any point in time, has some primary source of limitation - a primary constraint - impeding its ability to do more of what it is trying to do. Even more Every organisation, at any point in time, has some primary source of limitation - Every organisation, at any point in time, has some primary source of limitation - a a important, and useful, is the fact that this constraint colours the policies, - a primary constraint - impeding its ability to do more of what it is trying to do. practices, and resulting problems found throughout the organisation.

Elegant cantilever chair

Myto cantilever chair is an innovatively and ergonomically designed stackable plastic chair. The design has been developed in collaboration with the Italian furniture maker Plank and the Germany-based BASF. According to the company officials, the chair is the first of its kind, made entirely from an advanced engineering plastic called Ultradur® high speed plastic which has an extraordinary flowability. The particular strength and high flowability of the plastic enables a unique transition from thick to thin cross-section. The chair, produced as a monoblock, presents a strikingly stable frame into which the seat and the backrest fit perfectly with their net-like perforations.

PET bottles provide on-the-shelf ‘Muscle’

Long-time fitness centre owner turned beverage entrepreneur Steve Ondish and his partners have launched FYXX Hybrid®, a line of natural, caffeine-infused spring water beverages. Constar, a leading supplier of high-performance PET packaging to the beverage industry, is supplying 20-ounce (590 ml) PET bottles with Vertical Compensation Technology™ (VCT) for four FYXX Hybrid flavours: Original, Lucky Lemon Blast, Tropical Citrus Smash and Blue Razzberry Storm. The company plans to expand the line with an additional flavour - FYXX Freak. The innovative bottle design includes an eyecatching cobalt blue colourant, reinforcing the image of a refreshing, spring water-based beverage. Roll-fed labels with bright, flavour-specific graphics of white, orange and yellow ‘pop’ off the brilliant blue bottle. The result is a product with true shelf appeal.

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DESIGN INNOVATIONS

Window profiles for thermal optimisation

BaySystems has developed an innovative design concept, the Top Therm 90, for slimline windows and facades. The design incorporates insulating properties that cut heat losses by around half as compared to the solutions currently on offer. The profiles with a thickness of just 90 mm owe their outstanding insulating properties to a combination of Baytherm® polyurethane insulating foam and a thin, weather-resistant and dimensionally stable outer shell made using the Baydur® casting system. As a result, they more than satisfy the growing demands for thermal insulation of buildings that now apply in a number of countries, for example, the provisions of the new EnEV energy-saving regulations in Germany. Despite its slimline design, Top Therm 90 meets the requirements for use in passive houses. The Uf-value, as a measure for the amount of heat that passes through one square meter of frame in the space of an hour, is just 0.8 W/m2, according to the company officials. The concept is based on an integrated approach that views the windows and frames as a single unit in thermal and structural terms. The aim is to develop and test slimline profile designs and highly efficient glazing. In the Top Therm 90 design, a layer of polyurethane insulating foam ensures that there is virtually no contact between the warm and cold sides of the frame profiles.

Elegant new coffee machine

Innovative design provides patient comfort

The O2-RESQ™ System is designed in an innovative way for providing immediate ventilation in cases of congestive heart failure and other respiratory distress. It includes a face mask with a soft, rounded elastomeric cushion that fits comfortably on the patient’s face and is free of odour, according to manufacturer Pulmodyne Inc. The translucent cushion, or seal, is made of a custom-formulated compound in the Medalist® range of medical-grade elastomers from Teknor Apex Company. The soft, 37 Shore A elastomer is over-moulded onto the transparent front portion of the mask, which is made of a rigid terpolymer material. Medalist elastomers are odourless, latexfree, and contain no phthalates, according to Lisa Charno, Medical Market Manager - Thermoplastic Elastomer Division, Teknor Apex. Over-moulding the Medalist elastomer provides strong adhesion to the rigid substrate and combines different functions of the soft and hard components into what is in effect a single part.

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Of late, the single serve coffee world has been buzzing about the new Senseo Quadrante HD7860/90. The machine features sleek new styling and all the favourite features that fit comfortably into any modern kitchen style – and a sharp departure from the Senseo’s traditional cylindrical style. The innovative design not only adds an extra appeal but also cuts cost by incorporating light-weight material in its fabrication. During the summer last year, Philips Consumer Lifestyle BV presented the coffee machine. The body is made up of Multibatch® micro-talc, which is sourced from Multibase.


BUSINESS & MARKETS

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS Novel Polymers ...............................................................................44 Process Technologies ......................................................................52 Innovative Designs .........................................................................56 Production Economy ......................................................................60 Recycling & Reuse ...........................................................................64

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Novel Polymers

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Novel polymers

The next ‘green’ revolution New materials present big opportunities for fascinating innovations. And so is the case in the fields of polymers. Depleting landfill capacities, pressure from retailers, growing consumer interest in sustainable plastics solutions, independence from fossil oil & gas, and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, are the key drivers leading to the development of ‘green’ plastics, finds Sarita Kutty.

Charlie Crew

President and Chief Executive Officer, SABIC Innovative Plastics

Hermann Althoff Senior Vice President Engineering Plastics Asia Pacific, BASF

Frederic Scheer

Fredric Petit

Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Cereplast Inc

Director - Sustainability, DSM Engineering Plastics

Dan Sawyer

Managing Director - Asia Pacific, NatureWorks LLC

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Mandar Amrute Market Development Leader, Arkema India


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he engineering plastics sector, especially within Asia, is said to have considerable growth potential. This is mainly due to the fact that several OEMs have so far not exploited the opportunities for metal replacement in cars & trucks as well as in household appliances and many other applications. The increasing usage of engineering plastics in automotives, transportation, healthcare, electrical & electronics, telecommunications, and building & construction segments are driving growth in Asia and will continue to do well as the standard of living in these countries continues to rise. Furthermore, car producers are under pressure to build more fuel-efficient cars that have less emission. The answer is to build more lightweight cars, which can be achieved by replacing metal parts in the powertrain, exterior and interior of the car with high performance engineering plastics. These materials are an integral part of complex, high-value, high-performance automotive systems and make a significant contribution to the performance, safety and comfort of modern motor vehicles. Concurs Hermann Althoff, Senior Vice President - Engineering Plastics Asia Pacific, BASF, “Engineering plastics markets were growing at healthy rates before the financial crisis last year. After a loss in Q1 2009, we saw demand

“Nano-scale technology can bring improved functionality to plastics” Charlie Crew, President and CEO, SABIC Innovative Plastics In terms of sustainability, what’s ahead in 2010 for resin manufacturers and users? We anticipate that 2010 will continue to demonstrate increasing expectations and use of PCR-based products and advances in biobased materials. Consumers and governments continue to press for sustainable, environmentally responsible products. Heavy use of commodity resins without regard to their green attributes is going by the wayside. The old way is being replaced by new approaches to product design, new resin formulations and increasingly close cooperation between manufacturers and resin suppliers, from early design stages onward.

Does modification of polymers and rubbers with nanoscale particles lead to sustainable products? Nano-scale technology can bring improved functionality to plastics, enabling reduction of the amount of material required in applications or reducing energy requirements in both production and application use. As long as designers remain aware of end-oflife strategies, nano-scale materials may offer significant environmental benefits. The exact nature and amount of these benefits will depend on the specific details of the material and the end-product.

for engineering plastics grow as a result of government stimulus packages to support the automotive industry. In 2010 material shortages for polyamide 6.6 base polymers continues and prices of other raw materials are increasing rapidly due to tight supply and surge in market demand leading to an increase in prices of engineering plastics. Nevertheless, we expect the strong demand to continue.”

responses are inherent in the traditional performance and the functionality of plastics. Corroborates Charlie Crew, President and Chief Executive Officer, SABIC Innovative Plastics, “The most obvious result of using plastics in a multitude of industries is weight savings. In automotive, for example, the plastics industry may deliver the greatest environmental benefit by developing new and more effective means of reducing vehicle weight, which reduces emissions by increasing fuel economy.” However, every application needs to be looked at on a case-by-case basis. What is ‘green’ in one application is not necessarily ‘green’ when used elsewhere. Explains Althoff, “For example, some BASF plastics like Ecoflex® and Ecovio® are biodegradable and are great for applications like mulch films and grocery bags where the plastics can be composted under controlled conditions. On the other hand, non-biodegradable plastics are better for durable applications where biodegradation is not desirable and in which application may be more suitably recycled or used in a waste-to-energy scenario at end of life.” DSM Engineering Plastics too has been leveraging its unique combination of competences in life science and material science clusters, and is actively developing and commercialising new bio-based performance engineering plastics. Affirms Fredric Petit, Director – Sustainability, DSM Engineering Plastics, “Our latest launch is EcoPaXX, the 70 per cent bio-renewable high performance polyamide 410, which is carbon neutral from cradle-to-gate.“

Tackling the sustainability issue

New resins that are being developed today comprise both bio-based materials as well as recycle grade materials. Besides, the plastics industry has been responding to the challenges of sustainability and ‘green technologies’ in many ways. Some

“It is important that people understand just how sustainable plastics are in general” Hermann Althoff, Senior Vice President - Engineering Plastics Asia Pacific, BASF How has the industry been responding to the challenges of sustainability? Sustainability is an important criterion for all products. It is important that people understand just how sustainable plastics are in general: thanks to their light weight and technical properties they can play an important part in increasing energy efficiency in numerous applications.The ‘green’ issue is quite fashionable right now and it is sometimes difficult to know what customers want when they ask for product that is ‘green’ or ‘eco’. But carbon footprints and measurements of greenhouse gas emissions only look at a small part of the bigger picture. Measuring sustainability requires lifecycle assessments that cover a range of relevant ecological, economic and social indicators. BASF’s Eco-efficiency Analysis and SocioEco-efficiency Analysis investigate lifecycle performance in all these dimensions of

sustainability. We can use these analyses to compare the sustainability of alternative solutions for a given application over the entire lifecycle. What is the most important sustainability initiative of your company, and why? Ensuring sustainable development is one of BASF’s four strategic guidelines. We take a holistic approach and tend not to think in terms of initiatives for individual industries or projects. The engineering plastics business in Asia Pacific, therefore, plays its part in achieving the environmental and safety goals defined for the entire BASF Group. However, one project initiated by BASF at the end of 2009 might be of particular interest to readers. Together with partners, we have launched a pilot project in Thailand to highlight the potential of composting as a feasible and effective management option for household organic waste.

June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Novel Polymers

“Sustainability challenges need to be adressed over the full value chain” Fredric Petit, Director – Sustainability, DSM Engineering Plastics Throw light on the opportunities to reduce the environmental impact of conventional plastics. Achieving sustainability means simultaneously pursuing social equity, environmental quality and economic prosperity, in other words creating value on the three dimensions of people, planet and profit. Hence, while sustainability trends call for new innovations, these are not limited to bio-based resins. Other innovations, including solutions based on nano-technology, have the potential to contribute to a lower environmental footprint over the value chain. Moreover, conventional plastics have earned their importance to a large extent thanks to their contribution to reduce the environmental impact

versus substitute materials. Metal and rubber replacement by plastics results in most cases in weight reduction for the automotive industry, leading to better fuel economy and reduced GHG emissions. Plastics allow for the insulation of homes, recycling opportunities after the usefull life and many more. The environmental impact of conventional plastics can be further reduced by eliminating hazardous substances. Hence, sustainability challenges need to be adressed over the full value chain. An integrated approach is needed to come up with the right answers. Energy reduction in each phase is the dominant target. Also in the production of energy, the GHG emissions need to be reduced. Renewable energy is a way to contribute.

Further, global sustainability initiatives (for example, RoHS, EPEAT, EU Ecolabel, TCO, Blue Angel, WEEE, among others) are driving development of environment-friendly products and the use of post-industrial and post-consumer recycled content.

instead of 260°C and has better flow properties. In processing, this results in energy savings of up to 20 per cent.” Another example could be the case where SABIC Innovative Plastics continues to evolve the use of direct metallised Ultem resin in lighting reflectors, helping reduce the weight of the reflector by up to 55 per cent over the incumbent technology, a small but significant savings that in annual greenhouse gas emissions is the equivalent of up to 200 zeroemissions cars on the road for every one million cars using reflectors made with Ultem resin. The functionality of plastic

Of cost and energy

Economic factors already encourage plastics manufacturers to continuously strive to reduce energy and raw material use. For example, process improvements and catalyst improvements help improve the embedded energy in plastics. In the BASF Verbund, production facilities, energy flow, logistics and infrastructure are intelligently networked with each other, in order to increase production yields, save resources & energy and reduce logistic costs. Avers Althoff, “Plastics help reduce emissions. They can be processed at lower temperatures than glass or metal. They save energy for heating or cooling when used as insulation. They reduce food wastage and reduce the energy required for transport when used as packaging materials. And they help make cars lighter and more fuel-efficient. Further, we are constantly working to improve the performance of our products. For example, we have developed a new type of polybutylene terephthalate called Ultradur® High Speed. By influencing the structure in the nanometer range, the material can be processed at 230°C

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resins, for example moulded in colour, has also eliminated the VOCs and the energy associated with painting. The industry continues to add such new capabilities as renewable biomaterial content and reduced footprint. There remains a need for further gains in recycling and upcycling – most plastic material produced today only sees one lifetime in consumer use. This can be improved through more advanced recovery techniques, including design for disassembly and recycle that retains the original materials properties. For example, in consumer electronics, the greatest contribution comes from reducing the impact of each electronics enclosure, either by reducing the amount of material used through thinwall design, or by utilising recycled content. Elaborates Crew, “SABIC Innovative Plastics produces a grade of Lexan EXL resin for mobile phone enclosures utilising up to 25 per cent post consumer recycle, reducing the associated greenhouse gas emissions and energy footprint of enclosure production by close to 20 per cent.”

Opportunities in bioplastics

Volatility of oil prices is a big factor driving the use of bioplastics, the second one is the demand from consumers interested in more green products and finally the concept of energy independence is pushing the overall market. Further, local

“Bioplastics offer a wider range of options than traditional plastics” Dan Sawyer, Managing Director - Asia Pacific, NatureWorks LLC Does bioplastics deliver all the functionality of conventional plastics in an economical and eco-sensitive way? Just like with conventional plastics, no single polymer meets all application performance requirements. In the early days of introduction, polylactic acid was only applied across a relatively narrow range of applications. Particular challenges were related to heat resistance, barrier and stiffness inherent with PLA polymer. Since those early days, as it has become evident that the product could be produced at a scale and with economics that could replace conventional plastics, a wide range of additive companies and compounders, as well as converting partners have developed additives and compounds that allow Ingeo to address a much wider range of market segments.

We hear a lot of questions about new and upcoming alternative biopolymers. Although many of these are at a stage in manufacturing and economics where NatureWorks was 510 years ago, we view these other polymers as complementary and believe they have the potential to help build a robust range of bioplastics that better addresses the range of conventional applications. NatureWorks is increasingly looking at ways where we can continue to lead the bioplastics market in better addressing the plastic smarket through collaboration aimed at driving towards costeffective solutions that perform from both a technical and economic standpoint. Moreover, bioplastics offer a wider range of options than traditional plastics. The right endof-life option among these will depend on the application and local infrastructure.


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Novel Polymers

Worldwide production (million tonne per annum)

and national governments are increasingly attracted to bio-based products in order to reduce their environmental impact and also to reduce their dependence on fossil resources. Government measures are aimed at reducing carbon footprint and driving the use of bio-based resources through uniform labeling and certifications. Cites Frederic Scheer, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Cereplast Inc, “As of today, we estimate that bioplastics could substitute 30 per cent of the current market for traditional fossil fuels plastics. In 10 years from now, it will be somewhere around 50 per cent and in 20 years it will be 90 to 100 per cent. Bioplastics is evolving fairly quickly and there is more and more dollars invested in R&D at a fast path.” As far as the end of life options for bio-based plastics (recycling, composting, etc) are concerned, there is a need to differentiate between two very different scenarios. According to EPA, it will take another 15 years before this will happen completely in the US but in the meantime it does happen in different parts of the country (West Coast- New England). Next, is the hybrid for durable applications. They need to find their way through the traditional recycling stream and this is what companies are working on to make sure that they do not disturb the fragile existing recycling streams. Dan Sawyer, Managing Director - Asia Pacific, NatureWorks LLC, foresees one of the main drivers affecting the growth of the bioplastics segment. The green movement has absolutely taken root on a consumer level. The challenge in this is that consumers do not universally understand or define what that means to them.

Paper and board

Mature bio- Emerging bioproducts based plastics

Global production of bio-polymers

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“Bioplastics is evolving at a fast pace and is witnessing more investment in R&D” Frederic Scheer, Chairman and CEO, Cereplast Inc How do you foresee the future of bio-based polymers, in terms of growth opportunities and technological innovations? The growth will be similar to what we experienced for the traditional plastics industry in the past 50 years. From 1950 to 2000 the plastic industry went from a few billion dollars to 2.5 trillion dollar. It is an extraordinary success story. This was possible only because the price of

oil was very low. With a price of oil at $ 80+ the demand from new countries will push the price of oil towards stellar number and the plastics industry needs to move towards an alternative. This will happen in less than 50 year so the growth we experienced in the traditional plastics industry will just duplicate for the bioplastics industry and will make it the fastest growing industry of the next 30 years.

Arkema on its part has 60 years of experience in producing bio plastics such as renewable Rilsan Polyamide 11 that delivers all the functionality of conventional plastics in an economical and eco-sensitive way. States Mandar Amrute, Market Development Leader, Arkema India, “In this aspect, Arkema is in a much stronger position in terms of technology and manufacturing expertise as compared to other MNCs that only develop biobased product in the last few years. Our renewable Rilsan PA11 is now complete with our new recycling service offer.” Continued high oil prices & volatility and stable plant-based feedstock prices continue to drive the economics in favour of bioplastics. A key to this growth is the further education that is happening through brand-owners and retailers to the consumers, so they can understand and appreciate the benefits of bioplastics.

enforce domestic legislation aimed at punishing littering. Close cooperation between industry and all stakeholders is needed to develop and implement joint prevention and recovery programmes for marine debris at a regional level. Educational activities are also needed to increase awareness for the long-term impacts of residual plastic material in the marine environment. Finally, more efforts are needed to ensure that products and waste are managed correctly at every stage of the value chain, including transportation.” Agrees Crew, “Our view is that advancing end-of-life solutions for plastics and ‘clean chemistry’ are the most important opportunities. Improving end-of-life solutions requires education and encouragement of consumers to recycle, a better infrastructure, and better recycle process technology. When plastics are fully recyclable, their amazing functionality is retained and their environmental footprint is minimised. Advances in ‘clean chemistry’ driven by good science will increase the confidence of consumers in the sustained use of plastics.“ And while biodegradable plastics have proved their worth in certain applications, it is not considered as a solution to the littering problem. “In fact, they could even make the situation worse by encouraging people to discard litter in the environment in the belief that it will degrade,” cites Althoff. As recycled plastic material becomes more available, new streams – once too expensive to access – will become more economically feasible. These material advances coupled with low cost alternative energy are a powerful combination for the future.

Reducing the environmental impact of conventional plastics

There is a clear and growing demand in all value chains for solutions which create more value with less environmental impact. Many of those solutions can be achieved via traditional products like, for example, via weight and friction reduction in cars, hazardous substance free (like halogen free) flame retardant grades for the electronics market, high flow grades for better productivity or products with extended life time. Of late, the plastics industry has been active in promoting end-of-life waste management. Althoff emphasises, “Countries should be urged to integrate the issue of marine littering into national waste management strategies and


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Process Technologies

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Process technologies

Enhancing efficiency Technologies that are considered state-of-the-art today, can be obsolete by tomorrow. Moreover, the rising cost of raw materials worldwide and more stringent regulations have led to the demand for innovative ideas and concepts in the plastics processing industry. Sarita Kutty delves deeper into the world of plastics processing, which is demonstrating progress towards sustainability while also meeting important market requirements for enhanced performance of plastic products.

Ashok Goel

President, Plastindia Foundation and Vice President & MD, Essel ProPack

Thorsten Kuehmann

Secretary General, Europe’s Association for Plastics and Rubber Machinery Manufacturers (EUROMAP)

Dr Peter Neumann

Herbert KraibĂźhler

CEO, Engel Holding GmbH

Managing Director Technology & Engineering, ARBURG

Gerardo Chiaia

President, Husky Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa

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Vimal Kedia

Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd


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reen thinking and acting has become part of the daily work of the EU Commission and especially the Environment Commissioner. Irrespective of the lean outcome of the World Climate Conference in Copenhagen late last year, the EU has set the decisive goal to reduce CO2 emissions by 20 per cent and to improve the energy efficiency by 20 per cent by the year 2020. This aim is consistently implemented and applied for all sectors of the economy and industry. Moreover, it has been realised that sustainable production brings a better quality of life through efficient process and a progressive practice during production. By looking into supply side of the equation it tries to address the needs of future generations. The industry should focus on optimal use of materials while minimising the use of natural resources, and emissions of waste, etc over the life cycle. Further, the ecospace should be utilised in a manner where renewable resources and absorbing waste becomes a technique of production.

Initiatives on the go

One directive that will most likely have a direct influence on the industry will be the EC Directive on ecodesign requirements for energy-related products (EuP Directive). Informs Thorsten Kühmann, Secretary General, Europe’s Association for Plastics and Rubber Machinery Manufacturers (EUROMAP), “This Directive establishes a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy-using products. It aims to improve the environmental performance of products throughout the life cycle, by systematic integration of environmental aspects at a very early stage in the product design. Many fields have been set under the scope of the EuP

“All those ‘green’ claims for injection moulding presses can be measured against a solid industry standard — the new Euromap 60” Thorsten Kühmann, Secretary General, EUROMAP In what way does Euromap 60 fit into the scheme of sustainability? Standards are needed to cut through the maze. A lot of companies have gone out in the market and said they are energy efficient. They have logos and so on. However, it is really difficult for converters to see: Is it true, or is it just marketing? Can I really compare? And that was the reason why we decided, OK, we need to have a provable base standard. Euromap 60 is devoted to the standardisation of the type of measurement to get the specific machine-related energy consumption of an injection moulding machine. Moreover, it covers thermoplastic injection moulding machines with a single injection unit and a reciprocating screw, horizontal clamping and an electrically heated

barrel. It excludes energy used to cool water for the machine & mould, and for compressed air. Most presses fall into that category. The test uses an adjustable nozzle and squirts a shot of polypropylene into the air. There is no mould. The standard spells out details about the nozzle, which each press maker will have to provide. Euromap 60 gives cycle parameters for the three common injection moulding applications: thin-wall parts, technical parts and thick-wall parts. For each type of part, the standard lists injection speed, pressure and time, part ejection and other parameters. The necessary injection pressure is set using the adjustable nozzle. So, everything is specified and with the values you achieve with your measurement, you really can compare the energy consumption of a machine.

already, for example, standby lights, street & office lighting, electric motors, domestic refrigerators, televisions and more. By 2011, the European Commission is going to decide if plastics and rubber machines will be affected.” Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation, feels that the Indian plastics industry has been responsible to a great extent. When we consider that almost 40 per cent of the material undergoes recycling, the highest in the world, the industry should be commended. However, he is quick to add that there is a lot more that can be done to achieve sustainability. The scope of renewability has to be far more encompassing and energy as a ‘material input’ also needs to be addressed with verve. Energy audits and incentives for use of renewable energy as well as optimising use of energy across the processing spectrum is one initiative, which could be considered.

Determination of specific energy consumption

“Speeding up the manufacturing process is one of the ways to achieve energy efficiency” Ashok Goel, President, Plastindia Foundation Comment on the innovations to speed up the manufacturing process and make the entire process sustainable. Innovations are being taken up by plastics machinery manufacturers in a serious way. The innovations come in the form of automations, replacing manual by electronic diagnostic processes, etc. These have helped machinery manufacturers attain higher speeds and efficiency in the production process for the downstream industry. Speeding up the manufacturing process is one of the ways

of making it energy efficient to make the process sustainable. Typically, the manufacturers will look at sustainability through increased throughput, faster product changeover times, integrated manufacturing processes, optimised subprocesses, wastage reduction and integrating technological breakthrough to bring efficient use of energy and materials. These are proven ways and means to achieve sustainable growth and Indian machinery manufacturers are well aware of the advantages of adopting these processes.

Energy efficiency is an important issue for the European plastics and rubber machinery industry. “Major exhibitions in our sector have followed the trend and have become greener – such as Fakuma, Chinaplas and the forthcoming K-show. Energy-efficiency therefore has become a marketing issue for many exhibitors – unfortunately without real transparency for the buyers. In many cases, apples and oranges are compared because the measurement for efficiency was not defined. Therefore, EUROMAP – Europe’s Association for Plastics and Rubber Machinery Manufacturers – has become active,” avers Kühmann. In the beginning of 2009, leading injection moulding machinery manufacturers across Europe came together to find a common standard for energy efficiency. This process resulted in the Euromap 60 recommendation Quantitative energy-saving potentials during injection moulding

Well thought-out product design Suitable temperature control

Intelligent energy management

Energyefficient machine technology

Rational production organisation

Individual machine settings

Optimum configuration

Courtesy: ARBURG

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Process Technologies “Nano-scale technology can bring improved functionality to plastics” Herbert Kraibühler, Managing Director - Technology & Engineering, ARBURG Could you elaborate on ARBURG’s initiatives to offer economical solutions? In the field of automation, the focus is increasingly on the integration of upstream and downstream operations in the injection moulding process, but also on the combination of several injection moulding machines in a composite system. For this area, Arburg has had its own project department for over a decade and acts as a main contractor. With the individual design of such systems, Arburg customers receive everything from a single source and have a central point of contact as well as a global after-sales service. Our customers only need to tell us which part they wish to produce and in what quantities, and we plan & create the required production cell all the way through to commissioning. This makes the entire design and manufacturing process extremely economical from the outset and quickly produces a return on investment. Such turnkey systems are implemented in close cooperation with our customers. Here, our modular design also enables the manufacture of high-performance, high-quality production cells, with the best possible price/performance ratio. Our wide machine range, including vertical ALLROUNDERs in addition to horizontal machines, offers a high degree of flexibility. For part handling tasks, we employ our MULTILIFT robotic systems and, increasingly, our innovation in this area: the flexible six-axis robotic system from Kuka can be programmed very simply and reliably by the operator himself, thanks to the implementation of our unique SELOGICA user interface.

published in June 2009. Thereby, the comparison of specific energy consumption of injection moulding machines (kWh per kg material) independent of the drives (electrical/hydraulic) under standardised conditions has become possible. Further, Euromap 60 is to the benefit of buyers; they get transparency and can compare the effectiveness of new machinery with regard to energy consumption. The principles of Euromap 60 have been adopted by US Society of the Plastics Industry (SPI) in the meantime.

Green production

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buying energy efficient machines and may contribute to a sustainable production. What’s more is this has become an important issue for the end-user. Elaborates Herbert Kraibühler, Managing Director - Technology & Engineering, ARBURG, “Our objective has always been to achieve the most individual and thus the most perfect harmony between machine technology and production requirements. We have succeeded in this through our modular ARBURG injection moulding technology and associated peripherals, as well as via our offering in the field of individual automation solutions.” And while performance, speed, quality and durability characterise such individual configurations, energy efficiency of the machines has been gaining importance. “In this context, we have developed our ‘e²’energy-efficiency label, which in addition to the electric ALLROUNDER A and the hybrid ALLROUNDER H machines, also appears on the hydraulic ALLROUNDER S machines with electromechanical dosage drive (AED) or with the ‘advance’ equipment package. It is, however, important for ARBURG to emphasise that our label serves only to identify and not to classify the relevant machines, as specific statements regarding the actual energy consumption are always dependent upon the relevant machine configuration and the application. If the drive technology is perfectly designed and adapted with respect to the particular application, the energy consumption of the machine can be reduced by up to 50 per cent,” adds Kraibühler. However, the company considers the

“The focus is on the use of energy-saving machines” Dr Peter Neumann, CEO, Engel Holding GmbH In terms of sustainability, what have been the recent initiatives at Engel? Energy optimised, powerful machine designs are the focus of the Engel development activities: Sustainable, energy-efficient, but powerful. Intelligent technological solutions from Engel effectively combine this requirement for modern injection moulding machine design. New systems, an energy-optimised design, or the new Engel ecograph analysis tool all show that Engel is not resting on its laurels in our economically challenging times, but pushing development ahead at full speed and thus offering its customers the best possible conditions for a successful market presence.

“The importance of realising overall efficiency gains has never been more important to injection moulders” Gerardo Chiaia, President, Husky

Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa What measures have been undertaken to offer sustainable business solutions? In beverage packaging, there are numerous opportunities to help customers develop business solutions that will enable them to be more sustainable moving into the long-term. There is still significant opportunity for more widespread adoption of lightweight bottles. The lightest water bottles in the market only represent a small percentage of all bottles in the world. Most bottles are still much heavier, so there is significant potential to reduce resin usage. Husky is continuously looking at how we can help our customers produce lighter weight beverage packages. In addition, we offer our EcoBase preform design, which enables an additional 2.5 per cent in resin savings by focussing on the preform design itself. As the cost of energy continues to rise, the importance of realising overall efficiency gains has never been more important to injection moulders. The implementation of proactive energy management programmes that consider all parts of an operation is a key factor to realising sustainable cost savings over the long-term.

complex subject of energy efficiency in the overall context, in other words beyond the machine itself, and therefore places great importance on a holistic support offering. It advises its customers not only with regard to the optimal selection of their technical equipment, but also for example, how to perfectly adapt their moulds to the relevant application, how to optimise and minimise the energy balance of their moulded part production and, in addition, how to improve the energy efficiency of their entire production process. Commenting on energy saving systems, Dr Peter Neumann, CEO, Engel Holding GmbH, says, “The use of energysaving machines and energy saving systems is still in the injection moulder’s focus. And this makes it all the more important for the machine manufacturer to face these challenges and offer innovative and sustainable energy-efficient solutions for injection moulders.”

Enhancing efficiency

In order to achieve the goal of ‘efficient production’, maximum productivity with minimum cycle times and energy-efficient


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Process Technologies “It will not be long, before sustainability is considered at par with GMP” Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd What is the way forward for plastics processors/machinery manufacturers? Today, sustainability has gone beyond being a mere CSR measure. In fact, it will not be long, before sustainability is considered at par with good manufacturing practice (GMP). For the plastics industry, the challenge is even greater because of perception issues; we must not only adopt sustainable practices we must also be seen doing so! However, there is also heartening news on the perception front – a study by Mckinsey and Oko Institute of Germany has found that reduction in carbon emission due to usage of plastics in industries like packaging and automobiles among others, far exceeds the amount of green house gas emitted during the production of plastics. The drive for sustainability has to be a continuous process that takes into account the evolving nature of business requirements and resource availability. Specifically in 2010, a combination of energy efficiency, faster and better machines to produce more and thin wall products, better material grades, and faster processes should be the way forward for the industry.

systems offering the highest availability are required, according to Vimal Kedia, Managing Director, Manjushree Technopack Ltd. This includes: high-performance machine technology tailored precisely to customer requirements, individual automation solutions, detailed production management, fast and comprehensive service as well as competent consulting. And, as the cost of energy continues to rise, the importance of realising overall efficiency gains has never been more important to injection moulders. The implementation of proactive energy management programmes that consider all parts of an operation is a key factor to realising sustainable cost savings over the longterm. Gerardo Chiaia, President, Husky Asia, Europe, Middle East and Africa reiterates, “At Husky, we have long been committed to minimising the impact our business has on the environment. Our goal is to offer customers solutions that will help them to achieve both business and environmental success by lowering part costs, reducing scrap, improving quality and maximising operational efficiency. These things are beneficial both from a business and green perspective as these efforts save money and reduce environmental footprint.” Further, in the case of machinery, latest innovations are being applied to use far lesser power and produce as thin a plastic product as possible. A case in point is ‘thin wall moulding’ of cups, beaker, etc whereby 0.2 mm/0.3 mm wall thicknesses are becoming a possibility today. Also, electric moulding machines are a reality whereby power consumption as compared to that of machines of a decade ago is only 30 per cent approximately. “Larger and more technology efficient machines are being introduced to produce more quantities/units in a single cycle,” adds Kedia.

The way ahead

Technology is a driving force in the game, and the future trend is clearly moving in this direction. Areas of production are becoming increasingly centrally controlled and increasingly complex sequences are managed via a high-performance operating system from a control station. The goal pursued by manufacturers in this regard is that all production processes should remain efficiently controllable, despite having increasing complexity.

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Innovative Designs

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Anniversary

Innovative designs

A user-friendly concept Translating an innovative idea into a product ready for manufacturing, is a difficult process involving long periods of dedicated work, the solution of many subproblems in component design, and often several setbacks. Sarita Kutty examines the role of design in business competitiveness, besides identifying factors related to the success and sustainability of design in new product development.

Sergio Sosa

Mark Minnichelli

President, Sosa Tech Advisors LLC

Director of Technology & Development, BASF’s Engineering Plastics Business in North America

Pierre-François Tardy SCRT/SBM Industrial Program Manager, INERGY Automotive Systems

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Gaylon White

Manager - Design Industry Programs, Eastman Chemical Company


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Innovative Designs

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lastics, as a potential solution, is quite adaptable. It can be formed & shaped and have the potential to offer almost everything we need. Plastics is not just a raw material; it is an enabling technology. And, like other enablers it creates opportunities. The key attributes one looks for in plastics is clarity, scratch resistance and colour… plastics is fascinating because it can be almost anything and more of these. Moreover, a designer’s role with the use of new materials is to provoke and challenge convention – to make the clients think differently about their product. Innovation in material can lead to innovation in products.

The role of innovation Sometimes, the selection of the material is the innovation itself, but other times the material selection is only to present the idea one has. Nobody has the complete knowledge of all existing materials. Hence, raw material investigation is very important, as well as, the recycling/reusing aspects that involve it. Avers Sergio Sosa, President, Sosa Tech Advisors LLC, “As an engineer,

“Design is the ‘soul’ of innovation process” Sergio Sosa, President, Sosa Tech Advisors LLC In light of today’s global economic climate, what is the role of innovation? How much of the design focusses on usability and sustainability? As the classics declare, innovation together with marketing are the two activities in the present organisations that generate value, all the others are only cost. For me, the design is the ‘soul’ of

the innovation process, because design acts at an unconscious level. It is inspiration at a powerful internal force and for this reason usability and sustainability are automatically present in the mental generation of ideas. The beauty of doing innovation in plastic products is that the aesthetics is the art, the cost-effectiveness is engineering and sustainability is inspiration.

developing new moulding processes and covering the product’s necessities are the most exciting activities that I have. That was the case of the Inside Injection Foaming (IIF) process. Once developed the IIF process, we needed to design a production line that could work with two different technologies intermittently: the IIF process and the structural foam injection moulding. The result is that we have in Mexico one of the best plastic pallet production lines in the world.” Innovation also plays an important role in light of today’s global economic climate in several ways. However, Mark Minnichelli, Director of Technology & Development, BASF’s Engineering Plastics Business in North America feels that there are numerous claims from a variety of potential

environment-friendly solution providers in the market space today. “I think the confusion comes from a combination of having to understand a wide variety of terms and technologies regarding sustainability, combined with the issue of clearly understanding total life-cycle costs versus a limited focus on a part of the lifecycle. Finally, the overall cost of implementing a ‘green’ solution has to be taken into account, since costs will always play an important role in any business decision,” Minnichelli opines. Agrees Pierre-François Tardy, SCR/ TSBM Industrial Program Manager, INERGY Automotive Systems, “To bring breakthrough alternatives to fossil energies, and make it affordable for most of the populations is quite a huge challenge. Therefore, innovation must take into consideration the customer need, choice of raw materials, energy consumption, recyclability aspects and market price. Design participates in all these items and current as well as future designers should integrate these criteria.”

“Innovation can create lower-total-cost alternatives to status quo solutions” Mark Minnichelli, Director of Technology & Development, BASF’s Engineering Plastics Business in North America How has design and innovation evolved over the years? I believe innovation plays an important role in light of today’s global economic climate in several ways: Innovation can create new demand and whole new businesses by generating excitement and interest for features which may not have existed previously (consider the i-pod, i-phone, kindle, etc) Removing costs from existing business should enable faster economic recovery and return to economic growth Virtual testing/computer aided engineering and rapid prototyping bring new products to

market faster, also creating new competitive market space Over the last 20 years, we have seen interest in environmentally sustainable plastic solutions discussed considerably, but only over the past couple of years we have seen that the discussion has become more grounded in reality across several industries. As a result, we are seeing more of our customers placing emphasis on sustainable materials and designs than ever before. We have developed, and will continue to develop new materials to meet the changing needs of our customers, as well as continue to assist our customers to design components and assemblies, which are more environment-friendly over their life cycle.

Leading by example In automotives, the biggest single impact that plastics can continue to have regarding improved sustainability relates to the impact of weight reduction on improving the fuel efficiency of vehicles, and the corresponding amount of fossil fuel saved over the vehicle lifetime. There

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Innovative Designs

“Design innovations must addresses economic and environmental concerns” Pierre-François Tardy, SCR/TSBM Industrial Program Manager, INERGY Automotive Systems What are the factors to be considered to create/design a product? There are several factors to be considered while designing a product. First and foremost, it must address economic and environmental concerns yet should be innovative and refreshing.

are still a number of applications around the vehicle where engineering thermoplastics can replace traditional materials such as steel, aluminium and glass to yield lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by petrol, gas or electricity, there will be an implication on fossil fuel consumption for years to come. “We have been able to work with the automotive industry to find ways to reduce costs while achieving the desired weight savings. And of course the same features of improved design freedom and flexibility, which have come with engineering plastics, still exist today! Plastics still provide the opportunity for part consolidation, which also can help reduce labour costs,” cites Minnichelli. In building and construction, one of the most significant impacts that plastics have contributed has to do with the improved energy efficiency associated with insulation materials. Engineering plastics have also replaced steel and wood in window frames, further reducing the thermal load on heating and cooling systems for both residential and commercial buildings. Several designers are also looking at wood-based plastics to achieve a new look that has green values. Says Gaylon White, Manager - Design Industry Programs, Eastman Chemical Company, “One example is a clear protective case for the Apple iPhone 3G that showcases the device’s iconic design. The brief was

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Besides, the materials choice must integrate: The total energy consumption of the polymeric production and transformation The recyclability (re-use percentage) and energy consumption of recyclability The affordability of the product (mark price)

for a crystal-clear material with windowlike clarity. The material is called Naturacell, a durable plastic developed by Rotuba Extruders Ltd that blends a natural-based softener with Eastman cellulosics derived from the pulp of softwood trees. Cellulosic plastics, which are composed of 40 to 45 percent wood pulp, have a distinct feel and scent. And, all of our wood pulp comes from sustainably managed forests. For every two trees that are harvested, three are planted.”

Challenges and opportunities Most of the difficulties come from the fact that the specifications are fixed by the regulations but the industrials have to combine performances level of the product (compliance with these regulations) and price that the market can afford. A great innovation has no future if it is not economical. Says Tardy, “Simulation software (used in research and pre-development phases) should integrate energy consumption, raw materials consumption and recyclability during the design phase. It does not exist yet as far as I know.” However, there are a lot of materials and applications to choose from. Offering insights into one of the most recent design innovations, Emeco Seating - ‘111 Navy Chair®’, from BASF, Minnichelli says, “Emeco introduced this new version of its iconic aluminium Navy® Chair at the 2010 Milan Furniture Fair (Salone

Internazionale del Mobile 2010). The 111 Navy Chair is injection moulded from BASF’s PETRA® recycled PET (polyethylene terephthalate) resins, and according to Emeco, uses the equivalent of 111 recycled plastic bottles in each chair, thereby converting 111 used plastic bottles into a ‘next generation’ of useful life, as a high-quality, designer seating application! A collaborative design and development effort between Emeco, The Coca-Cola Company, and BASF began about two years ago, and the redesign, material testing and moulding was completed in an aggressive 18-month timeline. Everything from radii and fillets required significant focus to refabricate the traditional Navy® chair from an aluminium design to one based on recycled PET resin. BASF’s engineering plastics expertise and computer-aided engineering analyses were used to optimise the two-piece design in Petra® 7030, a 30 per cent glass filled thermoplastic PET resin. Once moulded, the new chair design was tested to meet BIFMA (Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturer’s Association) performance standards. This is one of our latest examples of an innovative design and material solution, which has resulted in a beautifully designed and functional component, which is environment-friendly as well!” Thus, selecting from the wide range of polymeric materials generally available, the product should address economic and environmental concerns. It could exploit emerging technologies that deliver positive changes in energy efficiency. Further, the design might save overall lifetime costs or be a modification of a product targeted at a new market, allowing an item to be rejuvenated rather than discarded.


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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Production Economy

Anniversary

Production economy

Measuring the impact It is a simple calculation: the less energy and resources used, the less damage it is to the environment from pollutants and the more efficient & sustainable is the production system. In fact, environmental concerns as well as reduction in energy consumption will increasingly gain attention in the coming years. Sarita Kutty offers an insight into the various aspects of value chain in the context of sustainable production.

Stephan Greif

CEO, Demag Plastics Machinery

Jonathan Fischer

CMD, Lohia Starlinger

S V Kabra

Chairman & Managing Director, Kabra Extrusiontechnik Ltd

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

Managing Director Infrastructure, Battenfeld-Cincinnati

Raj Kumar Lohia

President & CEO, Mold-Masters

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Walter Haeder


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Production Economy

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ource reduction is gaining more attention as an important resource conservation and solid waste management option. Source reduction, often called waste prevention is defined as activities to reduce the amount of material in products and packaging before that material enters the municipal solid waste management system. Explains Raj Kumar Lohia, CMD, Lohia Starlinger, “Sustainable production requires conservation of energy, reduction in weight and rejection of parts, standardisation of processes and product specifications supported by efficient recycling of post consumer waste. These can be achieved by focussed collaboration between various stakeholders, viz, raw material & machinery suppliers & end users supported by proactive actions of the government agencies.” The extrusion of pipes and profiles hinges around material and energy efficiency. According to Walter Haeder, Managing Director – Infrastructure, Battenfeld-Cincinnati, both were at the heart of new and most promising developments in pipe extrusion in the last decades. “Melt cooling in the pipe head and inside air cooling of the extruded pipe are combined in the new KryoSys system with ‘Efficient air cooling’. Already in the pipe head the temperature of the polyolefines is reduced significantly. This allows for reduced sagging and thus reduces material usage significantly. Also, the output of the extrusion line can be increased because the cooling length can now accommodate a higher output

“The energy needed for production can amount up to four times the investment costs” Walter Haeder, Managing Director – Infrastructure, Battenfeld-Cincinnati How do government policy and regulation need to evolve in order to support the shift to sustainable production? Throughout the world, governments have already started programmes to support sustainable products. In this regard, the whole product lifecycle needs to be considered, beginning from the initial investment costs up to the needed energy for production. Especially

in the area of extrusion machinery the initial investment costs are just a minor part when looking at the full lifecycle costs. The energy needed for production can amount up to four times the investment costs. Therefore, fostering the investment into new machinery that is more energy efficient by supporting the initial costs can lead to a significant increase in sustainability.

due to the reduced temperature of the material at the exit of the pipe head and due to the increased cooling effect of the EAC. More pipes can be produced with the same cooling equipment. This reduces the amount of water and energy being used per kg of pipe,” Haeder elaborates.

to its design parameters if the operators are well trained. This is a challenging task for the whole industry. A good understanding of the processing can make the difference between a quality product made with low resource consumption and a lower quality product spoiling energy, polymer or water. “The biggest change of the last months is to save energy with new drive solutions like electromotors and very accurate control systems. The manufacturing process becomes more precise in order to save time, waste of material and not qualified products,” says Stephan Greif, CEO, Demag Plastics Machinery. Further, co-extrusion enables the combination of the advantages of different materials in an effective way. Lower cost material can be combined with small layers of tougher material to yield a better product. In co-extrusion, the pipe head design is the most critical part. “The combination of the knowhow in multilayer spiral distributor systems and sieve basket technologies at Battenfeld-Cincinnati offers the most experience in this leading solution field. We see a lot of potential in this field,” avows Haeder.

What’s new in processing technology? Wood plastic composites (WPC) are combining renewable resources with the technological advantages of plastics. The development of this new material class has just begun. Decking is growing rapidly. The first market to develop was North America. Now Europe also understands the benefit of this new product class. In other regions of the world too WPC offer the potential for longer lasting outdoor applications, saving both on natural wood usage and wood protection measures which have to be re-applied ever so often.

Optimising the manufacturing process The best equipment can only be used

“Life cycle management is of critical importance for the sustainable production” Jonathan Fischer, President & CEO, Mold-Masters While the focus is primarily on development and optimisation of components, as well as practical implementation and applicationrelated process engineering, what must be done to ensure that sustainable production is achieved? The development and optimisation of component with practical implementation and application related process engineering are

indeed very foundation of knowledge building for sustainable production. The life cycle management requires much more intense collaboration with all the stakeholders supported by a conducive framework by policy makers. Consumer education for responsible actions & behaviours are key issues for efficient life cycle management.

Investment matters Throughout the world, governments have already started programmes to support sustainable products. In this regard, the whole product lifecycle needs to be considered, beginning from the initial investment costs up to the needed energy for production. Especially in the area of extrusion machinery the initial investment costs are just a minor part

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Production Economy

“Existing machinery should be upgraded to reduce waste & loss of productivity” Raj Kumar Lohia, CMD, Lohia Starlinger What kinds of changes & innovations are being incorporated into machinery to speed up the manufacturing process and make the entire process sustainable? Machinery suppliers are already implementing the advancement in electrical, electronic, hydraulic & pneumatic and material processing technologies faster than ever before to achieve reduction in energy, more reliable; consistent and safe performance with reduction in waste. Machinery suppliers can pay greater attention to upgrade the existing machines and incorporate advancements to reduce waste & loss of productivity. Raw material suppliers have a critical role to develop the resins, additives & processing aids for processors to take advantage of the advancements taking place in machinery to be able to utilise these technologies for realisation of benefits.

when looking at the full lifecycle costs. The energy needed for production can amount up to four times the investment costs. Therefore, fostering the investment into new machinery that is more energy efficient by supporting the initial costs can lead to a significant increase in sustainability. Haeder says, “As already mentioned, the whole product lifecycle needs to be considered. By investing into energy efficient machinery a lot of energy can be saved throughout the whole lifetime. The initially higher costs pay themselves off very fast. Besides that, proactive maintenance is another step to increase product lifetime. By checking wear already at an early stage, not only production losses can be avoided but costs for maintenance can also be reduced tremendously. We at BattenfeldCincinnati offer our customers extremely energy efficient products (for example, the KryoSys pipe extrusion system) and also proactive wear control and maintenance.” Referring to automotive production in China, Greif says that production of high quality goods with competitive pricing is possible only due to highly

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automated processing, professional supply chain and highly educated staff. Thus, while manufacturing in a global environment is becoming increasingly competitive with the prevalence of offshore/outsourcing practices, MoldMasters has taken some innovative steps to ensure that it takes entrepreneurial leadership. States Jonathan Fischer, President & CEO, Mold-Masters, “First, we have begun in-sourcing to ensure effective results. In particular, we have begun leveraging the core skills of each of our global facilities to optimally mix design, detailing, engineering and domestic market support processes so that we can remain competitive. Also, there is a constant focus to be more environmentfriendly and functional. To move towards this focus, Mold-Masters is trying to reduce its carbon footprint by beginning to incorporate technologies such as co-injection with recycled content, thin wall technologies and biodegradable plastics.” Co-injection is the simultaneous injection of two compatible thermoplastic materials where one material engulfs or encapsulates the other. Using recycled content is very practical as it provides

“Use of nanotechnology may result in reduction of part thickess” S V Kabra, CMD, Kabra Extrusiontechnik Could you enumerate the various solutions that should be undertaken to increase product life and reduce energy consumption? Product life depends on selection of correct material and optimised processing of the material into product. Materials with better performance properties, for instance, polymers from mettalocene catalyst may be blended with commodity resins. Similarly, the use of nanotechnology may result in reducing part thickess, ie, down guaging. Efforts like melt rheology of the material with additives such as flow promoters, viscosity reduction, enabling them with easy and faster demoulding and making them suitable for high speed extrusion will bring down energy consumption.

the necessary functionality, yet is good for the environment. Mold-Maters invokes a variety of ‘green marketing’ strategies such as linking its products with sustainability performance; simplifying sustainability communication at the Point-Of-Purchase (POP) by providing information about product attributes or corporate operational performance; and, encouraging customers to reduce impact by providing information on product lifecycle or global and community issues.

Process engineering The advancements in the critical technologies in the machinery & availability of high performance raw materials are pushing higher throughput per unit of energy consumed with smaller footprints of the machines. The standardisation of specifications of plastic components in packaging, automobile & consumer durables have allowed significant improvements in design of die & moulds allowing mass production reducing weight, energy & rejections. The processing machines are getting smarter and intelligent to produce parts with lesser weights at higher efficiency. “For example, the extrusion machinery produced by us for raffia tape have achieved speed of nearly 600 m/min from 300 m/min in last one decade mainly thanks to availability of high quality resin at affordable costs and focussed development in extruders, die and control technologies, etc. The speed of 1000 m/min is not far away and will be achieved in half time compared to past development,” says Lohia. Thus, the meaning of the term ‘sustainability’ is strongly dependent on the context in which it is applied and on whether its use is based on social, economic or ecological perspective. Moreover, it is important to think about all those steps in a product’s life cycle not just what happens when a product’s useful life is over - to get a true picture of its environmental performance.


SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Recycling & Reuse

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Anniversary

Recycling and reuse

On the path to recovery The plastics recycling industry has been fast adopting novel technologies. It is also important to recognise that plastics recovery and recycling adds social and economic value to communities and economies by generating employment, skill development and business growth, discovers Sarita Kutty.

Susan Kozora

Chairperson - Environmental Division, Society of Plastics Engineers and Engineering Manager - Materials Department, International Automotive Components

Dave Cornell

Technical Director, Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers

Joseph Hensel

Surendra Borad

Chairman, Polyflow Corp

Chairman & CEO, Gemini Corp; and Chairman - Plastics Committee, Bureau of International Recycling (Belgium)

Steve Mojo

Exceutive Director, Biodegradable Product Institute

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Recycling & Reuse

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ill date, recovered or recycled plastics have always shown their ability to stabilise costs. Although their pricing will increase modestly due to increased demand as virgin resin prices rise, they are not at the mercy of the volatile pricing of petroleum or natural gas. Further stabilisation of pricing of recovered plastics will occur with increased/improved infrastructure to recycle plastics of all types, especially engineered plastics, and increased/ improved recovery from both industry and consumer sources will provide consistent and abundant feed streams. States Susan Kozora, Chairperson Environmental Division, Society of Plastics Engineers and Engineering Manager - Materials Department, International Automotive Components, “One needs to look at the industry and consumer trends in order to monitor today’s market. To fill in the gaps in infrastructure takes a demand in recycled materials, such as WEEE (Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment) Directive in the electronics industry and the ELV (End of Life Vehicle) Directive in the automotive industry- where the industry is driving use of recovered materials. Consumers who are willing to pay a premium for green products also will create an impetus to building and establishing more recyclate streams.”

New approaches to recovery The automotive industry has tried to encourage ‘design for disassembly’ or ‘design for recycling’. These include use of mono-family materials that can be recovered without separation, using heat stabilising additives to the original resin formulation to help the material maintain its properties through multiple heat exposure in reprocessing, and

“The consumer must be educated regarding the proper disposal of each type of material” Susan Kozora, Chairperson - Environmental Division, SPE Some industry analysts consider the development and use of bioresins to be the most exciting industry development of the past decade. How will this affect recycling? Yes, bio-based resins are by far the hot topic of the decade and many technologies have truly delivered sustainable solutions. One very basic aspect of bio-based resins that must be defined and understood is whether or not the bio-based resin is targeted for a one-time use or a durable commodity. In other words is the polymer formulated to be biodegradable/ compostable or is intended to be recycled and used again? There is much confusion that a bio-based resin is somehow automatically bio-degradable or compostable, but it must be understood that bio-based only means the monomers used to form the polymer are derived from a renewable source. How you put them together and make a plastic define the material’s ability to be biodegradable, compostable, or recyclable (used back again in a moulded part). The bio-based

assembly methods that lend themselves to easy disassembly for the recovery process while maintaining durability in the useful product life. another option is to test the initial product with a maximum established level of regrind so that an outlet for the manufacturing scrap is determined before manufacturing of the product begins. One more option if regrind is not feasible for a particular design, is to have another product that can be a channel for the scrap. One of the most important design steps in my mind is to have upfront involvement of green/ sustainable/recycled materials in the first stages of a product design. This will assure the optimal use of recycled/ bio-based resins.

“Coding systems give very specific information on plastic items” Dave Cornell, Technical Director, Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers Could you offer insights into new and improved ways to identify and sort plastics, both at the materials recovery facility and at the plastics reclamation plant? The challenge is to identify resins coloured black and sorting the identified items accurately with no carryover of other materials. The technology

for quick, sure, and inexpensive separation is an opportunity for innovators. ASTM in the US is considering changes. There are coding systems today that give very specific information on plastic items. The challenge is to optimise the identification without confusing and discouraging household consumers.

plastic water bottle is a good example. Most of the bio-based plastic bottles were compostable materials, but consumers put them in the regular recycle bin or tossed them on the road expecting them to ‘dissolve or disappear’ in a matter of a few days. The major benefit that I see from bio-based polymers is the sustainable aspect of renewable sources for the monomers instead of relying on petroleum or natural gas based finite sources. If the end item is targeted to be recycled, then the polymer it is made from should be formulated to do so. If bio-degradable or compostable, then the consumer must be educated about the proper disposal of these types of materials. Also, various industries leading the way in bio-based material development and manufacture are working together (SPI, BPI, SPE, etc,) to define and implement industry standards and definitions for bio-based technologies to guide this area of development and avoid ‘green-washing’ of consumers. Again the key here is standardisation and education!

Developments in recycling technology As more materials are collected for recycling and those materials are consistent, markets to use those materials will grow and pricing will improve. The keys are supply – the creation of collection systems and achieving a critical amount of collected material – and demand – the deliberate inclusion of recycled content in manufactured goods. Avers Dave Cornell, Technical Director, Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR), “To be sustainable, material must be recycled after its intended use. Design for Recyclability Guidelines need to be developed and kept current for major uses of plastic. APR has such guidelines for rigid packaging.” Further, consumers also need to know that their efforts in curbside and community recycling are actually being re-used and turned into other products. In all of these, the key is to educate the consumers and industry leaders in green technologies. “Our SPE Plastics Environmental Division is now in the planning stages of an educational programme that can be given to school children of all ages and adults to help them understand recycling and bio-

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SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS - Recycling & Reuse “Recycling industry is over $ 200 billion business worldwide” Surendra Borad, Chairman - Plastics Committee, Bureau of International Recycling (Belgium) Could you comment on the global trends in recovery of plastic scrap? China continues to be the biggest importer of plastic scrap. It imports around 7 million tonne of plastic scrap annually. Therefore, the rate of GDP growth and volume of exports from China are very important information to monitor to judge the price and market of plastic scrap. I believe that there is international trade of about 12 million tonne of plastic scrap worldwide. The role of India is very insignificant in the world plastics scrap trade. It is estimated that India imports annually only two hundred thousand tonne of plastics scrap and this is very small compared to the Chinese import volume of 7 million tonne. I believe that the recycling industry is over $ 200 billion business worldwide and it is increasing at between 10 and 20 per cent annually. It is believed that during the year 2009, environment technology sector contributed 8 per cent of German GDP. It is expected to increase to 20 per cent by 2020.

based materials and how best they can support these efforts. Besides, one of the most promising areas of plastics recycling I have seen recently is MBA Polymers separation and reprocessing. Mike Biddle & Associates have successfully developed a method to recover mixed streams of plastics, producing a sound infrastructure to recover plastics from electronics and durable goods. They can then take the recovered plastics and compound them to various levels of purity depending on the end use. MBA Polymers has global presence with plants in China, Austria and the US,” mentions Kozora. There are new techniques introduced every day; however, the polymer industry can develop new grades and types of plastics, that too faster than the recycling equipment industry can develop identification & sorting techniques as well as equipment. Observes Joseph Hensel, Chairman, Polyflow Corp, “The resin coding system is good, has served a good purpose for several years and will continue to be useful. It is not now, or ever will be an effective means of sorting plastics for recycling. By the time a labourer picks 66

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up a plastic container and looks at the number on the bottom, he has destroyed any profit the MRF could hope to make on that item. Any successful sorting techniques are not going to depend upon code numbers. Moreover, 65 per cent of the polymer packaging in the waste stream is film anyway.

The way forward Recycling any material requires acquisition, processing, and end use, all within the framework of economic viability. Technical work occurs in each area as technology companies see opportunities for profitable investments. Sometimes seed money is needed for ‘proof of concept’

“Automatic identification and low cost developments will help pull more plastics out of the waste stream” Joseph D Hensel, Chairman, Polyflow Corp Please throw light on the latest developments in plastics recycling technology. There are at least three primary initiatives to increase the sustainability of plastics, the development of biodegradable plastics, improved automatic identification and sorting technologies and the commercialisation of mixed polymer recycling technologies. I think biodegradable plastics have their place but overall this entails forgoing the properties that have made plastics successful, durable and low cost. Automatic identification and low cost developments will help pull more plastics out of the waste stream but will be limited in effectiveness as the complexities of the waste stream increase. I favour the mixed plastics recycling technologies. Many of these technologies eliminate the need to sort and many can handle the myriad of fillers and modifiers used today as well as the contamination that comes with most polymer waste. These technologies also have the ability to handle, in addition to the thermoplastics, the thermosets that the rest of the recycling industry largely ignores. Gasification may eventually be developed to produce feed stock chemicals but the techniques to build liquid hydrocarbons from syngas are still very expensive. The new and improved pyrolysis techniques, like Polyflow, to directly produce feed stock chemicals from mixed and dirty polymer waste are fully developed and now being commercialised. If the classic recycling technologies are improved by 100 per cent, then, in the United States, the plastics recycling rate will double to 14.2 per cent. Chemical recycling can address the current 92.9 per cent being landfilled.

“Not all materials are biodegradable under all conditions” Steve Mojo, Executive Director, Biodegradable Product Institute Can the terms ‘biodegradable’ and ‘compostable’ be used interchangeably? No, because one describes a process, while the other describes where and when the process will take place. When you say something is ‘biodegradable’, it means that under the right conditions, microbes in the environment can completely break down the material and use it as a food source. Biodegradation is a process that can take place in many environments, including soils, compost sites, water treatment facilities, marine environments and even in the human body. This is the process that converts organic carbon into energy and maintains life. Not all materials are biodegradable under all conditions. Some are susceptible to the microbes found in a wastewater treatment plant, while others need the conditions and microbes found in a compost pile or in the soil. When we say materials are ‘compostable’, we are talking about where the process will occur and in what time frames. When products are designed to be composted, they should meet ASTM International specifications D6400 (for compostable plastics) or D6868 (for compostable packaging). Products that meet the requirements in these two specifications will disintegrate rapidly in a professionally managed compost facility, will biodegrade quickly under the composting conditions, will not reduce the value or utility of the finished compost by leaving plastic fragments and will result in humus that supports plant life. demonstrations. Today, the most activity is probably in the technology to sort plastic at high rates, efficiently, and inexpensively. The challenge is identifying resins coloured black and sorting the identified items accurately with no carryover of other materials. The technology for quick, sure, and inexpensive separation is an opportunity for innovators. There is still much that can be done to improve the collection and infrastructure of the recycling industry. Incentives to increase collection and use of recycled/bio-based materials come mainly from legislatively mandated initiatives or from positive business climates (such as dramatic increases in oil prices or consumers demand).


LEADERS SPEAK

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Anniversary

“The demand for is growing across sectors”

bio-polymers

… says Diane Gulyas, President DuPont Performance Polymers, part of the DuPont Performance Materials Reporting Group; including engineering polymers, packaging, elastomers and films – which had revenue of $ 4.8 billion in 2009. Today, sustainable development — promoting growth and its advantages to society without depleting earth’s resources — is a concept coming into its own after nearly three decades of fitful progress towards such a notion. On the occasion of Modern Plastics & Polymers’ 5th Anniversary, Gulyas shares Du Pont’s sustainability initiatives and its growth plans in this exclusive e-interview with Sarita Kutty.

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LEADERS SPEAK

Fortune magazine has named DuPont among the 50 ‘Most Admired Companies’ in the world for 2010. Your views on the critical factors when it comes to a company earning the respect of its peers… During these challenging and uncertain economics times, the 200+ year DuPont tradition of core values continues to be a source of great respect. These values for safety, health and environmental stewardship, high ethical standards and the respect for people provide the foundation for our overall commitment to sustainable growth through marketdriven innovation. Market-driven innovation is also a primary means by which DuPont Performance Polymers earns the respect of customers, across multiple industries and regions, with more sustainable solutions for enhanced performance and lower system costs.

On sustainability and plastics processing… Five years ago, there was a lot of talk about sustainable solutions. Today, DuPont Performance Polymers is a driving force, with meaningful solutions, addressing the need to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels in both developed and emerging economies. Right now this is being achieved principally by the light-weighting and downsizing of automobiles for greater fuel-efficiency and the use of renewably sourced materials in place of petroleumbased polymers. The continuous challenge is to reduce the cost of sustainable solutions while enhancing performance. It is a tough challenge and we are making steady progress in addressing a need of global market significance. Across a broad spectrum of industries, including automotive, contract furnishings, sporting goods and consumer durables, we are finding increased demand for renewablysourced materials that deliver equal or

better performance versus petroleumbased polymers at an affordable cost. DuPont is responding to this demand with a portfolio of renewably sources materials developed within our Zytel®, Sorona® and Hytrel® product lines. Further, new applications for products such as DuPont™ Hytrel® thermoplastic elastomers, have been adopted for key railway infrastructure projects in India and China; besides replacement of metal with high-performance plastics in under-the-hood components for weight reduction in the transportation industry. We are in an asset and energy intensive business. As such, it is we are continuously looking for ways to reduce the cost of energy consumption in our operations, as well as in the operations of our customers. An alternative energy source is one of many options that we consider. Relative to raw materials, in the long-term it is our strategic intent to place more emphasis on renewablysourced materials to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.

On speeding up new product development in performance polymers… We are absolutely focussed on speeding up new product development in our portfolio. DuPont Performance Polymers has a broad portfolio of high performance semi-crystalline engineering polymers. Within this portfolio we have many opportunities to invest for growth. A recent example is the introduction of Zytel(R) Plus with Shield technology for automotive applications. It is a long-life plastics that withstands hot oil, coolant and road salts. Performance demands in the automotive industry continue to increase as automakers strive to deliver higher performance and improved fuel efficiency, resulting in smaller, hotterrunning engines. With the launch of Zytel(R) Plus, DuPont is delivering market-driven innovation that enables plastic components to reliably perform

twice as long in that environment, reducing weight and supporting the push for sustainable mobility. Higher durability of components also helps automakers achieve their goals of improved vehicle reliability, better quality and improved warranty performance. In pre-launch trials, Zytel(R) Plus was demonstrated to improve heat performance by 30-40oC and to maintain performance levels much longer than traditional nylons. The new product family is the result of several research and development breakthroughs. The product’s long-term performance under exposure to heat and chemicals is a result of Shield technology, which combines several innovations including a new polymer backbone, polymer modifications and proprietary additives which enhance many performance characteristics. While initial grades are targeted primarily to the automotive industry, additional product grades are planned for 2010 for other applications in multiple markets. The energy efficiency resulting from this new product supports DuPont’s focus on reducing dependency on fossil fuels. It could double the life of automotive components. Relative to market-driven innovation, our 2010 business directive is to derive more than 25 per cent of revenue from products commercialised in the past four years. We are on track to meet this goal.

Future of bio-based polymers, in terms of growth opportunities and technological innovations… Demand for bio-based polymers is certainly growing across several sectors and regions. An example of how we have responded to this demand was in April, at a Wire and Cable Trade Fair in Germany. DuPont Performance Polymers announced expansion of its wire and cable solutions by adding renewably sourced and halogen free resins. The

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LEADERS SPEAK

There is an increased demand for renewablysourced materials that deliver equal or better performance versus petroleum-based polymers at an affordable cost. stand featured Zytel® renewably sourced nylon resins, Hytrel® thermoplastic polyester elastomer renewably sourced resins, DuPont™ Vamac® ethylene acrylic elastomers (AEM) flame retardant, halogen free, and a new grade of ETPV Performance thermoplastic vulcanizate flame retardant, halogen free. These resins show DuPont commitment to the industry trends and the need for truly sustainable options for 21st century. As infrastructure build-out continues in Asia/Pacific, we envision an increased need for these materials in many applications as well as an important role for the DuPont Knowledge Center in Hyderabad – with its combined capability for product application development and engineering design services to better meet the needs of our customers.

Your strategy in India... We will have a two-fold approach in India. One is to drive the growth in the Indian market and the other is to leverage the advantage that India offers for the global market. We plan aggressive sustained profitable growth. We will focus on mega opportunities namely agriculture and food, automotive, construction materials and renewable energy.

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Recently, the DuPont Knowledge Center in Hyderabad received the ‘Silver’ rating from the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED-INDIA). The DKC is the first laboratory site in India to have been awarded this green building status. The LEED-India Green Building Rating System is a nationally and internationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings.

Growth opportunities in Asia… India was a bright spot for DuPont during the global financial crisis and continues to be of great importance. Emerging markets in Asia represented nearly 20 per cent of performance polymers global sales in 2009 with India being among the fastest growing countries. Automotive is clearly an important growth area for performance polymers in India, where we are working with the major car manufacturers. Beyond automotive, our polyester resins offer important growth opportunities in railway beds and photovoltaic unit frames. Further, the value we provide for customers in both infrastructure and automotive industries is a portfolio of materials - creating new formulations when new properties are required; design capability – which shows customers up and down the value chain the possibilities for greater functionality and lower cost provided through metals replacement with an integrated plastic part; and processing know-how – teaching our customers how to mould our products effectively. Servicing the customers in this way allows them to enhance their product’s performance, improved sustainability and reduce total system cost.

The four principles that you advocate for moving ahead in turbulent times… I would advocate organisations to practice the following points:

Get closer to the customer: This is always important, but especially in this time of uncertainty. Staying close to the customer helps in better understanding demand signals in order to serve customer needs in the most cost-effective manner. Simplify and standardise: The global financial crisis forced us to make changes to improve productivity in a number of areas that were critical to cash management. Simplification and standardisation will help ensure that we permanently eliminate all complexity that does not add value for our customers. Engage and develop people: Our success depends on everyone in the organisation clearly seeing their role relative to our primary performance metrics as well as progress against them. Act with speed and agility: We have moved to a model of planning globally and executing regionally with the expectation of faster decisions made closer to the customer. Clearly, the last two years has taught us that speed is essential.

Future plans… Business growth will be fuelled by growth in emerging markets, economic recovery, new products and continued cost and working capital productivity improvements. We plan to grow the business’ sales greater than 12 per cent in 2010 while increasing the pre-tax operating income (PTOI) margin. Critical elements of the business plans include leveraging global capabilities and value chain expertise, continued productivity initiatives and growth in emerging markets, which accounted for almost 30 per cent of sales in 2009. DuPont Performance Polymers expects to deliver about 10 per cent compounded annual sales growth rate and pre-tax operating income margin expansion greater than 700 basis points between 2009 through 2012.


LEADERS SPEAK

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Anniversary

“Sustainability sits at the heart of our strategy”

…says Nicholas Smith, Head (Coatings, Adhesives and Specialties Business Unit) India, Bayer Material Science, who is positive about India’s infrastructure growth in the years to come. He also heads the sub-region Indian subcontinent, ASEAN and Australia/New Zealand. In this exclusive interview with Chandrashekhar Modi, Smith outlines the megatrends and growth drivers that will arise from the need for sustainable solutions.

The latest trends in the coatings, adhesives and sealants sector… The market in general, along the whole value chain, is taking to a more holistic view of the whole lifecycle of products used in the field of coatings, adhesives and specialties. This certainly includes the procurement of raw materials, which of course is an important component of the end-products taken by the market. More than ever before, producers are inquiring about the ‘sustainability credentials’ of products that they source from the raw materials market, and are valuing these at the purchasing decision, since it is clear that their products will also be valued in these terms. These credentials 74

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LEADERS SPEAK

may refer to individual products or the actions taken in general by the raw material producers.

Market potential for novel polymers in India… The continuous and substantial growth witnessed in Indian infrastructure, viz, roads, bridges, buildings and public transport, coupled with advancements in the consumer markets for automobiles, domestic appliances, electronics, footwear and packaged food, has created a huge potential for coatings and adhesives. Moreover, this is solely based on domestic demand. Also, when one considers the increase in production for export, for instance in the automotive industry, the effect is only enlarged. Allied to this, there is a technology shift from low to high performance polymers such as polyurethane, due to the demand for global performance standards. In India, environmental protection has become a major concern and is also recognised as a priority by the government and many agencies. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in awareness and demand for environmentally responsible products and services in the country. This is why Bayer MaterialScience aims at bringing in high-quality raw materials and advanced technology to the country. We have started several initiatives from within the Bayer world towards our goal for a safer and cleaner environment. It is our endeavour to provide our customers with comprehensive solutions for their requirements keeping these objectives in mind.

New solutions for construction… Energy consumption in buildings is responsible for almost 20 per cent of

greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Bayer MaterialScience has further developed the ‘EcoCommercial Building’ initiative originally launched at the end of 2007 as part of the Bayer Climate Programme - into a comprehensive programme in itself. A central element is the partnership network that the company has built up with suppliers, construction companies, architects and property developers. The company contributes through its expertise and high-tech products and arranges for the involvement of suitable partners to facilitate tailored solutions for the construction of energy-optimised commercial and public buildings ranging from lowenergy and passive constructions to zero-emission buildings. With the usage of renewable energy and incorporation of optimal insulation achieved through polyurethane raw materials from Bayer MaterialScience, these buildings achieve an emissionneutral energy balance over the course of the year. Several such ‘zero-emission’ buildings have been built at various sites, viz, Monheim in Germany, New Delhi in India and Diegem in Belgium. The one at Belgium consumes just half the energy of comparable structures, and received the Belgian award for architecture and energy in 2009. Bayer plans to increasingly apply the EcoCommercial Building programme within the new partnership network.

On green initiatives… The polymer industry today is on the quest of emission reduction, production of lightweight and durable materials, short design cycles and recyclable materials. Bayer MaterialScience provides sustainable solutions, including manufacturing materials

that are recyclable using environmentfriendly process technology. Polyurethane (PUR), in which Bayer MaterialScience enjoys a leadership position, largely contributes towards sustainability. Rigid PUR foam can be used for high and low temperature insulation. Approximately, 50 million kWh of energy is saved each year in the EU through the use of PUR insulation. A wall insulation of 1.6 cm of PUR has the same insulation efficiency as a 134 cm thick concrete wall. Lightweight, stable and transparent polycarbonate sheets have also been developed, which can effectively replace the energy-guzzling glass in buildings and automotive components like windows, panorama roofs, headlamp lenses and bezels. Bayer MaterialScience has been continuously pursuing research in developing raw materials for low and zero VOC, coatings and adhesives. Further, in collaboration with partners, Bayer MaterialScience has developed a proprietary gas-phase phosgenation process technology. Compared to conventional technology, solvent consumption in such a largescale plant is reduced by about 80 per cent, while energy consumption is reduced by up to 60 per cent and at the same time 60,000 tonnes less CO 2 is emitted for a plant of the same size (2,50,000 tpa). Such energy saving technology points to a more sustainable development of the chemical industry at large. At the end of the day, the most important factor is our commitment to ensure that we minimise the impact on the environment and community by the way we manufacture, transport, distribute and dispose off our products. This emphasises the fact that sustainability sits at the heart of our strategy.

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LEADERS SPEAK

Around 50 million kWh of energy is saved each year in the EU using PUR insulation. A wall insulation of 1.6 cm of PUR has the same insulation efficiency as a 134 cm thick concrete wall. Bayer MaterialScience’s growth plans in the Indian market… Bayer MaterialScience has recently invested Euro 20 million in a new

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aromatic and aliphatic polyisocyanate manufacturing facility in India as part of its strategy to grow its business in the country and strengthen its position as a market leader in the supply of polyurethane raw materials. The new plant in Ankleshwar, Gujurat, is scheduled to start operating in 2011. The facility will produce Desmodur® polyisocyanates, raw materials for the formulation of a variety of polyurethane coatings and adhesives. Specifically, these will be Desmodur® L for the coating of wood & furniture and for the formulation of adhesives for flexible packaging, and Desmodur® N, used in the automotive, industrial and plastic coating sectors. This investment underlines our commitment to India and the region. We believe India holds much promise for sustainable market growth.

The coatings and adhesives sector continues to establish itself in India as its economy grows. The Ankleshwar investment highlights our commitment to this market and will strengthen our ability to meet demand in the future In addition, we have a thermoplastics manufacturing facility in Cuddalore, which was expanded recently with the commissioning of a new extruder this year. Our polyurethanes systems facility in Greater Noida has already brought us in close proximity with the customer. With the coming inauguration of the ‘Color Competence & Design Center’ for polycarbonates, we will be able to provide tailor-made, customised products to our customers. Taken together, we expect these different growth initiatives to see Bayer MaterialScience making a significant contribution to Bayer’s ambitious growth targets in India.


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MPP ( Jun 2010) 2Tab-68

LOXIM


FACILITY VISIT

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Anniversary

LANXESS SCP Wuxi Compounding Plant

Integrating innovation with performance The LANXESS chemical group’s Semi-Crystalline Products (SCP) Business Unit in Wuxi has plans to boost the supply of its products to meet the growing demand for more environment-friendly plastics in China. In line with this, it has been expediting the development of new polyamide and polyester grades by means of extensive material testing at its Research & Development Testing Centre. Sarita Kutty takes a closer look at the four-year-old compounding facility.

A

two-hour drive past Shanghai - lined with skyscrapers and sprawling high-technology parks - slowly gives way to the splendid scenery of lush river valley, where images of Wuxi start flooding the senses. Set in emerald green pastures, Wuxi is located some 120-kilometer northwest of Shanghai, and is today a prosperous city on the shores of Lake Tai, linked by the Grand Canal to the Yangtze and Yellow river. What sets this city apart is its strategic location and quality infrastructure that have contributed to its success in attracting world-class companies and hi-tech firms from all over the globe. And, this is also the place where LANXESS (Wuxi) Chemical Company Ltd – a wholly owned subsidiary of LANXESS Deutschland GmbH has its presence. The company located in the National

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High & New Tech Industrial Development Zone (Wuxi) manufactures products for the leather, textile and engineering plastics industries in China as well as the Asia Pacific Region.

Compounding facility In April this year, LANXESS SemiCrystalline Products (SCP) business unit reached a milestone when production of high-tech plastics at the company’s compounding facility in Wuxi, passed the 1,00,000-tonne mark. The facility, which has been in operation since January 2006, compounds Durethan (polyamide 6 and 66) and Pocan (polybutylene terephthalate and its blends) for the entire Asia-Pacific region. At the heart of the plant is a compounding system that is designed for a throughput of more than 6,000 kg/hr. Upstream of the twin-screw compounder are feeding


FACILITY VISIT

and unloading stations for sacks and big bags. Operations downstream of the compounding machine include pelletising, grading, pellet cooling, and transfer of the finished pellets to silos. “This production capability formed the basis for the rapid expansion of our business in the Asia-Pacific region and has resulted in one of LANXESS’ biggest success stories in the last five years. It is also a tribute to the successful transfer of technology and production knowhow from Germany to China,” explains Dr Hubert Fink, Head of Semi-Crystalline Products, LANXESS.

Research and development testing centre In recent years, the company has invested heavily in expanding its technical service and marketing organisation in Wuxi. This involved, among other things, the establishment of a Research & Development Testing Centre (RDTC) designed to carry out extensive material tests and thereby accelerate the development of new grades of Durethan and Pocan. “We not only want to bring our production close to our Asian customers, but also our services, that cover every stage in the successful development of a component,” states Dr Fink. The RDTC works closely together with the product development department at the Dormagen site in Germany. They are connected online via a laboratory information management system, which enables the direct and rapid exchange of test jobs and results. Further, the RDTC is equipped with an injection moulding machine with a clamping force of 200 metric tonne and around 20 devices for testing materials. The tests are performed by specially trained personnel according to ISO and ASTM standards. The necessary test pieces – such as rods and sheets – are also manufactured in the RDTC. The following tests are conducted according to ISO and ASTM: Sample preparation (injection moulding of test bars and plaques) Mechanical tests (tensile, bending, impact)

Physical tests (HDT, Vicat, DMA, TMA, moisture content, colour measurement, density, shrinkage) Rheological tests (melt viscosity, melt flow index) Ageing of materials (heat, climate and media) In 2008, this Centre passed the most rigorous DAP (Deutsches Akkreditierungssystem Pruefwesen GmbH – German accreditation system for testing) ISO 17025 certification.This standard places particularly stringent requirements on the training and expertise of employees. Consequently, the SCP business unit of LANXESS AG can now offer its customers accredited results for a total of 15 mechanical, physical and rheological tests. Besides, accreditation to ISO 17025 ranks more highly than certification to ISO 9001, as not only must the processes and documentation of the organisational unit be audited, but the workforce must also be assessed on their ability to carry out the test procedures. The qualification was achieved by implementing a state-of-the-art quality management system. It ensures customers receive test results that meet the highest quality standards, and puts the results issued by the RDTC on a comparable basis with those of other accredited laboratories worldwide. The accreditation confirms the high level of training among the employees and the quality of the local management team of the RDTC, led by Waihong Loh. “This achievement marks an unequivocal success for our team. Through their expertise and personal commitment, every single person has played his/her part in fulfilling the requirements needed for accreditation,” says Loh, who heads the team of employees in her role as Site Manager.

Of sustainability and performance Nowadays plastics are seen to replace metals more often. Due to this metal substitution not only weight can be saved but also an increasing number of functions can be integrated in an individual application. Since cost-intensive finishing

LANXESS will expand capacities at its stateof-the-art compounding plant for high-tech plastics in Wuxi, China. We will soon invest in a third production line at the plant, which will increase compounding capacities by nearly 50 per cent and go on stream mid-2011. Martin Kraemer

Chief Executive Officer, LANXESS Greater China work, like painting, has to be avoided wherever possible, this then leads to more stringent requirements being placed on quality and surface finish. With the high-modulus grades from its Durethan and Pocan product series, LANXESS is able to provide precisely the right solution here. Offering stiffnesses of up to 18,000 MPa and high strengths of up to 250 MPa, these grades attain values comparable with those of diecast materials and are thus eminently suited to the substitution of metals – especially for structural applications that are subject to a high level of stressing. Under certain conditions, expensive specialty polymers can also be replaced by Durethan and Pocan. “I am particularly proud of the fact that our hybrid plastic-metal technology is helping carmakers build lighter, safer cars – resulting in lower fuel consumption. For example, this technology has been used in the front-end construction of the Ford Focus, yielding a 20 per cent reduction in part costs, a 50 per cent reduction

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FACILITY VISIT

in investment cost, and a 40 per cent reduction in weight. At the same time, the structural strength of the cars is reinforced. Our Durethan line of polyamides, one of LANXESS’ most versatile products, is now also being used to create injectionmoulded spare wheel compartments in the latest Audi luxury sedans. It provides greater strength and lower weight at a reduced cost. That is the kind of technology that benefits carmakers, the driving public and the environment all at once,” avers Milan Vignjevic, General Manager Asia-Pacific of the LANXESS Semi-Crystalline Products business unit.

Future plans LANXESS will expand capacities at its state-of-the-art compounding plant for high-tech plastics in Wuxi. The German specialty chemicals company will invest in a third production line at the plant, which will increase compounding capacities by nearly 50 per cent and is scheduled to go on stream mid-2011. After the expansion, the plant will have a capacity of approximately

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60,000 metric tonne per year. Says Martin Kraemer, Chief Executive Officer, LANXESS Greater China, “This investment will serve the growing demand from Chinese and Asian customers for premium, high-performance engineering plastics, mainly driven by the booming automotive industry. This latest investment highlights our commitment to provide our customers with tailormade solutions that carry the German seal of quality and technology. And it ensures we can produce enough of our engineering polyamides and polyesters to meet demand in China.These materials play an important role in electrical and electronic products, but they are also important to the automotive industry.” And, while the demand growth for Pocan and Durethan in Asia currently stands at around 8 per cent and in China at 13 per cent, LANXESS has set its sights on growth, and is well equipped to cater to growing demand from Chinese & Asian customers for premium, high-performance engineering plastics.


SECTOR WATCH

th

Anniversary

Plastics in construction

Building blocks of the future Cutting cost, improving quality and reducing carbon footprint have been the prime focus areas of the building and construction industry during recent years. To achieve these objectives, plastics are being increasingly used and their wide gamut of properties including durability, lightweight, glass-like transparency, corrosion resistance, high strength & low maintenance make them the ideal choice. Further, plastic components can also be engineered to provide specific performance characteristics. Chandrashekhar Modi examines the inroads that plastics have made in the building and construction industry.

W

hat makes plastics an ideal material for building is the fact that it is strong, weather resistant, heat resistant and flexible. Plastic parts typically require less maintenance than other conventional materials. “Unlike wood, plastics do not swell with moisture absorption, do not need to be repainted, and do not succumb to rotting or insect infestation. And as opposed to metal, plastics do not dent or rust and scratches can be buffed out,” explains Dr Jitendra

Kapadia, Head - Technical Center, Plastic Additives, BASF India Ltd. Besides saving resources, the low maintenance cost throughout their life cycle and good recyclability makes them an ideal choice for the construction industry. Commenting on the role of plastics, Y R Anand, Managing Partner, Unimark says, “Plastics find myriad applications in the building & construction sector in several countries and their usage is much more widespread in the advanced economies. They help reduce costs, improve thermal efficiencies and reduce dependency on natural resources. The foremost role of plastics in this sector is to reduce the usage of natural raw materials like wood, soil, cement, etc in favour of synthetic materials, which can be mass produced at affordable costs.”

Evolving with time

Courtesy: Hudson Climate Action Network

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One of the earliest applications of plastics in construction has been the use of polyvinyl choride (PVC) in pipes, conduits, etc. This is now perhaps the most accepted and widely used thermoplastic application in water distribution and drainage system. Rajnikant Patel, Business Development Manager, India, HASCO, explains the reason for surge in the market for PVC pipes, “Besides having abysmally low conductivity (0.16 W/mk) PVC pipes and fittings save 30 per cent of cost and 20 per cent on installation time as compared to conventional materials


SECTOR WATCH

like copper or iron. It thus facilitates significant saving in energy in case of hot water transportation.” Today, a polyurethane (PU) layer is applied to plastic pipes in order to considerably augment its insulation properties. “The highly efficient insulation provided by the PU layer makes these pipes the ideal solution whenever a significant temperature differential is required to be maintained between the medium flowing through the pipes and the ambient temperature. In some cases, the medium being transported is hotter – such as supply lines for combined heat and power or geothermal plants, or hot water pipelines in general. Insulated pipes are also sometimes required for potable water transport if there is a risk of freezing of pipes. In other cases, the medium must be kept cold, for example, in air conditioning or refrigeration systems, or in pipes for transporting liquefied gas,” explains Daniel Lachhammer, Product Manager Pipe, KraussMaffei Technologies GmbH.

Termite resistant additives are one of the latest and exciting advancements in the field. This application can meet major demand in a tropical country like India, where bug-attack is a major cause for concern. Y R Anand

Managing Partner, Unimark

Light yet strong Plastics present a unique combination of tremendous structural strength and lightweight making them suitable for building huge components like wall panels, slabs and roofs. “There are several technologies available for using expanded polystyrene (EPS) and PU as sandwich materials in building panels and these materials are much lighter in comparison with traditional materials, thus enabling faster transportation to the construction site in addition to lower fuel consumption. This factor will play a crucial role in timely completion of large housing and infrastructure projects in future,” explains Anand.

Managing heat transfer Buildings consume about 40 per cent of energy produced and a large proportion is mopped by heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) applications. The development of PU system with environment-friendly blowing agents, in addition to saving energy, meets the fire safety regulations and is neutral to ozone layer depletion as well. “Plastics possess excellent thermal insulation properties due to extremely low conductivity as compared to conventional materials. This enables energy savings in harsh winters and prevents over-heating in summer,” explains Jitu Vadodaria, Independent Consultant. One such material is PU rigid foam which has an extremely low thermal conductivity of around 0.024 W/mk, that has not yet been achieved by any other conventional insulating material. This makes it possible to achieve heat retention or consistent temperature control of air-conditioned environments, even with relatively thin walls or facades. Demand for thin insulating materials is growing as it gives architects greater freedom to design.

Unlike wood, plastics do not swell with moisture absorption, do not need to be repainted, and do not succumb to rotting or insect infestation. Dr Jitendra Kapadia

Head - Technical Center, Plastic Additives, BASF India Ltd guzzling conventional materials which require low maintenance. “Doors and windows have always been made in wood and glass. However, plastics like PVC, PC and polyesters have almost completely replaced these traditional materials,” affirms Dr Kapadia. All the above requirements are fulfilled with windows/door profiles made from uPVC, one of the extensively used materials. A unique combination of lightweight, strength, corrosion and fire resistance, wind resistance, low electrical conductivity, heat reflectivity, formability and suitability for a wide variety of durable finishes make uPVC the most versatile polymer to be used for these profiles.

Substituting glass Glass, the material known for its class and elegance, has also been 3500 3000

Opening doors to innovation Today’s windows are expected to perform much beyond their basic functions such as letting in light or keeping out heat or cold. In addition to attenuating noise and being aesthetically attractive, they are expected to be made of energy efficient materials in place of scarce, energy

Plastic doors Plastic windows

1999 15 50

2004 25 110

2009 50 180

2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

1999

2004

2009

Window & doors

The demand for windows and doors in India ($ million)

Source: www.polymerupdate.com

June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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An invite that rewards as well...

Dear Reader, ‘Modern Plastics & Polymers’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the plastics & polymers industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Modern Plastics & Polymers’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a complimentary copy of that particular issue and an honorarium cheque. Published by Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘Modern Plastics & Polymers’ is the leading monthly magazine exclusively meant for producers and user fraternities of the plastics industry. Well supported by a national readership of over 80,000 and our strong network of 26 branch offices across India, this magazine reaches out to key decision makers among the Indian manufacturers of plastics products, machinery and allied sectors. Brought out in association with Hong Kong-based Ringier Trade Media Ltd (one of the world’s largest trade publishing houses with more than 200 special interest titles and offices in every major country), it ensures that advertisers are able to promote their products and services across the globe at no extra cost. So get going and rush your articles, write-ups, etc… Thanking you, Yours sincerely,

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SECTOR WATCH

Besides having abysmally low conductivity PVC pipes and fittings save 30 per cent on cost and 20 per cent on installation time as compared to conventional materials. Rajnikant Patel

Business Development Manager, India, HASCO

replaced by polycarbonate (PC), the thermoplastic polymer and many functionalities have been added apart from the basic one, ie transparency. Polycarbonate is a tough, dimensionally stable, transparent thermoplastic that has versatile applications which demand high performance properties. It maintains its properties over a wide o range of temperatures, from -40 F o to 280 F. It is generally available in three types: machine grade, window and glass-filled. It has unbeatable strength and is transparent up to 2” in special grades. Besides, PC possesses

Courtesy: BASF

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Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

outstanding dimensional and thermal stability, exceptional machinability, stain resistance and non-toxicity with low water absorption. Bullet-proof windows and enclosures as seen inside banks are often made of polycarbonate. Focussing on the major applications of PC, Vadodaria says, “PC is extensively used in the replacement of glass on domes or glazing. Sound walls are used in public places like airports where clear PC sheet is used to connect terminals to reduce the noise level.”

The power of composites Plastic composites find myriad applications in building and construction. Technically known as fibrereinforced plastics/polymers (FRP), they generally comprise two components: a reinforcement fibre and a polymer binder (matrix). The size, shape, weight/ volume and material of the reinforcing fibres typically determine the plastic composite’s mechanical properties, such as stiffness and strength. The type and proportion of the plastic resin matrix lends the finished plastic composite its physical characteristics, including resistance to impact. Fillers or additives can also be used to lend the final plastic composite attributes such as resistance to ultraviolet (UV) rays or fire resistance. Resins, also known as binders, are typically thermoset plastics (for example polyester, vinyl ester, modified acrylic, epoxy, phenolic, and urethane) that serve as the glue holding the reinforcing fibres together in an orderly fashion. These fibres, which are embedded in the plastic resin matrix, are structured to overlap and help transfer the load within the plastic composite structure. The plastic composite’s structural properties depend primarily on the type of fibres used. While glass fibres are the main ingredients for many plastic composites, certain physical characteristics can be harnessed through the use of carbon, aramid, or boron fibres. These materials impart stiffness and strength to the finished plastic composite and

can control, to varying degrees, the weight of the end product. Although polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polypropylene are the polymers dominantly used with natural-fibre composites, natural fibres can also be used with phenolics, polyester, polystyrene, polyurethane, and other polymer matrices. Patel points out various applications of plastic composites, “Polymer composites are used for manufacturing of baths, sinks, shower enclosures and trays. Fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) are used in the application of doors and door frames as well as for bridge decks. Natural FRPs are used as a substitute for wood & metal for fences, railings, flooring, roofing and wall tiles application.” Many plastic composite building products are now produced by embedding natural fibres derived from the bast (ie outer stem) of certain plants — wheat-straw fibre, flax, jute, kenaf, sisal, hemp, and coconut — in a polyester or polypropylene matrix.

The highly efficient insulation provided by the polyurethane layer makes these pipes the ideal solution whenever a significant temperature differential is required to be maintained. Daniel Lachhammer

Product Manager - Pipe, KraussMaffei Technologies GmbH


SECTOR WATCH

Plastics have excellent thermal insulation properties due to their extremely low conductivity as compared to the conventional materials. This enables energy savings in harsh winters and prevents over-heating in summer. Jitu Vadodaria

Independent Consultant

The cost advantage Plastics are gradually approaching or surpassing the norms of conventional building materials and hence presenting a clear cost advantage to the building contractors. “A study comparing EPS with stone wool for external thermal

insulation composite systems (ETICS) applications in Germany concluded upon the following observations: The main differences in cost included: Lower material cost for EPS compared with stone wool: It is approximately Euro 8/m² for EPS and approximately Euro 17/m² for stone wool, each for 10 cm thickness of application. Shorter time required for mounting the EPS insulating material. It is approximately 0.35 h/m² for EPS and approximately 0.40 h/m² for stone wool. This translates into lower labour costs for mounting EPS. EPS is more rigid and can be fixed to the existing wall with plaster and glue without the use of dowels, which are necessary for fixing stone wool. Material cutting and fitting are also faster in the case of EPS,” explain BASF officials. Similarly roof, walls and floor can be insulated by polyurethane which can deliver savings of 18-85 litre of heating oil per square metre per year and help cut energy bills substantially.

Expanding horizons Plastics have greatly widened their gamut of applications in the building industry and are commonly seen in the plumbing fixtures, siding, flooring, insulation,

panels, doors, windows, glazing, bathroom units, gratings, railings and the list is growing with more and more structural and decorative application added continuously. Explaining the recent advancements Anand says, “Termite resistant additives are one of the latest and exciting advancements in the field. These additives make plastics completely resistant to termites and other bugs. This application can meet major demand in a tropical country like India as bug-attack is a cause for concern in the building industry as durability is at stake.” The continued development of light weight composite panels is an area that needs to be watched and adopted wisely in India. “There are systems which can be used for monolithic construction, which possess the ability to make buildings completely immune to earthquakes and hurricanes. This is a completely new technology for India and plastics are a major component of these systems,” adds Anand. Further advances in plastic composite formulations and manufacturing technology offer exciting opportunities to customise high performance properties and translate them into a wide variety of commercial and residential building applications.

Going forward Diagonal ‘truss’ wires Individually welded internal truss wires or diagonals extend through the panel core between each surface. These galvanised truss wires are welded continuously in the required spacing so they form, with the welded wire fabric, a triangulated truss system which greatly increases the panel strength.

Insulation When welded in place, these strut wires pierce through a modified expanded polystyrene core placed between the two layers of welded wire fabric, maintain the required distance apart and provide the shear transfer between the panel surfaces.

Welded wire fabric Each surface of the wire space frame has a 2“ square welded mesh pattern of longitudinal and transverse wires of the same diameter (11gauge, class III galvanised).

Field-applied ‘shotcrete’ The modified expanded polystyrene core (minimum density 0.9 pounds per cubic foot) is held 1/2” or 3/4” from each face of the wire frame to be embedded in an application of approximately 1”- 2” thick concrete mixture with 2,500 psi minimum.

Different applications of plastics in construction

Courtesy: Unimark

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Construction is the second largest economic activity after agriculture, and accounts for 11 per cent of India’s GDP. “I strongly believe that contribution of plastics will continue to grow in the construction industry from the current rate of 17-18 per cent to about 20-25 per cent in the coming 25 years. Global production of plastics is 200 million metric tonnes (MMT) and 27-30 MMT (approximately 15 per cent) is used in the building and construction industry,” confirms Vadodaria. Plastics applications in building and construction are second only to those in packaging. The investments made in this sector amounted to Rs 8 trillion in FY08, thus reflecting bright future prospects ahead in this sector.


MARKET TRENDS

th

Anniversary

Blow moulding for bottles

A ‘green’er package Today, much of the environmentally sensitive packaging solutions revolve around ‘thin walling’ blow moulded containers to reduce plastic content while engineering in stability. Lightweighting is another trend to which preform and equipment manufacturers are turning their attention. By reducing material thickness, considerable cost savings can be achieved. Sarita Kutty analyses some of the recent sustainability concepts that have been particularly inspirational to the bottled water industry.

O

ver the past few years, lightweighting PET packages have been gathering momentum, driven largely by the need for environment-friendly packaging solutions. While previous decades witnessed a rise in environmental awareness by focussing on reduced packaging, the intensity of the movement gradually subsided. However, the bottled water industry has always been under intensive environmental scrutiny and the reduction in the consumption of raw materials, energy, water and chemicals has become a top concern for the entire industry. In line with this, the bottled water industry has established a track record of source reduction initiatives. Furthermore, it has been instrumental in PET bottle lightweighting, and also initiated a number of equipment innovations that are aimed at reducing the consumption of energy and other resources.

Courtesy: KHS Corpoplast

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Overall equipment effectiveness Development efforts have shifted towards improving efficiency and reliability, reducing changeover times and reducing time required for machinery maintenance. In fact, several processors have installed high-speed, efficient blow moulding systems, thus replacing a larger number of smaller and lessefficient blow moulding machines. By doing this, they have been able to dramatically improve the efficiency of processor’s operations, resulting in a much lower cost per bottle. This approach has proven to be beneficial, not only for dairy bottles, but also for containers for juice products and other single-serve beverages. Further, the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) ratio is a crucial variable for determining how efficiently a line is actually running. The OEE measures the entire bandwidth of effectiveness losses in production lines, and identifies which machinery/ process-dependent losses need to be minimised. It covers not only the technical availability losses, but the organisational ones as well, synthesising the parameters of time, quantity and quality, and rendering them transparent for the production team. OEE is computed from an availability factor, an output factor and a quality factor. Elaborates Christoph Klenk, Member of the Executive Board, Research and


MARKET TRENDS

Development – Engineering and Product Divisions, Krones AG, “Standardised continual determination of the OEE is of great advantage to bottling facilities concerned. By recording and evaluating key ratios and producing long-term analyses of time losses, effectiveness deficits in the line can be lastingly reduced. The causes of malfunctions are accurately documented, auxiliary process times (for example, changeover times, maintenance times, etc) can be simply and promptly ascertained by the operator.” In line with this, Krones AG, has developed a system called MouldXpress Advanced, which downsizes the changeover time for moulds in the Contiform, thus improving the availability levels of the stretch blowmoulding machine.

Specialised package design Making prototype preforms for blow moulding trials is a sound investment, as it will often help designers squeeze the last few fractions of a gram from the preform specification. Moreover, optimal bottle design is a significant prerequisite for cost-effective bottle production. For instance, optimised design of a PET bottle enables lighter preforms

Lightweighting advantages Reduce resin consumption Increase productivity & performance Maximise cycle benefit (thinner means faster) Satisfy end-consumer demand for sustainable develpment

to be handled in the stretch blowmoulding process. In addition, stretch blow moulding process has carved a niche in the production of high-quality PET bottles. The change in the neck geometry, thinner walls with structural elements for assuring high stability, reduced weights of the neck finish and closure, plus the weight reduction in the base area are the salient worksteps in the lightweighting process. Further, for optimum performance, the heat setting process must be combined with a specially designed preform and bottle. In fact, it is known that the heat resistant (HR) process makes packages that can withstand either hot filling or pasteurisation using a process known as heat setting. In this process, preform heating temperatures are higher, and the bottle remains in contact with the hot mould for a longer period. “The HR preform profile guarantees specific biorientation ratios that limit internal residual stresses while optimising package weight. The neck is especially heat sensitive, but there are ways to improve neck strength in HR heat setting. It can be crystallised, or an amorphous neck can be designed with added thickness,” says Vijay Walia, GM – PET Sales, Pearl Drinks Ltd.

Saving by lightweighting While there are a number of ways to be more environmentally responsible, one of the most obvious is to reduce the amount of material used in packaging. Lightweighting PET bottles means that less plastics is used in the manufacturing process and less plastics has to be

Standardised continual determination of OEE is of great advantage to bottling facilities. By producing long-term analyses of time losses, effectiveness deficits in the line can be lastingly reduced. Christoph Klenk

Member of the Executive Board, Research and Development – Engineering and Product Divisions, Krones AG

recycled, reclaimed or dumped after use. Corroborates Walia, “In order to keep the overall operating costs as low as possible, cost-cutting measures include minimising the use of materials. In times of skyrocketing oil prices and intensive competition, lightweighting is becoming increasingly important, especially in the water sector. When manufacturing 100 million bottles, only one gram less weight leads to a saving of Euro 1,20,000 in material costs alone. At the same time, the bottles must continue to be stable enough to enable customers

Courtesy: KHS Corpoplast June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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MARKET TRENDS

Lightweighting is becoming increasingly important, especially in the water sector. When manufacturing 100 million bottles, only one gram less weight leads to substantial savings in material costs. Vijay Walia

GM – PET Sales, Pearl Drinks Ltd

to produce and transport them in a continuously repeatable process with maximum efficiency.” Seconds Edward Kosior, Managing Director, Nextek Pty Ltd, “A further environmental benefit of lightweighting is energy saving. There is less energy used in the disposal or reclamation of the bottle after it is sent for recycling or waste management, and lighter bottles need less energy to produce. For every one gram of weight reduction in a preform approximately 500 kWh per million preforms can be saved - this is roughly the daily energy consumption of two 72cavity preform moulding systems.”

The latest round of development has seen several bottle designers breaking the 10-gm barrier. “In theory, lightweighting involves removing weight from the neck finish area and the body. However, in practice it is not so simple. This lightweighting drive has challenged preform mould and blow mould designers alike. While material usage has additional benefit of reducing injection moulding cycle times, maintaining bottle rigidity becomes more difficult and requires sophisticated bottle design,” states Kosior.

Challenges and solutions The challenges encountered when trying to produce an attractive, yet rigid lightweight bottle begin at the preform handling stage and continue throughout filling, labelling, packing and logistics. At the filling stage, a groove in the neck finish and an appropriate straight section below the lowest ring of the neck finish are essential for high-speed fillers that work with neck handling. The lowest ring of the neck finish has to have an appropriate design and thickness to be able to take the momentum and head pressure required for capping. If the bottle is labelled after filling, the challenges are introduced by water on the outside of the bottle. In the case of empty bottle labeling, the bottle has to withstand a certain amount of empty top load until it is pressurised with compressed air for stabilisation. However, advancements in bottle design and production machinery have led their role to play in overcoming these challenges. For example, Sidel attributes its lightweighting success to a

combination of factors. “We developed the Flex technology, which allows us to design flexible bottles with shape memory, and new necks that further lightweight our bottles, says Franck Hancard, Product Manager Packaging & Actis TM, SIDEL B&C SAS. “The design of the preforms is also changing – they are easier to heat, which helps us produce lightweight bottles. But what also makes new design possible is the evolution of new machines.” Further, reciprocating screw (intermittent extrusion) is the most popular and cost-effective method to produce lightweight dairy, juice and water containers. In this process, the

In theory, lightweighting involves removing weight from the neck finish area and the body. However, in practice it is not so simple. This drive has challenged preform mould and blow mould designers alike. Edward Kosior

Managing Director, Nextek Pty Ltd

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MPP ( Jun 2010) 3 Tab-85


INGECO

MPP ( Jun 2010) 3 Tab-86


MARKET TRENDS

extruder feed screw reciprocates similar to an injection moulding machine. Says Jeff Newman, VP - Sales & Marketing, Wilmington Machinery, “The moulds are stationary under the die head and simple open & close but do not shuttle. As the screw moves forward, the parison is pushed out into the moulds for blowing. For lightweight container, cycle times can be very fast with some under 5 second.” Here, major machinery manufacturers include Rocheleau and Uniloy. According to Newman, some of the pros in this process include:

An analysis by Beverage Marketing Corporation (BMC) for International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) The average PET bottled water container weighed about 19 gm in 2000; by 2008, the average amount of PET in each bottle declined to about 13 gm During the eight-year period, more than 1.3 billion pound of PET resin was saved by the bottled-water industry through container lightweighting In 2008 alone, the bottled water industry saved 445 million pound of PET by reducing bottle weights “IBWA is proud the bottled water industry has worked diligently to reduce the weight of its plastic bottles. In addition, we salute the PET plastic resin manufacturers who worked hard to find new ways to strengthen PET plastic resin so that less plastic goes further in maintaining the structural integrity of the thinner bottle. Advances made in light-weighting bottled water containers reduce waste, preserve resources and deliver a more sustainable product to consumers,” says Joseph K Doss, President and CEO, IBW. Courtesy: International Bottled Water Association

Very fast cycle time capabilities Simple machine motions since clamps do not move Capable of 16 cavities small bottles or 8 gallons. Smaller models available Relative low cost per cavity Can easily run homo polymers and very low melt temperatures

Going green For companies, keen on boosting their green credentials, Kosior suggests that incorporating a percentage of recycled content into bottles is a better way to go. “The use of recycled content is the fastest way of reducing the carbon footprint of any bottle. One can reduce weight but will only achieve a carbon footprint reduction in proportion to that weight reduction, whereas if recycled (rPET) is incorporated into the bottles, a far greater reduction can be achieved with no change in the actual container structure. Another reason rPET is more environment-friendly than ultra-lightweighting is because, when bottles get very light, they cannot be recycled. In a plastics recycling plant, bottles that are in the order of 20 gm are a sensible material to recover, but when they get down to 10 gm, they become harder to capture because they cannot be unscrambled and sorted by conventional means. So, a high proportion of those bottles ends up in landfill,” says Kosior. That said, incorporating rPET into water bottles is not without its problems. Affirms Kosior, “The use of rPET for producing new bottles presents a

Reciprocating screw (intermittent extrusion) is the most popular and cost-effective method to produce lightweight dairy, juice and water containers. Jeff Newman

VP - Sales & Marketing, Wilmington Machinery

number of challenges, including clarity, yellowness, black specs, and often an increased frequency of blowouts during blow moulding. When you are dealing with lightweight water bottles, the problem becomes even more pronounced.” In short, lightweighting not only reduces consumption of PET resin but also increases productivity & performance, maximises production cycles, and of course, satisfies consumer demands for sustainable development from manufacturers. And as PET packages continue to get lighter, technology leaders in the industry continue to develop new solutions to address sustainability factors as they arise.

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KNOW-HOW

th

Anniversary

Design optimisation in mould making

Going with the flow

Mould designers and machine operators often come across projects where minimum cycle times are essential for profitability or where the part is particularly sensitive to shrinkage and/or warpage. Professionals address these issues by paying particular attention to cooling circuits within the mould and the packing profile used in the moulding process. Read on to know how optimisation can be used as a tool for improving designs.

Manoj Mehta Why is optimisation relevant in the mould making process? Over the past decade, mould designers have come to use and trust ComputerAided Engineering (CAE) tools as Finite Element Analysis (FEA), Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and motion simulation. They are considered as important aids to producing better designs faster. They know that such tools help them design parts, assemblies, and products that will withstand the toughest services likely to come their way. However, moulds designed to meet ‘worst case scenarios’ may not be the best designs for their respective real life environments. In a bid to ensure compliance with safety and strength requirements, these moulds may be over-engineered and too heavy for their purposes, or excessively difficult and costly to manufacture. Mould designers who want to get closer to designing the best and most profitable products for their functions need to take the next step forward in product development through CAE optimisation. What are the key benefits of optimisation to the mouldmaker? The design engineer is, by definition, on the forefront of product development. Today, such an engineer is already familiar with

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design analysis. This means that he or she already has at hand the basic knowledge required for initiating the process of optimisation, and only needs the relevant tools to take it to the next level. Moreover, optimisation helps the design engineer increase his knowledge of his product’s behaviour and improve upon the design, while adhering to the data obtained from previously completed analyses. Elaborate on the process of optimisation. The process of optimisation has three major components objective, constraints and variables. At its simplest, an optimised design should either maximise or minimise the objective by changing the variables while keeping critical responses within defined constraints. Objective: The objective is the purpose for which optimisation is being undertaken. For example, if a company’s research shows that it will gain a competitive advantage by producing the lightest or least expensive product, then minimising weight or cost becomes the objective of optimisation. Such a case is called single-objective optimisation. Mould makers frequently have to deal with multi-objective optimisations. These, however, can call for greater resources than may be available on a daily basis. If the design engineer can refine his problem definition to a single objective or one objective at a time the optimisation process becomes easier. In the majority of cases, engineers


KNOW-HOW who work with structural responses have weight minimisation as one of the objectives. In fluid flow applications, the most common objectives are minimising pressure drop and turbulent energy, or maximising velocity. Constraints: Constraints bring reality into optimisation. If the optimisation problem were set up as an unconstrained weight minimisation study, the optimisation programme would immediately choose the minimum material condition allowed by the dimensional variables. In the real world, however, most parts have such other operational requirements as strength or stiffness. Thus, it is important for the engineer to choose constraints that define the acceptable behaviour of the part within its system. The constraints he chooses are typically those allowable in a single static, frequency, or thermal analysis. Design variables: In an optimisation study, the mould designer needs to be able to change the design parameters if he hopes to find the best of several possible design configurations. These parameters are the design variables. They may be dimensions, or the number of instances in a pattern, or material properties, or loads, spring stiffness — or any other aspect of a design that may have a detectable ‘best’ value or consideration. Variables can be continuous, ie, the variable can have any value between a specified minimum and maximum. Most dimensional variables fall into the continuous category. Describe the tools for product optimisation in mould-making. FEA-driven optimisation represents a growing research field in engineering. Although many programmes and techniques are available for performing it, trade studies, sensitivity studies, and shape optimisation are the most commonly used today. The two most frequently used methods of shape optimisation include gradient search and Design of Experiments (DoE). The latter is based on response surface calculations, and results in ‘robust’

Courtesy: Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corp

solutions that is, effective in the broadest range of possible service conditions over the life of the product. How do some of the most effective optimisation programmes run? Industry leading optimisation programmes use a DoE-based optimisation method. To run a problem, the engineer provides the maximum and minimum values of his dimensional design variables, and then chooses a ‘standard’ or ‘high quality’ optimisation. The standard approach works on the assumption that the objective response curve between the limit values is linear, and calculates only the response at these values. The high quality optimisation takes into account the possibility of a second order response between the limits, and evaluates a middle value as well as the extremes. In this case, design constraint is not to exceed the yield strength of the material under static loading. Describe the CAD and analysis connection for optimisation. The CAD system is essential to optimisation as well, because the method of creating models, dimensioning schemes, and embedded relationships affects the designer’s ability to explore design alternatives. As the engineer creates his models, he should consider dimensioning that allows features that have previously benefited from optimisation to be modified without causing any model rebuild errors.

For optimisation, planning is critical. A designer may discover benefits in creating a CAD model to be used exclusively for optimisation, and then use the information gathered from the process to complete a CAD model for detailing and production. The complexity of the part and of the structure should guide him in choosing the features to study. How must a mould maker leverage optimisation capabilities to derive maximum benefits from their technology investments? Engineers planning to use optimisation as a tool for improving designs and products need to clear their minds of any preconceived ideas of what constitutes ‘optimal’. Allowing the optimisation programme to provide insights, and then understanding the various implications of the data helps derive better results out of the entire process. The open-minded designer may find that the optimisation tools offer several possible solutions to the problem. Solutions that need to be considered in light of manufacturing needs and efficiencies in order to obtain the best and most profitable product at the end of the day. Manoj Mehta is the Country Manager - India and SAARC Operations, Dassault Systèmes SolidWorks Corporation. He can be contacted on email: mmehta@solidworks.com

June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PERFORMANCE METRICS

Anniversary

Fatigue strength

Standing the test of time Choosing the right material and component design is particularly critical for plastics destined for use under the hood. Materials in this environment are exposed to pulsations for long periods of time in hot, aggressive media. With a newly developed test specimen made from glass-fibre-reinforced polyamide, it is now possible to systematically study the fatigue behaviour of engineering plastics.

Dr Werner Wilhelm Kraft, Dr Stefan Glaser, Sven Wenigmann, Kai Beringer, Jochen Huber and Dr Anka Bernatt

particularly the case in highly stressed, safety-relevant applications.

he high degree of mechanical and chemical stress that modern engineering polymers are required to withstand can well be gauged from their technical specifications. However, the behaviour of these polymers under long-term cyclic load, ie, their fatigue behaviour, has not been intensively studied so far. Yet, knowledge of this behaviour is essential for the development of application-tailored materials. Today, system suppliers as well as automakers insist that engine mountings, oil intake modules and other structural components and media transporting parts exposed to pulsations show defined and predictable behaviour under long-term dynamic load. This is

In order to obtain comprehensive theoretical and practical knowledge of the fatigue strength of components, experts at BASF designed a special test specimen made from engineering thermoplastics for cyclic internal pressure testing. They concluded that the specimen should be open, hollow and not completely rotationally symmetrical with a thickness no less than 2.2 mm at any place. Further, it should have the smallest possible volume for later media tests and permit the impingement of media from inside as well as outside. In addition, it should satisfy the following criteria: Ability to withstand cyclic loading pressures up to a maximum of 30 bar Only one failure mode in the basic structure Failing in a defined area A typical fibre distribution at the defined weak point Permitting size variations and the incorporation of knit lines/weld lines via slight design changes

T

Concept of a novel test specimen

The CAE design challenge

Test specimen for studying the fatigue strength of engineering plastics

Courtesy: BASF

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The requirements that the test specimen had to meet presented an enormous challenge for CAE design optimisation. The approximate rotational symmetry and spherical cap result in large,


PERFORMANCE METRICS highly stressed zones that result in the specimen having various failure sites or modes, depending on the position of material or production-induced weak points such as voids or surface defects. To complicate matters further, with fibre-reinforced materials, the influence of the manufacturing process on mechanical properties must also be taken into account. Virtual design and optimisation of the test specimen were carried out using Ultrasim and involved not only simulation of the production process but also strength analysis with integrative simulation and mathematical component optimisation. The load criterion was a static internal pressure that would lead to failure at a maximum of 40 bar. The requirement of failure at a defined point was achieved by introducing a flat area in the cylindrical part. In the edge zones of the flat area, there is a highly stressed region where a circumferential stress is superimposed on a flexural stress. Since local fibre orientation and weld lines considerably influence local strength behaviour, it is essential to include them in the design. The strength analysis under static internal pressure shows the critical zones. Stable failure behaviour can be observed in both static and dynamic tests. During the development of the test specimen, many geometrical variations were considered, in which failure occurred in several regions at the same time, for example, in the curved areas in the transition to the flange or to the threaded section. Through systematic use of optimisation tools and failure modelling with Ultrasim, the shape and process were optimised so that the test specimen in its final version had – as intended – only one failure mode at a defined point.

Optimum production parameters Parallel to the CAE design process, the optimum production parameters had to be determined. This is because the macroscopic properties of the Ultrasim fatigue tester depend not only on the

plastics used but also to an important extent on processing factors. Therefore, process control in the injection moulding process plays a key role. In order to obtain reproducible and meaningful results from the planned series of tests, all injection moulded parts must have identical properties. The most important criterion is the bursting pressure obtained. In the Wöhler test, pressure deviations of just a few bars can lead to the specified number of load cycles to bursting either not being reached or being exceeded many times over. This then makes adequate selection of the stress amplitude (and therefore accurate test planning) difficult.

Knowledge of fatigue behaviour is essential for the development of application tailored materials. The different wall thicknesses of the test specimen lead to complex filling pattern. Through skilful choice of machine settings, it is possible to influence the position of the knit lines and especially at the point where the flow fronts merge. At higher melt temperature or injection rate, melt viscosity is decreased by the higher shear. The melt then flows more quickly into the thin-walled areas and the point where the melt flow fronts converge, moves towards the end of the flow path, while the knit lines are shifted outwards. These effects in component morphology are manifested in the bursting pressures of the components. To quantify the effect of the machine parameters and determine the optimum processing point for production, a full factorial 23 test plan was used and the melt temperature, mould temperature and injection rate were varied. Previous

screening tests had shown that other machine parameters have no significant effect on bursting pressure. The result showed a plausible influence of melt temperature on bursting pressure. As expected, a lower melt viscosity shifts the flow front convergence point towards the end of the flow path. At first, the influence of mould cavity temperature was surprising. Against all expectations, lower values which would tend to hinder the flowability of the plastic led to higher bursting pressures. This can only be explained in terms of the complex interaction of the three flow fronts. As a result of the high injection rate, the melt is highly sheared in the thin-walled area and the cooler mould temperature is of relatively little consequence. The rapid flow of the melt fronts from the thickwalled regions is thus compensated. Besides selecting the right test equipment, constant monitoring of the injection moulding of consistent quality, the changeover from the injection to the holding pressure phase is initiated by a mould internal pressure sensor.

To sum up All important parameters affecting the fatigue of plastic components can now be systematically determined. The focus will be on the influence of stress, stress amplitude, R-ratio and load frequency, temperature and temperature changes, and the presence of media like oil, fuel & coolants. From the gradients of the Wöhler curves in the fatigue endurance strength range, engineers will gain vital information on the fatigue behaviour of real components as a function of real parameters. This knowledge will in future lead to further improved and more specific material selection and component design belt. Dr Werner Wilhelm Kraft, Dr Stefan Glaser, Sven Wenigmann, Kai Beringer, Jochen Huber and Dr Anka Bernatt are responsible for product development of engineering plastics within Business Management Automative, BASF SE. Email: Wernerwilhelm.kraft@basf.com June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

Anniversary

Sustainable manufacturing

Towards a green economy A key challenge for manufacturers is to not only design but manufacture products using a sustainable approach. Manufacturing industries have started recognising that it is their responsibility to design a sustainable manufacturing system which has less environmental impact & social disruptions and promotes wealth. This article presents a case for adapting sustainable manufacturing practices, and in the process create a positive brand image in the customer’s mind.

A

ccording to the definition given by the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED), ‘Sustainable development’ is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising on the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Manufacturing has three basic inbuilt components viz, product, process and distribution. Manufacturing is said to be sustainable when all discussions and decisions regarding these three components converge on the concern for environment.

Major areas of concern In order to achieve and implement a sustainable manufacturing process, there are a few key areas which every organisation needs to pay special attention to. These can be broadly categorised as: energy, materials, wastes and water. Since these aspects have a direct bearing with the environment,

Courtesy: Green home

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addressing them significantly contributes to reducing the overall adverse impact of the manufacturing process on the same.

The four-stage approach There are four different stages at which sustainability can be introduced into the manufacturing process. These stages include: Enterprise level: The newfound environmental focus of the economy has posed a threat to both product as well as corporate reputation. Hence, organisations must formulate a sustainability strategy that will lead the way for other businesses and manufacturing processes like energy management programmes. These, however, may need substantial investments and modifications in manufacturing processes and/or facilities initially. Adopting sustainable manufacturing practices influence products & product mix, business processes, manufacturing plant locations, supplier & distribution network, warehousing, transportation and other business functions in the long run. All such decisions need to be taken during corporate planning at the enterprise level. An effective management control system must be established to set the targets and to have accountability and real time visibility of the business processes. Product design:The environmental impact of the product should be assessed right from conceptualisation, design and


MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

Process

Product

Distribution

Environment & resourcefriendly Manufacturing sustainability Sustainable manufacturing

development stage. Products must be designed with an eye towards minimum fuel use and minimum carbon emissions while in use. Further, while designing the product modular designing and selective assembly techniques should be kept in mind so that the subcomponents can be designed in a way that renders them fit for use by following generations of product. This concept supports sustainable manufacturing by making parts available for reuse and recycling. Use of CAD Software can minimise machining wastage. For example GD&T (Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing) technique can be used to achieve accurate and precise tolerances. Moreover, use of simulation technique eliminates necessity for actual field trials and, thus saving on time and resources. Manufacturing processes: Manufacturing production operations is the area which consumes maximum material, energy, water and generates maximum amount of waste. Hence, this is an essential area of consideration for implementing sustainability measures. Manufacturing processes for products must be modified to minimise energy usage, carbon generation, waste and water consumption. Improving operational efficiency for energy conservation would help reduce CO2 emissions. Use of fossil fuels should be avoided completely or partly, wherever possible and renewable energy

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sources should be employed instead. It is essential to have a system to gauge the energy consumption and carbon footprints of the organisation as a whole or for each process individually. Based on this data, energy/emission intensive operations can be duly modified. Further, for product planning based on energy consumption or emission, this parameter can be allocated to products using same technique that is used for activity-based costing. Supply chain management: The environmental lifecycle of a product begins with the extraction of raw materials from the earth and ends with its disposal. The supply chain network should be designed parallel to the product’s environmental lifecycle in order to assess its total impact on environment. While supplying goods to consumers or customers, the concept of reverse logistics should be applied. Reverse logistics is applicable in front-end as well as back-end logistics. The disposable products can be taken back by manufacturer and some parts can be reused or disposed in a green way. Packaging material can be reused as well. This will definitely help reduce the burden of waste on the environment. Manufacturers should collaborate with suppliers and dealers to implement reverse logistics throughout the supply chain network. Empty vehicles and under-utilised warehouses indicate inefficient business practices and damage environment through unnecessarily emitting pollutants

Stage1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

Enterprise level Product design

Manufacturing processes

Supply chain managent

The four processes of sustainable manufacturing

and carbon. There is need to extend sustainability to logistics too and this can be achieved by logistics collaboration between non-competing or even competing companies. For example, 23 SMEs can join their shipments together to buy full vehicle loads instead of each paying higher part-load rates. This can be a powerful tool for reducing cost, improving customer service and cutting emissions.

A profitable proposition Needless to say, sustainability is the need of the hour in view of the rapidly depleting natural resource base of the planet. Sustainable manufacturing practices not only reduce the adverse environmental impact of the process substantially, but also bring marginal benefits in terms of savings to the manufacturer by lowering overheads and hence product cost. The savings thus made can be invested in upgrading technology or improving R&D facilities, thus giving a competitive edge to the business. Also, sustainable practices reduce business risks at every stage associated with material shortage, energy price increase and waste disposal, for instance. Companies can create an annuity based service business by taking after sales responsibility of product. For example, Caterpillar’s pricing model attracts customers to return old equipment and get refurbished replacement at half-price. This creates a positive brand image in the customer’s mind, thus locking him in for lifetime. Sandip Badgujar is a Consultant with Savoir Faire Management Services Pvt Ltd. Savoir Faire develops cost information systems to support pricing, outsourcing and control decisions using the cost excellence (CE©) model. Applying cost management methodologies and lean thinking to align process to customer value, Savoir Faire helps firms across sectors to improve their bottom line. Email: sfgroup@vsnl.com


th

EVENTS CALENDAR

Anniversary

National

Chennai

Pune

Ahmedabad

Indore

Maharashtra

Gujarat

Madhya Pradesh

Tamil Nadu

Feb 7-10, 2011

March 11-13, 2011

Nov 19-22, 2010

Dec 17-20, 2010

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies from machine tools, fluid power, instrumentation & control, electrical & electronics, material handling, plastics, rubber, packaging, chemical, CAD/CAM, auto components, and general engineering

For details contact:

Engineering Expo

Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649 Fax: 022-3003 4499 Email: shamal@infomedia18.in

Global Petrochemical Conference (PGPC 2010) This two-day conference aims to offer insights into petroleum, chemicals & petrochemical investment regions (PCPIRs) in the global context. It will also focus on the future of plastics recycling, growth of plastics in healthcare & electronics sector in India, besides highlighting the growth & trends in PET market and polymers in the packaging sector as well as the latest in flexible packaging trends; August 19-20, 2010; Hyatt Regency, Mumbai, Maharashtra For details contact: Heital Yaagnik Polymerupdate Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: 022- 30408821-25 Fax: 022-30408826 Email: hetal@polymerupdate.com Website: www.polymerupdate.com

International Conference on Electroactive Polymers: Materials and Devices This conference is specifically designed to give insights into the rapidly growing market of electroactive polymers with respect to the applications in various engineering sectors; November

21-26, 2010; New Delhi

at

Surajkund,

For details contact: Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur Kharagpur, West Bengal Tel: 03222-255 221 Fax: 03222-255 303 Email: rishu_chandras@yahoo.com Website: www.icep2010.org

Plast Show The unique feature of this expo is the presence of the entire spectrum of plastic & rubber products manufacturers from tyres to tubes, hoses, industrial components, extruded profiles, moulded goods, latex articles etc.; Dec 0306, 2010; Akota Stadium, Vadodara, Gujarat For details contact: Sunline Infotech, Rajkot, Gujarat Tel: 022-2850 3932 Email: sunlineinfotech@gmail.com Website: www.plastexpoindia.com

Plastivision India 2011 This help the the

event is being designed to exhibitors and visitors discover potential markets. It will be 8th in the series of national

exhibitions and seminars organised by AIPMA; January 20-24, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre - NSE Exhibition Complex, Mumbai, Maharashtra For details contact: Sanjivini Kothare All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association, Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: 022-2821 7324/7325 Fax: 022-2821 6390 Email: marketing@plastivision.org, info@plastivision.org, office@aipma.net Website: www.aipma.net

PU TECH 2011 The event will focus on diverse opportunities in the polyurethane industry which is one of the rapidly growing industries in India and has registered double digit growth during the past five years; March 09-11, 2011; at India Expo Centre & Mart Ltd, Greater Noida For details contact: Indian Polyurethane Association Chennai, Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-2499 5923 Fax: 044-2499 5923 Email: admin@pu-india.org Website: www.pu-india.org

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EVENTS CALENDAR

International Packaging, Plastics, Mould & Die Machinery Surabaya

China Plastics Exhibition & Conference

A premier trade show for plastics, packaging and rubber, die & mould industry in Indonesia; June 02-05, 2010; at Grand City Convention & Exhibition Centre, Surabaya, Indonesia

This tradeshow will unfold innovations in plastics machinery & ancillary equipment and will serve as a platform for business networking in South Asia; September 03-05, 2010; at Taizhou International Convention & Exhibition Center, Taizhou, China

For details contact: PT Pamerindo Buana Abadi Jakarta, Indonesia Tel: +62-021-3162001 Fax: +62-021-3161981/316198 Email: wiwiek@pamerindo.com Website: www.pamerindo.com

InterPlas Thailand A showcase of technological innovations as well as the latest developments and trends in Thailand’s plastics business community; June 24-27, 2010; at Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), Bangkok, Thailand For details contact: Reed Tradex Bangkok, Thailand Tel: +66-2-6867299 Fax: +66-2-6867288 Email: rtdx@reedtradex.co.th Website: www.reedtradex.com

Rubber Plas Malaysia

The main objective of the 21st edition of this exhibition is to develop the nation’s manufacturing Industry with special attention given to the small and medium industries (SMIs) to further develop and keep ahead with the competitive environment; July 1518, 2010; at Putra World Trade Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: ES Event Management Sdn Bhd Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Tel: +60-3-91321922 Fax: +60-3-91331920 Email: sales@rubberplas2010.com Website: www.rubberplas2010.com

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For details contact: Taizhou International Convention Exhibition Center Tel: +86-576-82531122 Fax: +86-576-82531016 Email: china_pec@yahoo.com.cn Website: www.china-pec.com

&

Plastec Midwest A leading regional trade fair for the international plastics community, Plastec is considered to be the natural venue for machinery manufacturers interested in international expansion for their products throughout the world; September 28-30, 2010; at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, Rosemont, USA For details contact: Canon Communications Los Angeles USA Tel: +310-996-9495, 310-4-454200 Fax: +310-4-454299 Email: plminfo@cancom.com Website: www.cancom.com

K 2010 A premier exhibition that will provide the latest and the best in plastic materials for all manufacturing and processing industries alike. The unique feature of the expo is the presence of the entire spectrum of plastic & rubber products manufacturers; October 27-November 03, 2010; at Dusseldorf Exhibition Centre, Germany

For details contact: Messe Dusseldorf GmbH Messeplatz Germany Tel: +49-211-4560900/4560175 Fax: +49-211-4560668/4560740 Email: k-online@messe-duesseldorf.de Website: www.k-online.de

Arabplast This event will offer an unique opportunity to the Middle East plastics & rubber Industries. It is designed to help exhibitors and visitors to discover the potential markets around Middle East, Asia, Africa & CIS countries; January 8-11, 2011; at Dubai International Convention & Exhibition Centre For details contact: Jeen Joshua Al Fajer Information & Services Dubai, United Arab Emirates Tel: +971-50-8535820, Fax: +971-4-3403608 Email: alfajer@emirates.net.ae Website: www.arabplast.info

INTERPLAS 2011 An international event aimed at serving the European polymer industry, which will feature the latest machinery & equipment for processing and converting polymers; September 27-29, 2011; Birmingham, United Kingdom For details contact: Reed Exhibitions Companies Surrey The United Kingdom Tel: +44 20 8271 2134 Email: rxinfo@reedexpo.co.uk Website: www.reedexpo.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities


th

REPORT

Anniversary

Setting the pace for future growth Dedicated to providing buyers from around the world with a highly-efficient, convenient and one-stop-shop platform for the procurement of advanced technologies and updates on market information, this edition of Chinaplas attracted nearly 100 local and overseas buyer groups. These groups encompassed associations and end-user enterprises from industries such as plastics and rubber products, automotive, building and construction, E&E, IT & telecommunications, packaging, toys, medical and moulding, among others. With such extensive support from global players worldwide, Chinaplas 2010 provided diversified options to stay competitive in the wake of economic revival, reports Sarita Kutty.

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REPORT

T

he 24th international exhibition on plastics and rubber industries, Chinaplas 2010, recently concluded at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre, Pudong, Shanghai, PR China. The four-day exhibition attracted over 75,000 professional buyers to visit and source the latest chemical and raw materials as well as all kinds of plastics & rubber technologies. Besides, the scale of the exhibition reached 1,50,000 sq m this year, which is 11 per cent higher than its 2008 predecessor, thus setting a record. The number of exhibitors also surged by 18 per cent, with over 2,100 exhibitors, showing high potential for the development of China’s plastics and rubber industries. “The new slogan of Chinaplas 2010, ‘The growth engine for your industries’ witnessed the congruent growth of this exhibition along with various industries and sectors. Further, it injected new momentum into various industries, besides enabling enterprises to take advantage of early opportunities in the wake of economic revival,” said Stanley Chu, Chairman, Adsale Exhibition Services Ltd, the organiser of Chinaplas 2010.

Reflecting the growth momentum A number of overseas associations and enterprises from Brazil, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Jordan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, the UK, Vietnam, etc organised bigger buyer groups this year, whereas Algeria and Japan sent their buyer groups to Chinaplas

110 Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010 110

for the first time. Their remarkable attendance resulted in more business opportunities for the exhibitors. Also worth mentioning is the presence of a group of over 250 delegates that was led by the All India Plastics Manufacturers’ Association (AIPMA). Corroborated Mayhur D Shah,Honorary Secretary, AIPMA, “Our delegation to Chinaplas this year is the biggest ever. More than 250 people have joined because the show gathers so many international exhibitors. We have high expectations of the new products exhibited, especially those related to green technology.”

The launchpad From solutions for cars and electronic products to the latest machinery and materials that apply to packaging, medical and building & construction, the fairground witnessed the launch of several advanced technologies and materials. BASF added a new member to its existing Ecovio product line. The new biodegradable plastic called Eciovio FS is based on renewable raw material. The company has optimised this new plastic for two specific applications: for coating paper such as paper cups and cardboard boxes, and for manufacturing so-called shrink films, which serve to easily wrap packaged goods. Sample materials were made available to customers, while introduction to the market is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2010. For the plastics packaging industry, ExxonMobil Chemical announced

Exhibitors’ views

We are committed to developing solutions designed to meet the key challenges and megatrends that are shaping the future of both China and the world. Dr Rainer Rettig

Senior Vice President – Polycarbonate Advanced Resins Division – Asia Pacific, Bayer MaterialScience

We mainly produce UHMW-PEPTFE/Teflon and engineered plastics, so our aim has been to obtain more information about these. Bipin Desai

CEO, Pali Polymers new Enable mPE products that are recyclable and help make strong but significantly thinner films that use fewer raw materials and less energy than conventional films.


REPORT

Visitors’ views

We came to the show representing our clients in Japan to source in China. This is because Chinese firms are able to provide quality products that are also good value. Hiroshi Tatsumi

General Manager, Shanghai YishiTrading Co Ltd

We have just set up a technology research centre and hope to know more about the testing equipment and devices in this show. The entire industry should work towards the goal of achieving sustainability. Wan Weiping

Director, Vice General Manager, Guangzhou Zenxin Industrial Co Ltd Further, the newly developed THERMOLAST M group of products from Kraiburg TPE claims to

offer customers in the pharmaceuticals and medical markets safe and economical handling of materials that will come into direct contact with medicaments.

Green initiatives In every edition, exhibitors take Chinaplas as a valuable opportunity to showcase the latest technologies and achievements. This year, high-efficiency and eco-friendly applications were the focal points in order to echo the green trend of the plastics and rubber industries. Green raw materials such as polylactic acid (PLA) and biodegradable resin and their products were the favourites. Ashland’s green exhibit applied its proprietary technology to process natural plant sugars to make Ingeo bioplastics. In addition, Kureha displayed its innovative Kredux product line, which is a biodegradable polyglycolic acid resin with superior strength and barrier properties suitable for a variety of medical and packaging applications. The event also showcased several key environmental protection and energy saving applications from exhibitors. Among these, the servo energy saving injection moulding machine was a notable eye-catcher. While KraussMaffei’s BluePower offers servo drive technology for hydraulic injection molding machines with high potential for energy savings, Engel’s new Victory with Ecodrive, keeps the speed down to requirements, and consumes virtually no energy when idle. ARBURG, too, showcased the highperformance of its hybrid, energy-efficient HIDRIVE machine series with a high-speed packaging application. They combine the servo-electric clamping units and the

hydraulic injection unit with hydraulic accumulator technology and servoelectric dosage to a high-performance machine design. Further, Chinaplas served as the ideal stage for the discussion on green plastics and how 3Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle) can be adopted to current & future plastics & rubber industries, and to highlight the importance & influence of ‘going green’ in achieving sustainable development for the industry. Theme activities included ‘Industrial forum on green plastics and rubber’ and ‘Green corner’. Speakers from BASF, Bayer, DSM, DuPont, Guangdong Liansu, Mitsubishi Chemicals, Haitian, Shanghai General Motors, PATAC and Shanghai Shuanglu Electric Appliance provided rich information on green applications. In addition, the ‘Green corner’ displayed the most advanced eco-friendly plastics and rubber technologies.

Looking forward to Chinaplas 2011 The successful staging of Chinaplas 2010, has no doubt laid the foundation for the next edition. It is worth mentioning that many renowned exhibitors like BASF, Chen Hsong, Conair, CML, Dow, Engel, ExxonMobil, Guangdong Liansu, Haitian, Jinhu, Jiangsu Lianguan, Kureha, LANXESS, Lyondellbasell, Mold-Masters, SABIC, Windmoeller & Hoelscher KG (W&H), Zerma, etc, have already reserved their booths for the forthcoming edition of Chinaplas. Chinaplas 2011 will be held at China Import & Export Fair Pazhou Complex, Guangzhou, PR China from May 17-20, 2011.

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PRODUCT UPDATE

th

Anniversary

Injection moulding machines Yuh-Dak Machinery Co offers ‘Y-series model Y-350V’ injection moulding machines for manufacturing common electric accessories such as plugs. These come with a vertical cast mould, while the stamping die is fixed. These are provided with electrically controlled fitting (hydraulic pressure fitting). The locks mould has strength of 15-35 tonne. These injection moulding machines are provided with PLC. Yuh-Dak Machinery Co Ltd Taipei Hsien - Taiwan Tel: +886-2 2694 6450/6453 Fax: +886-2 2694 6454 Email: yuhdak@ms19.hinet.net

Nozzle heater Lance Engineers & Consultants offers 'Thermasleeve’ nozzle heater, which is a low-profile electric heater with rapid thermal response that allows the heat to be created precisely where it is needed. It features a computercontrolled laser cutting technique that precisely generates the power distribution pattern. It is designed to have intimate contact with the surface of the nozzle, which optimises heat transfer. This intimate contact combined with lower heater mass contributes to rapid thermal response to and from the nozzle tip. This helps reduce cycle times and ensures high quality final parts. This heater can be easily installed and removed from the nozzle with a custom installation and removal tool. The heater is self-clamping, which ensures the heater is secured into position during operation. This easy installation and removal reduces down time for mould maintenance and allow the heater to be reused. The nozzle heater is also designed to accommodate a thermocouple secured to the external body of the heater. The heater is slotted to accommodate commercially available, offthe-shelf, thermocouples. The application areas of the nozzle heater are hot runner moulds, syringe heating and analytical instrumentation. Lance Engineers & Consultants Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-5561 2700 Fax: 040-2341 2217 Email: lanceindia@hathway.com 112

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

Robothand (EOAT) Neejtech India offers robothand (EOAT) manufactured by Gimatic SpA. This product is available with grippers, vacuum cups, sprue cutters, air hands, air nippers, quick changers, tilt units, modular clamping systems, etc. The advantages of this product are that each point of the part is attainable, and the company develops special elements to solve customer's problems. Other advantages include specifically developed profiles, high flexibility, etc. The company also offers more than 200 patented products. This dynamic and flexible robothand are manufactured as per design for customised applications. The robothand is used in robots as end arm for applications in industries like automotive, packaging, medical, pharmaceutical, etc. The company also offers pneumatic components for handling like grippers, rotary actuators, linear actuators and 'pick and place'. Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312, Mob: 09825040231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

Cable gland Novoflex Marketing offers 'HY-Grip PG' cable gland. These are high-performance engineering cable glands suitable for unarmoured, plastic insulated cables. Being corrosion resistant, vibration proof, impact resistant with compact streamline construction and high stability, these can be used for both indoors and outdoors. These are resistant to salt water, gasoline, alcohol, oil, grease, benzene, common solvent, weak acids and alkalis. The cable gland has high tensile strength with self extinguishing and self lubricating properties. These are watertight and provide good strain relief and have a multi purpose application. These cable glands are used for protection and fixing of cables in control panels and appliances, machines & devices, measuring & control engineering, plant installation, etc. Novoflex Marketing Pvt Ltd Kolkata - West Bengal Mob: 99031 63634 Fax: 033-2229 7814 Email: sales@novoflex.co.in


MPP (Jun 2010) 4 Tab-103

AB DIACHEM


MPP (Jun 2010) 4 Tab-104


PRODUCT UPDATE Mould systems Neejtech India offers mould systems for pharmaceuticals, medical & healthcare, packaging, automotive & electrical industry, manufactured by Braunform GmbH. Highly sensitive packaging and measuring components, caps for use in the dental and insulin fields, dialysis components, hygiene products, etc are manufactured by the company. Adapplicator, alu cap, snap cap, PE bottle pack cap, PE twin port cap are some of the many clean room moulds offered by the company. The company also manufactures powder inhaler, flow regulator for IV, PE twin port cap, bottle euro pack cap, snap cap, tamper evident closure for pre-filled syringes, etc. The products offered by the company include medical moulds-clean room moulds, IML & IMD moulds, multi cavity moulds, multi component moulds, stack moulds, etc and rotary table programmes. Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312, Mob: 09825040231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Pass controller Priamus-Uniplast Technoogy (Kunshan) Co offers pass controller for injection moulding process. This is used for identifying moulded parts. Independent on how moulded parts are manufactured, if the cavity pressure and the cavity temperature of the moulded part and the viscosity of the melt are within a defined monitoring window, a good part is produced. If the values are outside this window, the bad part is automatically identified and if necessary, rejected. The pass controller shows this clearly with bright light emitting diodes (LEDs). Green light indicates good parts and red indicates bad parts. The pass controller is designed for easy handling. This compact monitoring device conforms to industrial standards. The settings are entered using the integrated touch screen display. Priamus-Uniplast Technology Kunshan Co Ltd Jiangsu - China Tel: +86-512 5791 1258 Fax: +86-512 5791 1238 Email: info@priamus-uniplast.com

Ms Shilpa Pophale Managing Director Electronica Finance Ltd “MODERN MACHINE TOOLS covers all the aspects pertaining to machine tool industry and assists Electronica Finance to have brand presence all across India. Our advertisements makes our brand & goodwill strong in the industry. Various articles in magazines help us understand and know the latest innovations, trends & technologies in the machine tools industries, within India and across the globe. We congratulate Infomedia 18 for its excellent job & would be more than happy to grow our the relationship them”

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Hot-half hot runner systems Madhu Machines & Systems offers ‘Mastip’ hot-half hot runner systems manufactured by Mastip Technology for plastics moulding industry. These systems are used for manufacturing electrical, electronics, packaging, automobiles, white goods and consumer products. The key feature of these systems is that it takes away hassles of assembly and ensures smooth start-up, reduces 'time-span' of mould manufacturing to parts production. The hot halfs are engineered to international standards and presales liaison with mould manufacturer makes hot-half installation in the mould, convenient and easy. The company is TAGMA accredited and provides facilities for conducting 'proving trials' of 'hot runner moulds' which could be utilised by the mould manufacturer. Madhu Machines & Systems Pvt Ltd Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: 0265-235 3886/232 1104 Fax: 0265-233 4278 Email: machinery@madhu-group.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Water chiller Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co offers water chiller, which uses the latest European, American or Japanese compressors. This chiller is available with single or double compressors. The compressor (of the double compressors) can be used individually or in combination. It comes with highly efficient shell-pipe condenser whose heattransmission function can save up to 25 per cent energy. It is also equipped with a digital temperature display and ‘abnormal’ warning indicator. The benefit of the water chiller is that it can control the moulding temperature directly and shorten the moulding cycle in order to accelerate shaping products. It can be used with plastic moulding machines. Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co Ltd Taichung - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-2271 0000 Fax: +886-4-2271 1988 Email: yb@yannbang.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Hot runner nozzle Allied Solutions India offers hot runner nozzle with the 'LT' type sub-runner manufactured by G端nther Heisskanaltechnik Gmbh, Germany. This nozzle finds applications in medical technology and packaging. The 'LT' type sub-runner can be used with a connection nozzle as single nozzle (DELT) and also in combination with a manifold. The nozzle tip is made of a hard-metal alloy with good thermal conductivity for processing filled material. It is provided with side gating, without cold slugs. The tips can be replaced individually. Its features include direct injection on to the product, up to 24 tips per distribution, etc. It has minimum pitch spacing of 12 mm and maximum spacing of 132 mm. The company also offers butt welding machine, blown film lines, granulators, pipe extruders and ancillaries, gas assist injection moulding systems, injection compression machine, etc. Allied Solutions India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-4221 0100 Fax: 022-2557 6234 Email: info@alliedsolutions.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Photoelectric sensor Lubi Electronics offers the ‘EQ-34W’ dual output adjustable range reflective photoelectric sensor. It is a specialised sensor for detecting two different levels or surface for up to 2 m sensing range. The sensor contains two individual outputs for two sensing distances: far (main) and near (sub). The detectability of the sensor is stable even if the lens is contaminated by dirt, dust, mist or smoke under an unclear environment. It has IP67 protection so it can be used in places splashed with water. The main benefit of the sensor is non-contact type detection of the object with two different level outputs, which is suitable for packaging, pharma and food processing industries. Typical applications of the sensor include detection of level (upper & lower) in hopper, etc. Lubi Electronics Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2220 5471-76 Fax: 079-2220 0660 Email: info@lubielectronics.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Microtubular coiled heaters Joule Tech offers microtubular coiled heaters. Unlimited range of possible shapes can be obtained from the straight heater. The company offers 10 different cross sections. The electric resistive wire is uniformly distributed in a compacted MgO insulation, with CrNi steel outer protection sheath, which gives high resistance to mechanical shocks and withstand sup to 700째C operating temperature. These heaters are used in various applications, such as heating plastic injection nozzles, and is also used in aerospace, railway, chemical, metal working & food industry, glass & paper industry, automotive, packing, medical industry, etc. These heaters are also available with built-in thermocouple for high-resolution temperature measuring (J type standard and K-type on request). Joule Tech Inc Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2353 1025; Mob: 9322 244540 Fax: 022-2351 7431 Email: sscorpn@vsnl.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE Wheel dryer Wittmann Battenfeld India offers ‘Drymax Aton’ wheel dryer. The drying wheel consists of a series of chambers, which houses a loose accumulation of molecular sieve. Due to this construction, strong air circulations on the molecular sieve enable increased energy and heat transfer. Depending on the degree of water load of the dryer, the wheel dryer works either in continuous wheel mode or the energetically preferable 'Quasi-2-Bed' mode and the 'EcoMode'. The dryer has available dry air capacity of 120m³/h (70CFM) and can be configured as a single hopper dryer with sizes 180 lbs to 50 lbs (150 l, 200 l, 300 l and 400 l). It can be equally combined with a drying hopper battery SILMAX E compact with either 2 or 3 drying hoppers. The dew points of the dryer are typically in the range down to -65°C (-85°F). The control panel features a background lighting, named ambiLED, which indicates the current mode of the dryer. Wittmann Automation India Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-4207 7009, Fax: 044-2371 9602 Email: n.kumar@wittmann-robot.com

Humidity cum temperature transmitters Katlax Enterprises offers humidity cum temperature transmitters. These transmitters are available in wall mount with display and duct mount without display. The sensor continuously monitors temperature and humidity. The conditioning/ control circuit can be supplied in PCB form or in enclosure (IP-55) as per requirement. These transmitters are used in HVAC, automotive, consumer goods, weather stations, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, test & measurement, data logging, automation, white goods and medical. These transmitters offer a temperature range between -50°C and +150°C, accuracy of ± 1.5°C, operating ranges of 0 to 75°C, humidity ranging from 0 to 100 per cent RH and response time that is less than 15 second. Katlax Enterprises Pvt Ltd Gandhinagar - Gujarat Tel: 02764- 286784-85, 079-2685 4693 Fax: 02764–286793, 079- 2685 3979 Email: info@katlax.com 122

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

Co-rotating twin-screw extruders STEER Engineering offers ‘Alpha Series’ co-rotating twin-screw extruders. The entire extruder processing zone (EPZ) is based on the modular design concept with engineered gearbox for long life at ultra high torque capacity of 17 Nm/cm³. All the barrels can be dis-assembled by means of the special quick clamp system. The screw shafts have been designed with split construction comprising a safety shaft adapter and the 'Continua™' splined shaft. 'Continua' spline avoids stress concentration in both screw shafts and screw elements, thereby increasing torque carrying capacity. These extruders are suited for shear intensive application with high-bulk density ingredients & specific energy of 0.2 kWh/kg or higher. These are available in 30, 40 and 50 mm sizes. The key applications include mineral filled polymers, colour & carbonblack masterbatch, polymer blends, melting and homogenising. STEER Engineering Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2372 3310 Fax: 080-2372 3307 Email: info@steerworld.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Control system for BMM Streamline Controls offers control system for bag/pouch making machine (BMM) in a customised programmed package. It comes with up to four inputs (start signal, stop signal, batch reset and mark sensor); up to five timer based outputs (cutter, sealer, punch, alarm and batch); up to three errors (mark sensor missing, over speed, and temperature); manual/fully auto functions of the machine; optionally analogue input to synchronise with the main motor, etc. It also facilitates additional inputs/outputs and timers for advanced customised solution. Security of programmed parameters is ensured by the latest E2PROM technology. It comprises enhanced user-friendly membrane keypad programming for easy operator interface and 16x2 big LCD displays with 24 key membrane keypad. It is equipped with four digit preset counters for batching and cutter, besides six digit totaliser to count total number of bags. The programmable features include missing mark counter, offset, mark sensor on/off, timers, length, speed, start proximity on/off, cycle delay, selective display of speed of the machine in number of bags per minute, forward/backward inching and individual output on/off from MMI, etc. Streamline Controls Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-3291 0812, 3012 5136, Fax: 079-2741 1463 Email: mktg@streamlinecontrols.com

Mr Hitesh Shah Managing Director H.G.SHAH & Co “We are pleased to be associated with SEARCH & MODERN MACHINE TOOLS Magazine since last 7 years. We are very much satisfied with Ad Spending as it generated relevant inquiries. The magazine is targeted to the right audience & has wider reach. We are looking forward for long-term tieups with the magazine.”

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Dispensing system AM Spa offers ‘Servo-Flo® 801-HV’ positivedisplacement, two-component meter-mix dispensing system manufactured by Sealant Equipment & Engineering. It is designed to apply small precision beads as well as small metered shots of precisely mixed resins and provides longer bead lengths and/or an increased quantity of metered shots. The servo-motor design provides consistent & repeatable bead profiles and a change of flow rate during the dispense cycle. The fixed-ratio design improves production rates, product quality and reduces manufacturing costs in micro-dispensing applications. This dispensing system is designed to provide a variety of preset material-dispensing profiles and dispense results ranging from 0.2 cc up to 18 cc at 1:1 ratio. It can dispense precisely mixed materials for different part configurations in batch or random processes. It can be preset to vary the flow rate during dispensing in automated, indexing, XYZ-motion and robotic processes. The control accepts operator preset material profiles or electronic commands from the automation. AM Spa Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-26489074 Mob: 98339 32265 Email: anjanitewari@amspa.org

Screen changer Rajhans Plastic Machinery offers lever type screen changer for the processing of thermoplastic extruders. This screen changer is used in pipe plant, sutli plant, blown film plant, co-extrusion line, multi layer blown film plant, lab extrusion and PVC recycling plant. The company also offers specially designed heavy-duty models with capacity upto 600 bar. The filter stations can be changed without the loosening of any clamping bolts. It can be manually operated with the help of handle. It is provided with detachable breaker plate, which enables easy cleaning. The special ceramic bend heaters help in faster heating. This screen changer is available with special wheel mounted trolley for dismantling and movement of screen changer. Rajhans Plastic Machinery Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2583 0003, 2589 5852 Fax: 079-2589 1838 Email: exports@rajhansindia.com June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Plastic brightner/shiner Plast Fine Polymers offers plastic brightners/shiners/ whitener for natural transparent, colours and milky white end products. This is used for adding clarity and gloss finish to natural transparent polymers. It gives shining and bright finish colours to end products. This brightner/whitener removes yellowness and dullness from the end products and makes it super milky white. It is used in virgin, second dull natural or milky white sutli, ropes, twine, reprocess granules, HDPE-LDPEPVC pipes & profiles, box strap, PET jars, spoon, container, carry bags, liners, sheet, yarns and other end products. One of the main advantages of this product is that it also saves excess use of white pigments and titanium dioxide for opaque end products. Plast Fine Polymers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-6524 2332 Mob: 98255 87152 Email: plastfine@indiatimes.com

Shovel element

Mr Kinjel Shah Director HI-LIFE MACHINE TOOLS Pvt Ltd “We are a regular patron of SEARCH and MODERN MACHINE TOOLS since their inception. Both these magazines are superb platform for product awareness, and information. It has wide coverage and the readership in the industry. We are thankful to Infomedia 18 for bringing out such quality publications.”

STEER Engineering offers single flight shovel element. The snow plough with a shovel comes to the rescue of co-rotating twin-screw extruder applications. These elements are capable of achieving intake capacity of over 300 per cent compared to normal elements. This element improves the efficiency of processing by lowering the specific energy. Certain applications specially powder feeding requirements are greatly benefitted. Side feeding can be avoided, thus reducing the equipment cost. The company also offers die assembly, HMI, co-rotating twin-screw extruders, barrels & liners, vanadium rich tool steel, lab extruder, gearbox, etc. STEER Engineering Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2372 3310 Fax: 080-2372 3307 Email: info@steerworld.com

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The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

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AC drives Additive masterbatches Aerosol spray paint Air bubble film plant Air bubble sheet plant Air chiller Air compressors Air compressors parts Air cooled die face palletiser Air receiver Air-conditioner parts Aluminium extrusion Auto burners Automatic material handling system Automobile Barrel screws Barrels Barriers Batching system Biodegradable masterbatches Black & colour masterbatches Blenders Blending unit Blow moulding machines Blower motor BMS system Cable gland Capacitive proximity sensors Cast film line Cement plant Certified reference materials Chillers Clamps Cleanroom applications Cleaning ovens Co-extrusion die Co-extrusions blown film plant Colour masterbatches Colour measuring instruments Combined auto loader Complex multi part assembly Compressors Conical twin screw extruders Connectors Continuous screen changers Control panels Control system for BMM Converters Conveying system Cooler with moisture separator Cooling tower Core cutter machine Co-rotating twin screw extruders Counters & power supplies Cutter D punch machine Data logging software DC control panel meters Dehumidified air dryer Dehumidified dryers Die casting machines Digital instruments Digital panel meter Digital temperature controller Dispensing system Distribution control panel Doctoring rewinder machine Door trims Double shaft gear box Drives Drum roller Drum type slitter rewinder machine Dryer Dryers Dual channel with modbus Dynamic controller Electric injection moulding machine gearboxes Electric solutions Electronic balance Electronic modules

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PRODUCT INDEX

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To know more about the products in this magazine, refer to our ‘Product Index’ or write to us at spedit@infomedia18.in or call us at +91-22-3003 4685 or fax us at +91-22-3003 4499 and we will send your enquiries to the advertisers directly to help you source better. Product

Pg No

AC drives ............................................. 49, 121 Additive masterbatches.................................................. 16, 31 Aerosol spray paint ................................................................. 91 Air bubble film plant ............................................................126 Air bubble sheet plant........................................................... 35 Air chiller .................................................................................... 25 Air compressors......................................................................122 Air compressors parts ..........................................................122 Air cooled die face palletiser............................................... 77 Air receiver................................................................................122 Air-conditioner parts ..................................... Front gate fold Aluminium extrusion............................................................119 Auto burners............................................................................118 Automatic material handling system............................... 77 Automobile...............................................................................122 Barrel screws............................................. 120 Barrels...................................................................................67, 116 Barriers ........................................................................................123 Batching system ......................................................................104 Biodegradable masterbatches ............................................. 16 Black & colour masterbatches.............................................. 16 Blenders..................................................51, Front inside cover Blending unit.....................................................Front gate fold Blow moulding machines................................. 6, 80, 87, 122 Blower motor.............................................................................. 36 BMS system ................................................................................. 76 Cable gland ............................................... 112 Capacitive proximity sensors................................................ 32 Cast film line ............................................................................... 35 Cement plant............................................................................122 Certified reference materials ..............................................115 Chillers.................................................................................... 11, 50 Clamps.........................................................................................121 Cleanroom applications ............................................................9 Cleaning ovens .......................................................................... 67 Co-extrusion die ........................................................................ 35 Co-extrusions blown film plant........................................... 35 Colour masterbatches ............................................................. 31 Colour measuring instruments..........................................104 Combined auto loader............................................................ 59 Complex multi part assembly.................................................8 Compressors .............................................................................122 Conical twin screw extruders............................................... 77 Connectors ..................................................32, Front gate fold Continuous screen changers................................................ 67 Control panels................................................................ 117, 118 Control system for BMM.......................................................124 Converters..................................................................................117 Conveying system..................................................................... 11 Cooler with moisture separator ........................................122 Cooling tower............................................................................. 25 Core cutter machine ................................................................ 95 Co-rotating twin screw extruders.....................................123 Counters & power supplies......................................................5 Cutter............................................................................................. 36 D punch machine ....................................... 95 Data logging software ..........................................................117 DC control panel meters .....................................................118 Dehumidified air dryer...................................Front gate fold Dehumidified dryers.................................Front inside cover Die casting machines .............................................................. 23

Product

Pg No

Digital instruments.................................................................118 Digital panel meter .................................................................. 10 Digital temperature controller............................................. 29 Dispensing system..................................................................125 Distribution control panel ...................................................118 Doctoring rewinder machine............................................... 95 Door trims...........................................................Front gate fold Double shaft gear box ............................................................ 86 Drives............................................................................................. 29 Drum roller .................................................................................. 36 Drum type slitter rewinder machine................................. 95 Dryer ............................................................................................122 Dryers .............................................................Front inside cover Dual channel with modbus................................................... 29 Dynamic controller................................................................... 29 Electric injection moulding machine gearboxes...................................................... 7 Electric solutions ....................................................................... 47 Electronic balance...................................................................104 Electronic modules................................................................... 32 Electronic scale remover ......................................................103 Encoders..........................................................................................5 Engineering Expo....................................................................113 ERP/SAP/LIMS/DMS clinical database systems.............. 76 Ethyl vinyl acetate ................................................................... 63 Extruder ........................................................................................ 36 Extruder machine............................................................... 13, 89 Extrusion coating lamination plant ................................... 35 Extrusion machines..................... 19, 87, Black inside cover Extrusions dies .........................................................................126 Feeder.......................................................... 36 Ferrous casting .......................................................................119 Field plate .................................................................................... 32 Fixtures........................................................................................121 Flame retardant masterbatches .......................................... 16 Forged components ..............................................................119 Gas & water assisted moulding technology .................................................. 14 Gas injection unit...................................................................... 14 Gear box ....................................................................................... 86 Gear pump..........................................................................67, 125 Gears .............................................................................................. 86 Granulator.......................................11, 59, Front inside cover Granule colour mixer............................................................... 59 Grinder .......................................................................................... 59 Grip pliers...................................................................................121 Hall sensors................................................. 32 Haul off ......................................................................................... 36 HDPE pipe plant ........................................................................ 35 Head lamps & tail lamps ...............................Front gate fold Heart valve frames..................................................................119 Heat transfer rolls...................................................................... 67 Heater cooler mixer.................................................................. 77 Helical speed reducer.............................................................. 86 High cavitations............................................................................9 High density polypropylene ................................................ 63 High performance screws...................................................... 67 High speed heater cooler mixers and spares...............126 High speed mixer............................................................... 13, 89 Hopper dryer .............................................................................. 59 Horizontal handle clamp......................................................121

Product

Pg No

Hot air dryer..........11, Front gate fold, Front inside cover Hot half hot runner systems...............................................117 Hot runner nozzle...................................................................119 Humidity cum temperature transmitters ......................122 Hydraulic press........................................................................... 77 Hydrostatic pressure tester .................................................135 Hydrostatic pressure testing machine............................123 IML technique ............................................... 9 Inductive proximity sensors.................................................. 32 Industrial control & sensing devices.....................................5 Industrial electronic plastic parts .....................................124 Industrial inkjet printers .......................................................104 Industrial robots ........................................................................ 23 Industrial safety belt ..............................................................123 Information technology solution........................................ 76 Injection cylinders ..................................................................116 Injection moulding machine ..................................................... 12, 15, 23, 42, 73, 87, 112, Back gate fold, Front gate fold Injection moulding technologies ....6, Black inside cover Inspection cum siltter rewinding machine..................... 95 Interfacing with MIS packages ............................................ 76 Invertor/variable frequency drives........................................5 Jigs...........................................................................121 Jumbo bag dumping station ..............................77 Knobs & switches ..................Front gate fold Lab equipment ........................................... 76 Lab extruder................................................................................ 77 Lab micrometer .......................................................................135 Lab mixers...........................................................................77, 126 Lab spray dryer ........................................................................104 Ladder .........................................................................................123 Lamination/coating machine ............................................... 95 Level controllers ...........................................................................5 Life jacket...................................................................................123 Liner low density polypropylene ....................................... 63 Liquid filling machine............................................................104 Loader.............................................................Front inside cover Low density polypropylene ................................................. 63 Low speed granulator ............................................................. 59 LV motors ..................................................................................... 49 Machine automation.................................. 76 Machined components.........................................................119 Machinery parts......................................................................... 85 Manual & hydraulic screen changers ................................ 67 Marine air conditioners........................................................... 25 Market research......................................................................... 39 Masterbatch mixer.................................................................... 77 Masterbatch plants.................................................................126 Material blender unit............................................................... 11 Material dryers ........................................................................... 51 Measuring & monitoring relay ...............................................5 Medical moulds ............................................................................9 Medium speed granulator..................................................... 59 Melt flow index test apparatus..........................................123 Melt flow index tester ...........................................................135 Metal detector on-line check weigher............................104 Microtubular coiled heaters................................................121 Milky polymers.........................................................................115 Mixer cooler ................................................................................ 36 Moisture analyser....................................................................104 Moneycontrol.com ................................................................... 97

CRACK THE BEST DEALS! June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

133


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Monolayer blown film plant ................................................. 35 Motion controls ............................................................................5 Mould systems .........................................................................115 Mould temperature controller............................................. 11 Moulding automation................................................................8 Moulding system..........................................................................9 Moulds.................................................................................... 13, 89 Muffle furnace..........................................................................135 Multi component moulds.........................................................9 Multilayer blown film plant................................................... 35 Namur sensors............................................ 32 Natural polymers.....................................................................115 Nip .................................................................................................. 36 Non-ferrous casting................................................................119 Nozzle heater............................................................................112 Oil coolers ................................................... 50 Oil trace monitor.....................................................................115 Opacity tester ...........................................................................135 Oxygen plant ............................................................................122 Pallet scale ................................................ 104 Panel coolers............................................................................... 50 Paperless recorder .................................................................... 10 Parallel & right angle axes gearboxes..................................7 Parallel shaft helical gearbox................................................ 86 Pass controller ..........................................................................116 Pelletisers ..................................................................................... 67 Performance plastic 2010 ....................................................105 PET blow molding machine................................................138 PET botting plant....................................................................122 PET dehumidified dryers.........................Front inside cover PET masterbatches ................................................................... 16 PET recycling plant................................................................... 35 Photoelectric sensors ....................................................... 5, 120 PID controller............................................................................117 Pipe extrusion line for PVC/PPR/PE.................................... 42 Pivot system................................................................................ 95 Planetary gearboxes ................................................................ 86 Plant automation solutions................................................... 76 Plant wise scada solutions..................................................... 76 Plastic articles...........................................................................124 Plastic auxiliary .......................................................................... 59 Plastic brightener....................................................................115 Plastic brightner/shiner ........................................................126 Plastic conveyor belt................................................................ 89 Plastic extrusion machinery........................................... 23, 27 Plastic granulator ...................................................................... 59 Plastic industrial parts...........................................................124 Plastic processing machinery ancillaries and spare ..120 Plastic tinopol...........................................................................115 Plastic whitener .......................................................................115 PLC........................................................................................... 29, 49 PLC/SCADA/DCS systems....................................................... 76 Polypropylene ........................................................................... 63 Polystyrene ................................................................................. 63 Polyvinyl chloride...................................................................... 63 Post processing machines ..................................................... 69 PP glass filled compounds .................................................... 16 PP mineral filled compounds ............................................... 16 PP/HDPE/pet box strapping plant...................................... 35 PP/HDPE/pet monofilament plant ..................................... 35 PP/PP/TQ film plant.................................................................. 35 PPRP powder ............................................................................115 Precision fabrication works .................................................121 Precision moulding ................................124, Front gate fold Precision temperature controls .........................................117 Process controllers...........................................................10, 117

Product

Pg No

Process turbidity meters ......................................................115 Process viscometers...............................................................115 Product assemblies ................................................................119 Profile controller........................................................................ 29 Programmable logic controllers.............................................5 Programmable terminals ..........................................................5 Proximity sensors .........................................................................5 PU parts .....................................................................................124 Pull action ..................................................................................121 Pulveriser............................................................................... 13, 89 Pumps...................................................................................21, 117 PVC braided hose plant........................................................138 PVC suction hose plant.........................................................138 Quick connectors........................................ 81 Quick mould change systems.............................................. 81 Raffia tape lines.......................................... 35 Relay units.................................................................................... 32 Retro automation...................................................................... 76 Retrofitting/reconditioning of injection moulds .......... 80 RFID ...................................................................................................5 Road studs .................................................................................123 Robohand (EOAT) ...................................................................112 Robot systems............................................................................ 15 Robots ............................................................Front inside cover Rock n roll machine .......................................................... 13, 89 Roll wrapping machine........................................................... 95 Rotogravure printing machine ............................................ 95 Round table carrousels........................................................... 89 RTD ...............................................................................................117 Safety baton ............................................. 123 Safety helmet............................................................................123 Safety jacket..............................................................................123 Safety light curtains ....................................................................5 Safety net ...................................................................................123 Safety shoes ..............................................................................123 Scale watcher............................................................................103 SCR power regulator..............................................................118 Screen changer........................................................................123 Screws................................................................................ 116, 120 Secon & dull polymers..........................................................115 Segmented barrels for compounding ............................126 Self adhesive tapes................................................................... 91 Sensors.......................................................................................... 32 Separate vacuum conveyor................................................... 59 Shaft mounted speed reducers........................................... 86 Shaft type slitter rewinder machine.................................. 95 Shovel element .......................................................................126 Shut off nozzles ......................................................................... 67 Single bag feeding systems.................................................. 77 Single mill pulveriser ........................................................ 13, 89 Single screw and barrel .......................................................126 Single screw and barrel with grooved sleeves............126 Single screw extruder gearboxes ..........................................7 Single screw extruders............................................................ 77 Single shaft extruder gear box ............................................ 86 Soldi state relays......................................................................117 Sprockets...................................................................................... 86 Square cone ..............................................................................123 Stack moulds .................................................................................9 Straight line action.................................................................121 Strand pelletiser ........................................................................ 77 Styrene acytonitrile ................................................................. 63 Switching relays............................................................................5 Synthetic string plant (sutli plant) ...................................... 35 Tailor made package................................ 122 Takeup drum............................................................................... 36

Product

Tank weighing..........................................................................104 Technical molds............................................................................9 Teflon parts................................................................................124 Temperature controller...................................... 5, 10, 29, 117 Temperature sensors .............................................................117 Tensile tester.............................................................................135 Tensile testing machine with extension-o-meter.......123 Textile ..........................................................................................122 Thermocouple..........................................................................117 Thermoplastic alloys ................................................................ 68 Thermoplastic compounds ................................................... 68 Three arm bi-axial roto moulding machine............. 13, 89 Thyristor drive ..........................................................................118 Thyristorised power controllers.........................................117 Timers...............................................................................................5 Toggle action clamp ..............................................................121 Toggle press..............................................................................121 TPE/TPU compounds............................................................... 16 TPU master batches ................................................................. 31 Trade show .................................................................................. 55 Transmission .............................................................................122 Turned components ..............................................................119 Turnkey projects ....................................................................... 76 Twin mill pulveriser........................................................... 13, 89 Twin roll mill ......................................................................77, 135 Twin screw extruder gearboxes .............................................7 Twin-screw co-rotating extruders.....................................119 Twin-screw elements.............................................................119 Twin-screw extruders ............................................................119 Ultra deep temperature freezer................ 25 Ultrasonic flow meter.............................................................. 10 Underwater pelletiser.............................................................. 77 Universal controller .................................................................. 29 Universal input temperature scanner .............................117 Universal masterbatches........................................................ 16 Universal testing equipments.............................................. 41 Unwinder system ...................................................................... 95 UV & PU masterbatches.......................................................... 16 Vacuum loader...........11, 59, Front gate fold Valves...........................................................................................117 Ventilators.................................................................................... 91 Vertical batch mixer ................................................................. 59 Vertical colour mixer................................................................ 59 Vertical handle clamp............................................................121 Vibro screens ....................................................................... 13, 89 Virgin polymers........................................................................115 Viscometer.................................................................................104 Vision inspection systems ..................................................... 76 Vision sensors................................................................................5 VSPT/HDT test apparatus.....................................................123 Water chiller.............................................. 118 Water/brine/hydraulic oil/chilling plant........................... 25 Web aligner unit........................................................................ 95 Weigh bridge............................................................................104 Weigh scales .............................................................................104 Welding cable...........................................................................123 Wheel dryer...............................................................................122 White masterbatch................................................................... 16 Winder........................................................................................... 36 Worm reducer gear box ......................................................... 86 Worm reducers........................................................................... 86 X-ray inspection system .......................... 104

CRACK THE BEST DEALS! 134

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010

Pg No


th

ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Anniversary

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No AB Diachem Systems

103

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No

DMT International

63

Kabra Extrusion Technik Ltd T: +91-22-26734822 E: nishant@kolsitegroup.com W: www.kolsite.com

19

113

Kant Plastology T: +91-79-25895727 E: info@kantplastology.com W: www.kantplastology.com

123

T: +91-11-25155456

T: +91-22-25896148

E: sales@scalewatcher.in

E: dmtindenting@gmail.com

W: www.scalewatcher.in

W: www.dmtinternational.net

ABB Limited

49

Engineering Expo

T: +91-80-22949560

T: +91-09819430607

E: amit.a.sharma@in.abb.com

E: shamal@infomedia18.in

W: www.abb.co.in

W: www.engg-expo.com

Adinath Controls Pvt Ltd

117

Freeze Tech Equipments Pvt Ltd

T: +91-2764-286573

T: +91-44-42152387

E: info@adinathcontrols.com

E: info@freezetechequip.com

W: www.adinathcontrols.com

W: www.freezetechequip.com

Allied Solution I Pvt Ltd

6

Frost & Sullivan

T: +91-22-42210100

T: ‘+91-22-40013419

E: gopal@alliedsolutions.com

E: anishc@frost.com

W: www.alliedsolutions.com

W: www.frost.com

Alok Masterbatches Ltd

31

Gayatri Control & Automation P Ltd

T: +91-11-41612244

T: +91-79-25840686

E: sales@alokindustries.com

E: info@gayatricontrol.com

W: www.alokindustries.com

W: www.gayatricontrol.com

Blend Colours Pvt Ltd

16

Grundfos Pumps India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-40-2436 1499 / 2436 0887

T: +91-44-24966800

E: info@blendcolours.com

E: salesindia@grundfos.com

W: www.blendcolours.com

W: www.grundfos.in

Business Development Bureau India Pvt Ltd 39

Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-20-27010321

T: +91-22-25706316

E: info@bdbmr.co.in

E: snair@husky.ca

W: www.bdbmr.co.in

W: www.husky.ca

Chamunda Equipments

121

Heattrans Equipments Pvt.Ltd.

T: +91-79-27522437

T: +91-79-25840105

E: clamp@chamundaequip.com

E: info@heattrans.com

W: www.chamundaequip.com

W: www.heattrans.com

Chilton Refrigeration

25

T: +91-22-25706316

E: chilton@sify.com

E: snair@husky.ca

W: www.chiltonindia.com

W: www.husky.ca 27

Ingeco Gears Pvt. Ltd.

T: +91-22-6106332

T: +91-2717-251551

E: shah.d@cet-austria.com

E: info@ingecogears.com

W: www.cet-austria.com

W: www.ingecogears.com

Creative Automation & System Engine

80

105

118

21

.BIC

119

Husky Injection Molding Systems P Ltd .BGF

T: +91-484-2544571

Cincinnati India Pvt Ltd

50

Instron India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-44-32429971

T: +91-44-28293888/5024

E: creativeplc@gmail.com

E: instronindia@instron.com

W: www.creativeplc.com

W: www.instron.com

86

41

Karishma Instruments Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-28576531 E: info@karishmainstruments.com W: www.karishmainstruments.com Katlax Enterprice Pvt Ltd T: +91-2764-286784 E: info@katlax.com W: www.katlax.com

32

Kevin Technologies Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-27541971 E: info@kevintech.com W: www.kevintech.com

76

Lan Marketing Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-27893645 E: jai@lanengg.com W: www.maag.com Larsen & Toubro Ltd T: +91-44-26812000 E: handigolg@larsentoubro.com W: www.larsentoubro.com

Matsui Technologies India Ltd. T: +91-120-4243862 E: sales@matsuiindia.com

11

Messe Dusseldorf India Pvt. Ltd. T: +91-22-6678-9933 E: messeduesseldorf@md-india.com W: www.md-india.com

123

Mifa Systems T: +91-79-26870825 E: info@mifasystems.com W: www.mifasystems.com

29

47

E: danfoss.india@danfoss.com

E: sales@jayinst.com

Money.Control.Com

W: www.danfoss.com

W: www.jayinst.com

W: www.moneycontrol.com

104

55

Metro Moulding Industries T: +91-11-25265343

T: +91-22-2352620

Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd

.FGF

68

T: +91-44-66501555

36

125

Loxim Industries Limited T: +91-2717-308000 E: polymers@loxim.com W: www.loxim.com

Mold - Masters Technologies Pvt Ltd T: +91-422-4502171 E: mmiplinfo@moldmasters.com W: www.moldmasters.com

Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd

115

97

Our consistent advertisers 136

Modern Plastics & Polymers | June 2010


ADVERTISERS’ LIST Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No N.A. Corporation

13

T: +91-79-25840809 E: info@naroto.com W: www.naroto.com Neejtech India (Braun)

9

T: +91-79-26561312 E: info@neejtech.com W: www.neejtech.com Neejtech India (Hekuma)

8

T: +91-79-26561312 E: info@neejtech.com W: www.neejtech.com Neejtech India (Niigata)

12

T: +91-09909974224 E: contact@niigataindia.com Neoplast Engg Pvt Ltd

77

T: +91-79-25830602 E: info@neoplastindia.com W: www.neoplastindia.com Nidhi Poly Plast

124

T: +91-79-25630319 E: nidhiplast@gmail.com W: www.nidhiplastindia.com Ocean Extrusions

35

T: +91-79-22902200 E: oceanextrusions@gmail.com W: www.oceanextrusions.com Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

5

T: +91-80-40726400/41466400 E: srirams@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com Paras Engineers

59

T: +91-79-25894285 E: paraseng@hotmail.com W: www.auxiliaryequipments.com Plast Fine Polymers

115

T: +91-79-65242332 E: plastfine@indiatimes.com W: www.plastfine.com Prasad Gwk Cooltech Pvt Ltd

89

T: +91-79-25830112 E: plastics@prasadgroup.com W: www.prasadgroup.com Procon Technologies Pvt Ltd

10

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details Pg No

Rajoo Engineers Ltd T: +91-09825312700 E: rel@rajoo.com W: www.rajoo.com

Tan Star Material Co., Ltd.

Reifenhauser India Marketing Ltd T: +91-22-26862711 E: usha@reifenhauserindia.com W: www.reifenhauserindia.com Sacmi Engineering India Pvt Ltd T: +91-2717-250397 E: sales@negribossi.in W: www.negribossi.com Samson Extrusion Ind Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-23422238 E: samson7@vsnl.com W: www.samson-grp.com Sanity International T: +91-79-65227458 E: info@sanityindia.com W: www.sanityindia.com

E: tanstar@ms22.hinet.net W: www.tan-star.com.tw 87

73

Unimark (Arburg Gmbh)

15

E: infomum@unimark.in 85

W: www.unimark.in Unimark (Maguire Inc)

51

T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in 120

W: www.unimark.in Unimark (Staubli Faverges Sca)

81

T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in W: www.unimark.in Vacon Drives

121

T: +91-44-24490024 E: bavani@vacon.com W: www.vacon.com Windsor Machines Limited

42

T: +91-79-40200300

Shree Radhekrishna Extrusions Pvt Ltd 126 T: +91-79-25842509 E: mail@radhekrishnaexports.com W: www.radhekrishnaexports.com Shree Siddhivinayak Industries T: +91-22-28458372 E: minivacg@hotmail.com

117

Shyam Plastic Industries T: +91-79-25841459 E: info@shyamplastic.in W: www.shyamplastic.in

138

Spark Technologies T: +91-09444069967 E: ravindran_k@sify.com W: www.cinpres.com

14

W: www.steerworld.com

W: www.toshiba-machine.co.jp T: +91-22-25506712

95

W: www.procon.co.in

23

E: dineshlja@toshiba-machine.co.in

Shree Ganesh Converting Machinery T: +91-79-32447499 E: rotoganesh@gmail.com W: www.shreeganeshconverting.com

E: info@procon.co.in

Toshiba Machine (India) Pvt. Ltd. T: +91-11-43291111

135

Sreelakshmi Traders T: +91-44-24343343 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

116

T: +886-3-328-9035

Saumya Technocrates T: +91-79-22970976 E: indra_spectra@yahoo.com W: www.saumyainternational.com

Steer Engineering Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-23723309 / 10 E: info@steerworld.com

T: +91-79-27492566

.BC

E: hrs@wml.co.in W: www.windsor-imm.com Wittmann Battenfeld India Pvt. Ltd.

.FIC

T: +91-44-42077009 E: info@wittman-group.in W: www.wittmann-group.com Xaloy Asia (Thailand) Ltd.

67

T: +91-79-27541971 E: m.sanghvi@th.xaloy.com W: www.xaloy.com XL Plastics

69

T: +91-265-2638125 E: info@xlpalstics.com W: www.xlplastics.com

91

Zambello Riduttori Group

7

T: +39-0331-307-616 E: info@zambello.it W: www.zambello.it

119

Zen Air Tech Pvt. Ltd.

122

T: +91-79-22819821 E: info@zenairtech.com W: www.zenairtech.com Our consistent advertisers

June 2010 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

137


Modern Plastics & Polymers

June 2010


Modern Plastics & Polymers

June 2010


Regn. No. MH/ MR / WEST / 234 / 2009-2011 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25265 Allowed to Post At Patrika Channel Sorting Office, G.P.O., Mumbai 400 001. Date of Mailing: 1st & 2nd Of Every Month Issue.

142

Modern Plastics & Polymers - June 2010  

‘MODERN PLASTICS & POLYMERS’, the numero uno monthly B2B magazine for the plastics & polymers industry, offers the latest trends, in-depth v...

Modern Plastics & Polymers - June 2010  

‘MODERN PLASTICS & POLYMERS’, the numero uno monthly B2B magazine for the plastics & polymers industry, offers the latest trends, in-depth v...

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