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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

4

ON

THE

May 2012

COVER

LOST COAST SEARCH

AND

RESCUE

U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Humboldt Bay By Sagar Pathak

J

agged rocks, rough seas, and thick clouds are just some of the hazards in this part of the world. With more than 250 miles of rugged coastline from the Mendocino-Sonoma County line north to the California-Oregon border, the men and women of U.S. Coast Guard Group/Air Station Humboldt Bay provide a vigilant 24/7, 365 watch over the residents and mariners of these waters. Recently I had the privilege to spend a few days with the maintainers and air crews of the MH-65C Dolphin at the Arcata-Eureka Airport in McKinleyville, Calif. With three MH-65C Dolphins based at the Air Station, a standard crew of two pilots and a flight mechanic on each, and several Coast Guard rescue ships in the area, the group is able to provide immediate search and rescue (SAR) assistance and respond to any maritime emergency in the region; along the coast, well off-

shore, or even inland. When the helicopter crew is augmented with a rescue swimmer, the Coast Guard is able to provide a unique air asset that is able to provide immediate rescue and medical attention to victims that find themselves in dangerous situations. As our formation of two orange helicopters flew over the endless Pacific Ocean under a thick low-lying marine layer, my training as a fixed-winged airplane pilot had me nervously wondering if we would be able to make it to the distant shoreline should our engine quit. Dressed in a thick blue flight suit, and the only person on board without a bright orange dry suit, I would not last long in the chilly 40-degree Pacific Northwest water if we were to go down. But that is exactly the situation that my crew was training for today. Be it from a helicopter crashing into the ocean, a boater being hit with a giant wave and sweeping him into the frigid ocean, or a

surfer being swept out by a riptide, the crew of the USCG SAR helicopter is able to rescue a victim from the cold, nearly freezing temperatures of the ocean. I was aboard Coast Guard 6569 as we provided air cover for our sister-ship Coast Guard 6573 and their rescue swimmers. We approached the 47-foot motor lifeboat (MLB) that was awaiting our arrival and started a slow orbit. 6573 entered a slow hover and dropped down to 15 feet above the dark green ocean. With safety as the primary factor, our helicopter would be there to render immediate assistance should the primary training mission turn into an accident and anything happen to the other helicopter or rescue swimmers. And the MLB would be there to back us up. Luckily it was a relatively nice day and somewhat calm seas, but these crews train in all weather because they may be called upon to rescue someone in bad weather. Continued on Page 16

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TABLE Volume 28, Number 9

OF

CONTENTS

650-358-9908 • Fax: 650-358-9254 • E-mail: vickie@inflightusa.com • www.inflightusa.com

May 2012

ON THE COVER COVER STORY

PHOTO FINISH

LOST COAST SEARCH & RESCUE

EL CENTRO AIRSHOW

Page 4

Page 57

Photos and Editorial By Sagar Pathak

By Clark Cook Cover Photo By Sagar Pathak

NEWS Warbird Issue: Swift Action Helps Reverse Course ..................8 Wathen Center Educates For the Future By David Gustafson ....................................................................20

FEATURES

DESTINATION

Editorial: Revealing Your Priorities to Your Editor (and something about Freedom) By Ed Downs ..............................................................11

Flying With Faber: Los Angeles Basin By Stuart Faber ..............................................................29

Aero Friedrichschafen Wrap Up ..................................................38

B-25 Gathering Honors Doolittle Raiders By Alyssa J. Miller (AOPA) ............................................12

Lindbergh Prize for Innovation: E-Volo ......................................39

Bush Pilots: Where Did They Come From and Go? By Alan Smith ..............................................................13

Milestone Takes “Flying Car” Closer to Delivery ......................40

Aviation Pioneer James Herman Banning By Louisa Jaggar and Pat Smith ....................................26

NTSB Makes Safety Recommendations For Reno Races ........44

Two (Flying) Peas in a Pod By Herb Foreman ........................................................27

Reno Race Tickets On Sale..........................................................46 C-17 Makes Final Landing at USAF Museum ............................48 Business News: Safe Skies Act and Cargo Pilots ....................51

Behind The Scenes: Air Show Audio By Clark Cook ............................................................32

Flabob Launches Flying Circus ................................................53

Special Section: Aircraft Services ..............................35

LOOK FOR MORE NEWS AND FEATURES

AT

COLUMNS Contrails Goodies & Gadgets What’s Up?! From Skies to Stars Safe Landings The Pylon Place

by Steve Weaver ......................17

..............................................24 by Larry Shapiro ......................28 by Ed Downs ..........................41

..............................................42 by Marilyn Dash ......................45

DEPARTMENTS Calendar of Events ........................................................9 Classifieds ....................................................................54 Index of Advertisers ....................................................58

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

6

May 2012

B-25 GATHERING HONORS DOOLITTLE TOKYO RAIDERS B-25 Gathering Honors Doolittle Tokyo Raiders

By Alyssa J. Miller for AOPA.org ld Glory is owned by John Ward and based in California but flew to Ohio to take part in the Grimes Gathering of B-25s to honor the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders. A five-ship formation of North American B-25 Mitchells depart in rapid succession, a 20-degree, 30-plus-knot crosswind causing little excitement in the cockpits. The World War II bombers join up over Grimes Field in Urbana, Ohio, for a mission to bring attention to another mission, one that launched 70 years ago from the USS Hornet on April 18, 1942 – the Doolittle Tokyo Raid. The pilots and crew of these restored B-25s are volunteering their time to fly 45-minute hops, returning to cheering spectators with their passengers exploding with excitement after a ride of a lifetime – all because 70 years ago, 80 men on 16 bombers launched on a one-way mission from an aircraft carrier, flew hours into hostile territory, and bombed the Japanese mainland. The aircraft are among 20 expected

O

at the Grimes Gathering of B-25s to honor the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders – led by Lt. Col. James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle – the crew of the USS Hornet, and the Chinese who helped them. The gathering, April 14 through 16, started with steady rain that prevented many aircraft from arriving early, but better weather provided a window that allowed more aircraft to join a mass formation flyover of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base on April 18 during a special ceremony. Events continued through April 20 at the museum. “This is not a fly-in, it’s a history lesson,” said Larry Kelley, organizer of the Grimes Gathering of B-25s and pilot of Panchito, the lead aircraft in the mass flyover to commemorate the anniversary of the raid. “It’s the first and the last time we could ever do this,” he said, explaining that the Grimes Gathering and National Museum of the U.S. Air Force will bring together the five remaining Doolittle Tokyo Raiders – Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole, Maj. Thomas C. Griffin, Lt. Col. Robert L. Hite, Lt. Col. Edward J. Saylor, and Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher – along

with a survivor of the October 1942 Japanese attack that sank the USS Hornet, a Chinese woman who assisted the Raiders, and sister ships of those mighty bombers that carried the brave young men aloft. Putting all the pieces together, including bringing two Chinese to the United States, required coordination from both countries’ governments. “The Doolittle Raid was the first domino in the series,” Kelley said, calling it a turning point in the war in the Pacific that put Japan on the defensive. The Doolittle Tokyo Raiders couldn’t track to their intended destination because the aircraft transporting the beacon crashed before arriving, Kelley said, and storms had moved into the area, reducing visibility. One of the 16 aircraft turned north to land in Russia, and the crew was interned. The other 15 aircraft with 64 crewmembers went down in Japanese territory, either ditching at sea or continuing into China. Eight men were captured, three of whom were executed; another died of malnutrition. The Chinese provided aid to the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders to help them return to friendly soil, something the civilians paid for dearly: A quar-

Old Glory is owned by John Ward and based in California but flew to Ohio to take part in the Grimes Gathering of B25s to honor the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders. (Mike Fizer)

General aviation pilots start flying in April 15 after the first day of the Grimes Gathering of B-25s was weathered in by heavy rains. (Mike Fizer) ter-million Chinese were killed in retaliation for the protection the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders received. Continued on Page 10

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May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

7


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

8

May 2012

LISTENING TO OUR MEMBERS By Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO

I

t’s airshow season again, and I love to get out to events large and small and talk with AOPA members. Or should I say “listen”? Because, in truth, it’s hearing what you have to say that makes attending these events so rewarding. And what you tell me helps guide our agenda as an association. I was recently at Sun ‘n Fun in Lakeland, Fla., and the energy level was higher than I’ve seen it in years. I flew an extended route to Florida from our Frederick headquarters in my Aviat Husky. Flying off my wing was my colleague Dave Hirschman in our Tougher than a Tornado Sweepstakes Husky. The

flying itself was great, and so was the reaction to the planes, parked side by side in front of AOPA’s tent at Sun ‘n Fun. Members were clearly excited about the sweepstakes airplane and the fun flying it represents. Time and again members stopped by to tell me how excited they would be to win the Husky at AOPA’s Aviation Summit in Palm Springs this October. The fun of flying is what brings people together at events like Sun ‘n Fun. And it’s the camaraderie of being among their fellow pilots that keeps them coming back. At the same time, concerns over the costs of flying are prevalent among our members. But during my conversations with members at Sun ‘n Fun and elsewhere, I’ve heard that, for many, fly-

ing clubs provide both camaraderie and cost savings. These discussions have really reinforced my thinking that flying clubs could play an increasingly important role in making flying more accessible to more people in the future. Look for more on this idea in the near future. Making flying more accessible is vital to the future of general aviation, and so is helping students complete their training. I’ve been pleased to discover that many of our members are aware of and actively taking part in our efforts to promote successful flight training experiences. Many of the people I’ve spoken to have already gone to www.aopa.org/ftinitiative to nominate a flight training program for AOPA’s Flight Training

Excellence Awards. These awards will be given for the first time at AOPA’s Aviation Summit in October to recognize schools and instructors that “get it right.” Because getting people into flying and keeping pilots engaged is so important to our future, AOPA announced at Sun ‘n Fun that we will be creating and staffing a new department to focus on our flight training and GA community building activities. Reflecting on all that I’ve heard from members, I am certain that we are on the right path here at AOPA. We remain true to our founding principles by working to protect our freedom to fly while building greater participation to ensure a vibrant future for general aviation.

VOICES HEARD: SWIFT ACTION HELPS REVERSE COURSE ON WARBIRD ISSUE Swift action by members of EAA and Warbirds of America, plus other aviation enthusiasts, made a difference in reversing a threat to warbird aircraft posed by a possible amendment to the House National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 4310). Thousands of EAA members and aviators contacted their congressional representatives after EAA and other warbird organizations reported late in April that a proposed amendment to the House bill would bar the Department of Defense from loaning or gifting any U.S. military aircraft or parts to any entity except those that would put the aircraft on static display, such as in a museum.

EAA has learned that the amendment will no longer be offered to the bill. It would have precluded military aircraft from being loaned to private individuals, associations, or museums where there was any intent of flying the historic vintage warbirds, even at airshows or demonstrations of support for veterans. While EAA members were expressing their views to their elected officials, Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO), a longtime EAA and Warbirds of America member, reached out to House colleagues – including the proposal’s sponsor, Rep. Mike Turner (R-OH) – regarding the devastating effect the amendment could have on

U.S. warbird operations. The House General Aviation Caucus and the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee were also valuable in conveying key information regarding warbirds and the proposed amendment in support of public response. “We thank EAA and Warbirds of America members for acting quickly in support of warbird operations and for Rep. Graves’ strong leadership efforts. This is an excellent example of how establishing good relationships in Congress and building an effective caucus can address these issues in a unified manner,” said Doug Macnair, EAA’s vice

president of government relations. “We also thank Rep. Turner and his staff for listening and considering the input of constituents, aviators, veterans, and aviation and military history enthusiasts.” EAA worked in conjunction with its Warbirds of America division, the Commemorative Air Force, Collings Foundation, and other warbird groups on the issue. This unified effort again proved the value of aviation groups being stronger together to preserve and promote GA.

ARSA HIGHLIGHTS REPAIR STATION SAFETY CONGRESSIONAL HEARING On April 25, Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) Senior Vice President Gary Fortner, vice president of Quality Control at Fortner Engineering in Glendale, Calif., testified at a House Aviation Subcommittee hearing about the excellent work repair stations across the country and around the world are doing to ensure aviation safety. Fortner’s testimony emphasized that

for repair stations, good safety is good business. The basic nature of the aviation industry demands that safety and security be the top priorities. Operators and airlines will not do business with companies that put their passengers and valuable business assets at risk. Fortner highlighted that, for the maintenance industry, aviation safety does not begin and end with the Federal Aviation

Administration or any other regulatory body. Safety is the responsibility of every aviation maintenance employee and company. In addition to speaking to the industry’s commitment to aviation safety and its positive contributions to the American economy, Fortner stressed that Congress must refrain from micromanaging the aviation maintenance industry and the need for consistent application of avia-

tion safety regulations. Too often, inconsistent application of rules overburdens businesses and inhibits growth with no benefit to flight safety. For more information, please visit the hearing page at the House Transportation & Infrastructure Committee website at http://transportation. house.gov/hearings/hearingdetail.aspx? NewsID=1612.

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...

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May 2012

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Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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“I think the Doolittle Raiders was one of the more daring things I’ve read about,” said Bruce Bream, who flew his Arrow III to Grimes Field with friends. Nearly 20 light general aviation aircraft had flown in by midday April 15. Announcers recounted the raid for hundreds of spectators from toddlers to nonagenarians who gathered to see the B-25s, P-51s, and a Japanese Zero on display. Veterans from all branches of the military who served in various wars from World War II to present and active duty servicemen and -women also came out to pay tribute. Jim Gower racked up about 200 hours piloting the B-25 at the end of World War II during missions in Midland, Texas, and Carlsbad, N.Mex., where he was stationed. Chinese, Brazilian, and Turkish servicemen were trained to fly the B-25 at those locations, he explained. Gower entered the Army Air Corps Cadet Program in 1943. He graduated in 1945, and the military sent him to college where most pilots first learned to fly in a Piper Cub. “Of course, I’d flown the Cub before, but I didn’t tell my instructor.” (He had started flight training when he was 13 years old but was forced to quit when the instructors discovered his true age.) From the 65 hp Cub, Gower moved up to the 220 hp Stearman, the 650 hp AT-6, and finally the twin-engine B-25 with 1,700 hp each. He had about 175 hours of flight time before getting in the left seat of the B-25. Gower recalled practicing formation flying at night, formation takeoffs, and short-field takeoffs like the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders made off the USS Hornet. Bower was discharged after the war in 1946 and began a long career in aviation that included instructing, flying a Beech 18, joining the crew of a Citation, and serving as an FAA pilot examiner. “It means a lot for the people to rec-

pose [of the war],” Gower said, expressing disappointment that so many don’t know the Doolittle Tokyo Raid story. He was proud to see the hundreds of spectators who turned out to see the B-25s and learn about the history of World War II. Army veteran Philip Johnson was among the World War II veterans and said it was important “to know that they’re [the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders] still being recognized.” Crews who had their B-25 on display, like Pacific Princess, answered questions for several youngsters. Some of the children already had “a little bit of knowledge of the Raiders,” said Frank Donnelly, who flew on Pacific Princess from Los Angeles to Urbana. Detroit-based Yankee Warrior crew hopes to reach the same young age group to keep history alive. “We do it for the veterans. We do it for the American history. We do it for the future generations,” said Doug “Duffer” Duff, a 12-year volunteer crewmember for Yankee Warrior. The groups are paying for their expenses themselves, Kelley said, adding that for some, that bill could reach $35,000. Fuel expenses alone are staggering; each 1,700 hp engine burns one gallon of fuel per minute. Northrup Grumman and Enterprise provided corporate sponsorships, and individual donations comprised the rest of the $100,000 raised for the gathering, but that is just a fraction of the $900,000 that was needed to help offset the costs for the crews. In return, the crews are permitted to sell rides for $450 per person to help recoup some of the cost. “Everybody said, ‘We’ll find a way to do it on our own,’” Kelley said. The crews understood the significance of the event and wanted to take part. “The people who served, that’s why we’re doing it,” Kelley’s crewmember Matt Sager said.


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

Editorial

By Ed Downs

IT WOULD HAVE BEEN

A

funny thing happened on the way to this month’s editorial view. The topic was going to be a treaties on words buried in the text of Title 49 of the United States Code of Federal Law. Title 49 deals with transportation in the U.S. and defines the fundamental responsibilities of the FAA. Within Title 49 is the Code of Federal Regulations Title 14, known by us aviators as the Federal Aviation Regulations. Title 49 contains five basic mandates with which the FAA must comply, including the need to “protect the right to navigable airspace.” Yes, flying in the U.S. is a right, not a privilege. Not all “rights” in this country are contained in the Constitution’s “Bill of Rights.” Many are buried deep within millions of legislative legal words, often lost and alone. The danger to aviators, and many others, is that these rights can be quickly, almost secretly, taken away by amendments added to almost any legislation working its way through congressional committees. This month’s rant was going to warn readers of just how

11

important it is to actively support and understand this “right to fly,” remembering that the United States is the only country in the world that views their airspace in this manner. Then this writer’s cell phone lit up. The caller was my twin brother, who has recently completed building a Zenith 601. He had been working on this project casually for a couple of years and got caught up in the major mods recommended by the manufacturer after several accidents occurred. Zenith has had a long history of good customer support and helped many builders get through a tough time. My brother had recently conducted a first flight, in which this writer had participated as ground crew and radio coordinator. As recommended by AC 90-89, the first several flights were monitored by ground crew so that critical engine numbers could be recorded by ground helpers while the pilot concentrated on flight characteristics. My brother and I combine well over a century of flying experience, much of it in flight test analysis, but still take every new plane very seriously. Our caution was warrant-

A

GOOD ONE

ed, as a number of engine adjustments were made over the next 10 hours of flying time in addition to flight control modifications coordinated with the factory. But back to the phone call. My brother suggested that a beautiful day was in store, and asked if I would

like to fly his Zenith 601. Would I mind validating his observations regarding the plane’s performance? Well, it has been more than a year since this writer had done any flight evaluation work; I had never flown the 601 and was interested in Continued on Page 12 P.O. Box 5402 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (650) 358-9908 • Fax (650) 358-9254

Founder ..................................................................................................................Ciro Buonocore Publisher/Editor................................................................................................Victoria Buonocore Managing Editor ........................................................................................................Toni F. Sieling Associate Editors ........................ Nicholas A. Veronico, Sagar Pathak, Richard VanderMeulen ..................................................................................................................................Russ Albertson Staff Contributors ......................................................................S. Mark Rhodes, Roy A. Barnes, .....................................................................................Clark Cook, Larry Nazimek, Joe Gonzalez, ........................................................................................Alan Smith, Herb Foreman, Pete Trabuco Columnists..................................Stuart Faber, Scott Schwartz, Larry Shapiro, Ed Wischmeyer, ..........................................................................................Marilyn Dash, Ed Downs, Anthony Nalli Production Editors ..............................................................................Anne Dobbins, Toni Sieling Copy Editing ............................................................................................................Sally Gersbach Advertising Sales Manager ........................................Ed Downs (650) 358-9908, (918) 873-0280 Web Design ..................................................................................................................Josh Nadler In Flight USA is published each month by In Flight Publishing. It is circulated throughout the continental United States. Business matters, advertising and editorial concerns should be addressed to In Flight USA, P.O. Box 5402, San Mateo, Calif. 94402 or by calling (650) 358-9908–fax (650) 358-9254. Copyright © 2008 In Flight Publishing. In Flight USA is not responsible for any action taken by any person as a result of reading any part of any issue. The pieces are written for information, entertainment and suggestion – not recommendation. The pursuit of flight or any action reflected by this paper is the responsibility of the individual and not of this paper, its staff or contributors. Opinions expressed are those of the individual author, and not necessarily those of In Flight USA. All editorial and advertising matter in this edition is copyrighted. Reproduction in any way is strictly prohibited without written permission of the publisher. In Flight USA is not liable or in any way responsible for the condition or airworthiness of any aircraft advertised for sale in any edition. By law the airworthiness of any aircraft sold is the responsiblity of the seller and buyer.

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Editorial Continued from Page 11 evaluating the 130 hp Jabiru he had installed. But, this editorial was already late and my journalistic responsibilities are taken seriously by the editor/owner of this fine publication. After considering all options and commitments for about a nanosecond (the length of time it takes light to travel about 11 inches), I pushed away from the computer and headed to the airport. With just more than 10 hours of flying time on the plane, which included many adjustments and flight control modifications, this would indeed be a test flight in a plane I had never flown before. Certified in the Experimental, Amateur Built category, the Zenith 601 meets the FAA definition of a Light Sport Aircraft (LSA). In that the plane is still in its FAA mandated 40-hour â&#x20AC;&#x153;fly-offâ&#x20AC;? period, no passengers may be carried (thus, no inflight check out) and flight would be restricted to a rather generous geographical area defined by the local FAA. The appearance of this Zenith 601 is as one would expect from a two time airplane builder and A&P mechanic. Painted white with tasteful trim, it would fit in with any line up of new production airplanes. The basic flight instrumentation is pure steam gauge technology, calibrated in old time mph. The engine instruments are, on the other hand, represented by a highly capable, but hard to read electronic system popular in homebuilts. This electronic unit shows nearly 100 bits of information when all custom settings are taken into account and would be great if you have a flight engineer on board to manage it. A good com is installed and, of course, the mandatory GPS. A transponder is yet to come, and may end up being of the ADS variety. Given our combined experience, one might think this would just be a simple matter of â&#x20AC;&#x153;kick the tires and light the fires.â&#x20AC;? Not so. Our flight briefing takes well over an hour and a half, with a full understanding of every system being assured. Remember, no two homebuilts are exactly the same, and understanding electrical, fuel and flight control systems is paramount. All critical engine numbers are reviewed, written on paper, and taped to the panel. Climb, cruise and approach speeds, power settings, radio frequencies and traffic pattern information are also taped in plain view. These are not the kinds of things one needs to be searching your memory for if something goes wrong. Finally, it is time to fire up and get flying. Given the thorough briefing, there are no surprises. Take-off acceleration is very rapid (less than five seconds to

May 2012

rotate speed, about 45 mph) and a 90 mph cruise climb nets a rate of climb pegged at 1,100 fpm. The nose is quite high and clearing turns are needed. While roll feel is a bit heavy, pitch is light, but not â&#x20AC;&#x153;twitchy.â&#x20AC;? The electric pitch trim is fast and effective. Very little rudder is required for coordination. The immediate impression is of high performance and reasonable stability. It takes just a bit of time to equate the high pitch attitude with a resulting airspeed. A lot of attention must be paid to the multiple numbers on the digital engine display, which are forever changing up and down. Some temperature management is still needed, using the carb heat â&#x20AC;Ś yes â&#x20AC;Ś carb heat. The Bing carburetor used on the Jabiru has an automatic altitude compensating system that precludes the need for a lean mixture. With the installed fuel jets still running a bit hot at some power settings, the carb heat enriches the mixture to help cool the engine. See what is meant by understanding the systems installed? This writer was able to verify numbers being recorded on other flights as the magic carburetor settings needed are getting closer and closer to being smack on. With a conservative cruise power setting the IAS is 117 mph at 5,000 ft, the true airspeed approaches 128 mph. These numbers have been roughly verified by flying a couple of GPS triangles, but more work needs to be done. A few coordination maneuvers are followed by turns and slow speed practice, including a carefully executed stall. All is well and fun. The short flight is followed by a standard pattern and stabilized final approach with full flaps and 65 mph over the fence. That speed may be a tad fast, as there was some float and a slightly high flare. The little plane politely â&#x20AC;&#x153;thumpedâ&#x20AC;? to the tarmac and is easily controlled with the direct nose wheel steering. Rudder pedal and brake pedal geometry are excellent. Pilot extraction is a bit more difficult than entry, but cleverly placed hand holds and reinforcements (designed by the builder) enable this 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;1â&#x20AC;?, 180 lb. old guy to clamber out without looking all that clumsy. It had been a great flight, good info was gathered and safety was assured through constant radio contact with ground crew. Now the guilt set in. What about this important legal topic I was supposed to write about? Then it occurred to me. This writer had just experienced the topic of our editorial comment. For more than 40 professional years, this writer has participated in aircraft and pilot certification issues in at least 40 different countries. Continued on Page 13


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

13

BUSH PILOTS:

Where did they come from? And, where are they now?

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hen mot people think of “Bush Pilots” most of them think of Alaska and northern Canada. In fact there are bush pilots around the world, carrying things like food, fuel, medical supplies and (courageous) passengers. The term basically means a pilot that may depart from an airport but has no airport, runway, or landing strip at his destination. They fly airplanes equipped with larger tires suitable for landing on rough ground, floats for landing on lakes or rivers and sometimes with amphibious floats that make landing on the ground or on the water possible. Where did this aviation specialty come from? It is generally thought that this kind of flying began shortly after the end of World War I in South Africa. The African “bush” simply described any wilderness outside the then growing cities of the region. Some highly valued mining had begun in parts of the African countryside (Diamonds and precious metals) and those operators were in constant need of supplies. Strings of burros proved to be far too slow, and the recently developed airplane was much faster and therefore more attractive (though more expensive) than the plod of hooves through the bush country to various growing industrial projects. Some of the earliest bush planes were Curtiss JN-3 and JN-4 “Jennys.” More than 5,000 of these were built after 1917 for various nations. Most were for the United States military, but many went to nations of the world and to the early bush pilots of South Africa. Basically, bush flying means flying from an airport but not landing at one. The bush pilot must possess both a suitable airplane and the necessary skills to land

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A Curtiss JN-3 in military colors. These were among the earliest bush aircraft. (Courtesy of the San Diego Air & Spacemuseum archive )

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An American Champion Scout. Originally designed by Bellanca. Note the large tires for landing in rough country. The tires also increase prop clearance. It is built standard with STOL equipment and will get off the ground in less than 150 feet. (Photo by Tom Gideon)

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almost anywhere in the surrounding wilderness on rough ground, water and snow or ice. While here in the United States, we do usually think of bush flying taking place in northern Canada or Alaska, this kind of transportation service is offered around the world. There are bush pilots working in Australia, Baja California, Russia, as well as in various parts of South America and yes, still in Africa. Continued on Page 14

Editorial Continued from Page 12 The flight just completed in a “spur of the moment” could not have taken place in any country known to this writer, except the United States. Every other country would have required some kind of preapproval, specific pilot training, pre-take off authorization, positive ATC control or, most probably, have been simply prohibited. Remember, this Zenith 601 is flying on a provision certificate at this time, a certification mechanism that does not even exist in most countries. The ability of Americans to conduct such flight is

soundly supported by that one obscure phrase, “protect the right to navigable airspace.” In fact, this is the only country in the world that will allow a non-licensed pilot to fly a non-certified aircraft. We call them “ultra lights.” We need to keep watch on congressional amendments, like the one concerning warbirds that was just defeated, and support our “alphabet groups.” We need to acknowledge and defend the exceptional nature of American aviation. And one last thing, please don’t tell my editors where my priorities really reside!

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May 2012

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A modern bush plane – the Sherpa eight place K300-C400 built in Oregon. 450 hp twin turbo engine for quick takeoffs. (Courtesy of Sherpa Aircraft Manufacturing Co.) as the pioneer for Canadian air service. What they had proved was the feasibility of wilderness air service across Canada. In 1926, the first real bush plane was introduced by Anthony Fokker’s U.S. aircraft manufacturing company. It was the Fokker Universal and was solidly built. It could carry either passengers or cargo in a cabin under it’s high wing while the pilot flew in a single-seat open cockpit ahead of the wing (and immediately behind the new Pratt & Whitney radial engine). It had a flexible landing gear with individual bungee cord shock absorbers. Fokker built 44 Universals between 1926 and 1931 and more than half of them went into Canadian wilderness flying. The others were used by beginning airlines in the United States.

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A canadian Noorduyn Norseman. The first aircraft built exclusively for bush flying. (Courtesy of the Canadian Bush Plane Heritage Center)

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Continued from Page 13 Yes, bush flying began soon after World War I was over, and provided air transportation when the airport was a fledgling project in many cities and almost nonexistent in outlying areas. Bush pilots came from the many discharged military pilots who wanted to put their newly learned skills to work. Some took routine jobs as civil aviation began to emerge, others went into agricultural (crop dusting) flying and the most daring quick learners set about using the airplane to provide outlying but growing communities with some kind of air service. The bush pilot actually existed some time before the appearance of airline service and airline pilots. They were true pioneers, Things reportedly got started in Canada late in the fall of 1920 when a fur buyer walked into the office of the newly founded Canadian Air in Winnipeg and asked for a ride back home to the pass far across Manitoba. They took him up on it and one of their pilots flew for hundreds of miles across uninhabited land, crossing lakes, rivers and swamps on the way to land at a spot no aircraft with wheeled landing gear had ever visited. The idea of using an airplane in wilderness took hold. Early uses included mapping and patrolling for forest fires in order to call back their locations. Supplies were carried out to remote logging operations, and injured workers could be returned for hospital care. In 1924, the government of Ontario province realized how their wilderness could be served by bush flying and established the Ontario Provincial Air Service at Sault Ste. Marie with 13 surplus U.S. Navy Curtiss HS-2L flying boats. Several attempts were made to establish scheduled flying services across the province, and other bases were established. However, the contest for service contracts and a growing demand around Canada for skilled personnel caused financial erosion and the company was eventually forced to close. Nevertheless, it is known


May 2012

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

May 2012

Lost Coast Search and Rescue

The Rescue Swimmer signals the Aircrew of the helicopter that he survived the jump into the water. (Sagar Pathak) Continued from Page 4 With the orange helicopter slowing to a hover at 15 feet above the water, the pilot okays the flight mechanic (FM) in the back of 6573 to slide the door of the Dolphin open. The FM is now the eyes of the operation. He clears the area below as the first rescue swimmer approaches the door of the helicopter and sits on the ledge. Three taps on the back from the FM, and in a split second the swimmer slides out of the door and falls into the ocean below. Thumbs up to let the aircrew know that he survived the two-story jump and he starts swimming through the swells to assume his position as the “rescue victim.” In a matter of minutes, the aircrew is reset to launch another swimmer into the water to simulate saving the “victim.” Check the winds, enter a stable hover, and keep an eye on the ocean. With the helicopter in a stable hover 15 feet above the undulating ocean, swells can make that jump anywhere from five to 30 feet in a matter of seconds. The FM looks down at the ocean and will time the swimmer’s jump so as he/she hits the water at the top

A Flight Mechanic (left) and Rescue Swimmer (right) walk out together toconduct a training exercise. (Sagar Pathak) of the swell instead of the bottom, which would add an extra one to two stories of free falling, and potentially cause a harder fall and injure the swimmer. Once in the water, the rescue swimmer swims several yards in the rough, cold sea while being battered by the down wash from the helicopter hovering above. Oh, and did I mention there are sharks in the water too? This is not a job for the faint of heart. These swimmers are in top physical condition and continuously train to swim and save lives. Continued on Page 22

During ocean training exercises with a rescue swimmer in the cold water, two helicopters are launched for extra safety. (Sagar Pathak)


May 2012

Contrails

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17

by Steve Weaver

FALLING

IN LOVE WITH A

CASSUTT, PART II

T

o anyone who has been stranded, immobile and silent on the side of a busy interstate, the whoosh of passing cars and the blasts of air from speeding tractor trailers rocking your vehicle is familiar. You sit in your crippled automobile on the verge and you change not a whit the traffic that ignores you and continues on its way. I can tell you though, when the stalled vehicle is an airplane, things change completely. Apparently, jaded though the public is, the sight of an airplane beside a busy road is enough to stop traffic. Within minutes multiple cars and trucks had stopped and I had dispatched one volunteer to phone the airport and tell my friend Jake to come to my aid. In 20 minutes or so Jake arrived, a wide smile plastered on his face. Thankfully, with the cell phone still an invention of the far future, the police had not also appeared, and we began to noodle the problem of getting the airplane back into the air. At that time the interstate had recently opened and traffic was a fraction of today’s flow. We decided that our plan would be to start the airplane, and then just wait by the side of the road, run up completed, until there was a break in the traffic. At that point I would start my takeoff run and be airborne before anyone could catch up with me. The plan worked perfectly. I’ve often wondered what the people driving in the other lane thought when the small yellow airplane zipped by, heading north on I-79. Back at the airport, I told my story and the crew at the hangar lapped it up and congratulated me on my good flying. Secretly I thought there was more luck than good planning involved and I figured that God wasn’t finished with me yet and He needed for me to stick around

Steve Weaver in the early ‘70s with his Cassutt in order that several more service bulletins could be accomplished on my airframe. In spite of the unscheduled landing, I continued to fly the airplane over the next few days. My theory was that the airplane hadn’t done anything wrong and I sure wasn’t going to repeat my faux pas of the vertical roll. A couple of my friends were qualified to fly the Cassutt, Jake being one, and I gave them free reign to take it up when they liked. One evening after Jake came back from a flight he called me out to the airplane. The first thing I saw was that the large spinner was missing from the propeller. Parts of it were clinging to the back plate, but it had been seemingly wrenched from the prop. Jake had been in level flight at normal speed when the spinner had let go and he said a heavy vibration had accompanied the spinner’s

(Photo provided by Steve Weaver) departure. After much talk and careful examination of the offending end of the Cassutt, our conclusion was that if the spinner came off, then obviously whoever put it on the last time had failed to tighten the screws that held it in place and that was that. We would order a new spinner and make sure the screws were tight. In the meantime, there was no reason we couldn’t continue to fly the airplane, was there? Youth, inexperience and optimism are always a deadly mix, but never more so than in aviation. The stage was set for the final act. Next day a brilliant late-summer sky beckoned me aloft again and late in the afternoon I pushed the now spinner-less airplane from the hangar. After a careful preflight, I caged a prop spin from one of the mechanics. The engine caught instantly and settled down into its rumbling and un-muffled idle. Confirming oil

pressure, I started my slow taxi to runway 18. I felt the coolness of the rudder pedals on my bare feet, since due to the limited leg room I had been flying the Cassutt without shoes, and even then it was a squeeze for my body. Arriving at the end of the runway, I went through the check list, did the runup and faced the tower, signaling I was ready. They responded with a steady green light. I lined up on the centerline and slowly pushed the throttle forward. I couldn’t get enough of this airplane. I felt like a teenager in love. I was enamored of the performance and the true third dimension that this ship’s vertical ability gave to flight. I quickly climbed to 3,000 feet and trimmed for level flight. Tonight I would fly south to Barbour County and give my friends at Simpson Airport a look at the Cassutt, with some low passes and other thrilling maneuvers that I would decide on when I got there. Leaned and stabilized, I noted that the absence of the spinner had stolen only about five miles per hour from the indicated airspeed and we were still going like a house afire. I had just passed the town of Grafton and was still level at 3,000 feet, when I felt the first tiny vibration. I had only time to check my instruments when a second later the vibration suddenly became violent, so violent that I had no doubt that the engine was going to tear itself from the mount if I didn’t do something quickly. The instrument panel was just a blur, with instruments unreadable and oil was now streaming back over the windshield. I instinctively knew that coming down with a dead engine was far better than coming down with no engine at all and my hand shot forward to pull the mixture. Continued on Page 18

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Contrails Continued from Page 17 At the same moment I pulled the mixture there was a terrific bang and something departed the front of the airplane, from about the two o’clock position on the nose. As the engine stopped the thought flashed through my mind that a piece of the cowling had shaken loose and left the airplane, but I couldn’t confirm it because oil now coated the wind-

shield and I had no forward visibility. As I slowed the airplane to best glide speed I glanced out either sides of the canopy and felt my heart fall. I was now over some of the most inhospitable terrain in this part of the state, near the area of Tygart Lake, where steep wooded hills impounded the waters of the Tygart River and a panoply of stark, jagged folds of earth extended in every direction. There wasn’t a spot with-

in reach for even a helicopter landing, never mind a place to put the Cassutt. At the foot of each dramatic, forested hill another hill began to rise with scarcely room between for a road or a creek. I was in deep doo-doo and I knew it, and it seemed to me at that moment that I had used up my luck and grace from God on the last forced landing and I was on my own on this one.

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As I searched the horizon desperately for some place – any place – to put the airplane, my eye caught a glimpse of green several miles to the east of my position, green and welcoming in the slanting, late afternoon sunlight. I knew the distance to it exceeded the gliding range of the crippled airplane, but I had no other options, so I banked the little ship in that direction. As the seconds ticked by I was puzzled at the shallow glide angle the airplane was maintaining. Perhaps I could glide that far after all. I was familiar with the dead engine gliding characteristics of this airplane from the landing I’d made the week before, but now it was gliding like a different airplane. Soon I realized that I was indeed going to make the field I had chosen; in fact I was arriving with too much altitude. I aligned my path with the longest span of the field, which appeared to be a fenced pasture of about 1,500 feet in length, relatively level, with open approaches. I was slipping the airplane to give me forward vision out the side of the canopy and now I saw I was going to be too high and I would overshoot. With the knowledge that it was better to chance a crash trying to get into a field than crash for sure overshooting one, I put the airplane in a vertical forward slip, literally falling out of the air and pulled out of the slip at the last second, simultaneously flaring for the landing. The airplane floated for a second, then touched the grass. With the stick hard back and the brakes almost locked, I saw through the left side of the canopy, a fence angling towards me. I ruddered the little ship to the right and continued maximum braking until I came to a rocking, skidding stop. I sat for a second, surrounded by green tinted silence, thanking God for once again, pulling my fat from the fire. It was hard to believe that for the second time in six days I had survived another forced landing in this airplane. I knew at that moment that I was through with the Cassutt and I made a promise to myself that I would not give this beautiful demon a third chance to kill me. I swung the canopy open, unbuckled my belt and stood up. Cattle were lowing as they swayed toward me from all points of the pasture. As I hopped down from the wing they were forming a curious but respectful circle around the airplane and filling the air with their bawling complaints of a UFO’s presence in their field. Once on the ground, I walked to the front of the airplane and got a shock. No wonder the airplane had glided so well, the propeller was gone! The magnificent, paddle-bladed, scimitar shaped, wooden Continued on Page 19


May 2012

Contrails Continued from Page 18 propeller was gone, completely gone, along with the bolts that had held it to the engine. I flushed with shame as I understood what a fool I’d been for not listening to what the airplane had been trying to tell me. I realized too late that the aerobatics that we’d been doing had compressed the wood around the washers and bolts securing the prop to the crankshaft until it had become so loose that a harmonic wobble had occurred and sheared the bolts. If we had simply checked the bolt torque after the spinner incident this near disaster would have been avoided. As I was standing by the airplane berating myself, the noise of an approaching vehicle registered on me. I looked toward the north end of the pasture and a grayed head appeared, rising smoothly and majestically over the hill, as if born by magic. It was followed quickly by the shoulders and upper torso of an old woman. Next came the farmer, carried along by the same magic, and then the tractor itself appeared, with the farmer clinging to the steering wheel and his wife standing on the spreader bar behind him. “See there Pa,” I heard over the noise of the engine, “Ah toll you somethin was bothern’ them cows” After introductions were accomplished and I had given a brief description of what had brought me to their farm, we wrestled the airplane into an equipment shed located at the edge of the pasture. We then secured fencing across the front of the shed to keep the cows from munching on the airplane’s fabric as cows are wont to do. Now afoot, I welcomed the farmers offer to give me a ride somewhere. After orienting myself I realized that I was only a few miles from the home of my Uncle Harold Holmes in the hamlet of Nestorsville, so the farmer and his wife and I set off for there in his truck. We arrived at my uncle’s house just as darkness was falling and the night birds had started to call. I rang the bell and as the porch light came on I realized that my sudden appearance in my present state must look very strange indeed. I was covered with the cow poop that the wheels had sprayed on the side of the airplane while landing, and which I’d

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applied liberally to myself in wrestling the airplane into the shed. I was without a jacket and the evening had turned chilly. Strangest of all, I had no shoes on, but I was wearing socks. For a moment after he opened the door my uncle just stared at me in the reflection of the yellow bulb. After about

a three beat he said, “Why Stevie…what happened?” I was true to my promise and I never did fly the Cassutt again. My friend Willie and I did rescue it from the field where it came to earth, and we trucked it back to Morgantown one bright November Sunday morning when the traffic

19

was light and the police were sleeping. Eventually it was sold and I lost track of it, but in the years since, I’ve often thought about that little piece of my past. I’ve wondered where it ended up and who owns it now. But most of all, I’ve wondered if there was ever a third dead-stick landing for the pilots who followed me.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Above: The Flabob Airport Preparatory Academy hosts middle and high school students. Right: Tom Wathen and the French Caudron that he had replicated at Flabob.

By David Gustafson

R

ecognizing that a million professional pilots and A&P mechanics are going to be needed over the next 20 years, the Wathen Center, which is headquartered at historic Flabob Airport in Riverside, Calif., has initiated planning to train young men and women for those professions. The Center already has a successful middle and high school program on its grounds and is moving rapidly to establish the A&P program, while upgrading its flight training operations. The charter school, which is expected to transition to a Big Picture charter soon, will begin phasing in an extensive aviation-based curriculum in 2013. Seniors and juniors in the school will be able to begin working on their A&P license while finishing up their high school requirements. In the meantime, students at the Flabob Airport Preparatory Academy have a wide range of extra-curricular activities they can pursue. Many of them become involved in one of the restoration projects at the airport. Currently, students are volunteering their time on Saturdays to bring a Stinson 108 and a Stits Playboy back to flightline status. Previously, they restored an Aeronca Chief and two of them flew it to AirVenture. An active group of juniors and seniors are participating in “The Aviators,” a group raising funds to attend AirVenture 2012. By working on the restoration projects, students earn credits toward flying

lessons. Already 24 students have earned their private pilot licenses and some of those have gone on to study at a military academy, the University of North Dakota or Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. At some point in the future, the Wathen Center hopes to upgrade their flight training operations to support the projected need for professional and military pilots. By the time it’s in place the airlines are expected to be in dire need of new pilots. The A&P program is already in the advanced planning stage, with expectations of bringing it online next year. The program will accommodate veterans and students from the high school. Veterans will be able to complete studies for the A&P certificate in 11 months, or even less with distance learning of classroom subjects. Prospects for employment after completing the program are excellent, because of forecast aviation needs and also because many companies who have no affiliation with aviation want an A&P because of the extensive knowledge they possess when they graduate. For example, Disneyland only hires A&P mechanics to work on rides in their parks. The program at Flabob will utilize remote learning activity, allowing military personnel to begin studies before they actually arrive on campus. Most soldiers, Continued on Page 22


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Lost Coast Search and Rescue Continued from Page 16 Once the victim â&#x20AC;&#x201C; who may be very combative because they are scared â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is stabilized, the rescue swimmer pulls the victim through the ocean back to the hovering helicopter where the FM has lowered a basket into the water. The rescue swimmer gets the victim into the basket and the FM hoists the victim up and into the helicopter. The hoist is then lowered to retrieve the rescue swimmer. This ballet continues for the rest of the two-hour flight. Swimmers go in, swimmers come out. We then head to nearby Crescent City airport to stop for a quick lunch and more fuel and head back out to practice these drills some more. In 2011 Humboldt Bay had 295 SAR cases resulting in 24 lives being saved. It was the constant training, day and night, that resulted in the 24 lives being saved. The U.S. Coast Guard motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Semper Paratusâ&#x20AC;? (always ready), and the communities of the Pacific Northwest are very lucky to have the helos of Humboldt Bay watching over them. A very special thanks to Lt. JG Andrew Taylor and the men and women of Group/Air Station Humboldt Bay for hosting me during my trip.

A Flight Mechanic works the hoist that lifts survivors and rescue swimmers up to the helicopter. (Sagar Pathak)

An MH-65C Dolphin sits on a wet ramp in front of Group/Air Station Humboldt Bay at Arcata Airport. (Sagar Pathak)

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Let Gibson Aviation return to Service your Cylinders in Overhauled, Yellow Tagged Condition for $345.00. Cylinders must be crack free and the bore must be in manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specifications for return to service. The price is inclusive of all parts stationary in the cylinder. (Valve Guides, Seats, Studs, Bushings, etc) Any moving parts, (Valves, Pistons, Rings, etc) constitute an additional charge which varies from each different make & model. For additional charges we can supply rings, gaskets and any other related parts you might need.

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Wathen Center Continued from Page 20 who work as mechanics in the military, will be able to â&#x20AC;&#x153;test outâ&#x20AC;? of some of the 44 subjects they are expected to master before receiving their license. In addition to the three key programs, the Wathen Center annually runs a number of Air Academies. To date, over 1,500 kids have participated in the academies which attract middle and high school students. They are exposed to aviation science, weather, navigation and the theory of flight. At the end of the weekly programs they are taken for an airplane ride and earn their Young Eagles certificate. Many of the students who sign up for the academies come through Flabobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elementary School Visitation program. For this after-school event, team members share the theory and fundamentals of flight with fifth and sixth graders at their school, before bringing them to Flabob to tour a DC-3 and visit a number of other historic aircraft. For most kids, it is their first experience walking around an airport. Making them aware of what happens at an airport generates appreciation for aviation activity that can last a lifetime.

Flabob, however, is more than education. It is a busy hub for recreational pilots, hosting a wide range of activities from Fly-Ins, an annual Veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day celebration, kite contests, model aircraft building, to an Aerospace and Leadership program that has been set up for 400 visiting Chinese students, along with numerous other aviation events. EAA Chapter One is based at the airport which has also provided space for homebuilding pioneers like Ray Stits, Ed Marquart, Bill Turner and Lou Stolp. All of this has been possible because of one man with a vision: Thomas W. Wathen. He saved the airport from some aggressive developers at the eleventh hour back in 2000 and has invested a tremendous amount of time, effort and money into upgrading many of the facilities on the airport. Tom not only envisioned the airport as a destination facility for pilots all over the Southwest, but he set out to create educational activities that will preserve and expand the legacy of sport and general aviation by drawing new people into it. The high school, the A and P program and the flight training operations are positive steps in assuring growth in aviation.


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Fax: 415-898-5155 www.tjair.com Email: tjair@tjair.com

351 Airport Road #3 Novato, CA 94945 415-898-5151

1965 PIPER CHEROKEE 180

1997 PIPER MALIBU MIRAGE

1960 CESSNA 182 SKYLANE

LOW TIME AIRFRAME HOURS (2297 TT), 582 hrs SMOH, GPS coupled to Alt Hld Auto-Pilot, Digital IFR radios " MUST SEE"!!!!

1837 TT, 75 SFRAM, Full Garmin Package, Air Data Computer, Gpss Steering. Beautiful!

2791 TT, VFR, 1989 Paint, Always Hangared, Very Clean!

1964 BEECHCRAFT S35 BONANZA

1978 GREAT LAKES 2T-1A 2 AEROBATIC

1995 SOCATA TB-20 TRINIDAD

3873 TT, 1088 SMOH, 2-Axis Autopilot, Garmin 480, IFR Waas GPS, Tip Tanks, Incredible Leather Seating, 1616 lb. useful load, Much More!

484 TT, 9 hours SFOH, Aerobatic, Beautiful, Complete Logs!

2400 TT, 433 Since Restoration, Garmin 480 GPS/Comm/color moving map WAAS approved, Garmin 200 MFD, KX 165 Nav/Comms , KFC 150 A/P-FD, Air Conditioning.

1978 PIPER TURBO ARROW III

1973 CESSNA TURBO 210L

1977 AMERICAN CHAMPION 7-GCBC

3420 TT, 571 FRMN, S-Tec 60-2 electrically driven Autopilot w/ Alt Hld, lots of additional equipment! Sharp!

4255 TT, 578 hrs TTSFR, Hot prop, Garmin 530, 2 axis autopilot, King avionics.

7601 TT, 263 SMOH, 263 SPOH, 180 HP Engine w/ Constant Speed Prop., KX 155 w/ GS, Vacuum Sys., New Windows.

1979 VARGA 2150A

1960 BEECHCRAFT 33 DEBONAIR

1969 BEECHCRAFT 36 BONANZA

651 TT; VFR; 1979 paint and interior; Incredibly Low -Time pampered fun airplane! Excellent condition for an original Varga!

5589 TT, 150 Hrs. on Factory Reman Engine and Overhauled Prop., No Logs.

Call for Details, 1/7th Ownership: 8444 TT; 2008 Paint; 2008 Int., Garmin avionics, 300HP engine.

2008 REMOS G-3

1967 MOONEY M20C

1982 WING DERRINGER D-1

386.4 TT, Dynon HS34 AutoPilot, Garmin avionics, Dynon systems.

5642 TT, 136 SMOH, Garmin 430, 320A, SL30, 3 blade, Stand by vac, Hangared.

1976 BEECHCRAFT V35B BONANZA

2008 TEST TST 13 JUNIOR

1975 BEECHCRAFT A36 BONANZA

2490TT, 722 FRMN, 32 SPOH, Garmin 327A, Magellan Sky/Nav 5000 GPS, Century III G/S coupled, 1900 paint. Very nice!

S-LSA (no FAA medical required) single seat, mid wing, T-tailed aircraft. New!

2100 TT, 2008 SNEW, 1975 Paint; 2006 Int; Make offer! Clean Southwest based, low-time, great turbo normalize candidate!

LD O S

299 TT, 2 place, 170+ KTAS, Light twin engine, last one built, personal Airplane of Dr. Wing.

All specifications and representations are believed to be accurate to the best knowledge of the seller. However, it is the buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to verify all information prior to purchase.

T. J. Neff

Phone: 415-898-5151

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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OODIES AND ADGETS

May 2012 One of the truly great things about being an aviation buff is the number of “Goodies and Gadgets” available to play with. Here In Flight USA has collected a few new ones worthy of your consideration.

BrighLine Bags New Modular “Flex System” Flight Bags

DIVORCE – PATERNITY MEN’S RIGHTS

BrightLine Bags, Inc. has announced an entirely new modular flight bag system to replace its current market-leading flight bag design. The new product line, called “The FLEX System,” starts with the basic modular design concept that made the current BrightLine Bags flight bag so popular and then takes that same innovation and thoughtful engineering to a whole new level by creating an entire system that now contains five different-sized interchangeable modules, a front and rear end cap, and a collection of four interchangeable external pockets. The result is that for the first time, every individual pilot can create a customized bag that is the exact size and has the exact functionality he or she wants, according to the needs of their next flight. BrightLine Bags has improved on their original idea of a single bag that can be divided into two smaller bags, by creating a system of 11 different parts that can be combined together in an almost countless number of configurations. Then to simplify the process, BrightLine Bags has established five standard bag configurations, ranging in size from extra small to extra large, to satisfy the most common flight bag scenarios. These basic configurations will address the majority of customer needs and will act as a starting point for each customer, since the option to come back later and add individual pieces, or create a custom configuration for a particular need, will always be available. Ross Bishop, President of BrightLine Bags said, “We designed this system of modules and pockets to allow every pilot to – once-and-for-all – have a bag that actually works to control and organize their flight gear, no matter the nature of their next flight. We call this, ‘Adaptive Utility’” Gone are the days of trying to fit your pilot flight gear into a non-conforming, preexisting bag. The new FLEX System creates a powerful solution for all pilots by allowing customized bag configurations that work equally well for students or instructors, VFR or IFR conditions, even overnight or longer trips. FLEX will begin shipping in late May 2012. For further information visit www.brightlinebags.com. See a video describing the bags at http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=J59Gt5_9SYs

New Valve Stem Access Panel

If you are Involved in a Divorce or Paternity Case... ...you Should Know That: 1. You may have an excellent chance of obtaining child custody; 2. It’s your child...she doesn’t own it; 3. There are numerous legal methods of avoiding alimony; 4. There are numerous legal methods of avoiding loss of your property; 5. If properly represented, you won’t be “taken to the cleaners”, 6. Courts can be legally required not to favor the woman; 7. You can fight against false charges of child abuse or spousal abuse. 8. You can emerge from a divorce emotionally and financially sound; 9. Men do have rights! 10. California cases only.

Contact: Lawyers For Men’s Rights 213-384-8886 or visit us at www.mensrightslawyers.com LAW OFFICES OF STUART J. FABER

Many aircraft, in pursuit of speed and efficiency, are equipped with close-fitting wheel pants. They look great and lower wind resistance; but because they cover so much of the wheel, they can also make checking tire pressure inconvenient. Underinflated tires increase takeoff roll, degrade ground handling, make braking unpredictable, and can lead to rapid tire deterioration and even tire failure. The solution is a small, light, but strong hatch that can give instant access to nearly any tire’s valve stem. Quick pressure checks and easy tire filling will make handling better and enhance safety. The assembly, consisting of an aluminum frame, door, and quarter-turn fastener, can be installed without an STC on certified aircraft in the U.S. (and most other jurisdictions); and on experimentals worldwide. The frame is generally glassed in place, and the removable door is secured by the included fastener. The opening (2.5” square; the flange is 3” on a side), gives adequate clearance for a tire gauge or an air chuck, but is not so large that finding a good place to mount it can become a problem. Scott Wick, President of Wicks Aircraft Supply that carries the access panel, says, “We are happy to find such an effective and elegant solution to such a common problem. These doors should save a lot of time and thus make actually checking the tire pressure part of many more preflights.” This part is available through Wicks and the part number for a set is VSS01; the kit of three sells for $180. Since the door is not attached, it is possible that it might get lost sometime, so Wicks also offers a single replacement door (part number is VSP01) for $30. For more information visit: www.wicksaircraft.com or call: Orders 1-800/2219425 or Help Line: 618/654-7447. Email: info@wicksaircraft.com. Wicks Aircraft Supply is located at 410 Pine Street, Highland, IL 62249.


www.inflightusa.com

May 2012

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818-896-6442 800-828-6756 fax 818-896-9541 vista@vistaaviation.com Whiteman Airport • 10000 Airpark Way • Pacoima, CA 91331 USA

ASPEN EFD1000 PRO The EFD 1000 Pro PFD gives you all the major tools that help professional pilots fly safely and easily in instrument conditions, at a breakthrough price. The Pro has all the same great features as the Pilot PFD-integral ADAHRS, backup battery, emergency GPS, altitude alerter—plus a whole lot more.

BOSE

LIGHTSPEED DAVID CLARK

GARMIN G500

At last, retrofit glass is now within your grasp. Upgrade your avionics panel to the G500 and start reaping the benefits of enhanced situational awareness, safety and pilot workload reduction. This affordable glass system combines a primary flight display (PFD) and multi-function (MFD) display in one 10-inch wide bezel — dramatically simplifying the cockpit.

Now with Geo-referenced charts

Now Helicopter Certified

AVIDYNE EX-600 BENDIX KING AV8OR

Multi-Function Display offers the most feature-rich, pilot-friendly, easiest to use multifunction display available. The EX600’s user interface improves your ability to access & display critical flight data. Operation is simple and consistent, allowing you to select & display what you need on a single integrated moving map. As a radar display replacement the EX600 provides easy access to radar modes, tilt control & bearing adjust. With the EX600s map-centric operation and our new map panning feature, you can display a moving map of your flight plan and view datalink weather all along your route. And view on board Wx Radar. And special use air space. And traffic. And Terrain. And color lightning. All without leaving the map page. It’s the only MFD available that provides the complete picture. And it’s easiest to use.

VISTA AIR FLIGHT SCHOOL Flight Training & Aircraft Rental Cessna Approved Pilot Center

GARMIN GPSMAP 796

GARMIN AERA 500

All New Features

Vista Aviation Inc. has been servicing the Garmin G1000 since its introduction as well as installing modern state of the art avionics suites from most manufactures. We are proud of what we do and are capable of one radio to a full custom panel. Call for Your Quote Today.

NEW HANGARS AVAILABLE FOR RENT Office Space Also Available

AIRCRAFT FOR SALE 1975 Bellenca Super Viking 17-30A

1976 Cessna 150 - SOLD

1972 Baron

1977 Cessna 150 - SOLD

1976 V-35B

1980 Cessna 172RG

1973 Cessna 182P - SOLD

1979 Cessna 172 - SOLD

1977 Cessna 172N - SOLD

1975 Cessna 172 - SOLD

GARMIN GTN-750 Packed full of powerful avionics, the GTN 750 is a fully integrated GPS/NAV/COMM solution. The 6-in.-tall system’s intuitive touchscreen controls and large display give you unprecedented access to high-resolution terrain mapping, graphical flight planning, geo-referenced charting, traffic display, satellite weather and much more.

STEC Autopilot Systems

Visit our website for details www.vistaaviation.com/aircraft_sales.php

New & Used Aircraft Sales

SYSTEM 20/30

SYSTEM 55X

For Flight School Info Call:

(818)896-5224 See Our New Website

www.vistaair.com

1972 BARON, 480 TT, 309 SMOH, 633 SPOH, KNS80, KMA20, KX155, KY196, G327, CIII AP, Strike Finder.

1975 BELLANCA SUPER VIKING 17-30A, 2300TT, 650 SMOH, dual Garmin 430, IFR, Call Dusty for more information.

1976 V35B, 1180 SFREMAN, 454 STOH/SPOH, G600 Primary FD, GEM, GNS 530W & GNS430W WAAS GPS/NAV/COM, 55X AP, 3blades, MUCH MORE. Call for details.

SYSTEM 40

SYSTEM 60

Call for Details & installed pricing MasterCard

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

26

THE STORY

OF

By Louisa Jaggar and Pat Smith Have you ever heard of James Herman Banning? If you have, you are unusual. Most people know Lindbergh and Earhart, but Banning, for the most part, has escaped the history books. Why? Because he was African American and in the 1920s the mainstream press didn’t write about African American aviators.

California City Municipal Airport (FAA LID: L71) TWO AIRCRAFT HANGARS on private 2.92 acres.

Sam Heller RE Lic#00891062

Email: sam@samheller.com 661-259-9385

May 2012

AVIATION PIONEER JAMES HERMAN BANNING He was the first African American to fly across the continental United States, and many believe he was the first to receive a United States issued pilot’s license. Almost 70 years from the time of Banning’s death, Pat Smith was researching aviation heroes from Oklahoma for National Geographic’s Celebration of 100 Years of Flight. She found an aviation history file and pulled out a short

Access to property which is located on airport grounds is by your private gated road/driveway. Deeded access to adjoining (direct access) runway. One hangar 125x100 with 2,500 sq. ft. of offices (5), restroom/shower facilities (2), reception area with bar, 3 storage/machine shops, sleeping rooms, PLUS 100x100 or 10,000 square feet of clear span aircraft hangar space. Second 44x45 clear span aircraft hangar is detached and can be rented for additional income. Airport to be expanded and upgraded in near future. PERFECT TIME to get in on future development. This 2.92 acre property is fully fenced and can be used as storage, manufacturing, wearhousing or what it was built for, AIRPLANES!! Seller will consider lease. Seller may help with financing with good offer. Airport has fuel facilities, restaurant, repaved runway. California City Municipal Airport covers 245 acres and is located two miles (3 km) northwest of the business district of the California City, in the Freemont Valley of Kern County, California. The airport is open to the public, and lies at an elevation of 2,450 feet above sea level.

14,662 Square Feet • $499,950

news clip that mentioned Banning. She saved it because it peaked her interest and she wanted to know more about him. About two years later, she mentioned him to me. Together, we decided to write the story of his life for young adults. This decision sent Pat on her quest to discover more about Banning’s life. She uncovered newspaper articles, journals, photos as well as Banning’s grades from his year at Iowa State College. She found the family’s homestead deed, the plot of the homestead and the Banning family on the Oklahoma census. More importantly, Pat discovered a true hero. It turns out that Banning had searched for a couple years to find someone to agree to teach him to fly. Most white people didn’t believe African Americans could take to the skies. Finally, a Lieutenant Fisher agreed, but he died in a crash before Banning could begin his solo hours. When Banning couldn’t find someone to lend him a plane, he built his own airplane. He earned his pilot’s license and became a top barnstormer, competing and winning against many white pilots. Banning believed that freedom in the air would one day translate to freedom on the ground and he let nothing stand in his way. After a lifetime of discrimination, Banning wanted to make a lasting statement that African Americans could make real contributions to aviation – not just as entertaining barnstorming stunt pilots. He wanted his plane and his picture in the Smithsonian, next to Lucky Lindy’s. He decided to fly across the continental United States. At this time, Banning had no backers and owned a dilapidated plane with a 14-year-old engine. Thomas Cox Allen, a gifted mechanic also from Oklahoma, bought his way into the adventure with $200. Allen also came up with the ingenious idea to fund their flight with small donations from each town they landed in to cover the next leg of their journey, whether a warm meal, a place to sleep, or money for gas – and then inscribe the name of the donor on what they called the “Gold Book” – the wing of their plane. In this way, each contributor shared in a piece of history. Twenty-four communities participated and 65 individuals inscribed their names on the “Gold Book,” as Banning made his way across America. Banning succeeded against so many odds. But even with all the facts Pat has

By Louisa Jaggar and Pat Smith found, we are still searching for any and all information on Banning. Did anyone in your family fly during the Golden Age of Flight? Do you have old pictures stored in your attic by any chance? Do you have photos of the Bessie Coleman Aero Club in 1929 when Banning was the chief flight instructor? If you do please let us know. Aviation enthusiasts out there: share any information you may have about Banning and his mechanic, Thomas Allen, by emailing: JHBaviationpioneer@mail.com. We also have another goal. We want to right a past wrong. We want to see Banning in the National Aviation Hall of Fame. He deserves to be. What can you do to help make this a reality? His nomination packet will be placed with the subcommittee of the NAHF Nomination Committee this June. Let them know how deserving Banning is by emailing: kcitro@nationalaviation.org or mail: National Aviation Hall of Fame, P.O. Box 31096, Dayton, OH 45437-0096, Attention: Kerisa Citro. That’s not all folks! Pat and I, in partnership with the Tulsa Air and Space Museum, are creating a traveling exhibition on Banning’s life and accomplishments. His is a great story that is almost never told and we intend to tell it as loudly and as often and in as many mediums as possible. The traveling exhibition, On Freedom’s Wings, will make its first stops in Oklahoma, then move to Los Angeles where it will follow Banning and Allen’s route across the United States to New York. If you are interested in having this exhibit visit your town, please let us know at: JHBaviationpioneer@mail.com. Louisa Jaggar is the author of Saving Stuff, Simon and Schuster, 2005

Check the latest aviation news at www.inflightusa.com


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

TWO (FLYING) PEAS IN

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POD 1980 CESSNA 182Q/PETERSON 260/SE STOL 1767 TT, 447 SFRM/FWF, Garmin 430W, KX-155 NAVCOM, STEC 50 A/P, Garmin GTX-327 TXP, PS Eng. PMA7000MS Audio Panel, EDM-700, Custom Metal Inst. Panel, ALT VAC Sys., Kts-2-U Speed Mods., Stby Att. Gyro, BOSE Headsets, Converted in 2/2001. Like New Paint, Leather Int. & Glass! Fresh Annual, NDH & N. NV Based..............................................$199,500

Above: Fred Koehler in Herb’s office. Right: The author, Herb Foreman

By Herb Foreman

I

first met Fred Koehler when he talked to me about the intense “chronic” pain in his back caused by a broken vertebrae in his spine. I have the same problem from an exploded disc. I have an epidural pump implanted in my abdomen that pumps a drug into my spinal column at the point of pain. The pump operates on a long lasting battery, seven years, and I don’t think I would be here today without it. The physician that installed the pump explained that it would not affect my flying as the medicine was delivered below my waist and would have no effect on my brain. The FAA did not agree and would not renew my medical. Fred had the same procedure done which cured the pain but he has not attempted to renew his medical. We both began flying lessons in mid-life. I soloed in 1971 at age 41. Fred began a little later at age 58. We both soloed in the great C-150/152. We are both private, single-engine, instrumentrated pilots. Since I began flying some time before he did, I have close to 4,000 hours logged compared to his 1,400. It is surprising how much of our lives in what Journalist Tom Brokaw called the “Greatest Generation” are so similar. Fred is the son of immigrant parents, as am I. He badgered his Congressman and was appointed to West Point. His intention was to end up in the Air Force but instead chose the Infantry. He did go through jump school and completed ranger training. WWII was still raging when I graduated from high school. I was drafted and went to the Infantry, also serving as a First Scout in an Infantry regiment of the 43rd

Division. At the War’s end, I was transferred to the 1st Cavalry Division for a year in the occupation of Japan. Fred did not make the Army a career. He was discharged as a Captain and began climbing the corporate ladder in Silicon Valley. He served 10 years with IBM and 10 yours with Varian. He later worked for Memorex and Zerox and was both an executive and CEO. He retired in 2000 and began years of community service that still goes on today. He became Vice Commander of the Sheriff’s Air Squadron in 2006 and Commander in 2007. He was named Citizen of the Year by the City of San Carlos (San Francisco Peninsula) in 2006. Meticulous and intense, he found he needed a hobby and began flying but not just for pleasure. He joined the Veterans Flying Club. The Great Bill Hartman, retired from United, was his instructor in Bill’s 152. He became a pilot for Angel Flight, flying patients and parents to various hospitals and home again. Heavily involved in the Young Eagle program, he introduced 170 youngsters to the joys of flight. Most of his flying was in the Cherokee 235 and C172 although he has time in the C-182, Piper Arrow and the C-206. After WWII, I took advantage of the Continued on Page 34

2009 AMD ZODIAC CH 650 LS - SLSA 198 hrs. TT Since New, Garmin 340 Audio Panel, SL40 Com, GTX-327 TXP w/Enc, 396 GPS + Tru Trak II A/P w/ALT Hold! Dual DYNON EFIS D100 Screens, EMS-D120, Digital FF, Electric Trim, Night Package & More! Like New, Estate Sale, Fresh Annual & NDH. ................................$79,500

1964 MOONEY M20E 3924 TT, 1223 TT Engine (200HP), 1507 TT Prop, KMA-24 Audio Panel, KX-155 NAV/Com w/GS, CNX80 WAAS & Com Radio, KT 76, STEC 30 Auto Pilot, Apollo Fly Buddy 820 GPS, Lowrance GPS, GAP Seals, Precise Speed Brake, Standby VAC, EDM700, EGT/CHT + Much More. An Exceptionally Fast Mooney...$49,500

1965 PIPER COMANCHE 260 4318 TT, 1449 SMOH, (Fuel Injected IO-540), 1053 SPOH, King KMA-24, Dual KX155 NavComs w/GS, KN-62A DME, KLN-89 GPS, 2 pl I/C, Updated Gyros, Eng Pre-heat, .250 Solar Gray Glass. Complete Logs since new. Annual Due 2/2013 ............$52,500

1963 PIPER COMANCHE 250 4966 TT, 1671 SMOH, 63 SOH, KX-170B w/GS, KX-170B, NARCO ADF 31, King 209 Nav, King 208, NARCO Auto Panel, METCO Air Tips, SKY TEC Starter and more. All Log Books and Fresh Annual .... .........................................$32,500

New 2009 ZODIAC CH 650 XL SLSA

1964 PIPER COMANCHE 400

46 TT Since New (Ferry Time Only), Garmin 396, GMA-340 Audio Panel w/MB, SL-40 Nav/Com, TruTrak DigiFlight II, Dynon EFIS D-l0 w/Battery Backup, Wheel Pants, Electric Trim (A+E), Dual Brakes and more. Zodiac 6Zu-1 thru 6Zu-4 modifications complied with 1/2010 and NDH ...........................$94,500 or Best Offer

4353 TT, 197 SMOH, 215 SOH, KMA20 TSO Audio Panel, 2-KX175B TSO Radios, 2-VOR 209 w/Digital Readout, KLN135A GPS, KN64 DME, Narco AT 50 Transponder w/Encoder, STEC 50 w/NAV and GPS Coupler, Radar Altitude, Electric Trim, Gear Lobe Fairings, NDH, Complete Logs and more...ESTATE SALE $99,500

ALSO AVAILABLE

1978 CESSNA TU 206F ‘STATIONAIR’ ....................................$199,500 STERLING AIR, LTD. takes pride in offering members of the general aviation community the following selection of professionally tailored services: • Aircraft Sales • NAAA Certified Appraisals • Computerized “MLS” • Aviation Consulting – Cost Effective Analysis FREE – NAAA Certified Aircraft Appraisal and National “MLS” Listing, in return for your consigned aircraft!

Call 800-770-5908 • 775-885-6800 www.sterling-air.com 2640 College Parkway • Carson City, Nevada 89706 Bill Drake • Jim Jenkins • Steve Lewis


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

28

Elite Air Interiors FAA Approved Repair Station # 7EIR562B

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peaking of news here’s your first WOW Story: I am compelled to share this news with you and I hope you will take the time to check it out as it could be you one day. I have the honor and pleasure of saying that I am a friend of Stan Cooper. If you haven’t followed his story during the past five years, and learned how our government politically raped him, then you missed a frustrating but exciting story on how David slew Goliath, and he did it in the arena of Aviation vs Politics. Stan’s story is a “must” read for all of us. With his limited resources, but an amazing display of strength and the pursuit of fairness, he took on the system and in many ways won. I invite and encourage you to read his story and look forward to his forthcoming book and how he took on the “big” fight and won it for the Gipper. I only ask that you take this egregious governmental action as seriously as anything that could potentially ruin your life and you will see why I am standing and applauding this courageous man, Bravo Stan, you have raised the bar for all of us. You can learn more about it here: For those interested, a copy of the 36 page Decision and Justice Sotomayor’s Dissent is on the U.S. Supreme Court website (218 kB PDF) at: http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/11pdf/10-1024.pdf

WOW Number Two Get Ready For Another Challenge, This One Is Going Vertical Let me set the scene: The Characters (and I do mean characters): One youngish 40-year-old VP of something and one older (youngish thinking) white haired dude – not a grandfather yet. The Setting: A second story office in a spectacular, up-scale Northern California Aviation Museum with a big glass-window wall facing east, overlooking a runway at an airport to be named at a later date. The Time: A few years ago, mid afternoon, on a very uneventful day. The dress is causal, wrinkled shirts and Dockers. The mood is somber, and the only noise is the copy machine sounds in the hallway plus a few departing, training-class aircraft taking

Larry Shapiro

off to the north from the runway. The young guy (TYG) speaks: Whew! The older guy (TOG) responds, that bad huh? TYG replies: I need a revenue producing idea that will bring folks to our museum, but it has to be something exciting and it has to be legal. Directors Note: Both these character were very involved in the airshow industry and had worked or performed at many of them. Boom! The light bulb goes on and one of them – I don’t remember which one – says: I’ve got it! Let’s do a helicopter only airshow! (The room goes silent) Then they both simultaneously respond with: Brilliant! Again, the room goes silent. TOG speaks first: Let’s do it! TYG says: Great! By the way, he says, we have no budget, no FAA permission, and we can’t close the airport because of the less than cooperative airport manager. Next Scene: Same characters, same place, 20 minutes later. After a rather short deliberation, the two characters decide to go for it. The Goal: To get at least 1,000 spectators and a salvage yard full of helicopters, plus an army of volunteers to help. The characters are elated about the idea and popping buttons because they thought of it. With their buttons popping off they launch their new idea and have now picked Father’s Day weekend as their target date for this first helicopter only airshow. Some 4,000 helicopter lovers invaded the museum like a mini-Woodstock on that Father’s Day and the numbers have continued to grow and grow as this event has matured into a premiere aviation attraction with standing room only and now spans two-days event. Bulletin: This just in. Your writer is pleased to announce that he will again be at the microphone as the Announcer for the 2012 edition of the Hiller Museum Vertical Challenge at the San Carlos Airport in San Carlos, Calif., still the only major Helicopter Airshow known at this time. So mark you calendars for June 15 - 16, 2012 so we can finally meet face to face. Continued on Page 48


May 2012

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Flying With Faber AIRPORT HOPPING AROUND SOUTHERN CALIFORNINA

F

or the most part, my flights carry me long distances from my home base in Southern California. But I remember with fondness the days when a group of us pilots would take off from Van Nuys or Burbank, Calif. and fly just a few miles to a nearby airport. Although the trips took less than an hour, on a Saturday or Sunday morning or afternoon, we could reach places to which it would take hours to drive. In essence, we could take a long trip in the morning and be home by lunch or dinner. My basic flight training originated on grass strips in Wisconsin. As a matter of fact, it was just a few flight hours prior to my private check ride that I made my first landing on a hard surface runway. When I moved to California in the late 1950s, I yearned for the feel of my wheels touching down on a grass strip. I did discover a few grass strip fields. Meadowlark Airport was a memorable field. It was located about a mile off of the Pacific Coast near the city of Huntington Beach. The grass strip, later paved, was about 1,750 feet long – a great place to practice short field landings. Once upon a time, Bermuda Dunes Airport near Palm Springs boasted a grass strip. Believe it or not, I can remember flying into John Wayne Airport near Santa Ana when it was little more than a grass strip. Every once in a while, I hop into my C-210, take off from the San Fernando Valley and mosey around the neighborhood. For those unfamiliar with the greater Los Angeles – Orange County basin, you can, of course, fly anywhere in this vast valley VFR. The challenge is to avoid all of the restricted airspace. It does not take much inattention to penetrate Class B or Class C airspace. For that reason, I generally obtain an IFR clearance. Since the distances between the multitude of airports in the basin are relatively short, the FAA has developed what is referred to as Tower Enroute or Tower to Tower clearances. These are all published routes that will take you, say, from Burbank to Long Beach along a specific path. The clearance assures the pilot of immunity from invading Class B or Class C airspace – or it safely weaves you around these interdicted areas.

The Airports John Wayne Airport, (KSNA), once known as Santa Ana Airport was conve-

niently located to where I wanted to go in Orange County. As I mentioned, this field was once a grass strip, all traces of which have disappeared. It is now a huge commercial airport with flights to just about every major city in America. After departing Burbank Airport, the route is along a Victor airway heading southwest across the San Gabriel Valley into Orange County, then a turn to the ILS for Runway 19 and you have almost arrived. The field has a set of parallel runways. The advantage to accepting an instrument approach is that it takes you to the longer runway with an easy turnoff to the FBO. I generally select Atlantic Aviation, 949/851-5061. Long Beach Airport (KLGB), also known as Daugherty Field, is one of my favorite airports in the basin. My FBO of choice at Long Beach is AirFlight, 800/241-3548. When I was an instrument student, Long Beach was one of our major practice airports. From the air, directly over the top of the field, it looks like a tictac-toe board. The main runway is 30/12. There are two sets of parallel runways, 7R/25L and 7L/25R, plus 34L/16R and 34R/16L. The reason we selected this airport was that there was just about every kind of instrument approach known to aviation. During my check ride, the examiner was interested in my NDB approach skills. He was not too impressed. Nevertheless, I passed. I assume that my ILS and VOR approaches convinced him that, in bad weather, I could manage to find my way to the airport. Apparently, the FAA agreed with him because the NDB approach has since been de-commissioned For visits to the Palm Springs region, there are two choices. The first is Palm Springs International Airport, (KPSP). The airport, which has parallel runways (13R/31L and 13L/31R), is serviced by Atlantic Aviation, 760/320-7704. From the Los Angeles Basin to Palm Springs, you can fly VFR. The IFR clearance will take you up to about 13,000 feet, so there is no tower-to-tower procedure for that mission. I generally fly VFR from Burbank to Palm Springs – or I will file IFR until I approach the higher MEA and then I cancel and continue VFR. The Gorgonio Pass, which was created by the San Andreas Fault and cuts through the San Jacinto Mountains and the San Bernardino Mountains, is notorious for severe updrafts and downdrafts. On a calm day, one could scrape through the mountain range at 5,500 feet. On windy

days, I prefer more altitude. Palm Springs is about 470 feet above sea level so moments after you emerge from the pass, the airport is almost just below you. For pilots coming from the L.A. Basin and crossing through the pass for the first time, it is a dramatic sight to view the sudden appearance of the desert floor. On one occasion when I departed PSP, the conditions were IFR in the basin. I figured that the best way to get a clearance to the 13,000 foot MEA was to climb out VFR, circle around the field until I reached 13,000, and then get the clearance. It worked! If you are visiting the Palm Desert part of the valley, Bermuda Dunes (KUDD) might be the better choice. The grass runway no longer exists. But the airport still retains that old fashion friendly feeling. The two restaurants described below are within 10 minutes of UDD. Runway 10/28 is 5,002 feet in length. Desert Jet, 800/381-5387 is the FBO. By the way, there is a great restaurant on the field. Murph’s Gaslight Restaurant, 760/345-6242, is a great traditional airport restaurant. The countryfried chicken is wonderful. Morgan’s in the Desert, La Quinta Resort, 49-499 Eisenhower Dr., La Quinta, Calif. 92257, 760/564-7600 No, it’s not a typo. Morgan’s in the desert writes all but the first word in lower case. Spearheaded by celebrated chef and restaurateur Jimmy Schmidt and evoking the glamour, history and architecture of the original 1926 venue, Morgan’s in the desert is La Quinta’s hugely popular signature dining venue. Chef Jimmy, a friendly, unpretentious guy, has risen to the stature as one of California’s top chefs. He searches for local products and focuses on traditional cooking methods such as grilling, slow roasting, braising and curing. The result is a collection of recognizable cuisine with sensible combinations and flavors that are out of this world. Start with a pasta dish. All of his pastas are hand cut. The linguine with broccolini and garlic fused with herbs, Meyer lemon and parmesan is incredible. If you love rack of lamb, you will be amazed by the flavors imparted by his pistachio crusted Colorado rack served over a Beluga lentil, cipollini and garlic ragout. The seared Maine diver scallops delivered a freshness and flavor as if just retrieved from the water. Served with a

Stuart J. Faber and Aunt Bea

Morgan’s at La Quinta Resort roasted butternut squash and an apple and wild mushroom risotto, this was a memorable dish. Morgan’s rates as one of my top five dining experiences for 2012. Morton’s The Steakhouse, 74-880 Country Club Drive, Palm Desert, Calif. 92260, 760/340-6865 If you land at Bermuda Dunes Airport, you can tie down the plane and be seated at Morton’s within 15 minutes. Located minutes from the super-fancy El Paseo Shopping District and the McCallum Theatre for the Performing Arts and across the street from the Marriott Desert Springs, the restaurant’s rich decor, sleek dining room, private boardrooms, and lively bar make this restaurant one of my favorite spots in my search for the Ultimate Steak. Although Morton’s is one of a corporate collection, the room has the feel of a cozy neighborhood steak house – and the service is impeccable. Crab cakes, or should I say, bread and mayo cakes, are usually disappointing. But at Morton’s, these succulent beauties are filled with lump crab and little else. Inarguably, among the best I have had. Maine lobster cocktail is another winner. For steaks, you can’t beat the pillowy, 12ounce filet mignon – prime beef, of course. You can cut it with a fork. We also sampled the exquisite USDA prime porterhouse for two. Cheryl and I arm-wrestled for the bone – I lost. It did not matter. I emerged with the beef tenderloin portion and it was extraordinary. For sides, we shared a plate of bright green jumbo asparagus and a dish of twicebaked potatoes. Other recommended entrees include a honey-glazed salmon filet Continiued on Page 31


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Flying WIth Faber Continued from Page 29 or the combo of plump scallops and meltin-your-mouth short ribs. The Hotel Hanford, 3131 Bristol Street, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92626, 877/426-3673 In the heart of Orange County and just a mile from the John Wayne Airport,

Hanford Hotel Guestroom The Hotel Hanford is a delightful boutique hotel. The property has 228 beautifully appointed hotel rooms including six suites, more than 6,000 square feet of conference rooms and event space for as many as 300 guests – so bring all of your friends. The rooms are furnished with large flat panel TVs, modern bathrooms with rainwater showerheads and executive desks and chairs. The hotel has a Jacuzzi, fitness center, business center and, most important, is pet friendly – just ask Clara Belle, my dog. If you land at John Wayne, the hotel will pick you up. If you rent a car at John

Wayne, parking is free – and so is in-room wi-fi. What I loved about this hotel is that it is five minutes from the airport, five minutes from the classy South Coast Plaza Shopping Center and just as close to major restaurants and entertainment centers. Speaking of major restaurants, The Savoy in the hotel was the site of another of my top five dining experiences of 2012. A young, energetic chef named David Fune is gifted with an innovative culinary touch. Many of today’s chefs

The South Coast Plaza Shopping Center overcompensate with incongruous combinations and presentations that look more like sculpture than cuisine – and some which taste like sculpture. Not David. I enjoyed a plate of mussels, which were nestled in a bed of baby lettuce and floating in a tasty broth which could have been a meal itself. He gently sprinkles exotic spices, which enhance, but do not overpower the dish.

I also tried a bowl of the sensational onion soup with a topping of Parmesan cheese and toast points, which were more like toasted cheese sandwiches filled with Gruyere. For the main course, we each had a huge filet of Chilean sea bass. It was golden and crispy on the outside and moist and flakey on the inside. Served over a bed of creamy risotto, the fish just melted in the mouth. For more on the Hotel Hanford, call 1/877-HANFORD or visit www.thehotelhandford.com. Queensview Steakhouse, 435 Shoreline Village Drive, Long Beach, Calif., 562/432-6500 On the way home from Orange County, we took a short hop to Long Beach. Located on the shores of Long Beach, Parker’s Lighthouse is a landmark restaurant. On the third floor is the outstanding Queensview Steakhouse. With spectacular views of the Queen Mary at its moorings in Long Beach Harbor, this warm, stylish room is home to some the best steaks I’ve had in Southern California. Just a short drive from Long Beach Airport, the restaurant is located at the foot of a pier, which is lined with inviting shops and attractions. You can select from an array of signature appetizers and salads; prime steaks and chops; the freshest grilled fish and lobster;

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Queensview Steakhouse with the Queen Mary in the background. sensational sides and decadent desserts – plus a Wine Spectator award-winning wine list and live music from Tuesday through Saturday nights. We started with a mile-high tower of fresh seafood served over shaved ice. I always love a wedge salad and this one – a huge crisp iceberg wedge of lettuce with smoked bacon and dripping with blue cheese dressing – was marvelous. We then dove in to a 32-ounce Porterhouse for two. The steak, USDA prime was well aged and cooked with a beautiful mahogany colored caramelized crust on the outside and tender and juicy within. Don’t miss the desserts. We savored a cappuccino crème brulee, a key lime tart and a Fuji apple cherry cobbler a-la-mode. I love to fly around my “backyard.” I feel as if I have taken a long trip, but I return home relaxed and refreshed.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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By Clark Cook

May 2012

BEHIND THE SCENES: AIR SHOW AUDIO

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s the National Anthem is sung, all eyes are skyward as the jumper carries our nation’s colors towards the ground at airshow center. For the team at Air Show Audio, this is a critical moment in which they are prepared and ready to act in case of a malfunction in the sound system. Air Show Audio’s motto is the “Can Do” Attitude and it certainly lives up to its name. Long before most of the performers and static displays arrive, the dedicated crew is already meticulously setting up and running sound checks. Air Show Audio utilizes a transport trailer which doubles as an observation platform for the announcer, air boss, FAA and any other essential personnel. The inside of the trailer also serves as an office for the soundboard operator. Besides providing high quality audio at airshows, Air Show Audio serves as a communications center. As most eyes are pointed skywards towards the action, Air Show Audio’s crew is standing by to make sure everything is running smoothly. “A malfunction is inevitable somewhere down the line,” says Dirk Stewart, Founder and

Air Boss Eric Thompson clears a performer for take-off from ASA’s elevated platform. (Clark Cook)

President of Air Show Audio (ASA). “But we are already two steps ahead of the game, which in turn will minimize any chance of interruption.” An example of a minor glitch occurred at an airshow when the sound suddenly cut out. Within a few seconds, it was found that a generator had stopped and a replacement was quickly put online. “Thanks to the quick action of the crew, most of the spectators didn’t even notice that there was an interruption. We have backups of just about every component, from speaker cable to aircraft radios,” says Stewart. “And because we have modern equipment and a high quality staff, the vast majority of our shows go great without a hitch.” Air Show Audio started out as a small company, providing a sound system for a monthly event at an aircraft museum in Southern California. The museum was very pleased with the services and offered the company a contract to provide audio support for their annual airshow in Chino, which is the largest gathering of warbirds

Dirk Stewart performs a sound and communications check. (Clark Cook) on the West coast. Dirk Stewart still volunteers for the Planes of Fame museum, donating his own time for a good cause. Dirk is also the Vice President of the USS Johnston/USS Hoel Association. “Patriotism is a component that motivates us to serve in this exciting industry,” says Stewart. In a typical week, the crew can be dismantling and packing the equipment in Southern California and be on the road for an event the same week in Oregon. “I have a very dedicated crew and they share with me the same passion for aviation,” says Stewart. “If needed, I have a small plane and a private pilot’s license which makes it easier to get to and from locations.” Despite some health issues and a struggling economy, the company continued to grow in 2011, adding the Miramar Air Show and a few others to their schedule.

The elevated platform atop ASA’s trailer provides for greater visibility for the Blue Angels narrator at the 2011 Lemoore Air Show. (Clark Cook)

Sound crew checks the speaker for proper volume and clarity. (Clark Cook) It’s a dream come true for Dirk Stewart and the staff at Air Show Audio, which provides audio support at nearly two dozen airshows a year. Look for them at an airshow near you.

FAA ADMINISTRATOR, MICHAEL HUERTA ADDRESSES SUN N’ FUN The following speech was delivered by the new FAA Administrator, Michael Huerta at Sun n’ Fun on March 30. It was his first speech delivered to the GA community. We present it here in its entirety. Remarks as Prepared by Delivery

Introduction I’m delighted to make my first visit to Sun ‘n Fun. It’s great to see this kind of enthusiasm for aviation. It’s admittedly a shorter visit than I’d like, but it was important to me to visit with you…even with the long journey that Doug mentioned. I am honored to serve as the FAA’s Acting Administrator. My predecessor, Randy Babbitt, was a tremendous leader who did a great deal for the FAA, as well

as for the safety of our nation’s aviation system. He is truly missed, but he left a very positive legacy. I don’t know how long I will be in the “acting” position. The White House and Secretary LaHood have told me that I have their complete confidence to move onward – and we certainly have plenty to do.

Safety Safety is the FAA’s top priority, and so I want to note a few areas where the FAA is working very productively with the GA community on key initiatives. - First is the Aviation Rulemaking Committee on part 23, airworthiness standards for normal, acrobatic, utility, and commuter category airplanes. I understand that this work is going very well.

- Second is the Aviation Rulemaking Committee on Airman Testing Standards and Training, which is almost finished with its work to help us improve FAA airman certification and testing standards. - Third is the Unleaded Avgas Transition Aviation Rulemaking Committee, which recently provided– recommendations for the FAA’s review. I also want to express appreciation for the work that the General Aviation Joint Steering Committee is doing. Our joint efforts – especially the ongoing work to help reduce loss of control accidents – will help us achieve our 2018 goal for reducing fatal GA accidents. On that subject, we still have a lot of work to do. We are seeing far too many fatal accidents in general aviation. I want to take this opportunity to

reinforce the importance of doing everything you can possibly do to make a difference in GA safety. Following the rules is a step in the right direction, but safety requires a lot more than rule-driven rote behavior. It takes discipline. It takes skill. And it takes knowledge. I am counting on you to make a difference by making sure you are the best that you can be. One way you can make a difference: Attend the FAA Safety Team’s 2012 Safety Standdown, which starts right here on Saturday. The focus this year is on preventing loss of control accidents, and I know the FAASTeam has prepared a great program. I also encourage you to take a copy of the March/April FAA Safety Briefing Continued on Page 34


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Two (Flying) Peas In a Pod Continued from page 27

a Cherokee 6 and the third, a Bellanca Super Viking and used them all in my work for the Association. I flew my good friend Lieutenant Governor Leo McCarthy around the state in various campaigns for 13 years in the Super Viking. Fred’s service to the communities of San Carlos/San Mateo County is exemplary. He chaired the Drug and Alcohol Board for six years and currently serves on the San Carlos Arts and Culture Commission and is the City’s liaison to the wonderful Hiller Air Museum at the San Carlos

GI Bill and became a teacher, first in Auburn, Calif., and then in San Francisco. After nine years in the classroom, I moved to the California Teachers Association rising to the position of Assistant Executive Secretary in charge of Personnel and Staff Training. I was named in Doris Foley’s book on Nevada City High School graduates as one who had succeeded! Who’s Who! Through the years, I have owned three airplanes. The fist was a C-172, the second

Airport. He has tasted the “political world,” also, and serves on the Business Advisory Board to Assemblyman Rich Gordon. Perhaps one of the most satisfying aspects of Fred’s time in the air was experience in more than 30 Angel Flights. One vivid flight took him into Arcata, the Nation’s foggiest airstrip. With Bill Hartman in the right seat, he squeaked the wheels of the C-235 in at absolute minimums. Commercial flights were already diverting to other airfields. They picked up a woman and her

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sick child for a trip to a San Francisco Bay Area hospital. In another flight, he was honored to fly a terminally ill veteran from Fresno to the Bay Area and thrilled to let him briefly take control of the aircraft. I have done some community service as well, serving a number of years on the San Carlos Airport Land Use Commission and the Round Table that deals with noise abatement at the San Francisco Airport. I can remember flying into foggy Arcata in the Bellanca with United Captain Walt Ramseur and Lieutenant Governor McCarthy in the rear seat. I established the San Carlos Airport Pilots Association in 1982 to make sure we had a viable group working to keep the San Carlos Airport the excellent field it is. Perhaps we both deserve a “pat on the back.” Fred has been married 53 years and has nine grandchildren. I have been married 63 years and have five grandchildren and one stepgrandchild. I guess that sums it up. I hope there is time left for both of us to continue our service to the communities and health of our grate nation. We are both a part of the exciting 20th century with all of the fury and savagery of a number of wars but many wonderful accomplishments, as well. Brokaw in his 1998 book, The Greatest Generation, may have said it best, “It is, I believe, the greatest generation society has ever produced.”

Michael Huerta Continued from Page 32 magazine from the tables in back and the Safety Forum area. The articles match up with the Safety Standdown, and it will be a great reference.

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Now let me talk about one of the FAA’s most important safety initiatives: NextGen, which is the Next Generation air transportation system. NextGen involves the complete transformation of our system from the ground-based navigation of the last century to the satellitebased navigation of tomorrow. NextGen capabilities and technologies are vital to the safe and efficient aviation system our nation needs. Civil aviation contributes $1.3 trillion to our economy and generates more than 10 million jobs. NextGen is vital to protecting these contributions. The current sysContinued on Page 43


AIRCRAFT SERVICES PROPPING

UP

YOUR MACHINE

By Tim Kern

How long can the prop be?

“Y

ou can think of the prop as the ‘governor’ for the engine,” said Steve Boser, Chief Engineer with Sensenich Propellers. That works for aviation folk; for those who need automotive analogies, the prop is the transmission and drive tires. Just as a car with the wrong gearing or crummy tires won’t perform, the airplane’s power can be turned into performance only through a proper link to the air, and that link is the propeller. Getting a prop that’s just right takes a lot of engineering and some subjective judgment. Are we looking for cruise performance, ultimate top speed, or short takeoff with quick climb? As uses for our airplanes have evolved, so too have the prop choices. An Alaskan bush plane may be able to take off from a sand bar and haul an elk and a hunter over mountains, but the “same” airplane in Florida will need 1,500 feet of pavement, climb at 700fpm – and go 30 knots faster. The difference is the prop, the heart of performance. What we want depends on what we want to do, and numerous STCs often allow us to choose from many possibilities. In this economy, a lot of good airplane buys present themselves. New potential owners, especially, are attracted by the low prices and the classic looks of the smaller “spam cans.” Unfortunately, most pre-buy inspections cover only the age and condition of the prop; it’s rare that a new buyer will inquire about the prop’s performance. They should. Charley Denny, who handles technical sales at Sensenich says that it’s obvious that the use of the plane affects what prop will be best. “But how do we get to the best prop? With any given aircraft model, there is a basic prop model for that airplane, and it’s available with different pitches. The mission of the airplane determines what’s going to be best. In some cases, it would be silly to suggest

35

anything but a climb prop; in others, a cruise prop makes the most sense. Most airplanes are supplied with a “standard” prop, one that provides adequate climb without sacrificing the engine too much. Denny says, “If someone with, say, a J-3 Cub (regardless the engine), calls in wanting to get a new propeller, you ask, ‘What do you do mostly? Pavement or grass strips? What is your weight? Do you usually fly solo? How much stuff do you carry? What’s the nature of the airfields – short, long – are there trees at the end of the runway? Is your field high or often hot? Well, grass, heavy, loaded, short, trees, hot: you’re going to wish you had a climb prop!” The main thing, he says, is to understand what you do most of the time, and get something appropriate. In fixed-pitch props (the subjects of this article), the main descriptors are length (or diameter) and pitch. Diameter is easy to grasp and to measure: it’s the distance from tip to tip. Prime considerations for length are ground clearance and expected engine rpm. A short prop may be necessary for ground clearance in a nosewheel-equipped machine; it may also be essential in some pushers; and it may be necessary to allow wheel takeoffs and landings from unimproved fields in a taildragger. A floatplane, with its engine atop a tall structure, or a taildragger on tundra tires, may get to use a longer prop – within reason.

Diameter determination thus is a relatively easy decision, when you’re repropping an airplane. Denny says, “These props have been chosen hundreds of times – a Cub or Tri-Pacer, Aeronca, Stinson, Taylorcraft – we’ve done so many of these, that the model is pretty well set. The pitch is where you do your tuning.”

There are three choices, sometimes four. Or maybe more. Denny says, “In both certified and experimental (where we do start from scratch a bit more), you pretty much always have a climb, a standard, and a cruise choice; and you may have an even-lowerpitch prop for float operation. In addition to thinking about this when you buy a new prop, it’s really important to look at what’s on the airplane you’re buying.” Sometimes, misinformation or egos can get in the way of the wisest choice. With a Cub, for instance, you really probably don’t want a “cruise” prop. You won’t see the advantage of higher speed – a low-speed airfoil just won’t go through the air much faster, no matter how hard you pull on it. “The 42-inch pitch standard prop will give you pretty much all the speed you’ll be able to use; the 44-inch pitch ‘cruise’ prop will maybe give you a little more ‘comfort’ – you’ll turn a little lower rpm.” Interestingly, “All three props will give about the same speed at full throttle – but you’ll turn more rpm with the flatterpitch prop.” Even on faster airplanes like an RV-6, in full throttle level flight, Denny says you’ll get pretty much the same top speed, but your cruise rpm will be different and your climb characteristics will vary with the pitch. As an example, he noted “There were a lot of guys with Murphy Rebels, a design that started with a Rotax 912;

In the certified world, the airframe manufacturer sets that number, but from a theoretical point of view, the prop should be short enough that its tips do not go supersonic, taking into account both the rotational speed (rpm) and the aircraft’s forward speed. Typically, we’re looking at top engine speeds of 2,750rpm or less; our forward speed is of much less consequence, as we fly at speeds “in the low tenths” of Mach. Taking into account the mean speed of sound, adding an adequate fudge factor, and simplifying all the math (reducing all the constants), a useful “maximum length” rule of thumb says that the prop length (in inches) times the maximum rpm should be no more than about 200,000. The actual number for ultimate Mach depends on air pressure, and the ultimate tip speed also depends on the aircraft’s airspeed; these are covered by the “fudge factor.” The actual number may be as high as 220,000, under optimum conditions – but do we ever encounter optimum conditions? So, for an engine that’s going to pull 2,750rpm, maximum diameter should be [200,000/2750=72.73”] – effectively six feet. guys built them up to use O-320s. Now, speed didn’t change much; but climb – well… Okay, yes. But then, they used more gas and had a lot less time in the air!” Everything’s a tradeoff.

Wood or metal? Or composite? When considering wood versus metal props for a classic airplane, it’s generally accepted that wood is lighter, smootherrunning, arguably better looking, and cheaper; metal has a little edge in performance and requires less maintenance. Even though they’re about three times as heavy, metal props can perform better, because they can be constructed with a thinner airfoil; that can improve efficiency. Unlike having a fat wing on a slow airplane, which works perfectly well in the slow airstream going past the wing, a thick airfoil on a prop matters – the prop tip is traveling near Mach speed, so the thickness of the prop’s airfoil always matters. Continued on Page 36


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

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Continued from Page 35 A secondary advantage of wood props, particularly in aircraft with increasingly more-difficult parts to get, is that (because of its material) it’s a better vibration damper and (because of its lighter weight) it imposes lower gyroscopic forces on the crank. Some folks with, for example, [the rarer] Franklin engines, really appreciate the availability of wood props – they believe that wood puts less stress on their hard-to-replace crankshafts. Still, metal props are particularly desirable if the airplane is stored outdoors. A wood prop requires a cover (more for UV protection than anything else) and requires periodic torquing and more-frequent inspection. Composite props combine most of the positive features of both; and they’re adjustable. Sensenich’s ground-adjustable designs allow automatic indexing: both (or all three) blades are automatically set to the same pitch, when any of the pitchsetting methods (key, pin, or protractor) is used. With composite adjustable props available for most of the popular LSA engines (Continental, Rotax, Jabiru) and experimental (VW-derivative, Corvair, Mazda), this lightweight hollow-blade design is holding the lead in its class; and builders of larger Experimental designs using engines up to the O-320 Lycoming (and more to come) are lining up for the latest in the series. A number of folks still act as though a prop does not make a lot of difference. “It’s certified for my airplane – what could possibly be wrong with that?” Well, a race car’s transmission has a lot of gearing choices, too; and when the wrong gears are selected, the race is lost. And with an airplane, consequences can be much more significant than the difference between a sixth and a nineteenth place finishing position. What about using an equivalentmodel LSA prop on my certified machine? A question that has come up lately is that of buying a prop that is popular on an

LSA and putting it on a certified airplane. “I fly my 1948 J-3 Cub under LSA rules, and I’m a Sport Pilot,” goes the argument, “so why can’t I fly the same prop as the LSA-qualified Legend Cub? Same airplane, same engine – what’s the difference?” The difference is that the J-3 is a certified airplane and it must use a certified prop; there are no certified composite props for a J-3. If that’s not fair, you’ll need to talk with the FAA; but that’s life. (Sensenich is not currently working on certification for its composite props.) Whatever you have, whatever you get: be sure that you know what to expect from your prop. Asking a cruise prop to haul a fully-loaded floatplane off a pond is wishful thinking, and quite possibly dangerous, even if you do get it that mismatched configuration into the air. Particularly when you’re flying an airplane that’s new to you, check what you’re flying before you overextend yourself! (Note that most POH tables give performance figures for the standard prop only. Sometimes, a prop change is made and the updated handbook page is omitted. If you’re not looking for it, you may not find it; worse, it may not even be there! On Experimentals, this lack of data can beg for a long and important series of test flights.) No matter what, take care of the prop you have: if it’s wood, protect it from the sun and check the mounting bolts’ torque periodically; and no matter its construction, do a good preflight inspection. For more information visit www.sensenich.com. Note on bogus Sensenich props: recently, a “Sensenich” prop was returned to the factory for repair. Though the prop looked like a Sensenich right down to the stickers, it wasn’t a Sensenich. The most-easily-recognized identifier, apparent to anyone in the field, was that the fake prop had green glue holding the laminations together; Sensenich has never used a glue of any color but brown. Though imitation is flattering, in this case, it’s also criminal. Don’t get fooled.

BERINGER BRAKE SYSTEMS NOW COMPATIBLE WITH MIL FLUID For more than a quarter-century, Beringer Wheels & Brakes have provided the highest-quality, lightweight wheels and brakes for motorcycling and aviation. One of the acknowledged difficulties in expanding its market in aviation

has been that Beringer’s commitment has been to top performance, and while automotive brake fluids have steadily improved, aviation fluid is constrained in a practical sense by the Mil spec and its brother, FAA certification requirements. Continued on Page 37


May 2012

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AIRCRAFT SERVICES

CENTURION AIRCRAFT ENGINES NOW OFFERS 155 HP Centurion Aircraft Engines now offers the 155 hp diesel aircraft engine Centurion 2.0s for retrofitting the Diamond DA40. The European Aircraft Safety Agency (EASA) authorized the retrofit in mid April 2012, and production launch of the new Centurion retrofit kit is underway with the first demo flights taking place. Orders are being accepted and deliveries will commence in Summer 2012. Piper PA28 operators retrofitting their avgas engine or exchanging their old Centurion can now choose between two replacement engines: the well-known, fuel-efficient Centurion 2.0 and the more powerful Centurion 2.0s. Both engines feature excellent performance, efficiency, and reliability. The Piper PA28 is the fourth aircraft model – after the Cessna 172, Diamond DA40, and Robin DR400 – that can be equipped with the Centurion 2.0s. The Diamond DA42 is to follow. The 155 hp Centurion 2.0s power pack is now certified in Europe for retrofitting the Piper PA28. The PA28 of the Cherokee, Cadet and Warrior I to III series are one of the best-selling general aviation aircraft of the last decades. The worldwide fleet counts more than 33,000 units. The series 28-151 and -161 have been certified. The Centurion 2.0s is the more powerful version of the well-known and proven fuel-

efficient Centurion 2.0. Despite having identical weight and dimensions, its power exceeds that of the basic model by 20 hp. In combination with the Piper aircraft it makes a powerful team. “A modern diesel piston engine in one of the best proven airframes of general aviation makes the Piper an everyday partner. With 20 hp more power thanks to the Centurion 2.0s, it will also become a top performer,” commented Centurion’s CEO, Jasper M. Wolffson. At 100 percent load, it reaches a top cruising speed of 133 KTAS (true airspeed). This 100 percent performance can be obtained up to an altitude of 8,000 ft. The average fuel consumption of Jet Fuel or Diesel (DIN EN 590) during flight is 22.1 l/h at a speed of 110 KTAS (at 70 percent power, 6,000 ft.). The very good climb rate up to an altitude of 6,000 ft. averages approximately 658 ft/min and the takeoff roll of 836 ft. is also very short. The range with a standard tank is up to 850 NM (all values with MTOW and standard ISA). The maximum takeoff weight is 2,440 lbs. Like all aircraft equipped with a Centurion engine, the PA28 also has a fully electronic engine and propeller control system with single-lever control. The time between replacement (TBR) for the Centurion 2.0s is currently still 1,200

flight hours. The goal is to extend the TBR to 1,500 hours, as it is the case for the Centurion 2.0. On the production side, the company has intensively prepared itself for the new product in the recent weeks. Orders as well as requests for demo flights are now accepted. First deliveries will commence early this summer. The Centurion series engines are distinguished by a high degree of fuel efficiency and reliability as can be seen in the Diamond DA42 TDI with Centurion 2.0 135 hp equipment, which has contributed a lot to Diamonds success in the last years. Currently third parties prepare a DA42 version with 155 hp Centurion 2.0s that convinces with low weight in all of the nearly ten first test flights. In contrast to the competition, Centurion engines were developed under the assumption that they could be integrated with the same weight under existing cowlings. This enables their use in a wide range of aircraft, as well as the technically simple replacement of the Centurion 1.7 with the Centurion 2.0, which can be carried out in all aircraft. Both engines feature above-average reliability. According to data from the FAA, general aviation aircraft experience an average of 10 in-flight shutdowns (IFSD) for every 100,000 flight hours. The shutdown rate of Centurion

TAIL WHEEL TRAINING TAKES OFF Mach 5 Aviation has announced the addition of a Cessna 150G/150 Texas Tail Wheel trainer to its robust offering of aircraft, ideal for Tail Wheel endorsements and training also known as bush flying. The term “bush flying” is used to describe any aircraft operations that are executed in remote and often inhospitable regions of the world. The planes used in bush flying should have good short take-off and landing capabilities, which is why, along with its great aeronautic ability, a tail wheel or conventional aircraft is better suited than a tricycle gear for this type of flying. “We have recently noticed an increased interest from students wanting

to obtain a tail wheel endorsement. This is partly due to the recent popularity of bush pilots and the depiction of their lifestyles through reality television,” says Dennis Pearson, owner and CFI for Mach 5 Aviation. “This is one of the many reasons we decided to add this particular aircraft to our fleet.” Overall interest in bush flying and the pilots who have acquired the specific skills needed to fly in the sometimes torturous conditions has increased in recent years due to the popularity of such shows as National Geographic Channel’s, Alaska Wing Men and Alaska State Troopers, Discovery Channel’s, Flying Wild Alaska, and several others which

THIS

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engines is approximately 50 percent lower and may be even less. For example, in the period since the market launch in 2003, the shutdown rate for all Centurion engine models has been 5.46 shutdowns per 100,000 flight hours. Throughout the past 52 weeks, the shutdown rate of the currently latest engine model, the Centurion 2.0, was actually only 2.32 IFSD per 100,000 flight hours. This makes it one of the most reliable piston engines in general aviation. As logical technical enhancements, the Centurion 2.0 and 2.0s possess a range of advantages over the 1.7 since they incorporate the entire field experience gained with the predecessor model. The cumulative flight hours of the Centurion fleet increased over the same period by half a million to now 2.75 million hours. “With the market launch of the Centurion 1.7 in 2002, we provided the decisive stimulus for the development of alternative propulsion systems for small aircraft. So far, the currently series-produced Centurion 2.0 and Centurion 2.0s successor models account for 1.4 million flight hours. In sum, well over 3,000 Centurion engines have been delivered so far,” explained Centurion’s CEO Jasper M. Wolffson. For more information visit www.centurion.aero.

SPRING

follow aviators as they battle one of the toughest climates in the world to transport supplies and other necessities to the surrounding isolated inhabitants. Training to add a tail wheel endorsement consists of three phases. The first phase is an introduction to tail wheel aircraft and the differences it has from a tricycle gear. The second involves covering advanced tail wheel operations to include tail wheel specific ‘wheel landings’ and short and soft field procedures. And the final phase is a concentration on increasing the students’ proficiency in performance of tail wheel procedures and maneuvers and tackling crosswind operations and landings. A minimum of ten hours of

training (depending on the pilot’s previous experience) is required before an endorsement is awarded. “Our vastly experienced tail wheel certified flight instructors (CFIs), include two high tail wheel time instructors who owned their own tail wheel aircraft, two military pilots (with Pitts, Stearman and T6 Texan time), and a former FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) director,” adds Pearson. “It is an intensive endorsement to obtain, but one that can ultimately provide pilots with unique opportunities and adventures beyond what they would traditionally expect.” For more information visit mach5avaition.com or call 530/889-2000.

Though our heritage has been with automotive fluid and we still support that as our standard, we are now confident that the ‘red’ fluid will perform up to our standards, for years to come.” The Mil (“red”) fluid parts must be spec-

ified; as with all machinery, customers should be sure to ask for the parts they want. For more information visit www.beringer.fr/aero.php or email contact@beringer-aero.com. Beringer parts are distributed in the U.S. by Aircraft Spruce.

Beringer Brake Systems Continued from Page 36 After arduous testing, Beringer has now announced that it can provide its brake system assemblies (master cylinders, calipers, ALIR anti-skid system, parking brakes, and pressure limiters)

compatible with either fluid, per the customer specification. Lines and fittings remain compatible with either fluid type. “This has been a question for some of our OEM customers, particularly,” says Rémi Beringer, Chief Designer.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

38

AERO 2012

DOING GOOD BUSINESS

For four days, pilots and aviation experts flocked to the international aviation show in Friedrichshafen, Germany. A total of 550 exhibitors from across the entire spectrum of general aviation were present at the exhibition grounds. The aircraft represented ranged from ultralights to business jets, but they all had one thing in common – making the dream of flight a reality. 30,800 industry visitors (2011:

ONE

33,400) made for an industry meeting at the highest international level. “We welcomed a highly-specialized audience to the AERO,” said Messe Friedrichshafen CEO Klaus Wellmann and project leader Roland Bosch, in summing up the positive results of the show. The show took place over an intense four days. Feedback from exhibitors shows that they were very pleased with the results of the show:

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“Good international business contacts and plenty of new contracts” sums up the comments of AERO 2012 exhibitors. In Friedrichshafen, everything general aviation was ready for takeoff. Ultralight and Very Light Aircraft (VLA), one and two-engine aircraft, turboprops and gyrocopters, kits and trikes as well as the entire world of suppliers and service providers. Maintenance, avionics and the latest business jets in general aviation moved into position, complemented by electric aircraft and helicopters. “The new Engine Area was especially wellreceived,” reported Roland Bosch. The business of aircraft, aerial vehicles and the large number of suppliers are clearly at the center of the AERO. The AERO aviation show is the first address in Europe for any company working in general aviation. Project leader Roland Bosch is convinced that the show is also an important meeting place for industry experts. “Engineers and builders have discussions here, we have a high-level exchange of high tech experience. This is where new innovations are born and new ideas become reality. You could say that the AERO is the motor for new developments and new impulses, it’s the networking partner for the aviation industry. High-level air traffic regulatory institutions from the U.S. and Europe met for the first time in Friedrichshafen. This is also a clear sign of the role that the AERO plays in international air transport,” said Bosch. This fact is also clearly recognized by exhibitors, as their comments show: Christian Dries, CEO, Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH, sees the development of the AERO over the past few years as very positive: “This year’s show was the best yet. The AERO was the ideal platform to present our two premiere aircraft.” Walter da Costa, Sales Manager,

PIPISTREL

May 2012

AERO 2012

Tecnam: “Like every year, the AERO is where we go to meet all of our international dealers and customers. We successfully presented our new aircraft. We expect to conclude about 35 new contracts by the close of the show. We are very satisfied.” After several difficult years, manufacturers in general aviation are optimistic again. The strength of the German economy and rising growth in other European countries and the U.S. are leading to a marked rise in demand in several areas of general aviation. Ultralight aircraft are in, and economic machines are in very high demand. The introduction of newer, more fuel-efficient diesel and hybrid motors as well as electric motors that are as quiet as a whisper are some of the new incentives for potential buyers. The fourth e-flight expo once again focused on everything having to do with alternative propulsion in aviation, in other words on modern and efficient electric and hybrid engines. Helicopter fans got their money’s worth in the helicopter hangar. Attendance at more than 120 high-level lectures at the AERO conference was also strong. For the future, the AERO team wants to bring the next generation on board and get them excited about careers in the cockpit. The next AERO will take place April 24 - 27, 2013 at the exhibition grounds in Friedrichshafen. For more information visit www.aero-expo.com.

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PANTHERA 2012

The revolutionary four-seat all composite design, featuring retractable undercarriage, 200 kts cruising speed, 1,000 NM range, comfortable cabin and a choice of three powerplants – conventional/hybrid/electric - is presented to the World for the very first time. Following last year’s project launch, Pipistrel was proud to present the Continued on Page 39

(www.pipistrel.si)

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...

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May 2012

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39

LINDBERGH PRIZE FOR INNOVATION GIVEN TO E-VOLO The ninth Lindbergh Prize recognizes innovation in vertical take-off and landing. On April 20 at AERO-Friedrichshafen, Erik Lindbergh, grandson of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, announced the AERO 2012 winner of the Lindbergh Prize. The Lindbergh Foundation's aviation prizes are designed to recognize and stimulate innovation, and promote meaningful advancements in green aviation. e-volo is the winner of the AERO 2012 Lindbergh Prize for Innovation. Many innovative aircraft designs on display at AERO-Friedrichshafen this year were considered by the independent judging panel, but one aircraft stood out. In fact, this aircraft was so innovative that it appears to be in a category all by itself. The e-volo Volocopter VC1 is a completely novel vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) system. Using the distributed power of multiple small electric propulsion units, e-volo has demonstrated breakthroughs in redundancy, simplicity of controls and inefficiencies inherent in the control surfaces normally used in aircraft. Safety: The VC1 proof of concept includes multiple redundancies of all security relevant systems including 16 motors, controllers and propellers. The next phase design, Volocopter VC evolution 2P, will relocate the propulsion units above the fuselage which should improve the stability with a lower center of gravity and allow for the use of a whole airframe parachute (a safety system not normally available in a helicopter). Simplicity: e-volo has demonstrated control of this aircraft with a fly-by-wire

system using a joystick. One can imagine that a new generation of pilots will be able to transition right from their smart phones and game stations to the Volocopter, an aircraft that will ultimately be easy and safe to fly. Efficiency: The e-volo system has a unique application of electric power to control flight direction and velocity, much different than normal flight controls. For example, ailerons, elevators and rudders create drag when they are applied to change the flight path of a normal aircraft. The VC1 demonstrates the potential of differential power to change flight path, which will reduce the amount of power required. Also, with multiple small distributed electric propulsion units the amount of noise generated is significantly reduced. “We believe that the development of the Volocopter holds significant promise to radically change short distance transportation,” said Erik Lindbergh. “It has a long development path ahead, but if this innovative design reaches the commercial market it will dramatically change the way we move about the planet.” The Bose Corporation provided two QC-15 acoustic noise cancelling headsets to be awarded to the prize winning team.

Pipistrel Panthera Continued from Page 38 Panthera at AERO 2012. Panthera is an all-new, four-seat composite cruiser, developed entirely in house. The streamlined design with a very comfortable cockpit takes four people 1,000 NM and cruises at 200 kts while burning only 10 U.S. gal per hour of fuel. The prototype is powered by a proven and reliable Lycoming IO-390 fuel injected engine, but Hybrid- and Electro powerplants are coming soon. Pipistrel CEO Ivo Boscarol calls the design wildly innovative: “Panthera will shake the World of General Aviation, setting the benchmark for efficiency, cabin

comfort and safety for others to follow. Hybrid and Electric aircraft are the future of aviation with Panthera being the best airframe to demonstrate the potential of this technology.” Panthera’s standard equipment includes a specially-developed, low-altitude high-speed Ballistic Parachute Rescue System, 26 G safety cockpit, tuned exhaust system, titanium trailinglink retractable landing gear and select Garmin avionics. Global Part-23 certification is expected in 2015. For more information visit www.pipistrel.si/plane/panthera/overview.

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

MAJOR MILESTONE TAKES “FLYING CAR” CLOSER

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Second Generation Transition Street-Legal Airplane Takes Flight The Transition Street-Legal Airplane is now a significant step closer to being a commercial reality. The production prototype of the Transition Street-Legal Airplane completed its successful first flight at Plattsburgh International Airport in Plattsburgh, NY on March 23, 2012. The same vehicle has also successfully conducted initial drive and conversion testing, demonstrating the Transition’s capability to provide unmatched freedom, flexibility and fun in personal aviation. Developed by Terrafugia, Inc., the Transition is a two-seat personal aircraft capable of driving on roads and highways, parking in a single car garage, and flying with unleaded automotive fuel. “The successful first flight of this Production Prototype Transition marks a critical move toward initial production and first delivery,” said COO Anna Mracek Dietrich. The Production Prototype phase of the Transition program follows proof of concept work, which included a flying and driving the proof of concept vehicle and was com-

pleted in 2009. The Production Prototype program includes two vehicles and is being used to develop and inform the manufacturing tool-up and compliance program necessary to begin commercial deliveries. Terrafugia will continue its testing program in preparation for first delivery, which is expected to occur within the next year. Regarding this first flight, Terrafugia CEO/CTO and co-founder Carl Dietrich said, “The first flight of the Transition Production Prototype is a major milestone for Terrafugia. With this flight, the team demonstrated an ability to accomplish what had been called an impossible dream. We look forward to continuing to show that the challenges of bringing a practical street legal airplane to market can be overcome. This is a very exciting time for Terrafugia. We are on our way up – literally and figuratively!” The Transition’s first flight reached an altitude of 1,400 feet above the ground and lasted eight minutes while staying in the vicinity of Plattsburgh International

Airport. It demonstrated the controllability and safe operational characteristics of the aircraft. Six phases of flight testing are planned to continue development and demonstrate compliance to the Light Sport Aircraft standards. Speaking about the first flight, Terrafugia Chief Test Pilot Phil Meteer said, “It’s a remarkable vehicle both on the road and, now, in the air. When I drove it into the shop, literally from the road through the garage door, I was amazed that I had just flown it at Plattsburgh a few days before. A longoverdue mode of transportation and fun is just around the corner. I can’t wait for the upcoming flight tests and the chance to ‘wring it out’, demonstrating how safe and enjoyable the Transition is to fly.” Terrafugia (terra-FOO-gee-ah), based in Woburn, MA, is a growing aerospace company founded by pilots and engineers from MIT and supported by a world-class network of advisors and private investors. The company name is Latin for “escape the earth.” Terrafugia’s

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From Skies to Stars

By Ed Downs

FROM SKIES

F

rom Skies to Stars is a new feature appearing in In Flight USA that taps into the natural connection between flying enthusiast and the space sciences. We have joined up with the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium (TASM) and the Astronomy Club of Tulsa (ACT), a dedicated group of professional and amateur astronomers, science enthusiast and professional educators who have generously offered to share their ongoing outreach program with our readers. This month invites you and your family to join the fun in astronomy’s version of a great flying tradition, the “fly-in.” Flying can be a very personal and singular event, enjoyed as the sole occupant of an airplane as one passes over spectacular country, like the breathtaking “four corners” area of the U.S. It can be an ethereal experience. The same is true with astronomy. Just recently this writer was learning how to use a newly acquired computer system that interfaces with the telescope to guide one to thousands of celestial objects. While utilizing an integrated “tour” feature, I landed in the constellation Leo and noted three dim “fuzzy” blotches. A little research disclosed that I had focused on “Leo’s

41

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STARS STAR PARTY

Galaxy Trio.” The fact that these Galaxies were first cataloged in the mid 1700s by French astronomer, Charles Messier, took nothing away from my personal “discovery.” Increased magnification allowed the elongated shape of these galaxies to be clearly seen. The realization that these galaxies are an estimated 40 million light years from Earth only added to the excitement. The light this writer was looking at began its journey long before our species even existed. It was a singularly ethereal experience. But flying can also be a very social party. We call them “fly-ins” or perhaps an air show. The ultimate flying party is EAA AirVenture. Enthusiasts get together, lust after the other guy’s airplane and exaggerate performance claims. Hangar flying abounds as stories of heroic events and adventures can be heard from one end of the show site to the other. It is very social and great fun. Guess what, amateur astronomers have their own version of the fly-in. It is called a “Star Party.” Astronomy clubs across the country get together at regularly designated locations for communal viewing. The experience is not nearly as “geeky” as it sounds. Private and public star parties frequently include a cook out, a great deal of socializing

between a stunningly diversified group of people, and a setting that is family friendly. A local expert often sets up the evening viewing activities with a kick off presentation. Equipment “lusting” is the order of the day and stories about spectacular objects seen by attendees abound. Most important, a huge amount of education and information transfer takes place. Newcomers are not only welcome at star parties, but aggressively recruited. Folks new to amateur astronomy can be quickly overwhelmed by today’s advanced viewing technology. Web sites and magazines can certainly help educate the beginner, but nothing equals the touch, feel, of actually working with telescopes. Experienced attendees are eager to help. Many astronomy clubs have “club” telescopes of all types that they will simply loan to visitors. Star Parties can be quite local, with perhaps 20 to 40 attendees, or be regional events, with hundreds in attendance. National parties are major events, attended by product venders and experts who deliver extraordinary lectures on cutting edge topics. The U.S. National Park system (Bryce Canyon, Great Basin, Grand Canyon and Acadia) hold annual Sky Festivals. Yosemite and other National Parks even

hold weekly events that are prescheduled with clubs. Star Parties are wide spread, low cost (most only request a modest donation to help support a club facility) and plentiful. The question is, how does one find out more about these activities? A great place to start your search is with the Astronomical League, a federation of astronomical societies and nonprofit organizations. The Astronomical Leagues web site, www.astroleague.org provides a tab (Member Societies) that allows the visitor to select their state and thereafter locate a local astronomy club. The contact information provide is detailed and all clubs have a web site that lets visitors get a feel for activities and, of course, star party dates and locations. Club web sites often contain information about “star party etiquette” which covers issues of controlling unwanted light and survival in the dark. Details about current viewing opportunities and even weather and dress recommendations are often included. Yes, flying and astronomy do have a lot in common, and the star party is a major part of that commonality. Join the fun, meet some great people and, yes, fondle the equipment. The gadget list is infinite, kind of like those galaxies!

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

It has been said that the only voluntary act in aviation is the decision to take-off. Every action after take-off involves the skillful management of risk, the enjoyment of flight and a continuous stream of decisions that result in a safe landing. In 1974, NASA created the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) to allow aviation professionals to share experiences in a frank, non-punitive manner. The ASRS structure allows pilots and other aviation professionals to file an anonymous report of an incident, error or occurrence that the contributor feels might be of value to others. These reports are gathered, analyzed and data based by NASA experts and made available to all interested parties as a tool for creating pro-active aviation safety programs. Additionally, NASA distributes an electronic publication, CALLBACK, which contains selected, de-identified, reports on a free subscription basis. In Flight USA is proud to reprint selected reports, exerted from CALLBACK, for our readers to read, study, occasionally laugh at, and always learn from. Visit http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/ to learn how you can participate in the ASRS program.

ON

M

uch of the guidance given to pilots by Air Traffic Control comes in the form of numbers associated with altitude, airspeed, and heading assignments. But, when feet, degrees or knots get interchanged, pilots end up doing the wrong thing with the right number. The lessons from this month’s reports are: listen carefully; clarify when there is doubt; read back the full clearance, not just the numbers; confirm with another crewmember, if available, before acting.

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THE LIGHTER

A Walk in the Park This pilot of a Light Sport Aircraft learned that an engine manufacturer’s recommended Time Between Overhaul (TBO) is not a number to be taken lightly. Exceeding the TBO hours, especially with a two-stroke engine, can result in an aircraft falling short of its destination. • While climbing through 1,200 feet at full power over a wooded area, the engine suddenly lost power and quit. An uneventful dead-stick landing in an empty field at a public park followed. There was no damage or injuries. Upon inspection of the engine after landing, it

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The Ups and Downs of an Emergency Landing Your troubles are just beginning when the propeller departs your Light Sport Aircraft. However, as this pilot

demonstrated in a well-handled emergency, there can be a good result when you apply the lessons learned from good training. • I recently acquired a new carbon composite LSA. I am a student pilot and after my CFI provided three days of flight instruction in the aircraft, I departed on a solo flight to an assigned practice area. After executing a series of flight maneuvers at approximately 2,000 feet AGL, the three-blade propeller departed the aircraft. Just prior to separation, the aircraft acted erratically with short, intense jerking movements in various directions then Continued on Page 43

1979 WARRIOR, 161, 800 SMOH, new paint. $39,500.

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1961 Nice AZTEC, here and ready to go.Good trainer/time builder. $39,500.

1969 C150, square tail, 358 SMOH, $16,950. 1981 152, 1150 SMOH, new paitn & interior. New annual. $29,500. 1977 C172, 1450 SMOH, late paint, IFR. $37,500. 1977 172N, 676 SMOH, new P&I, IFR. $47,500 will finance.

1961 COMANCHE 250/260, fueld injected, 1310 SMOH, 4400 TT, no AD on propeller, tail SB complied with, NDH. $49,500 must sell! 1962 FORTUNE 500 G-18 hi-cabin tail dragger, 350/350 SMOH, new int., Custom paint. King IFR, AP, 2 blade Ham Std. Trade. $125,000 OBO.

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was found to be seized up. Later inspection of the intake port revealed metal debris from internal disintegration. I was lax in getting the engine overhauled at the manufacturer’s TBO of 300 hours. The engine had 350 hours on it since last overhaul. I will be much more diligent in maintenance from now on. Luckily, I walked away from it and no one was hurt.

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Safe Landings Continued from Page 42 resumed smooth flight. I must have pulled the throttle to full idle, because I remember advancing the throttle slowly about one inch, slightly spooling up the engine, unaware the prop was gone. Ignorance led me to believe that some internal plate or gear slippage had occurred and that the prop was wind-milling. The VSI indicated a 500 fpm descent rate. I scanned the wheat, corn and soybean fields and finally selected a rectangular green field and started a long descending final. At some point I realized my landing point was rapidly moving and this field would soon pass by. I kicked in a slip, straightened it out at the last moment and, on touchdown, went for the roller coaster ride of my life. I had landed in a soybean field with a crop approximately 12 inches high and with rolling topography. I touched down near the top of one of the hills, did not porpoise and maintained full aft elevator control during the up, down, up, down ground roll. Fortunately the moisture content of the soil was fairly low, providing very good load carrying capacity at the point of wheel contact…I shut down all systems and opened the canopy…I called my CFI via cell phone…and he soon arrived and carefully examined the aircraft for any damage. There was none. My CFI’s consistent

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43

training provided me with the composure to fly the aircraft… come hell or high water.

On a Different “Lighter Side” While the aircraft in the next report is not in the Light Sport category, there are some aspects of this incident that might be taken in a “lighter” vein.

A Sign of Trouble A Tower Controller submitted this report of a night taxi incident in which an aircraft, apparently with no lights on, encountered an unlit sign with an ironic message. • It was still dark out when I issued taxi instructions to a PA28 to [taxi to] the runway via Taxiway F. After a minute or so had passed and I hadn’t seen the aircraft begin his taxi, I asked him where he was. Radio problems are not uncommon in that area as there are spots that are obscured by a hangar. He told me he had just passed an intersection and was going to have to get out of the aircraft and assess some damage. I again asked him where he was and found him on a service road south of Taxiway F. He didn’t have any aircraft lights turned on. He had run into a “This Is Not a Taxiway” sign.

Michael Huerta Continued from Page 34 tem just can’t accommodate the level of growth we expect to see. There are a lot of people who think NextGen is about the far-off future. But many components of NextGen are in place, and NextGen is showing results today. Raise your hand if you have ever flown a WAAS-enabled RNAV GPS approach, such as an LPV approach. If you raised your hand, then you’re already benefiting from the satellite-based navigation elements of NextGen. And I bet you’d agree that the investment you made to equip your aircraft paid off the first time it got you into the airport where you wanted to land. Automatic Dependent SurveillanceBroadcast, or ADS-B, is another investment that will pay off in terms of safety, efficiency, and situational awareness – not only for air traffic control, but also for you. ATC uses ADS-B to improve surveillance and separation, and to provide those services in areas that radar can’t reach. That’s why we are requiring ADSB Out by 2020 to operate in certain kinds of airspace. But ADS-B In can provide some

very important additional benefits to pilots. How many of you have flown with on-board traffic information, or a weather data-link? ADS-B In will provide traffic and weather information, with no need for a subscription. It may not take long for the cost of new equipment to pay for itself in savings from the monthly or quarterly subscriptions. Another reason to put ADS-B on your upgrade list: A lot of the efficiencies we expect depend on a system where most aircraft are using them. The best equipped aircraft will be best placed to benefit. Overall, everyone will benefit from the airspace management efficiencies we can get from use of ADS-B and other NextGen technologies.

Reauthorization and Budget Our ability to advance NextGen and other initiatives depends on funding. This is going to be a demanding year. With a constrained budget environment and an election year, everything we do gets a lot more scrutiny. Continued on Page 44

Stanford Researchers are looking for Pilots with IFR Experience for Two New Studies! ILS fMRI Study: • IFR rated pilots who have at least 500 hours logged time and no more than 2500 hours total time. You will be "flying" using a small projection screen while simultaneously having your brain scanned! • This study applies state-of-the-art functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to measure memory and decision-related activity while you perform ILS approaches. • Approximately three hours of your time (single session only). • $100 for your participation.

ILS Eye-tracking Decision Height Study: • While you are performing the task on the computer we will watch with an eye tracker how you are moving your eye to look at different visual objects on the screen. • No more than two hours of your time (single session only). • $60.00 for your participation.

For more information, please contact: The Stanford/VA Aviation Lab Phone: (650)852-3457 Email: kcastile@stanford.edu or heraldez@stanford.edu


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

NTSB PROVIDES INVESTIGATIVE UPDATE AND ISSUES RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCREASE SAFETY AT AIR RACES

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) provided an investigative update on April 10, 2012, on last year’s crash of a highly modified P-51D airplane at the National Championship Air Races in Reno, Nev. On Sept. 16, 2011, the pilot of the Galloping Ghost experienced an upset while turning between pylons 8 and 9 on the racecourse. The airplane crashed on the ramp in the box seat spectator area. The pilot and 10 spectators were killed and more than 60 others were injured. In addition to the investigative update, NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman announced that the agency was issuing a total of seven safety recommendations to make the National Championship Air Races a safer event for pilots and spectators alike. “We are not here to put a stop to air racing,” said Chairman Hersman. “We are here to make it safer.” The safety recommendations address racecourse design and layout, prerace technical inspections, aircraft modifications and airworthiness, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) guidance on air racing, the effects of G-forces on pilots, and ramp safety issues. They were issued to the FAA, the Reno Air Racing Association (RARA), and the National Air-Racing Group Unlimited Division. While the investigation is ongoing, Chairman Hersman provided a detailed interim update that showed that the accident sequence initiated with an upset that preceded the separation of the left elevator trim tab by approximately six seconds. One key safety area highlighted during the investigation is the extensive modifications made to airplanes that race in the unlimited class and the lack of docu-

The Red Areas and the dashed lines indicate the stock P-51D

mentation and inspection associated with those modifications. On the Galloping Ghost, modifications included reducing the wing span from about 37 feet to about 29 feet, and significant changes to the flight controls – all designed to increase speed and enhance racing performance. “Our investigation revealed that this pilot, in this airplane, had never flown at this speed, on this course,” said Chairman Hersman. “We are issuing a safety recommendation to ensure that pilots and their modified airplanes are put through their paces prior to race day.” Related findings from telemetry data showed that during the upset; the airplane exceeded the accelerometer’s 9-G limit. While the investigation into G-forces and G-tolerance is ongoing, the photographic and telemetry evidence indicates that both the airplane and pilot experienced an unanticipated, rapid onset of high G-forces and appears to support pilot incapacitation. The fatalities and injuries in this accident draw attention to the course design and layout. The unlimited racecourse is designed for an average ground speed of 500 mph. As pilots make the final turn toward the home pylon, the trajectory of the airplane is in the direction of the spectators in the box seats and grandstands. The NTSB has recommended that RARA review the current course and consider changes to lessen the exposure to spectators. To download documents that outline all the safety recommendations, visit these URL’s. www.ntsb.gov/doclib/recletters/ 2012/A-12-013-017.pdf, www.ntsb.gov/ doclib/recletters/2012/A-12-013-017.pdf, www.ntsb.gov/doclib/recletters/2012/A-12008.pdf

Michael Huerta Continued from Page 43 But there is some very good news. In February the President signed the FAA reauthorization bill. It ends a four-and-ahalf year series of 23 short-term extensions. • We are still in the process of working through all the program and budget implications. But one thing is for sure: the four-year reauthorization provides stability that will enhance safety, create jobs and help us implement NextGen. • In addition, the Administration

rolled out the President’s proposed FY 2013 budget for $15.2 billion. It allows us to execute plans for ATC and aviation safety, as well as research and development, capital investment in airport infrastructure, and FAA facilities and equipment. • As you may have heard, one of the provisions in the FAA’s reauthorization requires us to accelerate the full integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems – UAS – into the National Airspace System, or NAS.

• Safety is our top priority, so our focus when evaluating UAS operations is to avoid situations in which a UAS would endanger other users of the NAS, or compromise the safety of persons or property on the ground. • There are a lot of integration challenges ahead, but the FAA has a proven track record of introducing new technology and aircraft safely into the NAS. So I am confident that we will succeed in this area as well.

Conclusion • Thanks again for inviting me here today – it’s a great show, and what’s not to like about Florida in March? • I look forward to your comments and questions, and to seeing a little bit of what makes Sun ‘n Fun so special. And I hope to be able to spend more time here next year.

Check In Flight USA’s NEW online calendar for upcoming aviation events...

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May 2012

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The Pylon Place

Marilyn Dash’s

STATE

OF THE

RACES

On April 10, the NTSB presented their preliminary recommendations during a well-attended press conference at the Reno Tahoe Airport. Unable to attend in person, I was able to view the on-line version. I will say, the first time I really believed we were racing in September was after I heard the words of NTSB Chairperson, Deborah Hersman, state, "We are not here to put a stop to air racing, we are here to make it safer.” With those words, I saw a bright light at the end of this long, dark tunnel. During the conference, several recommendations were addressed. I will review several here and give my comments.

Evaluation of Aircraft with Structural or Flight Control Modifications Require aircraft owners, as a condition of eligibility to participate in the Reno National Championship Air Races, to provide an engineering evaluation that includes flight demonstrations and analysis within the anticipated flight envelope for aircraft with any major modification, such as to the structure or flight controls. What we know is when a new Unlimited Design is brought to the Races, (think Tsunami and Pond Racer) much scrutiny is lavished on the aircraft. But, because Galloping Ghost was a returning aircraft, had raced before in several configurations, it was considered to just be a modification and not a new design. These modifications will now be viewed with a similar scrutiny as a new design. But, what constitutes a major modification? The recommendation stated, “such as to the structure or flight controls.” This leaves some things to interpretation. We know that several of the Jets have had major power plant modifications – would this be a major modification under the recommendation? It’s not specifically structure or flight control – but should be analyzed as well. And about testing – a specific point that was made clearly, "This pilot, in this airplane, had never flown this fast, on this course.” While this is true, it is nearly impossible to test an aircraft within the race conditions, unless they are on the race course – with other aircraft. G-Forces, air

Training and Mitigation Techniques for High G Operations

Waiting for September pressure differentials, heat, winds, buffeting and the course design would all need to be replicated in a true test environment. While I would concede that the Galloping Ghost should have been tested further, the ability to do that is not easy due to speed limits on aircraft under 10,000/18,000 feet and the inability to find true test environments.

(Mike Arnold) I haven’t seen the old course and new course overlayed together to see how much the course will change, but I will share it with you when it’s completed and made available. Just assume there will be changes to the course.

Provide high G training to pilots, including techniques to mitigate the potential effects of high G exposure, as part of preparations before the Reno National Championship Air Races (NCAR) and during daily briefs at the NCAR. Evaluate the feasibility of requiring pilots to wear G- suits when racing at the Reno National Championship Air Races; if the evaluation determines it is feasible, implement a requirement. Most of the pilots who participate in NCAR each year are at least Aerobatic Trained, most are Commercial Pilots and many are Military trained. I can guarantee that we have all had conversations about G tolerances and have been exposed to high G maneuvers. You canContinued on Page 46

NCAR Unlimited Class Course Design Evaluate the design of the unlimited class course and safety areas to minimize maneuvering near and potential conflicts with spectators; if warranted by the results of the evaluation, implement changes to the race course Through the years, modifications have been made to the race course as needed. It looks like RARA will be making additional changes to Pylons 4, 7, 8 and 9. Pylon 4 has been mentioned by several pilots as hard to see at race speed. I tend to believe Pylon 4 was going to be moved prior to the events of 2011. And, I wouldn’t be surprised if the relocation of Pylons 7, 8 and 9 may have also been on the list. My assumption is the deadline over at the Valley of Speed (Western edge of the course) will now be made larger. This could also impact the flight path of the racers. The turn from 7, 8, 9 and home pylons has always been tricky – will it get even trickier?

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May 2012

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The Reno Air Racing Association is now selling tickets for the 49th annual National Championship Air Races. In January, the organization announced that the 2012 event would take place Sept. 1216, 2012 at Reno-Stead Airport. “The National Championship Air Races have provided a fun-filled racing experience for hundreds of thousands of fans from all over the globe for nearly half a century and we are committed to preserving this historic and unique aviation event,” said Mike Houghton, president and CEO of the National Championship Air Races. “The continued support of our incredible fans from within the northern Nevada community and around the world has been overwhelming and we plan to

put on a powerful and emotional celebration for them this year.” In light of the tragedy of last September, the Reno Air Racing Association is planning a world-class memorial and tribute, as part of this year’s event, to those who lost their lives and for their family and friends. More details will be announced later this year. The 49th annual National Championship Air Races will feature David Martin, Kent Pietsch, Patty Wagstaff, Jim Pietz flying a Bonanza and the U.S. Navy F/A-18 Hornet. Additionally, the L-39 Patriot Jet Team will return to awe crowds with their recognizable red, white and blue smoke sysContinued on Page 48

The Pylon Place Continued from Page 45 not get to this level of competition without this experience and knowledge. I think it’s a great idea for us to have additional conversations about effects, exposure and preparation. I don’t think it’s feasible or practical for G-Suits to be required. We’ve done some research and a tank, systems and a G-Suit could be purchased for approximately $5,000. Installation and design requirements would be additional – but, the weight is prohibitive to all classes except Unlimited and Jets. As far as I know, the only racers who have worn G-Suits in the past have been in the Jet Class. Jets are more likely to already come with the systems necessary, which is why they were in use. I have never heard of anyone installing a system for racing. I also want to say that a G-suit would not have changed things in the Galloping Ghost incident. Rapid onset of high G’s is rarely mitigated by these suits; they are more useful for sustained high G maneuvers. Looking at the U.S. Military Jet Teams, the Thunderbirds wear them and the Blue Angels do not. The Angels do not wear the suits because of the potential for unexpected stick inputs when the suit “inflates.” If the pilot is bracing his/her arm on the top of their leg to have more firm stick control (standard) – this inflation could have an effect on the pilot’s ability to safely fly in formation close to other aircraft and close to the ground.

Fuel Truck Operations Take the following actions to raise the level of safety for spectators and personnel near the race course: (1) relocate the fuel truck away from the ramp area and (2) in front of any area where spectators are present, install barriers more substantial than those currently in place. This is another one that we have discussed in the past. The fuel trucks need to be available for racers to obtain fuel prior to the races. But, they should probably not be between the pit area and the racecourse. Okay, I agree. However, the convenience factor needs to be considered. What we’ve heard so far is that the fuel trucks will be in position between races and removed during all races. Okay, this could work and would be a happy medium between convenience and safety.

The Future Mike Houghton said after the press conference, "I don't think any of these would have had an impact on the tragedy we experienced, but the association is open to changes that lead to a safer event.” I agree with Mike and I know they are doing everything they can to keep us all safe and keep us racing. This is what we know now. Believe me, we are constantly learning more. But, what I want to say now is, buy those tickets – because we are racing in September. And believe me; it makes me very happy to say that! See you there!


May 2012

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A FIRST LOOK LiveAirShowTV has announced that its newest feature video takes a behindthe-scenes” look at the much anticipated IMAX film Air Racers 3D, which launched a limited premiere in April. Principal photography for Air Racers 3D took place during the 2009 and 2010 Reno National Championship Air Races. LiveAirShowTV broadcast the Air Races Live in 2009 and provided daily race week & post-event video reports in 2010. An exclusive opportunity existed for us to follow the IMAX film crew as they also covered the “World’s Fastest Motorsport” at the Reno Stead Airport. This first look at Air Racers 3D includes writer, producer and co-director Christian Fry talking about the production and some of the unique aspects of how it was made. “Roaming the ramp at Reno and covering another crew shooting different aspects of the same thing was a lot of fun for our broadcast crew,” said Jeff Lee, President of LiveAir ShowTV. “Being at Reno is really hard to explain to people. It’s something that gets inside of you. You just have to be there to experience it for yourself. Because of the

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film’s immersive 3D aspect, Air Racers creates a starting point to help put people “inside” the incredible action at Reno.” LiveAirShowTV Co-Producer Hans Kummer, a veteran of IMAX and 3D production added, “I’ve been involved with several attempts to bring air racing to the giant screen and can attest to the complex production challenges. It has been a pleasure to interact with the Air Racers 3D film crew over the past few years and to witness their passion for aviation. I hope that the film serves as an inspiration to future generations of aviators and race fans.” Air Racers 3D is a co-production of 3D Entertainment USA & Pretend Entertainment in association with Stereoscope and is distributed by 3D Entertainment Distribution. It will have a staggered release in worldwide IMAX Theaters and 3D Digital Cinemas over the next three years. Advanced screenings have taken place internationally and it has opened at museum IMAX screens in Huntsville, AL, Pensacola, FL, Columbus, GA, and Hutchinson, KS. More theater launches are continually being announced, including European locations.

47

AIR RACERS 3D Paul Walker, star of The Fast and Furious franchise narrates the film as it takes audiences not only through the excitement of racing at Reno, but educates them on the principles of flight and the history of air racing. “I was privileged to see a near final version of the film at the Giant Screen Cinema Association conference held in Austin last September,” said Jeff Lee. “It was a slightly strange sensation since I had just returned from Reno the night before and was still coping with witnessing the tragic crash of the P-51 Mustang Galloping Ghost. The 3D in this film is very real. It adds depth in the same way 3D was used to great effect in films like Avatar and Hugo. The racing scenes are staged for safety reasons, but the excitement is still there.” True racing fans always want more when it comes to the Reno experience. Air Racers 3D fills that need, if only for a short time. LiveAirShowTV’s story will introduce more of the film to race fans looking to fill that void. Watch the story at: http://www.liveairshowtv.com/video.php?vid=66 As airshow season ramps up,

LiveAirShowTV continues to cover shows and performers. Stories in production include a profile of aerobatic pilot Matt Chapman, a look at airshow safety, and the kick-off of the Sport Air Racing League’s 2012 season. The Air Racers 3D story, along with the other 80-plus stories they have produced can be found on their website.

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Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...www.inflightusa.com


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

48

C-17 MADE FINAL LANDING

AT

NATIONAL USAF MUSEUM

by Sarah Swan National Museum of the U.S. Air Force The U.S. Air Force’s first C-17 (T-1) arrived at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, April 25. This C-17 Globemaster III (S/N 870025) was essentially hand-built for the sole purpose of developmental test and evaluation, with an estimated life span of approximately five years. The aircraft was periodically rebuilt and refurbished over the years and its lifespan grew from five to 21 years. T-1 made its first flight on Sept. 15, 1991, when it was delivered to the USAF at Edwards AFB, Calif., for testing. After completing the extensive C-17 flight test program, T-1 supported many other flight and propulsion test programs for the

May 2012

The C-17 Globemaster III T-1 takes off from Long Beach, Calif., on Sept. 15, 1991. (Photo courtesy of Boeing) USAF, NASA and others. In addition to its role as a flight test

aircraft, T-1 is also a Hollywood star. The aircraft appeared in country superstar

Collin, who had taken some lessons on takeoff and landings some 30 years ago, successfully landed the plane as it was running out of gas and an engine sputtering. She was released from the hospital with minor injuries after her bumpy landing on April 2 at Sturgeon Bay. Despite the miracle landing, Helen Collins’ husband John, 81, did not survive. Now don’t ask me why I encourage

every pilot I know to get their spouse some pinch-hitter time with a good instructor. Remember, there are no emergency take offs, only emergency landings so they only have to learn the one obvious thing . . . don’t ask them, insist on it! May, or May I, or May-be, either way it’s a big month for me and some of mine. We’ve got birthdays, anniversaries and even a day called May. Two of my ex-

Toby Keith’s Emmy Award-winning production of American Soldier. T-1 went on to appear in five motion pictures: Transformers, Iron Man,Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Iron Man 2 and Superman: Man of Steel (to be released by Warner Brothers in 2013). The public was able to view the aircraft landing from the museum grounds. The aircraft made a pass over the museum prior to landing on the runway behind the museum. The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located on Springfield Street, six miles northeast of downtown Dayton, Ohio. It is open seven days a week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day). Admission and parking are free. For more information about the museum, visit www.nationalmuseum.af.mil.

What’s Up Continued from Page 28

WOW Number Three As you probably have heard or seen from all the news media: A frail 80-yearold Wisconsin woman spent a harrowing 90 minutes learning how to handle a Cessna 421 and then land it after her husband, who had been piloting the plane, collapsed while at the controls. Helen

dependents will celebrate the days of their birth. My best friend and I will celebrate another year of marital bless, and I will retell the story of my Air Force Career, which began on May 19. Don’t worry, I’m not forgetting the mom’s of this great nation, they are the ones that tell you when you can fly and when you can’t, when you’re cold, and when you’re hungry. While you are sharing your special family moments, please remember our troops and their moms. Check your local areas for a place that might have some warriors without families locally – the USO is always a good call – and offer them a seat at your table. You are all in my thoughts and prayers for another safe, fun-filled month. Until next time . . . That’s Thirty! “Over”

Tickets Continued from Page 46 tem and the notorious “Tail Slide” where the aircraft slides backward toward the ground. The National Aviation Heritage Invitational will be on-site to recognize and celebrate some of the most wellknown and historic restored aircraft from around the world. Pilots and aviation enthusiasts alike have the opportunity to cruise through the extraordinary display. To purchase tickets for the 49th annual event or for more information about the National Championship Air Races, visit www.airrace.org or call 775/972-6663.


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

49

AIRCRAFT EXEMPTION PROGRAM

Associated Sales Tax Consultants’ Aircraft Exemption Program is designed to help taxpayers legally avoid California sales and use taxes on the purchase of aircraft. Moreover, by engaging our firm to assist you throughout the exemption process, you can save between

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chase. Our success in lowering or eliminating the tax is substantial, even if we are retained after the purchase. ASTC’s experts have prevailed in securing tax adjustments and/or refunds with of an average savings to our clients of over $62,000 or 80.1% of the tax liability as originally proposed by the state. We will work as a team with you and your staff, tailor every engagement to fit the unique needs of your situation, while maintaining compliance with the sales and use tax law. We shield you from the intense scrutinizing and burden of dealing with the tax auditor yourself.

Associated Sales Tax Consultants chairman and CEO Joseph F. Micallef has 40 years experience in the specialized field of taxation ... 10 years as a government tax auditor and 30 years as a business professional, California Courts-qualified tax expert and legislative taxpayer advocate. A private pilot since 1985, Mr. Micallef is a pioneer in the field of aviation taxation having personally trained and supervised many of the self-proclaimed pre-eminent experts in the industry.

(::6*0(;,+:(3,:;(?*65:<3;(5;:05* / 9700 BUSINESS PARK DRIVE, SUITE 300, SACRAMENTO, CA 95827   T / WWW.AIRCRAFTEXEMPTION.COM / INFO@AIRCRAFTEXEMPTION.COM “Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the exceptional service you personally, and ASTC generally, have provided to the I2 Group, LLC. Through your extraordinary proactive, thorough and persistent efforts, we were able to avoid an improper tax circumstance from California tax authorities. Their non-responsive, delaying, and non-cooperative conduct was working! That is until ASTC stepped in. Your exceptional knowledge of the law, their own internal processes and pursuant facts saved us tens of thousands of dollars of excessive and improper tax. Our sincere thanks for a job well done.” – John Iffland, Partner, The I2 Group, LLC


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

50

May 2012

Business Aviation News

CIRRUS AIRCRAFT ANNOUNCES 'FULL SPEED AHEAD' REVOLUTIONARY VISION SF50 JET PROGRAM New Investment Spurs Hiring and Development Ramp Up To Complete the Innovative Single-Engine Personal Jet Cirrus Aircraft announced on April 18 that its Cirrus Vision SF50 personal jet program, with major investment by its new owner CAIGA, is fully funded through certification and initial production. The company anticipates first customer delivery will take place in 2015. The Cirrus Vision creates a new category in personal aviation - it is the first aircraft of its kind to fill the gap between high performance pistons and traditional turboprop twins and light business jets. The Vision will offer the same class-leading innovation, technology and style hallmarks that Cirrus is known for in its bestselling SR20, SR22 and SR22T family of single engine piston aircraft. Seating up to five adults and two children in an

expansive cabin that sets a new standard in luxury and flexibility for pilots and passengers, the Vision is designed for performance, affordability and safety. “Today is simply a tremendous milestone for Cirrus,” said Dale Klapmeier, CEO and Co-founder of Cirrus Aircraft. “We revolutionized general aviation with the introduction of the SR20 just over a decade ago. With more than 5,100 SRseries aircraft delivered to date, pilots, entrepreneurs, families and aviators of all kinds have embraced our dream. Today, that dream is renewed as we are on the cusp of an even bigger leap with the Cirrus Vision. Cirrus customers, employees and partners around the world are rightfully proud of this moment.” Klapmeier added, “We have come so far in just a brief time with our new owners as they share our vision for the

future of aviation and personal transportation. They have set the highest expectations for the Cirrus team. But more importantly, they are actively partnering with Cirrus while providing substantial resources for us to meet and exceed our shared goals as we build an entire family of Cirrus aircraft.” The first flight of the Vision concept aircraft was in 2008. Detail design, systems verification and full flight envelope testing have been ongoing since that time. Today’s investment, however, significantly increases the pace and momentum of the program and allows the company to bring the jet to the market. In an effort to ramp up to certification and production, Cirrus Aircraft will accelerate hiring of engineers, designers and other related technical disciplines critical to the completion of the program.

FOR

The Cirrus Vision development team, working with global design and vendor partners, is based at Cirrus Aircraft company headquarters in Duluth, Minn., and Vision jets will be assembled right alongside the SR20, SR22 and SR22T in the same Minnesota and North Dakota Cirrus Aircraft production facilities. Garmin (avionics and flight deck), Williams International (turbofan engine) and Triumph Group (trailing link landing gear) are just three of the strongest brands in aerospace that are members of the Vision supplier team. Through June 30, 2012, the list price for a well-equipped Cirrus Vision SF50 is $1.72 million with list price moving to $1.96 million effective July 1, 2012. For more information visit www.cirrusaircraft.com.

CRAVAACK-BISHOP INTRODUCE "SAFE SKIES ACT OF 2012" H.R. 4350 On April 16, 2012, U.S. Representatives Chip Cravaack (R-MN) and Tim Bishop (D-NY) introduced H.R. 4350, the Safe Skies Act of 2012. Importantly, the bill would ensure that pilot rest requirements apply to all cargo air operations. Following the Colgan Air Flight 3407 crash on February 12, 2009, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) developed a rule to address pilot fatigue for passenger flights using extensive scientific study, hearings, and industry feed-

back. The rule, which requires eight hours of rest between shifts, was finalized on January 4, 2012. The rule is scheduled go into effect January 14, 2014, but exempts cargo pilots. “As a former cargo pilot, I understand the importance of a single standard of safety for pilots who share the same airspace and runways with passenger aircraft. I introduced the Safe Skies Act in order to apply the new, common sense standards for pilot rest to cargo pilots as well,” said Rep. Cravaack.

Specifically, the bill directs the Secretary of Transportation to apply the rule relating to flight crew-member duty and rest requirements to all cargo operations in the same manner as they apply to passenger operations. “Congressman Cravaack has shown real leadership today by introducing legislation to ensure that the FAA’s recently enacted flight duty and rest requirements for passenger airlines equally apply to allcargo carriers,” said Independent Pilots Association President, Captain Robert

Travis. “The Cravaack-Bishop Safe Skies Act of 2012 will bring the FAA’s final rule back in line with Congress’ original intent, one level of safety for U.S. aviation.” Representative Cravaack serves on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee – where he is Vice Chair of the Aviation Subcommittee – the Homeland Security Committee, and the Science, Space and Technology Committee. The 8th Congressional District covers 18 counties in Northeast Minnesota.

PHOENIX AVIATION MANAGERS, INC. AND NBAA RENEW EXCLUSIVE AVIATION WORKERS' COMPENSATION INSURANCE PROGRAM Phoenix Aviation Managers announced on April 17 that it has renewed an exclusive agreement with the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) to provide a workers’ compensation program for the NBAA’s Membership of more than 8,000 companies. The NBAA Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program was introduced in 2009 to provide access to high-quality coverage at competitive rates for NBAA Member companies. The program is

independently underwritten by Phoenix Aviation Managers and its affiliate, Old Republic Insurance Company. “We are delighted with the results of this insurance program. In addition to receiving competitive premiums, the participating NBAA Members earned a 20 percent cash dividend for two consecutive years due to the excellent loss experience of the group,” stated Phoenix Aviation Senior Vice President and Workers’ Compensation Manager Craig Benn.

All NBAA Members who operate aircraft are eligible for this insurance program regardless of size or Member category. This includes all size flight departments, from single aircraft operations to multi-aircraft flight departments. Policies cover everyone involved within the company’s flight operation including pilots, maintenance technicians, flight attendants, flight department managers, aircraft operators and administrative personnel. In addition, there are provisions

for companies using contract pilots, contract flight attendants and other contract crew. NBAA Member companies that are not participating in the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program, but would like to know more should contact their insurance agent or visit www.nbaaworkerscomp.com. Insurance coverage is provided by Old Republic Insurance Company.


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

WICKS AIRCRAFT SUPPLY TEAMS UP

WITH

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POLYFIBER AIRCRAFT COATINGS

For a Two-Day Fabric Covering Workshop, June 8-9 This two-day seminar will give you hands on experience learning the basics of fabric covering. Poly-Fiber Aircraft Coatings personnel will be running the hands-on seminar. Working from a syllabus that has been refined over the past 15 years, the presenters will demonstrate preparation, fitting, gluing, heat-shrinking, coatings, taping, rib stitching and final painting techniques. Essentially, it’s a 16-hour hands-on course, working with the materials and learning the skills of aircraft covering. “We provide all the materials and tools

for the class. In two days of cutting, stitching and painting, most people are ready to go home and cover wooden wings or a tube fuselage.”

Friday, June 8th: 7:30-8 a.m.: Registration (coffee & donuts). 8 a.m.-12 noon: Introduction and Safety; Priming; Varnishing and Surface Prep; Fabric Installation; Heat Shrinking; First coat of Poly Brush. 1212:30 p.m.: Lunch (provided). 12:30-5 p.m.: Envelopes and Tail-feathers, Rib

Lacing, Fuselages.

Saturday, June 9th: 8 a.m.: Taping , Heat smoothing tapes. 12-12:30 p.m. : Lunch (provided). 12:304:30 p.m.: Spraying Poly Brush, Spraying Poly Spray, Spraying Poly Tone, Repairs, Topcoat paint review. Place: Wicks Aircraft Supply, 410 Pine Street. Highland, IL 62249 Cost: $350 per person. Discounted price for EAA members is $325.

PACIFIC COAST AVIONICS COMPLETES PANEL UPGRADES Pacific Coast Avionics Corporation, located on Aurora State Airport in Aurora, Oregon has announced the completion of a contract to upgrade the panels on a fleet of three Cessna Caravans. The Caravans are owned and operated by Westwind Air, which has a number of parachute jump schools located around the United States. Commenting on the upgrades, Dewey Conroy, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Pacific Coast Avionics, said, “Westwind Air keeps these airplanes busy and frequently moves them around the country for maximum utilization. They wanted a modern avionics suite in the airplanes to help accommodate their busy schedule and to provide added safety when repositioning

the aircraft between school locations. Our technicians and installers worked with the customer to come up with just the right solution.” The upgraded panels consist of dual screen Aspen EFIS PFD/MFD systems, dual Garmin Mode S Transponders with Traffic Avoidance, a GNS-530W GPS/Nav/Com, and a Garmin-GMA 340 Audio Panel. The new avionics and existing instrumentation was all installed in a custom-designed, laser-engraved instrument panel. The panel upgrade package was identical for all three aircraft. Commenting further on the project, Conroy said, “The variety of products and the level of technology available today provides a wide range of effective, affordable panel upgrade options. We can com-

AIRCRAFT SPRUCE RECIEVES SENNHEISER’S DEALER OF THE YEAR AWARD AND GARMIN’S PLATINUM AWARD In recognition of exemplary sales and customer support, Sennheiser Electronic Corporation has named Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co. its Dealer of the Year for 2011. Chris Throndsen, Sennheiser National Sales Manager, presented the award to Jim and Nanci Irwin of Aircraft Spruce on April 12. Founded in 1965, Aircraft Spruce is a leading distributor for avionics, aircraft parts, and pilot supplies, shipping to aircraft owners worldwide from distribution facilities in California, Georgia, and Canada. “Aircraft Spruce has been a leading dealer for the Sennheiser aviation headset product line for many years, and it is an honor to receive the award as Sennheiser’s Dealer of the Year. The S1 headset, introduced last year, is one of our most popular general aviation headsets”, said Jim Irwin, President of Aircraft Spruce.

Aircraft Spruce also recently received the Platinum Award for achieving the highest sales performance among Garmin International distributors. Aircraft Spruce has received similar awards from Garmin for elite performance durring the past twelve years, always ranking among the top distributors for Garmin aviation products worldwide. Mike Young, Southwest Aviation Sales Manager for Garmin, presented the award to Jim and Nanci Irwin on April 11, 2012 at Aircraft Spruce headquarters in Corona, Calif. For more information on Garmin and Sennheiser aviation products, or to request a free copy of the company’s 800 page product catalog, contact Aircraft Spruce at 1-877/4SPRUCE or 951/3729555, or see the company’s website at www.aircraftspruce.com.

Credit card required to secure your reservation. Your credit card will not be charged until the week of the workshop Equipment: Poly Fiber manual, all tools and supplies for class are provided. Attendees may purchase any fabric, paint, spray equipment and painting tools and supplies. Wicks offer a 10 percent discount during the workshop. For complete information and to sign up online at wicksaircraft.com for “Fabric Class ,” or call 1-800/221-9425 for more details and to reserve your spot.

ON CESSNA

pletely customize an upgrade to make sure that the panel capability matches the customer’s mission requirement.” Pacific Coast Avionics is headquartered in a 14,000 square foot facility at Aurora State Airport, which can accommodate a wide range of personal and business aircraft up to, and including, business jets. Pacific Coast Avionics is an FAA approved Repair Station, No. OPXR455L, Airframe and Class 1, 2 Limited Instrument. For complete details, contact Dewey

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

GULF COAST AVIONICS ADDS TWO EXCITNG NEW PRODUCTS Rick Garcia, President of Gulf Coast Avionics Corporation, has announced the addition of two new product offerings from its extensive inventory. In making the announcement Garcia said, “We are constantly looking for additional products that contribute to pilot efficiency and safety of flight. The two products we announce today certainly fit in those categories.” The first product is the most recent offering of high performance Emergency Locator Transmitters from Ameri-King. The AK-451 series is an FAA TSO approved line of ELTs that bring new performance standards to the search and res-

cue function with new features such as triple frequency transmission (Satellite/ Military /Civilian) which establishes exact aircraft location by GPS/Nav Latitude/ Longitude within one minute of activation; transmission and reception that is not dependent on Polar Orbiting Satellite (which could take up to four hours) but sends exact position on the very first burst; and the assurance of distress signals reaching NOAA Satellite Operation and US Air Force Search and Rescue Operations with full reliability. The enhanced response time and GPS/Nav accuracy narrows site location for ground search teams to as little as 22 meters.

The second product being added to the Gulf Coast Avionics inventory is the new and surprisingly affordable iFly 720 dedicated aviation GPS. This new iPadbased GPS features superior reception, sunlight readability, and numerous other outstanding features at a fraction of the cost of competing systems. Data updates for the iFly 720 are affordable, easily obtainable, and fast and easy to upload through connection to a Wi-Fi hotspot. iFly 720 operators can even create preferences for quick, automatic updates Commenting on this new product, Garcia said, “This is truly a runway-tothe-highway system. The ‘ iFly Streets’

function is a realistic road navigation system, which provides voice-guided directions along with 3D visuals including lane guidance, street signs, buildings, and landmarks. In addition, a unique ‘ Find a Place’ feature provides details on hotels, restaurants, and gas stations.” Gulf Coast Avionics is a major supplier of avionics, instruments and pilot supplies to customers around the world. For complete information on Gulf Coast Avionics’ product line, call 863/7099714, ext. 102. Complete details on Gulf Coast Avionics are available at www.GCA.aero.

WINGS OVER THE WORLD WEBSITE TAKES OFF FROM WICHITA The aviation and aerospace website, Wings Over The World, www.wingsovertheworld.com, created and launched by Chance Communications, owner of www.wingsoverkansas.com, has landed on the Internet. The new website was created to serve National and International aviation and aerospace interests with news and feature articles and video’s of unique content. A significant number of feature material to be published will come from esteemed writer contributors, Walter J. Boyne and Lionel D. Alford, Jr., both

nationally and internationally recognized aviation and aerospace historians and authors. Aerospace writer and editor Carl E. Chance will join Boyne and Alford in submitting article features of interest to the site at www.wingsovertheworld.com. A few of the story feature subject’s in the launch issue are, Cyber Warfare, The Rise of Putin And The Probability of a New Cold War, The Amelia Earhart Disappearance Mystery and other features. The Wings Over The World website subject categories are, Aeronautic News, Air & Space Legends, Aerospace

Features, Notable Aircraft, Space Program, and AVTube Video’s. Additional categories are planned for future issue updates. Wings Over The World website owner/writer/editor Carl Chance said, “The development of aviation and aerospace has unfolded naturally and yet extraordinarily under the vision and creativity of the world’s aviation pioneers. My goal is to expand upon the stories past, present and future yet to be told.” The creator/writer/editor of www. wingsovertheworld.com and www.wings

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overkansas.com, Carl Chance, is a former news consultant/correspondent and TV producer/writer/reporter for Wingspan Air & Space Channel. Chance is also a board member of the Kansas Aviation Museum. For comments and contact, please log on to www.wingsovertheworld.com and www.wingsoverkansas.com.

SENSENICH CELEBRATES 80 YEARS – ONE LUCKY CUSTOMER TO WIN 80 PERCENT OFF PROPELLER

Sensenich Propeller will be celebrating 80 years in business at the Airventure Oshkosh 2012 fly-in this year, by giving one of its next 80 customers an 80 percent discount on his or her new prop. “I hate gimmicks,” says company President Don Rowell, “but hey, this is a birthday celebration; and who wouldn’t want 80 percent off?” To be eligible, a private customer (not an airframe manufacturer or OEM) must be one of the first 80 to buy and pay for a Sensenich prop between the close of Sun ‘n Fun (April 1) and the opening of Oshkosh (July 23). Any new or rebuilt Sensenich prop purchased from the factory – wood, metal, or composite – is eligible. The winner will be drawn at Continued on Page 53


May 2012

www.inflightusa.com

FLABOB AIRPORT LAUNCHES FLYING CIRCUS In a program designed to bring the origins of flight into the modern day, Flabob Airport will become the site for an Aerial Cavalcade on September 20, 2012. On that date, people attending the event will have the extremely rare opportunity to see a Wright Flyer replica make a flight straight down the runway. A French Bleriot is also expected to fly. These two pioneer aircraft will be followed by flying machines from the 20s, 30s and 40s. Commentary will detail the significance of each aircraft that departs the grass runway. The Aerial Cavalcade, part of what the organizers plan to make an annual Flying Circus, will be part of a four-day event. Arrivals for the program will begin on Thursday, Sept. 27 and continue on the following day. More than 70 antique aircraft are expected to participate in the Cavalcade and most are expected to be flying around the area on Thursday and Friday. Flabob will be closed to outside traffic on Saturday while the Cavalcade is

American Aircraft Sales Co. HAYWARD AIRPORT 50 YEARS SAME LOCATION LD SO

Tom Wathen’s fabulous replica racers will be part of the Flying Circus this fall. in progress. On Sunday, Sept. 30, the pilots of antique aircraft from all over the Southwest will begin departing for home. Airplane camping will be available to pilots of taildragger aircraft for $5 per night. Pilots flying tricycle aircraft are encouraged to land at Riverside Municipal Airport, and use free transportation to Flabob. Adults driving in will be charged $10. Children under 12 are free. For more information, visit www.FlabobFlyingCircus.com.

FLABOB STUDENTS QUIZ ASTRONAUT ON ISS Students at the Flabob Airport Preparatory School had a Thursday worth remembering. They were able to pose questions to astronaut Don Pettit, aboard the International Space Station, who gave informative answers that were often laced with humor. The interview lasted about ten minutes, while the ISS passed from horizon to horizon. A total of 12 students were poised with 17 questions that had been written out and voted on by students in grades 7 thru 12. They got answers to 16 of them before the Station orbited out of range. All 120 kids were in the EAA Chapter One Hangar when the event occurred. They were joined by approximately 200 adults, including the mayor, city council members and other local dignitaries. “This was another historic day at Flabob,” said Bill Sawin, President of The Wathen Center, which owns the air-

53

1979 Beechcraft F33A

1999 Cessna T206H Stationair

287 SMOH, 3200 TTSN, Garmin 430 GPS, S-Tec 55 A/P, fresh annual NDH ..$119,950

890 TTSN, King IFR, KAP 140 A/P, GPS, Flint AUX L/R Fuel, Like New California Airplane, NDH, ............................$249,950

D

D

L SO

L SO

1968 Piper Arrow 180

1997 Mooney MSE (M20J)

Garmin 430 IFR, Garmin 696 linked to Zaon Traffic Alert, Stec 50 A/P, Speed Mods, 1599 SMOH, 4085 TTSN, NDH... $44,950

1406 TTSN, King Avionics, GPS, KAP 150 A/P, One Owner, Hangared Since New, NDH, Like New ................................SOLD

File Photo 1992 Grumman Tiger

1980 Cessna 172N

450 SFOH, 2715 TTSN, Digital IFR, A/P, fresh annual, ................................$69,950

300 SFRMAN, 6,000 TTSN, King Digital IFR, GPS, Nice P/I....................................$44,950

Two Piper Warrior IIs

1979 Piper Warrior II 161 1500 SFOH, 6200 TTSN, Digital IFR, Century 1 A/P, Nice Paint and Interior, NDH...................$39,950 1976 Piper Warrior II 151 1100 SMOH, 0 STOH, 3260 TTSN, King IFR, Fresh Annual, NDH..................................$36,950

Flabob Airport Preparatory School enjoyed the rare privilege of talking to an astronaut while as he passed overhead aboard the International Space Station. port and middle/high school. “The energy level in the Chapter One Building was phenomenal. The students were flawless in their inquiries and the audience was spellbound. The questions that were asked were intelligent and drew great answers. It was an inspirational event.” For more information on the Wathen Center visit www.Flabob.org.

1976 Piper Archer II 181 King Digital IFR, Garmin 150 GPS, 2000 SFRMAN, 7400 TTSN, NDH ........$34,950

D

L SO 1967 Cessna 150 Texas Tail Dragger

1947 Piper J3 Cub

1500 SMOH, 4500 TTSN, King Digital Avionics, GPS, Hangared since 1980 by same owner, NDH, Very Nice,...... $24,950

585 SMOH, 6404 TTSN, Restored to Original Condition, ........................$29,950

Two Cessna 152s

1978 C152 0 SMOH, 10,050 TTSN, Digital VFR, NDH, ....................................$24,950 1980 C152 6700 TTSN, 1242 SMOH, New King/Garmin IFR, New Paint, NDH ..$29,950

1969 Piper Cherokee 140 / 160 hp 115 SFRMAN, 5000 TTSN, New Paint/ Interior, Speed Mods, Like New......$29,950

Sensenich Celebrates Continued from Page 52 Sensenich’s Press Conference at Airventure (date to be confirmed soon, and will be seen in the official show schedule); the winner need not be present to win. Sensenich has manufactured props for the industry since 1932, and its lineup now encompasses propellers for airboats and UAVs, along with traditional aviation, in classic wood, metal, and industry-leading ground-adjustable composite props in

two- or three-blade configurations, for engines including many experimental powerplants, plus Rotax, Jabiru, Continental, and Lycoming engines up to 320 cubic inches – with more on the way. What does Sensenich plan for its 90th celebration? Rowell says, “We’ll have to wait and see.” For more information visit www.sensenich.com

1972 Grumman AAIA Lynx

1981 Cessna 172RG Cutlass

2752 TTSN, 903 SMOH, 0 STOH, Very Nice Paint/Interior, Fresh Annual,..$21,950

0 SMOH, 7800 TTSN, New Interior, Average Paint, Fresh Annual, One Owner, NDH,..........$49,950

Robert Coutches

(510) 783-2711 • fax (510) 783-3433 21015 Skywest Drive, Hayward, CA 94541

www.americanaircraft.net


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

54

May 2012

InFlight USA Classifieds (All ads run for 2 months)

00

Classified Ad Rates: $45 for the first 20 words, $750 for each additional 10 words, photos $750 ea.

Phone: (650) 358-9908

Fax: (650) 358-9254

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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May 2012

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BLUE ANGELS KICK-OFF 2012 AIRSHOW SEASON AT THE

EL CENTRO AIRSHOW

Torrey Ward, our newest airshow performer taxis in after his first public show.

Air Show Narrator John "Huggy” Huggins is ready to rock the Imperial Valley.

Story and Photos by Clark Cook Rocketbilly Jet Truck spews a twin colume of flame and smoke before a race

A

s the Blue Angels were concluding their debrief after their final winter training practice, the festivities at the El Centro Naval Air Facility in Southern California had already begun on the eve of the team’s first airshow of 2012. Clear skies, warm temperatures and relatively calm winds over the Imperial Valley provided a picture perfect day for the annual event held on base, which attracted people as far away as Northern California and Arizona. Military, civilian and ground acts performed flawlessly in front of a record crowd, as John “Huggy” Huggins provided the narration. The airshow concluded with the grand finale – The U.S. Navy Blue Angels that had spectators stopped in their tracks. ......and gets the traditional initiation by other performers.

Spencer Suderman tail slides it into his own smoke. Right: A beautiful pass in review by the Blue Angels Diamond

F-8F Bearcat and F/A-18 Super Hornet in the Tailhook Legacy Flight.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

58

May 2012

AD INDEX ACT ..................................39 Aerozona Parts..................14 Aircraft Insurance Agency14 Aircraft Insurance Res. ....22 Aircraft Magneto ..............46 Aircraft Magneto Service 46 Aircraft Specialties ..........19 Aircraft Spruce..................15 Airport Shoppe ..............2, 3 Airtronics ..........................11 Alliance Intl. Aviation ......12 American Aerobatics ........13 American Aircraft Sales ..53 Ameritech............................7 AMR&D ..........................16 AOPA ..................................9

Arizona Soaring................52 Arizona Type Ratings ......24 Assoc. Sales Tax ..............49 Bobs Aviation Supplies ....20 Buchanan Aviation............41 Cherokee for Sale ............47 Chino Aircraft Sales ........42 Corona Engines ................36 Divorce For Men ..............24 Dragonfly Aviation ..........45 Eddie Andreini ..................38 Elite Air Interiors ..............28 Flabob................................14 Fly It............................21, 59 Flying Tigers Wine ..........16 Gibson ..............................22

Giottos Aircraft Interiors ..10 Globe Fiberglass ..............48 Golden West Fly-In ..........33 Hartwig..............................20 Hiller Vertical Challenge..26 HME Watches ..................34 J.T. Evans ............................4 Jorgenson Lawrence ........58 Loop Net ..........................23 Mach 5 Aviation................43 Pacific Coast Avionics......10 QREF ................................18 R & M Steel......................46 Remax – Ryan Team ........12 Rio Vista Municipal Airport ..46 Schweiss Doors ................10

Select AirParts ..................60 Sheble..........................30, 31 Sky Ranch Upholstery......51 Stanford Research ............43 Sterling Air........................27 Steve Weaver Aircraft Sales ..17 T.J. Aircraft Sales..............23 Tiffin Aire..........................47 Tsuniah Lake ....................28 USA Aircraft Brokers ......13 Vista ..................................25 Wicks Aircraft ..................39 Wings Over the World........6 Wisconsin Aviation ..........40 Zannette Aircraft Ins...........5

"Still Specializing In First Time Buyers And Student Pilots Needs" Happy Mothers' Day

JORGENSON-LAWRENCE AIRCRAFT SALES AND MANAGEMENT

Rare Opportunity to Own a Piece of Aviation History.

“Doing it Right The First Time” HOME OF WHAT’S UP?! AIRSHOW ENTERTAINMENT Voted Best “After the Sale Customer Service” for the 16th Straight Year 75% New Interior, low times and priced right!

Located at the beautiful Palo Alto Airport (PAO) in the Baylands Recreational Area where aviation, golf, nature and good food live in harmony creating a comfortable and convenient setting to select a new airplane. South of San Francisco along the west side of the bay, north of San Jose.

Also providing services as: • Expert witness for aviation based legal cases, appraisals, and bank repossessions • Guest Speaker for aviation related subjects • Aviation humorist and speech writer Larry Shapiro • Larry@LarryShapiro.com • Or Call Us! 650-424-1801 For more information about these planes and others, Please Visit Our Web Site: www.LarryShapiro.com

1982 T-210, a true Miss America!

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call us, we speak Beechcraft!â&#x20AC;? Intâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l: 540-564-0010 E-mail: sales@selectairparts.com Fax: 540-432-0193 www.selectairparts.com

   0/"OXs7EYERS#AVE 6!

May 2012 In Flight USA  

In Flight USA is the magazine that serves general aviation throughout the United States. with aviation news, features and monthly columns co...

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