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Editorial

A lot can happen over coffee!

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TIMULATED! That’s the feeling. CHARGED! That’s the mindset. FRONT FOOT! That’s the game plan. The coffee sessions at BIEC with stalwarts from the metalworking industry during the recently concluded IMTEX 2013 has redefined the proverbial ‘wake up and smell the coffee’ for us in more ways than one.

For starters, the stimulating ideas discussed over hot cups of coffee with these leaders with a vision & mission cleared the air and reiterated the fact that MMT is on the right path with the right people for the right cause. As we sipped the soft froth and came down to real coffee with these friends from the industry, we also fathomed that the real issues gripping the industry are beyond the superficial froth and thanks to these deeply insightful discussions, we are now better equipped to address the real issues plaguing the growth of our sector. Indeed, a lot can happen over coffee!! We have got the Grip and the Pulse of the industry! Grip & Pulse incidentally are the buzz words for this edition of MMT, as Workholding Equipment (WHE) and Medical Machining are the focus segments. Getting the Perfect Grip, as the cover shouts, is all about gearing the industry to serve this segment better. Like our experts point out, the Indian industry needs to emulate the versatile and dynamic global tooling & WHE industry, especially as the presence of global industries in India is on the rise. With the present-day globalisation, products and processes being exported out of India, the local developing industry needs to be at par with its global counterparts. The trade pundits also suggest that there is a need for a quantum rise in exports, more FDIs, which would bring advanced processes to the local industry, and enhancement of the domestic industry to follow international standards. Also, it is suggested that the missing factor from the Indian workholding industry today is the absence of a common standard and standardisation followed by the user industry (i.e. the machining industry). Talking about the user industry—and this month, it happens to be Medical Machining—as one of the analysis suggests, Indian companies need to focus on medical machining and take precision to unimaginable heights. The industry, today, is talking not just in terms of waterjet machining, but is also imbibing machining through laser, plasma, electron and ion beams. Technologies such as Abrasive Water Jets (AWJs) are capable of machining most materials up to the thickness of about 0.2 μm and additive manufacturing is capable of producing almost every complex part. Indian companies needs to adopt these technologies in their shop floors. Though the future looks promising for medical machining in India, the industry still needs to upgrade itself with the technological know-how. It is still shying away from incorporating this technology to the optimum utility. So, not giving away any more of the excitement that is packed in this issue, enjoy the read and do let us know your feedback, as this helps us to be more relevant … more refreshing … this brings us back to BEANS … let’s smell some coffee!

MMT Mentor Shailesh Sheth

Corporate Strategy Advisor

Archana Tiwari-Nayudu archana.nayudu@network18publishing.com

February 2013 - MMT

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Contents

evENTs

Imtex 2013 .................. 114 RT

PO

EX

44

IMP

EX

Engineering Expo Ludhiana 2012 ........... 116

T

TR

POOR

Engineering Expo Indore 2013 ............... 122

Special Focus

EXIM Tooling Dynamics

50

Special Focus SME Trends

76

Special Focus

Latest Developments

iN cONVERSATION WITH 40 Dr Wilfried Schäfer

82

Facility Visit

SOCO Machinery Co Ltd

Development 100 Skill Cutting Tool Industry

Trends 111 Automation Precision Engineering

Executive Director, German Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW)

rEGULAR SECTIONS

Special Focus

Insights & Outlook

Evolution of Tools ....................... 43

Business Dynamics ......................

86

EXIM Tooling Dynamics ................

44

Material Matters .........................

88

One Q Many Views .........................

46

Techno Wise ..................................

92

SME Trends ...................................

50

3D Printing ...................................

94

Technology & Innovations ...............

36

Expert Insight ..............................

71

Micromachining ..........................

96

Tenders ......................

126

Tips & Tricks .................................

74

Additive Manufacturing .............. 98

Products ...................

127

Latest Developments ...................

76

List Of Products .......

134

78

List Of Advertisers ...

140

Refurbishing Tool Holders ........

next edition highlights

Editorial ....................

23

Sarathi Sutras ..........

29

News, Views & Analysis .....................

30

Special Focus: Robotics & Automation Insights & Outlook: Dies & Moulds Special Supplement on Aerospace Machining

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February 2013 - MMT

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Shailesh Sheth, an eminent authority, shrewd analyser of trends, brilliant strategist and considered by the industry as a ‘Guru’, to us, he manifests as ‘Sarathi’, accomplishing his timely purpose in the ever-evolving world.

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ByMerchant Shailesh Sheth of Dreams

Technology Phobia

machine tool industry? We need to rethink the meaning of e always hear the term ‘High-end ‘technology’ when applied to Indian machine tools. Technology’ in the machine tool industry, Events, like IMTEX, chant ‘technology’ like a mantra; but do we really see any new technology? there seems to be an affinity to technology without knowing Let us go a step back and analyse the what it is. This is almost creating an opposite reaction, i.e., machine tool industry structure—by a technology phobia, which leads one into believing that only geography, size and market share. Locations that account for high-end technology is mandatory; there is no need for General 90% of the machine tool production are Bengaluru, Pune, Purpose Machines (GPMs) in the market. However, nowhere Rajkot, Hyderabad, Delhi-NCR and Punjab. Size wise—where in the world has it been seen that just because CNCs have come an 80:20 concept applies—20% of the companies produce into the market, GPMs have become obsolete. Just because we 80% share of the goods. Only 30–35% of the market share is use cutlery, does it mean that we have stopped using our fingers? dominated by domestic companies, while the remaining 65% comprises imports. India will always need GPMs. The case Traditionally, market segments like is different in Europe owing to acute labour Any intelligent man can invent engineering workshops, job shops, general further complications, but it takes shortage. But, in India, there is always engineering and machinery manufacturing scope to train the unemployed masses to a genius to retain, or recapture, showcased a slow and long-drawn process operate them. In fact, it is more difficult simplicity. - EF Schumacher for the development of technology. to train people to use CNCs. Furthermore, However, future demand will neither be GPMs are required to meet market needs. slow nor long drawn. Other segments such as automotive, Hence, instances of people vacating this field and jumping to aerospace, medical engineering, orthopaedic, etc., are fast high-end technology is a classic case of herd mentality. evolving. Evolution requires advancement. Technology will Not everybody who is good at manufacturing GPMs will undoubtedly play a crucial role for future demand. Since 80% essentially be good at manufacturing CNCs. CNC manufacturing of the machine tool industry is small in size—by number, not requires different infrastructure and skill set. But manufacturing value—its ability to keep pace with advancements a GPM is easier. For example, if you go to Rajkot, in technology will be highly limited. you can buy different parts such as headstock, tailstock, chucks, etc. from different suppliers and From this, we can conclude: easily assemble a GPM. • Firstly, the top 20% companies need to The Indian Government and associations like shoulder the burden of bringing in new IMTMA and UNIDO, need to help industries technology. Did we see them do so at understand the need for co-existence of the so called IMTEX? Yes, there were some sporadic ‘low-end’ and ‘high-end’ technologies. For example, demonstrations of new technology, but it was just because cars were invented, bicycle production did not stop. more of a marketing gimmick than a display of real-time We need to look at technology in the form of a pyramid technology. representing people and technology that operate in its segments. • Secondly, most will say that CNCs = Technology. Contrary Rather than being concerned about staying at the top, one to what India thinks, CNC is a household name for the should be concerned about becoming the best cost and quality world. But the CNC machine concept was introduced in the producer and having the maximum market reach. SMEs, in 1960s—a generation later, can we call it new technology? particular, need to be clear about their business models and Also, this concept was not developed by us; we are merely realise that it should not solely be determined by technology. following it. So, where is the contribution of the Indian


News, Views & Analysis

‘Intelligence in Production’: Theme of EMO Hannover 2013

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ith the theme of ‘Intelligence in Production’, the gates for EMO Hannover 2013 will remain open between September 16–21, 2013, in Hannover, Germany. Organised by the German Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW), EMO Hannover 2013 is the leading metalworking trade show across the globe. Speaking about the importance of the show for the global machine tool industry, Dr Wilfried Schäfer, Executive Director, Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW), said, “EMO Hannover is a crucial touch point for machine tool manufacturers who want to do business internationally.” Agreeing with his views, Sudhir Patil, Advisor, Hannover Milano Fairs India Pvt Ltd, said, “Manufacturing industries

Machine tool stalwarts honoured at IMTEX

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n order to recognise the contribution of the industry, every year, IMTMA honours its stalwarts with prestigious awards. This year, Parakramsinh Jadeja, CEO, Jyoti CNC Automation Pvt Ltd, won the Premier Outstanding Entrepreneur Award in memory of Vinod Doshi. SN Mishra, Vice Chairman, Bharat Fritz Werner Ltd, won the IMTMA-BFW Lifetime Contribution Award in memory of HR Gupta.

are always looking for machine tool solutions that offer high productivity, precision, efficiency and above all, are cost-effective, in order to retain their competitiveness in the business. The place to get a bird’s eye view of the latest machine tool technologies from all over the world is EMO Hannover.” Elaborating on the theme, Dr Schäfer said, “In the face of enormous pressure on costs as well as exceptionally tough requirements with regard to efficiency and environmental impact, production operations must continue to pursue maximum cost effectiveness.” Given that India remains one of the largest machine tool markets in the world, VDW is organising the ‘EMO focus on India’ at EMO Hannover 2013. Commenting on the Indian presence, B

Sarkar, Executive Director & Secretary, EEPC India, said, “We regularly take Indian companies to the EMO; it is one of the biggest machine tool shows in the world.” In addition, EMO Hannover will also host conferences on various important subjects like ‘Smarter manufacturing’, ‘Blue competence’ and ‘New manufacturing technologies in the aerospace industry’. Dr Schäfer added that EMO Hannover will be accompanied by a fascinating and comprehensive events programme and hoped that the event will give both visitors and exhibitors guiding ideas on the critical areas for the growth of business as well as redefine the upcoming trends in manufacturing. As part of the initiatives taken to promote EMO Hannover 2013, conferences were organised in Delhi, Pune and Bengaluru.

DMG MORI/SEIKI expands its reach in India with cost-effective and used machines

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MG MORI/SEIKI launched its new Ecoline series, which combines high quality and cost effectiveness in the same machine for its Indian customers. Understanding the cost-effective psyche of Indian customers, DMG MORI/SEIKI launched its new Ecoline series, which combines high quality and cost effectiveness in the same machine. Dr Jens Hardenacke, CEO Asia, DMG (Asia) Holding, said, “Understanding the domestic psyche is very important; hence, along with the Ecoline series, we are also selling used

DMG MORI/SEIKI machines that will ensure similar quality at a lesser cost.” The company is showcasing nine machines during IMTEX this time, and as part of the global expansion, the company will be launching 27 machines worldwide along with two new manufacturing facilities in Russia and China. As part of an interactive initiative, the company is conducting informative seminars on the topics of aerospace, automotive and medical machining. The seminars will be held throughout the event for interested participants at the show.

LAPP Group announces Indo-German exchange programme between schools

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APP Group, one of the leading German manufacturers of cables and other cabling solutions, announced its support for a student exchange programme between BRJD Public School, Bhorugram, India, and Fanny-LeichtGymnasium, Stuttgart, Germany. This is a dedicated initiative under the motto ‘Education needs Communication’ that helps support the exchange of knowledge, further strengthening the relations between 30

MMT - February 2013

the two countries. This was announced at the 9th ‘Stuttgart meets Mumbai’—a two-day celebration of the long and enduring partnership between the twin cities of Mumbai and Stuttgart. The programme, which is taking place for the first time, will see a participation of approximately 20 pupils from each country. Andreas Lapp, Chairman of LAPP HOLDING AG and Honorary Consul of India, said,

“Globalisation will play a major role in the future and we need to be prepared for an inevitable development. We can be prepared by welcoming the change, opening ourselves up to new things and evaluating the opportunities and potential this future holds, as well as the risks and stumbling blocks it will bring. Moreover, familiarising ourselves with other cultures will be the key to sustainability, along with the major topic of education.”


News, Views & Analysis Hypertherm strengthens its presence in China

I

n line with the increasing business in China, Hypertherm announced the expansion of its Shanghai office. With a larger presence, the company is confident that it will be able to better support partners and end users across the country. Hypertherm China is now situated within a larger compound, and its Cutting Technology Centre (CTC) is located with the new office. The new CTC is larger than before and allows channel partners to perform mechanised and stainless steel cutting and run demos on various air plasma systems. Hypertherm also has plans to carry out fibre laser and bevel cutting demonstrations in the near future. Aaron Zou, Director, Hypertherm China, said, “Hypertherm has always recognised the important role that distributors and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) play in establishing the large install base we have today.”

Timken announces the acquisition of Wazee companies assets

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he Timken Company announced its acquisition of the assets of Wazee Companies, LLC, a regional leader providing motor, generator, wind and industrial crane services to diverse end markets including oil and gas, wind, agriculture, material handling and construction. The addition of Wazee to The Timken Company’s process industries segment further expands the footprint of the Timken industrial services business. Based in Denver, Wazee had trailing 12-month sales through December 2012 of

approximately US$30 million. The acquisition brings Timken additional diversified services, including motor rewind, generator rebuild, electric controls, industrial bridge cranes and uptower wind maintenance and repair, operating from four western US locations. “We continue to focus our strategy on further diversifying the Timken services portfolio. Wazee complements our industrial repair capabilities and takes us into critical motor and generator services,” said Carl Rapp, Vice President of Industrial Services for Timken.

IEEE collaborates with German institute for standardisation

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EEE, the world’s largest professional organisation in advancing technology for humanity, collaborated with DIN, the German Institute for Standardisation, and SAE International, the global body of engineers and technical professionals developing volunteer consensus standards for passenger cars, in organising a new event to explore how standards are driving innovation in Electric Vehicles (EVs) and charging infrastructure globally. “Vehicle electrification will be successfully implemented only if 32

MMT - February 2013

consumer experience is repeatedly positive,” said Jack Pokrzywa, Director of Global Ground Vehicle Standards with SAE International. Standards developed collaboratively across various sectors and regions will assist in creating this type of experience and will lay the foundation for more advanced solutions in the future. A conference was organised by three prominent Standard Development Organisations (SDOs)—DIN, IEEE and SAE— for the purpose of enabling and promoting this collaboration, which, in turn, will steer growth and advancement.

Danfoss appoints new director for the power electronics division

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anfoss Industries Pvt Ltd, a leader in mechanical and electronic components and solutions, announced the appointment of Kamal K Singh as the Director of the Power Electronics Division of Danfoss India. An important aspect of Kamal’s role will be to encourage the growth and visibility of the Power Electronics Division and also ensure the division’s continued expansion in the country. “I am delighted to begin work with Danfoss. India is a high potential market for Power Electronics and I look forward to working with the company to drive more focus and visibility whilst reinforcing the high value and credibility Danfoss is associated with,” said Singh.

Starrag sets up its first manufacturing plant in Bengaluru’s Aero Park

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tarrag India Pvt Ltd, a whole-time subsidiary of the Swiss-based Starrag Group Holding AG, is the first company to launch its machining centre manufacturing plant in KIADB Aerospace Park, Devanahalli. The Greenfield factory at Bangalore was inaugurated on January 25. The factory will roll-out four popular size models of WMW horizontal machining centres from July 2013 to December 2014. A cost reduction programme through the local supply chain is also in its advanced stages.


News, Views & Analysis

n

n

n

n

n

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n Many The industry hardly believes in Indian companies are the statisticians’ talk. They are all changing gears from automated awaiting a big growth in the next processes to conventional processes. n Indian builders are entering into few minutes. collaborations with foreign players to Owing to the increasing demand for enhance their presence and increase the US manufacturing industry, the their knowledge base. domain of manufacturing is shifting n New entrepreneurs are not waiting back to the US from China. for the government to support and Smart machines that can design, programme and machine in a single machine are selling like hot cakes in the industry. SMEs are not waiting for government support to come their way. They are making their route to success and are looking for venture capitalists to raise funds. Many companies are gearing up to face a slow industry growth for the next six months. A huge number of participation has come from SMEs that have taken keen interest in ´ The highly charged atmosphere at IMTEX 2013 the show.

Courtesy: Bmaximage

n

Interesting trends observed @ IMTEX

MMT - February 2013

are making their own way towards success. n In this modern and competitive world, companies are adopting social networking in their marketing strategy to promote their brand. n A major demand by the industry is for government support in education and infrastructure for this segment to grow. n Each local tool builder are trying to build complex machines rather than simple machines. n The Indian industry is becoming more aesthetic. Indian manufacturers today are also looking into ways in which aesthetics can be incorporated and be at par with the global machines. n Breaking the trends, companies no longer look for general purpose machines. The new trend is that of special purpose machines and customised solutions.


Technology & Innovation Torque Limiting Clutches

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estStand applications place the highest demands for torque limiting clutches, which quickly overstrain the standard designs available

USPs

Suitable for high-speed operation  Reduces torque  Increases productivity in the market. Therefore, mayr® power transmission has developed new torque

limiting clutches that meet these demands and are suitable for speed values of up to 16,000 revolutions per minute. mayr® power transmission has been in the market with a wide range of products in load holding; load separating; torque and force limiting; frictionally locking; positive locking; magnetic, controllable & switchable torque limiting clutches since decades. TestStand technology is one of the application areas wherein torque limiting clutches should primarily support extremely high speeds. Furthermore, they must be able to transmit the torque in a backlash-free and torsionally rigid manner. In case of malfunctions, the protection of high-quality systems must be guaranteed. When dealing with high speeds, the only expedient option is a residual torque-free separating (disengaging) torque limiting clutch. It helps the rotational energy stored in the uncoupled masses to slow down freely in case of overload.

Plasma Cutting System

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ngineers are constantly searching for methods for enhancing the cut quality, cut speeds, power levels, operating costs and ease-of-use of plasma systems. In the last two decades, a new category— high-definition plasma—has emerged as a result of much research and development. The new high-definition plasma technology essentially works by forcing the plasma arc through a smaller nozzle orifice. Such equipment takes advantage of the laws of high temperature physics, allowing for cleaner cut edges while maintaining acceptable torch consumable (nozzle and electrode) life. The earliest high-definition plasma systems were limited in amperage (70 amperes maximum) and thickness capacity (0.95 cm thickness for steel), and, by today’s standards, were considered difficult to handle. They required an expert machine operator to

36

MMT - February 2013

monitor and adjust multiple parameters that affect the cut quality. However, over the years, high-level engineering efforts by major plasma-cutting system manufacturers have lowered operating costs and improved consumable life, cut quality and speeds. Some of these have also proven to be highly versatile, with the ability to pierce 75-mm thick metals, sever 160-mm thick ones and easily cut

USPs

 Produces complex geometries  Increases cut quality and speed  Optimum for thin materials thin metals—including gauge—with just a single torch. It is for these reasons that high-definition plasma systems have now become metal fabricators’ primary metal-cutting system of choice.

Waterjet Cutting System

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his cutting technology is getting increasingly popular for its green quotient. Waterjet plays a crucial role in the metal cutting industry as it is highly versatile. It can be utilised to cut both metals and non-metals up to the thickness of 300 mm, with a good finish and without any heat or burning effect. Waterjet cutting can also be used in various industries as there is no hazardous waste produced in the process

USPs

   

Environment friendly High-speed cutting Increased efficiency Beneficial for metals and nonmetals

of waterjet cutting. Also, this type of cutting prevents unnecessary waste as single large pieces of reusable material can be cut off easily. Materials that cannot be cut with a waterjet include tempered glass, diamonds and certain ceramics. The latest trend is to utilise waterjet in the profile cutting of precious metals like stainless steel, titanium, aluminium, copper, brass, marble, granite, etc. However, low-cost conventional technology with less power consumption and high-cutting speed could pose a challenge for some applications of waterjet cutting.


Technology & Innovation Incremental Sheet-metal Forming Method

Simulation in Grinding

of conventional sheet-metal stamping processes. It is constantly adopted by the engineering community owing to its flexibility and low cost. The die-less nature of incremental forming provides a competitive alternative for USPs economically and effectively fabricating  Suitable for complex 3D parts low-volume functional sheet products.  Does not need die Potential application  Is low cost areas include aerospace  Effectively fabricates lowindustries, customised volume functional sheet products in biomedical products applications and prototyping in the using a matching die. The automotive industry. It is process locally deforms sheet- a numerically controlled metal by utilising a moving incremental process that tool head; thus, achieving can produce complex shapes forming limits higher than those from various materials.

rinding is one of the most important machining methods used for finishing. While this feature enables accurate and high-quality machining, it makes it difficult to analyse the grinding process. In order to solve this problem, several computer simulations, which help users to statically calculate the geometric interference between a grain and a workpiece, have been developed. This gives users the flexiblity to visualise the result as an animated image using a 3D graphics technique. USPs New-generation CNC control systems  Reduces errors use 3D simulation  Helps in analysing the process to work out the  Makes the process easy programmes offline,  Enhances speed which, in turn, increases productivity. The simulation makes it easy to understand the microscopic grinding phenomena and can be used as a practical tool for predicting grinding results and for optimising grinding parameters such as infeed rate. The key advantage of tool grinding simulation software is that users can design and perfect a complete tool grinding process offline, prior to the actual production.

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ncremental forming is one of the technologies that have emerged as alternatives to conventional sheetmetal forming processes for mass customisation. Incremental sheetmetal forming has established its potential to form complex 3D parts without

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nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com


In conversation with Dr Wilfried Schäfer Importance of Quality Machine Tools

The implementation of high and sophisticated machine tools brings in high levels of accuracy & precision and increases the level of productivity & efficiency in the manufacturing process. Further, it also strengthens the competitiveness of the production process for a company. Over a period of time, all companies across the globe have realised the importance of adapting quality machine tools and are taking all the possible initiatives in this direction. This creates opportunities for German machine tool companies as Germany is traditionally an industrial country with a strong engineering base. The companies offer machine tool solutions that are high in quality and very reliable. It is a long-term investment and impacts the life cycle cost of manufacturing.

Customers want Skilled Partners in the Global Market

German machine tool solutions are highly respected by the global manufacturing community due to the country’s excellence in technology. In an engaging conversation with Arindam Ghosh, Dr Wilfried Schäfer, Executive Director, Machine Tool Builders’ Association (VDW), shares his thoughts on issues ranging from the role of the association, global demand patters for the machine tool sector and key areas of cooperation between India and Germany. VSW Plays Growth Catalyst

The VDW represents the German machine tool industry and we are one of the few industry associations that directly organise trade shows in major industrial locations across the globe, including Germany. Through this initiative, we try and help our member companies to showcase their solutions, communicate with their customers and find potential buyers. This gives companies the scope to expand their business operations in the world. Further, we also have German pavilions at all major international machine tool 40

MMT - February 2013

shows. For instance, in India, we always have a strong presence at IMTEX. We also have members based in locations like Shanghai to provide support to companies with specific questions like the lucrativeness of a market with respect to a specific business. We also help companies take well-calculated business decisions. Our association is 120 years old and together with the VDW and the Sector Association Machine Tools and Manufacturing Systems within the VDMA (German Engineering Federation), it boasts of around 280 voluntary members and jointly accounts

for around 90% of the industry’s turnover generated in Germany.

Positive Demand Trend

We have a positive perspective of the international consumption of machine tools, which is driven by investments made in all major countries, including Europe. We have seen that in the last two years, there has been major investment in all major industries like automotive. It has also been followed by mechanical engineering in Europe, which relies a lot on export activities. This industry is the second largest customer for


Dr Wilfried Schäfer machine tool solutions. We see a strong development-backed production in the US. In addition, there has been a huge demand for machines from the infrastructure and energy mobility sectors, especially from Asia, resulting in a positive trend in the demand for machine tool solutions. However, to tap this demand opportunity, companies need to be technologically competent and ensure that they offer their customers quality solutions along with better service. German and European manufacturing companies have done well on both these fronts; they have established their base across all the major industrial destinations across the globe. Currently, a major proportion of our member companies is aggressively focusing on Asia.

Customisation: Major Consideration

German companies always believe in solution-oriented discussions with customers as the companies are not strongly footed in standard machinery. They believe in offering customised solutions based on market requirements. This allows for higher accuracy and, more importantly, customer satisfaction. It is very critical to understand that customers want skilled partners in the global market. These specific requirements vary from industry to industry and German solution providers look into each of the aspects in detail and understand the nature of customer demand. Technological advancements are mostly driven by customer requirements and based on market forces or led by possibilities in better technological or solution offering from the product.

Blue Competence

Today, sustainability is one of the most important prerequisites for progress in policy, business and research. Officials from various sectors like politics, industry and academics are fast realising the importance of energy efficiency and are initiating change. A paradigm change of this magnitude is also

required in the manufacturing industry. This is why the ‘Blue Competence Engineering a Better World’ initiative has been launched by the European machine tool industry and the German mechanical engineering sector. More than 250 companies have signed up for this initiative. For the second time, EMO Hannover, one of the world’s leading metalworking trade shows, will host a special Blue Competence stand to complement discussions on the subject.

Exporting: A Successful Model

In terms of value, customer-specific special machines and projects represent nearly half of the total production volume of Germany’s machine tool manufacturers, while advanced technology comprises only about 30% of the world demand. In recent years, Germany’s share in the global market has fluctuated near the 20% mark. In Western Europe, the USA and the catchment area of BRIC countries, the average growth of nearly 18% is expected by 2015, provided the current crisis in Europe and the US does not escalate further.

Key Areas of Cooperation

India remains one of the major markets for German machine tool solution providers. In 2011, the machine tool

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&personal

Your hobbies I like to go for sailing and read books when I have time. Author who inspired you the most Dr Zoota, a famous European author, writes intelligent, short stories, which reflect the different aspects of society. Success mantra You should never give up, irrespective of any challenge you face.

consumption amounted to US$2.6 billion and machine tool imports were worth US$2 billion. Germany is the second largest supplier to the Indian market after Japan. I believe the customer base from India lies in the automotive and automotive supply industry. It is one of the fastest growing business verticals in the country. Here, the demand comes from not only Indian companies but also foreign firms. Aerospace and electrical equipments are industrial sectors where German technology can prove beneficial. Further, German machine tools can bring high levels of productivity and efficiency in the mechanical engineering segment. In the metals sector, the steel industry is an important customer in India.

Eurozone Crisis: An Opportunity

The crisis is a prolongation of the international financial crisis, and this economic scenario is a result of this long-term development. Now, political and financial systems are taking various measures to come out of this situation. From our viewpoint, industrial growth is dependent on a stable financial system and ‘trust’ is very critical in this market, because if there is no trust, there will be lack of investment. We are happy to see that the situation can be salvaged, unless huge risks are undertaken. Further, this is a huge opportunity for India and Germany to cooperate. Both the countries are currently cooperating on a number of projects, of which one is international trade regulations, where officials from the countries are working and hopefully they will soon come up with deliberations for promoting the trade between both the countries.

Message to German Companies

German companies need to be fully informed, have a long-term vision and research the Indian market before coming to the country; this will help them tap the market potential and increase their business. arindam.ghosh@network18publishing.com

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Special Focus Work Holding Equipment 43

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Evolution of Tools

Tooling Trivia: Interesting Facts

EXIM Tooling Dynamics

Analysing the Market the EXIM way!

46 One Q Many Views

Emulating Global Clamping Excellence

50 SME Trends

Exploring Industry Dynamics

52 Industry Speaks

Getting the Right Hold

72 Expert Insight

It’s all About Making the Right Choice

74 Tips & Tricks

Optimising Scope and Life

76 Latest Developments

Workholding Gets Accurate by the Day

78 Refurbishing Tool Holders

Adding a New Zest of Life

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special focus Evolution of Tools

Trivia: Interesting Facts

From Inception to the 21st Century

The first lathe dates back to around 1300 BC, when Ancient Egyptians developed the first two-person lathe. Its use has also been seen in Assyria and Ancient Greece. Ancient Rome improved the Egyptian design with the addition of a turning bow. The Middle Ages saw the introduction of a pedal replacing handoperated turning, allowing the skilled worker to use his hands to manoeuvre the woodturning tools. Because the pedal was connected to a pole, this type of lathe came to be known as the ‘spring pole lathe’. In fact, its use was common even in the early 20th century. The 1500s is when Leonardo Da Vinci invented a treadle lathe with a crank mechanism—a continuous rotary motion. Although this lathe was not very efficient because the poor bearings and alignment produced high friction, there was little power for rotating the workpiece. Henry Maudslay invented the first practical metalworking lathe in 1800. It was a simple machine tool that held the workpiece in a clamp or a spindle and rotated it so that the desired contour could be obtained on the workpiece surface using a cutting tool. The Industrial Revolution brought about the mechanisation of tools with the generation of mechanised power using water wheels or steam engines. The power was transmitted to the machine via line shafting, ensuring and easier work.

Oxford Dictionary defines the word ‘tool’ as a device or implement, especially one held in the hand, that is used to carry out a particular function. In informal terms, the word is used to describe a procedure for a specific process. Some even say that the evolution of mankind is dependant on the tools man has created. Nedra Pereira looks at a few interesting facts that you may not have known about the complex tools we now so often take for granted.

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In the 1960s, Computer Aided Drawing (CAD) came into the picture and rapidly started replacing paper drawings and draftsmen. By 1970, CAD was in itself a decently sized industr y.

ng The early milli as w machine li invented by E . 18 18 W hitney in

The longest lathe in Asia (100 feet long) is located at KCP Ltd at Thiruvottiyur, Chennai. There are many more types of CNC machines apart from CNC lathes, CNC milling and CNC routers; examples include CNC presses of various kinds.

The 1950s witnessed machines being operated through numerical control by adding a servomechanism to the control system of the machine, which was then coupled with computers to yield Computerised Numerical Control (CNC). During the late 1940s and early 1950s, after World War II, John T Parsons was involved in the manufacture

The smallest lathes are ‘jewellers lathes’ or ‘watchmaker lathes’.

of helicopter rotor blades. These blades required precise machining of complex shapes. Using an early IBM computer, Parsons soon found that creating more accurate contour guides were possible using manual calculations and layouts. Thus, the modern CNC machine design was born out of Parsons’ efforts. nedra.pereira@network18publishing.com

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special focus EXIM Tooling Dynamics

Analysing the Market the

EXIM way! The Indian machine tool industry largely depends on the import of machine tools and Workholding Equipment (WHE) to be able to flourish. Even though India produces a wide range of capital goods, the ratio of imports to exports is much higher. Nedra Pereira gets an overview of the current market scenario and looks at potential strategies to make a change in the shift.

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he Indian machine tool industry produces an array of products with excellent quality and at par with global standards. Even though the demand is growing, the manufacturing sector is still dependant on the import of machine tools, including Computer Numerical Control (CNC) and nonCNC machines, lathes, forgings and dies. Why is it that this industry imports more than it exports? Lajpat Rai, Managing Director, Airtech Pvt Ltd, says, “As of today, it is true that India imports more Workholding Equipment (WHE) than it exports. MNCs, many a times, bring in the perception that an effective solution can only be provided by a foreign WHE supplier. The other reason pertains to the common Indian users’ psyche about giving one up to a foreign name.” Apart from this, capacity constraints, lack of investments and late & limited entry of domestic players in the segment are also thought to be the main factors. Globally, the machine tool 44

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manufacturing industry is worth around US$66 billion. Moreover, countries such as Germany and the US are traditionally the main suppliers of different subsegments of capital goods. However, recently, Asian countries such as China, Taiwan and South Korea have become major players in the production and export of capital goods. The consumption of capital goods has also increased substantially in developing Asian countries due to the thrust given to value-added manufacturing. In the world, India ranks 12th in machine tool production and 7th in machine tool consumption, according to a recent survey. More so, the country is set to become a key player in the global machine tool industry. With the circumstances changing for better thanks to the Indian market share increasing to 33% in 2010– 11 from 25% in 2009–10, there are signs of an ever expanding industry with a plethora of options to grow. In India, WHE is primarily imported; this is because most machines used in the country too have been imported. In

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order to improve the import-export ratio, it is necessary to start manufacturing in full swing in the country. Nandkumar Deshpande, General Manager, (SE Asia & India), EROWA South East Asia Pvt Ltd, Singapore, avers, “India has a huge base of automotive manufacturing that uses WHE. This automotive production is a major component of the domestic consumption market rather than the automotive export market. So, for this major portion of domestic automotive production, a large chunk of WHE is being imported. WHE manufacturing in India is carried out on a small scale and import substitution, which has just started, has a long way to go. The current statistics indicate that WHE exports are less than 1/6th of the WHE imports. This market can potentially be worth US$2 billion and can grow at 10–15% year-on-year, given the size of the Indian manufacturing demand.”

Challenges

Technological Competency The latest technological trends


EXIM Tooling Dynamics used for production are not always updated in line with global trends. There are some companies that have technological competencies, especially in areas such as design capability, application innovation and process innovation, the technological capabilities of a large number of companies, especially in the SME sector, are limited. Moreover, the transfer of technology from other developed countries has also not been significant even though liberalisation of policies for technology transfer and foreign direct investments are present.  Cost Competitiveness The Indian machine tool sector largely uses crucial inputs such as iron and steel that is of domestic origin. Over the years, there has been a significant increase in the cost of inputs, but the players in this industry are unable to pass on the price increase to the end consumers due to competition from imports. In addition, the industry that makes manufacturing machines and tools also has a high incidence of taxation; a number of indirect duties (such as excise duty, octroi, entry tax, sales tax and service tax) are levied, adding up to the end user cost. This makes the indigenous supplies costlier than imported capital goods. The cost disadvantage is estimated to be up to an extent of over 20%.  Delivery Schedules The time taken to deliver an order of a machine tool or WHE is longer than that taken for many other engineering products owing to customisation. However, because of various reasons such as infrastructure constraints, the delivery time of Indian capital goods suppliers is longer than their foreign counterparts. Industry experts estimate that the delivery time of Indian capital goods manufacturers is two times more than their global counterparts, thus affecting the competitiveness in delivery schedules. In such circumstances,

In India, WHE is primarily imported. To counter this, it is necessary to start manufacturing in full swing in the country. imported capital goods are preferred over Indian capital goods, even though they conform to international standards technologically and functionally.

Strategies

Research and Development First, there is an immense need for strengthening Research and Development (R&D) in India. To keep itself updated with global trends, the manufacturing sector needs to make innovation and R&D its highest priority. In comparison with other sectors such as automobile and pharmaceutical, the R&D in firms that cater to capital goods is less than 1%. Precision measuring, materials engineering and process innovation are some of the areas that need to be strengthened in the Indian capital goods industry. It is also important to increase the linkages between public research systems and the industry to facilitate technology transfer and enhance the responsiveness of the capital goods industry.  Enhancing Market Position Various market entry strategies may be adopted including attaining market leadership through acquisition and consolidation and achieving economies of scale in price-sensitive markets. The mergers and acquisitions route may also be adopted by the players in the Indian capital goods industry to build and nurture brands in export markets. A value-based supply chain may be created by building customised products and offering engineering

services to create exclusiveness in competitive markets. WHE manufacturers also need to closely interact with end users (especially sectors such as automobile, defence, aeronautics, space, metals, construction, textiles, chemicals and pharmaceutical) to understand the latest trends in manufacturing; their expectations with respect to the performance of machinery and areas of improvement in process efficiency, energy efficiency, product quality and cost control strategies.

Steps to be Taken

India needs to leverage its innate strengths such as availability of skilled labour, low-cost operations and existence of extensive domestic demand in orde to strengthen its manufacturing sector. Leveraging the abundant availability of software skills in engineering design and drawing would strengthen technological competitiveness. Continuous training and skill upgrades, along with R&D, would help the human resources in the industry to capture the trends in new processes and technologies. Cost-effective manufacturing will make India the preferred base for capital goods. Strategies such as transformation of the shop floors to produce different types of machineries and redesigning the machining process to accommodate the usage of common components in various types of machineries would encourage the sector significantly. Sourcing technology from countries such as Germany, Switzerland, Italy and Spain should be encouraged, especially in the context of shift in manufacturing base from developed to developing countries. The strengths of machining technologies in other developing countries such as China and Taiwan should be effectively learnt and adapted by Indian players. Effective supply chain management and thereby, optimising product delivery schedules should be given top priority in order to retain the existing customers as well as fetch new customers. nedra.pereira@network18publishing.com

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special focus One Q Many Views

Emulating Global Clamping Excellence Much has been spoken and written about the need for the Indian machine tool industry to raise its bar and meet the global standards. Does the same stand for the workholding equipment industry? What are the setbacks that this industry is facing in particular? Debarati Basu Das talks to industry leaders to know their views on the need to emulate the versatile and dynamic global tooling & workholding equipment industry. Nandkumar Deshpande, General Manager, (SE Asia & India), EROWA South East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore The presence of global industries in India is on the rise and with present-day globalisation and the products & processes being exported from India, the developing local industry needs to be at par with its global counterparts. The Indian industry needs to stay abreast with the modern advancements in the field of tooling and Workholding Equipment (WHE). The process of emulation also follows its own time span with respect to the absorption of technology and learning curve. The following factors should be considered in order to attain the stature of global counterparts: - Quantum rise of exports, which would need to produce

products on par with world standards - More Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs), which would bring advanced processes and standards to the local industry - Enhancement of the local/domestic industry so that it can follow international standards. This would need some financial investment initiatives for which government help would be needed. The problem in the Indian workholding industry today is the absence of a common standard followed by the user industry (i.e. the machining industry). Conventional old techniques coexist with advanced methods—the latter being a small proportion in the industry presently.

Lajpat Rai, Managing Director, Airtech Pvt Ltd, Dharwad There is no doubt that the Indian tooling and WHE industry will have to and has been emulating the global best in class. However, the key pain area with respect to Indian WHE suppliers is the lack of focus on WHE. Unlike global machine shops, Indian machine shops do not give importance to their workholding and tend to live with what comes with the machine as part of the original equipment. To move up to the global stature, Indian WHE suppliers should: - Reduce the quality and branding gap that exists between an Indian supplier and a foreign WHE supplier. This can be done by selecting the best values from global counterparts such as assuring product performance. At the same time, they need to keep their product cost low - Invest more on R&D to create the technology value advantage that will help them to get preference over foreign suppliers - Keep developing the services market by consulting and manufacturing customised WHE - Work together with the machine builder and tool manufacturer to create the system as a whole

Taha Umerathi, Partner, Star Trading Corporation, Pune There are various types of workholding equipment for CNC machines and mechanical work like bench vices, milling vices, etc. The main reason that companies in India import workholding equipment is that most machines used are imported. Hence, WHE is an integral part of the machines bought as these WHEs are made according to machine specifications and operation. 46

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If companies bought machines manufactured in India, there would be no need to import WHE and replaceable tooling would be available in the local market. Companies like Godrej and Batliboi are manufacturing machines that are at par with global players. India can become a large supplier of WHE as the quality is at par with global standards. The industry can give global players stiff competition and can offer equipment at a better rate than its foreign counterparts.


One Q Many Views Vidhu Nevatia, Director, Dagger Master Tool Industries Ltd The need to emulate global industry stands true for all products in India today. There is a quantum difference in the kind of workholding equipment used in India and those used in France, Germany or other European countries. These differences are in terms of precision, automation and productivity, which are yet to catch up in India. So, in the manufacturing set-up, there is a tendency to compromise on the workholding products. However, many Indian companies now feel the need to compete in terms of quality levels, productivity levels and modern machinery. Although they will continue to import,

The Verdict

once the country starts to manufacture high-end machines, workholding companies will develop in India; but that will take some time. The machines that are imported come with their accessories. Machines and workholding equipment are totally interconnected. If Indian machines do not require high-end workholding, no company will manufacture it. Today, people who wish to upgrade themselves in the aftermarket are the only ones who may try high-end products. An entire essence of technology is missing from the general Indian industry. For instance, a lot of products in Europe use through-spindle coolant that most companies in India do not buy. Any innovation and improvement is welcome in this sector.

The industry is waiting for a change in the Indian workholding industry. But this segment of the industry can grow only if Indian machine manufacturers bring in the edge in technology and build high-end machines that new-generation Indian companies would want to acquire. Amidst global dependence, most Indian manufacturers who rely of foreign machines get support for concurrent workholding devices as part of the complete package. This is hampering the dependence on Indian workholding device manufacturers. However, with the industry going global, the Indian workholding industry has to bring an edge in the manufacturing of workholding equipment and cater to the global industry as well. debarati.basu@network18publishing.com

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special focus SME Trends

Illustration by Soheb Shaikh

Exploring Industry Dynamics

New-generation machines and components, which assure high-precision machining, need to be supplemented with an equally high quality workholders. However, the cost-conscious industry, for long, has been neglecting this small segment. Nishant Kashyap finds out the SMEs’ take on this technology and its importance.

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s the demand, in terms of accuracies and features of the mechanical parts produced, grows to increasingly tighter specifications, the workholding process, which holds the key to consistent repetitive manufacturing production, faces innumerable challenges. The equation of perfect manufacturing is the result of an amalgamation of the right type of machine, precision cutting tool and an appropriate workholder. While a lot of deliberation goes into investing in the perfect machine and cutting tool, there is not much assessment made when it comes to investing in workholding equipment. 50

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Current Scenario

The machining field—including mould & die as well as precision parts manufacturing—is undergoing rapid changes with regard to the practicalities of the process. This shows promise with respect to creating advanced machine shops of the future. Currently, in India, all kinds of Workholding Equipment (WHE) and tool holding systems are used as cost-effective and high-precision products are in demand. While the big players have adopted high-end WHE, SMEs are still using the conventional WHE. However, this scenario is changing rapidly as many SMEs are realising the importance of technology and are taking efforts to include the

latest technology in their system. Ashutosh Pratap Singh, General Manager, Hind Tools Pvt Ltd, says, “There are various types of WHE for different kinds of operations, with more options now than ever before. As the industry continues to grow, our customers demand better and precise products; this has given the industry enough reason to invest in better clamping devices. The manufacturers of these devices have also given a lot of support to the users, which led to an increase in the general awareness of WHE among SMEs.”

SMEs Take on Latest Technology SMEs are the backbone of the Indian economy; they play a vital


SME Trends role in the growth of the Indian manufacturing sector. As the industry has grown to become highly demanding, they need to upgrade their technology. Currently, many manufacturers of WHE have started training programmes and support users in their operations, which, in turn, helps companies to achieve high productivity. Apart from the companies, the government and associations such as UNIDO have initiated various technology awareness programmes to support the member companies. UNIDO has selected six machine tool clusters that have the maximum production capacity in the country. To support them better, UNIDO has appointed consultants who will help companies in the overall operation of each of these clusters. This has been instrumental in creating awareness about the latest technology and has encouraged SMEs to adopt the latest technologies as many SMEs are making the shift from conventional machines to latest machines. Nevertheless, Indian SMEs have a lot of ground to cover in order to adopt high-end WHE. “Although many companies are adopting the latest WHE to serve their customers better, some still shy away from the latest technology because of the cost. But this will change gradually, and sooner or later, we will see the industry completely accept the latest WHE, toolholders and chucks,” says Singh. There is also a slight difference in the usage of the latest technologies, as companies from Bengaluru and Pune are keener to adopt the latest technology in their shop floors, but those from north India still have to work on the technologies. However, they are gradually catching up and investing in newer technologies. According to Lajpat Rai, Managing Director, Airtech Pvt Ltd, “In India, particularly in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu, there exists a

Ashutosh Pratap Singh, General Manager, Hind Tools Pvt Ltd There are various types of WHE for different kinds of operations, with more options now than ever before. As the industry continues to grow, our customers demand better and precise products; this has given the industry enough reason to invest in better clamping devices. The manufacturers of these devices have also given a lot of support to the users, which had led to an increase in the general awareness of WHE among SMEs.

better understanding of WHE. Manufacturers in the region also give more importance to WHE right from the beginning, which has helped raise the quality standards. We like to do everything as per the specifications; we do not opt for shortcuts.”

Understanding the Technology

Understanding and deciding upon the holding equipment for better machining operations is the key factor in increasing the productivity levels. It is very important to have appropriate knowledge about the equipment and the operation. Many a times, companies use the same WHE for various machining operations; however, if they use the appropriate WHE for specific operations, it will lead to an increase in the speed, efficiency and reduction in the cost. “Today’s user has to change the psyche that Indian WHE is equally good as its global counterparts, and if Indian users lay less stress on the cost factor and more on quality and consistency, WHE will yield better results. There is also need for more efforts by machine tool builders in understanding the requirements of users,” avers Rai. Lack of rigid and reliable work holders will lead to the products having a bad finish. Hence, it is important to have the right kinds

of clamping devices for different materials. Specialised industries, such as aerospace, have been using materials like titanium and Inconel, which are ‘hard to machine’ materials. The usage of such materials over the last decade has subsequently brought in a dramatic change in the scenario of workholdings. Earlier, in aerospace machining, the impeller blades of turbines were held by mechanical holders, which did not give the best results in machined component in terms of finish and tolerances. Today, the industry has come up with innovative work holders such as a set of flexible pins that can easily be adjusted as per the shape of the material being machined. Unlike mechanical vices, these are clamped at various points around the component to offer higher strength while machining.

Scope for Infinite Possibilities

In the modern age, workholding on machine tools has undergone a paradigm shift from the conventional work clamping methodology. It will see more of a system-based approach rather than a system merely based on discreet components or devices. As the machine tool industry undergoes technological advancements, workholding will have to follow suit. “I see that, in the future, many companies will adopt the latest technology not only in terms of WHE but also in terms of solutions such as automation, better CNC machines, tools, etc. The future of the manufacturing scenario of WHE, tool holders and chucks looks promising as the industry is witnessing a surge in demand,” concludes Singh. The infinite possibilities being ushered in by IT in the global market will increase the demand thrust on manufacturing. This promises a future that holds in store a positive outlook for the machining industry —a future where there is light, although somewhere towards the end of the tunnel. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com

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special focus Industry Speaks

Getting the Right Hold With every new machining challenge, the industry aims to achieve a higher cutting speed. However, the task of making the right clamping device for critical manufacturing operations is becoming difficult with every new cut. Debarati Basu Das talks to industry experts to find out the nuances of getting the right ‘fix’ and ‘hold’ for the user industry and opportunities that are in store for the workholding equipment industry.

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he precision of a cut is determined by the way in which the job is held. However, adhering to a huge array of complexities of a workpiece in terms of material, shape, dimensions, etc. is too much of an expectation from a simple workholding equipment. While the industry is already using the latest machines and cutting tools, workholding equipment is yet to pick up the right momentum in India. “Workholding equipment forms a major part of a machine tool process, which decides the turnover, accuracy and specifications in an operation. However, the Indian machine tool user mostly relies on imported machines and accessories that come with the machines. They are yet to look into the possibilities of improvisation of products,” says Lajpat Rai, Managing Director, Airtech Pvt Ltd. 52

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Industry Outlook

For perfect machining, a proper synergy among entities such as the right machine, a concurrent tool and the right clamping device in every aspect of the machining operation is required. While the machine tool industry is growing leaps and bounds, the workholding equipment industry too has encouraging prospects. According to a global survey, the workholding market is projected to reach US$2.7 billion in 2013. The need for better workholding equipment is bringing in the scope for innovation and experimentation in this segment. However, the outlook of the Indian industry towards workholding equipment needs to change dramatically. “Presently, the user industry deploys a varied & inadequate mix of conventional and modern equipment and processes. This prohibits the application of common

modern standards and the industry continues to run with this handicap. The Indian industry still relies on human/ personal skills to produce good results rather than an engineered way through the right technologies, right machinery and right processes,” feels Nandkumar Deshpande, General Manager (SE Asia & India), EROWA South East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore. He adds, “The industry has to invest time and money in setting this input area right. The Indian user industry has a huge potential to consistently produce results at par with the rest of the developed world. This, in turn, would prove effective in boosting the economies of scale and the economy itself.”

Comprehending Clamps

The industry today has a gamut of choices for clamping devices to match


Industry Speaks up with the machining operation. However, one of the most important needs today is for the workholding manufacturer, the machine tool builder and the user industry to come together to create the perfect clamping device. Although cost is one of the most important factors that negatively affect the choice of workholding equipment in the Indian industry, quality cannot be ignored. Any clamping device has to be precise, and for this, several other parts of the operation and manufacturing environment should be reviewed before a clamp is chosen or customised according to manufacturing requirements. To survive in today’s highproduction scenario, workholdings should be robust and provide consistent clamping force, easy and swift loading & unloading and repeatable part location to reduce the overall changeover time in any manufacturing process. The range of workholding devices available in the market today is exhaustive. Most high-production workholding today is automated. While the industry has been comfortably using mechanical vices, hydraulic vices are making a prominent mark in the industry. In addition, two other unconventional systems of workholding that are accepted are vacuum and magnetic fixturing. Unlike others, both these types of fixtures allow clamping from all sides without any fixture interference. These types of workholdings are gaining popularity in the field of aerospace and medical machining where the components machined have a high rate of complexity.

Reviewing Indian Clamps

Even with significant developments in the field of machinery, India still relies on importing machines. Hence, the situation cannot be expected to be any different in the segment of workholding equipment. According to Rai, the size of the workholding equipment industry in India is around `80–100 crore, of which Indian manufacturers account for approximately `60 crore. However, this is not the main pain area. Rai 54

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explains, “The Indian user industry can be classified into two groups. The first group consists of MNCs and machine shops supplying to MNCs. The focus on workholding equipment in this group is much greater, with effectiveness, efficiency, accuracy and productivity of WHE being at the forefront. The other group consists ´ The range of workholding devices available in the market today of Indian machine is exhaustive. shops where the focus on quality is less and the main demand in place with the right efforts. If there is for low-cost and low-maintenance is no lifting of the foot, the question clamps.” of climbing a step will never arise,” expresses Deshpande. While the country mainly focuses on manufacturing general purpose One needs to accept the fact that machines, high-end machines and the quality of the Indian industry technology are largely imported. These has dramatically improved. The imported machining solutions come country, with its capabilities and along with the requisite accessories domain knowledge, has been able to and workholding equipment. Hence, manufacture products with global this trend is gradually reducing acceptance. “The biggest challenge that the dependence levels for Indian the Indian WHE supplier faces is the workholding, and manufacturers perception that an effective solution and thereby hindering their growth. can only be provided by a foreign “Although Indian manufacturers WHE supplier. Common Indian users are meeting the demand in terms of should change this psyche. Indian numbers, foreign manufacturers in India WHE suppliers, if not better, are no are less in number but more in terms of less than foreign WHE suppliers. value,” says Rai. We provide better after-sales services as compared to any foreign supplier today. User industries should examine Future Outlook the effectiveness and efficiency of their Given its existing dependence, the WHE. This can be achieved if WHE Indian user industry is yet to connect specialists are involved in the process with its own counterpart. While a of identifying the optimal solution section of the industry is using highfor a particular component. The right end machines, there is a need for the workholding can have a major impact Indian machine tool industry to upgrade on cost and quality.” itself first for the workholding industry to follow suit. Going forward, this change in “The Indian machining industry has attitude can be a major boost for Indian to adopt and upgrade the machinery to workholding manufacturers in terms modern international machinery and of delivering better and effective clams WHE standards before it is too late. and vices. Once the direction and will of a firm is set, the avenues for resources will fall debarati.basu@network18publishing.com


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special focus Expert Insight As the Indian component manufacturing industry opens up to the global market, it is highly essential for this industry to become globally competitive in terms of cost and quality to succeed in the new and evolving market dynamics. The key contributors to a machine shop’s cost and quality efficiency are machines, tooling and workholding. Industry experts closely analyse the workholding scenario and suggest how to lock on the right workholding option.

It’s all about Making the Right Choice

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oday, Indian machine shops can no longer compete with the machine shop next door; the competition is with the best in class. If the competition is not already here, it will be here soon and will leave no room for underperformance. It is time for Indian machines shops to be well prepared to not only defend their home turf but also enter the global playing field. Although some prominent Indian machines shops have done it right and are already challenging the best global players, most have not and the time is running out.

Based on the type of parts produced and the amount of capital invested or planned, the challenges may be different and sometimes, unique. In effect, there will be a combination of challenges and expectations for the manufacturing system. In most cases, one will find the following levers that can majorly impact the cost per part:  Type and capacity of the machine  Type of tooling  Workholding solutions Here, we will focus on workholding solutions:

Where To Start

The first step is to define the business requirement of today and the strategy for the future. Some questions that you can ask include: What is the cost per part and is it being used optimally? What are the current components and what will be machined in the future?

Selecting The Right Workholding Solution

Get the experts involved: It is important that the workholding solution is selected based on expert opinion. Companies like Airtech and Chuckmatic have teams of experts with extensive experience of helping various companies in selecting or designing the optimal

workholding solution.  Ensure objective communication: The objectives should be clearly shared with the experts, for example, your existing process & cost and the best way to utilise it. It is also essential to share your unique challenges and know-how of existing manufacturing systems. This is regardless of whether you wish to improve single component efficiency or want a range to be accommodated in a single machine.  Evaluate: When working with experts to evaluate and document the existing process and challenges, get the right team (the users) to interact with the experts. It is also a good idea to translate the objectives into workholding requirements such as component reference points, accuracy requirements, setup time requirements, changeover requirements, etc.  Work along: While the experts work out the solution, it is essential to stay engaged through the process and go through the solution process iterations. Today, the iterations February 2013 - MMT

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Expert Insight do not call for extensive travel to workholding manufacturers’ works or vice versa; this can easily be done using remote collaboration tools over the Internet in a secure way. Companies like Airtech and Chuckmatic extensively use such remote collaboration tools to help control the project costs and keep the end-user team engaged through the process.  Ensure expert manufacturing: Not anyone can manufacture a workholding solution; it calls for intricate dimension controls, heat treatment, balancing and control of each part at various stages. Thus, it is best to let experts manufacture the solution.  Prove out: A thorough testing is a must; do not waste energy on unnecessary details. It is optimal to stay focused on the elements that contribute to the results and measure the performance against the earlier documented requirements.  Follow a timeline: A strict discipline of project management should be employed or else, factors such as cost-effectiveness and benefit will not be achieved.

Some Examples

A truck manufacturing company was facing the problem of low production of brake drums due to a higher rate of rejection. Despite many efforts by the machine supplier and the tooling team, the results were not coming through in that when the accuracy went up, the cycle time also increased. Finally, the workholding company identified the problem—the component was deforming at the time of declamping. The solution that the experts came up with was to use a special dual pressure chuck with floating jaws instead of a standard power chuck. In a dual pressure chuck, the clamping forces can be adjusted in the running condition without stopping the spindle. The pressure at the time of rough cut can be higher and can be automatically 72

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reduced at the time of finish cut. The end result was that the production throughput increased by more than 30% with the same machine and the same tools. Here is an example from the valve industry. The component was a valve seat and the manufacturing process involved first machining the component and then using hydraulic press to remove the ovality, which was introduced during the machining process as the wall thickness was less. Here is how sometimes knowledge moves between industries; the new works manager, who had previously worked in the automobile sector with extensive experience of working with workholding specialists, called in experts with a clear requirement to remove the hydraulic press process. This was easily achieved by employing a compensating type self-centering 2+2+2 chuck. Another example is of an Indian company that had to start a new mass-produced component at a highly optimal cost to overcome the global competition. The new works manager knew that he needed an optimal manufacturing system to get the results. He got three experts—the machine builder, the tooling supplier and the workholding expert—to work together and build the most effective solution. The result surpassed all expectations and today, the company enjoys a major share in the supply of components globally. Not always is the solution complex; here is an example where a small change in the workholding solution helped the customer immensely. A machine shop, which was a mass manufacturer of very short cycle time components, worked with the workholding solution that came in as standard equipment with the machine. The works manager, as a casual remark, advised the workholding expert to change the chuck every three months as the chuck wears out very soon due to frequent clamp/declamp cycles. The workholding expert studied the system for a few hours and advised

´Special dual pressure chuck with floating jaws

the manager to replace the existing cylinder with a lower actuating force cylinder. This resulted in the life of the chuck increasing by more than 50%.

Key Takeaways

Give importance to the workholding solution. It can greatly reduce the cost per part  Engage an expert workholding company  Follow project management discipline Finally, workholding may look like a small element in the entire manufacturing system; however, it can make a big difference to the effectiveness and efficiency of the system. Global competition is increasing by the day. It is time to change your outlook towards workholding.

AC Kulkarni is the Senior E xecutive, Design and Projects, at Airtech Pvt Ltd. He has over 32 years of consulting and designing experience in special workholding solutions. Email: sales@airtechindia.com

Anil Madan is the Executive Director of Airtech Pvt Ltd. He is a Six Sigma black belt and has extensive experience of process optimisation for various national and international companies. Email: anil.madan@airtechindia.com


special focus Tips & Tricks

Optimising Scope and Life

Many a times, a machining operation in full swing comes to a complete stop because the workholding device gives way. While the machine and the tools are given enough attention, the selection and maintenance of workholding equipment often goes unnoticed. Debarati Basu Das gives you some tricks on how to understand the nuances of modern-day operations to enhance the life and scope of workholding equipment.

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Spend on the right clamp

A perfect manufacturing operation requires the right machine, a compatible tool and appropriate workholding equipment that complies with the tooling operation. The selection of the right workholding equipment will automatically synchronise the clamp with the tool movement, ensure better hold & stability and increase the life of the equipment.

Understand the process

The innovation quotient in the industry is at its hilt and the range to choose from is extensive. However, even the most expensive and new-age workholding equipment might fail to survive the operation. The operator needs to understand the entire manufacturing process, tool behaviour, etc. before the right workholding tool is chosen.

Choose a flexible chuck

The selection of workholding also depends on the volume of work. Today, most manufacturing operations are multifunctional. Chucks also have to go through tremendous changeovers from one operation to other. A quick jaw change chuck can be ideal to keep the chucks from wearing off.

Check the jaws

The number of jaws in a chuck can play a critical role in determining the efficiency of the workholding equipment. The more the number of jaws, the better would be the grip over the machining parts. However, for this, the shape of the workpiece needs to be given sufficient consideration before deciding upon the number of jaws to be used.

Customise the grip

Every manufacturing operation is different. A better understanding of the operations and customisation of the workholding equipment will transpire into better results. A chuck might sum up to just 5% of the total operation. Some amount of investment on workholding equipment will be highly useful.

Consider work volume

A workholding device should maintain its accuracy throughout the volume of workpieces. An operator needs to choose a clamping device that will better stand the test of time and longevity through the operation while offering high accuracy.

Check if the clamp is adaptive

To get value for money, the investment in the workholding solutions needs to be smart and calculated. One needs to check upon the adaptability factor of workholding solutions, quickly adapt to changes and minimise the impact of those changes.

Take good care of clamps

Workholding equipment, like any other part of the entire machinery, needs proper care and servicing. Here, there is a need to keep a check on the devices on a regular basis and ensure proper maintenance of the clamps for better productivity and life of the devices. debarati.basu@network18publishing.com

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SPECIAL FOCUS Latest Developments Workholding equipment (WHE) is defined as any device that can grip a workpiece while it is being machined. As technology advances, the need to have everything under one roof increases. WHE has also been a part of making life a little bit easier. With the cost being a fraction of the price one would pay to upgrade to a new machine, WHE can enormously help streamline processes. Nedra Pereira finds out more...

Workholding gets accurate by the day

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veryone wants to streamline their processes, increase productivity and make profits. The cost of the latest computerised machine tool, the cutting tools & toolholders in the toolchanger and other peripherals such as hardware & software for programming is high. Workholding Equipment (WHE) usually costs only a fraction of the amount of the above mentioned parts. However, it helps save time and streamlines the process. Reconsidering the innovative solutions that the market has to offer in WHE may actually help in enhancing efficiency in its application. Basic workholding devices are usually simple clamps that are screwed into place on a machining centre’s table. More complex ones involve WHE that are custom-built for particular parts. Commonly used WHE also include vices and chucks as well as indexers or rotary tables, which allow the position of the part to change while being gripped, so that machining can be done without the need to change the set-up. The other advantage of WHE is that it can also locate the part, thus allowing for precision 76

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machining. On a machining centre, the vice that grips the part in place may also allow for the part to be aligned at a certain position and orientation where the set machining programme expects to find it.

Developments in WHE

• Self-centering vice for 5-axis machining, which enables the workpiece to be held in position on the centre line of the machine, thus enhancing accuracy and efficiency • Quick-locking pallet system for fast changeover on machining centres, which enables lean manufacturing • Fifth-axis tombstone device made by KME CNC to complete multiple parts on an HMC in a single set-up without the need for extra controls • SCHUNK claims that its TENDO E compact toolholder has started a new era in tool clamping; users no longer need to adjust its toolholding devices for milling, drilling and reaming • In collaboration with an OEM, WDS Fixturing Systems designed a system based on a precision, customised riser table and angle plate. They found

a novel fixturing system that allows the machining of submicron-scale components at the same time • BIG Kaiser Precision Tooling Inc has developed a 5-Axis Duo bridge with dual 45° 105/65 base plates, so that systems can be mounted directly atop a 5-axis table, or loaded through a pair of zero-point chucks • TalonGrip bolt-on system is designed to increase the versatility of standard 4” and 6” vices, and is suited for performing aggressive machining operations while clamping on as little as 0.060” of the workpiece material According to industry experts, WHE has always been around and this market will continue to grow. With the industry all set to take on customisation, WHE is the most feasible option that allows the machining of components under a single set-up, thereby shortening cycle times and streamlining processes.

In the Offing

WHE is a boon and can not only enhance efficiency and streamline processes but also helps in cutting costs and getting firms to adapt to lean manufacturing. WHE has always been around in various industries and the recent developments, value for money and price factors allow most companies to absorb them into their processes. nedra.pereira@network18publishing.com


Latest Developments

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special focus Refurbishing Tool Holders

Adding a New Zest of Life

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utting tools are the most important part of a machining process. However, a perfect cut can only be determined by the perfect grip over a tool, negating any kind of vibrations in the tool during the machining process. Hence, understanding tool holders and choosing the right type of tool holder for specific machining jobs have become priority for Indian manufacturers lately. Given the research that goes into the choice of tools and their concurrent holders, the investment in this sector has undoubtedly gone up. Today, the market has tool holders within the range of `3,000 to `3 lakh and more, depending on the operation and quality of tool holders. However, during a machining process, tool holders bear a significant amount of wear and tear along with the tool itself. However, while 78

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The industry, with every given machining complexity, is striving to get a better cut. State-of-the-art cutting tools available in the market today come with excellent tool holders assuring that perfect cut. Tools, along with the right holder, are one of the significant investments in a manufacturing process. However, like everything else, these tool holders too have a shelf life. Once damaged, a new one is bought. Can these tool holders be refurbished to be reused and thus save costs? Does India fail to see the market potential of refurbished tool holders? Debarati Basu Das finds out. the tools are refurbished and reused, the Indian industry has not yet done the same with tool holders.

Unchartered Terrain

In the Indian machine tool industry, damaged tools are discarded. The scenario is completely opposite in the Western market. Refurbishing tool holders is common in the US and Europe. It is, in fact, a well-known practice wherein tool holder manufacturers refurbish the tools for the user industry. Even lesser known tool making companies have authorised repair shops for these processes. “We are probably the only company in India who has entered this segment of refurbishing tool holders. With a special redeposition technique, we have been able to maintain the precision to as much as 20 microns. We have repaired almost every known brand of tool holders of every given material with a guarantee that it will work as good as new.

If tool holders, which are simply discarded, can be repaired to the same precision, it certainly has a severe costoptimising potential for the industry. Ours is a small business, but the potential of this market is huge,� said Kumar Ramachandra, Founder & Director, Wintegral Engineering Pvt Ltd. Refurbishing tool holders does not simply mean the redeposition of material. The repaired tool holders are made to match the dimensions, characteristics and performance levels of the original ones. Kumar has been able to refurbish and repair a tool holder worth `45,000 in just `5,000. This shows the huge impact that a user industry can have on the overall cost of manufacturing.

Hindrances

In a country that believes in optimising every opportunity, why has this business not taken off as yet in the Indian


Refurbishing Tool Holders market? Nandkumar Deshpande, General Manager, (SE Asia & India), EROWA South East Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore, says, “The stage is not yet set for the Indian industry to look at large-scale refurbishment. Also, the high level of mix and variation of holders used would be a hindrance. But we should not rule out or discard the very idea; it should be implemented in the right sequence. Once the adoption of modern international standards is achieved and stabilised, it would be the right time to invest in the refurbishing industry and help the industry to fight financial economics, which often are unfavourable for a weaker/lowvalue currency market on the international platform.� Lajpat Rai, Managing Director, Airtech Pvt Ltd, feels that while the refurbishment of workholding equipment is active in India, such a concept for tool holders is yet to be introduced. Indians, as he feels,

With the industry in India growing in a much organised manner, the country can well emulate the art of refurbishment of tool holders with focused research in this segment. have a strong sense of refurbishment of workholding equipments and their reuse in order to cut on the manufacturing cost. The same can someday be applicable for tool holders as well.

Grip on the Future

This is a small and close-knit industry. While there are a handful of global companies in India well-

known for tool holder manufacturing, an additional service of refurbishing the same will boost businesses. This will come in as a major aid to the small- and mid-sized companies in terms of saving the cost of production. However, the odds here are that improper refurbishing of tool holders at unauthorised places will only lead to paying a higher price for the damage caused. With the industry in India growing in a much organised manner, the country can well emulate the art of refurbishment of tool holders with focused research in this segment. This will give a boost to tool manufacturers if the refurbishment of tool holders is offered as an additional service to customers, wherein damaged tool holders can be repaired by experts from the same tool holder manufacturer making it exactly like the original one. debarati.basu@network18publishing.com

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Facility Visit SOCO Machinery Co Ltd

Innovation with Value Addition

Since the last three decades, SOCO, the manufacturers of tubes, pipes and solid bars, has taken a big leap and showcases Taiwanese superiority in the machinery industry. The company is known for its sophisticated high-end technology and is exporting innovation all around the globe. Avinash Pandey, during a visit to the company’s facility, learns about SOCO’s strategy, solutions and product ranges.

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estled in one of the buzzing industrial areas of Asia, Taichung Industrial Park, Taiwan-based SOCO Machinery Co Ltd has come a long way. Known for manufacturing tubes, pipes and solid bars, SOCO, established in 1979, today boasts of 25 branch offices and more than 40 partners in all major continents. The products made by the company are primarily used in the automotive industry (car, motorcycle, bicycle, ships); comfort (home seating, office furniture); health care industry (wheel chairs, hospital beds) and in day-to-day life (fitness equipment, gardening tools, playgrounds).

Product Range and Facility

The company has more than 30 years of experience in design, manufacturing and tube cutting technology. The product range 82

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of the company comprises three major products—laser cutting machines, tube bending machines and tube cutting machines—that are precisely manufactured and tested. The company’s new laser cutting line is the ultimate solution for merging multiple machining processes in one system for maximum flexibility, automation and performance. Devin Lai, 2nd Sales Dept. - Export Sales, SOCO Machinery Co Ltd, says, “SOCO is the leading manufacturer of tube bending machines in Taiwan; the company has built its reputation by providing advanced technology and unsurpassed machine performance. The company adheres to client requirements and provides machine design, functions, high quality, customer service and management. We strive to be the industry’s best suppliers of tube benders & pipe

bending machines.” SOCO has a skilled and knowledgeable R&D team for developing and innovating new ideas. It uses and applies cutting-edge 3D designing technology such as Auto CAD to achieve efficiency in the development of products. Each of the design engineers has received proper technical and hands-on training, thereby achieving 100% customer satisfaction through research, new techniques and innovations. SOCO uses Fac.2 to build its tooling processing centre, which provides high accurate clamping jaws and bending molds. For tool processing, it is equipped with CNC machining centres and CNC computer lathes. The design solutions are provided as per as customer demand by using the CAD/ CAM software. After production, the products are tested to evaluate their performance and to provide the best quality to customers


SOCO Machinery Co Ltd in the desired time frame. The computer system creates a file with the customers’ information, such as their names, the machine models and the major components that were used, all in an effort to ensure excellence in the aftersales service and support. Patrick Chen, Director, SOCO Machinery Co Ltd, says, “SOCO emphasises on building long-term relations with its customers by understanding their needs and expectations. To accomplish this, they use a unique Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system for customer service and analysis.” SOCO has trained a team of professional design engineers to work closely with customers. Through this, SOCO can continue to develop, change and create new customer-oriented machines and equipment.

Eco-friendly Initiatives

When engineering new machines with innovative technologies, SOCO makes sure that they are environmentally compliant as well. The company has installed a photovoltaic system that converts solar energy to electrical energy in order to generate power. As a result, the company generates 200,000 Kwh/ year and saves 121,449 kg (CO2), which is equivalent to 54,240 ltr of petroleum. The company has installed a Rain Water Harvesting System (RWHS) of 20,000 tonne for their gardens and to use in cases of emergency. Volunteers from the Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation teach the SOCO staff how to sort the trash and recycle it.

Management System

The company believes in quality management system and has ISO 9002 certification in 1995, ISO 9001 certification in 2003, 5S management and Total Productive Management (TPM) in 2009 and ISO 14001 certification in 2012. Jay Lin, 1st Sales Dept. – Assistant VP, SOCO Machinery Co Ltd, says, “SOCO gives importance to knowledge management as it believes that innovations and creations depend on communal

rather than individual knowledge.” The President of the company selects different articles from various management magazines or books and shares it with employees to develop a knowledge sharing culture and process. As motivation is the key determinant to individual performance, SOCO encourages its employees to offer solutions to the problems they find in the company as part of the ‘Improvement Proposal’ project. In this, employees put forth a solution proposal, which is read by the president and passed through three levels (A,B,C) for approval. If the solution is approved, it is implemented by the related staff members. The employee who suggested the solution also receives an award for his/her contribution towards the company’s development and for showing zeal towards his/her job.

Advancements in Innovation

SOCO believes in innovation through development. For example, if any automotive manufacturer requests company X to cut down 3–5% of its manufacturing cost, the company will request SOCO to do the needful. In the event of such a situation, SOCO analyses the problem through a process survey and study. To state an example, in a normal process of 6 to12m material cutting to 1.5m/pc, it is bended and then transformed into a final workpiece. While using this method, a lot of material, time and manpower are wasted. SOCO came up with a solution to save material by decreasing the length of the first and the last crop. Time and cost were saved by decreasing the time frame of loading. This was carried out through an innovative machine called All Electric Tube Bender. This machine is an all-electric 12-axis eco-power machine that helps increase the production rate. The machine also includes Dual Blade Shearing (DBS), which provide more number of workpieces. The machine also cuts down 50% of the manpower and reduces crop waste, which results

Awards Won 2008

:

Taiwan excellence

2009 :

Taiwan superior brands

2009 :

Poland STOM, medals of Kielce trade fairs

2009 :

National award for outstanding SME

2010

:

Taiwan excellence

2010 :

Taiwan excellence silver award

2011 :

Taiwan excellence silver award

2012 :

National industrial innovation award

in 20–50% of material saving. This machine has seven patents to secure its technology and innovation and has also received the Taiwan Excellence Silver Award in 2010.

Global Marketing

In terms of marketing, SOCO believes in strong branding as it is a 100% original brand manufacturer and the brand is registered in 39 countries, including India. According to the data, 82% of the total production was exported in 2008, 83% in 2009 and 85% in 2010. This shows a rapid growth in the company’s exports as compared to the domestic market. The company is also interested in competing in the global market and gaining a strong foothold. The company also invests 14% of its Return on Investment (ROI) in R&D, owns 67 patents globally and has 40 agents around the globe and the number is increasing. This helps SOCO to achieve the standards of a good brand and grow rapidly. avinash.pandey@network18publishing.com

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Insights & Outlook Medical & surgical Machining 86

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Business Dynamics

Medical Machining: The Next Big Thing?

Material Matters

Evolution of Materials and Machining Techniques

Techno Wise

Medical Industry gets ‘Manufacturing Aid’

3D Manufacturing

Manufacturing gets Intricate

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Micromachining

Making the World a Smaller Place

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Additive Manufacturing

Technology for a Healthy Future

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Addressing the Skill Gaps

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Insights & Outlook Business Dynamics

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he high demand for new medical devices and technologies, timeliness and quality are critical factors in medical manufacturing. The medical market is highly regulated, requiring accountability and consistency. Lives depend on accurate machining performed by experienced professionals. According to Vidhu Nevatia, Director, Dagger Master Tool Industries Ltd, “The level of precision required by implants demands accurate shapes and burr free surfaces, so the selection of tooling is critical to achieve end-product specifications

without compromise. Knee and hip joint 5-axis machining requires the use of extremely precise cutting tools and machines with higher speed thrucoolant spindles suitable for using micro-tools on difficult materials.”

Current Trends

Currently, Indian manufacturing and the machine tool industry is witnessing huge growth. The demand for machine tools has increased significantly and manufacturers are under constant pressure to increase the capacity to meet the

Medical Machining: The Next Big Thing? While India has forayed into high-end technologies like chemical etching and EDM machining, what is keeping the industry from taking up medical machining in a big way? Nishant Kashyap finds out the business dynamics, competitiveness and current trends in medical machining.

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growing requirements. In addition to the automobile, aerospace, infrastructure and energy industries, the medical industry is also growing in the country. The growth phase of the Indian medical industry has given the much needed push to machine tool builders to focus on this segment. Samir Kumar, Regional Manager, Tungaloy India Pvt Ltd, says, “To tap the growing market, in the last 4–5 years, many global companies have set up base in India. Ahmedabad and Pune are considered the hubs for medical machining.” There are many new technologies that have been used in the manufacturing of medical implants. Micromachining has been used since long to develop such products, but over the years, additive manufacturing seems to be the best option for some of the applications and is being used by manufacturers in a big way. “Use of additive manufacturing is the latest trend in medical machining. Lately, the technology is being successfully used in the manufacturing of surgical part, implants and other small parts,” says Nevatia. Another notable trend is that many cutting tool manufacturers have started focusing on medical machining. The medical and surgical industry is a small business segment for cutting tool manufacturers, but the growth and demand have forced these companies to develop products in this segment. Kumar says, “If you take it as a business segment for any cutting tool company, it is not a big focus area; however, it is becoming popular and will grow with time. If you talk about the cutting


Business Dynamics tool industry, they lack focus in this area because of the very obvious reason that the market is really small. As the demand will grow, companies will start focusing on this area.”

being a preferred destination for business. These technologies are gradually finding their space in India and will prove fruitful in the coming future.

Indian Micromachining Industry

India is witnessing a major demand for medical equipment. Owing to this, many global companies have set up their base in the country. This has created competition between Indian players and their foreign counterparts. Global companies have a lot of expertise in the segment, while Indian companies are yet to foray into the medical equipment segment in a big way. According to Kumar, “If we talk about the competence of Indian companies, the capabilities are in place; they just need to focus on it in a big way. There are a few Indian companies that have started producing medical and surgical components.” In the coming future, Indian companies will have to invest more in R&D and will have to come up with innovative solutions to survive in the market. Medical machining needs lot of micromachining, which is an area of concern for Indian manufacturers. If Indian companies wish to foray in this segment, they have to adopt the latest technologies and will have to invest in product development.

The Indian machine tool market is dominated by MNCs; just 30% of the consumption is handled by Indian builders. However, when it comes to micromachining, Indian companies are in the nascent stages and import most of the parts and machining needed for medical equipment manufacturing. With the need for miniaturisation, the field of micromachining has grown at a rapid pace worldwide in the last decade. However, the Indian industry is yet to pick up this technology with the same fervour as other countries. Even as the Indian machine tool industry has matured in machining technology, micromachining is still developing in the country.

Going Beyond the Conventional

The increasing awareness about the advantages of manufacturing micro components is giving rise to new ways of machining micro components. The technology of micromachining is in itself taking the next leap to redefine precision. The need to create moving parts on a miniature device has opened up applications for sensing devices and those that physically exert force to create motion. These devices are categorised as sensors and microactuators and are required in every possible micromachined device. Sensors dominate micromachined applications in the sectors like aircraft manufacturing and even in the automotive sector where the primary application of these devices include speed sensors, accelerometers and sensors to monitor the temperature and pressure of machines. Although the sensor monitoring of medical implants is the next most crucial need of the medical industry, these technologies are yet to establish themselves in the Indian manufacturing industry. Although India does not have the acumen to adopt these technologies, the country has an edge over others for

Competitive Analysis

What India Needs?

Indian companies need to focus on medical machining and take the precision to unimaginable heights. The industry, today, is talking not just in terms of waterjet machining, but is also imbibing machining through laser, plasma, electron and ion beams. Technologies such as Abrasive Water Jets (AWJs) are capable of machining most materials up to the thickness of about 0.2 μm and additive manufacturing is capable of producing almost every complex part. Indian companies needs to adopt these technologies in their shop floors. The industry also needs some kind of government support to initiate FDA regulations and support in enhancing technology. This regulation will help companies to achieve global standards.

Vidhu Nevatia, Director, Dagger Master Tool Industries Ltd The government and health insurers & providers must come together to enforce better standards and promote investments in this field. With our huge population, economics of scale can be achieved to keep down costs to affordable levels.

“This segment can be sub-divided into the low-cost and high-value segments. The surgical and trauma procedures available vary from very basic to the highest end, corresponding to affordability. This is the great divide, but new FDA regulations have been introduced and should spur Indian companies to upgrade designs, materials and machines to match the capabilities of the US & European standards. The government and health insurers & providers must come together to enforce better standards and promote investments in this field. With our huge population, economics of scale can be achieved to keep down costs to affordable levels,” avers Nevatia.

Future Prospects

Though the future looks promising for medical machining in India, the industry still needs to upgrade itself with the technological know-how. It is still shying away from incorporating this technology to the optimum utility. The Indian industry does not have the acumen and the appropriate knowledge and information of the latest developments in the field of micro manufacturing and micromachining. In the future, the market will require the fabrication of micro devices useful in various engineering industries in general, and health and bio-medical equipment in particular. If Indian industries do not capture this market at the right time, they will miss the train as was the case with computer products. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com

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Insights & Outlook Material Matters

Evolution of Materials

and Machining Techniques The use of materials in medical engineering is bringing in advancements like never before. Typically, these components must exhibit a combination of properties such as an extremely small size, excellent corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, precision tolerances and mechanical strength. Nedra Pereira looks at the evolution of materials being used in this field.

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edical materials are of a wide variety and because they are usually meant for within the human body, they need to be non-reactive, lightweight, corrosion resistant, compact and durable. The complexity arises in keeping up with these advancements as the tools required to manufacture these products need to be finer and stronger.

Early Market

Man-made materials have been used in medical fields such as orthopaedics since the first metallic hip replacement surgery performed in 1940. Metals such as titanium, cobalt, chromium and other alloys are commonly employed to manufacture implants used in joint replacement surgeries. However, evolution has seen many newer materials like PEEK, ceramics and other nonmetallics being used in knee and hip joint implants and other medical applications. In addition, speciality steels are also being widely used in spinal fixation surgeries where 88

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the implants are later removed. In the past decades, medical implants made for hips and knees were expected to last for a minimum of 15 years. However, as the life expectancy for the population has increased, the ideal lifetime of the implant should surpass that mark. It is for this reason that metal was the first material considered and hence has dominated the market for almost 70 years. But metal and bone do not have any similarity in their basic structures or mechanical properties. Advancements in technology have brought about the use of not only superior metals and their alloys but also composites.

Latest Developments

• Polymer Composites Degradation resistant polymers such as PTFE, PEEK, PMMA, polyethylene and silicones are preferred materials for use in implantable medical devices. The success of these materials in implantable devices from pacemaker leads to joint replacement prostheses

was a major breakthrough as they have the ability to maximise fatigue strength and wear resistance. • Ceramics Ceramics are well-known brittle materials. However, most recently, ceramics have been used as hip components with success. This is an important breakthrough after the use of metals and later polymers as implant materials. In addition, ceramics have several advantages over metals and polymers. They are the most chemically and biologically inert of all materials. They are also strong and hard. • Metallic Glass The latest to enter the domain of medical materials are glassy metals or anamorphic metals. These can be several times stronger than the best industrial steel, but they are easily shaped like glass or plastic when heated near their melting point. These alloys are finding applications as super-tough biomedical implants, microscopic mechanical parts and as moulds


Material Matters for creating nanotechnological components and devices. Fortunately, with advancement in materials, the manufacturing or fabrication of components has also progressed at the same pace. These medical components are fabricated taking into account physical and mechanical properties and biocompatibility. • Manufacturing with an Edge CAD/CAM/CAE Medical parts generally have highly complex geometries and CAD/ CAM/CAE allows the feasible manufacture of medical parts with high precision and excellent quality, negating rejections in manufacturing as well. Various software that help make medical machining more feasible are available in the market. Chad Schwartz, Lead Design Engineer, Wright Medical Technology Inc, on using NX software by Siemens PLM for the MICRONAIL® project to design medical instruments and implants, says, “It is easy to achieve different sizes for implants or something the doctor wants changed because everything updates succinctly.” He notes, “NX is the most powerful design software I have ever used. The solid models, the assemblies, all the things that come together in the modelling aspect produce better results. You can see things fit together in a way that you cannot do in other software. You see your finished product before it is actually a finished product.” • Composite Flow Moulding Composite Flow Moulding (CFM) process was developed in 1992 by Icotec. The process involves pultruded carbon fibre or thermoplastic rods (50–60% fibre by volume) being heated above the matrix melt temperature, and then forced into a mould cavity during a proprietary injection moulding process. The method permits the use of long fibres at high volume fractions, significantly boosting 90

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mechanical properties compared to low-volume, chopped-fibre products. • Additive Manufacturing Additive manufacturing or 3D printing is a process where the metal is melted to the exact geometry defined by a 3D CAD model. Additive manufacturing allows for building parts with very complex geometries without any sort of tools or fixtures, and without producing any waste material. It is even possible to engineer components to have bionic properties. • Photochemical Machining Photochemical machining (PCM) is the process of fabricating sheet metal components using a photoresist and etchants to corrosively machine away selected areas. Photo etching allows for the accurate and economic manufacture of highly complex parts with very fine detailing. Its use is limited to flat geometry structures. • Laser Micromachining Laser micromachining offers the most favourable preconditions for the required quality and precision since machining is achieved in a contactless fashion and the extent of the heat-affected zone is very small. Laser micromachining has a vast scope in medical engineering, be it for the micro cutting of surgical instruments; the micro drilling of very tiny holes or for the manufacture of implants, foils and wires. The cutting and drilling can be done at a microscopic scale and 3D objects possessing a resolution of just a few microns can be generated. Not only metals but also plastics and glasses can be machined via this technology.

The Indian Story

Although this market has progressed explosively in the western world, it does not seem to have the same growth story in India. The Indian machine tool industry’s manufacturing quality is just as good if not better than its counterparts. However, there is an

Higher life expectancy requires that implants manufactured work above that number or for as long as possible. Because of this, there is a compelling need to find materials that display biocompatibility. obvious gap in medical machining in India. Sustainability seems to be one of the reasons for this lack. Shivaji Salagode, Chief Operating Officer, Cobra Carbide Pvt Ltd, avers, “The machinability of metals such as titanium materials is very good and hence the actual machining process as such is not an issue. The issue is the size of the components. They are all very small in size and the quantity required is very small. Hence, the batch quantity is too low and the cost of producing these components is high. High-precision machinery is required for manufacturing, which are not being made in India.” “India can go for such applications but will need investment in R&D. Furthermore, encouragement from the government for the organisations in this field is extremely necessary. The replacement of joints using machined components in the human body is low key in India at present, but this is owing to cost and the non-availability of such facilities in most hospitals. However, with an industry that needs to grow and build, this area too will grow in the coming years,” continues Salagode. This market, although niche, has immense potential. Medical engineering will keep evolving so that the near future sees implants that make the body believe that they are its own parts and cause less body rejection. nedra.pereira@network18publishing.com


Insights & Outlook Techno Wise

Medical

Industry gets

‘Manufacturing Aid’

Machining in the medical industry is important in a highly personal sense as the parts machined directly affect the lives of individuals. Keeping this in mind, manufacturers are constantly innovating products that suit the current requirements, be it software, tools & techniques or materials. Nishant Kashyap takes a look at some of the latest technologies and developments in the medical equipment industry.

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he manufacturing of medical instruments and implants is characterised by smaller structures as well as the demand for highest precision in terms of surface quality, absence of burr and material residue. While established fabrication technologies have certain limits, the latest technologies provide optimum preconditions for the required quality and precision, since machining is accomplished in a contactless fashion and the extent of the heat-affected zone is very small.

Micromachining

Micromachining, as a technology, is being widely adopted in the manufacturing of various applications that demand micro components. The technology, given the demand, is also being tried and tested for measures that can help achieve a breakthrough from the conventional machining range. This technology was first used for machine components like semiconductor chips. Now, it has widened its horizon to include a range of industries in its gamut. Sectors like aerospace, defence application, medical implant and equipment are highly eager to reach the next level of miniaturisation. Samir Kumar, Regional Manager, Tungaloy India Pvt Ltd, says, “There 92

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are two important things in medical machining: one is micromachining and the other is gun drilling. These two technologies have been widely used in the medical industry for small and complex part machining.” Micromachined components play a crucial role in terms of practical advancements in MicroElectromechanical Systems (MEMS), micro-electronics and nanotechnology. The technology is used for fabricating microchannels and microgrooves in microfluidic applications, microfilters, drug delivery systems, microneedles and microprobes in biotechnology applications. This technology is being intensely used in some of the finer applications of the medical equipment industry, which invariably depend on the usage of exotic materials. However, the challenge of achieving greater accuracy, precision and resolution still continues.

3D Design Technology

The medical industry requires highprecision components that are manufactured using validated medical machining and automation processes. Repeatability is vital for the success of any medical company. Companies have to adopt the latest 3D design systems to produce medical parts as there are many

complexities involved. Powerful, easy-touse 3D CAD solutions enable companies to speed up product development, reduce manufacturing costs and improve product quality and reliability across a wide range of industries and applications. An intuitive product development tool gives manufacturers the capability to create, validate, communicate, manage product designs and rapidly bring products to the market.

Multi-axis Machining

The latest CNC machines provide reliability, speed and efficiency in medical part machining. The latest high-precision, multi-axis, high-efficiency integrated mill turn centre offers measures against thermal displacement and achieves an installation footprint, significantly smaller than that of conventional models. This technology has been acknowledged as the ideal choice for machining small precision parts for medical equipment and measuring instruments, which have complex shapes and need highprecision, high-efficiency machining. “Multi-axis machining has been widely used in producing medical equipment. As the industry requires high precision, there cannot be any compromise on the use of sophisticated technologies. So, to produce small and complex parts, multi-


Techno Wise axis technologies are used,” says Ashutosh Pratap Singh, GM, Hind Tools Pvt Ltd.

Materials Medical Industry

The medical device industry consists of firms that produce a wide range of products used for the diagnosis and treatment of ailments, and these products include the following: medical, surgical and dental equipment (including electromedical equipment and related software), furniture, supplies and consumables, orthopaedic appliances, prosthetics and diagnostic kits, reagents and equipment. There are many new-age materials that have been used in manufacturing medical equipment, implants and surgical parts. Materials such as titanium, carbon fibre, special alloys, etc. have been used in the industry. “The biggest challenge in medical machining is the size because the tools and equipment are very small, so tool wear occurs often if you are not using them properly. Owing to this, the rejection rate of this kind of tool is higher than other normal tools. There are other

challenges such as use of materials like zinc, titanium and plastic, which demand different kinds of complexities,” avers Kumar. Material research and development for the medical industry includes efforts to design and discover new materials with unique capabilities, understand and improve the performance of existing materials and make products with improved reliability, ease of manufacturing and low cost. Many companies focus on this segment to tap the growing market. “New trends in machining include the usage of biomed materials and the development of tool geometries & coating to achieve good machining results. These new materials include plastic & fibre composites apart from the traditional austenitic stainless steels & titanium alloys,” informs Nevatia.

Laser Machining

Products in the medical equipment industry have to meet the highest quality demands. Laser technology, as a

precise and extremely selective material processing method, is steadily gaining importance in this industry. One of the major reasons is that laser technology fulfils the high quality requirements of surfaces being hygienic, dross-free and free of any material residue. As laser cutting or welding is a wear-free tool, the quality of the cuts or joints and hence, the quality of the workpieces, is consistently high. In addition, products in the medical device industry are becoming increasingly smaller. Lasers are ideally suited for cutting widths and weld seams in the range of only a few microns and provide extremely gentle processing. Companies have been developing laser systems for the medical device industry for over three decades and have combined all the essential technologies—beginning with laser sources to customised construction—all from a single source. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com

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Insights & Outlook 3D Printing

Manufacturing gets Intricate Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, of metals is not an easy task. Furthermore, producing dental products, medical implants and medical instruments made from titanium using a small selected laser-melting system is even more cumbersome. However, Concept Laser has developed a new machine—Mlab cusing R—that allows economic fabrication of these delicate titanium components. Here is what this Features

 An extremely compact machine with dimensions of 705 x 1,848 x 1,220 mm (WxHxD)

 Weighs 500 kg

 Fitted with a ‘drawer principle’ with a patented   

glovebox module, which enables safe handling of metal powder Rules out contamination of the powder with oxygen owing to the component structure in a closed system Designed in accordance with ATEX directives for the safe processing of reactive materials Has a robust and powerful 100 W fibre laser that operates with a focus diameter of less than 25 µm in order to reproduce supreme surface qualities and intricate component structures Can work with a range of materials such as gold, silver alloys, bronze, cobalt-chromium alloys and stainless steel. New materials that can also be processed on the machine are titanium and titanium alloys such as Rematitan® CL from Dentaurum, CL41TI ELI (Ti6Al4V) and pure titanium

Users

It can be used to replace conventional milling machines or casting fabrication for the following products:  Dental Implants  Medical Implants  Medical Components and Instruments

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Advantages

 Low level of investment  Compact machine  Reduction in order

throughput time  High material density  High surface quality  Delicate structures can be fabricated from titanium  Less reworking  Standardised production process  High quality  Less wastage  Reduced material costs

 Improved efficiency  Production process

can run unattended and overnight  Increased range of materials, including gold, silver alloys, bronze, titanium, titanium alloys, cobalt-chromium alloys and stainless steel  Can be retrofitted onto existing machines as an upgrade

Dental and Medical Technology

Laser fusing enables the fabrication of bionic structures for use in implant technology. This implies that implants can be constructed with a porous structure. Furthermore, cellular structures, which support growth into the bone tissue, can be integrated into the component. The use of these macroporous surface structures may be used in components such as hip implants. In this field of application, specific geometric features can be taken into account in order to enable new functions or functional integration. Depending on the requirement, the volume structure of the implant can be adapted to that of the bone tissue in order to ensure that it works durably over a long period of time. Courtesy: Concept Laser Mlab R


Insights & Outlook Micromachining

The world is gradually becoming a small place and miniaturisation has emerged as a significant concept in the world of machine tools—more specifically in medical applications wherein tiny metal parts are successfully instilled in the body, thus giving medical science a new lease of life. Debarati Basu Das finds out how significant a role micromachining plays in the creation of highly intricate parts and devices.

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i th rampantly changing technologies and the need to shift from small to minute, micromachining has become a significant part of the medical machining of miniature parts. Technically, micromachining is nothing but going down to 10-6 or one-millionth of a metre in size. As the parts become smaller, the intricacies increase and the machining operations become equally complex. In this, not just the component, but every aspect of operation—right from tools to machines—needs to be in sync with the miniaturised machining environment. Miniature products are changing the realm of medical science and with every new experiment, small parts are increasingly being used as implants in the human body. Although India is yet to embrace micromachining in full swing, this technology is creating waves across the globe. Today, many manufacturers are developing micromachining technologies to hold 96

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their own in the race of manufacturing small parts. With the sizes shrinking, the challenges have doubled. While machining components that are less than a 100 micron in size, the slightest variation in the manufacturing process can cause a complete failure of the process. These variations can be in terms of material or cutting tool characteristics, thermal variations, environmental variations, etc. A slight vibration can have a direct impact on the accuracy of the machining process. In micromachining, with such intricate parts and sizes, tolerance, accuracy and precision gets a completely different meaning.

What to Micromachine?

One would be amazed to find out the number of medical parts and devices that are being manufactured in sizes of less than 100 micron. With the increased use and acceptance of this technology, experts believe that micromachining can replace or complement traditional

Illustration by Sanjay Dalvi

Making the World a Smaller Place

machining techniques like EDM, forming, stamping and injection moulding. Materials used for components have also undergone a change as plastics, aluminium, brass, titanium, stainless steel, ceramics and glass are increasingly used. The number of medical parts being micromachined is increasing by the day. Right from ophthalmic devices to orthopaedic and coronary implants, the range today is unending. However, the biggest challenge in micromachining these parts is the need to process materials at faster speeds, in a wider range of materials and with greater precision and repeatability. Machining applications in this segment require tools beyond the capabilities of mechanical micromachining. Processes like laser micromachining are technologically among the most advanced methods today. Some of the instruments and applications that require cutting-edge technologies include lab-on-a-chip, microfluidics, drug delivery systems,


Micromachining biosensors, cell sorters, cell trapping, gene sequencing, hemocytometers, nozzles, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and micro filters. These applications call for complex features such as making holes, cones, channels, etc., which need to be microscopic and uniform in size. A wider range of materials, right from certain glass types to a generic form of Teflon, quartz and fused silica, complicates the machining process further. Some of these materials cannot be mechanically machined to achieve the required features or tolerances.

Micromachining vs Traditional Methods

The manufacture of miniature parts has been in demand for quite long, and machining technologies such as EDM and laser have been in use since long to produce micro components. However, over the years, there has been a constant debate on whether micromachining has an edge over other machining

technologies like EDM, injection moulding, etc. Even as the technologies can be optimally used in specific processes, micromachining can be more beneficial over other conventional manufacturing technologies. Instead of injection moulding, micromachining can be advantageous for prototyping and low-volume production. The process avoids purchasing intricate moulds for only a few parts while proving to be a faster and higher-quality alternative. As against its traditional version, micromachining provides better accuracy and small-part handling than that available on traditional CNC machine tools. Its small footprint and simple utility requirements make factory installation easier than traditional CNCs. Micromachining also directly machines many parts that traditionally require stamping or forming, or both. This technology has a flexibility to work on a wide range of materials, while EDM only works with metals. This process also provides higher productivity

and higher-quality parts as compared to laser-based machining.

Future Dynamics

Micromachining requirements will continue to change as the parts and components of medical devices keep shrinking. This will give a new definition and a wide array of opportunities to manufacturers of micro components. As designs and sizes change, machine tools, workholding & tool holders, cutting tools, etc. will continuously undergo evolution to reach new paradigms of accuracy and precision. In India, however, an increase in the demand for medical equipment and the concurrent increase in the volume of production will give a boost to the industry in terms of adopting micromachining in full swing. This demand alone will bring in a huge change in the manner in which micromachining is handled. debarati.basu@network18publishing.com

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Insights & Outlook Additive Manufacturing

Technology for a Healthy Future

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ealth care is one of the first industries that adopted Additive Manufacturing (AM). In recent years, it has been in the news for being successfully used in bone implants, dental implants, hearing aids, etc. In medical implants, all the products are different from each other; on a more sophisticated scale, medical devices like earpieces, dentures and replacement joints could be 3D printed, as most of these need to be customised based on patients’ requirements.

What is Additive Manufacturing ?

Unlike conventional manufacturing technologies such as casting, forging and milling, the 3D selective laser melting technology allows the most complex metal components to be produced layer by layer, driven directly from CAD data. Since all the articles are built by successively adding highly thin metal powder layers that are completely molten by a focused laser beam, the desired form of 3D geometry can be realised. Over the last 98

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decade, AM has become a burgeoning industry, enabling the rapid prototyping of components for automotive, medical and electronic applications.

Advantages in the Medical Equipment Industry

The medical equipment industry needs precision as small and complex parts require high-quality machining technology. The quality that AM provides while producing products layer by layer is a key ingredient in the health care industry. It has many advantages in producing small and complex geometries. Dr Phil Reeves, Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd, says, “The advantages are two-fold. First, a large proportion of medical devices are made in relatively low volumes, when compared to more traditional electronic and mechanical devices. Owing to this, AM represents a potentially cost-effective alternative for low-volume plastic and metal parts production. Second, AM has the potential to personalise individual products according to patients’ requirements. This is less likely in

Image courtesy: Econolyst

A year ago, an 83-year-old patient with a serious jaw infection became the first person to receive a completely 3D-printed titanium lower jaw implant. The combined effort by researchers and engineers from Belgium and the Netherlands is said to have allowed the patient unrestricted mandibular movement within a day of surgery. This perfectly exemplifies the kinds of changes 3D printing can bring in the medical and surgical industry. Nishant Kashyap discusses the advantages and adaptability of 3D printing in the medical and surgical industry.

diagnostic and monitoring applications, although both personalised implants and surgical guides are being used in surgical procedures. More recently, surgical devices are also being personalised according to surgeons’ requirements. We also have a host of patient-specific medical devices—from prosthetic limbs and orthotic shoe insoles to rehabilitation splints.” In 3D printing technology, the additive method of production has been adopted. The conventional method of production where materials are cut, torn, chiselled, etc. to transform them into a defined object is termed subtractive, since a waste of a large or small fraction of materials cannot be avoided. However, in 3D printing, layers over layers of material are spread to gradually shape the object. If advancements in 3D printing continue and large-scale manufacturing becomes possible, production industries would be able to save tonnes of material, consequently leading to lowered prices of goods. AM has proved beneficial in the following areas of medical equipment manufacturing:


Custom or standard implants and instrumentation Orthopaedic, Cranial and Maxillofacial (CMF) implants can be produced using AM technology. Examples include acetabular cups, trauma fixation plates, spinal components and CMF plates. In addition to prototyping and serial production of standard components, custom prostheses can be manufactured through seamless integration between the digital design and digital production stages.

Porous bone scaffolds enabling osseointegration Artificial bone replacement materials can be produced accurately using CAD designs. Strut widths down to 100 µm can be realised, with pore diameters down to 250 µm. By designing the actual porosity and producing scaffolds using the selective laser melting technology, highly consistent and repeatable mechanical properties and dimensions are realised. The porous structures can also be integrated into an implant design, resulting in better osseointegration than sprayed coatings and improvement in the long-term fixation of implants.

Dental implant bars and bridges Since AM enables complex, patientspecific design, it is the preferred choice for the production of dental prostheses. DentWise implant bars and bridges achieve a fit accuracy of more than 20 µm at the implant interface and may integrate complex surface textures and sealing edges.

Additive vs Machining

For bone replacement and medical implants, the size differs as per the need. In this scenario, AM seems to be the best option for manufacturing. 3D printing allows users to produce single products without any extra cost and effort and this is where AM proves to be more advantageous that the machining process. The quality of producing small and complex parts is the biggest USP of AM. According

to Reeves, “The thing to remember about AM is that the geometric complexity of parts is independent of their cost. It is the size and volume of the part that counts. This is highly different from machining where greater levels of complexity have a direct impact on cost. The same goes for injection moulding of plastics where increased part complexity means increased tool cost.” “Even for parts that are not so complex, AM can prove to be costeffective when compared to machining, as no path planning is needed for jigs and fixtures. However, for medium to large production runs, AM may appear expensive than machining,” adds Reeves.

Challenges

AM is steadily gaining acceptance in the production of critical components in different industries. Arcam, an AM provider, is at the forefront of this development with respect to the Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process. Production cases usually revolve around parts with complex geometries as well as the use of materials that are difficult or expensive to process using conventional methods. The inherent production challenges of such parts create the drive to look for innovative production methods. In the orthopaedic field, such challenges are present in two obvious areas: patient-specific (custom) implants based on CT data and press-fit standard implants with advanced porous materials. In the aerospace Dr Phil Reeves, Managing Director, Econolyst Ltd AM represents a potentially costeffective alternative for low-volume plastic and metal parts production. It has the potential to personalise individual products according to patients’ requirements.

Image courtesy: Econolyst

Additive Manufacturing

´ Additive Manufacturing enables complex, patient-specific designs

industry, the constant drive to achieve lightweight designs also leads to parts with very complex geometries.

The Way Ahead

3D printers capable of outputting physical objects have been in development for over two decades and are starting to present a host of new digital manufacturing capabilities. Their effectiveness in producing complex geometries has been a major reason that the medical industry has adopted it. According to Reeves, “There are seven billion people on the planet and we are all of different sizes and shapes. We are also organic, which means that we are all pretty complex in terms of our geometry (shape). This is perfect news for AM, as it enables the cost-effective manufacture of single part batch complex geometry parts.” Medical science has reason to cheer owing to the advancements in 3D printing. Furthermore, 3D printers have consistently been viewed as prospective in the space research, machinery and medical sectors. The production of an artificial arm using 3D printers revealed how promising those prospects are. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com

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Illustration by Soheb Shaikh

Skill Development Cutting Tool Industry

Addressing the Skill Gaps

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h metal cutting industry has seen a gamut of changes in technology over the last two decades, which has resulted in companies investing extra effortsin the area of skill development. The government and certain industry associations are in the process of initiating programmes on training and development. To develop new technology and hold their own in the market, companies have to invest in R&D and a skilled group of employees.

to have a proper train programme in placeand invest some percentage of revenue in skill development. As per Patrick De Vos, Corporate Technical Education Manager, Seco Tools AB, “It is important for a company to have well-educated and skilled people in the system. In today’s world, professionals in the machine tool industry have to be knowledgeable in all the areas pertaining to technicalities, piece quality, financial aspects of the process and market dynamics of the industry.”

Importance of Skill Development

The Seco Way!

For a company to be successful, it is highly essential for it to have the appropriate skill-set in place. Metal cutting industry is no exception; it has been referred to as the backbone industry in view of the vital role it plays in the manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative industries and thus, it becomes imperative for companies 100 MMT - February 2013

Seco is one of those companies that believe in innovating and constantly upgrading their technology. De Vos believes that the success of Seco is because of its employees. The company implementsa proper training and education programme with a team of people who constantly teach employees and conduct educationalworkshops all over the world throughout the year. “In

It is rightly said that employees are the biggest assets of any organisation, and its success lies in the skill set-up of people. In a competitive world like ours, a skill development programme should be a strategic response to technological change, globalisation and customer demands. Nishant Kashyap, along with Seco experts, analyses the current situation and the importance of skill development.

our company, we have educational and product seminars. The main aim of an educational seminar is to educate people while a product seminar is conducted for the purpose oftraining educated people. We have more than 1,000 events educating 26,000 people worldwide every year. The company not only focuses on its own employees but also educatesits customers. They constantly guide customers to enable optimum utilisation of tools. According to De Vos, “Educating customers is the need of the hour. It is part of our business solutions, and it is the way in which we function. If customers give us business by buying our tools, we have to educate and support them through the process. Even in the case of people who are not our customers, it is our moral responsibility to teach and exchange tooling knowhow with them. We offer advice to customers on amongst others the types of cutting fluids, the clamping systems, the cutting strategies (CAM)that can be usedas per the processes and so on.”

Current Situation in India

Currently, there are no any specific courses on metal cutting, owing to which engineers have not been able


Cutting Tool Industry to get adequate exposure to the latest technologies. In India, except for a few big players, companies are not giving the required thrust to skill development. The government should start focusing on the metal cutting techniques and introduce proper infrastructure for training and development. Sashi Menon, Dy GM – Technical Support, Seco Tools India (P) Ltd, says, “India is one of the fastest growing markets in the world; there should be more industry-academia participation. The engineers here are highly skilled, eager, passionate and talented. In my view,the government should focus on the means to impart the know-how of metal cutting. Menon adds, “This can be done by following the example of those countries whereinthe government focuses on the infrastructure, training and development of employees. Also, there is a need to have a proper education system in the metal cutting arena.” Correcting this situation will require

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Skills required in the Machine Tool Industry 

Operation monitoring: Observing gauges, dials and other indicators to make sure a machine tool and the cutting tools are working properly

Quality control analysis: Conducting tests and inspections of products, services and or processes to evaluate quality or performance

Monitoring: Monitoring/Assessing the performance of self, other individuals and organisations to make improvements or take corrective actions

Critical thinking: Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions and approaches to problems

Operation and control: Controlling the operations of equipment or systems

a collaborative approach to identify the weaknesses, requirements and areas of improvement. The skill gaps need to be addressed not only at the worker level but also at thesupervisory and management levels. Lately, many organisations such as UNIDO and IMTMA have initiated training programmes. UNIDO has identified certain machine tool clusters and has appointed consultants who closely work with the associated

companies and help them to achieve higher productivity and boost business. The government can also help by setting up a machine toolspark. Going forward, if India wants to be among the top five markets in metal cutting, the government and the industry will have to work in a collaborative manner for training and development. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com


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Automation Trends Precision Engineering

Synchronous Technology Improves Efficiency The Cendres+Métaux Group, a Swiss machining specialist, significantly cuts costs and saves time by using highly integrated CAD/CAE/ CAM technology featuring synchronous technology offered by Siemens PLM for medical machining.

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igh-quality materials are required for medical and dental engineering. The development of next-generation products and services is part of the success at Cendres+Métaux. In recent years, the company has expanded heavily into medical engineering, which is now a very important business sector alongside its dental, jewellery/watches and refining sectors. In addition to the company’s own products, which are developed and sold for the dental market, Cendres+Métaux also produces customer-specific micromechanical products using highquality bio-compatible materials. Design is also offered as a service. All products are manufactured at company headquarters in Biel, Switzerland, and more than 90% of the company’s products are exported abroad.

Need for High-performance Tools

Expansion is on the agenda for the future at Cendres+Métaux, where high-performance tools are viewed as the foundation for innovation and quality leadership. To that end, Cendres+Métaux converted early to 3D software for technical design and

development. However, for some years, its design engineers have been using multiple brands of software systems for various business sectors, between which data exchange was impossible. “For a team of 12 people, this is not very practical,” says Mathias Strazza, Head of Product Development. So, the company decided to switch to a shared system and also to establish an integrated process from development to production. After a selection process, Cendres+Métaux chose the NX™ software, an integrated product design, engineering and manufacturing solution from Siemens PLM Software, migrating all its data to this system. Today, the company is using NX CAD (computeraided design) for design/development projects, NX CAE (computer-

aided engineering) for finite element modelling (FEM) calculations and simulation and NX CAM (computeraided manufacturing) for the production of highly complex, small parts. A phase of in-depth evaluation, in which a project team from Cendres+Métaux defined various requirements for the new system, accompanied the decision-making process. One important factor was the integration of new production opportunities with 5-axis machinery that could produce even more complex and angled parts with free-form surfaces. Processes from development to production also need to be optimised with a significantly shorter prototyping phase and reduced risks, owing to simulation and strength calculations. A February 2013 - MMT 111


Precision Engineering unified system throughout the company was ultimately intended to enable rapid data exchange and reduce Information Technology (IT) time. The core competences of Cendres+Métaux, including the micromechanical production of medical, dental, watch and jewellery products, pose extreme challenges for product development. “It might be easy to enlarge these parts on screen, but the fact remains that our geometries are on a microscopic scale,” says Strazza. “You need to bear that in mind at all times in product development. It must be possible to manufacture and also accurately measure the parts.” The system, therefore, needs to be able to display and implement extremely small parts with special geometries and structures for a wide range of products.

Critical Parameters: Ability to use Legacy Data and Easy Data Exchange

Since the company began using CAD software in 1991, Cendres+Métaux has also archived relatively large amounts of data. Existing data can continue to be used with each operating step. Also, data from external software systems can be integrated quickly and easily. “The handling and processing of software data is far simpler than with other software systems and permits a lot of flexibility,” Messerli says. For Cendres+Métaux, the result is that technical design speed has significantly increased. Another requirement was problem-free data exchange with customers and suppliers. “We have a wide variety of systems to deal with, so it is important that our software supports as many formats as possible, that is, import, export and exchange,” Strazza says. On the practical side, such as modelling high-precision microscopic parts, Cendres+Métaux and Siemens PLM Software have enjoyed ‘very good experiences’ according to Hans Messerli, a design engineer at Cendres+Métaux. Even in the case of changes, it has been possible to quickly build on the parts created with NX and from the very 112 MMT - February 2013

early phases of product development. He notes that a decisive advantage of Siemens PLM Software’s NX was the integration of design, simulation and manufacturing capabilities into one system. Furthermore, he points out that the synchronous technology capability developed by Siemens PLM software works together with NX functions, so that the existing data need not be converted or recreated.

Getting the Maximum out of 3D Data

The efficiency of the system is demonstrable in the prototype phase. With the use of NX, design processes are accessible simultaneously and transparently throughout the entire group. It is here that Mischa Tahedl, Technical Designer and former Project Manager for updating the CAD/CAM infrastructure at Cendres+Métaux, sees the greatest time saving. Tahedl explains, “Because data is accessible at all times, we can work parallelly and start programming the machinery while the 2D drawing is still being created. This saves us a lot of time over the whole process.” In general, simulation helps reduce costs and meet quality requirements. “We get the maximum from 3D data,” says Strazza. “In fact, 3D data gives us something ‘tangible’ on the screen, without having to spend time and effort making a product.” The products of Cendres+Métaux need to meet high standards in a small space. Since the parts are subject to a great deal of wear, strength testing is a major issue in the simulation. Messerli explains, “The simulation lets us optimise the design quickly, because we can see exactly where the stresses occur.” Conventional tests merely show that something has broken. This is a notable issue, particularly when manufacturing with synthetic parts using expensive tools. “Here again, simulation helps keep costs down and helps us achieve the best possible design,” says Messerli. Messerli believes that the synchronous technology provided within NX will ultimately protect future

security. “For us, it is also a signal that we are continuing to develop and that, as a customer, we are not being left out,” he says. The support of Siemens PLM software during the migration has been a key part of this. Cendres+Métaux equally values the geographical proximity of its service provider. Due to the long service life of its products, the issue of reliability is central to the selection of a partner. Leveraging of NX is widespread, including use by large companies. “This means we can expect to be able to continue using our CAD data long into the future,” Messerli says.

Powerful Machining Strategies within NX

3D models ultimately make their way to Urs Stettler, who is responsible for the manufacture of micromechanical products at Cendres+Métaux. A large machine shop with 3- to 5-axis milling and turning machines is available for production at the site in Biel. “We can now make practically anything required on the machines,” Stettler says. He commends the “extremely powerful machining strategies” of the NX product development team. “I don’t know of any other system with so many solution options,” he says. The use of NX to develop the company’s advanced medical products verifies this. For example, Cendres+Métaux developed a medical sector project—a ‘bone-anchored port’ for dialysis patients. Here, the particular requirements were the complexity and sensitivity of the micromechanical parts. In such work, “scratches are simply not allowed,” says Stettler. Using NX, he configured the CAM strategy with processes such as gripping, cutting and unloading. Thanks to NX, the process is much faster and more intuitive than before. “The machine just does what I want,” he says. Stettler notes that with good preliminary work from other departments, “it is also extremely easy to produce customer proposals with 3D models created using NX.” Courtesy: Siemens PLM Software


Courtesy: Bmaximage

EVENT REPORT IMTEX 2013

A Truly Global Platform

Never did the ‘Think Global … Act Local’ anthem stand taller than at the mega event, IMTEX 2013. With the participation of 49% of the overseas exhibitors and 32 countries, this edition of the event showcased a truly international quotient. This also flagged off opportunities for Indian builders who are eyeing the overseas market. Nishant Kashyap runs you through IMTEX 2013 and introduces you to the latest trends.

I

naugurated at the spearheading exhibition centre BIEC, IMTEX 2013 and ToolTech 2013, organised by the Indian Machine Tool Manufacturers’ Association (IMTMA), was attended by the who’s who of the industry on January 25, 2013. The seven-day metalcutting event was inaugurated by S Sandilya, President, Society of Indian Automobile manufacturers (SIAM); Harish Lakshman, VP, Automotive Component Manufacturers Association (ACMA) and Vikram Sirur, President, IMTMA. To recognise the contribution of the industry, IMTMA honours its stalwarts with prestigious awards every year. This year, Parakramsinh Jadeja, CEO - Jyoti CNC Automation Pvt Ltd, won the Premier Outstanding Entrepreneur Award in memory of 114 MMT - February 2013

Vinod Doshi and SN Mishra, Vice Chairman, Bharat Fritz Werner Ltd, won the IMTMA-BFW Lifetime

Stats Talk

The growth prospect of the machine tool industry in India is:  Demand growth is expected to hold steady at 15% CAGR  Production projected to grow at 25% CAGR  Exports is likely to grow at 25% CAGR during the 12th Five Year Plan  Imports are estimated to grow at a CAGR of 6.7%  Total sales turnover in LFY 2011–12 was US$955 million  Total orders booked in LFY 2011–12 was US$983 million  The global position of India in 2011 is 7th, with China being the 1st.

Contribution Award in memory of HR Gupta.

Global Platform

IMTEX 2013 acts as a global platform where companies around the world reiterate their presence. The event featured almost all big companies and had over 900 exhibitors from 25 countries and 600 machine tools weighing 6,000 tonnes with a total value of `1500 crore in its premises. Apart from India, the key countries participating are Australia, Canada, France, Korea, Holland, Turkey, Belgium, Russia, Japan, Thailand, the UK, and the US. The exhibition also saw group participation from nine countries, including China, Germany, Italy, Korea, Spain, Taiwan, Czech Republic, Singapore and the US. This year, IMTEX exhibitors came up with unique solutions for specific


IMTEX 2013

Exhibitors’ Views Terrence Miranda, Managing Director, Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd The Indian machine tool industry has come a long way. The machines produced by Indian manufacturers are now reliable, productive and cost-effective. We showcased our unique dual spindle turning centre and received very good response at the show.

Klaus Ludwig, Vice President, HWACHEON Machine Tool Co Ltd Over the years, IMTEX has grown rapidly and has become a must-attend event for machine tool builders. It provides an opportunity to understand the vast Indian market and the requirements of the industry.

Sreekanteshwar S, President India Sales & Operations, Korber Schleifring GmbH Despite the downturn that the industry is facing, the response from the industry at this edition of IMTEX was really good. We received better enquiries than the last year’s edition.

Leaders’ Opinion

Vikram Sirur, President, IMTMA For the Indian machine tool industry, it marks the beginning of a new era of hope—to take on the challenges of tomorrow with courage and confidence. I am proud to mention that this edition was the largest ever IMTEX fair in its 44 years of existence. Over 900 exhibitors showcased the best machines and manufacturing solutions as well as potential futuristic metalcutting technologies. This exhibition will reinforce what we feel is a stepping stone towards the Indian machine tool industry’s journey on ‘VISION 2020’. Harish Lakshman, VP, Automotive Component Manufacturers Association (ACMA) The auto component industry caters to the ever-expanding domestic market and exports to the external replacement market. Globally, the automobile industry is the single largest customer of the machine tool industry. It is highly essential for the machine tool industry to expand the production capacity exponentially in order to meet the demands of the original equipment manufacturers and their ancillaries, including SMEs in the supply chain.

S Sandilya, President, Society of Indian Automobile manufacturers (SIAM) The automobile industry not only produces automobiles but also brings together the most diverse of industries. The machine tool industry plays an important and impartial role catering to the need of both small and large automakers alike. Forming the backbone of many major sectors and the industrial activity in the traditional manufacturing context, the machine tool industry in India has played and will continue to play a key role in enhancing competitiveness. Furthermore, it has also enabled the development of quality and excellence in the output of the manufacturing industry and the Indian economy as a whole.

Trends Observed @ IMTEX

 Turning  

 

the tables, this time at IMTEX, foreign companies took special interest in Indian machines and technologies. Visitors at IMTEX came with a lot of preparation. Customers put forth specific demands for high-end technologies.

Most Indian companies at IMTEX were looking for machines for new segments like energy, aerospace and medical machining. Despite the initial pessimism due to market conditions, IMTEX created a lot of buzz with a large number of potential customers visiting the show.

Celebrating 60 years of existence, HMT rejuvenated itself at IMTEX by showcasing indigenous machines. Smaller companies at IMTEX came armed with fresh perspective, high-end technology and machines.

industries such as aerospace, medical, electrical & electronics and energy in order to tap the opportunities present. In addition, the event welcomed visitors from all the ecosystems of the manufacturing industry. A multitude of visitors walked through the stalls seeking specific solutions and wanting to strike long-term partnerships with leading manufacturers. The growing enthusiasm of the market was reflected in the fact that many manufacturers had special offers to attract more number of visitors. As a whole, the mood of the event was euphoric, indicating revival and growth of the industry. Considered as one of the largest exhibitions across South & South East Asia, the event delivered its promise of growth and development. nishant.kashyap@network18publishing.com

February 2013 - MMT 115


Event Report Engineering Expo Ludhiana 2012

Ludhiana

December 21–24, 2012 GLADA Ground

Exploring a horizon of opportunities

Generating tremendous response from the industry, Engineering Expo Ludhiana has proved to be a game changer for the machine tool industry in the region. Leveraging the vast potential and possibilities of Punjab, the Expo provided the perfect platform for accelerating business. Held from December 21 to 24, 2012, the Expo witnessed a wide range of business possibilities being unfolded. The four-day event received a robust response from the industry at large.

´ L–R: Pravin Bansal, BJP – District Chief, Punjab; Hakam Singh Giaspura, Ex-Mayor of Ludhiana; Deepak Ballani, National Programme Officer, UNIDO-ICAMT; Mahendra Singh Dhakad, Programme Director, UNIDO-ICAMT; Harcharan Singh Golwaria, Mayor of Ludhiana; Sandeep Khosla, CEO, Network 18 Publishing; Anil Joshi, Hon’ble Industry Minister, Govt of Punjab; Sukhdial Singh, President, CLMTM

A

round Independence in 1947, Ludhiana had a handful of machine tool units and some units that manufactured hosiery machines. Over a period, units producing bicycle and auto parts entered the scene. Eventually, there came about the need for machine tools to meet the growing demands for mother machines in the country. That is when entrepreneurs established machine tool producing units in Ludhiana. Today, Ludhiana has evolved to become one of the major producers of mother machinery in India. Led by manufacturing biggies, Ludhiana is fast emerging as a leading investment destination in the northern region of the country. Capitalising on this vast growth potential, the Ludhiana edition of Engineering Expo organised by Network 18 Publishing emerged as an eye opener. Inaugurated amid incredible industry response, the maiden edition of Engineering Expo Ludhiana 116 MMT - February 2013

and Punjab Machine Tools Show (PUMTOS) stood tall with potential on the very first day. The Expo not only highlighted the potential of regions like Punjab in northern India but also made it evident to manufacturers how they could have easy access to this manufacturing-friendly zone. Held at GLADA Ground, Ludhiana, from December 21 to 24, 2012, the event generated commendable enthusiasm among exhibitors. Visitors too were excited about the prospects of a show of such a magnitude being held in the developing industrial region of Ludhiana.

A Grand Opening

Positioned to add positivities to the manufacturing and machine tools industry in and around Ludhiana, the Expo saw business deals worth `10 crore in the first few hours of the trade exposition and an order book looking potent with big business deals for the exhibitors, thus benchmarking itself

with the best in class trade shows. Gracing the occasion and boosting the confidence of the industry, the Minister of State for Industries and Commerce Anil Joshi asserted, “We need a foolproof plan to promote the machine tools industry in Ludhiana. The Ministry is willing to extend all possible support to the machine tools manufacturers to set up business. We have the right pool of manpower available, but we need exposure so that our machinery is accepted not only in India but across the globe.” The inaugural function was also attended by Ludhiana Mayor Harcharan Singh Golwaria. Addressing the audience, he said, “A cursory look at the halls in the Expo clearly showed that the machinery available in Ludhiana can benchmark global quality. However, we are still heavily dependent on imported machinery. We need to reduce this dependence by spreading awareness about our machinery to the world.”


Engineering Expo Ludhiana 2012 Highlights of this edition

250 exhibitors from across India Spread over more than

12,000 sqm 26,135 business visitors from across India

Business transacted worth

`195 crore 16,188 business leads generated

20,000+ pproducts displayed from different industries

More than 3,50,000 kg machinery moved in for display The other dignitaries present at the inauguration included prominent industry stalwarts like SSS Dhillon, Director, MSME Development Institute; Mahesh Khanna, GM, District Industries Center; Mahendra Singh Dhakad, Programme Director, United Nations Industrial Development Organization-International Center for the Advancement of Manufacturing Technology (UNIDO-ICAMT); Paramjit Singh, GM, Institute of Machine Tool Technology; Simarjeet Singh Bains, MLA; Deepak Ballani, National Programme Officer, UNIDO-ICAMT; Rajesh Jain, Senior Manager, National Small Industries Corporation (NSIC); Sukhdial Singh, President, Consortium of Ludhiana Machine Tools Manufacturers (CLMTM); Manjit Singh Matharoo, CEO, Matharoo & Matharoo Inc & General Secretary, CLMTM and Sandeep Khosla, CEO, Network 18 Publishing.

Boosting Industry Sentiments

While Ludhiana has seen a flurry of enthusiastic entrepreneurs and investments, there are areas that still need attention. Elaborating further, 118 MMT - February 2013

Matharoo added, “Of late, the machine tools industry in Ludhiana is suffering due to lack of exposure and a platform to demonstrate its credentials. However, with an event like the Engineering Expo, I am confident that we will successfully regain our lost ground.” The machine tools fraternity unanimously accepted that there was need for a platform, which can help the region showcase its industrial might. To this, Dhillon avered, “We need to organise similar events frequently in Ludhiana in order to bring our facilities and service providers together and discuss the requisite improvements for this sector in the region.”

An Innovative Platform for Business Possibilities

Visitors at the show were amazed by the variety of machinery on display and found the event to be best-in-class to interact with industry players. Amit Takkar, Director, Takkar Industries, exclaimed, “I visited this Expo for the first time and I am pleased with the arrangements. The variety of machinery on display was commendable. An event of this magnitude has taken place in Ludhiana for the first time; the local industry should take full advantage of this opportunity.” Another visitor, Abhishek Handa, Business Development Manager, Radeecal Communications, observed, “The Expo is appealing at first sight. Moreover, the companies exhibiting here are big names from the industry. I am quite satisfied with the overall arrangements at the Expo.” Pankaj Jain, Manager, Rexam Bright Solutions, another visitor, also shared similar sentiments. He stated, “An event of this stature and scale is taking place for the first time in Ludhiana, and I am pleased to see the quality of machinery on display. The choice of venue is an important factor for such events and GLADA Ground is a perfect location to attract a large number of visitors. Such events should take place more often in Ludhiana.”

An Event to Reckon

The exhibition halls saw a large number of visitors, of which many expressed their keenness to exhibit in the Expo next year. Also, the exhibitors received considerable enquiries for their machines and were highly optimistic about generating substantial business. Substantiating the same, C S Sidhu, Director–Technical, GR Cranes & Elevators, said, “We have received large number of enquiries at this event and expect most of these to convert into business. We have already sold machines to many customers.” Another exhibitor, Robin Basant, Managing Partner, Basant Mechanicals, expressed, “The Expo plays a crucial role not only in business development but also in increasing profitability. Engineering Expo is considered an ideal platform for companies to foster growth through reach and awareness to their right target audience. Presented by Network 18 Publishing, Engineering Expo proves to be a perfect combination of a vast range of exhibitors, spacious venue, state-of-the-art amenities and humungous visitor turnout, which is crucial for exhibitors.” Didarjit Singh, Proprietor, Karam Chucks, who also exhibited at the Expo, said, “Personally, my expectations from Engineering Expo at Ludhiana were high, and this Expo has lived up to my expectations. It has not only given us vast exposure but also given us the confidence to launch some of our new products so that people who are not able to attend international shows can find internal quality products in India.” Matharoo aptly concluded, “Engineering Expo is a great platform to showcase the industrial talent residing in smaller towns and cities of India. A place like Ludhiana has the skills to attract international manufacturers to India, and such Expos do a commendable job in assisting this.” anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com


Event Report Engineering Expo Indore 2013

Indore

January 11–14, 2013

Labhganga Convention Centre

Empowering SMEs, expanding market reach The manufacturing and allied sectors in and around Indore are experiencing a surge in business and investment like never before. Amid such promising prospects and tremendous untapped potential, Engineering Expo Indore 2013 emerged as a catalyst and added to the growth momentum of Madhya Pradesh. A report...

´ (L-R): Omprakash Gupta, President, MPEMCA; Dinesh Patidar, Chairman & MD, Shakti Pumps (I) Ltd; Krishna Murari Moghe, Mayor, Indore; Amit Goyal, Chairman, FIEO; Ajay Sahai, Director General and CEO, FIEO and Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President, Network 18 Publishing

A

s one of the emerging cities of India, Indore offers potentially lower costs, necessary and inexpensive infrastructure as well as a suitable business environment for companies. Moreover, there is immense scope for innovative ideas to be nurtured in this region. Indore is a land of opportunities for small and large businesses alike. Today, Indore has opened its doors to both Indian and international investors. A hotspot for manufacturing units, the city has unleashed its mammoth potential of hosting new industries and tapping opportunities that await India. A recent study by Cushman & Wakefield stated that Indore is one of the top 10 emerging cities of India for long-term business investment across industries. Madhya Pradesh houses 122 MMT - February 2013

more than five original equipment manufacturers and more than 100 auto component manufacturing facilities. Their market size is approximately US$306 million. Additionally, IT major Infosys is investing `600 crore in its proposed unit in Indore. Tata Consultancy Services is also investing `410 crore in the city. With the country’s first operational greenfield special economic zone spanning 1,038 hectare set up in Indore, an influx of investor and business opportunities will be seen along with an increase in job opportunities.

Boosting growth

Given the current spate of investments across an array of industries in and around Indore, as well as those in the pipeline for the near future, this central part of India is poised for major industrial growth. In this context,

Engineering Expo Indore 2013, which took place on January 11–14, 2013, at the Labhganga Convention Centre, emerged as a catalyst for the growth momentum of Madhya Pradesh. The Expo was spread across more than 10,500 sqm and showcased more than 8,000 products by over 208 exhibitors in 30 diverse industry categories. With an outlook to augment business opportunities of the manufacturing and machine tools industry in and around Indore, the Expo saw business deals worth `72 crore and an order book with big business deals for the exhibitors, thus benchmarking itself with top class trade shows.

Inaugural ceremony: Highlights

The 5th edition of Engineering Expo Indore was successfully organised by Network 18 Publishing in association with Madhya Pradesh Electric Merchants and Contractors Association (MPEMCA) and Federation of Indian Export Organisations (FIEO). Amid promising prospects for a fast-emerging Madhya Pradesh, the Expo came alive with the lighting of the inaugural lamp in the presence of esteemed dignitaries comprising Krishna Murari Moghe, Mayor, Indore; Dinesh Patidar, Chairman & MD, Shakti Pumps (I) Ltd; Omprakash Gupta, President, MPEMCA; Amit Goyal, Chairman, FIEO; Ajay Sahai, Director General & CEO, FIEO and Sudhanva Jategaonkar, Associate Vice President, Network 18 Publishing.


Engineering Expo Indore 2013 In his inaugural speech, Moghe said, “I am pleased that Engineering Expo is being organised in Indore. We will benefit from the large business platform offered by the Expo. Business owners are getting a great opportunity to promote their brands and products through this Expo, which can contribute to the progress of not only the state but also the country and thus propel economic growth.” While appreciating the contribution of Engineering Expo to the industries of the region, Patidar said, “This Expo has given a good platform to exhibitors. The industry, as a whole, and local customers are benefitted by it. I sincerely hope everybody’s business is boosted through this initiative. Today, the business fraternity in Indore needs to engage in continuous learning and development to keep up with the innovative and changing concepts of business processes and practices.” Gupta encouraged the audience to leverage the Expo in furthering their business growth. He added, “Engineering Expo will help in increasing technical knowledge within the business community. I urge everyone to have a good time and take advantage of the Expo. This is a great chance for exhibitors to display a wide array of products and a golden opportunity for the industry to learn about the latest technologies available in the market.” Addressing a packed audience, Goyal observed, “Madhya Pradesh is a progressive state, and small & medium enterprises comprise 80% of the business. I thank Network 18 for taking this initiative to help the manufacturing fraternity gain more mileage and engage in knowledge sharing. I wish all the participants the very best and hope for the exhibition to be a grand success.” Sahai highlighted the role of this Expo and the importance of value addition in innovation for the manufacturing fraternity of the country. He observed, “Indore has been seeing healthy annual growth and has a 124 MMT - February 2013

competitive edge due to the availability of manpower. Engineering Expo has been a trendsetter for the domestic as well as the export market. Innovation and R&D will be the growth drivers for the manufacturing sector in India, and the country promises great potential in this direction.” Jategaonkar delivered the vote of thanks on behalf of the organisers and said, “I thank all our partners and participants who have helped us bring Engineering Expo to its current position of an insightful and engaging business forum. This Expo is intended for the overall benefit of the engineering and manufacturing industry, and we have plans to further strengthen its offerings in the years to come.”

An Empowering Experience

Engineering Expo Indore 2013 empowered visitors with the latest technologies and strategic industry insights. Being a transmission line (cables, energy metres, isolators) supplier, Deepak Lalwani, Proprietor, Deepak Traders, has been attending the Expo for the last three years. “I come to the Engineering Expo as I get an opportunity to learn about the latest technology, interact with the exhibitors and see new machinery. Responses from the exhibitors are great. I think this is an excellent platform for buying and sharing,” explained Lalwani. Another visitor, Suneel Arora, Proprietor, Pooja Electronics, said, “The Expo has been a knowledge sharing experience. Such Expos are good for a city like Indore as it enables the industry to become familiar with the latest technology. I am having a great experience here.” The exhibitors at the Expo varied from companies focussed on green initiatives to those involved in providing identity and security solutions. Among the exhibitors, Nimesh Doshi, Owner, Asiatic Traders, said, “We are distributors of machine tools and are working towards green energy. We have launched solar panels in this edition of

Highlights of this edition Pan India participation by 208 exhibitors Spread across more than

10,500 sqm

12,019 business visitors visited

from across India Business transacted worth `72 crore* More than 11,272 business leads generated* 8,000+ products displayed from different industries More than 75,000 kg machinery moved in for display * Feedback received from exhibitors

Engineering Expo. The Expo has been a success as all the stalls have 100 per cent occupancy.” Govind Agrawal, CEO, Anaxee Technologies Pvt Ltd, shared, “We deal in biometrics, identity management, fingerprint technology, face & iris recognition and metal detectors. The latest technologies we have launched at this Expo are new Adhaar authentication systems and JustLook face recognition systems. We are customising our Android-based applications for our clients and giving discounts to visitors who book here.” An exhibitors’ directory comprising the listing of all the exhibitors at the Expo and their vital details was also unveiled. This wealth of information took the participants of the Expo a step closer in their quest to stay competitive in business. Engineering Expo attracted more than 12,000 visitors and buyers from in and around the city. With a great display of some of the latest machinery, tools and technology, the Expo catered to the diverse requirements of the manufacturing industry. The next edition of Engineering Expo will be held in Aurangabad on February 22–25, 2013. pallavi.mukhopadhyay@network18publishing.com


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Products - General This section gives information about the national and international products available in the market

Cryo HiFeedMill

A Cryogenic CYCLO CUT® Hi-Feed milling cutter designed for Minimum Q uantity Cr yogenics machining discharges liquid nitrogen through cutter inserts. New model 5-axis HMC 1600 patented through-tool system dramatically increases material removal rates and/ or tool life on difficult-to-machine materials. The machine can be combined with Minimum Quantity Lubrication for further optimization. The multi-patented MQC technology facilitates increased process speeds, lower cutting forces, longer tool life, and reduced heat. It is also eco-friendly, yielding dry chips without releasing coolant mist or greenhouse gases. MQC delivers liquid nitrogen at -321°F (-196°C) through the spindle, directly to the tool tip and cutting zone. MAG India Industrial Automation Systems Pvt Ltd Bengaluru, Karnataka Tel: +91 80 4067 7000 Fax: +91 80 4160 0777 Email: Shashank.MP@mag-ias.in Website: www.mag-ias.com

Tool Grinding Machine

The machine is elaborately designed by Germany and equipped with Swiss top 5-axis NUM Flexium CNC controller and 3D tool grinding software NUMROTO plus. It offers maximum tool length 210mm/Ø120mm. Also, it has mineral-casting machine base with great performance in damping, deformation, and thermal conductivity. Nimble machine design for choice placing of electrical cabinet on either left or right side. Worldwidepatented with double-support B-axis and most distinguished kinematic design to allow 5-axis optimal movement. The machine is Equipped with Marposs 3D automatic tool measurement system, making the tool measuring process more precise and

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Synthetic High Speed Grease

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Boring Tool

Boring tools comes in different ranges ranging from 0.4mm to 3,255mm hole diameters. The complete range is available in analog & digital types with 2 micron diametrical adjustment. The size adjustment is easy and ISO inserts can be used, the connection of tools is modular type and the clamping is done on serrated slides to ensure strong mounting. When the tool size increases the tool body is provided in aluminium alloy to reduce the weight. We also provide tools which can do roughing & finishing in a single go thus reducing the cycle time. We also offer a range of tool holders, turn mill machine tools, boring & facing heads, customized tools etc to cater to your machining requirements. The tools can be easily serviced in India. February 2013 - MMT 127


Products - General Customised Technologies Pvt Ltd.,

Bengaluru , Karnataka Tel: 080-28522858 / 9880022400 Email:rapidi@customisedtechnologies.com Website: www.customisedtechnologies.com

Chipformer

Chipformer under the designation of M3M was designed especially for machining stainless and low carbon steel.In addition, it was designed with geometric features that improve the tool’s life due to a reinforced cutting edge at the area where VG (notch wear) wear tends to occur when machining stainless steel, causing poor surface finish and risk of edge breakage.Additional geometric elements such as optimal positive rake angle feature a smooth cutting process and reduced cutting forces (by 5 to 10%), thus reducing the wear and dramatically increasing tool life.The M3M has a wide chipbreaking range, making it the first choice in most stainless steel applications.The combination of the new advanced SUMO TEC grades IC6015 and IC6025, together with the unique and innovative M3M chipformer, ensures higher productivity over any other insert existing in the market for machining stainless steel. Wohlhaupter India Pvt Ltd. New Delhi Tel: 011-32227044 Fax: 011-26131690 E-mail: info.in@wohlhaupter.com; keshav.khurana@wohlhaupter.com

3D Scanning System

A non-contact scanning system has been developed on Rapid-I, Vision Measuring systems platform, which can scan at high density and very high resolution (<4µm @ 67x) of intricate small and medium sized parts. Rapid-I’s unique auto-focus technology, combined with CNC capability and powerful software helps to quickly and easily generate cloud points (in .dxf and .txt formats) or surface files (.stl) that can be easily processed. With .stl files, you can directly work with other CAM software to edit and generate CNC programs for machining, completing your reverseengineering work-flow at very low cost. The system allows the user to choose the density of points, and can scan complex 3D shapes and small surface details that are usually lost in handheld white light and laser-based scanning systems. The systems are also offered with Renishaw’s touch probes or Scanning probes and non-contact 3D Scanning to give a complete reverse engineering solution. 128 MMT- February 2013

Larsen & Toubro Limited –ISCAR

Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel- 022 6705 4015, 9833215872 Email: Shriharsh.Chandak@larsentoubro.com Website: www.larsentoubro.com

Plate Bending Machine

Hydraulic / mechanical 4 rolls / 3 rolls standard prepinch type and pyramid type plate bending machines are available in wide range from 1,000 mm to 6,000 mm length and 1 mm to 100 mm thickness. The machine features movable control panel, gear box / hydraulic motor, MS plates, fabricated main frame, housing with forged steel rolls and hydraulic and electrical balancing system. Moreover, it has the advantage of easy maintenance, simple mechanism enable, suitable for medium and heavy plates and pipes in full circle or various radius can be done easily. The machine also comes with the accessories like conical bending, section bending and plate feeding table etc. Weldor Engineering Pvt Ltd

Rajkot, Gujarat Tel: 0281 - 2360242, 2360243, 44 Fax: 0281 - 2360466 Email: weldor@weldor.com Website: www.weldor.com


Products - General Portable Welders

The welding machines are strictly manufactured & are confirming to IS, incorporating latest technological developments and controls with highest order of quality & performance. The machine also has modern looks, novel design concepts, Light weight and compact. Real Portability for one person to do welding at odd places like civial work sites etc. Sturdy belt provided for carrying and hanging. It is made from high-grade materials, with protection against overload by thermal cut-out. Works even on domestic power line, Reliable and durable, Epoxy powder coated body for long life, Coil varnishing by vacuum pressurised impregnating varnishing system. Canary Electricals Ltd

Gujarat Phone: +91-2822-250431 Fax: 91-2822-250433 Email: info@vulcanwelding.com, vulcanwelding@gmail.com

February 2013 - MMT 129


Products - General Flap Disc

Flap disc can be used for quick grinding due to consistent high abrasive quality right up to the last abrasive grain. Maximum economic efficiency due to increased performance per time unit and less wear on discs is attained. Grinding work with high stock removal performance is achieved. It features largest possible stock removal. The innovative design of the ceramic grit abrasive reduces sparks to a minimum. This means that damage to stainless steel work pieces caused by glowing sparks flying around is almost excluded. The surface temperature is reduced by 30 % during the grinding process which makes sure that there is no heat accumulation, no deformation, no thermal damage to the joints in the work piece. Tool life and aggressiveness for surface grinding and for the leveling of welds are 50 % higher than those of conventional flap discs. Besides, there is no glazing and constant use right down to the last grit. SWIT India

Bangalore, Karnataka Tel: 080 – 42187117, 09741481117 Email: sales@pferd.co.in Website: www.pferd.com, www.swit.in

Pipe bevelling tools

Pipe bevelling tool is fully portable for offshore pipelines and onsite use and can bevel at any degree of angle including precision ‘J preps’ for automatic welding. It is designed for long life and ease of use and requires no special operator training, all clamp to the pipe I.D., employ direct-drive bearing supported gears and use the EscoLock™ blade lock system with interchangeable cutter blades to bevel, face and bore simultaneously. A broad line of portable welding end prep tools for bevelling pipe ranging from 38mm I.D. to 914mm O.D. made of hard super alloys, offshore and in fabrication shops, is available with pneumatic, hydraulic and electric motors, depending upon model. It is suitable for bevelling stainless steel, super duplex, and P-91 alloys. ESCO Tool

U.S.A Tel: (508) 429-4441 Fax: (508) 359-4145 Email: matt@escotool.com Website: www.escotool.com

Self feed drilling unit

Drillmatic self-feed drilling unit is a versatile drilling machine, ideal for auto component manufacturing and drilling SPMs. This is an auto feed machine and is available in wide ranges for varied applications like tapping, 130 MMT- February 2013

drilling and tapping combined, peck feed drilling for deeper holes, with multi spindles for multi hole drilling, etc. The machine is highly productive and totally maintenance free. It is reasonably priced and mostly ex-stock delivery. Dolphin Special Machines Technologies [P] Ltd Chennai, Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-26257753, 09840332583 Email: dsmt@dolphinspm.com Website: www.dolphinspm.com

Polygon turning machine

The polygon turning machine is a very specialised kind of metal cutting machine used in mass production of small parts. The tool head and the work piece rotate at a predetermined ratio to generate a defined polygon. This machine has a productivity of 3-4 times the conventional milling machines. The parts produced on this machine are of high quality. The machines manufactured are in compliance to norms and practices of high standard. It has extensive applications in the automobile, power tool, hand tools, fasteners, valve parts and fuel injection industries. Trishul Machine Tools Pvt Ltd Bengaluru, Karnataka Tel: 080-78361001, 27836166, Mob: 09342554872 Email: trishulmac@vsnl.com Website: www.trishulmachine.com

Automatic band saw machines

The automatic band saw machine is a high performance, easy to operate, highly durable machines manufactured by well experienced engineers. This machines is used for cutting rods such as stainless steel rods in various industries. It consumes very less amount of electricity and is manufactured as per industry standards and norms. Petra Machines India Pvt Ltd Chennai, Tamil Nadu Tel: 044 -26243525, 09382164129 Email: ps.murthy@pe-tra.com Website: www.petramachines.com

CNC Lathe

The CNC lathe maintains the ease of use of a manual lathe, increasing the productivity and flexibility by replacing mechanical controls with a system of leaded numerical control. Easy machining operations can be made manually using just the hand wheels, as in conventional lathes.


Products - General This machine reduces the work time for work pieces produced on conventional lathes. The machine is equipped with the CNC unit 0i MATE®, AC motors and drives from Fanuc. It allows producing components of complicated geometries with ease, without the setting of complicated attachments. Tussor Machine Tools India Pvt Ltd Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu Tel: 0422 - 3200183 Email: info@tussorindia.com Website: www.tussorindia.com

Soluble cutting oil

The soluble cutting oil forms emulsion with water and contains rust inhibited to protect from corrosion, rusting and biocide to prevent bacterial and fungus growth in emulsion. This oil features excellent cooling and lubricating properties which give exceptional surface finish and minimise tool wear. The oil is recommended for a variety of cutting operations on ferrous and non ferrous metals. Soluble cutting oil meets BIS – 1115 – 1986 specifications. Eastern Petroleum Pvt Ltd

Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: 022 - 2529 9990 / 91 / 92 / 93 Fax: 022 – 2524 1895 Email: off ice@easternpetroleum.in Website: www.easternpetroleum.in

CAM software

PowerMILL will be the first CAM program that calculates the route of a toolpath with reference to the characteristics of the machine on which it will be run. The new release of PowerMILL will incorporate Machine DNA Profiler, which performs automated tests on the machine tool to profile its performance. The results are fed back into the software and used to calculate the optimum toolpath for that machine. Other parameters, such as corner radius and point spacing, are automatically set by PowerMILL, based on the results from the Profiler. It replaces the trial-and error approach to programming by allowing right-first-time toolpaths to be generated on a consistent basis. Delcam Software India Pvt Ltd

Pune, Maharashtra Tel: 020-3061 3900 Email: india.marketing@delcam.com Website: www.delcam.com

Digital laser scanner

Nikon’s superior optics is combined with innovative 3D laser scanning technology as digital laser scanner LC15Dx, and brings laser scanning in the accuracy range of tactile inspection. It is a viable alternative to a tactile probe for an increasing number of high precision CMM applications; including moulds, small turbine blades, medical devices and other complex geometry. A wider variety of parts, geometry and materials can be measured more effectively, including many parts too small or fragile for a touch probe. The application extends to pilot plant metrology, automotive components inspection, aircraft component inspection, surface analysis, sheet metal inspection etc. Nikon India Pvt Ltd

Gurgaon, Haryana Tel: 0124-468 8500 Email: ateet.kaushik@nikonoa.net Website: www.nikonmetrology.com

Drill & tap center

The DT-1 is a compact, high-speed drill and tap machine with full milling capabilities. The machine has a 20” x 16” x 15.5” (xyz) work cube and a 26” x 15” T-slot table. A powerful BT30 taper inline direct-drive spindle provides 12,000 rpm, and allows February 2013 - MMT 131


Products - General rigid tapping at speeds to 5,000 rpm. A high-speed, 20-pocket tool changer swaps tools quickly, while 2,400 ipm rapids and high accelerations combine to shorten cycle times and reduce non-cutting time. Other features include 15 hp vector drive, 15” color LCD monitor, built-in USB port. Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: +91-22-66098830 Email: indiasales@haascnc.com Website: www.haascnc.com

Taper pins

They are preferred for parts which have to be taken apart and when driving out the cylindrical pins would tend to wear the holes. These pins are also used to vary accurate constructed tools and gauges that have to be kept in proper alignment. They are manufactured as per DIN 1 and IS: 6688-1972. The taper pins are supplied soft condition from EN8 material and natural finish unless otherwise specified by the customer. R K Engineering Company

Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: +91-022-22671141 Email: rkeng@vsnl.net Website: www.rkengineeringco.com

Machining centre

UniSpeed5 is that universal machining center for milling (Unispeed 5) or milling-turning (UniSpeed 5T) which implements highly efficient dynamics and offers great flexibility/ versatility as well. The standard Scope includes, universal orthogonal milling head ATC 48 tools Siemens 840D or Heidenhein 530 iTNC control. The machine also feaures Powerful Spindle with Torque upto 750 Nm and rpm upto 6000 with mill/ turn model includes the rotary with turning speed upto 250 rpm. The UniSpeed 5 is also impressive with its space utilisation as it uses only 40 sq. meters of space. Its’ natural rigid base in polymer concrete allows the machine to be installed without any special foundation. SHW Machine Tools Pvt. Ltd

Mumbai, Maharashtra Tel: +91 7498770835 Email: adeshmukh@shw-wm.de 132 MMT- February 2013

Servo insert couplings

These servo insert couplings are equipped with features like, pluggable, damp vibration, compensation of misalignment & backlash-free etc. Different models like stud/set screws clamping, collet clamping, outer conical hub, split hubs, compact version, expanding clamps etc are available. Some of the applications include linear slide, machine spindle, screw jack units, servo drive, printing machines, packaging machines etc. Rotolinear Systems

Bengaluru, Karnataka Tel: 080-23572855, 9845196751 Fax: 080-23379749 Email: rotolinearindia@vsnl.net Website: www.rotolinearindia.com

Drill Re-Sharpening Machine

This machine has the “CE safety authentication”, which originated with up to down way of grind drill. This new research and develop about swing the drill from up to down made the finished of drill more sharpen and more durable than the traditional swing way. Easy to operate, easy to understand and the point angles are from 90°~135°. Chisel edge grinding can adjusting by your demand. Jin year precision Co Ltd

Taiwan Tel: +886-4-25232817 Fax: +886-4-25151230 Email: Liu0930@ms58.hinet.net Website: www.jinyear.com.tw

Machining Unit

The machining unit provides new speed options, reliably up to the maximum speed limit. With an increase of 25% up to a permissible maximum spindle speed of 23,000 rpm, operations requiring higher spindle speeds can be accomplished more easily. This improvement is the result of a complete redesign of drive and spindle bearing components. A new style timing belt drive multiplies the motor speed up to 13,050 rpm spindle speed. An AC drive is used to increase the spindle speed up to 23’000 rpm at 87 Hz. The machining unit can be applied in axial and radial orientation, directly mounted to a slide assembly type UA15-PH or UA15-CNC. In this combination numerous machining operations like milling or demanding drilling cycles including jump or peck feed can be accomplished very easy.


Products - General SUHNER INDIA PVT LTD

Bengaluru, Karnataka Tel: +91 80 27831108 Fax: +91 80 278311092 Email: automation.in@suhner.com Website: www.suhner.com

JHU-2706CNC Cylindrical Grinding Machine

This machine base is manufactured from high quality cast iron FC30, tempered and stress relieved for maximum stability of material and assures maximum rigidity. The base permits fast coolant exhaust, preventing thermal deformation from influencing machine accuracy. The forced lubrication system of the grinding wheel spindle features vibration absorbing function. The oil film pressure created by the hydrodynamic bearings automatically absorbs vibration according to the current working condition. The grinding wheel spindle is supported by two special hydrodynamic bearings on the ends with five-point support, providing maximum rigidity and stability of spindle running. In case insufficient lubrication oil occurs, the spindle stops automatically to avoid wearing on the spindle and bearings. Cylindrical grinding machine can be applied several different controller as customer request and it combines various grinding functions in one machine, effective improve grinding precision and operational convenience, such as, tapered grinding, curve and end face grinding and forming grinding etc. It is suitable for manufacture and process components such as machine spindle, roller shafts, large or small motor spindles, module accessories, etc. JAINNHER MACHINE CO, LTD Taichung, Taiwan Tel: +886-4-23585299 Fax: +886-4-23594803 E-mail: saledep@jainnher.com

Website: www.jainnher.com

Geared Head Light Duty Lathe Machine

Geared head light duty lathe machine series has height of centre 165mm, length of bed ranging up to 1820 mm, admit between centres up to 1135 mm. main spindle hollow is 38 mm. main spindle nose is A2- 4 or threaded type. Dynamically balanced spindle enable the spindle run at vibration free motion at 1200 rpm. All gears are made of 20MN CR5 material and fully induction hardened and teeth grinding. At the Norton gear box is able to cut the any of metric, modules and pitch (D.P). the bed is made from graded cast iron and flam hardened up to 400 BHN diametric. Also offered are face plate, carrier plate, steady rest, and follow rest, motorized coolant pump with tank and fittings, rear tool post, quick change tool post. The machine is maintenance free and easy to use. The parts of the machine are interchangeable and stock in regional dealer office

Vinit Engimech Pvt Ltd

RAJKOT, GUJARAT 360004 PHONE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (0281) 2312091 / 2311734 FAX: (0281) 2311935 Website. www.balajilathe.com Email vinit@balajilathe.com

Mini Arc Welding Transformers

Regulator type mini welder medium duty machines are available in 150, 200 & 250 Amps. They are compact, light weight arc welders used for repair and maintenance jobs in medium duty cycles, light fabrication works, light production jobs in farms and small workshops, automobile garage and repair workshops. Yielding quite higher performance to cost ratio compared to any other machine in the market. Built with latest trends in design and manufacturing and tested to most stringent standards to offer years of trouble free service. Canary Electriclas Ltd

MORBI, Gujarat Phone: +91-2822-250431 Fax: 91-2822-250433 Email: info@vulcanwelding.com, vulcanwelding@gmail.com Website: www.vulcanwelding.net February 2013 - MMT 133


List of Products Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MMT (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MMT EDM and send it to 51818

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Panel bender & material handling......................77

Cable carrier......................................................12

CNC vertical chucker................................... 28, 73

3 axes high speed machining center....................13

Cable connector.................................................12

CNC vertical machining center............ 10,13,28,73

3D Scanning System........................................128

Cam follower...................................................131

CNC vertical turning lathe.................................10

5 axes high speed machining center....................13

Cam shaft / crank shaft grinding machine...........75

Coating machine........................................ 16, 128

5 axis machining centre.............................. 91, 101

CAM software.................................................131

Coating plant............................................. 16, 128

5 faces double coulmn milling machine.............136

Camworks.......................................................129

Coating system.......................................... 16, 128

Abrasive blast cleaning.....................................129

Carbide endmill tool........................................ BC

Compressor oil..................................................58

Accoustic room................................................129

Carbide rod.......................................................59

Conduits and connector system..........................33

Adhesives........................................................104

Carboloy............................................................37

Connector................................................... 12, 47

Advance cutting material....................................31

Chain oil...........................................................58

Control cabinet..................................................47

Aerosol multispray.............................................58

Chains...............................................................12

Control panel....................................................47

Aerospace machine..........................................145

Chipformer......................................................128

Control system..................................................47

Air pollution control........................................129

Chuck jaw..........................................................95

Controlling machine tool................................BIC

Airline fluid.......................................................58

Clamping tool.................................................. BC

Conventional phase failure relay.........................14

All geared auto feed pillar drilling machine.........34

Cleaner............................................................107

Corrosion preventive........................................107

Allgeared autofeed pillar drill machine.............125

CNC......................................................5, 13, 110

Cosmetic.........................................................104

Analog timer......................................................14

CNC automatic line..................................... 28, 73

Counter.............................................................14

Angle encoder.................................................BIC

CNC cutting machine................................ 16, 128

Counters & power supplies................................57

Appliance switch................................................33

CNC double column machining centre...............10

Countersink........................................................ 9

Assembly & high temperature grease..................58

CNC equipment................................................35

Cryo HiFeedMill.............................................127

Auto feed radial drilling machine.......................34

CNC grinding machine................................ 28, 73

Custom & turnkey...........................................123

Automatic band saw machine...........................130

CNC horizontal borer................................ 91, 101

Cutting fluid....................................................107

Automation.......................................... 16, 95, 128

CNC horizontal boring & milling machine........10

Cutting machine........................................ 16, 128

Automation product.........................................121

CNC horizontal boring machining............... 28, 73

Cutting oil.........................................................67

Automotive.....................................................104

CNC horizontal machining centre...........10, 28, 73

Cutting tool....................................... 17,37,59,146

Automotive lubricant.......................................104

CNC horizontal turning centre..........................10

Cylindrical & internal grinding........................109

Backgeared autofeed radial drill........................125

CNC laser cutting machine........................ 16, 128

Cylindrical Grinding Machine.........................133

Backgeared fine feed machine...........................125

CNC lathe................................. 28,73, 91, 101,130

Deep hole drilling machines...............................18

Balancing systems for grinding.......................BGF

CNC machine.......................................7,13,15, 63

Deep hole drilling suBContracts........................18

Ball bearing.....................................................104

CNC machine tool..................................21, 28, 73

Demo. & refurb...............................................123

Bar feeder................................................ FGF, 69

CNC machining center................................ 13, 24

Dfmpro...........................................................129

Bearing..............................................................12

CNC multi-tasking centre..................................10

Diamond cutting & processing system...............89

Bending.............................................................77

CNC oxy fuel cutting machine................... 16, 128

Diamond lapping & polishing system.............BGF

Boring & miling machine................................141

CNC plasma cutting machine.................... 16, 128

Diamond tools.................................................... 9

Boring bar.........................................................67

CNC robodrill............................................. 28, 73

Didactic equipmetns for training........................47

Boring mill........................................................38

CNC small machining center.............................24

Die/mould machine.........................................136

Boring Tool.....................................................127

CNC tap chucks & tap adaptor........................106

Digital laser scanner........................................131

Broach sharpening machine.............................141

CNC tap holders & pull stud...........................106

Drawing & forming compound........................107

Bta / ejector counter boring................................18

CNC tools holders & pully stud.......................106

Drill & tap center............................................131

Bta / ejector drilling...........................................18

CNC turning.....................................................63

Drill machine............................................123,125

Buffing powder..................................................67

CNC turning center...........................................13

Drill Re-Sharpening Machine..........................132

Building automation.................................. 16, 128

CNC turning machine................................. 28, 73

Drill tool......................................................... BC

Cabinet.............................................................22

CNC turn-mill centre........................................10

Drilling machine................................................34

134 MMT - February 2013


List of Products Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Drilling tool......................................................17

Holemaking.......................................................31

Machine vises................................................BGF

Drill..................................................................34

Horizontal & vertical machining center.............75

Machined casting...............................................64

Drive technology............................................BIC

Horizontal boring mill.....................................136

Machining & grinding fluid.............................107

Edrawings publisher........................................129

Horizontal machining centre................. 13, 91, 101

Machining center...............................................20

Element shrink disc.........................................131

Horizontal milling machine.............................136

Machining centre.............................................132

Encoder.............................................................57

Horizontel machining center............................... 5

Machining tool die coater..................................60

Engine shafts work holding device......................64

Hydraulic & gear oil..........................................58

Machining Unit...............................................132

Exhibition- engineering expo...........................119

Hydraulic chuck.................................................64

Magnescale technology....................................105

Exposed linear encoder...................................BIC

Hydraulic forging hammer.................................48

Magnetic modular encoder..............................BIC

Factory automation.................................... 16, 128

Hydraulic machine................................... FGF, 69

Maintenance lubricant.......................................97

Fibre laser cutting machine................................39

Hydraulic press..................................................48

Material testing.................................................19

Flap Disc.........................................................130

Hydraulic valve housing shrinkfit adaptor...........64

Measured value acqusition .............................BIC

Floating holder................................................106

Hydrolic press break..........................................39

Measurement equipment....................................19

Form measurement............................................19

I-l winding........................................................70

Measuring & monitoring relay for 1ph/3ph........57

Freewheel-oneway-clutch.................................131

Imaging & vision system............................ 16, 128

Metal cutting tool..............................................55

Fule injection system parts collet........................64

Indexable cutting tool........................................67

Metal injection moulding...................................79

Gantry machining center....................................38

Inductive proximity switch.................................33

Metal spray booth............................................129

Gas spring..............................................65, 66, 80

Industrial control & sensing device....................57

Metal working fluid...........................................97

Gear box..........................................................108

Industrial exhibition........................................143

Metrology equipment.........................................19

Gear cutting machine.......................................136

Industrial lubricant..........................................104

Milling..................................................17,31,BIC

Gear grinder....................................................141

Integrated shot blasting room...........................129

Milling centre..................................................... 5

Gear hobbing machine.......................................75

IS ..................................................................39

Milling cum drilling machine...........................125

Gear milling solution for CNC milling & turn-mill

Keyless transmisson element............................131

Milling cutter.................................................9,59

machine.............................................................26

Lamination core cutting.....................................70

Milling machine..............................................123

Geared Head Light Duty Lathe Machine.........133

Large size machining centre.............................136

Milling tool..................................................... BC

General engineering.........................................104

Laser cutting......................................................77

Mini Arc Welding Transformer.......................133

Geomcaliper....................................................129

Laser cutting system...........................................89

Modular tooling system...................................... 9

Gold purity (xrf) systems....................................89

Laser marking - engraving system.......................89

Monitoring of grinding system.......................BGF

Grease...............................................................58

Laser medical.....................................................89

Motor..............................................................108

Grinding machine....................................... 75,113

Laser micro machining.......................................89

Motor protection circuit breaker load break switch.33

Grinding tool for hard material........................113

Laser robotic welding.........................................89

Multi function turret............................... FGF, 69

Grinding wheel..................................................67

Laser shaping...................................................113

Multi functional tool.........................................59

Grooving & parting tool....................................59

Laser welding machines.....................................75

Multimedia union...................................65, 66, 80

Gun drills........................................................... 9

Laser welding system.........................................89

NC lathe............................................................20

Gun reaming.....................................................18

Lathe chuck.......................................................95

Optical measurement.........................................19

Gundrilling.......................................................18

Lathes................................................................ 5

Paint booth......................................................129

Hanlding system module....................................47

Length gauges................................................BIC

Panel bending machine......................................39

Hannover messe-2013......................................143

Lens mold iron & steel parts mold components crush

Panel meter.......................................................14

Helical gear box...............................................108

blade ultra high pressur apparatus......................60

Peening...........................................................129

High pressure hydraulic clamping system.......BGF

Level controller.................................................57

Pegard.............................................................141

High speed drill tap centre......................... 91, 101

Limit switch......................................................33

Penta iq grip for grooving and parting.............FIC

High speed machining center...........................103

Machine measurement....................................BIC

Phase failure relay..............................................14

Hobs...............................................................141

Machine tap......................................................67

Photo electric sensor..........................................57

Hold back........................................................131

Machine tool accessories..................................106

Pillar drilling machine.......................................34

Holder...............................................................67

Machine tool protection system......................BGF

Pilot light..........................................................33

February 2013 - MMT 135


List of Products Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Pipe bevelling tool...........................................130

Shaper cutter...................................................141

Tool holding system.................................... 67, 95

Plasma cutting machine.....................................39

Sheet metal working machinery..........................62

Tool monitoring system.................................BGF

Shock absorber.......................................65, 66, 80

Toolholders turbo charger part...........................64

Shrink fit technology.........................................67

Tooling system...........................................31, BC

Siphon system.........................................65, 66, 80

Toolings for edm / wedm / vmc-s / hmc-s...........39

Slant / flat bed........................................... 91, 101

Touch probes..................................................BIC

Solar cell scribing system....................................89

Track roller.....................................................131

Solid carbide drill...............................................55

Trade show......................................................143

Solid carbide drills with IC................................55

Transformer....................................................104

Solid carbide mill...............................................55

Transformer oil...............................................104

Solid carbide reamer..........................................55

Transparent gel.................................................58

Solid carbide reamers with IC............................55

Tubing accessories.............................................47

Solid carbide special drill...................................55

Turning.................................................17,31,BIC

Solid carbide special mill....................................55

Turning holder..................................................59

Solid carbide special reamer...............................55

Turning machine...............................................75

Solid carbite tool..............................................146

Turning tool.................................................... BC

Solid rotating tool..............................................67

Turnmill centre........................................... 28, 73

Soluble cutting oil............................................131

Turret punching machine...................................39

Plate Bending Machine....................................128 PLC ................................................................121 Plugs and socket................................................33 Polygon turning machine.................................130 Portable Welder...............................................129 Power source.....................................................56 Preci chuck........................................................93 Precision gear cutting tool................................136 Precision steel..................................................113 Precision switch.................................................33 Precision switches single & multiple..................33 Process automation and cntrol equipmetn..........47 Process oils......................................................104 Profile grinding...............................................141 Programmable logic comtroller........................121 Proximity sensor................................................57 Punching...........................................................77 Punching laser cutting.......................................39 Punching shering machine.................................39 Push button.......................................................33 Quick change tapping chucks and tap adaptor..106 Rack..................................................................22 Radial drill machine.................................... 34,125 Reamer............................................................... 9 Reaming & tapping.........................................106

Special hydraulic expansion technology..............95

Tyre ................................................................104

Special induction hardening machine.................56

Universal quick change chuck & adaptors for drilling.106

Speciality lubricant............................................97

Vaccum chuck.......................................... FGF, 69

Speciality oil......................................................67

Vacuum /pneumatic recovery and conveying system....129

Spindle nose tooling..........................................59

Valve terminal...................................................47

SPMS................................................................18

Valves................................................................47

Stacking system.................................................39

Velocity & feed controller.......................65, 66, 80

Standard induction hardening machine..............56

Ventillation.....................................................129

Stationary work holding.....................................95

Vertical machining center............................... 5, 11

Sugar mill........................................................104

Vertical machining centres-single / double coloumn..........................91, 101

Relay.................................................................14

Surface & profile grinding...............................109

Vertical turning lathe.................................. 38,141

Reversible jaw....................................................93

Surface grinder.......................................... 91, 101

Vision sensor.....................................................57

Roatry................................................................ 5

Surface preparation solution.............................129

Wear part..........................................................59

Switching relay..................................................57

White oil.........................................................104

Synthetic High Speed Grease...........................127

Workholding solution....................................BGF

Tap .............................................................. 9, 68

Yellow pages......................................................84

Roll forming machine........................................39 Rolling oil.......................................................107 Rotary damper........................................65, 66, 80 Rotary encoder...............................................BIC Rotary indexing table.....................................BGF Rotary joints & union.............................65, 66, 80 Rotating union.......................................65, 66, 80 Rubber............................................................104 Rust preventing...............................................107 S4 punching-shearing system.............................77 Safety lig...........................................................57 Samputensili....................................................141 Screw press........................................................48 Sealed linear encoder......................................BIC Self feed drilling unit.......................................130 Sero drive........................................................121 Servo insert coupling.......................................132

Taper pin.........................................................132 Technology event............................................143 Temperature controller................................ 14, 57 Temperature indicator.......................................14 Tensioner nut..................................................131 Textile.............................................................104 Thread gauge.....................................................93 Thread mill.......................................................26 Thread milling cutter & tap holder....................68 Threading tool................................................. BC Threadmill cutter...............................................67 Timers...............................................................57 Tool grinding..................................................109 Tool Grinding Machine...................................127

INTERNATIONAL Chip conveyor.................................................102

CNC lathes.......................................................53

CNC lathes.....................................................117

CNC milling machine......................................133

Directional valve & hydraulic valves...................49

Flow control valve..............................................49

Lathes-automatic.............................................117

Machine guards system....................................102

Modular valve....................................................49

Power unit.........................................................49

Pressure control valve........................................49

Pump................................................................49

Telescopic cover..............................................102

February 2013 - MMT 139


List of Advertisers Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Accut Machinery Co. Ltd.

Pg No

38

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

EFD Induction Limited

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

56

Geometric Ltd

Pg No

129

T: +86-411-84804589

T: +91-80-7820404

T: +91-22-67056880

E: info@accutmachinetools.com

E: sales@efdgroup.net.

E: inquires@camworks.com

W: www.accutmachinetools.com

W: www.efd-induction.com

W: www.camworks.com

ACE Micromatic Group

11

Emag India Private Limited

T: +91-80-41492285

T: +91-80-42544400

E: customercare@acemicromatic.com

E: info@india.emag.com

W: www.acemicromatic.net

W: www.emag.com

Autotech Machine Tools Sales & Ser 7

Empire Machine Tools

T: +91-20-25690044

T: +91-22-24947066

E: autocnc@vsnl.com

E: empiremt@vsnl.com

W: www.autotechcnc.com

W: www.emtmcat.com

Birla Precision Technologies Ltd

64

T: +91-240-2554301

75

E: gskwang@hotmail.com

141

68

E: marketing@emugeindia.com

W: www.birlaprecision.in

W: www.emugeindia.com

49

T: +886-4-2461-5707

Ceratizit India Pvt Ltd

59

T: +91-33-24947146

16

T: +91-172-5063436

10

T: +91-80-42660122 E: sandesh.kumar@doosan.com W: www.doosaninfracore.com

Dormer Tools India Private Limited 37

140 MMT - February 2013

47

T: +91-80-40431252

W: www.heidenhain.in

Hurco India Pvt Ltd

103

T: ‘+91-9789052472 E: hurcoindia.south@hurco.in W: www.hurco.com

Hwacheon Machine Tools

15

W: www.hwacheon.com

Hyundai Wia India Pvt. Ltd

21

W: www.hyundai-wia.com

Igus India Pvt Ltd

12

E: info@igus.in

W: www.gwindia.in

W: www.gelco-world.com

Heidenhain Optics & Electronics (I) BIC

T: +91-80-39127800

E: info@gwindia.in

E: info@gelco-world.com

W: www.hannovermesse.com

E: mvhari@gmail.com

G W Precision Tools India Pvt Ltd 55

T: +91-79-22200902

E: geeta.bisht@hmf-india.com

T: +91-9940653703

W: www.festo.com

Gelco Electronics Pvt Ltd

T: +91-22-42369719

E: sales@hwacheonindia.com

W: www.farmax.in

Festo Controls Ltd

Hannover Milano Fairs India Pvt Ltd 143

T: +91-20-30429140

E: info_in@festo.com

W: www.coatecindia.com

W: www.carboloy.com

39

T: +91-80-22894100

E: info@coatecindia.com

T: +91-124-4703825

Farmax Machines Private Limited E: skr@farmax.in

W: www.ceratizit.com

Doosan Infracore India Pvt Ltd

W: www.ermaksan.com.tr T: +91-80-28435034

E: info@ceratizitindia.co.in

Coatec India

Ermaksan Sheet Metal Working Machinery 62 E: hakan.ceki@ermaksan.com.tr

W: www.camel555.com.tw

W: www.haascnc.com

E: info@heidenhain.in

W: www.engg-expo.com T: +90-224-2947500

E: rocci@camel555.com.tw

5

T: +91-44-30234000

E: engexpo@infomedia18.in

W: www.brisloy.com

Camel Precision Co. Ltd.

119

T: +91-09819552270

E: info@brisloy.com

Haas Automation India Pvt Ltd E: indiasales@haascnc.com

E: info@birlaprecision.com

T: +91-124-4283106

W: www.gsk.com.cn T: +91-22-61392800

Emuge India Pvt Ltd

Engineering Expo

35

T: +91-9886835186

T: +91-20-39310000

Brisloy Tools India Private Limited 145

GSK CNC Equipment Co. Ltd

14

W: www.igus.in

IMI Impex Pvt Ltd

T: +91-079-65499019 E: imi@imitoolsindia.com W: www.imitoolsindia.com

106


List of Advertisers Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Isgec Heavy Engineering Ltd

91

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Lico Machinery Co., Ltd.

Pg No

117

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Nmtg Mechtrans Techniques Pvt Ltd.

T: +91-1732-307211

T: +886-4-2563-0950

T: +91-79-22821527

E: presses@isgec.com

E: sales@licomachinery.com

E: nmtg@nmtgindia.com

W: www.isgec.com

W: www.licomachinery.com

W: www.nmtgindia.com

Isgec Heavy Engineering Ltd

101

Maco Corporation India Pvt Ltd 66, 80

NN Combined Engineering Agencies Pv BGF

T: +91-120-4085001

T: +91-33-24758371

T: +91-40-27844279

E: trading@isgec.com

E: rdutta@macocorporation.com

E: mail@nncea.com

W: www.isgec.com

W: www.macocorporation.com

W: www.nncea.com

Jyoti CNC Automation Pvt. Ltd.

13

Makson Machines Pvt Ltd

34

T: +91-2827-287081

T: +91-278-2446437

E: info@jyoti.co.in

E: makwana_eng@yahoo.com

W: www.jyoti.co.in

W: www.makwanaeng.com

Keyarrow (Taiwan) Co. Ltd.

102

Metrol Corporation India Branch Off 24

T: +886-4-2358-1239

T: +91-80-42105031

E: keyarrow@keyarrow.com

E: sales@metrolindia.com

W: www.keyarrow.com

W: www.toolsensor.com

Kirpekar-Micro Tool Machine Pvt. Ltd.

70

T: +91-11-41021234

E: sales@mtmkirpekar.com

E: mtdsales@mhiindia.com

W: www.mtmkirpekar.com

W: www.mhiindia.com

Korber Schleifring Gmbh

109

W: www.mitutoyoindia.com

E: pmwbvn@dataone.in W: www.prakashmachines.co.in

W: www.korloy.com

W: www.mitsubishicarbide.com

Precihole Machine Tools Pvt Ltd

T: +33-148117030

18

T: +91-22-25836780 E: info@precihole.co.in

97

W: www.precihole.co.in

PTC Creo

E: sm.haridas@larsentoubro.com

65

W: www.motul.com

121

NETWORK18

84

T: +1800-2335858

T: +91-22-303242518

E: cic@lntebg.com

E: mcc@network18publishing.com

142 MMT - February 2013

125

T: +91-278-2438241

E: mmcindia@mmc.co.jp

W: www.larsentoubro.com

E: para.mill@msa.hinet.net

146

E: sales.kip@korloy.com

Larsen & Toubro Ltd

133

T: +886-4-2680-0678

Prakash Engitech Pvt Ltd

T: +91-80-23516083

W: www.larsentoubro.com

E: info@prsales.in

W: www.paramill.com

T: +91-124-4930080

Motul

FGF, 69

T: +91-20-25437591

19

W: www.schleifring.in

T: +91-22-67051093

T: +91-80-40726400

Para Mill Precision Machinery Co., Ltd

Mitutoyo South Asia Pvt Ltd

MMC Hardmetal India Pvt Ltd

57

W: www.prsales.in

E: delhi@mitutoyoindia.com

FIC

Omron Automation Pvt. Ltd.

W: www.omron-ap.com

E: sales@schleifring.in

Larsen & Toubro Limited

E: jb.roytalukdar@gmail.com

P R Sales Corporation Pvt Ltd

T: +91-11-26372090

17

T: +91-141 -2570495

E: in_enquiry@ap.omron.com

T: +91-80-41554601

Korloy India Tooling Pvt. Ltd.

Octahedron Superbrasive Co Pvt Ltd 79

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries India P 136

T: +91-20-66741600

131

W: www.ptc.com/go/Aristides

Quaker Chemical India Ltd

T: +91-33-22822181

107

E: sales@quakerchemindia.com W: www.quakerchem.com


List of Advertisers Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Quickmill Inc.

Pg No

123

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Samkrish

Pg No

105

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Taiwan Takisawa Technology Co. Ltd. 53

T: +91-44-23612310

T: +886-3-464-3166

E: phil-g@quickmill.com

E: info@samkrish.com

W: www.quickmill.com

W: www.samkrish.com

E: bryan@takisawa.com.tw

Raj Petro Specialities Private Limi 58

Samkrish Machine Tools

63

T: +91-44-42288900

T: +91-44-23612310

E: francis@rajgrp.com

E: info@samkrishmachinetools.com

W: www.rajgrp.com

W: www.samkrishmachinetools.com

Rightvision (India) Pvt. Ltd.

48

Sap Technical & Marketing Consultant 28,73

T: +91-120-4261026

T: +91-80-26662386

E: lasco@rightvision.biz

E: saptech@eth.net

W: www.rightvision.biz

W: www.saptechnical.co.in

Rotomotive Powerdrives India Ltd. 108

T: +91-80-41277361

E: info@rotomotive.com

E: info@in.schunk.com

W: www.rotomotive.com

W: www.schunk.com

S&T Engineers

110

95

31

E: sales@stengineers.com

E: seco.india@secotools.com

W: www.stengineers.com

W: www.secotools.com/in

T: +91-22-66301911

T: +91-172-5063436

E: ipol@sahpetroleums.com

E: info@coatecindia.com

W: www.sahpetroleums.com

W: www.coatecindia.com

Sahajanand Laser Technology Ltd 89

T: +91-44-32407116

E: mktg@SLTL.com

E: 32407116@shuter.in

W: www.sahajanandlaser.com

W: www.shuter.in

Salvagnini Machinery India Pvt Ltd 77

Synco Industries Ltd

E: teknic@vsnl.co.in W: http://www.teknic.co.in

E: jaws@jaswindia.com W: www.jawsindia.com

E: info@trigontools.com W: www.trigontools.com

Tungaloy India Pvt Ltd

128

W: info@tungaloyindia.com

Tyrolit India Superabrasive Pvt. Lt 113 T: +91-80-40953259 E: subrahmanya.kumar@tyrolit.com W: www.tylolit.com

Vargus Limited 129

E: vishal@vargusindia.com

E: riddhish.jalnapurkar@salvagninigroup.com

E: saleem@synco.co.in

W: www.vargus.com

W: www.salvangninigroup.com

W: www.synco.co.in

Taegutec India Ltd

BC

T: +82-32-822-4811

T: +91-80-27839111

E: makeitdream@samchully.com

E: sales@taegutec-india.com

W: www.samchully.com

W: www.taegutec-india.com

144 MMT - February 2013

26

T: +91-9730028248

T: +91-9214407024

20

60

E: www.tungaloy.co.jp.in

T: +91-80-32214123

Samchully Machinery Co Ltd

93

T: +91-22-61248888

Shuter Enterprises India Pvt. Ltd. 22

T: +91-79-23287461

T: +91-22-26592392

T: +91-124-2370250

Seco Tools India Pvt Ltd

See Lube Technologies P Ltd

33

Trigon Tooling Solutions Pvt. Ltd. 67

T: +91-2137- 667300

104

Teknic

T: +91-20-26877842

T: +91-422-2590810

Sah Petroleums Ltd

W: www.takisawa.com.tw

The Jaws Mfg Co

Schunk Intec India Pvt Ltd

T: +91-2692-230430

Pg No

YG Cutting Tools Corporation Pvt Lt 9 T: +91-80-43543636 E: admin@yg1india.com W: www.yg1.co.kr


February 2013


February 2013


Reg No: MH / MR / WEST / 235 / 2012 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2014 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 24347 Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting Office, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001 Date Of Posting 5th & 6th Of Every Month / English & Monthly. Date Of Publication: 28th of Every Month

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Modern Machine Tools - February 2013