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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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October 2011

COVER STORY

RENO 2011: OUR COVERAGE n Flight USA wishes to express our deep condolences to the families, friends and fans of those who perished at the Reno Air Races on Sept. 16. Our thoughts and prayers are with all affected by this tragic event, especially those who witnessed it or were otherwise directly affected. We have dedicated several pages to coverage for two reasons: First, as a part of the general aviation community, we share with our readers the need to try to understand and comprehend the magnitude of this tragedy. Secondly, our writers are professionals yet as witnesses to the event, they bring a unique perspective and also reflect on the emotional impact. Some of the writing is their personal account as it happened and therefore, the words are sometimes powerful and raw. We also publish some writing and photos of race events prior to the accident, acknowledging the great effort racers put forth preparing for the races each year and recognizing that fans travel across the country and beyond to attend.

I

Race #42 Honest Entry of the Condor Squadron an AT-6 Texan piloted by Chris Rushing. We wish to note that some of our writers also speculate on what might have happened and perhaps what can be done to prevent such events in the future. However, we also publish the preliminary report from NTSB and await the final analysis in the months to come to

determine the cause beyond speculation. For anyone wishing to help the victims and families of those who affected, “Think Kindness,” a northern Nevada non-profit, has started a fund to assist them financially. Please visit www.thinkkindness.org for more information.

(Kevin Collver) Our coverage begins on page 45. Again, our condolences to the families of the victims, our prayers to the survivors, and to Mr. Jimmy Leeward, our thanks for years of aviation entertainment and joyous thrills. With a heavy heart, we wish you blue skies…

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TABLE Volume 28, Number 2

OF

CONTENTS

650-358-9908 • Fax: 650-358-9254 • E-mail: vickie@inflightusa.com • www.inflightusa.com

October 2011

ON THE COVER COVER STORY

PHOTO FINISH

RENO

WINE

COUNTRY AIRSHOW

MEMORIALIZED Stories start on Page 4 and continue on Page 45.

By Hayman Tam Story begins on Page 10

Reno At Dawn: Stillness and Sadness by Kevin Collver

NEWS EAA, AOPA Launch Plan to Expand Driver’s License Medical..6 Aviation Industry United Against Taxes, User Fees ............8 California Flight Training Industry Wins Relief Law....................8 CA Flight Training Background Report By AOPA ........36 NBAA Welcomes Bigger Voice on TSA Policies ..............11 F-22 Raptors Resume Flight Operations ............................20 NBAA Trumpets Plans for Exciting Convention ................39 Reno Coverage......................................................................45

FEATURES

COLUMNS

9-11 Remembered At Wine Country Airshow By Hayman Tam ..........................................................10 Editorial: Just Because I’m Paranoid By Ed Downs ................................................................16 Author Jack Whitehouse’s Fire Island History By S. Mark Rhodes ........................................................14 Author Maltin On His Aviation Film Favs By S. Mark Rhodes ........................................................31 Sara Schwarz: Success Story In The Making By Herb Foreman ..........................................................32 The Oxygen Lady Fielding Questions ........................60

Soaring With Sagar Contrails Aviation Ancestry What’s Up?! Safe Landings Homebuilder’s Workshop Goodies & Gadgets The Pylon Place

Cessna Launches New Light Biz Jet ..............................53

DESTINATION

Green News: Embry-Riddle Students Fly Hybrid ............56

Flying With Faber: A Trip to Mackinac Island By Stuart J. Faber ..........................................................50

2011 AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT WRAP-UP.........................BEGINS

by Sagar Pathak ......................12 by Steve Weaver ......................17 by Scott Schwartz ....................23 by Larry Shapiro ......................26

..............................................27 by Ed Wischmeyer ....................35

................................................37 by Marilyn Dash ......................45

DEPARTMENTS Calendar of Events ........................................................9 Classifieds ....................................................................62 Index of Advertisers ....................................................66

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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October 2011

EAA, AOPA ANNOUNCE PLAN TO EXPAND DRIVER'S LICENSE MEDICAL OPTION Aeromedical Awareness Training Would Replace Third Class Medical By J. Mac McClellan, Director of Publications, EAA AA and AOPA jointly announced on Saturday, Sept. 24, at AOPA Summit that the associations would petition the FAA for an exemption allowing pilots who have completed required aeromedical awareness training to fly recreationally with a driver’s license medical standard in place of the FAA Third Class medical certificate. The request for exemption would allow pilots to fly airplanes of up to 180 hp during daylight VFR carrying no more than one passenger even though the airplane may have up to four seats. Though a number of requests for exemption from the Third Class medical requirement have been made in the past this proposal differs markedly because pilots would be trained to understand

E

medical issues that can affect safety of flight. “We have more than five years’ experience now with the Sport Pilot certificate and the driver’s license medical standard,” EAA president and CEO Rod Hightower said. “In that time, we have not had a single medical incapacitation accident. The standard works.” “Our petition would enhance safety by requiring initial and recurrent training about health awareness and medical selfcertification for any pilot choosing the driver’s license standard,” added AOPA president Craig Fuller. AOPA and EAA plan to file the request for exemption after the first of the year to allow time to fully develop a curriculum for the aeromedical awareness training. Under the proposed exemption pilots holding recreational, private, commercial or airline transport pilot certifi-

cates could opt to fly under the same driver’s license medical self-certification standards. The health educational training program proposal is being developed jointly by EAA’s Aeromedical Advisory Council and AOPA Air Safety Institute in consultation with AOPA’s Board of Aeromedical Advisors. The goal of the training is to provide an equivalent level of safety as the Third Class medical by giving pilots the information and tools to make informed and safe decisions about their fitness to fly. “Pilots must always assess their medical fitness to fly every day, not just on the day they visit their AME, so this program would give pilots the information they need to make safe and healthy decisions,” Hightower said. EAA and AOPA estimate that the exemption could save pilots who current-

ly fly with medical certificates nearly $250 million over 10 years, and save the federal government more than $11 million over the same period. The number of basic single engine airplanes with 180 hp or less is believed to be more than 50,000 so pilots would have instant access to familiar airplanes to fly under the driver’s license alternative. “The safety record for pilots flying basic single engine airplanes under daylight VFR is already good, and the medical awareness training can only make it even better,” Hightower said. There is no way to predict how long the FAA will take to act on the request for exemption but among the first steps in the process will be to post the request for member comments. EAA and AOPA will keep their members informed of progress on the request and tell them when and how to comment to the FAA.

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...www.inflightusa.com


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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

8

October 2011

THIS TIME IT’S PERSONAL By Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO love to give away airplanes. Really, who wouldn’t? The day I hand the keys to a new owner is always one of the best of my year. Regardless of the aircraft and its story, I am excited. But this time is even more special. This time it’s personal. In 2012 AOPA will be giving away an Aviat Husky – not just any Husky but one that has already proven it’s tougher than a tornado. I’ve always admired the Husky. It’s such a capable airplane, good for everything from backcountry flying to routine travel. It can handle short fields, soft fields, and, of course, more typical runways. I first met the Tougher than a Tornado Husky at Sun ‘n Fun in April. I had been looking at the airplane and talking with Aviat President Stu Horn and John McKenna, president of the Recreational Aviaiton Foundation (RAF). John suggested it might make a good

I

Tougher Than a Tornado Husky sweepstakes airplane. Then, a sudden and violent storm hit Sun ‘n Fun. We captured what happened next in what has become one of the most widely watched videos on AOPA Live. The new 2011 Aviat Husky parked in front of the RAF tent was picked up by the storm, turned 180 degrees and backed into a curb where it bounced and rocked and road out the high winds of the storm.

(AOPA) At that moment, N40WY became the Tougher than a Tornado Husky and, with the RAF’s encouragement, we began the process of acquiring her, repairing the damage to “better than new” condition, and making her our 2012 AOPA Sweepstakes aircraft. This is a plane I am drawn to. The first time I saw the aircraft on display, it struck me as something that just had to be

pure fun to fly. In my 40-plus years of flying, I had not flown a tailwheel aircraft, and that certainly needed to be corrected. Nor, had I flown with the remarkable view you have when your passenger – if you have one – is sitting behind you! At about this time, a low-time 1998 Aviat Husky appeared on the market. It just seemed like a great opportunity. I could have my own Husky to learn with and I wouldn’t have to give it away in 12 months. The 2012 Sweepstakes Husky starts moving around the country in late September right after the AOPA Summit in Hartford. So, if you see N40WY and another yellow Husky parked next to it, along with two smiling people, there is a good chance it will be our sweeps airplane and me in for a visit! I hope you’ll join us and, with a little luck, you could be the next winner. You’ll find out next October at AOPA’s Aviation Summit in Palm Springs.

AVIATION INDUSTRY UNITED AGAINST ADDITIONAL TAXES, FEES EAA and more than two dozen other aviation organizations, including GA, airline, and labor groups, sent letters to House and Senate leaders on Sept. 21 urging them to reject president Obama’s proposal for additional taxes and fees on the aviation industry. Among the bipartisan group of Congressional leaders receiving the letter were House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), as well as members of the congressional “supercommittee” working on deficit reduction

strategies. The statement included representatives from nearly the entire U.S. aviation industry and urged Congress to “reject proposed increases in taxes or fees which will stifle the important contribution that aviation makes to our economy through travel and trade, and undermine an already fragile economic recovery.” The letter pointed out that aviation represents 5.6 percent of the nation’s total Gross Domestic Product, $1.2 trillion in economic activity, and 11 million jobs. “What is noteworthy about the letter to congressional leaders is the across-the-

board agreement by the national aviation community, from GA to airlines and labor groups,” said Doug Macnair, EAA’s vice president of government relations. “There is no doubt regarding the unity shown in opposition to what additional taxes and fees could do the America’s aviation industry, which remains a major export industry for our nation.” The letter also recommended that Congress and the Administration focus on increasing U.S. international competitiveness in aviation. That includes ensur-

ing “that tax and infrastructure policy are focused on strengthening U.S. aviation leadership and furthering the safety and modernization of the aviation system.” Visit www.eaa.org/news/2011/ Boeh nertaxletter.pdf to read the letter to House Majority Leader John Boehner. Visit www.eaa.org/news/2011/Reidtaxletter.pdf to read the letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

A letter was also addressed to President Obama. See page 24.

BILL PROVIDING RELIEF TO CALIFORNIA FLIGHT TRAINING INDUSTRY BECOMES LAW The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) announced that California Governor Jerry Brown has signed Senate Bill 619 into law as Chapter 309. SB 619 was introduced by State Senator Jean Fuller, sponsored by NATA and supported by many in the industry. SB 619 provides relief to many of the flight training facilities that were facing burdensome regulation from the California Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education (BPPE). With the signing of SB 619, flight training

providers and flight training programs that pose no financial risk to students are exempted from the BPPE's regulations. The fight for relief began in early 2010 after the California legislature included flight training in the BPPE's regulatory authority with the passage of Assembly Bill 48. Flight training providers were never included in the development and debate over this bill and the result was regulation that threatened to harm flight training severely in the state. “While we wish this long process

could have been avoided in the first place through inclusion of flight training providers in the legislative process, today's signing of SB 619 speaks volumes about the power of our industry when we all stand up and work together,” said NATA President and CEO James K. Coyne. “Today's signing of this bill marks the end of a long battle to ensure that California flight training remains a vibrant contributor to our state economy. I am proud to have worked alongside NATA and many others in the flight train-

ing industry in passing this legislation,” commented Senator Fuller, a pilot and author of the legislation. Under the new law, flight training providers and programs that do not require upfront payment of fees in excess of $2500 and also do not require students to enter into contracts of indebtedness are exempted from regulation by the BPPE.

Editor’s Note: For background information, see AOPA’s story on Page 38.


October 2011

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Drive and Fly In some ways itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to believe that the :WVY[7PSV[JLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L has been around for TVYL[OHUÃ&#x201E;]L`LHYZ To be a Sport Pilot, or a balloon or glider pilot for that matter, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need an FAA medical JLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[PVU0M`V\»YL healthy enough to drive a JHY`V\»YLOLHS[O`LUV\NO[VÃ&#x2026;`5V^(67(HUK EAA have joined forces to petition the FAA to expand that standard. 6\YVYNHUPaH[PVUZHYLHZRPUN[OL-(([VTHRL[OLKYP]LY»Z SPJLUZLTLKPJHSH]HPSHISL[V[OV\ZHUKZTVYLWPSV[ZWYV]PKLK [OVZLWPSV[ZÃ&#x2026;`\UKLYJLY[HPUJVUKP[PVUZ0»SSNL[[V[OVZL JVUKP[PVUZPUHTVTLU[-PYZ[SL[»Z[HSRHIV\[^O`^L[OPUR [OPZJHU^VYR 0UTVYL[OHUÃ&#x201E;]L`LHYZVMWPSV[ZÃ&#x2026;`PUN^P[OZVJHSSLK¸KYP]LY»Z SPJLUZLTLKPJHSZ¹[OLYLOHZU»[ILLUHZPUNSLPUJPKLU[VMWPSV[ PUJHWHJP[H[PVUMVYTLKPJHSYLHZVUZ(UK[OPURVM[OLZH]PUNZ )`UV[OH]PUN[VNL[HTLKPJHSL]LY`JV\WSLVM`LHYZVYTVYL KLWLUKPUNVU`V\YJLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[L^LLZ[PTH[L[OH[WPSV[ZJHU ZH]L TPSSPVUV]LY[LU`LHYZ·HUK[OLNV]LYUTLU[JHU ZH]L TPSSPVUPU[OH[ZHTLWLYPVK 6MJV\YZLHKYP]LY»ZSPJLUZLTLKPJHS^V\SKU»[ILMVY L]LY`VUL@V\^V\SKILHSSV^LK[V\ZLP[PM`V\OVSKH WYP]H[LJVTTLYJPHSVYL]LU(;7JLY[PÃ&#x201E;JH[LHZSVUNHZ`V\ TLL[[OLYLZ[VM[OLYLX\PYLTLU[Z;V[HRLWHY[`V\»KULLK [VWHY[PJPWH[LPUVUSPUL[YHPUPUNPUJS\KPUNYLJ\YYLU[[YHPUPUN HIV\[HLYVTLKPJHSMHJ[VYZ(UK`V\JV\SKVUS`Ã&#x2026;`MVY YLJYLH[PVUUV[PUM\Y[OLYHUJLVMHI\ZPULZZ@V\»KILSPTP[LK [VJHYY`PUNHZPUNSLWHZZLUNLYPUHZPUNSLLUNPULÃ&#x201E;_LK^PUN HPYJYHM[^P[OUVTVYL[OHUMV\YZLH[ZHUKOW@V\JV\SK VUS`Ã&#x2026;`PUKH`SPNO[HUKNVVK^LH[OLYHUK`V\»KNLULYHSS` ULLK[VZ[H`ILSV^MLL[ )\[SL[»ZNL[YLHS·[OH[»ZL_HJ[S`OV^[OV\ZHUKZVM\ZÃ&#x2026;`UV^ >LL_WLJ[[VÃ&#x201E;SL[OPZWL[P[PVULHYS`PUHUK^L»YLOVWLM\S [OH[P[^PSSOLSW[OV\ZHUKZVMWPSV[ZRLLWÃ&#x2026;`PUN^OPSLTHRPUN P[LHZPLYMVY[OV\ZHUKZVMV[OLYZ[VNL[PU]VS]LK(U`[PTL^L JHUÃ&#x2026;`ZHMLS`^OPSLLSPTPUH[PUN\UULJLZZHY`L_WLUZLHUK OHZZSL[OH[»Z^OH[^L^HU[[VKV(SSVM\ZH[(67(HUK,(( ILSPL]L[OH[L_WHUKPUN[OLKYP]LY»ZSPJLUZLTLKPJHSZ[HUKHYKPZ HNYLH[[VKVQ\Z[[OH[5V^^LQ\Z[ULLK[OL-(([VHNYLL0»SS RLLW`V\WVZ[LK

Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO

*For more information on the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the PZZ\LZ[OH[HMMLJ[`V\YÃ&#x2026;`PUNNV[Vwww.aopa.org today.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

10

October 2011

9-11 REMEMBRANCES AT WINE COUNTRY AIRSHOW

A piece of Ground Zero was on display next to the ‘First Responder’ F-15 Eagle. (Hayman Tam)

By Hayman Tam

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lose to 25,000 airshow fans came out for the Wings Over Wine Country Airshow put together on Aug. 20-21 by the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM) in Santa Rosa, Calif. This two-day show takes place at Charles Schulz – Sonoma County Airport (STS) and is the museum’s major fundraising event. The cloudy skies cleared and the temperature warmed up to perfect, just right to put in earplugs and sunscreen and enjoy the festivities. This year’s airshow honored two national occasions occurring this year, the Centennial of Naval Aviation and the 10th Anniversary of the 9-11 attack. The Navy theme was echoed on the ground by the museum’s F-14A Tomcat, F-16N Viper, F-5E Freedom Fighter, A4E Skyhawk, F-8 Crusader and A-6E Intruder. Wings of Gold took to the air in the form of flybys with several USN T-28 Trojans and a very rare C-1A Trader, a long-retired carrier onboard delivery aircraft. The popular Greg Colyer traded his normal USAF T-33 for one with a U.S. Navy “Blue Angels” motif, exciting the crowd as the only featured jet performer, showing how nimble a 50-plus year-old jet can be. As for the more somber of the two anniversaries, the Santa Rosa Fire Department displayed a section of steel from the ruins at Ground Zero that they were honored to receive. Prior to the start of the airshow, the flightline was packed with first responder vehicles from local agencies to mark the occasion. The twisted section of I-beam was displayed next to PCAM’s latest acquisition, the “First Responder” F-15A Eagle. This aircraft

...

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This Curtiss P-40N Kittyhawk is one of approximately 25 flyable P-40s remaining. (Hayman Tam)

Brian Sanders flies by in a beautiful Hawker Sea Fury. (Hayman Tam) was the first fighter to fly combat air patrol over the skies above New York that tragic day ten-years ago. Guest flybys included a U-2R Dragon Lady from Beale AFB and a pair of F-15E Strike Eagles courtesy of Klamath Falls ANG in Oregon. Solo aerobatic performances included Vicki Benzing, Tim Decker, and Eddie Andreini. The aerobatic headliner was Kirby Chambliss, stepping in to replace the recently departed Greg Poe. Kirby wowed the crowd in his Red Bull Edge 540, with his impressive very short field takeoff followed by an immediate vertical pull up, demonstrating why he is a twotime Red Bull Air Race champion. Continued on Page 65


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NBAA WELCOMES HOUSE MEASURE ALLOWING INCREASED INDUSTRY VOICE ON TSA POLICIES The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) on Sept. 19 welcomed House subcommittee passage of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Administration Authorization Act of 2011, which would allow increased industry input toward airspace governance and other TSA policies impacting companies that rely on business aircraft. “We commend the House subcommittee leaders for passing this legislation, which gives business aviation a greater voice in the security policies that impact our industry,” said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. The legislation passed out of the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on by a 6–3 vote. If approved by the full House, the Senate and the president, the bill would create an Aviation Security Advisory Committee that would include a subgroup specifically derived from organizations representing general aviation. Additionally, within a year of enactment, the bill would require the TSA to

develop procedures and protocols to permit business-aircraft operators access to airspace closed by temporary flight restrictions. Such airspace, usually surrounding a traveling dignitary and major sporting events, has for the past decade since 9/11 been closed to virtually all civilian traffic. The subcommittee’s bill calls for reopening that airspace to general aviation under some circumstances, as long as doing so does not affect security. The measure also contains an amendment, included by Subcommittee Chairman Mike Rogers (R-8-AL), aimed at bringing consistency to the TSA’s use of “security directives” (SDs). That issue was the subject of a letter sent to Chairman Rogers on Sept. 13 by a coalition of aviation groups including NBAA, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Air Transport Association, the Airports Council International, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association and the National Air Transportation Association. “We support your amendment to the

Transportation Security Authorization Act of 2011 on the issuance of security directives,” the letter to Chairman Rogers

states. “While we agree that TSA needs the ability to issue security directives Continued on Page 22 P.O. Box 5402 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (650) 358-9908 • Fax (650) 358-9254

Founder ..................................................................................................................Ciro Buonocore Publisher/Editor................................................................................................Victoria Buonocore Managing Editor ........................................................................................................Toni F. Sieling Associate Editors ........................ Nicholas A. Veronico, Sagar Pathak, Richard VanderMeulen ..................................................................................................................................Russ Albertson Staff Contributors ......................................................................S. Mark Rhodes, Roy A. Barnes, .....................................................................................Clark Cook, Larry Nazimek, Joe Gonzalez, ........................................................................................Alan Smith, Herb Foreman, Pete Trabuco Columnists..................................Stuart Faber, Scott Schwartz, Larry Shapiro, Ed Wischmeyer, ..........................................................................................Marilyn Dash, Ed Downs, Anthony Nalli Production Editors ..............................................................................Anne Dobbins, Toni Sieling Copy Editing ............................................................................................................Sally Gersbach Advertising Sales Manager ........................................Ed Downs (650) 358-9908, (918) 873-0280 Advertising Sales ....................................................Karyn Dawes (Southern CA) (760) 471-1144 Web Design ..................................................................................................................Josh Nadler In Flight USA is published each month by In Flight Publishing. It is circulated throughout the continental United States. Business matters, advertising and editorial concerns should be addressed to In Flight USA, P.O. Box 5402, San Mateo, Calif. 94402 or by calling (650) 358-9908–fax (650) 358-9254. Copyright © 2008 In Flight Publishing. In Flight USA is not responsible for any action taken by any person as a result of reading any part of any issue. The pieces are written for information, entertainment and suggestion – not recommendation. The pursuit of flight or any action reflected by this paper is the responsibility of the individual and not of this paper, its staff or contributors. Opinions expressed are those of the individual author, and not necessarily those of In Flight USA. All editorial and advertising matter in this edition is copyrighted. Reproduction in any way is strictly prohibited without written permission of the publisher. In Flight USA is not liable or in any way responsible for the condition or airworthiness of any aircraft advertised for sale in any edition. By law the airworthiness of any aircraft sold is the responsiblity of the seller and buyer.

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October 2011

Soaring With Sagar AIR MOBILITY COMMAND RODEO 2011 very two years, the best of the best from across the Air Mobility Command get together at Joint Base Lewis McChord, Wash., in an undisputed, winner-take-all competition that pits more than 50 aircraft and 2,500 airmen from across the world in a skills competition to crown the best of the best. This year, I had the chance to observe the March ARB Team as they participate in the Air Mobility Rodeo 2011. First held in 1945, the AMC Rodeo is a weeklong competition that has featured more than 2,500 competitors from across the globe. More than 50 aircraft (C-17, C-5, C-130, KC-10, KC-135, T-1, C-37, C-32, etc.) fill the ramp at McChord Field and compete in contests such as air-to-air refueling, on/off loading cargo, aero-medical evacuations, low-level flying and air drops. As we took off from March ARB, our team was already in the first event of the competition and would be judged on our landing. We had to land at McChord Field at exactly 10:05 a.m. and within 3,000 feet of the end of the runway. And delay in flight or lack of accuracy on the landing would cause our team to lose points. After the few-hour flight to McChord, the team landed one second early and right on the mark. It was a great start to the competition. The Airmen from across the globe, including the U.S. Air Force, Air Force

E

Story and Photos by Sagar Pathak

Reserve, Air National Guard, and more than 30 international teams eagerly awaited Brig. Gen. Rick Martin, the Rodeo’s 2011 commander, to officially start the competition. With the largest attendance in 55 years, this year’s Rodeo was shaping up to be one of the best events to date. One of the signs of increasing global cooperation between the USAF and the other countries across the world is evident by the number of international competitors and observers attending the events. No matter what flag was on their shoulder, they shared a common bond of flying cargo airplanes, and along with that came instant respect from any airman, from any base. Their words may have been different, but at the end of the day, they all performed the same mission, and all had the highest level of professionalism. This year, the flying international participants hailed from the Royal Netherlands Air Force, Pakistan Air Force, Swedish Air Force, Belgium Air Force, Spanish Air Force, Republic of Korea Air Force, and the Royal Saudi Air Force; each flying their C-130s. After observing the various events during the week, I was reminded of the preparation that the numerous crews Continued on Page 13


October 2011

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Soaring With Sagar

Continued from Page 12 must have gone through to get in shape for the events. March ARB was no different. The crews and maintenance that made up the team were some of the finest at the competition. After observing them first hand and measuring them up based on how I saw the other teams perform, it was clear that they were pouring their hearts into the events. They competed in the various events such as the ERO (Engine Running Onload) competition where their C-17 aircraft pulled up with its engines on, and an Aerial Port Team from another base scrambled to load a vehicle and some cargo onboard as quickly, and safely as possible. This competition required the Port Team to work closely with the Loadmaster of the airplane to get it loaded and make sure the center of gravity is correct. Some of the team drives the vehicles while others guide them into precise position. Not to mention, you didn’t want to back something into the aircraft and damage it. The second half of the challenge is to safely offload the cargo and vehicle. With competitions ranging from precision flying to daily maintenance inspections, March ARB and the other

teams had their hands full every day. But even when the March Maintenance team competed early in the morning, the aircrew was there to cheer them on. And 12 hours later, when the aircrew had a very late night sortie, the maintenance folks were there to make sure the jet launched and didn't break down. It was this spirit that made the Rodeo competition a success for TeamMarch. And just like that it was over for AMC Rodeo 2011. With severe weather delays in the beginning of the week, the schedulers had their hands full getting all of the crews in the air and the competitions closed out. But they did it in fine fashion, and when it was all over and done, the 97th Air Mobility Wing from Altus Air Force Base, Okla. earned the “Best Air Mobility Wing” title.

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AUTHOR JACK WHITEHOUSE’S FIRE ISLAND HISTORY By S. Mark Rhodes mbedded within the pages of Jack Whitehouse’s new book, Fire Island: Heroes & Villains on Long Island’s Wild Shore (History Press) is the fascinating, but mostly forgotten story of the creation of one of the first U.S. Naval Air Station’s on Long Island near the community of Bay Shore, New York in 1917. Whitehouse, an author/historian with a fascinating resume that includes graduation from Brown, a stint as the commanding officer of a patrol gunboat as well as having had the honor of being the first Naval Officer to participate in an exchange program with the Royal Norwegian Navy was nice enough to check in with In Flight’s Mark Rhodes about his book and this unique chapter in not only Long Island, but U.S. aviation.

E

In Flight USA: Bay Shore was basically the second American community to get a United States Naval Air Station. What do you think the rationale for locating it there was in particular? Jack Whitehouse: “The Navy had several good reasons for selecting Bay Shore, located in approximately the geographic middle of the south shore of Long Island, as a location for a U.S. Naval Air Station. First, in 1916 the Second Battalion of the Naval Militia of the State of New York had built an eightacre base in Bay Shore on the edge of the Great South Bay. The purpose of the naval militia base was to train naval volunteers in flying and aviation mechanics; thus to a great extent the site was already functioning as a naval air station.” “Second, Bay Shore was in a strategic location. The town lay within a few miles of the vital sea-lanes into New York harbor. Third, Bay Shore was within close proximity to other important naval aviation related facilities such as Glenn Curtiss’ Curtiss Aeroplane Company and Yale and MIT universities which contributed so much to providing many of the first navy pilots. Bay Shore was also very close to important research and development companies such as the Sperry Gyroscope Company developers of the flywheel catapult system, the gyrocompass and other vital aviation technology.” IF USA: There was a lot of press at the time about activity and training at the NAS in Bay Shore. How was it that this part of Long Island’s lore was eventually forgotten?

JW: “Naval Air Station Bay Shore was forgotten because no one has ever made the effort to preserve the memory. Following World War I and the May 1919 closing of Naval Air Station Bay Shore, U.S. domestic problems became so significant that efforts to focus on memorials to World War I accomplishments fell by the wayside. Prohibition, lawlessness nurtured by rampant rum running, the rise of organized crime, the emergence of the “new” Ku Klux Klan and a runaway economy followed by the Great Depression – and then World War II – contributed to eventually making Naval Air Station Bay Shore a near-forgotten part of Long Island history.” IF USA: Was there a figure associated with the base at Bay Shore that was particularly memorable or magnetic? JW: “As with his more famous contemporary Glenn Curtiss, the man who owned the property on which the Navy built N.A.S. Bay Shore was a multi-talented engineer and patriot. The landed and wealthy Charles Lanier Lawrance had trained to be an architect but found his calling as an aviation inventor with a passion for design engineering. It was Bay Shore’s Lawrance who came up with the revolutionary air-cooled aircraft engine design when water-cooled engines had been the standard.” “In the late 1910s, Lawrance established the Lawrance Aero-Engine Corporation eventually demonstrating a working model of his air-cooled engine to the Navy. The Navy found the machine more durable and reliable than their water-cooled engines and so fostered a union between Lawrence’s company and the Wright Aeronautical Corporation, the firm founded by Orville and Wilbur Wright. “Charles Lawrence went on to Continued on Page 16


October 2011

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2

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

16

October 2011

Editorial

JUST BECAUSE I’M PARANOID By Ed Downs s there anyone reading this who cannot complete the title of this editorial? Sure, it goes, “just because I’m paranoid doesn’t mean they are not out to get me.” Now, according to our friends at Wikipedia, the word paranoid, or paranoia, is defined in somewhat negative terms. It includes, “Paranoid thinking typically includes persecutory beliefs, or beliefs of conspiracy concerning a perceived threat towards oneself.” Wow, that definition looks a lot like the guy looking back at me in the mirror every morning. But the fact that I continue to see that reflection is, perhaps, an indication the my “paranoid” behavior has served me well for an aviation career that has lasted well over half a century. Early in my flying days I read a quote by Wilbur Wright that ended with the concept of “deliberately accepting risk.” Indeed, that is what we do in aviation. We exercise a metered level of paranoia and try to figure out what is out

I

there, “conspiring” to get us. This could be weather, aircraft design, marginal skills, carelessness, overconfidence, human error and many other gremlins that can conspire to spoil your day. Have I convinced you that “paranoid” can be a good thing? If so, you are invited to direct your “paranoia” to the future of ownership and private use of personal and business aircraft, an activity typically clumped together by the term “General Aviation,” or “GA.” To be sure, the GA industry has been working its way through regulatory and economic challenges for years, as do all industries, but something has changed. Never before has this writer seen the type of anti-GA rhetoric being hurled about as we have seen in the last several years. Think about it. Business aviation has been vilified at the highest levels of our electorate. The use of advanced aircraft as tools for conducting global business has been openly criticized as wasteful lavishness. The TSA took the time to issue a major press release just prior to

the 10-year commemoration of 9/11 that claimed private aircraft represented the greatest threat we have from terrorists. Major news networks picked up on this and conducted “exposé” type reports while walking amongst rows of Cessnas and Pipers. Reporters pointed out the need for much tighter controls over small planes and played reruns of the tragic suicide flight into an IRS office in Texas. Certified Flight Instructors (CFI’s) and flight schools are now burdened with requirements to positively determine (through a passport or birth certificate) that new student pilots, or existing pilots upgrading their ratings, are U.S. citizens. It seems as though pilots are presumed to be “bad guys” unless they can prove different. Once citizenship is determined, records must be maintained and multiple logbook endorsements made. Even this writer, as an instructor for Flight Instructor Refresher Clinics, is bound to verify the identity of each attendee through the review of personal documents. CFI’s are required to ensure

that foreign national students undergo a complete background check, and then the CFI becomes an integral part of the TSA bureaucracy in keeping track of foreign nationals. In other words, the GA instructing world has been conscripted to be unpaid employee of both the TSA and INS. Adding to the political vilification and civil rights issues directed at personal aviation, is recent legislation that proposes a $100 tax on each and every flight into controlled airspace. And finally, if you can afford to fly after paying new taxes and meeting complex TSA restrictions (multiple TFR’s), the hue and cry is out to stop all airport related fun activities, like fly-ins and air shows, just to make sure that our big brother is keeping us safe. How’s your blood pressure? We have admired the problem, so let’s get paranoid and get to work. Even a slight application of paranoia will cause most aviation enthusiasts to realize that the current environment has placed our right (yes right, check out the Continued on Page 19

Jack Whitehouse’s Fire Island

Continued from Page 14 design the immediate predecessors to the Wright Whirlwind aircraft engines. Without these engines, the spectacularly successful long-distance flights of Admiral Byrd, Amelia Earhart, Charles Lindbergh and others would not have been possible. Despite the considerable fame brought to Earhart, Lindbergh, and the other pioneering pilots, Bay Shore’s Lawrance, remained a relative unknown. When asked about his lack of public recognition he liked to say, ‘Who remembers Paul Revere’s horse?’” IF USA: Long Island’s aviation heritage is uncommonly rich. Do you think that this early episode in military aviation history contributed to what happened later? JW: “If asked, most people probably would point to Mr. Leroy Grumman’s landlocked firm in Bethpage, which first opened its doors in 1930, as Long Island’s original contributor to U.S. naval air power. Indeed, the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation built some of the Navy’s most well-known carrier based aircraft including the TBF Avenger (flown by the first President Bush in the Pacific in WWII), the F6F Hellcat and later the A-6 Intruder and the F-14 Tomcat. But, as we have seen, long before Mr. Grumman came along, the lit-

Postcards from the heyday of the Bay Shore Naval Air Station reflect the drama and energy of early military aviation on Long Island. (Long Island Maritime Museum) tle town of Bay Shore, together with entrepreneurs from the surrounding area, played a key role in placing the U.S. on the road to becoming the world’s preeminent naval air force.” (Many thanks to Barbara Forde and the staff of the Long Island Maritime Museum for assistance with this piece. http://www.limaritime.org)


October 2011

www.inflightusa.com

Contrails

SMACK

by Steve Weaver

IN THE

crouched miserably behind the instrument panel of the shuddering, heaving Aztec, listening to what sounded like a million BBs being shot against my windshield. I was reviewing my options as well as my sins, and I took what comfort I could from an observation that I remembered by someone who had been there; that when you’re really flying in hail, you won’t wonder if that’s what it is. I was still wondering, so this must still be rain. But rain like this I’d never seen. This was like being inside a garbage can that was being shot with fire hoses. I wondered how the engines could continue to run, since they seemed to be under water. Lightning was streaking on each side of me and almost at the same time the deafening crash of the thunder would for an instant, block the noise of the rain and even the engines. I was

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17

MIDDLE

OF A

smack in the middle of a thunderstorm and I was not a happy young aviator. It was the early 70s and after surviving nearly 5,000 hours of VFR flying, doing flight instruction, banner towing, VFR charter and whatever other flying there was to do, I had at last, a brand new instrument ticket. No more sitting on the ground waiting for the weather to clear. No more scud running to stay VFR. No more scheduling my trips around the weather. I was now a cloud dancer, and I could run with the big guys who made the airplane noises come from the inside of clouds. This was more like it. I’d made a few tentative forays into mild IFR conditions and everything was working just as it was supposed to. The flight plans were accepted, the clearances were issued and I took my place with all the other murk lurkers and experienced no surprises. I even sounded like I mostly knew what I was doing, and most of the flights were smooth and the minimums high. I was a real IFR pilot, and I was gaining confidence in myself, the equipment, and the system. I liked IFR flying. Life was good.

THUNDERSTORM

The never-to-be-forgotten trip that changed forever these warm, fuzzy feelings about instrument flying was across the mountains of West Virginia, to a midsized airport in Virginia. It was summer, and the forecast contained the usual “chance of scattered afternoon thunderstorms” warning, but the weather looked good to me when I checked in at Flight Service. This was well before internet accessible radar and, I believe, before Flight Service had a radar repeater, or at least before they let you look at it. You were simply read the teletype information pertaining to your flight, while you took frantic notes and tried to assemble the jumble of facts and numbers into something you could use. I did this, as best I could, and it looked to me like this day would be just another good IFR experience. The Aztec was almost new, and one we were using in our charter service. It was well equipped for its day, but lacked radar, and of course the Stormscope was still locked up somewhere in Mr. Ryan’s brain and yet to be born. I’d built up my multiengine time flying VFR, so I was quite familiar with the airplane and its

systems. I remember I was happy and proud to file IFR in the PAZT, and was soon issued a clearance to my destination airport. With my nose wheel on the numbers, the throttles came up smoothly and the fat-winged and lightly-loaded Piper levitated smartly into the summer sky. The air was warm and smooth and the Aztec climbed quickly, with just the fuel and I on board. Soon I was closing the cowl flaps, adjusting the trim and setting the props and mixtures for cruise at 9,000 feet, just above the scattered clouds that dotted the landscape below. For a time we skimmed the scattered tops, then the clouds began to thicken and rise, and soon I was on instruments. I asked for and received 11,000, but by the time I got Continued on Page 18

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Contrails Continued from Page 17 there, the clouds were there too. Well, I thought, this is why you get an instrument rating. I remained at 11,000 feet and soon the ride grew choppy and it started to rain lightly. I was just starting to think about doing something else but hadn’t yet decided what that might be, when the rain intensity increased to moderate, and the

clouds grew darker inside. Washington Center came alive with requests to divert for weather, some by airliners, and the rain intensity increased again to heavy. At this point I was belatedly attempting to call center to tell them I would like to divert too, but didn’t know in what direction, and did they have a suggestion? By now the frequency was completely filled with moaning pilots and static, and the

transmissions that I could fit in didn’t seem to be getting through to center, since they certainly weren’t answering me. I remember feeling quite at a loss as to what to do, for without clearance from center, I felt I could not deviate from my flight plan. Just then I flew directly into a mature thunderstorm. All my worries about being off my flight plan and running into another air-

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October 2011

plane evaporated, for suddenly I realized I was the only idiot in this very dangerous part of the sky. The one thing I did right was keep the wings level and let the altitude take care of itself. I throttled way back and tried to keep the airspeed reasonable. Other than that, I just hung on for several of the longest minutes of my young life and tried not to panic. I recalled reading reports from pilots who had done this very thing and lived to write about it. I fervently hoped I could do the same. I also remembered a large rock by the Tygart River just in front of my parent’s home, where as a boy I would sit and watch the airplanes pass high overhead and project myself into their cockpits. I wished I were there right now, watching this thunderstorm. ? Suddenly the clouds around me brightened and in an instant I was back in the clear blue summer sky and smooth air. The contrast was startling and I turned and looked back at the monster that had just spit me out. It was a brilliant, growing cumulus, stretching to over 20,000 feet; something that no pilot in his right mind would ever enter, but I had. I had come in the back door, which had looked to me benign and inviting, and because of my own ignorance been led down it’s hallways to a chamber of horrors. When I arrived at my destination, I checked the Aztec for signs of damage, but missing paint on the nose was all I could find. I finished my business at the airport and once again I checked the weather. It was still calling for a chance of afternoon thunderstorms, but now there was a chance that they could form in lines or clusters. My flight home was VFR, contritely done by a much wiser and very humble instrument pilot.

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October 2011

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Editorial: Just Because I’m Paranoid Continued from Page 16 wording in Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations) to fly. Free travel across our great country is at serious risk. It is this writer’s opinion that it is time to establish “situational awareness” and detect that our circumstances have changed, estimate our need to react, shoose an outcome we can live with, Identify what we need to do, do what is required and then evaluate the effect. Did that sound familiar? It should, as it came directly from the DECIDE model contained in the FAA’s Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, Chapter 16 (ADM), page four. Let’s use the DECIDE model as a guideline to see if we can direct our paranoia towards some positive and effective outcomes. DETECT – Are we chugging along in a business-as-usual environment, or do we see a rapidly approaching storm? You have read my thoughts on that question; what are yours? This writer sees a storm of unparalleled intensity. ESTIMATE the need to react – Will doing nothing allow us to avoid the storm? Shall we simply hold our current heading and plow into the storm at maneuvering speed, hopeful that our machine will simply stand up to the onslaught? That is certainly not this old pilot’s choice! CHOOSE an outcome – Define what you want success to look like, do not simply wave your arms and complain! Do you wish to fight for the American tradition of unrestricted flight and mobility, or will you accept some losses of freedom in the name of not getting stuck with a worst case scenario? Are the “alphabet” groups representing your view of success? This writer refuses to accept any result that ends up with a system mimicking the burdensome and innovation-killing standards (high taxes, massive constriction of available airspace and overwhelming bureaucratic policies) employed by many other countries around the world. IDENTIFY what we need to do – With outcome defined, decide what actions you will take. Perhaps it is contacting or joining the powerful “alphabet” groups (AOPA, EAA, NBAA, GAMA, ICAS and many more). Maybe you have access to local business groups. The web can help you communicate with elected officials. Can you contribute editorial comments to local news sources? Can you develop and practice a “30 second drill” that allows you to present GAs argument to those who have no knowledge of what is going on (more on this thought in editorials to follow)? Do what is required – Act! Don’t

just talk about it with a group of pilots. Tell your elected representatives what you really think. Invite elected officials to airport events, and see if they are willing to explain how the destruction of an entire infrastructure and loss of thousands of jobs helps America. Be aggressive! Remember, you will seldom avoid a severe storm in an airplane with only a 10-degree change in heading!

EVALUATE the effect – Did your efforts work? Does one maneuver solve an emergency issue involving an airplane in flight? The issues we are dealing with today have been building up for years, with an intense acceleration of hostility in the last two years. Your first shots may have a positive effect, but in all likelihood, follow-up will be needed. This will certainly not be the only editorial this

writer will offer on the subject. There are certainly many more words that can (and will) be written about the current challenges facing GA. But these challenges are going to remain challenges unless we all begin to get involved and act. Words written by Friedrich Gustav Emil Martin Niemöller (14 January 1892 – 6 March 1984) Continued on Page 22


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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An F-22A “Raptor” from the 49th Fighter Wing departs Grissom Air Reserve Base heading back to Langley AFB. This Raptor is configured with drop tanks. (Mike Heilman) is located near Kokomo, Ind. and is home By Mike Heilman to the 434th Air Force Refueling Wing. The majority of the F-22s were from he F-22 “Raptor” that has been the First Fighter Wing based at Langley. grounded since May was back flyThere were also F-22s from the 154th ing again, at least temporarily. The Fighter Group based at Hickam AFB, “Raptors” have been grounded due to Hawaii, and the 49th Fighter Wing and safety concerns with the on-board oxy53rd Fighter Group based at Holloman gen generation system. The Air Force liftAFB, N. Mex. On Aug. 30 the “Raptors” ed the grounding of the F-22 stationed at left Grissom and returned back to Langley AFB, Va. due to hurricane Langley without incident. The F-22 will Irene’s potential impact on the area. On remain grounded until engineers can fix Friday Aug. 26, 28 F-22s and four T-38s the oxygen system. began flying to Grissom Air Reserve Base in North Central Indiana. Grissom

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The Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley and Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz have recently approved an implementation plan developed by Air Combat Command officials that will allow the F-22 Raptor to resume flight operations after a four-month stand down. (USAF File Photo) (Courtesy of the Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs) United States Air Force The Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley and Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz have recently approved an implementation plan developed by Air Combat Command officials that will allow the F-22 Raptor to resume flight

operations after a four-month stand down. The commander of Air Combat Command directed a stand-down of the fleet May 3 as a safety precaution, following 12 separate reported incidents where pilots experienced hypoxia-like symptoms. The incidents occurred over a three-year period beginning in April Continued on Page 22


October 2011

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Continued from Page 20 regarding involvement in social change seem appropriate to GAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s situation today. As many others have done over the years, allow me to alter some of his prophetic words to meet the issues we face: When they attacked business aviation, I remained silent; I did not own a business airplane. When they assailed civil rights and dignity, I remained silent; I was not in training and did not travel by airline. When they sought to shut down airport

festivals and airshows, I remained silent; As I have no time for such events. When they levied tax restrictions against those who use ATC services, I remained silent; I fly only recreationally. When they told me my kind of flying had no value and must stop, I called for help; but there was no one left to speak out. This editorial reflects the views of the writer but not neccesarily the views of In Flight USA.

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Continued from Page 20 2008. Officials remain focused on the priorities of aircrew safety and combat readiness. The return-to-fly plan implements several risk mitigation actions, to include rigorous inspections, training on life support systems, and continued data collection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We now have enough insight from recent studies and investigations that a return to flight is prudent and appropriate,â&#x20AC;? Schwartz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re managing the risks with our aircrews, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re continuing to study the F-22â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oxygen systems and collect data to improve its performance.â&#x20AC;? In a task force approach to implementation, Air Combat Command officials developed a comprehensive incremental return-to-fly plan that balances safety and the expedient qualification of pilots against the inherent risks of flying advanced combat aircraft, officials said. The entire fleet will undergo an extensive inspection of the life support systems before returning to flight, with follow-on daily inspections, officials said. The aircraft is capable and authorized to fly above 50,000 feet. Pilots will use additional protective equipment and undergo baseline physiological tests. The return-to-fly process will begin with

instructor pilots and flight leads regaining their necessary proficiency, then follow with other F-22 wingmen. Prior to the stand down, ACC officials convened a Class E Safety Investigation Board in January 2011 to look into hypoxia-related reports. At the same time, a Hypoxia Deep-Dive Integrated Product Team began an indepth study on safety issues involving aircraft oxygen generation systems. In June 2011, the Secretary of the Air Force directed the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board to continue the oxygen generation study concurrent with the ongoing SIB. A releasable report will be made available later this year. The F-22 Raptor entered service in 2005. As of May 2011, the Air Force has fielded 170 of the aircraft. As Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary air superiority weapon system, the F-22 has flown more than 300 missions in support of Operation Noble Eagle and deployed on a rotational basis to the Pacific region and Southwest Asia. F-22 overseas deployments support the Department of Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theater Security Program, formal arrangements with our foreign partners to establish defense cooperation, promote regional stability, and deter potential aggression.

NBAA Welcomes House Continued from Page 11 (SDs), we believe that regulatory option should be strictly reserved for situations involving an immediate threat, as is stipulated in the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (ATSA) and in current TSA security regulations. We do not believe that Congress intended to provide TSA such latitude that it could issue SDs absent an identified threat.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Security has always been a top pri-

ority for business aviation, and in the years since 9/11, the industry and government have collaborated on a host of measures to further protect against security vulnerabilities without jeopardizing mobility and flexibility,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The measure passed by the House Subcommittee supports this effective approach to security policy, and we look forward to supporting its full passage by Congress.â&#x20AC;?


October 2011

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Aviation Ancestry

by Scott Schwartz

BUFF: PART IV

A B-52G in flight; notice the faired over tail gunner’s position. Unlike previous B-52 models, the B-52G’s tail gunner fired his guns by remote control from the forward crew compartment. Also notice the smaller outer wing fuel tanks. (Courtesy of the National Museum of the United States Air Force) ith the introduction of surfaceflown on June 18, 1965. To say that this to-air missiles (SAMs), a mission was unsuccessful would be an change in tactics was needed. understatement. Enemy casualties were First coming off the production line in negligible. In fact, so few enemy troops 1957, the B-52E was not much different were killed, that some speculated that from the venerable “D” model. However, there were no Viet Cong in the target area one of the changes incorporated into the to begin with. On top of this, two of the “E” model was the installation of “lowB-52s collided with each other in mid-air. level” Doppler radar. This enabled the BBoth crews were killed. Nevertheless, the 52E to do something that is hard to imagB-52Fs were used on ARC LIGHT misine possible for such a large aircraft. The sions until April, 1966; by then, the “Big B-52 could now fly below hills and Belly” B-52Ds had been deemed ready mountains in order to evade SAM radar. for action. Plus, the B-52E could launch AGM-58 By now, it should be apparent that “Hound Dog” cruise missiles (with the B-52 was a constantly evolving airnuclear warheads) – which reduced the craft. Next on the “evolutionary” scale aircraft’s exposure to enemy anti-aircraft was the B-52G, which differed from the weapons. other models in several ways. Intended for the nuclear-deterrent In an effort to lighten the aircraft, role only, the B-52E was not built in great nearly eight feet were lopped off the vernumbers – a total of 100 were constructtical stabilizer. This saved nearly 12,000 ed, and the “E” model was finally retired pounds. That was only one item. The during 1970 – although a few lingered on wings now became “wet,” meaning that as training aircraft. the wings themselves were filled almost At first glance, the next B-52 variant completely with fuel. Since there were no looked just like all of the other B-52 separate internal fuel tanks in the wings, models. However, a closer look at the jet fuel capacity was increased by 7,500 galengine pods would reveal a large bulge lons, and the aircraft’s weight was on the left engine in each pod. Prior B-52 reduced by another 6,000 pounds. This models were equipped with alternators enabled engineers to reduce the size of that were powered by small turbines. The the B-52G’s external fuel tanks, which turbines, in turn, were powered by bleedwere mounted under the outer wing panair from the engines themselves. In other els. words, the alternators were not connected The other major change was the mechanically to the engines. Enter the Belimination of the manned tail turret. The 52F, which first flew in May, 1958. The tail gunner now operated his guns by B-52F’s alternators were geared to the remote control from the forward crew left engine in each pod – this arrangement compartment. Radar and closed-circuit was sometimes referred to as the “hardtelevision were used to aim the tail guns. drive” alternator system. Ironically, the B-52G’s combatThese “hard-drive” B-52Fs were the loaded gross weight was 40,000 pounds first Stratofortresses to be flown on ARC higher (488,000 pounds) than previous LIGHT missions, the first of which was Continued on Page 24

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GA GROUPS STRONGLY OPPOSE USER FEES IN WHITE HOUSE PROPOSAL The nation’s leading general aviation (GA) associations on Sept. 19 forcefully opposed user fees for GA flights proposed in President Barack Obama’s proposal for addressing the nation’s deficit and job crises. The Aircraft Electronics Association, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, the Experimental Aircraft Association, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Helicopter Association International, the International Council of Air Shows, the National Association of State Aviation Officials, the National Air Transportation Association and the National Business Aviation Association jointly issued the following statement. “As primary representatives of the general aviation community, we are expressing our unified opposition to the new $100 per flight tax in your proposal. We believe this per-flight tax not only imposes a significant new administrative burden on general aviation operators who currently pay through an efficient per-gallon fuel charge at the pump, but it will

also necessitate the creation of a costly new federal collection bureaucracy. “As you know, the issue of how general aviation can best contribute revenue to the federal government has been the subject of significant study and debate as part of the FAA reauthorization process. After careful consideration, both chambers of Congress have passed bills that endorse the per-gallon fuel charges rather than adopt a per-flight tax similar to the one you propose. In fact, Democrats and Republicans in the House of Representatives felt so strongly about this issue that 116 members of that body sent you a letter earlier this year saying new aviation charges like the one you are now proposing would be ‘dead on arrival.’ “Mr. President, many foreign countries have imposed per-flight charges on general aviation and the results have been devastating. Please do not go down the dangerous path and cost jobs in our community. “Per-gallon fuel charges work. Perflight taxes destroy.”

Aviation Ancestry Continued from Page 23 B-52 models. This was due, in large part to the new ejection seat for the “tail” gunner and his new fire control system, new Electronics Counter Measures (ECM) equipment, and the additional wiring and plumbing that was associated with the “Hound Dog” Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). First coming off the Boeing assembly line in July, 1958, B-52Gs were used on record-breaking flights almost immediately. One crew flew more than 9,000 miles without refueling in December of 1958. Roughly one year later, another crew flew 10,000 miles – again without refueling. Although these record-setting flights demonstrated the B-52G’s incredible range, it should not be forgotten that manned bombers were now vulnerable to attack by surface-to-air missiles. Hence, the development of “stand-off” weapons such as the GAM-77 “Hound Dog,” which was an early cruise missile. Its

Pratt & Whitney J52 jet engine enabled it to fly at speeds greater than Mach 2, and the B-52G was the first B-52 model that was specifically designed to launch the Hound Dog (which was intended for use against radar facilities and SAM launch sites, although it could be fitted with nuclear warheads for use against strategic targets), as well as the GAM-87A “Skybolt” ballistic missile. Because it was designed to airlaunch missiles, the B-52G’s internal bomb load was limited. Still, B-52Gs were used during the Linebacker and Linebacker II operations over Viet Nam, where they flew alongside B-52Ds. During July, 1973, crews began flying their B-52Gs home, where they were placed back on nuclear alert status. The B-52Gs remained on nuclear alert until January, 1991. Trouble was brewing in the Middle Eastern sand, and the B-52Gs were called to action once again – 33 years after the first B-52G came off the Boeing production line.


www.inflightusa.com

October 2011

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October 2011

W h a t’ s U p ! ?

RENO . . . suppose there wasn’t any way this column could have been written without the mention of Reno. After all, this is an aviation publication, I write about aviation, and you would have to live in a cave not to know about Reno 2011. Okay, my aviation friends, here’s what I have to say about this. People much more qualified than me, since they were there and witnesses, are telling their stories on other pages in this issue of In Flight USA. Here’s what I know for sure. Reno is the “Super Bowl” of aviation. Without Reno the Reno area will take an economical hit worse than a flood. Furthermore, general aviation and professional air racing would simply not be the same without all Reno offers, from the thrills around the pylons to the live entertainment to the promotion of great skilled and talented pilots.

I

Do We Need It? Reno is a major test bed for aviation technology and many of us benefit from that. Please don’t forget how many folks/sport fans, are bitten by the “aviation bug” after being there and head for their local flight schools to take the first step into the “friendly skies.” I’m not forgetting the annual reunions among thousands of old and new friends. Will it affect GA and the children (i.e. pilots-to-be) that were there? Of course it will but hopefully, parents will explain to their children that this flying accident is not like the flying they do in their family or rental airplane. This accident was extreme. They have nothing to worry about and in time, hopefully they will put into perspective and better understand what they saw and heard.

Hopefully, the same goes for the adults and industry overall. We must remember that those who race and even those who come to watch have some understanding of the risks involved Can the sponsors of the Races obtain insurance again for this event going forward? Hard to know… however, in my experiences in aviation, I think they will. The real question is at what cost, both financial and with regard to restraints and limitations. Does it matter what went wrong? Sure it does. Will we learn lessons, no doubt? We already knew that there should be no energy towards the audience. This wasn’t a controlled maneuver, so the question is moot. I do have a problem with the box seating, specifically where it is located. When I would attend back in the day, it wasn’t there. It was installed fairly recently and if someone had asked me, I would have objected. There are a lot of things that now need to be looked at in terms of the overall event, from staging to seating and everything in between. Some will complain, some might take it further with a lawsuit, but this is not for discussion right now. It’s soon and the emotions are too raw. As for me, I send hugs and condolences to those who sustained physical and emotional injuries. I understand and feel your pain. Actually, just one more word or two about those lawsuits… Reasonable people sometime do unreasonable things. If there is just cause they will come. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that they are few and far between. First, let’s take care of those still in bandages. The Reno Race officials will handle this issue honorably if and when it occurs.

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Minutes Later . . . Within minutes I was buried by phone calls from Reno, TV stations, and many friends sitting neck-high in debris. I felt helpless and afraid knowing how many of my aviation family were in harms way. I made the decision not to get involved and leave the situation to those at the scene. Just FYI, one of the Docs there called me within minutes to give me an update. I was driving on I-5 when I got his call. Clearly, the accident scene was horrific and while my heart ached, my mind told me to lay low… let the pros on scene tend to the hurt and their families and disseminate information properly. A more spontaneous reaction on my part some time ago might have been to drop everything and head to Reno… maybe to save the day, maybe just to help one person… a shoulder to cry on if nothing else. What are the pilots saying? Many are my friends and acquaintances. I made the very careful decision to give them their space. They need to hurt and then heal. When the time is right, I’ll hear from them and we’ll talk. They know they can count on me to listen, maybe to cry with them and then try to move forward. By the way, I’ve been knee-high in photos and stories from well-meaning folks trying to help me cope and write. I thank you all for your efforts.

Is This The End? Is this the end of “Reno” as we know it? I hope not. I know emotions are running high right now but, look folks, here’s a little bit about who we really are: Those of us that love aviation, especially air racing, like the action and the thrills. We understand the risks involved. Please don’t tell me you’d go to a NASCAR event and not expect a big crash or two. While no one wants to see anyone get hurt, we go to extreme sports to see extreme action. The same goes for the Indy cars and all the other extreme and fast sports. The replays on TV are always that of the current roll-over or the previous crash. Even replays of previous crashes from years before get airtime. While every effort in all arenas is surely made to keep fans safe, sometimes bad things happen. At Reno, tragedy happened. Safety measures are taken, no one wants or expects tragedy to strike in the stands but I ask you, would we not be naive to think it could never happen?

Larry Shapiro I pray that reruns won’t happen with Reno. I really don’t want to see anything about it anymore or for that matter ever again. Enough said. I’ll close this subject by sending my prayers and wishes for quick recoveries for those still in bandages and those grieving at their loss and please, please feel free to contact me if you think I can help or you have a story I should hear.

Other Concerns It’s getting way too quiet on the field. Is it the price of fuel? Is it just plain economics? I suppose those darn Prez TFRs aren’t helping, especially in my neighborhood where he’s been harvesting all those high-tech dollars. When he’s around dozens of flight schools, charters, tours, and even pattern work all shut down. Will someone please talk to him about this? He needs a really cool tour bus and he should fly out west on a commercial tuna can so he can be one of us. Now there’s a first-hand taste of aviation he won’t soon forget. I want to clear security with him and watch him take off his shoes. Where is everyone? I’m still trying to figure out where all the pilots are if they aren’t at the field. They are either are the unemployment office or looking for a job I guess. I miss them. It’s lonely here without you. Sundays were the usual quiet days, now there seems to be a lot more Sundays. No wait, Sundays were the busy days and now I’m really confused. So is it the price of fuel or am I missing something? Will someone tell me why I’m all alone, with the exception of a few hard working business owners that work Sundays just like me? Heck, we can nap on the ramp. So, this might surprise you. I have some good words to say about the FAA this month. Hey FAA, thanks for all the great safety blurbs you have been posting on-line. I actually read them and find them of great value. I hope some of you will do so also. They are called: FAA Safer Team/Safer Skies Through Education. Continued on Page 34


October 2011

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It has been said that the only voluntary act in aviation is the decision to take-off. Every action after take-off involves the skillful management of risk, the enjoyment of flight and a continuous stream of decisions that result in a safe landing. In 1974, NASA created the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) to allow aviation professionals to share experiences in a frank, non-punitive manner. The ASRS structure allows pilots and other aviation professionals to file an anonymous report of an incident, error or occurrence that the contributor feels might be of value to others. These reports are gathered, analyzed and data based by NASA experts and made available to all interested parties as a tool for creating pro-active aviation safety programs. Additionally, NASA distributes an electronic publication, CALLBACK, which contains selected, de-identified, reports on a free subscription basis. In Flight USA is proud to reprint selected reports, exerted from CALLBACK, for our readers to read, study, occasionally laugh at, and always learn from. Visit http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/ to learn how you can participate in the ASRS program.

SEE The number of midair collisions in the United States has averaged 30 per year since 1978. 1 These accidents primarily involve general aviation aircraft, but air carrier, corporate and other operators are by no means immune from potentially serious airborne conflicts. In the preceding 12-month period, more than 4,000 in-flight traffic conflicts were reported to NASA ASRS. Of these, 235 met the ASRS criteria (within 500 feet) for a Near Midair Collision (NMAC). Nearly half of these NMACs involved air carrier, corporate and air taxi operations. Technological advances such as the Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) and Conflict Alert (CA) have

AND

enhanced the ability of pilots and controllers respectively to resolve airborne conflicts before they become critical, but the following ASRS reports show that the “see and avoid” principle remains a crucial aspect of collision avoidance in visual conditions.

Watch Out for the “Other Guy” You may be following all the rules, but there is no guarantee that everyone else is. This SF340 flight crew had an alltoo-close encounter when a crop duster approached out of the sun, at the wrong altitude and apparently not watching out for traffic. • While level at 8,000 feet, we expe-

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AVOID rienced a near collision with a turboprop crop duster. The other aircraft was coming from our 11 o’clock position and traveling northwest to southeast. It passed 300-500 feet in front of our aircraft and less than 100 feet above our altitude. The duster was so close that we could feel its wake turbulence as it went by. Our TCAS was operating and showed no other aircraft. Center and Approach Control gave no traffic warnings. No evasive action was taken as the encounter was over before we could take any. We were doing everything correctly at the time of the incident. All of our checklists were complete and there was very little distraction inside our cockpit. We had followed all ATC instructions and

Continued on Page 28

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Safe Landings Continued from Page 27

Easing Out of Formation

• Checking in with the tower, we were advised of traffic, a Mooney, which we both saw. The visual approach was normal until short final. I commented to the Captain that if I had to go-around, I was concerned about avoiding the Mooney. Below 400 feet, I heard the TCAS “traffic” call. I looked up from my primary scan on the runway and said that I had the Mooney in sight. I was unaware that the TCAS alert was not for the Mooney! After the 300-foot callout, I noticed something to my left. I looked and saw a Cessna through the Captain’s window. It was very close and I feared a collision. The Cessna was in a shallow left turn, descending. It was less than 100 feet away and we had wing tip overlap. I thought quickly about my options and to go-around meant that our wing would hit him. If I turned right in avoidance, my left wing would have come up to impact the Cessna. I believed the only option was to continue straight and duck under him. I could not use much pitch input for fear of impact with the ground. The Cessna had overshot the left runway final and had come into our space. We were at reference speed plus five knots so we passed him very quickly. The tower did not issue a traffic callout to us about the Cessna... Tower stated that the person responsible for traffic separation was briefing someone else during the incident and that they failed to notify us of the traffic. He stated that the Cessna had been informed of our position and had a visual on us. I believe that if I had not had many hours of formation time, we probably would have hit that Cessna.

On short final, a Cessna 172 got so close to a B757 on final for a parallel runway that separating safely became a concern for the First Officer who submitted this report.

1FAA statistic cited at SeeAnd Avoid.org, a website created by the Air National Guard Aviation Safety Division with the ultimate goal of eliminating midair collisions and reducing close calls.

Who’s on Base Tower assumed that the reporter’s aircraft would “beat” another aircraft to the runway. The reporter assumed that the other aircraft would make a 45-degree entry to the left downwind. The result was not a “towering” success. • It was VFR– clear with unlimited ceiling. I was instructing in the right seat. We contacted Tower just south of [the] Class D [airspace]. We received instructions to make left traffic and were cleared to land. We executed a 45-degree entry to a left downwind. Abeam the Tower, I requested a short approach to give the student a simulated engine-out arrival.

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The tower controller had cleared another aircraft to “enter left traffic.” He told me later that he thought we would beat the aircraft to the runway. Just past abeam the runway end, the other aircraft established not on a downwind, but perpendicular to the runway on a left base and streaked in front of us (… way inside the normal power-on base leg area). I took the controls and executed an evasive turn to the right... The other aircraft clearly didn’t follow instructions to enter the pattern for left traffic and instead headed directly to a left base entry. We received no traffic advisories on the conflict and came very close to colliding with the other aircraft. We saw and avoided, fortunately. [I] really wouldn’t like to come that close to a midair again.

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FILM CRITIC

www.inflightusa.com

AND AUTHOR LEONARD MALTIN HIS FAVORITE AVIATION FILMS Mr. Maltin was nice enough to speak to In Flight USA’s Mark Rhodes about some of his favorite aviation films and how the aviation film genre might make a comeback.

By S. Mark Rhodes eonard Maltin’s Movie Guides have been a great resource for filmgoers to discover new favorites and re-visit old chestnuts. His most recent addition, Leonard Maltin’s 2012 Movie Guide, from Signet, is nearly 1,700 pages and weighs in at nearly two pounds (it can crush the Kindle!). Embedded within this guide are insightful, capsule interviews of some of the most noteworthy aviation films that Hollywood turned out in its golden age.

L

In Flight USA: Once upon a time the aviation film was as much a part of Hollywood genre films as the detective film, the western, the science fiction film and so on. What do you think are the reasons that the genre declined? Leonard Maltin: (Long Pause) “I am just guessing mind you, but I think a lot of it has to do with gaming (video games) which maybe has taken the place of the excitement audiences used to get with aviation movies. When Top Gun (1986) came out in the 80s there was a lot of comment then about how some of the combat flying sequences resembled video games. And in those intervening years, those games have become really vivid and even realistic. This (the rise of gaming) might have replaced some of the thrill that films like Top Gun used to provide movie audiences.” IF USA: A lot of legendary actors

like John Wayne, Gregory Peck, Clark Gable and William Holden portrayed aviators. Do you have any favorite acting performances in aviation films? LM: “Right, it (playing an aviator) was part of the repertoire. With regard to actors playing aviators I have to say they all convinced me (laughs). I am a rank amateur, but I have friends who are aviation buffs who would have sharper opinions than my own. As a kind of inexperienced audience member they all did the job for me. I thought Gregory Peck was great in 12 O’Clock High (1949), and Wayne was convincing in High and the Mighty.” IF USA: What are the aviation films that have made an impact on you as an audience member? LM: “Speaking of John Wayne, I think Island in the Sky (1953) is a very underrated and under appreciated film. It is not as well known as a film called the High and the Mighty (1954) which came out a year later with some of the same cast including John Wayne and the same director, William Wellman, and based

31

ON SOME

OF

also on a novel by Ernest Gann. “Island in the Sky was striking because it dealt so much with the nuts and bolts of aviation at that time; the technical and navigational challenges that they faced; it is kind of quaint today with all of the sophisticated technology related to modern aviation. Continued on Page 34


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October 2011

SARA SCHWARZ: SEEKING SUCCESS IN 21ST CENTURY AVIATION ACTIVITIES By Herb Foreman he is the proud possessor of a Bachelor’s degree in aviation operations and business, received in May 2011 from the prestigious program offered at San Jose State University. Sara Schwarz is equally proud of achieving her private pilots license and is looking forward to the next step in her career, the instrument license. It hasn’t been easy because of the recent down turn in the global economy but she is determined to find a role that will lead to a successful future. At the present time, Sara is working at the front desk for U.J. Emetaron’s Diamond Aviation at the San Carlos Airport. She will be happy to accept your money for an introductory ride or a bay tour. She can introduce you to one of their ten excellent flight instructors. Diamond boasts a fleet of five modern, well-equipped, aircraft that include four C-172SPs and a 230 hp C-182T equipped with the Garmin 1000 GPS AP. An Elite PCATC Simulator equipped with the IFR Garmin 430WASS makes

S

Sara with two champions, Norm DeWitt and Joe Locasto. (Herb Foreman)

Sara with Norm DeWitt and the beautiful Edge 540. learning easy and less expensive than flying the real thing. Her father, a private pilot, got her interested in flying. He owns a Columbia 400 and has taken her along on many of his flights. Sara became enchanted with aviation and began flying lessons in both the C-152 and C-172. Her first solo was in the 172 at the San Carlos Airport in

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May 2007. Her private license was achieved in May 2008. Her CFI was the excellent John Bell. Sara’s total flight time exceeds 100 hours. Sara confesses that her flight time would be greater had she not focused on getting through school. With the accomplishment of her degree, she feels ready to move forward in her flight up the ladder. Her work at Diamond will be a positive step in that direction. After the instrument ticket, she will be able to log time in her Dad’s Columbia, an exciting prospect. The look in her face and the direct manner of her answers in my interview seem to project a determination to complete any activity she may become involved in. She knows that with the economy being what it is, she may have to combine her determination to fly with a look at another profession. She would not rule out some kind of medical work; Life Flight, Interplast, nursing, etc. She would consider entering a nursing program if it became necessary. I needed some pictures of Sara for this article and asked world-ranked aerobatic pilot Norm DeWitt if I could schedule a photo shoot with him in the beautiful Edge 540 that he has flown to win many trophies. Norm was happy to oblige and we met in his hangar at the San Carlos Airport on Aug. 8. As an EAA board member, Norm was eager to help bring a new pilot into the profession. Sara was intrigued by the Edge 540, and at Norm’s invitation climbed into the cockpit to check the difference between the C-172 she has been flying and the Edge. She hopes that Norm can introduce her to a demonstration flight in the near

Sara in front of Jeff Short’s StarDuster II. (Herb Foreman) future. She has already been performing spins under the tutelage of John Bell who proclaims her to be fearless and proficient. We couldn’t leave without talking to another champion, Joe Locasto whose hangar is directly across the taxiway from Norm’s. Joe is a four-time world champion at Booneville. He was the first driver to exceed 200 mph in gas-powered stock cars in the early 1960s. Joe has constructed a 1934 Curtiss P6-E that was once a first line fighter plane in the Army Air Force. Sara was able to check out Gail Turner’s exceptionally beautiful Marquart Charger and Jeff Short’s Starduster 11 that occupy the hangar, too. Born on April 28, Sara’s “sun sign” is Taurus. According to those who study astrology, the Taurus woman is the salt of the earth bearing a combination of sterling qualities, including emotional and moral courage. She’s a solid practical thinker with feet planed firmly on the ground. Most Taurus women have an appreciation for art and music. Many are gifted with the love of horseback riding. The above qualities have already shown up in Sara’s background. She was always into sports while in elementary school and loved to sing in the choir at Notre Dame High School in Belmont, Calif. She began to jump horses while in high school as well, but it was flying that won her heart. One does not have to be around Sara long to see that she is an exceptional person. The future of aviation looks to be in good hands. It will be interesting to watch her progress in the coming years.


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October 2011

What’s Up the airport, has to be nuts. If the pilot drove himself or herself to the aerodrome, them let’um fly! Being able to perform that task tells us they can see and hear. This is causing me a great amount of unneeded trouble and a waste of my very valuable time. Here’s a blurb from Aviation eBrief: Proposed: The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association have joined forces with the Experimental Aircraft

Continued from Page 26 Most exciting for me is to see the beginning of the grumbling about the possibility if you can drive a car, you can fly an airplane. Of course you can, duh! This will make a hangar full of dudes very happy and save a trillion buck-aroonies by eliminating the third class ticket exam. Anyone in their right mind who would get into an airplane as PIC but still has to ask someone to drive’em to

Association to propose changes for the medical requirements for private pilots. The groups would like to expand the "driver's license medical" from sport pilots to additional groups of private pilots. Sport pilots show a valid driver's license as proof of medical eligibility. I’ve been preaching to you all for years about “common sense.” Trust me on this, it works and will continue to work.

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I’m putting some of my other items on hold for now. I want you to dwell on what I’ve just shared with you. Other than have a safe Trick-Or Treat-night out, a reminder that the “Blues” are flying into the SF Bay Area the first week of this month. This is a good thing as Fleet Week is a biggie where I live, plus it lights a very big aviation fire under the seats of the little ones in the audience. Finally, I’m off to remind myself why I live and love California so much. I will leave for Texas soon to take some retraining in “two-year-old” talk. Having grandchildren is the reward you get for having children. I get to practice my “Y’alls’” and “Howdys.” That’s Thirty! “Over” Larry Shapiro is an aircraft broker, aviation humorist and fulltime grandfather. He’d love to have you share your thoughts and ideas for future articles. Palo Alto Office: (650) 424-1801 or Larry@Larry Shapiro.com

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Continued from Page 31 “Island in the Sky also addresses the particular camaraderie that aviators, particularly aviators that came through World War II share. This is what makes this a moving and affecting film for me. “Another film that I had the pleasure to re-discover recently was Night Flight (1933) which was an MGM production that had been out of print for 75 years. The film is an adaptation of the novel by Antoine du Saint-Exupery (The Little Prince) and is an interesting attempt by MGM to try to make an existential movie about man’s relationship to the heavens. Mind you, this was attempted within the framework of a mainstream Hollywood production. And, as with Island in the Sky, there is that rare sense of the wonder of early aviation with the fliers in an open cockpit and relying on primitive methods to chart a course and navigate.” IF USA: What do you think it would take to revive the aviation film genre? LM: “All it takes is one good film to revive a genre. Amelia (2009), a highprofile aviation oriented film with a highend cast could have done this. Amelia wasn’t a bad film; I liked some of the performances and it had good production values, but in the end it was a little too uninspired to really spark a genre revival.”


October 2011

www.inflightusa.com

35

Homebuilder’s Workshop

VANCE AFB, OKLAHOMA

inety minutes north of Oklahoma City by car is Vance AFB in Enid, Okla., where my nephew recently got his Air Force pilot wings. Leon Vance was a native of Enid – the Air Force folk refer to them as “Enoids” – and a WWII bomber pilot who won the Congressional Medal of Honor. The transport plane bringing him home was lost over the North Atlantic, after he survived a harrowing and heroic ditching of his B-24. But the relationship between Air Force and community is deeper than that – the citizens of Enid bought a wheat field and donated that for the then Army Air Corps to build a training base. Wheat? In Oklahoma? Yes. Enid actually has the world’s third largest wheat storage capacity, and a grouping of maybe 30 concrete silos is referred to by the pilots as “the battleship.” This year, though, the drought is ferocious and this July was a contender for being the hottest month ever. Cloud bases were at 9,000 feet and the 25-knot wind did no cooling but only parched those out on the 100plus degree flightline. Coming back into the air-conditioned flight ops building, there is a large fan at chest level to help you cool off. Vance AFB hosts three kinds of trainers – the T-6 “Texan II” (what an unimaginative name. You’d think that the folks at Army Air Corps II could think of something better); the venerable T-38 which first flew in 1959, the year that my ancient Cessna was built; and the T-1, known in civilian circles as the Beechjet. Everybody starts in the T-6, and then, giving the best students first choice, the tracks are assigned: T-38 for the fighter and bomber pilots, T-1 for the tanker / transport pilots. And of course, those latter two are referred to (as ungraciously as possible) as gas passers and trash haulers. I’m told that the T-38 is a hot jet only in one sense – its air-conditioning is pretty minimal. It certainly looks odd to see them taxi in 100-plus degree weather with the canopies open, but that’s the cooler alternative. Low-level training missions are apparently not much fun in high temperatures. And the plane is underpowered too, a notion that we twobladed propeller folks may not be entirely sympathetic to. Vance normally has three runways open, and each aircraft type nominally has their own runway. But with one runway closed for repairs, the T-6s stay on their short runway, the runway only they

N

can use, and the T-38s and T-1s alternate hours on the other runway. The sky is filled with airplanes Ed to two effects: one – Wischmeyer it’s very clear that training is the mission of this busy base; and two – if you hear an airplane overhead, you probably know what it is and don’t need to look up. There’ll be another along shortly. I got a personal tour of the flightline and got to look inside a T-6 cockpit, not all that impressive with the electronics turned off; and I got to fly a T-38 fixed base simulator. I did kind of okay, and we’ll attribute this to a compressed timetable and no pre-flight briefing. The T-38 is not all that easy to land, I’m told, and final approach speed is 164 knots, only a little slower than the cruise speeds of the Bumblebee Cessna and the AirCam combined. Graduation was a nice 90-minute ceremony, and family members were encouraged to come up front and take pictures of the new pilot. There were 25 graduates: 15 T-1 pilots, and 10 T-38 pilots, of whom two were Italian and one was from Iraq. (He’s to be the first Iraqi F-16 pilot). Later that night was a banquet, and the relieved tension was obvious among the happy graduates. I had my chance at Air Force OCS, but I chose grad school at MIT. Am I jealous? Of course I am, but my body instead has aged to the point where I’d probably have tremendous difficulties doing all that my nephew will be doing, like pulling more than nine Gs in the F-22. I really wouldn’t mind trying out the F-22 at 6 Gs, though.

AirVenture Had to leave Oshkosh early this year for reasons you just read about. Got to meet old friends, some of whom have impressive credentials and I was honored to be with them. Maybe I’m getting jaded, or maybe there wasn’t that much new aeronautical. There was an LSA legal aerobatic plane, and the pilot explained that they weren’t going to kit it because it cost almost as much to put out a kit version as a fully assembled version. Besides, he said, this plane was high-tech. Hmm, thought I, looking at the pop-riveted aluminum wings, what’s high-tech? He patiently explained that the wing was high-tech Continued on Page 36

1975 CESSNA 340

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On Sept. 21, the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) joined with 26 leading aviation and labor associations in a letter expressing their opposition to proposed tax and fee increases on the aviation industry. The letter was sent to leadership in the House and Senate as well as all 12 members of the “Super Committee.” GAMA President and CEO Pete Bunce added, “We join our fellow industry and labor colleagues in opposition to

the Administration’s aviation tax and fee proposals. As President Obama continues his perplexing assault on aviation, it is critical that everyone in aviation stand together to reject these ill-advised proposals. We have much at stake in this debate and we will continue to work together with Congress to develop proposals that support economic growth and job creation, improve our aviation infrastructure, and enhance safety.”

Homebuilder’s Workshop Continued from Page 35 because it was a 9 G wing – 9 G ultimate and 6 G design load. Right thought I, that tells me all I need to know. I did have dinner with Ken Krueger, all around good guy and chief engineer at Van’s Aircraft. He told me, on the record, that they are working on a new airplane. It is a twin engine, turbine, biplane canard that is aerobatic. And amphibious. You read it here first. The antiques were way down in attendance this year, and some of that may have been due to a line of storms across Illinois about even with Chicago. Those storms blocked arrivals from the eastern half (by population) of the country. Too bad, for the antiques are, I think, the most photogenic airplanes on the field.

The big news from Garmin is that they have slashed prices on the G3X series to gain market share, as the smaller manufacturers were eating their lunch in that market. They’ve also announced some price cuts in electronic database subscriptions. As I’ve noted before, electronic data is now so expensive that you can go for the $100 hamburger without even having to go to the airport. Tom Poberezny surprised people by announcing his retirement. His whole career has been at EAA, and I’ve got to believe that it was a tough ride for him, at times, what with all the conflicting opinions he dealt with. EAA is now a major force in the aviation world, especially because of AirVenture, and much of that happened on his watch. I wish him well.

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October 2011

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OODIES AND ADGETS

One of the truly great things about being an aviation buff is the number of “Goodies and Gadgets” available to play with. Here In Flight USA has collected a few new ones worthy of your consideration.

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Get iPAD Freedom with MyClip More and more pilots are incorporating the versatile iPad in with their flying. The only problem is, where do you put the iPad during a cross country flight? MyClip has come up with a practical solution that turns the computer into a kneeboard. This allows hands-free operation while airborne while making it easier to type or change screens. It also secures the iPad when working on tables or other slippery surfaces. The unit is also designed to work with the HP Slate, the Galaxy Tab, the XOOM and the Acer Tablet. When introduced this past summer at AirVenture, more than 400 pilots purchased copies of the MyClip accessory. Wicks Aircraft Supply has the units in stock and is selling them for $39.95. To order a MyClip, visit www.WicksAircraft.com or call 800/221-9425.

PropPastie Spinner Cover PropPastie is a new style spinner cover, designed to minimize snow, ice, and water from lying on your propeller hub and bearings and freezing inside your spinner. It fits all light aircraft. The proper way to position a propeller in the winter is to have a blade vertical on the bottom to allow water to drain. However, this will allow water, snow and ice to sit on your propeller hub and bearings. This could have disastrous effects should any water leak into your propeller hub. Without PropPastie, blowing snow also could end up inside your spinner and cause a detrimental imbalance. PropPastie will protect your controllable pitch propeller hub and bearings from water and ice and protect your engine and airframe from vibration caused by snow and ice in the spinner. Made in the USA with the highest quality UV-stabilized materials, it is designed to withstand all but the most extreme temperatures and has remained in position in testing, in up to 51 mph. gusts. The material selected stiffens in cold temperatures. This in combination with Velcro holds PropPastie in place. PropPastie can be purchased at Aircraft Spruce. For more information, contact Aircraft Spruce at 1-877-477-7823 and reference part number 13-10282, or visit www.aircraftspruce.com.

Garmin Unveils the aera 796 and 795 Portable Touchscreen Aviation Navigators with 3D Vision Garmin International Inc., has announced the aera 796 and aera 795, a new series of portable aviation navigation devices. As Garmin’s new flagship portable aviation product, the aera 796 incorporates the popular features of the GPSMAP 696, while also adding new capabilities such as a touchscreen user interface, pilot-selectable screen orientation and 3D Vision. The aera 796 also takes the pilot one step closer to a paperless cockpit with a digital document viewer, scratch pad and pre-loaded geo-referenced AeroNav IFR and VFR enroute charts. The aera 796 and 795 was on display at the AOPA Aviation Summit. “Pilots continue to embrace touchscreen in the cockpit because they see how much faster and easier it is to access information while in flight,” said Gary Kelley, Continued on Page 39

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AOPA REPORT: CFIS, STUDENTS WIN TRAINING RELIEF IN CALIFORNIA By Dan Namowitz (AOPA) alifornia flight instruction providers who waited more than a year for relief from crippling regulatory burdens imposed under a 2009 education-reform law got the news they were waiting for Sept. 21, when Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill exempting them from its provisions. “Since we learned a year and a half ago about AB 48 and its unintended devastating consequences on the California flight training industry, AOPA has been continuously working to convince the legislature that the health of aviation in the state is vitally important to the health of the whole state economy,” said AOPA California Regional Representative John Pfeifer. “Working with our allies, the National Air Transportation Association, and many other organizations and individuals, we were successful. The passage of Senate Bill 619 provides the relief necessary to keep flight training alive in California. We are especially grateful to Senator Jean Fuller and her staff for carrying this bill forward to completion,” he said. The California Private Postsecondary Act of 2009 was intended to protect the financial wellbeing of students who seek an education at a postsecondary school. The regulations posed unintended consequences for flight training providers by posing a financial burden that many flight providers would have been unable to bear. The bill signed by Brown exempts from its provisions providers or programs that provide instruction pursuant to FAA regulations and meet both of the following criteria: The flight instruction provider or program does not require students to enter into written or oral contracts of indebtedness, and does not require prepayment of instruction-related costs in excess of $2,500.

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Following the 2009 act’s passage, AOPA’s state legislative affairs team actively worked to ensure that the law did not inflict potential damage on an already fragile training industry in a state facing a huge budget deficit and 12-percent unemployment, near the highest in the nation. Working with AOPA’s allies in the legislature and aviation groups, Pfeifer shepherded the process of finding a fix for the problem. The first step was win-

ning a delay of implementation of the postsecondary education law’s provisions for flight training businesses, and continuing with development and passage of a permanent solution. Pfeifer’s testimony before numerous legislative committees was a key ingredient in the joint effort to inform lawmakers of the potential damage to California aviation training enterprises, and keep the bill on the legislative front burner. On Oct. 19, 2010, AOPA and its allies succeeded in winning a delay in the education law’s implementation until July 2011while a permanent solution was fashioned. (A previous measure providing for the moratorium had been vetoed on Sept. 24, 2010 by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger because of unrelated provisions.)

Finding the Solution Having gained time to develop a solution, the effort next focused on preparing legislation to achieve that goal. It emerged on Feb. 18 as Senate Bill 619 sponsored by Sen. Jean Fuller (RBakersfield). On April 25, the Senate Committee on Business, Professions, and Economic Development passed the bill unanimously. Pfeifer testified that the postsecondary act “clearly stated that it was the intent of the legislature to ensure a regulatory structure that provides an appropriate level of oversight. “I submit that onerous and expansive regulations that put flight instructors out of business even while there is no financial risk to the flight students is far from an appropriate level of oversight,” he said. Flight instructor Marc Santacroce, and Bridgeford Flying Services CEO Mark Willey also testified in support of the bill, which passed the Senate 39-0 on May 23. The bill cleared another major hurdle June 28, when the Assembly’s Business, Professions and Consumer Protection Committee voted unanimously in favor. Pfeifer, who worked closely with Assembly Member Jerry Hill (DSan Mateo) was present and testified in support of the bill, which passed the full Assembly Aug. 25. The bill, also cosponsored in the Assembly by. Anthony Portantino (D-Pasadena), contained an urgency clause which would allow it to take immediate effect upon final passage. Editor’s Note: Gov. Jerry Brown signed the bill into law in September. (See related story on page 8.


www.inflightusa.com

October 2011

39

NBAA TRUMPETS EXCITING PLANS IN MONDAY-WEDNESDAY LINEUP FOR 2011 CONVENTION

When the ribbon is cut to formally kick off NBAA’s 64th Annual Meeting & Convention (NBAA2011) in Las Vegas Nev., convention planners report that this year’s event, taking place Monday, Oct. 10 through Wednesday, Oct. 12, is anticipated to meet or exceed expectations from previous years, in large part because of the excitement surrounding the many offerings planned for NBAA2011. “We are very excited to be returning to Las Vegas, and we are delighted that our Monday-through-Wednesday show lineup is being enthusiastically received by exhibitors and attendees alike,” said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. For example, Bolen noted that the opening general session at the start of the first day will feature an outstanding lineup of leaders from industry and government, including U.S. Senator Joseph Manchin III (D-WV), Federal Aviation Administration Administrator J. Randolph “Randy” Babbitt, National Transportation Safety Board Chairwoman Deborah A. P. Hersman, John Deere & Company Agricultural and Turf Division President Dave Everitt and doctor, pilot and former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee. The second-day opening session will include aviation legends and luminaries such as actor Harrison Ford, famed air

show performers Sean D. Tucker and R.A. “Bob” Hoover, FAA Administrator Babbitt, astronaut Gene Cernan, and former Thunderbirds lead pilot and retired U.S. Air Force General Lloyd “Fig” Newton. All will gather to honor industry legend Clay Lacy, who will receive NBAA’s highest award, the Meritorious Service to Aviation Award. The session will also include a panel of general aviation organization presidents moderated by NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen, as well as a presentation of the Combs Gates Award by representatives with the National Aviation Hall of Fame. For all three days, the event will include hundreds of exciting indoor exhibits featuring all that’s new in the world of business aviation, as well as a first-of-its-kind Static Display of Aircraft located right next to the Las Vegas Convention Center, which will complement the larger Static Display at Henderson Airport. More than 100 education sessions will also be offered for business aviation professionals who are interested in seeing and learning the industry’s latest trends, including a host of sessions covering all aspects of maintenance and operations. Last, but certainly not least, the Convention will help raise money for a worthwhile cause. Funds raised for the

Goodies and Gadgets Continued from Page 37 Garmin’s vice president of marketing. “Not only does the aera 796 have the increasingly popular touchscreen user interface, but it is so robust with features and capabilities that only a dedicated aviation device can offer. With everything from 3D Vision to electronic charts and weather data, it’s almost like having a glass cockpit that you can fit in your flight bag.” The aera 796 has a high-resolution, 7-inch capacitive touchscreen display that can be viewed in portrait or landscape mode. The physical design has been optimized to fit on the yoke and is sized perfectly as a knee-mounted device. There are four touch keys on the bezel of the unit representing “Back,” “Menu,” “Direct-To,” and “Nearest” for quick navigation to frequently used functions. And because the aera 796 is customizable, the user can pick favorite features or pages to anchor as icons along the bottom of the screen for faster access. The display has large, finger-touchable icons with intuitive pictures and labels to indicate their function such as: map, terrain, 3D Vision, WPT info, FPL list, active FPL, numbers, doc viewer, charts, weather, SiriusXM and tools. Pilots can choose any of these functions by simply touching the appropriate icon. The touchscreen interface also allows the pilot to quickly pan across the map and pinch zoom. The aera 796 features 3D Vision, a unique 3D view of database-generated terrain. 3D Vision uses GPS position and the terrain-alerting database to recreate a behind-theaircraft perspective view of the topographic landscape. North American customers that do not require XM WX Satellite Weather and SiriusXM Radio, may be interested in the aera 795 Americas that has identical features to the aera 796 except that it is not XM capable. The aera 796 and 795 are available immediately for an expected street price of $2,499 and $2,199, respectively.

15th Annual Chairman’s Charity Classic Golf Tournament on Sunday, Oct. 9, will support NBAA Charities; money raised for the NBAA/CAN Charity Benefit on Tuesday, Oct. 11, will support the mission of the Corporate Angel Network, an organization that utilizes empty seats on business aircraft to transport cancer

patients to clinics for treatment. “Once again, NBAA’s Convention will be the must-attend event for anyone whose passion or profession involves business aviation,” said NBAA President and CEO Ed Bolen. “We look forward to seeing everyone in Las Vegas.

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WRAP-UP TO

AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT 2011

FAA KEYNOTE SPEECH J. Randolph Babbitt, Hartford, Conn., September 23, 2011 (Remarks as Prepared for Delivery) always enjoy coming to the AOPA Summit. As your website says, there’s “aviation action”–great phrase–for all ages and all levels of aviation enthusiasm. It’s also a nice combination of fun and serious discussion about the challenges this industry faces today. On that subject, let me take a few minutes to talk about what’s taking my time these days. Safety is the FAA’s primary mission and top priority. I’m proud to say that we have the safest aviation system in the world, bar none. Millions of Americans travel safely through our skies every year. And the number of airplanes in Hartford this week is proof that general aviation can provide safe transportation, not to mention a lot of fun, for people who love aviation. But I am still very troubled by the number of fatal accidents we see in general aviation. The long-term trend was moving down, in part due to all the work we have done together. But it has leveled out over the past 4-5 years. The summer of 2011 has been an especially painful time. Between June and September, we have lost 195 people in 114 GA fatal accidents. That hurts all of us. We don’t always have a good handle on what causes general aviation accidents. But one thing we do know is that there is usually a chain of events that leads to an accident … and the human element is almost always a link in that chain. That’s why I have been talking about professionalism since Day One as FAA Administrator. I want to thank AOPA, EAA, and others in the general aviation industry like GAMA, NATA, NAFI, and SAFE for being so helpful in getting the word out to your members. We can have all the programs in the world, but it means nothing if we can’t get through at the grassroots level. Working together, we can, and we must, redouble our efforts to figure out what’s driving these accidents and get the needles moving in the right direction. Speaking of working together: I am

I

AT

AOPA SUMMIT: "REDOUBLING OUR EFFORTS"

very pleased today to announce an initiative we are taking to update the aeronautical knowledge training and testing materials used for pilot and instructor certification. Specifically, we are chartering an Aviation Rulemaking Committee to make recommendations on improving these materials. This initiative is part of our five-year plan for transforming GA safety. Like other parts of this plan, it’s something we are doing in partnership with the aviation community. We don’t have all the answers for GA safety, so we need your help. The people who work day in, day out on the flight lines of aviation safety, training and assessment are the ones with the best insight on what kind of knowledge pilots need to operate safely in today’s national airspace system. You are the ones who know how to teach it. And you know how to measure it through good testing. We’re going to be knocking on some of your doors very soon to ask for participation. Speaking of participation, let me also thank AOPA and other organizations here today for working with us on our Airport System Strategic Evaluation Task Study (ASSET). Everyone in this audience understands the vital role that GA, and GA airports, play in our national aviation system. Our study, conducted with your input, will help us better define and explain the role of GA airports. We expect to have the final report early next year. Now let me turn to another big part of our mission: NextGen. NextGen is the complete transformation of our national airspace system from ground-based navigation and radar to satellite-based navigation and surveillance. It is one of the most important things we can do to improve safety and efficiency in a system that is vital to the American people and to our country’s economic health. Civil aviation accounts for more than 11.5 million jobs, and those jobs produce $396 billion in wages. NextGen technology is already taking us to the next level of safety and efficiency, and it is also helping us to make aviation more friendly to the environment. I’m curious about something. Raise your hand if you have ever flown a WAAS-enabled

RNAV GPS approach, such as an LPV approach. Great stuff, isn’t it? If you raised your hand, then you’re already benefiting from the satellite-based navigation elements of NextGen. And I bet you’d agree that the investment you made to equip with a WAAS-capable GPS navigator paid off the first time an LPV approach got you into the airport where you wanted to land. Automatic Dependent SurveillanceBroadcast, or ADS-B, is another investment that will pay off in terms of safety, efficiency, and situational awareness--not only for air traffic control, but also for you. ATC uses ADS-B to improve surveillance and separation, and to provide those services in areas that radar can’t reach, such as the Gulf of Mexico. That’s why we are requiring ADS-B Out by 2020 to operate in certain kinds of airspace. But ADS-B In can also benefit pilots. How many subscribe to some kind of weather service? Again, it’s great stuff. Most pilots I know are amazed by how these services expand situational awareness. They’re like GPS: once you’ve flown with this kind of information, you don’t want to go back to flying without it. ADS-B In will provide traffic and weather information right to your cockpit display, with no need for a subscription. And it may not take that long for the cost of acquiring and installing new equipment to pay for itself in savings from the subscriptions you buy right now. And here’s another reason to put ADS-B on your equipment upgrade list. A lot of the efficiencies we expect from ADS-B and other NextGen technologies depend on a system where most aircraft are using them. In most circumstances right now, the best equipped aircraft will be best placed to benefit from the many efficiencies that this equipment enables. And more ADS-B equipped aircraft mean more efficient operations for everyone. Some of you have asked what benefit there is for non-IFR aircraft in the system. You don’t have to be flying IFR to benefit from traffic information and weather information. You don’t have to be on an IFR flight plan to benefit from VFR flight following in places with little or no radar coverage. Everyone will benefit from the airspace management effi-

ciencies we can get from using ADS-B and other NextGen technologies. I’ve been around this business for my entire life--I started as a line boy in Florida, and later worked as a flight instructor before moving on to the airlines and eventually to the seat I have now at FAA headquarters. I have seen a lot of change over the years because of advances in airframes, avionics, and airspace management. I have to say, though, that this position has given me a whole new appreciation for both the present-day value and the future benefits of NextGen. I am convinced that it won’t be too long before we look at some of today’s technologies with the same kind of grins we have now when we hear about coffee grinder avionics and A-N radio ranges. Let me close today with an update on what is happening at the FAA. The taxpayers have entrusted us with operating the safest aviation system in the world. We will keep doing that--we will not compromise safety. But it was a very challenging summer, especially when the July funding lapse forced us to furlough nearly 4,000 FAA employees. And it wasn’t just about FAA employees. As a result of the lack of an authorization, we had to stop work on over 200 aviation construction and research projects across the country. Thousands of people in the construction trade had to go home and suspend work on a number of critical projects around the country. We were relieved to get the immediate crisis resolved, but we still need a long-term FAA funding bill in order to give the taxpayers the aviation system this country deserves. Since September 2007, Congress has passed short-term extensions of the FAA’s spending authorization 22 separate times. It’s tough to plan and execute the kind of long-term programs we need when funding comes in 30- and 90-day increments. We will continue to work with Congress to craft the kind of legislation that our aviation system needs and that the American people deserve. Again, it’s great to be here with people who are so enthusiastic about aviation in this country, and thank you for all you do to keep it strong.

Sell Your Airplane fast with an In Flight USA Classified Ad. Turn to Page 62 for detailsor call (650) 358-9908 to use your Visa/MasterCard


WRAP-UP TO

AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT 2011

SHIFTING THE TRAINING PARADIGM AOPA, Aviation Groups Gather to Address Declining Pilot Population By Julie Summers Walker (AOPA) ess than one year after the first AOPA Flight Training Summit, the AOPA Flight Training Student Retention Initiative presented its findings at a gathering of nearly 100 participants in Hartford, Conn., prior to AOPA Aviation Summit. AOPA Chief Operating Officer Rob Moran greeted flight school operators, flight instructors, aviation business owners, and aviation enthusiasts. They are among those who gathered in Long Beach, Calif., last year when the initiative launched. Moran thanked the participants for their involvement in this “national conversation.” “We have a huge possibility and potential before us,” he said, introducing AOPA President Craig Fuller. “The issue I worry about the most – and the one that keeps me up at night – is our declining pilot population,” Fuller said. “We must protect our precious freedom to fly.” Otherwise, issues such as user fees, closing airports, and security “become impossible to deal with.” AOPA Director of Flight Training Initiatives Jennifer Storm has spearhead-

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ed the initiative. She and her team have canvased the country in the past 10 months, conducting meetings in six different cities. The information and input from the hundreds of attendees at these meetings have resulted in several key initiatives, most notably including flight training scholarships, the relaunch of the Flight School Business newsletter, and the development of “My Flight Training,” a personalized online student support system. Additionally, the initiative has resulted in an unprecedented collaboration of the “alphabet” groups in aviation, such as the Experimental Aircraft Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, National Air Transportation Association, and others, all focused on the concerns of a declining pilot population. AOPA initially created two flighttraining scholarships of $5,000 each and launched an online application system in June. The results were so overwhelming – and the submissions so inspiring – Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA) and Jeppesen approached AOPA to each

NEW BRISTELL LSA

By Mike Collins (AOPA)

iberty Sport Aviation unveiled a new light sport airplane, the Bristell, at AOPA Aviation Summit on Sept. 22. The all-metal, low-wing airplane, designed by Milan Bristela – who was behind the Evektor SportStar and PiperSport (now SportCruiser) LSAs – is manufactured by BRM Aero in the Czech Republic. Powered by a 100-horsepower Rotax 912 ULS engine, the airplane cruises as fast as 117 knots; its fuel capacity of 34.3 gallons provides endurance of up to eight hours. An example was on display at Airportfest, at Hartford-Brainard Airport, through Sept. 24. “It’s a great flyer,” said Barry Pruitt, a partner in Liberty Sport Aviation who flew the airplane 2.5 hours from Lancaster, Pa., to Hartford on Wednesday. “It performs great. It’s very comfortable even after a long period of time.” The Bristell represents a fifth-generation design for Bristela, who began work-

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contribute an additional $5,000 scholarship to the program. The four winners were announced Sept. 24 at AOPA Aviation Summit. Flight School Business, an email newsletter designed to help, inspire, and educate flight school operators, was relaunched after Summit last year. The informative newsletter now has more than 3,500 subscribers. A demonstration of the “My Flight Training” student support program debuted during the summit Sept. 21. AOPA will be signing up student pilots at Summit to test the program, and their input will be evaluated before the program’s public launch. After the initial presentation, participants broke into focus groups to discuss an underlying issue identified during the regional meetings – that flight schools need more assistance to be successful as small businesses. The groups focused on the key five areas: finance and accounting; marketing and advertising; sales and customer service; management and leadership; and safety/risk management and insurance. “Flight schools know how to train; they’re asking for support on the

INTRODUCED AT

ing in aviation 20 years ago, initially in fatigue analysis and testing. “It gave me much experience about the structure,” he said. “The whole airplane is designed with CATIA software. Even the smallest, most basic part is done with CNC machines.” Should repairs ever be needed, they will be very easy, he said. “It’s just replacement of the damaged parts.” John Calla, also a partner in Liberty Sport Aviation, said the company – founded in 2005 – has been looking for the ideal LSA to introduce in the U.S. market. “We’ve been to a lot of airshows; we’ve talked and listened to a lot of customers. We’ve been looking for the perfect airplane and we have found it.” “We have been looking quite a while for another airplane that would meet what the market has been asking for,” Pruitt agreed. They’ve considered 15 or 20 models, he said, explaining that the airplane would have to have a company and the right attitude behind it to assure success. The Bristell is fun to fly, comfortable, and on the fast end on the light sport performance spectrum. “It’s a pleasure on

long trips.” Pruitt said they saw fatigue problems with some other designs; Bristela’s stress analysis background and materials choices set the airplane apart from other aircraft they considered. “By having that safety and longevity, I think we have a winner here.” Pruitt believes the airplane will be well suited for the U.S. training market. Features such as tire-size choices and brake components ensure that parts are accessible in the United States. “While we have great support from the factory in terms of the knowledge base, we won’t be shipping parts back to the factory for repairs.” Bristela said a Russian dealer has been using the airplane to train pilots. “They already operate five airplanes in their flight school,” which plans to teach 3,500 future airline pilots. “They started a year and a half ago. In the first six months, with four airplanes, they had 6,000 flight hours and more than 12,000 landings.” After 125 hours in the Bristell they move on to a twin-engine airplane, he said. The airplanes flew an average of six to seven hours daily in all weather condi-

business side,” said Storm. AOPA enlisted the support of partner associations to facilitate the discussion groups. Jason Blair, Executive Director of the National Association of Flight Instructors; Michael France, Manager of Regulatory Affairs for the National Air Transportation Association; Jens Hennig, Vice President of Operations for the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, David Oord, Government and Advocacy Specialist for the Experimental Aircraft Association; and Doug Stewart, Chairman of the Society of Aviation and Flight Educators served as facilitators for the five topic areas. At the end of the summit, AOPA Chief Operating Officer Rob Moran moderated a panel of the facilitators to capture noteworthy points from the operator and the customer perspective. Several key themes emerged, including selling the experience rather than the certificate, the importance of instructor and staff professionalism, as well as recognizing outstanding employees, leading by example, and the value of delegation.

SUMMIT

tions. “It shows the strength of the structure and how the undercarriage is attached to the plane,” Bristela said. “This is a very good one for flight school training.” “One of the features that will stand out to you is that it has a 51-inch cabin width – measured at the shoulder, where you really need it,” Calla noted. The rudder pedals are adjustable and the composite wing lockers are watertight. Currently there are 42 Bristells flying around the world. Base price for the airplane is $125,000, and the cost can go as high as $150,000, depending on customer options. Slots for delivery are available in February. “He has enough orders coming from the rest of the world that we’re competing for slots,” Pruitt said.


WRAP-UP TO

AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT 2011 WE HAVE

By Thomas A. Horne (AOPA) midnight rendezvous joins an airline pilot with AOPA’s Crossover Classic United Airlines First Officer Eric Short was making his usual 1 a.m. arrival on a trip from San Francisco to Washington’s Dulles International Airport. But he had one more stop after that. With assistance from United, the stop was carefully coordinated by AOPA staffers on a mission: to inform Short that he was the winner of AOPA’s 2011 Crossover Classic sweepstakes. Choreographing anything in the middle of the night can be a challenge, but with the help of a network of willing accomplices all the elements of the plan came together. An AOPA staffer with connections at United learned of Short’s schedule. United’s Dulles Operations staff agreed to pick up Short right at his arrival gate, and then drive him–along with the captain of the flight–to the Signature fixed base operator on the field.

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Short thought nothing of the shuttle van’s atypical routing on the airport grounds. “Some of these roads are flooded,” he was told, and so a different path had to be taken. And it made sense. The Washington area had been experiencing days of heavy rains. It was only when the van pulled to a stop on the Signature apron that Short sensed things weren’t quite right. His confusion grew when the van pulled up in front of two massive hangar doors. As the doors rumbled open AOPA President Craig Fuller emerged–trailed by a video crew, greeted Short inside the van, and told him he was the winner of the fully refurbished and restored 1974 Cessna 182P. Understandably bewildered, Short was led into the hangar. There, bathed in spotlights, was the Crossover Classic. Eventually, Short cracked a smile, and then beamed with the realization that he had in fact won. “A few minutes ago, we were flying 200 people,” he said. “And now here I am with a new airplane!”

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WINNER!

Short, who lives in Paulden, Ariz., has spent his life in aviation and served a 20-year stint in the Air Force. A son followed in his footsteps, who graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy and is currently flying in the Air Force. By 2:30 a.m. the festivities were over and Short went to his hotel to rest up for the next day’s trip back to California. But more milestones were to come. Short and his family arrived in Hartford on Sept. 22 and appeared on stage with Fuller and FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt at the opening session Friday morning. “I’d like to explain that deer-in-theheadlights look,” he said. “I have been an AOPA member since I was 17 and have wished and hoped to win. But this year I haven’t been following the sweepstakes; I didn’t know the airplane. My son had just told me about the 2012 sweepstakes and I thought, ‘Is it the Husky?’ but I am pretty happy it’s the 182 – it’s better than flying the Triple 7!” “Don’t get me in trouble with

Boeing!” Fuller replied. It won’t be long before the Crossover Classic finds its way to its new home – most likely at the Ernest A. Love Field in Prescott, Ariz. In sum, a fine airplane is finally matched up with a quality winner. It’s a fitting finale to the year-long restorationand-upgrade process that’s transformed this very special Skylane into one of the more popular sweepstakes projects AOPA has ever pursued. And for the other 399,999 or so AOPA members, who didn’t win this year, there’s always the 2012 Tougher than a Tornado Husky! They’ll find out if they’ve won at next year’s AOPA Aviation Summit, Oct. 11 through 13, 2012, in Palm Springs, Calif.

AOPA FOUNDATION RAISES MORE THAN $200,000

By Thomas B. Haines (AOPA)

he AOPA Foundation’s annual A Night for Flight online auction and banquet generated more than $200,000 for the organization. Foundation President Bruce Landsberg reported the news at the second-annual fundraiser banquet Sept. 22 at AOPA Aviation Summit. The dinner featured acrobatic performers with AiRealistic. The online auction, which launched

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Aug. 11 and closed the evening of Sept. 22 during the banquet, offered 120 items for sale, from aviation-related paintings to a lunch and flight experience with pilot and actor Harrison Ford. The Ford experience generated the highest bid, $50,200. However, other experiences, including a private tour of the Ronald Reagan ranch ($13,000) and a day of aerobatic flying with Sean Tucker ($10,200) also proved to be popular items. At the auction, Allan Schrader,

founder of the Lightspeed Foundation, provided the AOPA Foundation with a check for $12,000 – an amount donated by Lightspeed customers and the company itself. The Lightspeed Foundation’s goal is to support aviation nonprofits. The public can vote on the most deserving such entities. Schrader reported that the AOPA Foundation received about three times the votes of the next nearest nonprofit. FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt

addressed the more than 200 attendees, saying, “I hope you raise a ton of money for safety tonight because you will make my life a lot easier.” Landsberg reported that all of the funds from the auction and banquet will be used to support the AOPA Foundation, which has as its goals improving the perception of general aviation, protecting airports, growing the pilot population, and improving safety through the Air Safety Institute.

ACTOR, EXHIBIT HONOR TUSKEGEE AIRMEN By Mike Collins (AOPA) he Tuskegee Airmen – black airmen who trained as pilots in Tuskegee, Ala., during World War II as an “experiment” because the military didn’t believe they could learn to fly and fight – proved themselves in combat as the military’s first black pilots. Shortly after the war, they were largely responsible for desegregation of the Air Force, the first branch of the military to desegregate. Their contributions were recalled at AOPA Aviation Summit on Sept. 22 by Oscar Award-winning actor Cuba

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Gooding Jr., one of the stars of Red Tails, a new film by George Lucas set for release in January that tells how the Tuskegee Airmen continued to overcome adversity to prove themselves heroically in combat. And a new traveling exhibit operated by the Commemorative Air Force’s Red Tail Squadron, Rise Above, was on display at Airportfest at HartfordBrainard Airport through Sept. 24. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a restored P51C Mustang, painted in the distinctive red tail paint scheme the Tuskegee Airmen acquired in Europe – but the exhibit is really about the multimedia

presentation shown in the portable panoramic theater. Gooding, who is not a pilot but said he’s spent a lot of time in simulators and around pilots, was interviewed by AOPA President Craig Fuller on AOPA Live. “The closest I came to actually controlling in flight was a movie I did called Outbreak,” said Gooding, who performed several helicopter takeoffs – but not the landings, he quickly added. “I’d never trained to be a pilot but I’ve been behind the stick of a few Cessnas.” Gooding starred in a 1995 film, The Tuskegee Airmen. When the movie Red

Tails was announced, agents said they didn’t want to use any actors from the original movie. But the Tuskegee story appealed so much to Gooding that he mounted a campaign, and was able to sit down with the director. It turns out that Continued on Page 44


October 2011

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

44

October 2011

Actor, Exhibit Honor Tuskegee Airmen Continued from Page 42 the director had him in mind for the role he landed in the film. “The first one was a $2 million HBO film. This one was George Lucas’ passion project,” he explained. “It’s a nice bookend piece for the original Tuskegee movie, where I was a pilot.” In this film, Gooding’s character – Maj. Emanuelle Stance – is in an instructional role. “I always am excited when there’s a role in development about a real-life

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character,” he added, explaining that it heightens his desire as an actor to get the depiction right – especially if the person is still alive. “You get to embody a sense of who that person is and present that to the world. That’s always really exciting to an actor. One of my goals as an actor is to continue to do that. It’s always enriching and rewarding.” The veteran actor has not yet seen the film, which is still in post-production. “From the materials I’ve seen, I’m very

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proud of the accomplishments…the emotional impact that I’ve seen it have on me. [The film] really conveys the tribulations they went through in combat.” Gooding shared a little inside information, as well: Look for the release of Double Victory ahead of the movie. “Lucas put together a two-hour documentary on the history of the Tuskegee Airmen.” Several of the original Tuskegee Airmen were on the set every day in Prague, in the Czech Republic, where Gooding filmed for 13 weeks. “They would sit and talk about stories and it would remind them of something…they would tell us more. They were checking our uniforms and moving our belts. If there was anything too heightened in reality they would pipe up,” he said. “There’s a connection,” Gooding said, explaining that he’s called to stories themed around the African-American experience. “Those stories to me are very attractive–they’re very telling.” The airplane was restored in 2001 and flown to honor the Tuskegee Airmen, explained Doug Rozendaal, one of the Mustang’s pilots. It was damaged during a landing accident after the engine failed in 2004, and pilot Don Hinz was killed. At the time, the squadron had no money and wasn’t sure what to do. “We used the Tuskegee Airmen as an example of what to do,” he said. “We pulled it

together and then we just kept going. Don’s vision was to use [the airplane] for education.” That led to the portable theater and a traveling exhibit. The Texas Flying Legends, a museum at Ellington Field in Houston, saw what the squadron was trying to do and was so impressed by the Tuskegee Airmen that they provided the funding for the Rise Above exhibition. The trailer is an immersive experience, Rozendaal said. “You’ve got to create an experience in order to change behavior,” he said, paraphrasing FAA flight instructor training materials. “Our sense is that we’ve created an experience.” Some of the multimedia content is from Red Tail Reborn, a documentary that features the Mustang’s second restoration, following the crash. The Rise Above exhibit debuted at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh in July and had only been on the road for 45 days, Rozendaal said. The squadron plans to display the exhibit two or three times each week, often taking it off-airport. “We’re planning a 40-week tour for next year, over nine months,” he explained. “We’ll take it to wherever the kids are.” While they seek to take the story to young people – and ideally bring kids out to the airport – the primary goal is to tell the story of the Tuskegee Airmen. “At the end of the day, it’s about the kids drawing a target on the wall for what they want to be when they grow up,” Rozendaal said. “We all have overcome adversity. And these guys showed the world it could be done.” For more information on the Red Tail Squadron’s Rise Above exhibit, for schedule information when it becomes available, or to support the tour, visit www.redtail.org.

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RENO: DEDICATED

Marilyn Dash’s

TO THE

MEMORY

OF

JIMMY LEEWARD

AND THE

FANS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES

The Pylon Place

SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 – THE SADDEST DAY y now most of you have heard of our tragedy at the Reno Air Races on Sept. 16. I have still not come to a point where I can talk about what I saw and what I experienced. But, I wanted to tell you a story. They say that extraordinary people do extraordinary things. And I will say that every single one of the pilots and crew at the Reno Air Races are extraordinary people. They breathe a little deeper, love a little harder, stand closer to the edge. We know there are dangers in doing what we do – but we never thought our activities would hurt anyone else. Losing one of our own is a tragedy. Losing people who were only there to cheer us on is a catastrophe. Sometimes, these extraordinary things go extraordinarily wrong. Let me tell you about Jimmy Leeward. Jimmy learned to fly at a young age. He was a second-generation pilot and proceeded to raise two more generations of flyers. They were a flying family, living in their own dream community – Leeward Air Ranch in Ocala, Fla. The biggest thing for a new pilot was to have their first solo at the Ranch. Jimmy was also a movie stunt pilot, actor and aviation consultant. He was involved with no less than eight movies including Amelia, Tuskegee Airmen and Cloud Dancer. He had thousands of hours in hundreds of aircraft. He was a gifted professional. The first time I met Jimmy we talked about Cloud Dancer and his role in the movie. He was gracious and kind and

B

In Flight USA provides this list with respect to the families of the fans who lost their lives. • Cheryl Elvin, 71, of Lenexa, Kan. • Wendy Hewitt, 56, of Fort Mohave, Ariz. • George Hewitt, 60, of Fort Mohave, Ariz. • James McMichael, 47, of Graham, Wash. • Craig Salerno, 50, of Friendswood, Texas

“He was a showman who loved the sport, loved to fly and loved the people around him. My life is better for having known him and I will always remember his warmth and kindness.” Marilyn Dash didn’t mind answering stupid questions from a newbie. Our friendship continued over the years. He always had time for his friends and his fans. If you stopped him for a picture (he never shied away from a camera) he had to shake your hand and

chat with you for a minute. If you stopped him for an autograph, he made time for you. I have tried to model my public life after Jimmy and professionals like him. He was a showman who loved the sport, loved to fly and loved the people

• Regina Bynum, 53, of San Angelo, Texas • John Craik, 47, of Gardnerville, Nev. • Gregory Morcom, 47, of Stanwood, Wash. • Sharon Stewart, 47, of Reno, Nev. • Michael Wogan, 22, of Phoenix, Ariz. around him. My life is better for having known him and I will always remember his warmth and kindness.


RENO: DEDICATED

TO THE

MEMORY

OF

JIMMY LEEWARD

AND THE

FANS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES

NEVADA SENATOR HARRY REID: “MY HEART GOES HURT AT RENO AIR SHOW” Nevada Senator Harry Reid made the following remarks on Sept. 19 on the Senate floor about the fatal plane crash in Reno. Below are his remarks as prepared for delivery: I was saddened to hear of a terrible accident on Friday at the Reno air show, which killed 10 people and injured many more. My heart goes out to those who were

NTSB Identification: WPR11MA454 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation Accident occurred Friday, September 16, 2011 in Reno, Nev. Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS P-51D, registration: N79111 Injuries: 11 Fatal, 66 Serious. This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. On September 16, 2011, about 1626 Pacific daylight time, an experimental North America P-51D, N79111, impacted terrain following a loss of control while maneuvering at Reno Stead Airport, Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to Aero-Trans Corp, Ocala, Florida, and operated by the pilot as Race 177 under the provisions of 14 Code of

TRAGEDY

AT

By Alan Smith t 4:20 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 16 at the 2011 National Championship Air Races held at RenoStead airport, a beautiful day of racing became a nightmare. We had enjoyed 13 races in all classes that day and were watching the start of race 14, a Gold category heat race. Among the primary contenders were Stewart Dawson in the Rare Bear with its 4000 hp Pratt & Whitney 4360 engine, two-time Gold winner Steve Hinton Jr. In the 500+ mph Strega and Jimmy Leeward in the modified P51D #177 Galloping Ghost. The start went smoothly with Steve Hinton in the T-33 pace plane pulling up with his standard announcement: “gentlemen, you have a race!” Steve Jr. in Strega quickly got the lead, followed by Dawson, Leeward, and the others. For three laps, they screamed around the eight-plus mile course. Then, at the start

A

hurt. And my thoughts are with the families of those who lost their lives, including the pilot of the World War II-era plane that crashed into spectators. I commend the many first responders who rushed to the scene Friday. Their quick thinking and skillful assistance saved many lives. While this crash was devastating, I am glad the pilot took quick action to prevent

additional loss of life by avoiding a grandstand packed with thousands of spectators. My four grandchildren attended the show on Thursday. And my oldest grandson, Mitchell was at the even with his scout troop earlier on Friday. Although officials are still investigating the crash, initial reports indicate that a piece of the plane’s tail broke off prior to the accident.

NTSB PREMILINARY REPORT

Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Casualties on the ground included 10 fatalities and 74 injured. As of the time of this preliminary report, eight of the injured remain hospitalized, some in critical condition. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed for the local air race flight, which departed from Reno Stead Airport about 10 minutes before the accident. The airplane was participating in the Reno National Championship Air Races in the last event of the day. The airplane had completed several laps and was in a steep left turn towards the home pylon when, according to photographic evidence, the airplane suddenly banked momentarily to the left before banking to

the right, turning away from the race course, and pitching to a steep nose-high attitude. Witnesses reported and photographic evidence indicates that a piece of the airframe separated during these maneuvers. After roll and pitch variations, the airplane descended in an extremely nose-low attitude and collided with the ground in the box seat area near the center of the grandstand seating area. Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration examined the wreckage on site. They documented the debris field and identified various components of the airplane’s control system and control surfaces. The wreckage was removed to a secure storage facility for detailed examination at a later date. The airplane’s ground crew noted

OUT TO

THOSE

I hope this terrible event – the first of its kind in this nation – will not deter people from attending air shows in the future. Thousands of people enjoy these shows every year. The late Senator Ted Stevens attended the Reno show many times and told me it was the best of its kind. I will continue to monitor the investigation.

that the airplane had a telemetry system that broadcast data to a ground station as well as recorded it to a box on board the airplane. The crew provided the ground station telemetry data, which includes engine parameters and global positioning satellite system data to the NTSB for analysis. The onboard data box, which sustained crush damage, was sent to the NTSB’s Vehicle Recorder laboratory for examination. Investigators recovered pieces of a camera housing and multiple detached memory cards from the airplane’s onboard camera that were in the debris field. The memory cards and numerous still and video image recordings were also sent to the Vehicle Recorders laboratory for evaluation. The Federal Aviation Administration and the Reno Air Race Association are parties to the investigation.

2011 NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP AIR RACES of lap four, the air racing world blew up. Just past the start/finish line, Leeward in Galloping Ghost pulled up sharply, shifting slightly to the right. Mechanical, we thought. Forced landing coming up. But he continued steeply upward past 1000 feet, slowed at full power, and appeared to stall. Then Galloping Ghost rolled into a vertical dive downward. From where my associate Lisa Silva and I were, there was no evidence of an attempt to recover. I looked at Lisa (who was at the races for the first time) and said “he’s dead.” At impact, he was. And so were several other people. The victims on the ground were audience members in the front rows of the box seating section at the west end of the grandstand. The P-51 hit the ground like a missile, reportedly still at full power, and the site was filled with pieces of the aircraft and the bodies of the people who had been seated at the impact point.

In some wire service photos, there is evidence that the pilot made a last second attempt to avoid hitting the audience. Without that, he would have gone into the grandstand with even more disastrous results. What do we think? First of all, what caused it? Evidence recovered at and near the crash site indicate that the trim tab on the left elevator failed and left the airplane. The trim tab enables level flight to be maintained at varying airspeeds. At 400+ mph the nose would be trimmed strongly downward so the pilot would not have to maintain strong forward pressure on the control stick to stay level on a race course. If that trim tab tore loose, as it apparently did, the aircraft would pitch nose up violently and it is not only possible but probable that the pilot would momentarily black out due to sudden blood loss from the brain. We have seen that happen once before at Reno, but in that case, the pilot recovered quickly enough to realize

where he was and immediately land the P-51.We talked about it later that day and he said that his hearing came back before his vision and the sound of a Rolls Royce Merlin V-12 at full power gave him a clue as to what was going on and he realized where he was. We saw the initial skyrocket climb, saw the stagger of a power on stall, and then the nose came down and the airplane steadied and swept around to a fast but safe landing. Sadly, perhaps we can say that Jimmy Leeward did not recover in time to deal with the problem and that his last conscious act was the slight move away from the grandstand that may have saved many more lives. Now what? There is a lot of static saying that air racing should be no more. As the author of soon to be published Racing on the Sky I did a great deal of research on the history of the world’s fastest motor sport. It began in France in Continued on Page 47


RENO: DEDICATED

TO THE

“FLYING Story and Photos by Pete Shirk ir racing is a high-risk game but all the safety precautions and care usually keep it safe. Sometimes the best intentions are just not enough, and that happened in a horrible way on Friday, Sept. 16, 2011. Jimmy Leeward, a veteran pilot and air racer, had taken all the precautions, and yet on lap three of the Gold Race, coming off pylon eight on the west end of the course and heading down the home stretch in front of the flight line, crowd, bleachers, VIP tents, trailers, food and beverage concessions, FAA trailer, and control tower, all the care, safety precautions, experience and expertise gave way to catastrophe. As it came into the home stretch, Race 177 drifted outward from the course racing line, toward the ramp and crowd. While passing the pit area, a relatively small but critical part came off, the aircraft violently pitched up into a climb, half-rolled to the right at the top, turned 90 degrees back toward the race course, and dove almost straight down impacting the ground in the box seating area H3. The explosive force of the impact killed 11 and injured 70. (As of this writing, 9/21/11, final casualty figures are not known but two people remain missing.) The pilot was highly experienced and the aircraft had a long air racing history. In fact it had raced at the final Cleveland Air Races in 1949 when another racer hit a pylon killing two on the ground as well as the pilot. But the Galloping Ghost had more history than just Cleveland, and when Unlimited Air Racing resumed in Reno this aircraft returned as Race 69, owned and flown by Dr. Cliff Cummins, a Southern California radiologist. The airplane was competitive and well-flown, but in 1970 during the Silver race on Friday in the fourth lap, Race 69 which had moved from fifth place passing Clay Lacy and heading for Lyle Shelton leading in Grumman Bearcat Race 77, Cliff’s engine blew. He pulled up for a deadstick landing on runway 26 but was not

A

MEMORY

A

OF

JIMMY LEEWARD

AND THE

FANS WHO LOST THEIR LIVES

FULL CIRCLE”

able to get the altitude and distance worked out, and crash-landed into Lemon Valley to the east of Stead. Cliff walked away but the airplane was significantly damaged. After a rebuild it was raced again, went through a succession of owners, and went into storage in 1989. It re-emerged at Reno again in 2009 in the hands of Jimmy Leeward. In addition to Galloping Ghost’s Cleveland racing experience, the further irony of the 2011 Reno Air Races is the entry of an ultra-rare F2G Corsair. Race 74 (NX5577N), which also ran at Cleveland in 1949. Leeward had qualified well at 466 mph. In the Gold Race on Friday at the start he was several airplanes back from the lead, but beginning to overtake other aircraft. On the beginning of the third lap, the accident struck quickly. One of the startling things about this 2011 accident is how it unfolded. He was running side-by-side with Race 11 (Miss America). When coming off pylon eight he started to drift away from the race line and was heading for the home stretch in front of the stands when the violent pitchup occurred. Now it is known that Leeward’s aircraft lost the left elevator trim tab. That is a relatively small piece (approximately 6” x 30”) on the trailing edge of the elevator. Its function is to modify the effect of the elevator which controls up/down, which means it is important – but intuitively, losing it does not sound as drastic as losing an entire control surface like an aileron or an entire elevator. But apparently it is almost that bad. A similar previous incident illustrated how. In 1998 Bob Button of Winters, Calif. had thoroughly prepared his Race 5, Voodoo, in a real bid to win the Reno Unlimited class. Voodoo had been the top qualifier in the unlimited class at a 452.55 mph average. The pilot, Bob Hannah was leading another very competitive entrant, Dago Red in a preliminary heat race on Saturday. As with Jimmy Leeward, the left elevator trim tab came off the elevator at racing speed. Voodoo pitched up so

violently that pilot Hannah was subjected to 10 Gs of acceleration force, causing him to lose consciousness. When Hannah regained consciousness he found himself at 9,000 feet. He was able to regain control and recover to a safe landing, but trim tabs had made their point in the most graphic manner. These WWII fighter aircraft are highly engineered and well-built war planes. They are not delicate or fragile, and many times brought their pilots home despite major damage. And yet shedding a trim tab at 460 mph apparently so changes the aerodynamics, that a crash is entirely possible. Jimmy Leeward’s sudden pitch-up is thought to have been caused by the loss of the trim. This accident was probably the most closely observed and well-documented aviation disaster in history. This data is being given to the NTSB investigating team. The NTSB and FAA were even present at the event. Race 177 transmitted engine, airspeed, and other operating data by telemetry back to its crew in the pits. The NTSB report will be thorough and likely answer all questions, but will probably take a long time for a comprehensive report to be completed. The investigations are conducted in a very “assume nothing, prove everything” manner, and being that deliberate takes time. If you feel the need to understand what happened and how this accident occurred – and most of us who witnessed it do – here is some advice: Don’t listen to people who are trying to sound authoritative but aren’t. Anyone who begins “I’m not a pilot, but …” or “I wasn’t there, but ….” will probably not have any relevant information. Important decisions regarding the future of air racing will be made in the coming months. It is best to base decisions on information, analysis and reason. If public hysteria about safety is fed by rumor mongers, poor decisions will be the result. Until the NTSB report is issued it is best to not speculate if you love aviation. Speculation only confuses and misleads those who don’t understand it, and works cross-purpose with those of us who do.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

48

October 2011

Tragedy at 2011 National Championship Continued from Page 46 1909. The first meets were time trials of single aircraft around an oval closed course marked by towers. The first, at a field outside Reims in August 1909 was won by the American, Glenn Curtiss, in a modified version of his famous June Bug that he named the Reims Racer. His speed was about 50 mph. In the 102-year history of air racing, no spectator has ever been injured or killed until this year at Reno. No audience has ever had racers even come close to them. Why do we race airplanes at all? As an industrialized culture, we have always raced anything mechanical we built that could move. Over the years, this has included railroad steam locomotives, paddle wheel river boats, sailing ships, ocean liners, and, of course cars and motorcycles. Why not airplanes? Could air racing

be of benefit to the world of aviation? It has, big time, and will continue to be. Over the years, racing airplanes has led to the design and construction of high performance aircraft. During the ten years prior to World War II, retractable landing gear, wing flaps, variable pitch propellers and aircraft engine superchargers all came from air racing. Before that from 1913 to 1931, the Schneider Trophy events for racing seaplanes led to speeds of over 400 mph. The Supermarine “S” series of high performance seaplanes designed by Reginald Mitchell at Supermarine let Great Britain retire the Schneider Trophy in 1931 after three consecutive wins. Mitchell used what he had learned from air racing to design the famous WW II Supermarine Spitfire fighter in 1937. What about now? What can air rac-

ing contribute to aviation? Yes, the racers of the unlimited class are modified classics from the World War II years. Military aviation has long ago moved to the jet age. But, look at the other classes at Reno! Look at the sport class where a whole series of high performance light aircraft test each other every year. These are fast, economical airplanes, many of which can be built from kits in a two-car garage. The ones that race at Reno have either been home built or assembled by the kit manufacturer for competition with each other that leads to improvement in both design and performance. Even the sport biplanes fit into the home built competition category. Look at Tom Aberle’s Phantom. Here we have 250 mph out of 180 horsepower. His highly-modified design came out of the challenge of air racing.

But, yes, we still have the tragedy of 2011 drifting over us. It never happened before, and, no, that can never happen again. Back again to the cause. Both airframe and pilot failure. An out of control high powered unlimited racer with a semiconscious pilot in the cockpit is a traveling bomb. It was proved once before that if a pilot can return to the task, and recognize the danger, he can solve the problem. Can we eliminate the loss of pilot capability that can go with a partial airframe failure such as the loss of a trim tab? What about requiring G-suits for all unlimited race pilots? If we can eliminate the capability loss, we will never have a fully out of control airplane even with minor airframe damage. We will never have the kind of spectator loss that darkened 2011 at Reno. Once in 102 years is more than enough.

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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October 2011

Flying With Faber

A TRIP Stuart J. Faber and Aunt Bea here are several ways to reach Mackinac Island. The most popular is by boat or ferry. My favorite is to fly over the water at an altitude sufficient to glide to land should that configuration suddenly become mandatory. Swimming is another option - sharks are a rarity in the Great Lakes. As winter reaches its peak, the 15mile straits that separate the mainland from the island freeze over. Locals have named the frozen path “The Mackinaw Bridge.” Thousands of snowmobiles and other conveyances make their winter pilgrimages across the bridge. Each year, a few folks disappear. The more seasoned natives with whom I spoke wisely avoid the Mackinaw Bridge.

T

Airports The expanse of fifteen miles between land-masses presents little cause for concern for pilots. Those who prefer taking a ferry across the straits can park their airplane at nearby Cheboygan County Airport (KSLH) or Mackinac County Airport (83D) which is just across the bridge in St. Ignace. From either of these fields, it’s a short drive to the harbor where you can pick up one of the hourly departures of the Arnold Company Ferry at either the St. Ignace and Mackinaw docks. For more than 133 years Arnold Transit Company has served the straits area and Mackinac Island. The Arnold Line features the large, fast, comfortable, twinhulled triple-decked catamarans. Enjoy magnificent views from the open-air decks or relax in the large, comfortable, glass enclosed, passenger lounges. For more information on ferry schedules and fees, visit arnoldline.com or call 800/5428548. The ferry ride is wonderful, but the experience of flying across the straits and landing on the island should not be missed. Mackinac Airport rests atop a hill at an elevation of 739 feet above sea level. The sole runway is concrete and

TO

MICHIGAN’S MACKINAC ISLAND

well maintained. Runway 8-25 is 3500 x 75 feet and can be reached by an IFR approach, if necessary. The choice is between a GPS or VOR/DME approach to Runway 26. Unicom/CTAF can be reached at 122.7. You had better top off the fuel tanks prior to your arrival. There is no fuel service at the field. For more information, call the airport office at 906/847-3231.

The Discovery of Mackinac Island: Fort Mackinac Just north of the harbor, Fort Mackinac is perched on a hilltop and stands guard over the island as it has for more than 200 years. The Fort was founded during the American Revolution. Believing that Fort Michilimackinac, at what is now Mackinaw City on the mainland, was too vulnerable to American attack, the British moved the fort to Mackinac Island in 1780. Americans took control in 1796. In July 1812, in the first land engagement of the War of 1812 in the United States, the British re-captured the fort. In a bloody battle in 1814 the Americans attempted but failed to retake the fort. However, it was returned to the United States after the war. I must confess with some embarrassment that I was unaware that the War of 1812 extended as far west as Michigan. Since invasions are now unlikely, the fort has now been preserved as a National Park. In many respects, the compound appears similar to its 1812 architectural configuration. Many of the buildings have been restored to how they looked during the final years of the Fort’s occupation in 1885. It is a great place to enjoy lunch or a picnic while gazing at the panoramic views of the island and the straits. Until the War of 1812, Mackinac Island was primarily a military outpost. After the Civil War, wealthy Americans

Victorian homes on the island. (Stuart J. Faber)

were in search of new vacation spots. In those days, travel on an excursion boat was a popular way of exploring much of America which was yet to be “civilized.” Mackinac Island was discovered. Soon a group of easterners constructed stately victorian mansions on the island. Along with the mansions came tennis courts, golf courses, hiking and biking trails. Soon a small village emerged. Stores were opened to serve the new community. The waterfront grew into a bustling and colorful harbor. All of this was accomplished without firing a shot at the fort. Fortunately, many of those homes have survived the modern frenzy to obliterate history. Downtown has grown, yet it retains its 19th century charming simplicity. The harbor is postcard-perfect. Today, a number of the historic mansions as well as many of the small cottages are available for summer rentals. Accommodation choices include bed-and-breakfast places, large and small hotels and resorts, and some condos.

A Trip to the Past In many communities, especially Southern California, our cars have become our additional appendages. If Californians want to visit the neighbor two doors down the street, they hop in their cars and drive 100 feet. That may be an exaggeration, but it spotlights the dependence we have on our motor vehicles. The moment you set your feet on Mackinac Island, you had better treat those feet very well – they will be your closest friends and one of three modes of transportation during your entire stay. The other means of getting around are by horse-and-buggy or bicycle. Should you not be able to overcome your addiction to a vehicle propelled by an internal combustion engine, your other option is to get sick so that you can be transported in the island’s solitary ambulance – or join the fire department and hop on the solitary fire truck. Mackinac Island is a magical place. The absence of automobiles results in a serene oasis of quiet and cleanliness rarely found in a city. The only exhaust that permeates the atmosphere emanates from the horses – and that gets cleaned up before it reaches the ozone layer. As soon as we stepped foot off the ferry, we were caught up in the magic.

Just one block from the harbor is “downtown,” an expanse of approximately five city blocks. The streets are lined with one-of-a-kind shops and family owned restaurants. Three I would recommend are Yankee Rebel Tavern, Seabiscuit

Buggy riding with Faber. Tavern and Carriage House. As you walk east from downtown, you will be surrounded with many of the grand Victorian homes that were built during the last years of the 19th century. A further stroll brings more modest cottages into view – small but charming nevertheless.

Buggy Riding with Faber In the course of my travels, I’ve piloted, driven or ridden in a variety of transportation devices from jets to camels. This month, the column could be entitled Buggy Riding with Faber. I moseyed into Jack’s Livery Stable, a vintage place that has been operated by the same family since 1935. I sauntered up to a CBI (Certified Buggy Instructor – no double I ratings), and signed up for a few lessons on how to operate a horse and buggy. It’s not much different from an airplane. Left rein results in a left turn, right rein a right turn. However, pulling back on the reins won’t raise the nose. But it will bring the team of horse to a full stop – something you can’t do in the air. Jack’s offers two-, four-, and six-passenger models. A two-seater side-by-side was sufficient to accommodate Cheryl and me. I took the left seat. As soon as I completed my check-out, I was handed a map and off we went for an adventurous hour of galloping around the island. No GPS required. The horse (Tootsie), knew the way. For more on renting a horse and buggy, or just a horse, visit jack’s at Continued on Page 51


October 2011

www.inflightusa.com

Flying With Faber

Continued from Page 50 www.jacksliverystable.com.

Magnificent Mission Point If you leave the hustle-bustle of downtown Mackinac Island and walk (or buggy-ride), due east, within ten minutes you will be in the midst of an expansive green area the borders of which are the waters of the Great Lakes. This is Mission Point. The Mission Point area was first settled in the early 1820s when Reverend William Ferry, a protestant missionary, built the Mission House. Shortly thereafter, a church was erected, then a scattering of homes. The area, which became known as Mission Point, would eventually evolve into a college. Finally, it became the site of the Mission Point Resort. Construction of the resort began in the mid -1950s. The huge trusses, which support the structure were constructed of Norway Pine. Fifty tons of native stone form the outer walls of the building. The Main Lobby, one of the most distinctive architectural structures on the island, has a ceiling composed of nineton trusses, which resemble a great

CHINO AIRCRAFT SALES

Incredible workmanship in the Main Lobby. (Brian Walters Photography) teepee. Straits Lodge, completed in 1957 is a prime example of skilled wood craftsmanship, and has a huge marble encased fireplace as the focal point. Mission Point Resort, one of the largest and most complete resorts on Mackinac Island, is headquarters for fun and recreational activities for the entire family. The best deal is that kids eat free at the resort and, even better, the resort is pet friendly. The guestrooms are located in two large buildings, the Main Lodge and the Straits Lodge. The Main lodge contains 109 rooms including the presidential suite and five specialty/honeymoon suites and features the resort’s three main

BOB CULLEN BOB@CHINOAIRCRAFT.COM

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recreational activities. Everything from old-fashioned hayrides, picnics, boating, fly-fishing, lighthouse tours and offisland excursions through Michigan’s scenic Upper Peninsula is available. The resort also has a championship 18-hole putting golf course and a theater showing first run movies. The Activity Center rents a variety of bikes for exploring the 2,200-acre island and its 100 miles of hiking, biking and horseback-riding trails. Kids can meet at the resort’s “Kids Island Club, a 3,000-square-foot indoor children’s activity center. Two to fouryear-olds can have fun at Mission Point with storybook circle times, balloons and bubbles fun and teddy bear picnics. “Tweeners,” ages 11 through 15, can hang out in the resort’s game room where pool and pizza parties, video games and teen tie-dye parties take place.

Cozy digs at Mission Point Resort. (Brian Walters Photography)

Great for MeetingsBig and Small

Many Things to Do

Mission Point Resort is the largest and most complete resort for meetings on Mackinac Island. In addition, the resort is Continued on Page 52

Resort guests may drop by the Activity Center to arrange any number of

1979 WARRIOR, 161, 800 SMOH, new paint. $39,500.

1978 SENECA II 1700 SMOH, full de-ice, Garmin 420, 4400 TT. $79,500.

1961 F33 DEBONAIR, 260 HP, 104 gal., D’Shannon mods. Slope W/S, new paint, $52,500.

PIPER ARROW, 1720 SMOH, NDH, IFR, all records, new strip/paint, 3 blade prop, $42,500.

1978 SENECA II, Narco, Cent. III AP, 12 SMOH L/R, new glass new P&I & annual. $139,500 OBO.

1973 ARROW, 200HP, IFR, loaded, A/C, $54,500.

1961 Nice AZTEC, here and ready to go.Good trainer/time builder. $39,500.

1969 C150, square tail, 358 SMOH, $16,950. 1981 152, 1150 SMOH, new paitn & interior. New annual. $29,500. 1977 C172, 1450 SMOH, late paint, IFR. $37,500. 1977 172N, 676 SMOH, new P&I, IFR. $47,500 will finance.

1961 COMANCHE 250/260, fueld injected, 1310 SMOH, 4400 TT, no AD on propeller, tail SB complied with, NDH. $49,500 must sell! 1962 FORTUNE 500 G-18 hi-cabin tail dragger, 350/350 SMOH, new int., Custom paint. King IFR, AP, 2 blade Ham Std. Trade. $125,000 OBO.

1973 TURBO AZTEC, 1150 SMOH, fresh annual, MX20, Garmin 430 SL3, STEC 55, AP, $84,500 1967 680V TURBINE COMMANCDER $149,500. Will finance. 1977 LEAR 24, 2500 hrs to TBO, all records RVSM, LR fuel, Part 135 air ambulance.

1977 C172, 180HP , IFR, 700 SMOH, $57,500.

1976 BEECH DUKE, low time, new P&I, Garmin 530/430, STEC AP, loaded. $189,500.

1978 C172N, 5320 TT, 3 SMOH, IFR, P-mod engine, will finance, trades OK. $49,500

1968 CESSNA 310N, 100 hrs. Colemill conversion. Best offer/trade.

FOUGA MAGISTER, nice, custom Blue Angels paint job, mid time engine. Show ready $39,500 OBO. Will trade.

1979 C172N, 8270 TT, 0 SMOH, $56,000. New Paint. New annual, low down, will finance.

1973 C340, 950 SMOH recent P&I, Air/boots. 800 SMOH, RAM II engines, Low down, $149,500.

Look us up at www.chinoaircraft.com E-mail Bob@chinoaircraft.com

1981 C172P, 1000 SMOH, new paint, IFR. $52,500

1969 C401, STEC55 AP, new leather, call for details. Low engines. $129,500.

SHORT TERM INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY. HIGH INTEREST SECURED BY CLEAR TITLED AIRCRAFT.

1961 C175, 700 SMOH, new annual, $34,500.

1977 C402, 700/700 SMOH, spar mod done IFR.

SPECIAL FINANCING – big down/minimum credit on learn to fly aircraft. 150s & 172s available.

2002 CIRRUS SR22, 500 SNEW, dual Garmin 430, EMAX, CMAX, Dual EX5000. $165,000

1968 C421, 350/350 SMOH, available new annual. $99,500.

1979 TOMAHAWK, in license $17,500 OBO.

1973 C421B, 125/125, new annual, good boots, new fuel cells, mid time engines, rec. leather, vortex generators, air, King Silver Crown, HSI, ice, AP. Lease 1 yr min w/pilot. 179,500 sale.

WE RENT TWINS CHEAP!

1979 TOMAHAWK, 1310 SMOH, low price, offer.

1956 CESSNA 310 - $80/hr.

1961 COMANCHE 180, 0 SMOH,IFR, AP, $54,500. 1974 C421B, 300/1100 SMOH, loaded. $165,000.

1960 CESSNA 310 - $100/hr. CESSNA 340 - $250/dry

restaurants, plus the Great Hall with its six massive fireplaces (kept burning throughout the summer season) and the “library” with its numerous shelves of books and comfortable over-stuffed couches and chairs. The Straits Lodge, which is the only section of the resort that remains open during the winter season, has 133 rooms, including 14 two-room hot tub suites and houses Johnson Hall with its huge fireplace and galley kitchen.

1980 BE77 Beech Skipper, 1130 SMOH, excellent radios. $28,500.

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1975 WARRIOR,680 SMOH, IFR, $37,500. 1967 TWIN COMANCHE, 300 SMOH, 69,500.

Low cost Twins for rent & training. Seneca, C310, C340, C421 with safety pilot. Cherokee 160 IFR trainer dual KX155 with simulator lessons. Build complex/high performance time in a Cessna 210. DISCOVERY FLIGHTS $50! Flight instruction single/multi engine, IFR, BFR, IPC


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

52

Flying With Faber Continued from Page 51 the perfect place to bring the family while the adults attend the meetings. More than 11,000 square feet of meeting/banquet space is located in six rooms in and above the Main Lodge, while the adjacent Conference Center has more than 12,000 square feet of meeting space, including an amphitheater that can seat 65, and nine private offices for meeting planners. There is also a 2,900-squarefoot theater that can seat 575 with a 23foot by 30-foot stage and a foyer/lobby that can seat 50 banquet-style. Located above the activities center is a sound stage, which was used by Paramount during the filming on the island of the 1980 motion picture, “Somewhere In Time,” starring Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. If you intend to pop the question, do it at the Resort. Mackinac Island has been referred to as “America’s Summer Wedding Capital,” and Mission Point Resort is the leader for weddings on the island. Charming ceremonial sites such as the enchanting Water’s Edge Gazebo graces the grounds for that magical waterfront backdrop where vows are exchanged. Plus, how many places provide a horse-drawn carriage with a just-married sign on the back?

Take a Romantic Excursion on the Mackinac Breeze The Mackinaw Breeze is a 40-foot catamaran sailboat offering sailing tours

in and around Mackinac Island and the straits. Guests aboard the Mackinac Breeze, which can accommodate up to 25 passengers, can relax for either a short hour and a half sail, or can schedule a half-day or full-day sailing tour.

The Spa The 7th Heaven Salon and Spa, with beautiful views of the Straits, offers hair care and styling, skincare, massage, make-up, nails, boutique gifts and bridal hair styling. The latest equipment in the fitness center includes Cybex and cardiovascular equipment, saunas and locker rooms with showers – all services are available free for hotel guests. Tanning and massage therapy sessions are available by appointment, for an additional charge.

The Best Cuisine on the Island Most of the restaurants on the island are locally owned. Although several are quite good, some of the restaurateurs devote more effort to getting the tourists fed and back in the souvenir shops rather than dedicating themselves to culinary achievement. The best cuisine on the island was, without a doubt, at the Mission Point Resort. A new, young, very talented chef has introduced a perfect blend of contemporary cuisine with traditional flavors.

After 12 years with the Walt Disney Company where he worked his way up from line cook to sous chef, and three years as executive chef for the Wolfgang Puck Café, Keith Schockling was ready for a change and an opportunity to develop his own culinary signature. He has brought new, elevated levels of cuisine to the Resort. Chianti is a newly designed smart casual Italian dining room. Classic Italian dishes include steak pizziaola, veal picatta and chicken parmesan, plus some inventive items such as osso buco ravioli with leek and wild mushroom fricassee. In addition, the desert menu features freshly made zeppole (Italian) donuts, tiramisu and crème brule. The Bistro on the Green overlooks the resort’s putting course, “The Greens On Mackinac” and its interconnected lakes. Seating is primarily outdoors. The menu serves an array of tapas, all of which were outstanding. We sampled platters of espresso rubbed beef, grilled local lamb chops, ahi tuna, glazed shrimp and locally smoked fish. Lakeside Marketplace offers traditional coffee shop style selections for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

A Slice of American History Hardly a day goes by where I don’t hear a person in the throes of nostalgia yearning for “a return to yesterday.” I am

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October 2011

Golf At The Resort. (Brian Walters Photography)

Arch Rock.

(Stuart J. Faber)

not sure what yesterday means. My yesterday was bereft of television, computers, cell phones and microwaves. I did not know any better, but if I had, it would not have mattered. We had Lake Michigan at our doorstep, the fruit and vegetable department was down the street at Peterson’s farm and we walked the mile from our house to the movies never thinking of not returning home safely. I chuckle when I listen to a contemporary teenager rhapsodize about “the old days.” His or her old days are the late 1990s. Could he or she have survived in my old days? Mackinac Island has the best of the genuine old days with an acceptable level of modernity. During my visit to the island, I did not miss my automobile for even a second. Thoughts of Big Macs never entered my mind. I never turned on the TV. I did keep my cell phone strapped to my body like a gun in a holster, the need for which could have arisen at any moment. If necessary, I could have my trusty horse, Tootsie hooked up at a moment’s notice. What I loved about Mission Point Resort was that I could seclude myself within its beautiful grounds, yet I was accessible to downtown at any time I wanted to avail myself of its excitement. Yes, Mac Island and Mission Point are delightful today with just the right amount of yesterday. Mission Point Resort is located at 6633 Main Street, Mackinac Island, MI 49757, 800/833-7711. For more information on Mackinac Island, visit www.mackinacisland.com


October 2011

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CESSNA LAUNCHES NEW LIGHT BUSINESS JET: CITATION M2 Cessna Aircraft Company, on September 26 launched the Citation M2, a new light business jet that fills the gap between the Citation Mustang and the Citation CJ family. The Citation M2 features Garmin G3000 avionics, engines similar to those found in the Citation CJ series and an allnew cabin design. The aircraft is an aluminum airframe with a T-tail and a straight wing that includes LED lights. A cabin mock-up of the Citation M2 will be on display at Cessna’s exhibit in the Las Vegas Convention Center during the 64th NBAA Annual Meeting and Convention Oct. 10-12. With room for two crew and up to six passengers, the $4.195 million Citation M2 has a maximum cruise speed of 400 knots true airspeed (741 kilometers per hour) and a range of 1,300 nautical miles (2,408 kilometers). The aircraft can operate at airports with runways as short as 3,250 feet (991 meters) and will climb to 41,000 feet (12,497 meters) in 24 minutes. “Operator feedback and owner insight have indicated a market for a Citation with the size, speed and range of the Citation M2. We expect to see customers new to the Citation family, Mustang owners looking for a logical next step or CJ1+ operators who want a new, more advanced Citation,” said Scott Ernest, Cessna president and CEO. The Citation M2 is powered by a pair

Sell your airplane fast with an

(Cessna Aircraft) of FADEC-controlled Williams International FJ44-1AP-21 turbofan engines, each producing 1,965 pounds of thrust. This new and improved version of Williams’ FJ44 engine incorporates improvements gleaned from more than 6 million hours of operation of the 4,000 FJ44 engines in service. The FJ44-1AP21 produces 10-15 percent more altitude thrust (depending on conditions) and consumes less fuel at long-range cruise than the previous version, enabling the M2 to climb quickly and cruise fast and far. The engine also provides significantly higher performance at hot and high conditions and an increase in the time between overhaul (TBO) from 3,500 to 4,000 hours.

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The Citation M2’s clean cockpit design is anchored by the fully integrated Garmin G3000 avionics suite that seamlessly integrates numerous system components into an easy-to-use flightdeck to simplify operation and enhance situational awareness during flight and when taxiing. The G3000 system centers on three 14.1-inch LCD primary and multifunction displays and two infrared, touchscreen control panels. The touch-screen controllers react to changes in an infrared grid rather than traditional surface resistance sensors for better response under a variety of conditions. The controllers allow multi-function display page navigation as well as audio and FMS control.

The MFD and PFD provide split-screen capability so that two separate vertical pages may be viewed side-by-side. Pilots may simultaneously view maps, charts, TAWS, flight planning or weather. Popular options from other Citation models are standard on the Citation M2. Among the standard features of the avionics system are weather radar, TCAS I, terrain awareness and warning system (TAWS) and ADS-B Out. From the cockpit divider aft through the rear lavatory, the main passenger cabin of the Citation M2 is 58 inches wide (1.47 meters) and 11 feet (3.3 meters) long with a 5-inch dropped aisle providing a cabin height of 57 inches (1.45 meters). Eight large windows, roomy pedestal seats and intuitive cabin appointments highlight the all-new interior, of which materials and colors can be hand-selected by customers. Cessna’s proprietary cabin management system that includes the latest interface options for greater in-flight productivity and connectivity is optional. First flight of the new Citation M2 will be in the first half of 2012, with Federal Aviation Administration certification (Part 23) expected in the first half of 2013, followed by deliveries beginning in the second half of 2013. For more information, go to Cessna.com.

Mike Baird

Propellers

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October 2011

DALE KLAPMEIER NAMED CEO AT CIRRUS AIRCRAFT Cirrus Aircraft has announced that Co-Founder Dale Klapmeier has been named Chief Executive Officer. Brent Wouters, previously President and Chief Executive Officer, is no longer with the company. ?? In accepting the new role, Klapmeier commented: “At Cirrus, we are passionate about airplanes and flying, and I am passionate about this company. Along with our new owners, our commitment is stronger than ever to the same goals and ideals that we had when we started the company more than 25 years ago. And that goal is to make the dream of flight a reality for more people, both in the U.S. and around the world. Today we are at the beginning of the next chapter of the reinvention of personal transportation.” ?? For nearly 10 years in a row, the Cirrus SR22 family of aircraft has been the best-selling four-place airplane in the world. Known for incorporating luxury automotive ergonomics, pilot-friendly

avionics and advanced safety features into its high performance airplanes, Cirrus has delivered nearly 5,000 new piston airplanes over the last decade. Cirrus pioneered the use of the FAAcertified Cirrus Airframe Parachute System™ that is standard equipment on all Cirrus aircraft. Earlier this year, Cirrus Aircraft was selected to provide a fleet of training aircraft for the United States Air Force Academy.

USA AIRCRAFT BROKERS NETWORKS TO GET THE J OB DONE USA Aircraft Brokers uses the latest technology to promote the sale of its’ aircraft, including an interactive website that uses audio messages from brokers to promote their aircraft and email campaigns to all of the FBOs in the country whenever a new aircraft is listed. “We try to reach the market any way we can after we list an aircraft. Using our internet ad program and time-honored methods, like our quarterly newsletter that goes out to more than 8,000 FBOs and high performance aircraft owners nationwide, we can guarantee our clients the best possible exposure for that aircraft and sell it at top retail dollar,” said owner

Keith Latour. Established in 1991, USA Aircraft Brokers is the oldest and largest network of aircraft brokers in the USA. The company is not a franchise or franchisor. The company is a licenser, selling a license to own and operate an aircraft brokerage under the name USA Aircraft Brokers. They offer comprehensive training and support to allow you to start working successfully as a broker within a two-week period. For more information on becoming an aircraft broker, fill out the “Become an Aircraft Broker” application on the USA Aircraft web page at www.usaaircraft.com.

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

56

October 2011

Green News

EMBRY-RIDDLE STUDENTS FLY FIRST-OF-KIND GAS/ELECTRIC/BATTERY HYBRID AIRPLANE New Propulsion Design Challenges Current Efficiencies of Light Airplanes At 4:30 p.m., Sept. 7, a team of students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University demonstrated a first in aviation history. At that moment, in the skies over Daytona Beach, Fla., test pilot Mikhael Ponso transitioned the Eco Eagle, a hybrid propulsion aircraft they designed, from gas power to full-electric power. Ponso reported that when he switched the Eco Eagle from gas power to electric power, the airplane’s efficiency increased and its noise fell to all but silent, with the only sound a low whir of pulleys and propeller. “This aircraft challenges the current efficiencies of light airplanes,” said Pat Anderson, professor of aerospace engineering at Embry-Riddle and the team’s faculty advisor. “With this technologybreaking propulsion system, EmbryRiddle’s student designers are demonstrating that airplanes can be green, too.” In their technology demonstrator, the Embry-Riddle students incorporated an efficient gas motor with an electric propulsion system powered by batteries. This allows the airplane to climb on the more powerful 100-horsepower gas motor. When it reaches a cruising altitude, the airplane transitions seamlessly to a full-electric mode with 40 horsepow-

U.S.

AND

As Embry-Riddle student researchers watch, including team leader Lori Costello, second from left, test pilot Mikhael Ponso makes final adjustments before the Eco Eagle’s historic flight. (Embry-Riddle) er for the rest of the flight. While all-electric airplanes may be the future of aviation, today’s technology is still too heavy for most airplanes. The Embry-Riddle students believe their hybrid propulsion system yields the best

combination of speed, climb rate, range, and endurance for currently available technology. Over the past year and a half, around 200 students from different academic disciplines completely designed, manufac-

AUSTRALIA AGREE TO COOPERATE ALTERNATIVE AVIATION FUELS

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and Australia’s Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism have reached a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to continue research and development of clean, sustainable alternative aviation fuels. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and Australian Ambassador to the United States Kim Beazley signed the agreement on September 13. “Air travel is global and we need

international partners to develop these innovative new fuels,” Secretary LaHood said. “Our ultimate goal is to work with all of the Asia Pacific nations to achieve a sustainable, independent energy future for aviation, and this is an exciting first step.” The MOU calls for Australia and the United States to exchange information about policies, programs, projects, research results, and publications, and to conduct joint studies in areas such as fuel sources and environmental impacts. The

memorandum also facilitates analysis of fuel source supply chains. The signing nations agree to cover the associated costs. “The DOT and FAA are committed to making aviation as clean and as energy efficient as possible as part of our NextGen air traffic modernization goals,” said FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt. “This agreement and others with our international partners will enable the FAA to better share and exchange technologies and research to attain these goals not only for U.S. aviation but air

tured, and tested the airplane’s propulsion system. They were supervised by faculty and staff and led by Lori Costello, a graduate student in aerospace engineering. “A hard-core group of 40 students came in after classes and jobs and worked many long hours,” Costello said. “It is unusual for university students in the United States to design, manufacture, and test a manned aircraft technology demonstrator,” Anderson said. “Not only have these students designed and flown a completely new propulsion system, they are contributing to the greening of aviation. It will challenge the status quo for aircraft performance.” The Embry-Riddle team has set its sights on demonstrating the aircraft at NASA’s Green Flight Challenge, Sept. 25-Oct. 3, and at other aircraft performance expos. Funding for the project came from generous contributions by the Aviation Education Foundation and its founder James Ray; Randy Fiorenza, an EmbryRiddle alumnus; David Robertson, an Embry-Riddle trustee; Rotax Aircraft Engines; Flight Designs; MT-Propeller; Drivetek ag, Lockwood Aviation; Stemme Aircraft; and Moonshine Aviation.

TO

DEVELOP

travel on the global level.” In U.S. aviation, public, academic and private sector partnerships play a key role in developing alternative fuels through the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuel Initiative (CAAFI) and Continuous Low Energy Emissions and Noise (CLEEN) programs. More information on CAAFI and CLEEN can be found at: http://www.caafi.org or http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/hea dquarters_offices/apl/research/aircraft_te chnology/cleen/

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October 2011

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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October 2011

REMOS AIRCRAFT ROLLS OUT GXELITE After successfully introducing a new model at AirVenture 2011, Remos Aircraft has rolled out another configuration of the GX series: the GXeLITE. With a base price of $133,924, the GXeLITE is configured for day/VFR only. Providing the same high level of precision engineering along with the identical performance and flight handling characteristics as the other GX models, the eLITE offers a simplified instrument panel that is designed for basic VFR flight. Remos has focused on the Sport Pilot with the eLITE, responding to day trips and weekend flying by people who are in it for the fun and adventure instead of the technology of avionics. It has what people look for in a J-3 Cub, but the handling is better, the speed is faster and the

technology of the airframe and powerplant are far more advanced. “We’ve essentially removed a lot of the bells and whistles that people don’t need for recreational flight,” said Sue Parker, U.S. Sales & Marketing Manager for Remos. “If people decide they want to upgrade later, there is an extensive list of options they can add on if they feel it will enhance their flying experiences. This is the most economical version of a Remos, but we’ve done nothing to compromise the precision or performance that made the company a leader in the industry.” For more information on Remos Aircraft visit www.REMOS.com or telephone Ms. Sue Parker, U.S. Sales and Marketing Manager, at 1-831/229-4743. Remos Aircraft is one of the world’s

leading manufacturers of Light Sport Aircraft. Founded in 1994, REMOS is an international aerospace manufacturing company with operations in Europe and North America. Like the GXAviator II and GX Supreme, Remos’ new GXeLITE aircraft is an all-composite, single engine, recreational aircraft certified by the FAA and EASA. Manufactured in a state-of-the-art facility in Pasewalk, Germany, Remos aircraft are distributed and supported world-wide through an expanding network of exclusive sales, maintenance and flight training programs. The Remos GXeLITE makes high levels of performance and precision available at an affordable price.

WANNA TALK OXYGEN? Do you have questions about aviation oxygen equipment? Do you have a built in System? A portable system? Do you need equipment overhauled? Replaced? Upgraded? Recertified? Cylinder hydro tested? The Oxygen Lady has been answering questions posed by pilots and aircraft owners for more than thirty years. She considers no question or concern to be either stupid or unnecessary, and she continues to learn from her customers – even after all these years. She can also help you better understand - and perhaps enhance or upgrade - the equipment you are currently using in your aircraft and/ or advise you about the best equipment for your specific needs or aircraft. The Oxygen Lady - Phoebe Peasley

– is the sole proprietor of The Airport Shoppe (at Reid Hillview Airport in San Jose, Calif.) and has been in business at this location for more than thirty years. She and her longtime manager, Marilu can talk to you about portable or built-in systems; masks or cannulas; constant flow or diluter demand or pressure demand equipment. Both are knowledgeable about the newest oxygen equipment in the aviation marketplace – no matter the OEM - be it Scott, Puritan, Avox, Zodiac, Aerox, Precise Flight, BE Aerospace – you name it. The Airport Shoppe also provides cylinder hydrotesting, assembly recertification, EROS mask overhaul or repairs and regulator overhauls. Need an oxygen refill station? Other equipment? Their

government contractor’s license allows them to quote on any component. They stock a complete line of portable systems and ship other equipment – for general, commercial or military aviation - to both domestic and international destinations on a daily basis. Take advantage now of The Oxygen Lady’s specific knowledge. Call 877/6344744 or access her extensive website at www.aviationoxygen.com, which will answer most fundamental questions about pricing, availability and maintenance services. This website has well earned its reputation of being the best website available for aviation oxygen systems and equipment, and The Airport Shoppe enjoys a flawless reputation for excellent customer service and sales.

MCCAULEY GAINS ASTM COMPLIANCE PROP FOR SKYCATCHER Cessna Aircraft Company has announced its McCauley Propeller Systems division has achieved ASTM compliance for a new two-blade, fixedpitch composite propeller for the 162 Skycatcher. “This is the first of a planned family of composite propellers we have in devel-

opment, designed for a range of aircraft,” said McCauley Vice President and General Manager Peter Wilkinson. “We’re excited to have this announcement come on the heels of our consolidation of McCauley.” The 1L100 is a new all composite fixed-pitch propeller specifically

ON

designed for the Skycatcher’s Teledyne Continental Motors O-200D engine. It consists of a continuous fiber, single piece design giving it high strength as well as light weight. McCauley will continue testing to gain Federal Aviation Administration CFR Part 35 certification, making the propeller available to a wider

COMPOSITE range of aircraft. Cessna consolidated its McCauley operations in early July to better focus resources on development programs such as the 1L100. McCauley is owned by Cessna Aircraft Company.

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...www.inflightusa.com


October 2011

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WICKS HOLDS FIRST RED TAG PRE-INVENTORY SALE Wicks Aircraft Supply will hold its first annual Red Tag Pre-Inventory Sale November 18 – 19 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at their Will-Call Store. Discounts will be available on the entire warehouse inventory. Those who pay with cash will receive an addition two percent savings. There will be special bargain bins for selected building materials, vendors will be on hand to demonstrate their products with sale pricing, and EAA Chapter 64 will be providing lunch for donations. Those who want to fly in can land at St. Louis Metro-East (3K6), in St. Jacob, Ill., where shuttle vans will be available for the 10-minute drive to the factory. Door prizes will be awarded each day and there will be bulk discounts on 4130 steel tubing. In addition, everyone who makes a purchase will automatically be entered in the daily grand raffle. A new Dynon DX-15 handheld transceiver will be given away each day. There will be an

American Aircraft Sales Co. HAYWARD AIRPORT 50 YEARS SAME LOCATION LD O S

Scott Wick area where pilots can assemble and engage in “hangar talk.” Wicks Aircraft Supply is located at 410 Pine Street in Highland, Ill. For more information visit www.WicksAircraft.com or call 800/221-9425.

1979 Beechcraft F33A

2004 Cessna 182 Skylane

287 SMOH, 3200 TTSN, Garmin 430 GPS, S-Tec 55 A/P, NDH ......................$139,950 MAKE OFFER

G1000 Glass Panel, 265 hrs. Since New, One Owner, Hangared, NDH, Like New! ....................................................$249,950

1976 Piper Arrow 200

1997 Mooney MSE (M20J)

1249 TTSN, One Owner and Hangared Since New, All Original, NDH, Like New.........$69,950

1406 TTSN, King Avionics, GPS, KAP 150 A/P, One Owner, Hangared Since New, NDH, Like New ............................$149,950

Three Cessna Skyhawks

1971 Bellanca Super Viking 17-31A

WINGX PRO7 ADDS ZAON FLIGHT SYSTEM PCAS TRAFFIC Hilton Software LLC has announced support for the XRX PCAS Traffic System from Zaon Flight Systems. WingX Pro7 connects wirelessly to the portable XRX traffic system to provide real-time display of traffic threats on its moving map. WingX Pro7 also introduces its new field-tested traffic symbology. These new color-coded and easy-toread symbols improve the visual ergonomics and reduce interpretation time and errors. WingX Pro7 is compatible with both new and existing Zaon XRX systems. A small wireless dongle costing less than $100 is required for connectivity. “Our WingX Pro7 design philosophy is safety-driven. WingX Pro7 was the first and is currently the only iPad application to seamlessly integrate a number of safety features including Synthetic Vision, AHRS-driven attitude, dynamic terrain overlays, and in-flight weather. The addition of in-flight traffic together with our new traffic symbology increases

61

traffic awareness and therefore flight safety,” said Dr. Goldstein, CEO of Hilton Software LLC. Kevin Van Drunen, Vice President of Zaon Flight Systems commented “We’re excited to be working with Hilton Software to increase pilot and passenger safety. WingX Pro7 users will now be able to see the surrounding air traffic depicted on top of the moving map on their iPad application that they’re already using for navigation, increasing their situational awareness.” WingX Pro7 is available for download from the App Store and iTunes. WingX Pro7 is iOS 3, iOS 4, iPad, and iPad 2 compatible. Synthetic Vision requires iOS 4. Zaon traffic support is planned to be released in October, 2011. For additional information about Hilton Software LLC or its products, call 408/268-8418 or email support@hiltonsoftware.com, or visit www.hiltonsoftware.com.

Completely Refurbished in 2002 and Hangared, 3478 TTSN, 1311 SMOH, Digital IFR, A/P, Like New...............$49,950

1977 Cessna 172 N 1518 TTSN, KX155, GPS, Fresno Ca Since New, Well Maintained, NDH..........................................................$39,950 1980 Cessna 172 N 900 SMOH, 6000 TTSN, King Digital IFR, GPS, Nice P/I..............$44,950 1973 Cessna 172M 1330 SMOH, 12318 TTSN, King Digital IFR, Good P/I...........$34,950

1978 Piper Warrior II

1976 Piper Archer II 181

1285 SMOH, 7502 TTSN, King IFR, DME, A/P, Fresh Annual ........................ $29,950

King Digital IFR, Garmin 150 GPS, 2000 SFRMAN, 7400 TTSN, NDH ........$33,950

1956 Cessna 180

1947 Piper J3 Cub

307 SMOH, 5407 TTSN, GPS, New Paint/Interior, Hangared, Like Brand New ......................................................$99,950

585 SMOH, 6404 TTSN, Restored to Original Condition,................................$34,950

1978 Cessna 152

1976 Cessna 150M

0 SMOH, 10,050 TTSN, Digital VFR, NDH .......................................................$24,950

3478 TTSN, 1650 SMOH, 380 STOP, nice original airplane, NDH ..................$19,950 MAKE OFFER

AVAILABLE: FLIGHT SCHOOL / OFFICE SPACE 927 sq. ft. plus 10 tiedowns

Subscribe to In Flight USA today for home delivery of your source for aviation news, information and features.

Robert Coutches

(510) 783-2711 • fax (510) 783-3433 21015 Skywest Drive, Hayward, CA 94541

www.americanaircraft.net


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

62

October 2011

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9-11 Remembrances at Wine Country Airshow Continued fromi Page 10 The Team Rocket duo put their homebuilt Harmon Rockets through their paces, even sharing airspace with Dan Buchanan in his hang glider. The Sonoma County Sheriff’s Bell 407, with their SWAT team dangling underneath like garlic bulbs on a string, sprang into action as part of an air/ground action to rescue a school bus held hostage by bad guys. Warbirds took turns in center stage with flybys of Nanchang CJ-6’s. The heavy iron took turns performing, starting with trainers such as T-6 Texans and Stearmans, finishing with the fighters taking to the air with a whole herd of P51 Mustangs, a P-40 Warhawk, and a Yak-3U. The fighters were joined by a rare flyable A-26 Invader. Brian Sanders executed one of the most aesthetic warbirds performances ever seen with his Hawker Sea Fury. His smoke trails looked laser-printed on the blue sky, making the others appear crayon-like in comparison. Of the dozens of planes on static display, military jets, old and older, dominated the area. PCAM owns a large, impressive collection of jet fighters, and many were set up for open cockpit display. Vietnam veterans could appreciate classics such as the F-105 Thunderchief, F106 Delta Dart, A-6 Intruder, A-4 Skyhawk, and F-4 Phantom. Relatively newer jets included the F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-14 Tomcat, and AV-8 Harrier. These, and many others, had their cockpits open for the public to clamber into and pretend to be a jet pilot for a few minutes. Vintage warbird fans drooled over the P-63 Kingcobra that the Palm Springs Air Museum flew in only for static display. A few current military aircraft were on static exhibit, including a Canadian CF-18 Hornet, a C-17 Globemaster III from March ARB, a CH-46 Sea Knight from Camp Pendleton and a MH-60 Seahawk from North Island NAS San Diego. Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport is located just north of Santa Rosa, approximately 65 miles north of San Francisco. Constructed in 1939, operations in and out of STS include air cargo, private and corporate flights, military, search and rescue, fire fighting, law enforcement and training. The name was changed to Charles M. Schulz - Sonoma County Airport in March 2000 to honor Santa Rosa’s most famous resident.

Greg Colyer dismounts from the Navy T-33 he flew in the show.

(Hayman Tam)

A rare C-1A Trader unfolds its wings prior to a Navy warbird flyby.

(Hayman Tam)

Kirby Chambliss races earthward in his Zivko Edge 540. (Hayman Tam)

Left: The local SWAT team in action with air support from the Sonoma County Sheriff. (Hayman Tam)

Below: These P-51 Mustangs put a little peer pressure on the lone P-40 Warhawk. (Hayman Tam)

Eddie Andreini and his signature Super Stearman. (Hayman Tam)

Eddie Andreini and his signature Super Stearman. (Hayman Tam)


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

66

October 2011

AD INDEX ACT ........................................48 Aerial Avionics ......................33 Aero-Tax ................................12 Aerozona Parts........................26 Air Options................................6 Aircraft Insurance Agency ....27 Aircraft Magneto Service 28, 59 Aircraft Specialties Service....19 Aircraft Spruce ................15, 59 Aircraft Supply ......................43 Airport Shoppe ..............2, 3, 59 Airtronics ..........................17, 58 American Aerobatics ..............13 American Aircraft Sales ........61 AMR&D Inc...........................54 AOPA ..................................9, 58 Arizona Soaring......................52

Arizona Type Ratings ............24 Assoc. Sales Tax Consultants 49 Attitude Aviation ....................58 Aviation Insurance Resources22 Bel Air Int. ..............................57 Bob’s Aviation Supplies ..20, 59 Buchanan Aviation..................48 Carson Aviation Adventures ..59 Chino Aircraft Sales ..............51 Corona Aircraft Engines ........36 Dash Air ..................................16 Divorce for Men ....................38 DRE Communications ....38, 58 Eddie Andreini........................10 Elite Air Interiors ....................28 Fly It..................................21, 67 Flying Tigers Wine ................13

Gibson Aviation ......................22 Giottos Aircraft Interiors ........54 Globe Fiberglass ....................44 Hartwig Fuel Cells..................20 Hiller Aviation Museum ........58 HME Watches ........................34 Jorgenson-Lawrence ..............66 JT Evans ....................................4 Loop Net ................................44 Mountain High Oxygen ........14 Nice Air ..................................55 Oakland Air Museum ............32 QREF Media ..........................18 R&M Steel ..............................54 Rio Vista Municipal Airport ..37 Rotorcraft Ground School......35 San Carlos Airport ..................24

Schweiss Bi-Fold Doors ........48 Select AirParts ..........................7 Sheble Aviation ................30, 31 Sky Ranch Upholstery............27 Start Pac ..................................10 Sterling Air..............................35 Steve Weaver Aircraft Sales ..29 T.J. Aircraft Sales....................23 Tiffin Air..................................53 Travel Aire ..............................14 Tsuniah Lake ..........................28 USA Aircraft Brokers ............37 Vista Aviation ............11, 25, 58 West Valley Flying Club ..58, 68 Wicks Aircraft ........................39 Zanette Aircraft Insurance........5

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October 2011 In Flight USA