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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

4

ON

THE

COVER

Soaring With Sagar

THE LEGENDARY PITTS SPECIAL Story and Photos by Sagar Pathak

A

t a small airfield in 1945, a 30year-old Curtis Pitts climbed into a tiny 55hp homebuilt bi-plane for a quick 20-minute flight that would revolutionize aviation. With more than a dozen bi-planes created during the next 50 years, the Pitts Special has a long and storied history. Known worldwide as one of the premier aerobatic trainers, it has flown in more aerobatic competitions then any other airplane in history. Curtis Pitts' legacy is represented strongly with the last, and most prized designs of his career, the S-2C and Model 12. Recently I had the chance to do a very special air-to-air with three very unique Pitts over the picturesque Golden Gate Bridge. With only 59 flying Pitts Model 12's, having two hangared

next to each other, and in the air at the same time took a lot of planning and a bit of luck, getting two in the air at the same time with it's sister ship was a real treat. The red and black Model 12 was flown by Cory Lovell, the Green Model 12 was flown by Barry Woods, and the Pitts S2C was flown by Gary Evans, all based in the same row of hangars at Hayward Airport (KHWD). The photoship was expertly flown by Danny Paulas. The Green Model 12 was originally built by Jimmy Kilroy, a Bay Area European vintage car restorer, and was selected as the 2007 "Plans Champion Bronz Lindy" at Oshkosh. Kilroy didn't just set out to build any old kit plane, he added his signature, hand-crafted touches on his plane, including manufacturing the metal cowlings and wheelpants himself Continued on Page 57

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TABLE Volume 28, Number 7

OF

CONTENTS

650-358-9908 • Fax: 650-358-9254 • E-mail: vickie@inflightusa.com • www.inflightusa.com

March 2012

ON THE COVER LEAD STORY

PHOTO FINISH

THE LAST

THE LEGENDARY PITTS SPECIAL

DEPLOYMENT OF THE USS ENTERPRISE

Takes off on Page 4 Lands on Page 57

Page 10 By Mike Heilman and Ed Wells Cover Photo By Sagar Pathak

NEWS For Better or Worse: End of Paper Medical ................................8 Long-Term FAA Reauthorization Bill Signed ............................16 Pilot’s Bill of Rights Introduced in House ................................19

FEATURES

COLUMNS

World War I Aircraft: Aircraft Used in a War Effort? By Alan Smith ................................................................6

Aviation Ancestry Contrails Goodies & Gadgets What’s Up?! Tips From the Pros From Skies to Stars Safe Landings The Pylon Place

Editorial: Back to Business By Ed Downs ..............................................................11

President’s Budget Worries Aviation Groups............................20 FCC Moves Toward Suspending LightSquared ........................27

The Center Table

Fairness to Pilots Sought in FAA’s Enforcement......................36

By Herb Foreman ........................................................33

Women Soar – You Soar At AirVenture 2012 ............................44 Worldwide GA Shipments, Billings Mixed in 2011 ....................46 Strong Exhibitor Demand At AERO............................................48 NEW SECTION – Business Aviation News:

by Scott Schwartz ....................14 by Steve Weaver ......................17

..............................................23 by Larry Shapiro ......................26 by Mitchell Ange ......................35 by Ed Downs ..........................47

..............................................42 by Marilyn Dash ......................45

DESTINATION

DEPARTMENTS

Flying With Faber: A Visit to Harris Ranch By Stuart Faber ..............................................................29

Calendar of Events ........................................................9 Classifieds ....................................................................54 Index of Advertisers ....................................................58

Cessna Citation Latitude Has New Longer Range ................51 Ideal Cabin Pressure Standard On New Hawker 900XP........51

SPECIAL SECTION: SUN ‘N FUN BEGINS

ON

PAGE 37

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

6

By Alan Smith

WORLD WAR I AIRCRAFT

ing: The air-cooled radial aircraft engine and the self-supporting cantilevered wing. The early radial aircraft engines were rotary engines: The engine and propeller were one unit and rotated around a crankshaft secured to the engine compartment firewall. One purpose of this design was to use centrifugal force to get lubrication out to the valve gear in the cylinder heads. The throttle had two positions: closed and full power. The pilot used an ignition interrupter button for intermittent power to start a dive on enemy aircraft and to slow for landing. This rather hit-and-miss concept gave way quickly to the air-cooled carburetor radial engine we know today. In the U.S., most of these engines were built by the Pratt & Whitney, Curtiss Wright and Kinner companies. The cantilevered wing with internal strength provided by a main spar with the strength characteristics of a construction I-beam was developed by Dutchman Anthony Fokker, a major builder of com-

bat aircraft in Germany. The self-supporting wing was first used in the Fokker DR-1 triplane. After a test flight of the first DR-1, with lightly structured wire braced wings, led to a fatal crash due to wing failure, Fokker and his engineers returned to the drawing board to create a wing of self-sustaining strength. The new triplane was successfully test flown without any outer wing struts or wire bracing. However, high-ranking military decision makers refused to believe what they saw and insisted on outer-wing bracing. To get the order, Fokker sighed and put struts in even though he had proved them unnecessary. Both the new engines and the highstrength wing laid the foundation for the monoplane. Another important device was developed by Fokker’s engineers. It was a mechanical coordinator that would allow a machine gun to fire through the spinning propeller of a running engine without the risk of damaging the propeller. This allowed guns to be mounted

on the nose directly in front of the pilot and improve his aim at a flying target. Previously, machine guns had to be mounted on the top wing and were fired with a cable extending down into the cockpit. As the war went on, performance of the European fighter aircraft improved. Aerial combat was, after all, a form of competition as pilots sought to get and keep control of the airspace over the trench scarred battlefields. In early 1918, Anthony Fokker came up with his D-VII model. It was a strong biplane powered by both BMW and Mercedes engines. The BMW version had a top speed of 124 mph. That was fast for 1918. For most of the war, the parachute was unknown. This lifesaver was only used by barrage (observation) balloon crews. They could escape when attack set the hydrogen filled balloons afire. Battles between fighter pilots were often duels to the end of life for one or, in a few cases, both. In England, British designer T.O.M. Sopwith came up with both a biplane and a triplane. The biplane was nicknamed the “Camel” because of the humped cowling over the nose mounted synchronized guns. As the war came to an end, Fokker and many of his people, along with a trainload of D-VII fighters and equipment escaped back to Holland where work on aircraft design continued. The Fokker D-VII appeared in the Dutch Air Force, while Fokker and his crew turned their attention to transport aircraft, supplying tri-motors to both European and American fledging airlines. In 1922, he moved to the United States and became an American citizen. He established the Atlantic Aircraft Corporation and continued building transports. He died in New York in December 1939 at the age of 49.

The German Fokker D-VII was thought to be the best fighter of WW I. It was powered by both Mercedes and BMW engines.

The Fokker DR-1 triplane, the first aircraft to have cantilevered wings. The outer Wing struts seen are unnecessary. Anthony Fokker’s achievement made the streamined monoplane possible.

The world’s first aircraft carrier? The HMS Prgasus. Taken in 1918, it shows a Sopwith Camel taking off to attack enemy airships with the Lewis gun mounted on the top wing.

W

hen gunfire began in the First World War, the airplane was just 11 years old and had been in competition for five years. In America, however, the airplane was still an aerodynamic juvenile. No one had thought about using it to wage war. That would quickly change. The Europeans had moved far ahead of the U.S. in aircraft design and manufacturing, largely due to the willingness of their governments to invest in aviation. In 1913, for example, the French allocated $7.4 million for aircraft development while the U.S government spent a mere $125,000. As a result, during the opening years of World War I the American aviators were still flying fragile Wright and Curtiss pusher biplanes. While European designers were busy developing relatively high-performance combat aircraft, American exhibition pilot Lincoln Beachey and race car driver Barney Oldfield were amusing spectators by chasing each other around dirt racetracks. It was almost as though Americans had not yet figured out what an airplane could be used for. When the U.S. entered the war in 1917, there was no time to catch up in aircraft design. While American pilots were being trained on another Curtiss design, the JN-4 “Jenny” (powered with a 90 hp OX-5 engine), the government purchased combat aircraft from French manufacturers. One of the most popular was the S.P.A.D. “chasseur” (pursuit). When American squadron pilots arrived in France, they simply took delivery of their combat aircraft and upgraded their skills with a few practice hours. The war produced two major advancements in aeronautical engineer-

A Fokker triplane circa 1917. This type was flown in combat by baron Manfred Von Richtofen. He was known as the “Red Baron” in his triplane finished in red.

March 2012

The Curtiss JN-4 ‘Jenny” that trained U.S. Army pilots prior to their travel to France to fly French fighter aircraft (Photo byBrian Karli at Amarillo Texas in 1918/Holcomb's Aerodrome)

Visit In Flight USA’s website for the latest aviation news...www.inflightusa.com


March 2012

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Sun ‘n Fun Bldg. C Booths 78 & 79

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

8

ADVENTURES By Craig L. Fuller AOPA President and CEO

R

egardless of why you fly, you may occasionally find yourself in something of a rut. Whether you choose the same getaway destinations every weekend or fly the same routes for business time and again, it’s easy to forget how much fun it can be to break away from your routine and try something new. I recently had a chance to try something new with a five-day trip to the “out islands” of the Bahamas. And along the way I discovered that doing something different was both more fun and a whole lot easier than I had imagined.

Like many pilots who’ve never made this particular journey I had some misconceptions. First, I thought I’d be over open water for a long time. As it turns out, I was never more than 15 minutes from land, the sea below was delightfully calm, and the route was welltraveled. I’ve certainly spent longer over more isolated and hostile terrain. I also thought that dealing with customs requirements in the United States and the Bahamas might be highly complex. It wasn’t. Then, as a newbie to the experience, I imagined myself exploring uncharted territory. Not exactly. I spent a few days in Florida before

FAA ANNOUNCES END By Jim Moore for AOPA

T

he good news is, medical certificate applications submitted online should be processed more efficiently, medical certification processing errors should be reduced, and taxpayers should get a break on federal spending. However, the transition away from paper applications for medical certificates presents AOPA with some concerns for pilots who don’t currently use computers, and the FAA is about to make it mandatory: As of Oct. 1, 2012, aviation medical examiners will no longer accept paper applications. Federal Air Surgeon Fred Tilton announced the coming change to AMEs in the latest medical bulletin, calling on flight physicians to “significantly increase” use of the MedXPress system. The electronic medical certificate application system, introduced by the FAA in 2007, is relatively easy to use,

OF

IN

S

ome vintage aircraft owners got a big win in the FAA Authorization Bill signed Tuesday, Feb. 14 by President Obama, as the measure included an EAA-supported provision that authorizes the FAA to release certain type certificate and design data for aircraft no longer supported by a manufacturer. The specific element of the bill (Section 302) provides that the FAA can release “abandoned” data that is essential to safely maintain and operate vintage aircraft. That includes data for aircraft such as those built by long-defunct companies whose type certificates were not acquired

FLYING

heading to the Bahamas and I was amazed to discover that just about everyone I talked to had not only made the trip, but had wonderful recommendations about what to expect, where to stay, and how to get the most from the experience. Okay, so I wasn’t an intrepid explorer, but I did take great pleasure in learning from all those who had made the trip before me. When I arrived in the Bahamas I found the people to be extraordinarily gracious and welcoming. Not only are they accustomed to visitors arriving in private aircraft, they depend on it. As for the scenery, well, the beaches were pristine and the underwater world was vibrant.

And the food? Fresh lobster anyone? If you live almost anywhere along the East Coast, the journey to the Bahamas is a relatively short and easy one, and I’d encourage you to make it soon. For me, this trip was a mix of business and pleasure. That meant traveling with co-workers and lots of gear in the AOPA Caravan. Next time I’m planning to travel light, flying my Husky to these wonderful island destinations just for the joy of it. Of course, I know that your home base may be far from these island gems. If so, I encourage you to try something new in your own region. I’m guessing you’ll find, as I did, that the journey is easier–and more rewarding–than you could imagine.

PAPER MEDICAL CERTIFICATE APPLICATIONS

and offers several benefits to computersavvy pilots. Errors that once resulted from poor penmanship or transcription – errors that frequently resulted in delayed issuance of a medical certificate should no longer happen. The electronic system should also make application processing more efficient, with less time spent by AME and FAA staff. This, in turn, will allow the FAA staff to focus their efforts on the more complex medical certification cases that require additional time for review. AOPA director of medical certification services Gary Crump noted other improvements will be made possible as the electronic system is enhanced in the future, such as automatic completion of data that does not change from one application to the next, along with a planned enhancement of the system that would allow AMEs to scan pilots’ medical records directly into the system from their offices. The convenience of an online appli-

cation comes with some risks, however, for pilots who do not have access to a wired internet connection at their home or office. Using a public computer at a library, or a computer networked through a public wireless “hot spot,” such as at a coffee shop or internet café, could potentially compromise the security of medical information – especially if the user is unfamiliar with the need to completely log out of a program before leaving the computer for the next user. Between now and Oct. 1, AOPA will launch an education effort to be certain that pilots become familiar with the online application. AOPA will continue to work closely with the FAA to address members’ concerns that may arise between now and the implementation date. AOPA also will seek clarification of the future procedure for modifications to the application itself. The paper document, Form 8500-8, has been subject to approval by the Office of Management and Budget before any changes can be

VINTAGE AIRCRAFT OWNERS WIN By EAA .org

March 2012

or maintained. Three years is the initial threshold for inactivity. It also gives the FAA the authority to declare that data as abandoned, or releasable to the public if aviation safety will be enhanced by the information for aircraft, engines, propellers, and other aircraft appliances. “This is great progress for those who own and restore vintage aircraft and preserve our aviation legacy,” said H.G. Frautschy, executive director of the Vintage Aircraft Association, a special interest group within EAA. “EAA and VAA have been working for many years to eliminate this dilemma for those who want to own, fly, and display these magnificent aircraft. We have previously

IN

made, and it is not yet clear whether elimination of the paper document will affect that procedure. “On balance, this is a step in the right direction,” Crump said. “We encourage AOPA members to use the online application and contact us about any problems or issues that they encounter with MedXPress. We will act quickly to address with the FAA any problems brought to our attention.” Tilton, in his January briefing to AMEs, said a tracking system is planned that will allow pilots and examiners to check the status of applications; future enhancements could also allow for centralized access to medical documents and physician notes. Tilton noted that the FAA currently spends $150,000 a year to print, store, and distribute the paper form 8500-8, and the long-planned transition to an all-electronic application system is in keeping with laws and presidential orders intended to cut costs and increase efficiency.

FAA REAUTHORIZATION

sought and implemented policy and regulatory solutions to this dilemma. Each effort has failed under legal pressure on the FAA not to release solutions that could be considered proprietary or intellectual property. It was clear that a legislative solution would be required.” An additional amendment to the Reauthorization Bill (Section 816) requires the FAA to maintain engineering data relating to aircraft that were certificated between 1927 and 1939, and precludes the destruction of any such airworthiness and historically significant documentation. The amendment also eliminates the ability of type certificate holders from that period to force the FAA

to withhold such data under the claims of “trade secrets.” The amendment was proposed by longtime EAA member Greg Herrick, an owner and restorer of numerous vintage aircraft, and included in the legislation by Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO). “There are two initial and complementary victories contained in the nearly decade-long effort: the preservation and release of historically significant documentation necessary to restore and maintain truly antique pre-war aircraft contained in the Herrick Amendment, and the EAA initiative giving the FAA authority to release the design and airworthiness data for both pre- and postContinued on Page 32


March 2012

www.inflightusa.com

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

10

March 2012

THE LAST DEPLOYMENT OF THE USS ENTERPRISE

The USS Enterprise (CVN 65) was commissioned Nov. 25, 1961. In 2011 the ship celebrated its 50th year of service in the U.S. Navy. (Mike Heilman)

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n the fall of 2012 the United States Navy’s first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, the USS Enterprise (CVN65), will return from its 22nd and final deployment. The U.S. Navy has decided to decommission the ship after 51 years of service. The Enterprise is the eighth ship in U.S. Naval history to bear the name. It is the second aircraft carrier to be named Enterprise. The first Enterprise (CVN 6) served from 1936 until 1947. CVN 6 was a Yorktown class carrier and served in the Pacific fleet during World War II. This Enterprise was the first to receive the nickname the Big E. The Japanese nicknamed the carrier Grey Ghost because they reported that the Enterprise had been sunk on three separate occasions. In 2011 the U.S. Navy celebrated 100 years of naval aviation and Captain William Hamilton, Commander of the current Enterprise, put it in perspective, “If you consider when naval aviation became really viable in the late 1930s, about the time of the first Enterprise CVN 6, it was the first “Super Carrier.” If you say viable carrier aviation has been around 75 years, there has been an Enterprise for 67 years of that time.” Capt. Hamilton also added, “This Enterprise (CVN 65) has been around for half of the total time of naval aviation. This ship is a true icon in naval aviation.” The second Enterprise was commissioned on Nov. 25, 1961. The ship’s first mission was to track the flight of Alan Shepard in the Mercury spacecraft on May 5, 1962. In 1963 the Enterprise would take part in her first of many conflicts, when the ship supported the blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

The Enterprise is is due to retire in 2013 after 50 years of service. (Mike Heilman)

F/A-18C and F/A-18E setting on the USS Enterprise flight deck getting ready to launch. The Enterprise has three Super Hornet and one Legacy squadrons assigned to the carrier. (Mike Heilman) The Enterprise would play a major role in the Vietnam War. The carrier made six combat deployments from 1965 to 1972. In 1969, while in transit to Vietnam, an F-4 Phantom’s Zuni missile detonated on the flight deck and the fire quickly spread causing other aircraft’s bombs and missiles to detonate. The accident would claim 27 dead and hundreds wounded. John McCain, the future Senator from Arizona, was one of the pilots who escaped when his aircraft caught fire. In 1973 the Enterprise would head to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to be refitted to support the Navy’s newest jet fighter. In 1974 the Enterprise became Continued on Page 12


March 2012

www.inflightusa.com

11

Editorial

BACK By Ed Downs

T

he editorial staff of In Flight USA made a promise to our readers last August when it was decided to print monthly editorials that dealt directly with issues of concern to the aviation community. We promised to go beyond the usual tone of topical editorials, which smartly criticize a situation and or people and then back away from the subject, satisfied that word crafting alone will solve problems. We promised to make sure problem identification was accompanied by recommended solutions. We committed to changing or altering the content of In Flight USA when needed to address issues of importance. For example, our expressions of concern over national policies that effectively abandoned America’s leadership in space exploration and science has been answered by the inclusion of a new feature focused on enabling our readers to enjoy the transition from “The Skies to the Stars.” Recent political rhetoric and a continued strategy of creating a class struggle in America has resulted in an innocent bystander, business aviation, taking well publicized hits from political

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Founder ..................................................................................................................Ciro Buonocore Publisher/Editor................................................................................................Victoria Buonocore Managing Editor ........................................................................................................Toni F. Sieling Associate Editors ........................ Nicholas A. Veronico, Sagar Pathak, Richard VanderMeulen ..................................................................................................................................Russ Albertson Staff Contributors ......................................................................S. Mark Rhodes, Roy A. Barnes, .....................................................................................Clark Cook, Larry Nazimek, Joe Gonzalez, ........................................................................................Alan Smith, Herb Foreman, Pete Trabuco Columnists..................................Stuart Faber, Scott Schwartz, Larry Shapiro, Ed Wischmeyer, ..........................................................................................Marilyn Dash, Ed Downs, Anthony Nalli Production Editors ..............................................................................Anne Dobbins, Toni Sieling Copy Editing ............................................................................................................Sally Gersbach Advertising Sales Manager ........................................Ed Downs (650) 358-9908, (918) 873-0280 Web Design ..................................................................................................................Josh Nadler In Flight USA is published each month by In Flight Publishing. It is circulated throughout the continental United States. Business matters, advertising and editorial concerns should be addressed to In Flight USA, P.O. Box 5402, San Mateo, Calif. 94402 or by calling (650) 358-9908–fax (650) 358-9254. Copyright © 2008 In Flight Publishing. In Flight USA is not responsible for any action taken by any person as a result of reading any part of any issue. The pieces are written for information, entertainment and suggestion – not recommendation. The pursuit of flight or any action reflected by this paper is the responsibility of the individual and not of this paper, its staff or contributors. Opinions expressed are those of the individual author, and not necessarily those of In Flight USA. All editorial and advertising matter in this edition is copyrighted. Reproduction in any way is strictly prohibited without written permission of the publisher. In Flight USA is not liable or in any way responsible for the condition or airworthiness of any aircraft advertised for sale in any edition. By law the airworthiness of any aircraft sold is the responsiblity of the seller and buyer.

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airline travel, even an advanced LSA can more than compete with business airline travel in terms of cost and point-to-point travel time for trips of up to 500 miles. Step that up to a Cirrus and the airlines will find a strong competitor at distances of up to 1,500 miles. And remember, airlines now serve less than 10 percent of this country’s airports, with the other 90 Continued on Page 22 P.O. Box 5402 • San Mateo, CA 94402 (650) 358-9908 • Fax (650) 358-9254

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world? As in previous editorials, let’s look at it by the numbers. 1. Typical GA aircraft, often perceived as purely recreational, are definitely part of the business aviation scene. Many advanced singles, twins and light jets are operated by private individuals for primarily business purposes. It is their business use that makes them affordable. Given the hostility and inconvenience of

luminaries. While In flight USA has always carried news and features about the business side of aviation, the decision has been made to significantly enhance our coverage of this important partner in America’ s air transportation system. A dedicated page will highlight business applications of fixed-wing and rotor aircraft in addition to the technological advancements propagated by this sector of aviation. Additionally, In Flight USA will cover the services provided by America’s network of FBOs that specialize in serving this important sector of aviation. But, inclusion of such a dedicated section presents no shortfall of challenges. The subject matter to choose from is stunningly wide and diversified. Recent political remarks have basically painted a picture of “evil and wasteful corporate jets” as the mainstay of business aviation. Regrettably, the general public readily buys such rhetoric and the corporate jet has been vilified as the poster child of a corrupt free-enterprise system. The fact is the corporate jet is the smallest participant in the world of business aviation. So how would we explain business aviation to a critic of this multibillion dollar industry that employs hundreds of thousands of people around the

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

12

March 2012

The USS Enterprise Continued from Page 10 the first aircraft carrier to receive the F14A Tomcat fighter. The Big E made its seventh deployment on March 18 of that year with the new fighter. The F-14 and the Enterprise would star later in a movie called Top Gun. In 1986 on its 13th deployment, the Enterprise air wing participated in retaliatory strikes after the USS Samuel B. Roberts struck an Iranian mine. The attacks were against two Iranian oil platforms. The Iranians responded by sending armed speed boats and other ships out to attack American flagged ships. The Iranian ships were attacked and sunk by a US Navy surface ship and aircraft from the Enterprise. In 1989, the Enterprise participated in “Operation Classic Resolve” in the Philippines. President Bush sent the Enterprise and USS Midway in support of Philippines President, Corazon Aquino’s request for air support during the rebels coup attempt. It was the 14th deployment for Big E. On the carrier’s 15th Deployment in 1996 the air wing flew in support of “Operation Joint Endeavor” and supported the no-fly zone in Bosnia. The

wing flew nearly 700 missions during a three-week period. The Enterprise would return to support operations in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2003 to 2007. In April 2008, the Enterprise entered the Newport News shipyard for a scheduled 18-month overhaul. The cost of repairs came in much higher than originally estimated. The ship was slated to retire in 2015, but the Navy decided the cost was too high. The decision was made to put just enough money into the aging ship to continue sailing through 2013. In the Spring of 2012 the Big E will begin its 22nd and final deployment. The Enterprise has been a big part of naval aviation history. According to Cap.Hamilton, “The Enterprise is not only an icon in name, but we are going on our 22nd deployment in 50 years. We clearly have more deployments than other aircraft carriers, but also the rate is higher. We are not going on more because we are older, it is because we do the job as well as anyone.” The Enterprise is unique in that it was the only one of its class built for the Navy. The ship was the Navy’s first Continued on Page 13

An F/A-18F Super Hornet from VFA-211 “Checkmates” with the hook down coming in for landing on the USS Enterprise (CVN 65). VFA-211 is part of Carrier Air Wing One that is assigned to the Enterprise. (Mike Heilman) Enterprise also supported “Operation Southern Watch,” a no-fly zone in Iraq during the same deployment. The Enterprise would return to Iraq on the carrier’s 16th deployment in 1998 and participate in “Operation Desert Fox.” The Big E and it’s supporting ships attacked targets in Iraq over a three-day period.

On Sept. 11, 2001 the Enterprise was on its way home from the ship’s 17th deployment when the attacks occurred in New York and Washington. The Enterprise turned around and headed back to Southwest Asia. On Oct. 7 the air wing launched attacks against Taliban targets in Afghanistan. The carrier’s air

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March 2012

www.inflightusa.com

13

The USS Enterprise

Continued from Page 12 attempt at building a nuclear aircraft carrier. The Enterprise is the only nuclearpowered ship with eight individual reactors. The next generation Nimitz class carriers have only two reactors. The Enterprise is the largest and fastest carrier in the U.S. Navy fleet. This “one of kind” ship presents some unique situations for the crew. According to Capt. Hamilton, “There is no Enterprise “Parts-R-Us” anywhere. When something breaks or needs to be repaired there is no part on a shelf. You either fix what you have or go down to the machine shop and build what you need. When you compare us with other ships, as far as demand from the shore status, we are the lowest because our sailors are very self- sufficient.” “The Enterprise was a test model for the Navy,” said Marine Captain Talbot Harlin. He went on to say, “The island is as wide as it is long. This creates a giant area of disrupt air behind the ship that you don’t get on a Nimitz class ship. It makes it harder to land. The angle of the deck is at 11 degrees verses nine degrees (on Nimitz class) – the landing area is running away from you all the time. Basically, it presents you with some unique challenges.” Capt. Harlin is a pilot with VMFA-251 a Marine F/A-18C squadron assigned to Carrier Air Wing One. Lieutenant Jocelyn Liberg, a Naval Flight Officer (NFO) with VFA-211 and F/A-18F Super Hornet squadron assigned to the Enterprise, explains how it feels to be a part of the ships last deployment, “It’s a historic time for our country’s Navy and it’s a big deal. There is a lot that has happened on this ship and the name of this ship is historic. The ship has seen a lot and so have the people on it.” This is the second deployment for Lt. Liberg on the Enterprise. She explains that she will miss teamwork that you can only get from an older ship, “I will miss the comradery that comes from

An C-2A from VRC-40 “Rawhides” with the hood down coming in for landing on the USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The C-2A is commonly known as COD or Carrier Onboard Delivery. (Mike Heilman)

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An EA-2C from VAW-123 “Screwtops” with the hood down coming in for landing on the USS Enterprise (CVN 65). VAW-123 is part of Carrier Air Wing One that is assigned to the Enterprise. (Mike Heilman) being on an older vessel. There are different challenges that you don’t see on other ships and it brings everyone together in a way other ships can’t. Everyone has to find ways to work around problems that others don’t have to worry about.” “There are things unique about this carrier [Enterprise] that you won’t find anywhere else. First of all the history – The Enterprise has participated in so many more conflicts than the other carriers. I was on the flight deck the other day and I was thinking right here was where John McCain landed way back in Vietnam. Our naval aviation forefathers have landed on this boat over the last 50 years,” said Lieutenant Commander Mike Strauss, Tactics Officer with the EA-6B squadron VAQ-137 assigned to the Enterprise. VAQ-137 flies the EA-6B Prowler which is also retiring after the Enterprise returns from deployment. The squadron will transition to the E/A-18G Growler, but according to Lt. Cmdr. Strauss, “It is very exciting to be a part of the last deployment of the ship. It is exciting to be a part of the history. We will be the last Prowler squadron on the Enterprise. We are flying the Navy’s oldest airplane on the Navy’s oldest ship. That is amazing.” Continued on Page 18

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Aviation Ancestry

March 2012

by Scott Schwartz

B-29 SUPERFORTRESS-PART III

D

espite the inauspicious start to B29 bombing operations during WWII, raids on Japan itself were being flown by June, 1944. The first of these were flown on the 15th of that month, when 94 China-based Superfortresses bombed the Imperial Iron and Steel Works in Yawata, Japan. This raid was merely a harbinger of things to come. With the successful invasion of the Marianas, B-29s based there would now be able to strike at the heart of Japan itself. And so it was, that on Nov. 24, 1944, more than 100 B-29s departed from the Marianas and struck the Musashino Aircraft factory in Tokyo. From then on, things only became worse for the Japanese. During the months that remained until the atom bombs were dropped on Japan, most of Japan’s major cities were the targets of bombing with high explosive and incendiary bombs. Day and night raids wreaked havoc on Japanese cities. During one of the last “conventional” bombing raids, 836 B29s attacked Japan on Aug. 1, 1945. By

Pilots-eye view of B-29's dropping incendiary bombs over their targets. (Photo courtesy of the United States Air Force) the time that the incendiary/high explosive attacks had ceased, 34,000 sorties had been flown, 160,000 tons of bombs had been dropped, and 371 B-29s had been lost. One of the few major Japanese cities that had been spared from conventional

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attack was Hiroshima. Delivering the atomic bomb was more complicated than simply hoisting the weapon into the bomb bay of a B-29 and taking off. The size, shape, and weight of the bombs required special modifications to the aircraft in connection with what became known as Project Silverplate. Silverplate was the code name given to the atomic bomb missions, themselves. The modification program began with 17 B-29s being selected from the production line at random. From these aircraft, the remotely-fired gun systems were removed, and the turrets were faired over. The tail guns were left in place. Further, special bomb-racks, braces, shackles (designed by the British), release units (also designed by the British), and different bomb-bay doors were installed on these aircraft. Aside from the absence of the gun turrets and their associated sighting blisters, the Silverplate B-29s looked just like any other B-29. Wendover Army Air Base was the site of the atomic bomb “drop” tests, which ran through most of 1944. Well, they didn’t drop actual atomic bombs, but rather inert devices meant to simulate the size and weight of the actual weapons, for practice. In December of that same year, the first unit ever formed for the purpose of delivering nuclear weapons – the 509th Composite Group – was activated by the U.S. Army Air Forces.

Lest the reader think that the Hiroshima and Nagasaki missions were the only ones flown by the 509th during WWII, it should be noted that the group flew quite a few practice missions to deliver conventional weapons. On these missions, the group’s aircraft carried “counterfeit” markings of other units in order to maintain its low profile. All of the practice drops, aircraft modifications, and training paid off, of course. Flying the a B-29 that he named for his mother – Enola Gay – Colonel Paul Tibbets Jr. and his crew dropped a 9,000 pound atomic bomb (which was referred to as Little Boy) on the city of Hiroshima, Japan. The date was Aug. 6, 1945. A second atomic bomb was dropped on the city of Nagasaki, three days later, from a B-29 (named Bocks Car) flown by Major Charles Sweeney. Both cities were utterly destroyed, but the Japanese government didn’t make public its decision to surrender for six days. This was due primarily to haggling amongst Japanese government officials, as well as an attempted coup by fanatical officers who still wanted to fight to very nearly the last man, woman, and child. The idea was to inflict enough casualties on the Americans to force more favorable surrender terms. Nevertheless, Emperor Hirohito announced the surrender of Japan on Aug. 15, 1945. The final nonatomic B-29 mission had been flown on the previous day, when more than 740 B29’s attacked various targets throughout Japan. With the war over, large numbers of B-29s were ferried to bases in the United States for storage. Some were broken up for scrap, but many were put back into service with the newly-independent United States Air Force, during the late 1940s. The truth is that the B-29 was the only strategic bomber available while its replacements – namely the Convair B-36 and the Boeing B-47 – were under development. Once the newer bombers became available, the scrapping of the B-29 fleet was begun in earnest. However, the fire of the scrapper’s torch was extinguished, when another conflict broke out during the early 1950s. This new war would require the Superfortresses to fly combat missions in the Pacific skies once again.

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March 2012

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

March 2012

LONG-TERM FAA BILL SIGNED INTO LAW By Dan Namowitz for AOPA

F

or the first time since 2007, the FAA has the certainty of long-term authorization to operate the air traffic control system, build up airport infrastructure, and develop the air traffic control system of the future. On Feb. 14, President Barack Obama signed the conference committee report for the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. The bill provides a four-year, $63.4-billion authorization package for the agency, which has limped along on 23 short-term operating bills over the past five years. The president’s signature–on a bill that is free of user fees or fuel-tax increases–has been awaited since House and Senate approval of the conference report in recent days. Conference committee members of both parties still sparred on the merits of individual provisions but agreed broadly that passage of a long-term authorization measure for the FAA was long overdue. “Today we have in place sound multi-year policies that reform FAA programs, eliminate expensive ticket subsidies, modernize our air traffic control system, improve airport infrastructure, reduce air traffic delays, and create jobs,” said Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, and the sponsor of the bill in the House. “We appreciate the leadership of Chairman Mica in getting an FAA reauthorization measure through Congress,” said AOPA President Craig Fuller. “The FAA has worked for far too long with only shortterm extensions that simply couldn’t provide the stability needed to support longterm projects like NextGen modernization. “With the question of funding resolved through 2015, the FAA can focus on the real work ahead, from modernizing our air traffic system to improv-

ing our airport infrastructure. At the same time, the general aviation community can focus on recovery and growth in an industry that creates jobs, links communities, and serves as an important economic engine.” Mica noted that the new law contains reforms that “will provide the blueprint, metrics, benchmarks and performance goals necessary for developing” the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). “This critical effort to shift from our antiquated air traffic control technology to a GPS-based system will improve air traffic efficiency and safety, reduce fuel burn and pollution from aircraft, and bring costs down for consumers,” he said. AOPA reported Feb. 6 that the bill authorizes $13.4 billion in Airport Improvement Program funding. It contains language on through-the-fence operations ensuring that general aviation airport sponsors not be considered in violation of federal grant assurances for entering an agreement with a property owner adjacent to the airport for airport access. The bill also established a timeline for the issuance of improved, tamper-resistant pilot certificates that can accommodate a photograph, digital photograph, biometric identifier, or other unique identifier. Other provisions include requiring the Transportation Security Administration to use qualified private screeners, working under federal supervision, and a veterans’ preference for small businesses owned by disabled veterans of the Afghanistan/Iraq conflict, and the Persian Gulf War. “We applaud the president for signing a four-year FAA reauthorization bill and for all the hard work that went into this bill,” said Lorraine Howerton, AOPA vice president of legislative affairs. Congress must still approve annual appropriations to fund the FAA at the levels authorized in the bill signed by the president.

SHUSTER APPOINTED CONFEREE ON FAA REAUTHORIZATION BILL In January, Congressman Bill Shuster was named as a conferee to the FAA Reauthorization and Reform Act by Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-OH): “I appreciate being selected as a conferee for this critical legislation,” Shuster said. “We have kicked the can down the road on reauthorizing the FAA

for far too long. I look forward to representing the House in finalizing legislation that will make important reforms to FAA, modernize our air traffic control system, improve our aviation infrastructure, and promote safety.” In his capacity as a conferee, Shuster Continued on Page 19


March 2012

Contrails

www.inflightusa.com

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by Steve Weaver

THE 104TH AIRCRAFT RECOVERY SQUADRON

I

was driving the other day when I spotted a small airplane, mounted on a trailer and being towed down the interstate. I was wondering what sad occasion had brought it to such a low state and I fell to thinking about my old friend Willie Mason and the “104th Aircraft Recovery Squadron.” Willie came into my life in the late 60s as a flying student, while I was teaching flying and running a small country airport. Something between us clicked and in the process of teaching him about flying we became great friends. Through the next few years he taught me about the art of the small adventure. He was upbeat and funny and I loved the way he could wring joy out of the simplest things. Soon it was a given, that on the rare occasions that I could get away from the airport, Willie would appear and we would be off on yet another silly quest. One mission we repeated many time and which my wife came to refer to as our “old cars and old bars routine” consisted of visiting abandoned farms and looking for old cars left in the ruins. What the plan was if we found one I can’t recall, but I do remember the thrill of the chase – and yes, there always seemed to be an old bar involved during the trip home. Our bottle dig was another grand adventure. Willie had learned the location of the old town dump in his town – from a time when the garbage was picked up by horse and wagon – and we decided there was a fortune in old bottles awaiting us there. With shovels and sacks we made our way through the wooded terrain until we reached the gully that was said to be the site. An hour of digging proved the treasure map to be true and we started hitting pay dirt. Each time we heard the shovel hit glass we would carefully brush the dirt of decades away, extract our treasure and put it with the others. I can’t remember what happened to the burlap bag of old bottles we brought out of the woods, but I do remember how triumphant I felt coming home with our booty. On another occasion, I was anxious to try out the little trail motorcycle I’d purchased so I called Willie and asked if he could meet me for a motorcycle ride. He said he didn’t own a motorcycle, but his nephew did and he would borrow it and meet me. Early the next morning he drove up to our rendezvous in his truck, but with no motorcycle in sight. He dismounted, walked to the rear of the truck and took the smallest motorcycle I’d ever

seen down from the truck bed. It was no taller than my knees and the wheels looked as if they’d been borrowed from a lawn mower. The nephew, as it turned out, had yet to see his ninth birthday. Undaunted, Willie mounted up, or actually mounted down as the case was, and we whizzed away, down the dirt road that was our route for the day. I was laughing so hard at the bizarre sight of him that I could hardly control my bike. I followed dutifully as he roared along at his top speed of 25 mph, his knees positioned just about even with his ears. As we passed a large farmhouse about a mile into our trip, a very fast and very mean farm dog burst from the yard and went for Willie. I dropped back so as not to run over the dog while he had my friend in his mouth, and they disappeared around a turn in a shower of dust and gravel, the dog actually looking taller than Willie on the bike. Around the next turn I met the dog trotting back with a satisfied look on his face and had the thought that this did not bode well. I soon came upon Willie, a jumble of wrecked bike, ripped coveralls and skinned flesh, in a heap by the side of the road. He reported that he’d actually outrun the dog, but lost control of the bike doing it, and thought next time he’d just let the dog bite him. It wasn’t surprising then, when it was time to retrieve a downed airplane that Willie was the one I called on. I owned a trailer that had been modified to haul a disassembled aircraft and for whatever reason, it seemed to get plenty of use. Today an airplane roosting in some spot other than an airport would be far reaching news, but looking back to those heady days, it seemed to be rather a matter of course. I would get a call to pick up a downed airplane in Farmer such and so’s cornfield and I’d call Willie, hook up the trailer and we’d set out on another adventure. It happened so often that he started referring to us as, “The 104th Aircraft Recovery Squadron.” Sometimes we didn’t have far to go. I recall one week in 1969 when we had downed airplanes off both ends of our own 1,600-foot sod strip. One, a Cherokee 160 was setting on a race track a half mile off the east end of the strip and the other, a PA-12 was squatting in a corn field 300 feet off the west end, both victims of too much load for the available runway. The fence at each end of the strip made sure there was no fudging on the length of the runway, and both airplanes had hit it, one on Friday and the other the next day.

I didn’t witness the PA-12 accident, but the pilot had flown in to meet friends and wanted to give them a ride before he left. He loaded the back seat with two big people and found too late that the day was too hot and his engine too weary to lift them all over the fence. The airplane caught the top strand of barbed wire and made a sort of crumpled landing in the adjoining cornfield. There were no injuries, only minimal damage to the airplane, but of course major damage to the pilot’s pride. The second accident ended very differently and could have been a major tragedy. Again, the pilot had flown in to visit family and again, airplane rides were to be given to the whole family before departure. I happened to be outside working on an airplane when the pilot and his considerable entourage arrived and I watched with disbelief as he loaded three passengers into the airplane. A Cherokee 160 is far from a STOL aircraft and that was exactly what was needed to lift that load out of this short strip on such a hot summer day. The little wind that was blowing was across the strip and shifty, first favoring one runway, then the other. The engine started and as I watched, the pilot’s window opened and the pilot motioned for me to come over and speak to him. ‘Which runway would you use today?’ he asked. I replied that the runway I would use was located at another airport and much longer that this one. He thanked me, closed the window and taxied out. He chose to use the west strip and his take off run was slow, way slow and as he approached the fence he was still on the ground. At the last minute he gave a mighty heave on the controls and the airplane staggered into the air, missing the fence by less than a foot. I decided to be gracious when the shaken pilot came back and confessed that that had been the dumbest thing he’d done for a while, and went on working on the Cub. Soon the Cherokee landed and taxied up to the hangar. The three passengers were discharged but the pilot remained at the controls and three more people marched up to the airplane and got in. I was dumfounded. The airplane started and taxied out, this time using the east-facing strip. I called to Glen, our mechanic working in the hangar, and asked if he’d like to witness an airplane crash. The outcome was so predictable that I thought if I had time, I could sell tickets to this disaster. I wondered how anyone could do this, given the narrow escape that he’d just had.

The takeoff run seemed even slower than the first, and approaching the fence it seemed impossible that the airplane could rise over it. Again, at the last moment came the desperate pull on the controls and the airplane, amazingly, left the ground and cleared the fence by inches. But this time the stabilator met a fence post with a whack that we could hear from where we stood, and the airplane staggered. It remained flying though, and the nose continued to rise. Later we learned that the collision with the post had locked the stabilator in a fixed position and the only controls left to the pilot were the ailerons and rudder and of course, throttle. The pilot, for all his bad decisions, kept his head and reduced the power and kept the airplane from stalling. As it continued to the east Glen, I ran to a car and started to follow its path. A halfmile later we came upon the airplane in the middle of an old horse racing track, damaged but still in one piece, with the pilot and passengers standing about congratulating each other on being alive. Another one of our trips to rescue a downed airplane involved one of my airplanes. It was a Champ that I had sent to Tennessee for a prospective buyer to look at. My young instructor, Skip, filled with the enthusiasm of youth and the desire to log hours, volunteered for the trip. My assessment of Skip was that he was long on pilot skills but that his judgment hadn’t reached its full growth yet. Against my better instincts I let him take the trip. All went smoothly on the trip down, but returning found him flying long after the non-night-equipped airplane should have been on the ground. Faced with continuing on until it got really dark or doing an off airport landing in the remaining dusk, Skip chose to set down in a field on a mountain top in Southern West Virginia. The landing was perfect, but the corn stalks were thicker than they looked from the air and finally physics caught up with the Champ and it came to a halt before it was done landing. The call I got from Skip said the airplane was on its back in the middle of a corn field and it looked as if the only damage was one bent strut. The next morning found Willy Mason and I south bound with a spare strut lashed to the top of the car. We reached the airplane about noon and set about righting it and installing the strut. By this time the local grapevine had Continued on Page 18


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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The USS Enterprise

Continued from Page 13 What is next for the Enterprise after it returns in the Fall of 2012? “When we come home from deployment in the fall the Enterprise will be inactivated,” said Capt. Hamilton. “We can’t say decommissioned yet because as long as there is nuclear fuel onboard it has to be USS and has be commissioned. The ship will be deactivated and will never sail again.

“The ship will be stripped of useful stuff that other ships can use. That will take about six months of hard work to do. The ship will then go to a dry dock at Newport News Shipyard to dismantle the remainder of the ship and remove the nuclear fuel. Then at that point the ship will be decommissioned. It will be 2018 before the ship is totally dismantled.” The Enterprise will not be turned into

a museum according to Capt. Hamilton, “The reason is because the defueling is so intrusive that you will hardly be able to tell it was an aircraft carrier. The flight deck will have to be cut off and spaces below removed. To turn back the ship into something that looks like an aircraft carrier would cost millions of dollars.” Capt. Hamilton went on to reflect on his time on the Enterprise, “I will not

March 2012

miss the piece of steel, because the Enterprise is not the steel, it’s the sailors. We estimate that more than 200,000 sailors have served on the ship over 50 years. I hope I don’t miss the name. I hope the name gets carried over to another ship. We are the eighth Enterprise in the U .S. Navy. It started out with a sloop that Benedict Arnold stole from the British in 1775 and the name has kept going on and off for all that time.” The Enterprise has had several mottos such as “The first, the finest” and “A class of her own.” The current motto, “we are legend” seems to be the best fit for the final deployment of one the greatest warships ever built. Hopefully the U.S. Navy will continue the legacy of the Enterprise by naming the next aircraft carrier after the Big E.

Contrails Continued from Page 17

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spread the word that an airplane had landed on Phifer Mountain and the fools were going to try to fly it out. A crowd had assembled before we arrived and as we worked on the airplane people kept coming until the field was swarming with excited mountaineers. Since the corn had been harvested from the stalks, the farmer was kind enough to lend me his tractor and a drag, and I proceeded to drag the corn stocks flat in the direction that I intended to take off. When I was done and I dismounted the tractor, I found Willy laughing until tears were streaming down his face. When he could speak again he pointed to a small, wizened lady who looked to be almost 90 years old and the very picture of a mountain grandmother. She had come up to him and silently looked into his face. She then looked at the airplane, then at the trees bordering the field and finely she looked at young Skip standing nearby. Looking back at Willy, who was ready for her pronouncement that a miracle had occurred on this mountain in the sparing of young Skip’s life, she said in her thin mountain drawl, “The little son of a bitch lucked out, didn’t he?” Sometime later someone borrowed my trailer and forgot to bring it back and the next year we moved to an airport with a paved runway, a tower and a much less relaxed attitude about off-airport landings. Flying at this airport more closely resembled the FAA’s idea of safe and prudent operation of certified aircraft and the demand for the 104th Aircraft Recovery Squadron tailed off. In the years since, I’ve been involved in the recovery of other downed airplanes, but I can’t recall laughing as much doing it as I did with my friend Willy Mason.


March 2012

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PILOT’S BILL

OF

RIGHTS INTRODUCED

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IN

HOUSE

Companion Bill to EAA-Supported Senate Measure Unveiled Last Summer By EAA.org

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ongtime EAA member Rep. Sam Graves (R-MO), along with Rep. Dan Lipinski (D-IL), have jointly introduced the House version of the “Pilot’s Bill of Rights” that would provide aviators with more protection and access to information in FAA enforcement proceedings. The bill (H.R. 3816) is a companion bill to the U.S. Senate version (S. 1335) introduced last July by EAA member Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK). That Senate bill, which was outlined to aviators by Sen. Inhofe last summer at EAA AirVenture 2011, already has 60 co-sponsors. Rep. Graves, chairman of the House General Aviation Caucus, and Rep. Lipinski, also an active member of the Caucus, are currently seeking additional co-sponsors for their proposal. EAA and AOPA, as well as Helicopter Association International, the National Business Aviation Association, and the Recreational Aviation Foundation are industry supporters of the bill. The House measure contains four key elements: 1. More protection and access to information during FAA enforcement proceedings 2. Requires the FAA to initiate a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) improvement program 3. Requires that Flight Service Station briefings and other air traffic services provided by any government contractor be available through a Freedom of Information Act request 4. A review of the FAA medical certification process and forms, with a goal of greater clarity to reduce instances of misinterpretation.

Shuster Appointed Continued from Page 16 will help represent the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee during House and Senate negotiations to reconcile differences in the legislation approved by each body. Shuster will play an active role in crafting the final legislative package that will move through Congress and ultimately become law.

“Having companion bills introduced in both houses of Congress is a major step forward in advancing this legislation that will benefit aviators,” said Doug Macnair, EAA’s vice president of government relations, who assisted in crafting

the original legislation. “We thank Representative Graves for championing this issue and hope to build the sort of support in the House that has already been seen in the Senate. We encourage EAA members to contact their congres-

sional representatives and urge them to co-sponsor this bipartisan measure.” EAA members can find and contact their congressional representatives on the Find Your Representative website.


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March 2012

GAMA WARNS OF THE REPERCUSSIONS OF PROPOSALS AGAINST GA IN THE PRESIDENT’S NEW BUDGET On Feb. 13, 2012, the White House released their blueprint for the Fiscal Year 2013 budget which sets the Administration’s spending parameters. Manufacturing, which is identified as a key to lifting the economy and creating jobs, remains a cornerstone of the Administration’s priority to turn the U.S. economy around and address the nation’s debt. The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) welcomes the proposals to extend 100 percent depreciation for one additional year and the research and development (R&D) tax credit permanently. However, general aviation manufacturers remain confounded by the inclusion of proposals that would hurt the economic recovery of the general aviation manufacturing industry and cost jobs. “As an industry, we understand the urgency to address the fiscal challenges facing the United States,” said Pete Bunce, president and CEO of the General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA). “However, we have tremendous concerns about debt-reduction proposals like user fees and changes to the general aviation aircraft depreciation schedule. We look forward to being partners with the Administration and Congress in finding ways to strengthen the U.S. fiscal situation, but general aviation manufacturers will not stand for any proposals that threaten safety, jeopardize jobs or endanger the full recovery of the industry.” Specifically, GAMA has grave reservations regarding the president’s new tax, guised as a user fee, which would require a $100 per flight fee on operators who fly in controlled airspace. This tax, which Congress has repeatedly rejected, would not only impose a significant new administrative burden on gen-

eral aviation, but it would also necessitate the creation of a costly new federal collection bureaucracy. General aviation has long paid its fair share through an efficient per-gallon fuel charge at the pump and there is no rationale for change. GAMA also remains baffled that the Administration continues to propose that the depreciation schedule for general aviation aircraft used for business purposes should be altered. Changing from a fiveyear to a seven-year depreciation schedule in the United States will hinder recovery of the largest aircraft market in the world. Moreover, the overheated rhetoric surrounding this tax provision is harmful to the revitalization of the industry. “If President Obama is truly sincere in his goal to increase U.S. manufacturing and exports, which he repeatedly cites as key to economic recovery and long-term viability, his Administration should embrace general aviation manufacturers and its workforce as a part of the solution, not a target,” added Bunce. “We do not understand how the Administration on the one hand can propose 100 percent depreciation for an additional year to strengthen the economy and at the same time attempt to lengthen the depreciation schedule for general aviation aircraft in 2013 and beyond. These two proposals are diametrically opposed.” The Fiscal-Year 2013 budget is sent to Congress as a guideline for Administration priorities, but Congress has the authority to determine its own spending parameters. Therefore, GAMA will work with members on both sides of the aisle to convey the ramifications of these proposals, while also underscoring the benefits of investment in manufacturing.

NBAA BLASTS LATEST USER FEE PUSH IN PRESIDENT’S BUDGET PROPOSAL Association Looks to Members, Congress to Help Stop the Threat The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA denounced the latest attempt from the White House to impose a per-flight user fee on general aviation, and said industry would need to engage Congress to stop the renewed threat. Per-flight user fees are included in President Obama's fiscal year 2013 federal spending proposal, released on Feb. 13, which sets budgets for government agencies. Specifically, page 30 of the

president's budget overview states: “...the Administration proposes to create a $100 per flight fee, payable to the Federal Aviation Administration, by aviation operators who fly in controlled airspace.” Although the general aviation community has been unified in opposing user fees for decades, the president has continually supported the fees, calling for them first in 2009 as part of his annual budget Continued on Page 22


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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Continued from Page 20 outline. Last year, he renewed his call for user fees as part of his proposal for addressing the nation's deficit. More recently, the White House wrote to individuals who had signed a petition asking the president to reconsider his support for user fees. The White House message, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why We Need User Fees,â&#x20AC;? explicitly mentioned business aircraft in making its case for the new fees. Bolen noted that in none of these developments did the White House highlight the fact that the general aviation community pays for its use of the aviation system through the proven, efficient fuel tax. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ideally, the president would work with general aviation to acknowledge not only this contribution, but also the industry's value in generating jobs, helping companies compete and succeed, and providing a lifeline to communities across the country,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead, he's repeatedly proposed anti-general aviation initiatives like this one.â&#x20AC;? Along with the concern raised by the president's user fee proposal, Bolen said the White House budget sends a mixed message on two other key issues: funding for a Next Generation (â&#x20AC;&#x153;NextGenâ&#x20AC;?) air traffic system, and depreciation schedules on business aircraft. The budget would increase NextGen investment by $99 million over the previous fiscal year; however, the document calls for cuts to airport improvement grants by $926 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While we commend the president's acknowledgement of the need to expedite modernization with an increased NextGen investment, we also know that a continued investment in airport upgrades is an investment in the future of the nation's air traffic system,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Airports are fundamental to NextGen, and you can't promote one without supporting the other.â&#x20AC;? A similar mixed signal involves the budget's reference to depreciation schedules. In its budget overview, the White House declares that â&#x20AC;&#x153;continuing to allow

businesses to write-off the full amount of new investmentsâ&#x20AC;? will help â&#x20AC;&#x153;jumpstart job creationâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but the same budget goes on to call for extending the depreciation on the purchase of business aircraft from the traditional five-year timeframe to seven years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clearly the president believes shrinking depreciation schedules creates jobs, and we agree with him on that,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead of proposing a lengthening of the depreciation schedule, we should focus on shrinking them now and in the future.â&#x20AC;? Bolen added that, as with previous punitive proposals from the White House, those in the Administration's budget should be taken seriously â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but that as in the past, the key to stopping proposals the industry opposes is for people to mobilize and call upon Congress to take action. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proposals from the White House are serious business â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly if, like the user fee plan and the proposal to change aircraft depreciation in the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual budget â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are designed to raise revenue,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But White House proposals cannot become law unless they are approved by Congress. Over the past several years, the general aviation community has worked with Congress to successfully beat back a number of bad ideas proposed by the White House â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we can do it again by getting everyone active and engaged with their elected officials.â&#x20AC;? For example, Bolen said, NBAA Members can make their voices heard with their representatives in Congress through NBAA's online Contact Congress resource, which has a letter that can be sent to lawmakers opposing user fees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;NBAA will continue to advocate for the industry's priorities as Congress considers the president's latest budget proposal, and our efforts will be most effective if the people in business aviation echo our message with their elected representatives,â&#x20AC;? Bolen said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I encourage everyone in general aviation to contact their elected officials today.â&#x20AC;?

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Continued from Page 11 percent open to the GA business traveler. The fact is, business use of GA type aircraft has grown so recognizable that even the NTSB maintains separate safety records for this type of flying, which does very well from a statistical standpoint. 2. Perhaps the most recognizable use of business aircraft is the air taxi side of business aviation. These are â&#x20AC;&#x153;on-callâ&#x20AC;? services that meet stiff FAA requirements for training, equipment maintenance and operational safety. Aircraft used vary

from light, single-engine fixed-wing and rotorcraft to large airline type turbojets. Many classic air-taxi operations have expanded their business by becoming managers for shared-ownership type operations, which now have a set of FARs dedicated to this special form of on-call jet transportation. Corporations will join forces and jointly own a corporate plane, which is maintained and crewed by an air taxi type business. These aircraft are flown and maintained Continued on Page 24


March 2012

www.inflightusa.com

OODIES AND ADGETS

One of the truly great things about being an aviation buff is the number of “Goodies and Gadgets” available to play with. Here In Flight USA has collected a few new ones worthy of your consideration.

The Third Rail Portable Charging System The Third Rail System is the world’s thinnest battery-enabled protective case that allows you to add extra power when you need it, and remove it when you don’t. The extra Smart Batteries can also be used to charge 100s devices. Initially for the iPhone 4/4S, the Third Rail System is comprised of a protective case (Slim Case) and a universal, removable battery (Smart Battery). The Smart Battery can be connected to the Slim Case when power is needed, and removed when it isn’t. It can also serve as a stand-alone universal charger for other devices. Functioning as a protective case, a power case, a portable external charger and a power hub for charging multiple devices at one time, this universal power system replaces all existing charging accessories. Available at Airport Wireless, Techshowcase, select Inmotion store, www.ThirdRailMobility.com and 855/3RD-RAIL.

23

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Rain B Gon Rain B Gon is a rain repellent, which will dramatically improve your wet weather flying, riding or driving visibility, whether in rain, sleet or snow. Rain B Gon rain repellent is a hydrophobic coating technology that forms a chemical bond and causes the raindrops to bead up and blow away from the windshield. This new innovative technology is designed especially for plastic Acrylic and Lexan windshields, and has no alcohol which can harm plastic. It is safe to use on glass windshields also, for cars, RV’s, boats and trucks. It can be applied on painted surfaces, and aids in easy removal of salt, ice, frost, insects and mud. Rain B Gon is available through Aircraft Spruce and can be found at www.aircraftspruce.com. For more information, please contact Aircraft Spruce at 877/477-7823 and reference part number 09-03487.

Motorcycles Take Flight MotoPOD LLC has developed a motorcycle loading system for personal airplanes. A patent-pending collection of ramps and fixtures allows the pilot to load and secure a street-legal motorcycle while a built-in winch system, powered by a cordless drill, does all the work. After landing, it takes just a few minutes to remove the motorcycle and ride away in James Bond-style. Why carry a motorcycle? Most of the country’s 5,400 small airports don’t have ground transportation services. That’s a really big problem for personal aviation... or at least it was. By carrying a motorcycle, pilots can enjoy convenient ground transportation at every stop. MotoPOD customers travel more freely, visit new places and explore their destinations. MotoPOD LLC President, David Shelton, says, “We’re trying to support a paradigm shift and change the way in which people use airplanes. Integrated air plus ground transportation achieves more of the utility that we demand from our automobiles and provides more places to go and things to do. What percent of every-day destinations just happen to be fly-in destinations? To a motorcycle pilot, they are all “fly-in” destinations.” Tool or toy? MotoPOD says both. Mike Thornton of Texas, flies his Cherokee 6 for business, landing at small airports to quote jobs. He currently keeps old cars at several airports that he visits frequently, soon to be replaced by his MotoLOAD system. Steve Reed of Wisconsin, is looking forward to “the freedom of flying wherever I wish, whenContinued on Page 24

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24

Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

March 2012

Editorial

Continued from Page 22 owner who might use his personal plane for the furtherance of his personal business. This merger of classic air taxi operators with shared ownership has greatly expanded the use of corporate aviation. 3. Many corporations own and operate what amounts to mini airlines with a full-time staff and services. These corporations are now crossing over to the shared ownership side of the market to defer cost, but some major corporate operations continue to flourish. This writer has worked in such an environment, and the wide range of aircraft made going to work fun. Aircraft I flew ranged from a DC-3 to a Lockheed JetStar, with everything in between. Did that mean we had a lot of executives flying around in luxury? Not a chance, as this mini airline was used to transporting highly skilled specialist to a variety of remote points throughout the U. S. And this writer’s personal experience is not unique. 4. Many FBOs specialize in executive services for business aircraft. This writer has used, and continues to use, these types of facilities when I fly cross country. They typically have excellent services, 24-hour maintenance, very nice pilot lounges (full R&R facilities) and hangar availability for transient aircraft. A visit to one of these FBOs will make one swear off airline terminals and remind old timers of the days when flying from one place to another was an almost formal event. Thousands of skilled technicians work for these fine businesses and FAA certified maintenance and overhaul services are the rule. Many GA pilots tend to avoid these big guys and miss out on a rewarding experience. Give it a try, and check out their information center for a copy of In Flight USA. Yes, our new business aviation page will have plenty to choose from. And

don’t think this is not for you just because your executive airplane is a Cessna 150. Technology and equipment highlights will be amazingly applicable to all forms of flying. We invite our business friends to send us news announcements. We openly invite service providers to keep us up to date with what is happening in your region. Let us help you answer recent negativity with positive, accurate, information. Finally, let’s deal with the elephant in the room. What does an aviation enthusiast do when confronted with open criticism of the use of business or corporate aircraft? Simply ask the negative commenter to explain why the critic is hiding behind a machine, and not addressing the people of concern. Bad guys who rob a bank may use a Ford as a get-a-way car. The focus is on getting the bad guys, not on vilifying Ford. This is as it should be. But the recent financial bad guys and those who have taken taxpayer handouts for personal gain, along with the federal agencies and politicians who aided them, are not the subject of rhetorical focus. Instead, “tough talk” is directed at the machines they use. Folks, that is a classic us of “spin” that misdirects criticism away from the true culprits and selects a highly visible alternate that many envy and/or do not understand. This writer has searched his memory carefully, and cannot remember ever seeing a Cessna Citation sneaking money out of a bank, taking taxpayer bailouts or foreclosing a home. Ask your critic to clearly explain what their problem is with those using the machine being criticized, and then ask them if they plan to do more than just gripe. Suggest that promoting the destruction of a totally uninvolved industry is not a proper response when dealing with disreputable individuals. Give it a try.

Goodies and Gadgets Continued from Page 23 ever I wish, without worrying about ground transportation.” MotoLOAD is manufactured from welded aluminum tubing and the entire system may be inserted or removed from an airplane in seconds. After loading the motorcycle into a wheeled “sled,” it’s tipped onto one side, then winched into the aircraft cabin. Once inside, additional fixtures guide the motorcycle into position and the entire package is secured with seatbelts. Products are currently available for the popular Piper PA-32/34 series airplanes and the company has hinted that other models are on the way. It’s designed to haul the MotoCYCLE, a custom aviation motorcycle with folding handlebars, no-spill plumbing and other features. MotoCYCLE is lightweight, street-legal and provides highway performance for two. Complete packages cost less than $15,000; around the average price for a Harley-Davidson. It’s a little quieter in the rumble department but it can do what other motorcycles can’t... fly. For more information contact David Shelton at 847/651-4373 or visit www.motorcyclepilot.com


www.inflightusa.com

March 2012

25

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

26

WORLDWIDE GA SHIPMENTS The General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA) has announced the 2011 worldwide shipments and billings figures for general aviation airplanes. Speaking at GAMA’s “State of the Industry” press conference, GAMA’s 2012 Chairman Caroline Daniels, chairman and CEO of ATP, reported that industry shipments were relatively flat in 2011 although total billings were up a fraction of a percent. At year’s end, worldwide shipments of general aviation airplanes totaled 1,865 units, as compared to 1,932 airplanes deliv-

AND

ered in 2010. This represents a 3.5 percent decline. Worldwide general aviation billings grew by 0.4 percent in 2011 to $19.1 billion as compared to the previous year. The piston airplane segment shipped a total of 860 units in 2011, compared to 873 units in 2010, a 1.5 percent decline. The turboprop sector was down 2.4 percent, shipping 324 units in 2011, compared to 332 units the previous year. The business jet sector declined 6.3 percent with 681 airplanes shipped, compared to 727 jets in 2010. “Shipments declined in all three industry segments from the previous year,

March 2012

BILLINGS MIXED

but the declines reached single digits which indicate general aviation is reaching the trough in this cycle,” said Daniels. “The large-cabin, long-range business jet category remained sound and mid-size business jets saw growth. This resulted in a small uptick in billings for 2011.” “A majority of the market fundamentals are moving in the right direction. Corporate profits remain at record high levels, the used market and flight activity made year over year improvements, and emerging markets are driving new sales,” continued Daniels. “Like last year, our

IN

2011

greatest concern remains the lack of financing. Latent demand in the market exists and an ease in the credit markets could help boost our industry into positive growth once again.” 2011 vs 2010 Shipments of Airplanes Manufactured Worldwide** 2010 2011 Change Pistons 873 860 -1.5% Turboprops 332 324 -2.4% Business Jets 727 681 -6.3% Total Shipped 1,932 1,865 -3.5% Total Billings $19.0B $19.1B +0.4% Continued on Page 34

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LIGHTSQUARED FACES EVER INCREASING OPPOSITION, BUT GPS NOT SAVED YET EAA Calls for Members Comments to the FCC By EAA.org

A

fter the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) concluded that LightSquared’s wireless broadband signals interfere with millions of GPS devices in use today - including for aviation navigation - the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced on Feb. 15 that it is asking for more public comments prior to making the final decision to withdraw the Conditional Waiver Order issued to LightSquared last year. Withdrawing the Conditional Waiver Order will kill LightSquared plans to establish a high-speed wireless data network. The final FCC decision is anticipated no later than March 31, 2012, and if the waiver is canceled it gives a complete victory to the Save Our GPS Coalition, of which EAA is a member. The coalition has been vehemently opposing LightSquared’s proposal for the past year. Lawrence Strickling, NTIA assistant

secretary for communications and information, informed FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski that LightSquared’s proposed mobile broadband network will impact GPS services, “and there is no practical way to mitigate the potential interference at this time.” The FCC then announced it would vacate the Conditional Waiver Order to LightSquared and suspend indefinitely the company’s Ancillary Terrestrial Component authority, or the authority to operate cell towers. “The Commission clearly stated from the outset that harmful interference to GPS would not be permitted,” read a statement from FCC spokesperson Tammy Sun. “This is why the Conditional Waiver Order issued by the Commission’s International Bureau prohibited LightSquared from beginning commercial operations unless harmful interference issues were resolved.” “EAA is deeply gratified to learn that the FCC is favorably contemplating the recommendations of the fair and impartial

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evaluation by the NTIA, thus potentially saving GPS from being swamped by the high-powered, round-based signals proposed by LightSquared,” said Doug Macnair, EAA vice president of government relations. “All of us who carry portable wireless devices are eager to have ubiquitous wireless broadband service and would love for an effort such as LightSquared to be successful, but not at the risk of compromising aviation safety and jeopardizing the welfare of pilots and their passengers.” “The general aviation community and other industries that rely on GPS banded together on this issue and worked hard on Capitol Hill and with various federal agencies to ensure that the harmful effects on GPS of the LightSquared proposal and their ramifications were fully understood,” he added. “This is another successful example of EAA President Rod Hightower’s principle that we are indeed ‘stronger together.’” Based on the Feb. 15 FCC letter calling for additional public comments, EAA

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is once again asking members to submit thoughts to the FCC regarding the LightSquared proposal. EAA recommends your comments focus on these three points: 1. How you use GPS technology in your business and/or personal life 2. What would happen to your business/personal life if GPS became unavailable or unreliable 3. That the FCC should formally adopt the NTIA recommendations and deny LightSquared the authority to offer any ground-based wireless network in the satellite band To submit comments, go to http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/hotdocket/list, then click on the link to Proceeding11109 and follow instructions. When done, click on the continue button to confirm (submit) your comments or modify them. While this is an important step for GA in the battle against GPS interference, EAA will continue to be vigilant until such time as the FCC makes their final determination.

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es, you! We’ve all done it! Not once, but way too many times. We dial in the frequency for fuel, either on the ground or inbound from the wild blue yonder. Since we know we are the only airplane and pilot in the world at that moment, we think nothing of saying, “Hi fuel Dude, or Dudette,” (depending on where you might be coming from or going to), and announcing, “We need fuel,” or maybe broadcast, “we need a ‘top-off’.” So far this sounds pretty much the way it goes most of the time. So, just for the sake of having a little fun, let’s change places with the fuel mule. A transmission is heard and now all you have to do is... guess who is calling, where the airplane actually is – as in tie-down number, or maybe type of aircraft, and what the heck – just for fun throw in a tail number. If you want to be up for the good tenant award you could even mention what you want – as in how many gallons, if oil is needed, and – what the heck – request getting your windscreen debugged if seeing out of it is important to you. Did I mention that calls from above, which actually happen very often because we are all in such a big hurry, might come from more than one airport? They can share the same frequency when it comes to fuel trucks, or FBOs, or whatever. It’s not uncommon to hear a kerosene burner call in from a million miles away and want the fuel truck standing by. Of course mentioning the destination airport never crosses anyone’s mind. Trust me on this, fellow aviators, I have a base station in my office and when the phones aren’t ringing which is more often than not, I listen to the fuel frequency. It’s more interesting than the groundchatter and funnier than the tower frequency. I suppose sitting between fiveplus flight schools might add to the entertainment. I would love to sit-in and hear the CFIs teach this aspect of aviating. Finally, and just in case you may have forgotten, a thank you to the gas passer doesn’t cost extra. Manners may be free, but they still have value.

Family Planning No not that kind of family planning, I mean the fun and excitement kind. The Airshow season is upon us and you must know how strongly I feel about that.

Larry Shapiro Airshows are a family experience that provide excitement, education and some really questionable food. The key words here are; family, the great outdoors, really healthy noise, and the opportunity to see, feel and touch some real hardworking superstars/athletes. Airshow performers are so much more accessible than the rock-n-rollers and they are, without question, more sincere. Your family will never forget the experience and neither will you.

Headlines Texas Airport Gets New Screening Systems: I’m afraid to ask! Pentagon Will Boost Drones, Cut Personnel: Ooh, I’ll bet that’s going to hurt! Nevada Program Honors Tuskegee Airmen: Well what the heck took you so long? Technical College Begins Construction of Aviation Center: I never knew it was that technical. Alcohol-to-jet Fuel Could Power Aircraft: I suppose if you drink enough of it you can fly too. Texas Teens Fly Solo Through HighSchool Aviation Program: Well that’s a heck of a lot better than flying through the school itself. Alaska Bill Would Warn Travelers of Pat-Downs: Who’s Bill? Personally I’d rather hear from the police. AIN Reader Poll Selects Jack Pelton as Next FAA chief (and also “Sulley” Sullenberger): I’m speechless, they both must have more sense than to take such a pay cut. Law Bans Noisier Jets in Four Years: Honestly folks, I don’t write these, so get back to me in four years. Pilot Aims to Start Civilian Aerobatics Team in China: All I can say is; I hope his aim is good!

I’m Just Saying . . . On the many days I stroll around airports I am shocked and amazed to see fellow humans decide that it’s okay to touch airplanes that don’t belong to them, either by BOS or rental agreement. They Continued on Page 32


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Flying With Faber

A VISIT

G

ood old fashion airport restaurants have become an endangered species. In the past, a bunch of us could pile into our airplanes and, within an hour, rendezvous at a neighborhood airport for a fabulous breakfast – or even a great lunch or dinner. Some of us have fond memories for the now departed Skytrails Restaurant at Van Nuys, Calif. They served some of the best prime rib in town. On most nights, the ramp in front of Skytrails was packed with airplanes from all over southern California. In my Wisconsin days, we had a choice of more than a dozen outstanding airport restaurants. The Janesville Airport restaurant was famous for its sticky buns. We would park our aircraft and leap to the restaurant and grab a few gooey, dripping buns as they emerged from the oven. Lake Lawn Airport was another of our favorite stops. Just 30 minutes from Milwaukee, the airport was the site of a

TO

HARRIS RANCH

huge lakeside lodge. In the wood beamed dining room, we savored one of the best breakfasts in the Midwest. Today, it is a challenge to find a tower-less airport where you can chock the wheels and saunter over to a great dining spot. I have answered the challenge – and the place is less than an hour from either Los Angeles or San Francisco.

Harris Ranch – An Airport Restaurant and Much More Harris Ranch has everything the seasoned weekend pilot is looking for – and much, much more. Whether you navigate with the latest glass cockpit or just a compass, you can’t miss the place. Just follow I-5 either from the Los Angeles Basin or the Bay Area and within an hour, you will be descending over 800 acres of cattle, thousands of acres of just about every kind of fruit and vegetable crop imaginable, plus a rambling restaurant and hotel complex, and finally, a diminutive runway.

A Slice of California History – Agriculture and Aviation

The 25-meter Olympic-style heated pool is just one of the many amenities offered at Harris Ranch Inn. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch)

The Harris Ranch Restaurant welcomes guests daily with warm western hospitality for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The menu is designed around the fresh beef and the fruits and vegetables grown by Harris Ranch. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch)

Located in Central California, Harris Farms has been under continuous family operation since the 1930s. The ranch and farms have grown into one of the largest family owned agribusinesses in the nation. An integral part of the ranch is the historical airport. Harris Ranch Airport (K308) is owned and operated privately by the Harris family. The paved, lighted runway, 14-32 is open 24-hours a day. It is 2,820 feet long and at an altitude of 470 feet above sea level. As I stated, it’s adjacent to I-5, but if you lose your bearings, it’s about 16 miles due east of the Visalia VOR. If conditions are IFR, I suggest you try Hanford (KHJO), about 30 miles to the east. Once you land at Harris Ranch, you can’t get lost on the way to the restaurant. It’s about a 5-minute walk. The airport provides 24-hour self-service fuel.

Three Ranches in One Today, under the leadership of John Harris, the son of the founder, the Harris name is best known for producing the finest quality beef west of the Rockies. Together, Harris Feeding Company and

Harris Ranch Beef Company have established a reputation as two of the most innovative beef product firms in the industry. The cattle operation takes the beef virtually from conception to processing. Up to 120,000 head of cattle inhabit these grounds. Some of the critters are brought in from neighboring ranches. They arrive at Harris Ranch at about 16 to 24 months of age and spend the next four months in a special feeding operation. A diet of Midwestern corn and other special ingredients render these cattle better fed than many humans. The Harris Farms Horse Division was established in 1966 by John Harris and his father, Jack, cattle ranchers, farmers and horsemen devoted to the raising, training and running of thoroughbred racehorses. The farming division produces more than 35 commodities including cotton, lettuce, tomatoes, garlic, onions, melons, oranges, lemons, almonds, pistachios, walnuts, onions, garlic and wine grapes. Most of these crops find their way to the tables at Harris’s restaurants.

Stuart J. Faber and Aunt Bea

Many of the rooms available at Harris Ranch Inn overlook their tranquil farms, or lush courtyard with a beautifully landscaped garden. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch)

A Warm and Inviting Hotel The hotel, which resembles an historic California hacienda, is just steps away from the restaurants and shops. The 153 rooms and suites are tastefully designed and furnished in early American décor. Not only is the tariff very reasonable and the rooms cozy and comfortable, guests don’t have to pay for parking – nor is a local hotel tax added to the bill. Although you will enjoy the sensation of being ensconced in a country villa, all of the modern electronic amenities which we expect are at your fingertips. The Harris Ranch Inn is also an ideal central meeting point for corporate functions, executive retreats, weddings, tour groups, military groups or family reunions. With access to more than 7,500 square feet of fully-equipped, fullystaffed, conference and meeting space, you can organize a small fly-in and spend a few days with your pilot club buddies and never have to leave the grounds or hop in a car.

A Leader in California and American Cuisine The Harris Ranch Inn and Restaurant

TA look inside one of the spacious rooms at the Harris Ranch Inn. Room choices range from a Deluxe Double Queen to a Presidential Suite. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch) was established in 1977 and today serves nearly 2,000 guests a day. The restaurant showcases high-quality Harris Ranch U.S.D.A. Angus Choice and Prime Beef, plus Harris Farms fresh fruits, nuts and vegetables. The Harris family’s philosophy to provide only the best products, care, and service to customers is evident in every division of the company. The operations of the restaurants are like no other I have ever seen. To begin with, the kitchens and all food handling areas are as spotless as a surgical chamber. Whatever ends up on the customer’s plate was fashioned by experienced hands and sprung from an original natural source. For what seemed like an hour, Continued on Page 31


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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Flying With Faber Continued from Page 29 I watched one guy squeeze orange after orange for fresh juice. The meat, of course, is processed in the Harris facility. Final cutting into the ultimate pieces from steaks to pot roast to corned beef hash takes place in the kitchen. Special flour is purchased and milled on the premises. Every bakery item, from crusty breads to succulent pies, emanates from the Harris kitchen. Vegetables, of course, come from just down the road and grace your plate within hours of harvest.

The Harris Ranch Jockey Club is open for lunch and dinner by reservation. This intimate dining room has an equestrian atmosphere and the menu showcases traditional steak house favorites in addition to new, inventive creations from the kitchen. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch)

With few exceptions, Harris grows everything it serves. I confess that I saw no spawning salmon, oyster beds or lobster traps. But I can assure you â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if you select any of those items, they will be as fresh as if this restaurant was on the seashore. Harris Ranch Restaurant, the main dining room, is decorated in an attractive western motif. Virtually everything on the menu is made from scratch. I followed Chef Anthony Hagans around for a few days. He sprints back and forth from the bakery to the butcher shop to the final serving line and makes sure that everything is perfect. Most of the menu items are his original creations. One of the most enthusiastic, talented and dedicated chefs I have ever met, his skill and personality are revealed in every bite of cuisine. For appetizers, take your pick of anything from oysters on the half shell (not grown on the ranch, but flown in daily), chile relleno stuffed with Jack cheese and deep fried with a magnificent pico de gallo and lime sour cream, giant crab cakes or artichoke halves. The prime rib salad consists of romaine lettuce grown on the premises topped with slabs of prime rib which are grilled outdoors and brought in to top the salad the last minute. The spinach salad is served with peppercorn dressing, crumbled bacon, chopped egg, mushrooms

and parmesan cheese. For soups, I suggest the chuck wagon soup with ground sirloin and farm fresh veggies or the fajita soup. If you crave yet another intermediate course, try the chicken flatbread pizza with mozzarella cheese and sun dried tomatoes. Of course, Harris Ranch is renowned for steaks. But I urge you to stay an extra day so that you can try some of the old fashion comfort dishes such as the beef stew, liver and onions, a specialty hamburger, the pot roast or chicken fried steak. I also recommend the seared halibut or salmon, hearty meatloaf or fabulous osso bucco short ribs. Most items are available for lunch â&#x20AC;&#x201C; plus they create some of the best sandwiches I have ever tasted. Harris Ranch meat is hand selected from the highest quality USDA choice, Angus or prime beef-all natural and grain fed. All steak entrees are accompanied by vegetables and a choice of ranch beans, garlic mashed red skinned potatoes, a baked potato or yams - plus soup or salad. Among the choices are filet mignon, 24-ounce porterhouse or bonein ribeye, 20-ounce T-bone or 14 ounce New York strip. I opted for the superbly marbled ribeye, which, in my view, delivers the quintessence of flavor and texture. In my search for the ultimate steak, I found my selection to be one of

The Horseshoe Lounge is a favorite gathering spot for friends and family and a great spot to catch up on sports scores or enjoy live entertainment. It is open daily from 11 a.m. and offers lunch and dinner. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch) the most tender, juicy and flavorful I have ever encountered. I could cut it with my fork. If you like your beef roasted, I recommend a 20-ounce cowboy cut of dry-aged prime rib. Desserts? All homemade, of coursefrom the bakery that makes all the bread and rolls. Even the ice cream is homemade. Breakfast is served all day. You can get everything from ham and eggs to the best corned-beef hash you will ever taste. French toast and flapjacks are light as a feather. Biscuits and gravy are unbeatable. If you prefer a more intimate dining atmosphere with an equestrian feel, visit Continued on Page 32


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March 2012

Flying With Faber Continued from Page 31 The Jockey Club at Night. The menu is virtually the same. All the restaurants have award-winning wine lists. You can also saddle up to the bar at The Horseshoe Lounge, a favorite gathering spot which features lighter selections, plus many entrees from the main dining room. Catch up on the latest news and sports and enjoy live entertainment in the evenings during the weekend. You might even see one of the Harris Farm thoroughbreds racing at the track. Harris Ranch not only offers a variety of restaurants, it sells many of the

popular food items in its country store. If you are weary of supermarket meat, by all means, stop by Harris Ranch and the journeymen butchers will cut you a slab of beef to order. During my last trip, the butcher cut a four-rib hunk of prime rib roast to my specifications, which I feared would place the weight and balance of my airplane beyond the envelope. What I love about Harris Ranch is that it offers many luxuries that a big city destination provides, but without the bigcity disadvantages. Can you drive through a tomato field or almond orchard in a big city? Can you tour a huge beef

ranch or visit a champion horse ranch? No, but all of these attractions are footsteps away at Harris Ranch, plus you can shop for anything from western clothing to sides of beef, then pile yourself and all of your purchases in your airplane (parked just down the road), and head for home. You will be back, and so will I. For more information, contact Harris Ranch Inn and Restaurant, 24505 West Dorris Avenue, Coalinga, CA 93210, 800/942-2333 or www.harrisranch.com.

The Country Store at Harris Ranch is open daily from 8 a.m. with a fresh selection of fresh-baked goodies, and cuts of Harris Ranch Beef ready to take home and grill. The Country Store also offers gourmet gifts and souvenirs. (Paul Mullins/Harris Ranch)

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up Continued from Page 28 assume itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay to check out the interior, stand on a wheel pant, or place a beautiful young child not married or of voting age on a wing for that â&#x20AC;&#x153;Perfect Photo Op.â&#x20AC;? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just me, but these same folks would never touch someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s automobile. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just saying . . .

On final . . .

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Well my chocolate hangover has slowly dwindled. Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gearing up for corned beef and wearing some of my collection of green stuff. First it was red, and now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be green. Do you think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ever have a neutral colored holiday? I guess the holiday I want to celebrate most is the Welcome Home Day for all of our troops living in sand somewhere. Come on decision-making folks; get our kids and families home and back together where they belong. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also make sure we treat them as the celebrities that they are.

And last, but certainly not least . . . one of my personal heroes turned 95 years young this February. My wife has always said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d leave me for him as long as his wife said okay. He has flown more than 10,000 hours that could only make us dream about what it was like, and more than 9,000 hours of those thrills were in his two Cessna 195s. So, my treasured friend, Happy Birthday Martin Litton, you are our gift everyday . . . and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for the big 100 celebration, see you there. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thirty! â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overâ&#x20AC;? About the writer: Larry Shapiro is an aircraft broker, aviation humorist and fulltime grandfather of three. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to have you share your thoughts and ideas for future articles. Contact him at his Palo Alto Airport Office: 650-424-1801 or Larry@ LarryShapiro.com

Vintage Aircraft Owners Continued from Page 22 World War II general aviation aircraft that are no longer supported by a manufacturer,â&#x20AC;? said Doug Macnair, EAA vice president of government relations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These efforts do not give completely unfettered access to design data, but they do go a long way toward helping owners of antique and vintage aircraft maintain these beautiful flying pieces of history. The EAA effort also seeks to protect not only owners of aircraft that are no longer supported by a manufacturer but those that may not be supported in the future, making this a long-term protection for all general aviation owners. We are very grateful to the FAA for their collaboration in this effort and their willingness

to introduce the original language into the early drafts of the Reauthorization Bill on behalf of EAA and all who own and fly vintage aircraft.â&#x20AC;? As with all new laws, time will show how effective these measures prove to be in obtaining certification and design data for older aircraft. EAA will be monitoring how this process unfolds and is prepared to pursue additional remedies should they become necessary. For now, however, owners of vintage aircraft have an opportunity to seek data by filing a Freedom of Information Act request to the FAA for the information necessary to restore and maintain their aircraft, and those owners have a fighting chance of actually obtaining it.


March 2012

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THE CENTER TABLE It’s the Cat’s Meow! The Place to Be! The Center Table at the San Carlos Airport’s Sky Kitchen By Herb Foreman

T

wo tables seating six at each and fastened together make up the “center piece” for the Sky Kitchen Café at the San Carlos Airport in California, approximately 10 miles south of SFO. Each day of the year except Christmas Day, as many as 32 pilots (both men and women) rotate through them for lunch. You might call it a private club. Some call it the “Liar’s Club.” Some members have retired or moved away. Some members have died leaving a legacy of fond memories, which new members move in to take their place. I have been writing about it for 41 years and have heard at least a hundred times from pilots saying, “There is no airport, anywhere, that equals the camaraderie found at the Sky Kitchen Café. The lunch bunch begins to trickle in around 10:30 a.m. after the breakfast bunch have moved out. By noon, 12 seats are usually filled with one or two pilots standing behind their favorite “hard round stool” hoping to encourage the occupant to leave. If you’re interested in “pilot talk,” this is the place to be! There isn’t much talk about sex or romance. Most of the conversation revolves around politics and airplanes. Men outnumber women but there are many women pilots, as well. There seems to be an endless amount of talent. If you want to know how it feels to fly a B-17 of WWII fame, ask Butch Pfeifer. As a young man, Pfeifer began to fly one throughout California as a fire bomber. He even managed to loop one in an experiment. Butch went on to fly for United, retiring after 32 years, ending his airline career in the mighty 747-400. Norm DeWitt has accumulated a shelf full of trophies in his Zivco Edge 540. His hard work has made him one of the world’s top-ranked acrobatic pilots. Norm is a member of the

EAA Board of Directors, also. Dave Morss holds speed records set at Reno and elsewhere that would be hard for any pilot to duplicate. He is known, also, as one of the world’s best test pilots and has completed the first flight on at least 31 prototypes. I discovered it is not easy to write about the pilots that frequent the “center table.” I have been chronicling them for the past four decades and have assembled some 500 sketches filling eight binders. Maybe it would be best if I attempted to emulate a “Herb Caen” (a one-time popular San Francisco journalist who famously chronicled local society and events) format… There’s Dave Macdonald who has set land speed records at Bonneville, the latest in a Pontiac Fire Bird, of more than 300 mph. His Fire Bird became the world’s fastest passenger car. He set a record in 1985, placing eighth for speed, by flying from New York to Paris in his C-210. His counterpart, Joe Locasto holds four world-speed records at Bonneville. He was the first to exceed 200 mph in stock-bodied automobiles. How about the amazing flight that Reid Dennis completed in his Grumman Albatross in 1997, flying “chase plane” to Linda Finch as she duplicated Amelia Earhart’s 1937 world flight in her Lockheed 10-E. Another long flight was made by Carl Mauck on Dec. 8, 2009 when he flew the LSA Mustang from Wichita, Kans. to Manila in the Philippines. Astounding! A world champion in her own right is Karen Morss, Dave Morss’s wife. She established the very successful FBO, Diamond Aviation at the airport. She set a world record flying a Katana from San Carlos to Santa Barbara. Vance Cochrane was her co-pilot. Karen wanted to break the habit of three packs of cigarettes she smoked each day. She took a trip to Zimbabwe with the thought that if she

could bungee-jump from Victoria Falls, 370 feet in the air, she certainly could stop the vicious habit. She made the jump and it worked. She stopped smoking. A “gutsy” woman! Also on the west side of the field, Scott Bailey is re-constructing a KR-2 powered by a beautiful Volkswagen engine. He expects to fly it soon. John Dugan flies helicopters from his hangar on the west side of the field. A multi-talented man, he was on the U.S. Speed Skiing team for six years. In 1999, he was seventh fastest in the world, clocking 149 mph on the boards. That’s faster than a C-150 at maximum speed. Mike Paull, an aviation leader and author of the book, Tales From the Sky Kitchen Café, spent many hours at the Center Table. He was the first President of the San Carlos Airport Pilot’s Association (SCAPA). Mike is an outstanding pilot who owned and flew a beautiful Beech Baron. Upon retirement, he sold the Baron and became a partner in a pristine Bonanza. Turbine Yellow Tucan… Dave Kervinen painted a picture of his beautiful Tucan on one wall of the Kitchen. The plane, a highly modified Pitts S-2C with a turbine engine is capable of 750 hp. The huge prop spits out 1,870 pounds of torque. Dave’s wife Susan, let him take a year off from his job to complete the aircraft. (True love!) The enormous torque generates enough power to allow the plane to hover. Dave is looking for a sponsor that would like to advertise its products at airshows worldwide. There are so many talented people at the table it is difficult to decide who to profile. Bruce Estes and George Mendonca have each just completed an LSA Kit Fox. The amazing Bruce Wallace holds the speed record at Reno flying the T-28. Bill Trevor has just purchased a share of the Conquest owned by Continued on Page 34

Clockwise from Top Left: Pan Am’s Wally Dean on right holding picture of Boeing 314 with Jerry Schumaker, 1st director of Hiller Museum, Breakfast at the Center Table, Pat and Dave Forbes, Carl Mauck, Dave and Susan Kervinen, Karen Morss set a world record with copilot Vance Cochrane, George Mendonca, retired United 737 pilot with Deborah LaMere, Combat Helicopter Crew Chief , Nancy Stock stands on Wing of Herb Foreman’s Super Viking, Norm DeWitt with his Eagle, Kervinen’s powerful tubine yellow Tucan. (Photos provided by Herb Foreman)

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

34

March 2012

The Center Table Continued from Page 33 Reid Dennis. Radio Ralph Bailey is there every day to help solve communications problems. Diamond Jim Fritzler is joining the Sheriff’s Air Squadron after many years of flying freight in the big iron, the DC-10, DC-8, Boeing 727, 757 and the Air Bus 300. Dale Kuhns has been flying from the San Carlos Airport for more than 50 years. In 1968, he flew Robert and Red Kennedy from San Carlos to the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. Robert was assassinated four hours later.

always suspected the Center Table holds him back. Many from United Airlines… Dave Forbes began working for United Airlines as an apprentice mechanic at age 17. He retired 43-and-a-half years later as a captain. His last flight for United was in the left seat of a Boeing 767. Dave and his wife Pat, also a pilot, bring many stories to the Center Table. United Captain Walt Ramseur has been retired many years. His last flight was on the huge DC-10. Walt met his wife, Mary, former Mayor

I have mentioned only 21 individuals above but there are so many more interesting and talented people it is difficult to stop. I love the new paint job on John Carlson’s MU-2, a real screamer. Mark Schwartz has two planes in his hangar, a beautiful Beech Baron and an equally lovely Debonaire. He pours a lot of high octane through them. Vaughn Griffen and his wife, Nancy, fly back and forth to their second residence in Idaho in their spectacular C-180. Vaughn talks about moving there permanently. I have

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of Millbrae and San Mateo County Supervisor at the San Carlos Airport. Retired Captain Bill O’Connell knows more about the airport than any one. He was employed as a “gas boy” in 1958 at the princely sum of $1.25 per hour. In the early 60s, Bill was appointed manager, twice. After his service for Uncle Sam, he hired on with United in 1965. His last flight for United was in March 2000 in the great Boeing 747. Last Flight… I have a list of 49 who have taken their last flight and I know there are many more. Bill Conwell, former Atherton mayor and Pat Kelley, former mayor of Hillsborough loved to eat there. Bill flew a highly polished Beech T-34. Pat loved his Bonanza. Wally Dean flew 40 years for PanAm beginning in 1939. He flew the Big Boeing 314 flying boat around the world from its base at Treasure Island. I think of other treasured names such as Helmet Fenski, Lowell Duggan, Dan Butler, Bob Borrmann, Bill Heinicke, Leo Packowski, Dave Palmer and a host of others. I have just scratched the surface regarding the San Carlos Airport and the Center Table at the Sky Kitchen. Old members always welcome new people. If you have the opportunity, stop by one day and find a seat. You’ll love it! PS: I wanted to tell you about the Xpert, Syl Heumann, the teacher Nancy Stock, the Turner Dynasty: Bill, Gail and Willie. Oh yes…Jeanne McElhaton, Stan Hill, Scott Crossfield, Jim Rickelefts, Jean Tinsley, Larry Alleman, June Armanino and 400 more!

Worldwide GA Continued from Page 26 **Hawker Beechcraft Corporation’s (HBC) fourth quarter data will be available when their 10K is filed on or about March 31, 2012. The shipment and billings figures in this report do not include HBC’s 2010 or 2011 fourth quarter numbers. At the end of 2011, GAMA expanded its membership to include rotorcraft manufacturers. The association now represents every sector of the general aviation manufacturing industry. Shipment and billings data for rotorcraft will be reported on a quarterly basis starting with the first quarter of 2012.

Check the NEW Events Calender at inflightusa.com


March 2012

IPS FROM THE

www.inflightusa.com

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“Tips from the Pros” is a feature dedicated to allowing the In Flight USA family of aviation professionals to share tips and information regarding flying skills, airframe care and engine operations.

UPGRADING By Mitchell Ange President, Arizona Type Ratings

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ore and more, we see private owners of light jets deciding to upgrade their personal flying skills and obtain the training and ratings needed to operate their jet aircraft personally. Doing so allows them to lower operating cost and enhance schedule flexibility. But, what is it like to move up to these high performance, turbine aircraft. Let’s take a quick look at speed control. One jet characteristic that takes getting used to is the amount of thrust lever movement required to effect a significant airspeed change. Pilots transitioning from anything with propellers, whether piston or turbine powered, are accustomed to gently “tweaking” thrust levers, with the correct expectation of being rewarded with a rapid response. This gentle thrust lever movement makes the flying experience in propeller-driven airplanes smooth and comfortable. In turbocharged piston-powered aircraft, being smooth with power changes is desirable from a maintenance point of view as well, reducing shock-cooling concerns. In addition, the cabin altitude of many pressurized piston aircraft responds uncomfortably to brisk thrust lever movement. None of these “comfort” concerns apply to small, modern, civilian jets. But speed changes in a jet may require significant movement of the thrust levers. Fortunately resulting acceleration or deceleration will be gentle and comfortable. Don’t be afraid to aggressively move the thrust levers on a small jet, nothing bad will happen. Power changes result in other “jet peculiar” phenomena. Jets will frequently accelerate and decelerate for a significant period of time after thrust changes are made. When you add or reduce thrust, a gentle change in airspeed will commence that may continue for several minutes. This is not a bad thing; it’s just something you will need to monitor. This characteristic, plus the fact that many jets don’t sound or feel much different at 150 kts than at 250 kts, can result in the airplane getting very slow or fast, undetected. You can’t rely on sound or feel as indicators of airspeed, as you may have been able to in your propeller driven aircraft. You will need to monitor the airspeed indicator religiously while getting accustomed to these airplanes. You will

TO JETS

typically be provided with some “target power settings” to help you deal with these characteristics. These thrust settings are expressed either in pounds-perhour fuel burn or in N1 percent rpm. Regardless of the index used, memorizing these numbers will greatly simplify your energy management task. Since the “rotary speed brakes” offered by propellers are missing on pure turbojet engines, you can pick up a lot of speed in the descent. Free airspeed while descending in the en route environment is not a problem as long as aircraft speed limitations or ATC speed restrictions are not exceeded. In the terminal and approach environments however, excess airspeed can become a problem. We suggest you always have a target airspeed in mind and make the airplane fly that airspeed. Consequently, “flight idle” thrust will frequently be suggested during step-downs on approaches in order to prevent undesirable increases in airspeed. And keep in mind that you will then need to return thrust levers to that target power setting after leveling off to prevent the airplane from getting too slow. Again, get comfortable moving thrust levers more often and more aggressively in these light jets. A new term will present itself as you transition from light propeller driven aircraft to the light jet – that being “VSpeeds.” There are many of them but only a few are applicable to routine jet operations. Approximations of some of these “V-Speeds” are frequently presented on the airspeed indicator of most light twins, but these colorful markings are at a given weight, temperature and altitude. In jets, these speeds are precisely computed under current, existing conditions and referred to during takeoff and landing. Let’s look at V1 (sometimes called “decision speed”), the speed after which takeoff should be continued in the event of an abnormality during the takeoff roll. At V1, your right hand should be moved from the thrust levers to the yoke, as we are going flying. V1 is provided by the manufacturer and will vary with altitude, temperature and weight. Consult charts in the Normal Procedures Checklist and Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) and set the airspeed “bug” on the copilot’s airspeed indicator if operating crew, and on the captain’s airspeed indicator if operating single pilot. With an Electronic Flight Information System (EFIS) equipped jet, Continued on Page 36

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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March 2012

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practice of invoking emergency authority to ground a pilot immediately, before he or she has had a chance to defend against the FAA action. In response to the aviation community concerns, in December 2010 the NTSB sought public comments through an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) on changing the Rules of Practice in Air Safety Proceedings and Implementing the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) of 1980. Three main reasons for undertaking the action, it said, were to respond to parties’ suggestions for changing the rules, to update outdated rules; and to accommodate prospective electronic filing and document availability. Continued on Page 44

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Continued from Page 35 this airspeed index will appear on both the pilot’s and copilot’s airspeed indicators. You might ask, “Why not stop the airplane if I still have useable runway ahead of me?” Statistically, high-speed aborted takeoffs are very dangerous. Tire traction, directional control and predictable braking action are poor. At V1, speed is adequate to safely fly the airplane and return to the departing airport or some other airport if desired. Again, we are committed to fly at V1. Closely following V1 is Vr (rotate speed). Frequently, V1 and Vr may even be the same speed. If you rotate to the published initial pitch angle at Vr, the airplane will climb through 35 feet above the runway, with one engine not operating, within your published takeoff distance. In the vast majority of departures, you will have several times this published takeoff distance available and fortunately both engines are running. Consequently, we frequently rotate at Vr plus a few knots as a “long runway” procedure. This improves overall performance and handling. V2 follows Vr, which is of consequence to us only in the event of an engine failure after V1. V2 is normally “bug’d” on the captain’s airspeed indicator and should be maintained after gear retraction. V2 is similar to best angle of climb speed with one engine inoperative. V2 should be flown to the altitude specified in the AFM, typically either 400 or 1,500 feet AGL. Upon reaching the specified altitude, the pitch angle should be

reduced as is necessary to accelerate the aircraft without descending. As you accelerate through V2+10 kts, departure flaps are to be retracted. The last departure V speed to be targeted is Venr or Vyse. This speed is similar to best rate of climb speed with one engine inoperative. This speed would be flown if further single engine climb is required. Two approach “V” speeds come into play, Vref and possibly Vapp. These speeds are a function of weight only. Vref is 1.3 stall speed in landing configuration and Vapp is 1.3 stall speed in the approach flaps configuration. This assumes we are not maneuvering the airplane and wings are level. These are minimum “approaching the threshold” speeds. Typical target speeds will be significantly higher away from the airport. Flying the light jet is not that different from flying a light piston or turboprop twin, and completely within the skill capabilities of a well trained private owner. Approach speeds are similar and there are few operational differences. Be prepared to move thrust levers more aggressively, be aware of airspeed trends and know your power settings. Have a target airspeed in mind. Be prepared to set and fly specific airspeeds that apply precisely to current conditions. Finally, the right hand does not stay on the throttles until there is no useable runway left, as is the case in the light twin. Anything you do to the thrust levers after V1 will be wrong, so remove your hand and remove the temptation. On this class of airplane, we are going flying at V1.


March 27 - April 1 • Lakeland, FL

S UN ‘ N F UN 2012

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SUN ’N FUN FAMILY THRILLS, AVIATION STYLE At the end of March, the skies over Lakeland will begin to receive thousands of aircraft that will signal the start of Sun ‘n Fun 2012 and convert Lakeland Linder Regional Airport into the busiest airport in North America. Tuesday, March 27, is “Opening Day” of Sun ‘n Fun’s 38th annual gathering of the world of general aviation for its Spring Break for Pilots and friends. While the event started as a gathering of pilots who shared a common passion for aviation, it has grown to welcome all who enjoy the inspirations and thrills that aviation offers. The 2012 Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In & Expo will attract an estimated 160,000 to 170,000 visitors from Central Florida, North America and more than 80 other countries. The event is the largest aviation convention in the state of Florida and the first major international aviation event of the year in the Americas. The Sun ‘n Fun event (the major fundraiser to support the educational mission of Sun ‘n Fun) is staged on the south side of the Lakeland Linder Regional Airport. It sparks all levels of aviation interests from student to active “veteran” pilots, to “homebuilders” (people who design, build and fly their own airplanes!) and armchair enthusiasts, many who continue to nurture the dream to fly. On the ground, one will encounter nearly every form of man’s imagination in the pursuit of flight, from the one seat ultralight to a daunting Boeing B-29 Fifi from the Commemorative Air Force. Sun ‘n Fun features 500-plus exhibitors both outside on the campus and in four dedicated exhibit hangars. Attendees will have the opportunity to review and shop the latest developments in aircraft design, aircraft avionics, pilot equipment, supplies and services plus a variety of aviation oriented art work,

apparel and jewelry. The Sun ‘n Fun campus will showcase a world-class concentration of vintage, warbird, homebuilt, factory built, rotorcraft, ultralight, light sport, hot air balloon, aerobatic and current military aircraft that add to the memorable experiences for Sun ‘n Fun guests throughout the week. A partnership with nearby Fantasy of Flight will provide a home for Sun ‘n Fun’s seaplane Annual Splash-In on Lake Agnes on Thursday, March 29. As most residents of Lakeland can attest, the skies southwest of the city are a constant changing matrix of airplanes from sunrise to sunset. A highlight each day is the popular Sun ‘n Fun daily airshow, which is known as one of the finest and largest displays of aerobatic talent in the country. This year the show will begin at 1 p.m. and conclude at 5 p.m. each day. Sun ‘n Fun will welcome the Commemorative Air Force’s Fifi, the only flyable B-29 Superfortress that will be onsite and in the air for the entire week. Aviation and history fans will have an opportunity to purchase tours and schedule their “fantasy flight” on this one-of-a-kind icon of military aviation history. Sun ‘n Fun is again privileged to present the United States Air Force (USAF) “Thunderbirds” Jet Demonstration Team as the headliner of the weekend afternoon airshow. While the official ground and aerial precision performance of America’s Ambassadors in Blue is scheduled for the March 31-April 1 weekend, the team will arrive at Sun ‘n Fun on Thursday and offer their awesome aerial precision as they practice on Friday. Sun ‘n Fun will also welcome the CAF’s Red Tail Squadron and their Red Tail P-51C and “Rise Above” Mobile

Theater dedicated to spread the inspirational story of the courage and determination of a group of black WWII pilots known as the Tuskegee Airmen. The film is free, so be sure the entire family has an opportunity to experience this milestone of American history. A new addition to the Sun ‘n Fun experience this year is the aviation themed Kid Zone, an engaging series of inflatable climbing walls, slides, bounce rooms and bungee challenges that will add to the thrills of the Sun ‘n Fun experiences for the whole family. This year Sun ‘n Fun will celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Marine Aviation both in the air and on the ground. The week will begin with a Tuesday evening performance of the United States Marine Corps Concert Band from Parris Island. The celebration will crescendo on Saturday at 11:30 a.m. with the opportunity to witness the pageantry and precision of the “Commandant’s Own” United States Marine Drum & Bugle Corps with the United States Marine Corps Silent Drill Team and the United States Marine Corps Color Guard. Thursday evening Sun ‘n Fun will present recording artist and accomplished pilot, Aaron Tippin, staring in the Commemorative Air Force Red, White & Loud Tour, featuring the CAF’s B-29 Fifi at the AOPA sponsored Florida Air Museum Pavilion. Two other popular attractions at Sun ‘n Fun are scheduled again this year. These include the popular Friday Night Airshow and Fireworks followed by the “dawn patrol” launch of the festive Hot Air Balloon “Hare and Hound” Race on Saturday morning. Weather permitting, more than 25 balloonists are scheduled to ignite their burners, lift off above the shimmering morning landscape of

Lakeland and create an exciting, colorful start to the weekend’s activities. Visitors can look forward to a selection of quality, fairly priced snack and meal options during their visit. Food and beverage services will be available throughout the show site with the greater selection menu items offered in the central food court area near the indoor exhibit hangars. Sun ‘n Fun Sunset Grill, which is rapidly becoming the place to “hang out” after the airshow, will offer a full menu of breakfast, lunch and dinner options. Each evening Sunset Grill features a nightly schedule of popular live music acts throughout the week. A trip to Sun ‘n Fun would not be complete without stopping at the traditional corn roast and the new Sennheiser S1 Stage in Sun ‘n Fun’s campground. The close of each day will be punctuated by a schedule of evening programs beginning at 8 p.m. followed by the evening movie in the AOPA sponsored Florida Air Museum Pavilion. For details on the full schedule of events and activities throughout the six days of Sun ‘n Fun, visit sun-n-fun.org Discounts for advanced weekly and daily tickets are available. Special online discounts are offered to members of the Florida Air Museum and to the members of 20 North American aviation organizations. Special discounts are also available to active military personnel, new pilots certified during the past 12 months and pilots who fly-in to Sun ‘n Fun. A special (two-days for the price of one) weekend discount package is available to Florida residents; Children 10 years or younger are free regardless of the discount package. For complete information and to purchase tickets visit www.sun-nfun.org.

FIFI, THE ONLY ACTIVE B-29 SUPERFORTRESS COMING SUN ‘N FUN 2012 Fifi, the world’s only flyable Boeing B-29 Superfortress and queen of the Commemorative Air Force’s (CAF) fleet of vintage military aircraft will land at Sun ‘n Fun on Tuesday morning, March 27, day one of the 2012 Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In & Expo. “We are delighted that Fifi will be

with us the entire show this year,” said Sun ‘n Fun President Lites Leenhouts, “She is the ‘diva’ of all the warbirds that will join us this year. We are privileged to present this historic aircraft to all our guests. I know she will prove to be a show stopper each time she taxis down the runway.”

Fifi will be available for guided tours throughout the show week and the public is invited to purchase Dream Rides on the “one of a kind” airplane. Ride flights are scheduled for March 28, 29, 30 and April 1 and can be booked in advance by visiting the CAF squadron website at www.rideb29.com.

TO

The airplane will also be the backdrop for a group photo of all veterans of the armed services on Thursday, March 29. Also, veterans who served as crewmen on the B-29 with the U.S. Army Air Force and the U.S. Air Force will be welcome to visit Fifi with their family for no Fifi tour charge throughout the week.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

38

March 2012

SUN ‘N FUN 2012

BEN R. COLEMAN, AVIATION SAFETY EXPERT, NAMED SAFETY ADVISOR TO SUN ‘N FUN PRESIDENT Sun ’n Fun President John R. “Lites” Leenhouts has announced the appointment of Ben R. Coleman as Sun ’n Fun’s Safety Advisor to the President. In this role, Coleman will serve as the resident safety advisor to contribute to all phases of

ONE

Sun ’n Fun and its Florida Air Museum’s operations. “I am dedicated to advance Sun 'n Fun’s long-term commitment to safety to the next level,” said Lites Leenhouts, Sun ’n Fun’s new CEO, “and the opportunity to work with Ben

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“Eddie flies the Stearman like no other Stearman pilot out there. He’s Extreme.” Wayne Handley, Pilot, Winner, Art Scholl Award for Showmanship Explosive Maneuvers in the Commanding Yak-9 “Barbarossa”

Look What’s Coming Soon

Coleman to review our entire operation will yield significant benefits to our safety culture. Our commitment to safety is one of the cardinal values in the day-to-day operations of our campus. It is paramount in the operation of our annual International Fly-In & Expo,” said Lites. Coleman is among the top qualified and court recognized aviation safety experts in the U.S. He brings more than 38 years of aviation experience, much of that as an NTSB investigator and as an FAA safety inspector. He has investigated more than 400 aviation accidents and has amassed a tabloid of safety principles he will share with the general aviation community through Sun ’n Fun’s website, blogs and forum programming. “My role at Sun ’n Fun will be to help the organization minimize accidents and assure the safety of our guests, above all, the safety of our non-aviation guests, many of whom have never even been up close and personal with an airplane,” said Coleman. He will work closely with the Sun ’n Fun staff and volunteer team to sharpen the group’s sensitivity to potential risks. “I am constantly on vigil for safety issues and have the experience to recommend changes in the operations of the organization to help mitigate those risks,” said Coleman. In addition to accident investigations, Coleman is an FAA certificated commercial pilot in land and seaplanes, A&P mechanic with Inspection Authorization and Senior Parachute Rigger. He began his aviation career in 1975 in a cooperative educational program between EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University and Lockheed Aircraft Company. Upon completion, he joined Piper Aircraft Corporation where, in the last fours years of his association, he was Manager of

Field Investigation and a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Technical Expert. He left Piper to join the NTSB as an Air Safety Investigator in 1984 where, during the next five years, he completed 150 investigations of civil aircraft accidents or incidents. In 1989, Coleman expanded his professional skills to maintenance, repair, overhaul and manufacturing through his association with Comtran International, Inc., San Antonio, Texas and Comair Airlines, Inc, Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1995, he joined the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) as an Aviation Safety Inspector in its Orlando Flight Standards District Office. He relocated to Lakeland, Fla. and served as the creator and program manager of a new FAA safety program, know as FAASTeam, operating from a new FAA National Resource Center on the Sun ‘n Fun campus. Ben retired from the FAA in 2007, to start a private venture. After a two-year span as Aviation Safety Officer through a contract with DynCorp, Int’l for the Department of State in Baghdad, Iraq, he returned to his firm, Ben Coleman Associates, LLC, and the work of the Aerospace Management Systems Institute in Lakeland, Fla. The Institute is dedicated to assist organizations, like Sun ‘n Fun, in Safety and Preventative Management Systems. He is also, Manager of Flight Safety for Dynamic Aviation in Virginia. Coleman joins the Sun ‘n Fun team as a volunteer independent safety expert. He and his wife, Melody, reside in Lakeland at the Green Swamp Aerodrome, a private hangar/home aviation community conceived and built by the couple during the past five years. For more information visit www.sunn-fun.org.

FLYING HIGH WITH JULIE CLARK PRESENTED BY SELECT AIRPARTS Eddie Andreini Airshows 650-726-2065

Returning to the spectacular Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In and Airshow is graceful, aerobatic pilot, Julie Clark and her magnificent Beechcraft T-34 Mentor on March 28 and 29, 2012. After the unfortunate weather events of the 2011 Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In, Julie is very excited to be performing in 2012 with the gracious endorsement of Select Airparts. Select Airparts and Julie Clark have teamed up for this special partnership at the Sun ‘n Fun Fly-In.

Select Airparts, based in Weyers Cave, Virginia, is one of the largest independent Beechcraft parts suppliers in the world, specializing in airframe parts for all models of Beechcraft and Hawker aircraft. Join Julie at the Select Airparts booth # D-017, on Tuesday, March 27, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Friday, March 30, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. for autographs and some fun aviation talk.


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SUN ‘N FUN 2012

SUN ‘N FUN ANNOUNCES EXCITING EVENING PROGRAM SCHEDULE FOR 2012 Sun ‘n Fun’s evening programs are held in the Florida Air Museum’s AOPA Pavilion each night of the event. The programs begin at 8 p.m., followed by the evening’s film at approximately 9:30 p.m. Admission to all evening programs are included in the daily event admission, as well as in the “$5 after 5 p.m.” on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Saturday; and “$10 after 5 p.m. on Thursday and Friday.

his “Red White & Loud” musical tribute to America’s freedom and to those who have sacrificed to protect it. The evening’s concert pairs Tippin with the Commemorative Air Force (CAF) famous warbird, B-29 Superfortress Fifi. This is an uplifting event! Movie: Flyboys

Friday, March 30, 2012 Night Airshow & Fireworks Sponsored by FedEx

Tuesday, March 27, 2012 Sun ‘n Fun’s Celebration of the Centennial of Marine Aviation Begins The Parris Island Marine Concert Band kicks off the week-long evening programs. The Marine Concert Band is dedicated to upholding and displaying the highest standards and traditions of the United States Marine Corps. The 50 musicians of the band and their band officer will perform selections including patriotic marches, overtures, and instrumental solos, to name a few of their offerings. This concert proves to be an entertaining and uplifting evening. For more info on The Parris Island Marine Band, visit www.mcrdpi.usmc.mil/band Movie: The Spirit of St. Louis

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 Commemoration of the 40th Anniversary of Apollo 17 and the Apollo “Lunar” Program - Sponsored by Nikon Dr. Harrison H. Schmitt: Apollo 17 was the final historic mission of the Apollo program and Dr. Schmitt – the last of 12 humans to step on and explore the surface of the moon – was the Lunar Module Pilot and is the night’s presenter. He is an accomplished native of Silver City, N.Mex., and has been inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame, along with many tributes and honors. He is the author of Return to the Moon, (Springer-Praxis, 2006). Copies of his book will be available for purchase, with Dr. Schmitt on hand after the program to sign them. Don’t miss this exciting and informative evening. Movie: The Great Waldo Pepper

Thursday, March 29, 2012 Aaron Tippin: “Red, White & Loud” Concert - Sponsored by Scotts Miracle Gro Country music star, passionate pilot and patriot, Aaron Tippin will perform

With the setting of the sun over the Sun ‘n Fun flightline on Lakeland Linder Airport, world class aerobatic flyers take to the skies, creating one of the signature highlights of the Sun ‘n Fun experience – the Friday Night Airshow. This year, the evening spectacle will include the skillful work of the Aeroshell Team, Bill Leff, Steve Oliver, Roger Buis, Manfred Radius, Gene Soucy and Matt Younkin. The sky erupts with fireworks as the performers conclude their portion of this amazing show. Don’t miss any of the excitement! Movie: No movie on Friday

Saturday, March 31, 2012 Comedy & Music of the WWII Era: A Nostalgic night of wonderful music, laughs, and romantic memories! The night’s program will begin at 7 p.m. with The Flying Musicians, a group of pilot musicians who share their passion by bringing music to aviation events, encouraging and educating youth of all ages in the science and art of aeronautics and music. The Ultimate Abbott & Costello Tribute Show Bill Riley and Joe Zeigler transform themselves into Bud Abbott and Lou Costello through vintage dress and an authentic recreation of the team’s mannerisms and vocal styling’s. They perform routines made famous by Bud and Lou including the classic baseball routine, “Who’s on First?” Jason Crutchley will be on hand to recreate Abbott and Costello’s “Scoop Fields-Ace Press Agent.” Theresa Eaman, Retro-Songbird Theresa Eaman, a classically trained vocalist, has been performing since her early teens and has branched off to specialize in jazz standards and re-enacting the music of the WWII era. Movie: Airplane

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March 2012

SUN ‘N FUN 2012

RED TAIL P-51C AND TRAVELING EXHIBIT TO BE AT SUN 'N FUN 2012

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One of the highlights at Sun 'n Fun 2012 will be the week-long appearance of Red Tail, a P-51C Mustang distinguished by its bright red tail. The airplane, proudly flown to Sun 'n Fun by the Commemorative Air Force’s Red Tail Squadron, is a living symbol of the inspirational story of courage and determination by a special group of black WWII pilots known then and now revered as the Tuskegee Airmen. Their story, now better known as a result of the recently released George Lucas, Red Tail film, includes their training experience at the segregated base in Tuskegee, Ala., and their deployment to Africa and then to Italy where they distinguished themselves as American military aviators. With determination and skill, they proved that black men had the courage and intelligence to fly and fight effectively against the Axis powers. The Tuskegee Airmen painted the tails of their fighters red and, given their successes, bomber pilots began requesting the “red tail angels” as escorts to protect their “big heavies” from the German fighters sent to intercept their missions. The Tuskegee Airmen flew more than 15,000 combat sorties and earned hundreds of medals and designations, including the Congressional Gold Medal in 2007 in honor of their war service to the United States. The P-51C will be joined by the CAF Red Tail Squadron's new Rise Above Traveling Exhibit, a customized

53' trailer with expandable sides that houses a 160-degree curved movie screen and seating for 30 in climate-controlled comfort. The theater features a 14-minute original movie called Rise Above that focuses on what the Tuskegee Airmen – pilots and their support personnel – had to overcome to be allowed to fly and fight for their country during World War II. The goal of this traveling exhibit is to engage all, especially the youth who will be attending Sun ’n Fun, in the six guiding principles of the Tuskegee Airmen; Aim High, Believe in Yourself, Never Quit, Be Ready to Go, Use Your Brain, and Expect to Win. The Rise Above film also features great aerial footage – in the Mustang – that is enhanced by the extended curved screen. Admission to this special film experience is free, thanks, in part, to a special sponsorship by the www.flyingfreedom.us Texas Flying Legends Museum. The CAF Red Tail Squadron's Rise Above Traveling Exhibit and its redtailed P-51C Mustang, Tuskegee Airmen, will be on display throughout the entire six days of the 38th annual Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In & Expo from March 27 through April 1, 2012. The Mustang is scheduled to fly during Sun 'n Fun’s daily airshow. It is also taking reservations for a “memory of a life time “ ride which includes passenger “stick time” if desired.

SUN ’N FUN ANNOUNCES INCENTIVES FOR PILOTS FLYING INTO LAKELAND - KLAL This year all pilots who fly into KLAL qualify for the Fly-In Pilot Discount package: $30 for a daily ticket if pre-ordered online. In addition, each “Fly-In Pilot” will receive a Sun 'n Fun 2012 Welcome Packet which includes the following: Bottle of spring water Free 2012 Souvenir Program, Campus Map & Info Guide Voucher for a Free draft at Sunset Grill $2 off Coupon for the Sun ‘n Fun Event T-Shirt (redeemable at on-site merchandise tents only) Pilot-in-command receives an “I Flew to Sun ‘n Fun 2012” hat (provided to the first 2,500 pilots – one hat per aircraft) A new pilot who has received a pilot’s license between April 1, 2011 and April 1, 2012, will receive a welcome rate of $30 for purchase of a daily ticket. Online pur-

chase required. Also receive a $10 discount coupon to be redeemed at any Sun ‘n Fun Merchandise Tent location. In addition, Sun ‘n Fun is joining forces with their local avgas provider, Columbia Air Services, to ensure the best possible pricing for Sun ’n Fun. They will bring in nine additional fuel trucks and more than 40 professional fuelers so that no one waits for gas. The recommendation is to fly straight into Sun ‘n Fun, get there early in the day, avoid the air traffic, and enjoy a full day of aviation excitement. Those pilots flying in from across the country are encouraged to check the website at www.sun-n-fun.org for FBOs along the way that advertise special offers. Check the “Fly-In” tab and then choose “Getting There” to find an FBO on your route


March 2012

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SUN ‘N FUN 2012

SUN’N FUN IS STORMREADY! Recognizing the need for guidelines dealing with weather operations, the National Weather Service designed the StormReady program to help cities, counties, towns and events implement procedures to reduce the potential for disastrous weather-related consequences. Sun ‘n Fun, with the requirement to provide its guests with the safest possible aviation event, has achieved the prestigious recognition of StormReady. A cere-

mony was held on Feb. 16, 2012, where Sun ‘n Fun received the certificate and celebrated the achievement. Through StormReady, NOAA’s National Weather Service gives communities and event organizers the skills and education needed to survive severe weather – before and during the event. StormReady helps emergency managers strengthen their local hazardous weather operations. Working with StormReady guide-

lines, the Sun ‘n Fun Severe Weather Team has formulated a plan to ensure guests that they are StormReady. For a complete list of the steps that have been taken to facilitate the StormReady process visit sun-n-fun.org. In a continuing effort to ensure safety and preparedness and maintain diligence at all times, Sun ‘n Fun performs a tabletop drill in November, as well as a physical on-site drill in February each

FLORIDA AIR MUSEUM ANNOUNCES PREMIERE EVENT The Eagle Flight Gala, formerly known as Pre-Flight Night, is scheduled for the evening of Wednesday, March 28, 2012. As their primary annual fundraiser, the proceeds from Eagle Flight Gala are dedicated to the Florida Air Museum’s expanding menu of year-round education programs – especially those focused on young people and strengthening their science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills – and FAM’s Endowment. The Gala will be one of the premier events of the 2012 Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-

In & Expo, offering an elegant evening of socializing, ceremony, amazing food by Levan’s Catering of Orlando and exciting silent and live auctions. The staff and volunteers of the Florida Air Museum (FAM) and Sun ‘n Fun use their expertise in aviation to entertain, educate and inspire guests of all ages about the dynamic role of technology through aviation. While they are proud of the young people involved in FAM’s “Future Eagles” program (many of them enrolled at the Central Florida

year to familiarize staff and volunteers with the StormReady process. Volunteer meetings will include announcements of emergency preparedness planning. Sun ‘n Fun staff and volunteers pledge to make the event the safest possible. Look for the StormReady site designation signs when you enter the Sun ‘n Fun campus. For more information, visit sun-nfun.org.

FOR SUN ‘N FUN

Aerospace Academy on the Sun ‘n Fun /FAM campus and some of whom have already become licensed pilots), they are also very proud of all youth who find direction and motivation through FAM programs, regardless of their ultimate career choice. They work to “Empower the Future” of our youth. Funds raised from the Eagle Flight Gala will help make these goals a reality. The festivities will begin in the Florida Air Museum at 5:30 p.m. with a champagne reception and silent auction,

2012

followed by dinner at 7 p.m. in the Buehler Restoration Skills Center adjacent to the museum. Highlighting the evening will be a live auction with Sun ‘n Fun President John “Lites” Leenhouts as the distinguished auctioneer. Dessert will be served back in the museum, which will also serve as the check-out point for all auction purchases beginning at 8:30 p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets visit www.sun-n-fun.org/Event Articles/EagleFlightGalaDinnerAuction

SUN ‘N FUN INTERNATIONAL FLY-IN & EXPO ANNOUNCES FUTURE EVENT DATES As preparations began for Sun ‘n Fun 2012, it was time to reflect on scheduling the event for the future. Local and international events have always been a consideration when setting dates for Sun ‘n Fun.

After careful consideration, it has become evident that the ideal scheduling will once again be set around the first full week in April, with consideration given to Easter. Listed below are the dates for 2013

to 2020. Mark your calendars and plan to attend. 2013: April 9-14 • 2014: April 1-6 • 2015: April 21-26 • 2016: April 5-10 • 2017 -

April 4-9 • 2018: April 10-15 • 2019: April 2-7 • 2020: March 31 - April 5 For more information, visit www.sun-n-fun.org.

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Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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March 2012

It has been said that the only voluntary act in aviation is the decision to take-off. Every action after take-off involves the skillful management of risk, the enjoyment of flight and a continuous stream of decisions that result in a safe landing. In 1974, NASA created the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) to allow aviation professionals to share experiences in a frank, non-punitive manner. The ASRS structure allows pilots and other aviation professionals to file an anonymous report of an incident, error or occurrence that the contributor feels might be of value to others. These reports are gathered, analyzed and data based by NASA experts and made available to all interested parties as a tool for creating pro-active aviation safety programs. Additionally, NASA distributes an electronic publication, CALLBACK, which contains selected, de-identified, reports on a free subscription basis. In Flight USA is proud to reprint selected reports, exerted from CALLBACK, for our readers to read, study, occasionally laugh at, and always learn from. Visit http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/ to learn how you can participate in the ASRS program.

WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE DONE? This latest “interactive” issue of Safe Landings deals with two situations that involve general aviation pilots and one that involves an air carrier flight crew. In “the first half of the story” you will find report excerpts describing the situation up to the decision point. It is up to the reader to determine the possible courses of action and make a decision (preferably within the same time frame that was available to the reporter). The selected ASRS reports may not give all the information you want and you may not be experienced in the type of aircraft involved, but each incident should give you a chance to exercise your avia-

CHINO AIRCRAFT SALES

tion decision-making skills. In “the rest of the story,” you will find the actions actually taken by reporters in response to each situation. Bear in mind that their decisions may not necessarily represent the best course of action. Our intent is to stimulate thought, discussion, and training related to the type of incidents that were reported.

The First Half of the Story Situation #1: (C170 Pilot’s Report) • We diverted east-northeast…due to a slow moving storm system across the direct route to my destination…. We were getting beat up with turbulence and I

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1961 F33 DEBONAIR, 260 HP, 104 gal., D’Shannon mods. Slope W/S, new paint, $52,500.

PIPER ARROW, 1720 SMOH, NDH, IFR, all records, new strip/paint, 3 blade prop, $42,500.

1978 SENECA II, Narco, Cent. III AP, 12 SMOH L/R, new glass new P&I & annual. $139,500 OBO.

1973 ARROW, 200HP, IFR, loaded, A/C, $54,500.

1961 Nice AZTEC, here and ready to go.Good trainer/time builder. $39,500.

1969 C150, square tail, 358 SMOH, $16,950. 1981 152, 1150 SMOH, new paitn & interior. New annual. $29,500. 1977 C172, 1450 SMOH, late paint, IFR. $37,500. 1977 172N, 676 SMOH, new P&I, IFR. $47,500 will finance.

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1979 C172N, 8270 TT, 0 SMOH, $56,000. New Paint. New annual, low down, will finance.

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1969 C401, STEC55 AP, new leather, call for details. Low engines. $129,500.

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1973 C421B, 125/125, new annual, good boots, new fuel cells, mid time engines, rec. leather, vortex generators, air, King Silver Crown, HSI, ice, AP. Lease 1 yr min w/pilot. 179,500 sale.

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adequate fuel to get past the layer. The cloud layer did turn out to disappear approximately where I expected it to, but I could not get there with the fuel on board. I was way too far into the corner I created by the time I admitted it to myself. At this point, I did not believe backtracking was a reasonable option. The storm system, which I had done an end-run around, was slowly moving toward the route I had flown, the terrain behind me was higher, and the ceiling under the cloud layer was minimal. AWOS stations ahead of me were reporting a ceiling of greater than 6,000 feet, and some of them Continued on Page 43

1980 BE77 Beech Skipper, 1130 SMOH, excellent radios. $28,500.

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climbed above a scattered layer into smooth air, climbing to 6,500 feet MSL. The layer gradually increased in altitude and I climbed to 8,500 feet MSL to maintain VFR cloud clearances. Everything was fine at this point, but the cloud layer gradually increased to a continuous layer. The cloud layer was expected, but I also expected to be well past it before having to descend for fuel. I stayed above the layer rather than backtracking and descending below the layer. This was a poor decision. The wind gradually increased to about 40 knots of headwind. It gradually became clear to me that I did not have

1975 WARRIOR,680 SMOH, IFR, $37,500. 1967 TWIN COMANCHE, 300 SMOH, 69,500.

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March 2012

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Safe Landings Continued from Page 42 were reporting a broken layer. I was still hoping that I would find a break in the cloud layer and be able to stay legal VFR. I finally realized that I had to choose between two poor options: 1. A high probability of running out of fuel in flight if I continued trying to fly past the cloud layer. 2. Descend through the cloud layer, even though I am only VFR rated.

What Would You Have Done? Situation #2: (C172 Pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report) â&#x20AC;˘ I am a member of a club which gives me access to four C172â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. I typically fly one of the160HP models. On this trip, however, I would be carrying four adults and the airplane I took on that day was a 180HP model. It was the only plane with enough useful load to carry all of us. So, I chose to fly an airplane that I had never flown before. I got some performance information from the clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website (50 gallon, long-range tanks, 8.7 gallons/hour fuel burn, and a cruise speed of 128 knots). I used those numbers to calculate that I could fly for 5 hours and 15 minutes before reaching my 30minute reserve. I purchased [flight planning software] earlier in the week and used that to calculate that the trip should take just under 4 hours so I thought I had plenty of fuel. Once the flight was under way, I learned that the cruise speed was more like 120 knots (at 2,400 RPM), the headwind was stronger than I had planned for and I was only achieving a ground speed of around 100 knots. However, my GPS told me that I would still be able to make [my destination] in less than 5 hours. I failed to note our exact time of departure.

What Would You Have Done? The Rest of the Story: The Reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Actions Situation #1: (C170 Pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report) The Reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Action: â&#x20AC;˘ I chose to descend through the cloud layer. I set up a heading toward a nearby airport reporting a high ceiling, stabilized the descent, and descended on instruments. The layer was not very thick, but I did not maintain VFR cloud clearance requirements. Center would have known where and at what altitude I was from my transponder. Hopefully there was no other airplane cruising in that layerâ&#x20AC;Ś. After breaking out, I landed and refueled. Remaining fuel was minimal. I then continued on to my destinationâ&#x20AC;Ś. This is only about the third time that I have ever proceeded on top of an under-

cast. I did not plan to do it. I did not have adequate weather information to commit to that course of action, particularly with the fuel on boardâ&#x20AC;Ś. The jam I got myself into was my responsibility, caused by my poor decisions and not leaving a legal and safe way out. Fortunately, the minimal instrument time that I get every two years during biennial flight review allowed me to keep the airplane under control. (Ed. note: Air Traffic Control is ready and willing to lend assistance to pilots who find themselves in unforeseen difficulty. Establishing verbal communications with ATC, when able, may ensure that the situation doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go from bad to worse.) Situation #2: (C172 Pilotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report) The Reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Action: â&#x20AC;˘ Approaching [the destination], the fuel gauges began to dip near â&#x20AC;&#x153;E,â&#x20AC;? but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never trusted fuel gauges in airplanes and instead trust my math to determine my range. So, I refused to believe the gauges and continued to proceed (although the gauges did make me a bit nervous). After I had contacted Approachâ&#x20AC;Śthe engine started to cut out. I informed the Controller that I had run out of fuel. He told me to look for the North/South highway. While I looked, I tried switching the fuel selector to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leftâ&#x20AC;? and to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right.â&#x20AC;? It had previously been set to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both.â&#x20AC;? This did not help. I found the highway and felt that I could make it as long as the engine didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quit completely. The engine did cut out completely once I was within a few hundred feet of the highway, but I had already made it at this pointâ&#x20AC;Ś. I touched down on the highway and was very fortunate that traffic was able to see me land and stopped behind me. In reflecting upon my mistakes, I can find many. To start with, I used numbers from the club website to do my trip calculations rather than consulting the POH. I did not confirm the accuracy of the numbers with other club members who had plenty of experience in the airplane. I had far too much confidence in numbers that I did not know from experience to be accurate. I failed to check the exact time of departure when we took off. I did not trust the fuel gauges when they were nearing empty. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never trusted those gauges and assumed wrongly that they would go well under â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eâ&#x20AC;? like most cars do. I was stubborn and believed that my math was correct and more accurate than the gauges. I failed to inform the controller upon initial contact that I had minimal fuelâ&#x20AC;Ś I learned many valuable lessons from these mistakes and am very thankful that my friends and I are still here to benefit from what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned.

43

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WOMEN SOAR YOU SOAR SET Young women will be inspired to reach for their aviation dreams as Women Soar You Soar, a four-day mentoring camp featuring inspirational female aviators, returns for its eighth year in conjunction with EAA AirVenture 2012. Women Soar You Soar, scheduled for Thursday, July 26, through Sunday, July 29, will introduce 100 young women to aviation-based careers and a womenmentor network, providing encouragement and support to a possible career in aviation. They will participate in a variety

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Access to property which is located on airport grounds is by your private gated road/driveway. Deeded access to adjoining (direct access) runway. One hangar 125x100 with 2,500 sq. ft. of offices (5), restroom/shower facilities (2), reception area with bar, 3 storage/machine shops, sleeping rooms, PLUS 100x100 or 10,000 square feet of clear span aircraft hangar space. Second 44x45 clear span aircraft hangar is detached and can be rented for additional income. Airport to be expanded and upgraded in near future. PERFECT TIME to get in on future development. This 2.92 acre property is fully fenced and can be used as storage, manufacturing, wearhousing or what it was built for, AIRPLANES!! Seller will consider lease. Seller may help with financing with good offer. Airport has fuel facilities, restaurant, repaved runway. California City Municipal Airport covers 245 acres and is located two miles (3 km) northwest of the business district of the California City, in the Freemont Valley of Kern County, California. The airport is open to the public, and lies at an elevation of 2,450 feet above sea level.

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including WomenVenture, one of the largest gatherings of women aviators and enthusiasts, and the widely popular Night Air Show on Saturday, July 28. “Attendees will have the opportunity to engage with inspiring aviation mentors engaged in a variety of aviation careers and experience what a career in aviation has to offer as we create the next generation of aviators,” said Elissa Lines, EAA vice president of business and donor relations. “These young women will undoubtedly come away excited about the opportunities they have before them.” Among the mentors sharing her insights on aviation careers is noted aerobatics performer and Southwest Airlines captain Debby Rihn-Harvey, chairperson of the Women Soar You Soar steering committee. Applications will be accepted through

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June 29, 2012, and are available online at www.airventure.org/WomenSoar. The cost is $75, which includes lodging at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, meals, and admission to EAA AirVenture. Registration scholarships are also available for young women meeting financial need requirements. Space in the program is limited. Additional information can be obtained online or by calling the EAA Development Office at 800/236-1025.

Fairness to Pilots Continued from Page 36 AOPA, in comments submitted in February 2011, responded to a particular concern that under current rules, the NTSB, in reviewing the FAA's emergency determination, immediately grounding a pilot, must assume the truth of the FAA's allegations, which makes it virtually impossible to reverse the immediate grounding.

Under those rules, the FAA wins nearly 100 percent of the emergency challenges. AOPA wants the NTSB to get rid of the assumption and leave it up to an NTSB law judge to determine the legitimacy of the FAA's immediate grounding after hearing relevant arguments from the parties. “No presumption of a pilot’s guilt is either mandated or suggested in the intent of the statute that establishes NTSB review of such FAA determinations,” wrote AOPA Counsel Kathleen A. Yodice in AOPA’s response to the ANPRM. AOPA also urged that the revised rules include a requirement for the FAA to make the results of its enforcement investigation available to a pilot at the time that the FAA gives notice that it intends to bring an enforcement action against a pilot so that the pilot can understand the charges being made against him or her and be able to appropriately respond. Revised rules should also broaden pilots’ ability to recover certain fees and expenses incurred in successfully defending against enforcement actions, AOPA said, along with other suggestions.

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The Pylon Place

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rogress is being made, say officials for the Reno National Championship Air Races (RARA). Last month, RARA met with the Reno-Tahoe Airport Authority (RTAA) to discuss obtaining the permits needed to hold the event at the Reno-Stead Airport in September. RTAA is the owner and operator of the Reno-Tahoe International and RenoStead Airports. It is governed by a ninemember Board of Trustees. In this meeting, Mike Houghton, president of RARA told the airport officials that he is “totally satisfied” with the direction the board is taking in considering the permits. Only two people spoke up against RARA at the RTAA meeting, both having had previous anti-RARA episodes. One of their stated concerns was the NTSB will not complete its probable cause report before the planned September 12 start of the 2012 event. This is quite standard; the NTSB generally takes up to three years to investigate such an accident. The permits from RTAA are just one of the hurdles RARA needs to manage before the Pylon Racing Seminar in June and the Races in Sept. can be held. The next hurdle is the Air Racing Waiver from the FAA. This allows us to create the airspace necessary to hold such an event. Waivered airspace allows us to exceed the normal speed limits, fly in “close proximity” to other aircraft, etc. These two key items are essential to holding the event. But, they are not the only things on the task list. In March, the annual Presidents’ Meeting will be held to share the “State

Rare Bear out to break their own FAI Records of the Races” with each of the racing classes. This meeting should shed additional light on the issues being faced. As news becomes available, I will share what I can.

Speeding and Climbing

(Tim Adams)

plan, but I bet it is. Having Rare Bear break its own record would be a terrific boost for the team. We wish them luck. But, Steadfast shall not be outdone. Will Whiteside will also be going for the “Time to Climb” record in Steadfast. He just set the speed over straight 3KM course – internal combustion engine,

class C-1d at 669.53. Now, he is looking to topple the standing start to 3,000 meters. The current record was set by Russell Hancock in a Piper Navajo Piper at 3:33 in 1978. The record has to be broken by one percent. Keep in mind that Steadfast is much smaller than Rare Bear and that is why there are two completely different records to be broken. Both are under the Class C, for Internal Combustion Engine, but have different payloads. Knowing the competitive nature of the unlimited teams, we’re wondering if Strega will come out of the hangar to see if she can snag the record away from Rare Bear. Or, maybe Czech Mate sees a future in record breaking. Only time will tell.

Other News The Trailer for Air Racers -3D is now available. You can see it on You Continued on Page 46

In the meantime, Rare Bear has joined Steadfast in trying to break FAI records. We mentioned earlier that Will Whiteside in Steadfast set the 3km record in their weight class, previously held by the Hughes H-1 Racer. Now, Rare Bear will also go for the 3km record in it’s weight class sometime this summer. Lyle Shelton set the record in Las Vegas in August of 1989. It currently sits at 528 mph/850 km/h. Lyle also set the “Time to Climb” record standing start to 3,000 meters (approximately 10,000 feet) - in 91.9 seconds. We do not have word yet if this is part of the

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Continued from Page 45 Tube and the trailer will likely be playing at local IMAX theaters to gather some momentum. The last word we received was an April 5 release date in the US. I know we are putting together a viewing party the minute it hits my area. I will keep everyone posted about details like when you can see this movie and where to get more information about seeing it in your area. It should be amazing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; flying with Steve Hinton in Strega in 3D! Also, Pete Law will be speaking at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NAG (National AirRacing Group) banquet. Pete has a long history with air racing and aviation. He started in the business with Lockheed in 1959 to work on the F-104. He was then recruited to Skunk Works to work on such famous aircraft as the SR-71, U-2 and the F-117. Darryl Greenamyer recruited Pete to join air racing and we are sure glad he did. Pete is a fixture in the pits each year helping nearly all the teams with their ADI systems. As always, we look for good news from RARA and in the meantime, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll

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From Skies to Stars

LET THERE (NOT) BE LIGHT By Ed Downs, Member ACT rom Skies to Stars taps into the natural connection between flying enthusiast and the space sciences. We have joined up with the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium (TASM) and the Astronomy Club of Tulsa (ACT), a dedicated group of professional and amateur astronomers, science enthusiast and professional educators who have generously offered to share their ongoing outreach program with our readers. Learn more about these organizations at www.TulsaAir AndSpaceMuseum.org and www.astrotulsa.com. Our thanks to John Land, ACT member and officer who tipped us off to this month’s topic. Okay, “How many astronomers does it take to unscrew a light bulb?” An “offending light bulb” that was blinding sensitive telescopes answered this question during one of our astronomy club’s “star parties” (great fun). The answer is four. One to have a bad idea (the most experienced, by the way), one to steady a rickety step ladder, one to climb the ladder and unscrew the light bulb, and one to stand guard with a can of hornet spry just in case the hornet’s nest connected to the light fixture was disturbed. Well, the lad-

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der holder was unsteady, the bulb guy hit the hornets nest, the spray can guy panicked and sprayed the bulb guy and all three ran like idiots, all having chosen to dress lightly on that hot, summer evening. Regrettably, this writer was not an innocent bystander. Light is both friend and foe to the astronomer. Telescopes do not simply magnify images, although many cheap, box store telescopes would have you think so. Colorful boxes scream “500 Power Astronomical Telescope” or some other such claim, making the buyer think they will be able to see the little green guys on Mars. Not true, and they are not green. The usable magnification level of a telescope is limited to about 50 times the diameter (aperture, in inches) of the lens or mirror that is gathering and focusing the light. The bigger the aperture, the greater the magnification capability, but atmospheric distortion seldom allows magnifications above about 250 power. Even then, the ability to “resolve” (see details clearly) the image comes into play. Resolution goes back to how much light is being captured. The simplified story of observing our universe is that one must gather as much light as possible and then collate that light through high-

quality lenses or mirrors, with the results viewed through a high-quality, magnifying eyepiece. This chain of events to exploring starts with light. Learn more about telescopes at http://astrotulsa.com/ Learn/Telescope/Telescope.htm Now comes “light the enemy” in the form of “light pollution.” It is sad to realize that millions of Americans do not have a clue as to what the universe has to offer. This is because the pollution of urban lighting almost completely obscures the night sky. Let’s be clear, this writer does not believe we should snuff out all earth born lights and revert back to the dark ages. I like lighted streets and public areas just as much as anyone else. But, there is a lot that can be done with simple engineering to re-introduce our urban society to the wonders of the stars. For example, a simple flashlight concentrates its energy by focusing the light through a reflector that sends the light where we need it. Such simple, almost cost neutral, technology can be used in many areas of public lighting to direct light toward the streets. Almost 80 percent of public lighting is sent off into space, not where it is needed, costing an estimated billion dollars each year in wasted energy that we all pay for. And,

we are losing our universe in the process. Now you can participate in an international project to survey the effects of light pollution. The object is to observe and count the number of stars you can see in the Orion constellation, then pinpoint your location on the world map and enter your results on the World Wide Web. The project is simple enough for family fun, but also informative for experienced observers. Details and comparison maps are found at www.globeatnight.org/index.html This is a great example of “citizen science” that’s helping to raise dark-sky awareness in every corner of the globe. This is a simple way for you to actually participate in research that is fun and productive. The website is entertaining and easy to use. This writer has flown high enough to see the curvature of the earth and had starlight alone light my cockpit. Most pilots have seen night skies seldom seen by “earthlings.” Wouldn’t it be fun to share those sights? Learn more about what you can do to preserve dark skies at: http://www.darkskiesawareness.org/ and http://www.darksky.org/ Join the adventure at these fine websites. The universe is waiting for you.

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STRONG EXHIBITOR DEMAND With an extensive program, more than 500 exhibitors and numerous special events, AERO will take flight in Friedrichshafen from Wednesday to Saturday, April 18–21, 2012. Modern ultralights, powered aircraft, avionics, aircraft maintenance, as well as the latest business jets for general aviation, are all on display at the trade show. Special exhibits will also feature helicopters and new electric aircraft. With the launch of the new Engine Area powered by fliegermagazin, in addition to a wide-ranging conference program, this global show for general aviation will be an attractive forum for trade visitors at Lake Constance. Klaus Wellmann (CEO of Messe Friedrichshafen) and Roland Bosch (Show Director) are bullish about AERO 2012: “We’ve seen very strong demand,” declares Bosch. Following several difficult years for general aviation manufacturers (meaning the civilian aviation industry except for scheduled-service and charter airlines), there is once again a feeling of optimism. The economic revival in Germany, other European countries and in the USA is driving renewed demand in several general aviation sectors. This trend is led by ultralight aircraft, European Light Aircraft (ELA)

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March 2012

AERO FRIEDRICHSHAFEN 2012

and gyrocopters, which cost less to run; meanwhile, among airplanes with single or twin reciprocating engines, high fuel costs have put customer emphasis on the more economical machines. Additional market interest is being stoked by the introduction of new low-consumption diesel and hybrid engines, as well as ultra-quiet electric engines. Two successful special exhibitions will return to the trade fair in 2012. This will be the fourth edition of the e-flight expo, focusing on alternative energy in aviation, including advanced and economical motors, both electric and hybrid. And at the Helicopter Hangar, whirlybird fans will get a smorgasbord of choppers designed for training, travel, industry and the military. A large proportion of machines exhibited at AERO will be traditional airplanes powered by single or twin reciprocating engines. These require at least a Private Pilot License to fly, and form the backbone of the general aviation “fleet”. Trade visitors are eagerly awaiting the introduction of the new single-engine model from Pipistrel with combustion or hybrid motor, possibly a large twin diesel from Diamond Aircraft, as well as the final design of the Flight Design C4, a

single-engine four-seater that was exhibited as a mock-up at AERO 2011. In 2012, ultralight aircraft will once again form by far the largest group of machines on display. These have one or two seats and weigh no more than 472 kg. Ultralight popularity has been steadily rising for years, because the license needed for sport aircraft is relatively easy to get, and the machines are quiet and economical. Recent years have also seen a boom in ultralight gyrocopters. A growing number of participating exhibitors, as well as numerous aircraft with electric or hybrid motors, point to the increasing importance of the e-flight expo within AERO, with “e” standing for electrical, ecological and evolutionary aviation. On display are productionready aircraft and motor gliders, featuring electric motors or other advanced propulsion systems; prototypes are also being shown. AERO 2012 starts on Wednesday, April 18th, and runs through Saturday, April 21st, 2012. The opening times are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. Further information can be found at: www.aero-expo.com

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March 2012

MH OXYGEN SYSTEMS ANNOUNCES THEIR “BUILD-IN-YOUR-OWNAVIATION-OXYGEN-SYSTEM”

Designed for self-built aircraft from the ground up, the MH-EDS 2IP and 4IP (Electronic Oxygen Delivery System) are extremely precise multi-person in panel FADOC (Full Authority Digital Oxygen Control aviation oxygen delivery systems. The MH-EDS technology utilizes patented technology to provide the most efficient, yet smallest and lightest aviation oxygen system available. The MHEDS monitors micro-pressure changes from your breathing, delivering a precise individual pulse of oxygen at the instant each inhaling cycle is detected. Precious

oxygen that is otherwise lost (by using the constant flow method) is saved by using the MH “Pulse-Demand” system. Features: Automatically adjusts to pressure altitudes up to 25,000 feet; Can be configured for mounting in the overhead console or the instrument panel; Shows cylinder pressure and cabin pressure altitude; Provides situational awareness for all persons connected; Provides means for customizing oxygen flow at each station for unique personal conditions; Automatically turns on cylinder valve (via electric means) from control

head; Low cylinder pressure warning; Automatically adjusts to face mask at pressure altitude of 18,000 feet; Back-lit LCD and buttons; Simple to install low pressure tubing connects regulator to oxygen outlets; Provides delivery protocols for cannulas and facemasks; Emergency bypass provides oxygen to all stations independent of electrical power; Compatible with all 14- and 28-volt systems. For more information call Mountain High at 800/468-8185 or visit the website at www.MHoxygen.com.

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CALIFORNIA AVIATION SERVICES MOVES FROM PATROLLING FONTANA CITY TO TRAINING FUTURE POLICE PILOTS After nine years of helicopter service to the City of Fontana, California Aviation Services, Inc. is expanding its flight school operation to include specialized police pilot helicopter training courses. In 2003, Leo Bell (15 year police veteran and founder of California Aviation Services, Inc) entered into a contract with the City of Fontana Calif., to provide a complete aviation unit for helicopter police patrol. The original purpose was to have a two-year program, which would enable Fontana’s police department to learn helicopter operations, aircraft management, helicopter tactical operations, etc from the experienced group at California Aviation Services. The initial two-year program was intended to end in 2005 with Fontana purchasing their own helicopter and starting on their own. However, the economical police helicopter contract was so successful, the City of Fontana decided to keep Leo Bell’s police heli-

copter operation serving the city for an additional seven years. In April 2012, California Aviation will relocate the police helicopter used for Fontana’s police department, back to its flight school operation in Riverside. California Aviation Services will now place the fully equipped Robinson R-44II Police Helicopter into full-time

service at the flight school in Riverside, Calif. The company has gained FAA Part 141 Approval for its Commercial Helicopter Pilot Courses and has a specialized “Police Helicopter Pilot Aircrew Course” that will be integrated into the program. The R-44 helicopter will be utilized by civilian as well as police pilot trainees along with an experienced flight

instructor onboard. The local communities will gain benefit from the success of the California Aviation and Fontana relationship through the years. The experienced staff at California Aviation Services will be instructing new pilots from throughout the country utilizing the aircraft formerly supplied to Fontana. The flights will be in coordination with several local police agencies, allowing hands on police pilot experience for the pilot trainees. The communities and police departments will have the aircraft free of charge when students are conducting the training. California Aviation Services, Inc. is a leader in professional flight training and is one of very few law enforcement specialists in the helicopter industry. FAA approved flight training courses are offered in Riverside, Calif. For additional information, visit the website at www.californiaaviationservices.com.

AOPA LAUNCHES STUDENT PILOT SUPPORT TOOL Students have a powerful new tool available to help them track the progress of their flight training with AOPA’s new MyFlightTraining website. MyFlight Training takes the content of Flight Training magazine and personalizes it for students anywhere in the flight training curriculum. The site is based on the feedback AOPA received in its research about the ideal flight training experience. That report found that students have an overwhelming desire for information about the overall flight training process, access to ongoing resources, and a sense of community, among other things. MyFlightTraining addresses these points with a variety of features.

Open only to student pilots, the site tracks a participant’s progress with six key milestones–first flight, the student pilot certificate, solo, the knowledge test, solo cross-countries, and the practical test. Students come to the site and enter the successful completion of a milestone. By doing so, a wealth of additional content opens up about the next hurdle in training. Through online resources and access to the pilot information center, students will have additional support tools available to them 24/7. The milestones help to break the flight training journey down into manageable stages, while making sure that in

addition to the end goal of a pilot certificate, other successes along the way are acknowledged and celebrated. Anyone who completes an introductory flight will be offered a free logbook. After obtaining a student pilot certificate, a student will have the opportunity to get a free T-shirt to wear during his or her first solo that features a dotted line on the back of the shirt for an instructor to cut, keeping the “shirt tail” tradition alive. There also is a monthly sweepstakes where any student who enters a milestone could win $1,000 toward flight training or one of four $100 gift certificates from ASA, Jeppesen, King Schools, and

Sporty’s Pilot Shop. In order to address the issue of building community among students, participants can upload photos and details of their milestones to be shared on MyFlight Training, their own Facebook page, or the Flight Training Facebook page. MyFlightTraining is completely free and open to any student pilot. Participants don’t have to be AOPA members to join. Those who are no longer students can view a demonstration that details the site. For more information, visit the website www.aopa.org.


March 2012

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51

Business Aviation News

CESSNA CITATION LATITUDE

HAS

NEW LONGER RANGE

First Citation Latitude in Europe Announced

Cessna Aircraft Company has announced that it has increased the range capability of its planned new midsize jet, the Citation Latitude. The Latitude is now expected to have a maximum range of 2,300 nautical miles (4,259.6 kilometers). “Our customers asked, we answered,” said Trevor Esling, Vice President, Sales – Europe, Middle East, Africa and Asia (EMAA). He went on to say,”The increased range will give the aircraft more flexibility to fly a wider variety of missions and meet our customer requirements for comfort and performance. We’ve made this great aircraft even better.” As the first Latitude buyer in

Europe, EFO Aviation GmbH & Co. KG was sold on the aircraft’s new extended range as well as its 72-inch, flat-floor cabin. The aircraft will be operated by Air Hamburg Private Jets, Germany, which will use it for charter and executive transportation. “The Latitude is a new class of Citation and we are very happy to be the first to bring it to Europe,” said Floris Helmers, managing director at Air Hamburg. “The 2,300-nm range will allow us to meet many different mission demands, including between Germany and Moscow. It will be the perfect complement to the other Citations in our fleet, which include three XLS+ and two CJ3

as well as other Citation aircraft.” First announced at the 2011 NBAA Annual Meeting and Convention, the Latitude has been designed with space for a crew of two, plus up to eight passengers; features Garmin G5000 avionics; includes an 84-inch (2.13-meter) fuselage; a 6-foot (1.83-meter) high passenger cabin from just behind the cockpit through the rear lavatory area, a flat floor; and Cessna’s highly advanced ClairityTM cabin technology solution. Positioned between the Citation XLS+ and Citation Sovereign in Cessna’s product line, the Citation Latitude design offers a full fuel payload of 1,000 pounds (454 kilograms), a maximum cruise speed of 442 knots true air-

speed (819 kilometers per hour) and a range of 2,300 nautical miles (4,259.6 kilometers). Preliminary specifications project the aircraft will operate at airports with runways as short as 3,900 feet (1,189 meters), will have a maximum altitude of 45,000 feet (13,716 meters) and will climb direct to 43,000 feet (13,106 meters) in 23 minutes. First flight of the Citation Latitude prototype is expected to be mid-year 2014, with FAA certification (Part 25) and entry into service expected in 2015. The aircraft is priced at $14.9 million in 2012 USD. More information on the Latitude can be found at www.citationlatitude.com.

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT OFFERS DIGITAL PRESSURIZATION SYSTEM AS STANDARD EQUIPMENT ON NEW HAWKER 900XP AIRCRAFT System Provides Ideal Cabin Pressure Automatically for Pilots and Passengers Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) announced that a digital pressurization system is now included as standard equipment beginning with the 2012 factory-new model of the Hawker 900XP midsize business jet. “Passenger comfort in the Hawker 900XP is now fully automatic,” said Ron Gunnarson, HBC vice president, Hawker Marketing. “Not only will passengers

appreciate it, maintenance personnel will welcome the system’s diagnostics capability and a 94 percent reduction in components, resulting in easier and more cost-effective service and maintenance.” The digital pressurization system allows the flight crew to take off, climb, cruise and descend while having the ideal cabin pressure scheduled for them automatically. This automated system relieves

passenger fatigue associated with abrupt pressure changes and reduces pilot workload in flight. Pressurization can still be controlled manually at any time if desired. Digital pressurization is the latest example of a long list of enhancements made to the Hawker 900XP, including new technology, fuel-efficient engines, advanced composite winglets, LED lighting, and new cabin entertainment

options. With the latest technology systems integrated in a strong airframe with an unbeatable reputation, the Hawker 900XP is the most advanced version yet of the world’s best-selling midsize business jet, offering unmatched cabin comfort, increased performance, range and efficiency at an unprecedented value. For more information, visit www.hawkerbeechcraft.com.

ALL AMERICAN HELICOPTERS WIN FAA, VA APPROVAL The FAA and Veteran’s Administration have approved All American Helicopters’ proposal for a Part 141 Helicopter ATP course. This means that veterans who qualify for the program will be able sign up under the GI bill for 25 hours of flight time with an instructor and receive 40 hours of ground school for the written exam. The VA covers everything but the cost of the checkride. The

program should take about two weeks total. Upon completion of the course, the pilot should earn his/her ATP rating. The program is approved for both the Montgomery and Post 9/11 VA programs. All American Helicopters, a division of US Aviation in Denton, operates a complete Part 141 Professional Helicopter Pilot program. It is now possible to enter as a student and work from

primary flight up through the ATP rating. The program has attracted a considerable number of foreign students. To learn more, visit http://www.usaviationacademy.com/helicopters.php or contact Rick Hicks at 940/297-6423. Veterans can now utilize their VA benefits to advance through the helicopter ATP rating at All American Helicopters in Denton, TX.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

52

March 2012

WINGS OVER KANSAS WEBSITE WELCOMES HIGH TOUCH TECHNOLOGIES High Touch Technologies and Wings Over Kansas have become partners. The relationship not only strengthens the business profile of High Touch Technologies but also opens windows of support and development to Wings Over Kansas, from the High Touch national technology firm. Since 1984, High Touch has provided technology solutions to small and mid-size businesses. Headquartered in Wichita, Kansas, High Touch serves businesses with software and hardware services, web site development, and IT systems management. High Touch also

has locations in Corpus Christi, Dallas, Denver, and Kansas City. The company has 185 full-time employees and 20 to 25 contractors. For more information on High Touch Technologies, visit www.hightouchtechnologies.com Wings Over Kansas has been recognized by McGraw-Hill as one of the Top 500 Best Aviation Web Sites with visitors from over 225 countries. Wings Over Kansas offers a unique perspective on the role of Wichita and Kansas in the history and development of international aviation. The featured menu offers pages on aviation news, history, education, photos,

videos, careers, pioneers, quizzes and learn-to-fly categories. In addition, the Special Subjects section offers further aviation focused content pages. The site profiles the achievements of aviation pioneers like Clyde Cessna, Dwane Wallace, Walter and Olive Ann Beech, William Lear along with others and the companies they founded. Wings Over Kansas is honored to have the support of valued contributing editors, offering and hosting aviation and aerospace articles of unique interest. This esteemed group of aviation authors, historians and aerospace professionals consists

of Walter J. Boyne, Lionel Alford, Jr., Edward H. Phillips, Frank Joseph Rowe, Richard Harris, Daryl Murphy, Bonnie Johnson and Col. George M. Boyd. For more information on Wings Over Kansas visit the About WOK menu category. The web site owner is Carl Chance, former News Consultant/Correspondent/TV Producer for Wingspan Air & Space Channel. Chance frequently writes articles for In Flight USA and serves on the board of directors of The Kansas Aviation Museum. To access Wings Over Kansas, log on to www.wingsoverkansas.com.

DRE 8001 HEADSET OFFERS UNEQUALED VALUE, PERFORMANCE Headsets Inc. has announced the new model DRE 8001 active noise reduction headset with Bluetooth. This new headset is made in America and integrates a new ‘Lynx’ Bluetooth audio controller into the existing DRE 6001 headset to create more capability and value for today’s aviator. The Lynx is a complete audio/comm/ power controller providing Bluetooth, Hi-Fi amplification of audio input, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries plus traditional E6B functions. Recharging can be accomplished via one of three methods: plug into 110v AC (charger included); plug into a computer USB port

(cable included), or from aircraft power via the cigarette lighter adaptor (included). The 1700ma battery will power the DRE 8001 for 12 to 15 hours. The controls are straight forward with buttons large enough to allow for confident operation. The full-color screen provides for easy to read data in direct sunlight. The screen and back-lit buttons are self-dimming. The menu driven interface is simple and easy to navigate. The Lynx is available in a standalone version with adaptor plugs for use with existing headsets, or it may be hardwired into existing headsets. Factory installation is recommended for hard-

wired installations. Additional features of the DRE 8001 include: • Playback devices- if Bluetooth equipped can be controlled by Lynx. • Direct dial- dial on the Lynx keypad, no need to fumble with your cellphone. • Voice dial- dialing from a contact list. • Missed calls- caller ID viewed from the Lynx. • Auto-mute- phone calls and music are auto- muted when receiving groundcommunication. Auto- mute function may be disabled if desired. • Input jacks- available for legacy

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(non-Bluetooth) cell phones and audio devices. • Fail-safe operation- in the event of power failure, radio and intercom communication remain unaffected • Stereo output jack- allows recording of all communications. Introductory pricing is set at $599 through June 30, 2012. For more information, call 1877/987-9977 or visit the DRE website at www.drecommunications.com

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LSA IMPORTER CONTINUES PATTERN SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Flight Design has announced the appointment of Dave Armando as Director of Maintenance for Flight Design USA. The Connecticut company is the national importer for Flight Design GmbH, designer and producer of the CT and MC series of Light-Sport Aircraft. The German company is also developing a new four seat aircraft designated C4. “We are pleased to announce that during the Sebring Expo 2012 Dave Armando was selected as our new Director of Maintenance,” said Tom Peghiny, President of Flight Design USA, “Dave has been involved in aviation since 1990.” Prior to joining Flight Design USA, Armando was a successful entrepreneur managing up to 60 employees. With a keen eye for detail and experience focused on worker productivity, Armando is dedicated to providing the very best customer experience possible. His new email address tells the story: TopService @FlightDesignUSA.com. An experienced pilot with both fixed-wing and rotorcraft ratings, Armando will provide the company with increased options to best serve customers. “Flight Design USA remains an excellent representative and partner for

OF

53

American Aircraft Sales Co. HAYWARD AIRPORT 50 YEARS SAME LOCATION

File Photo

Matthias Betsch, Dave Armando, Tom Peghiny (Flight Design USA) Flight Design,” noted Matthias Betsch, President of Flight Design GmbH based in Germany. “We enjoy market leading success in the U.S. market thanks to consistent effort by Tom Peghiny and his staff, now including Dave Armando. “As the leading seller of Light-Sport Aircraft, Flight Design USA is firing on all cylinders to give its customers the best possible user experience, both at the time of purchase and after the sale. Adedicated new maintenance director combines with the company’s new XP (Extended Protection) warranty offered at no added charge for all new buyers since Jan. 1, 2011. The company also has the broadest customer support network of any LSA company, and it recently offered new CTLS customers a special bargain on a delivery position for the company’s new four seat C4 aircraft expected in 2013.

WICKS AIRCRAFT SUPPLIES HARDWARE KIT FOR ONEX

1979 Beechcraft F33A

1992 Grumman Tiger

287 SMOH, 3200 TTSN, Garmin 430 GPS, S-Tec 55 A/P, fresh annual NDH ..$119,950

450 SFOH, 2715 TTSN, Digital IFR, A/P, fresh annual, ................................$69,950

1968 Piper Arrow 180

1997 Mooney MSE (M20J)

Garmin 430 IFR, Garmin 696 linked to Zaon Traffic Alert, Stec 50 A/P, Speed Mods, 1599 SMOH, 4085 TTSN, NDH... $44,950

1406 TTSN, King Avionics, GPS, KAP 150 A/P, One Owner, Hangared Since New, NDH, Like New ............................$149,950

1999 Cessna T206H Stationair

1980 Cessna 172N

890 TTSN, King IFR, KAP 140 A/P, GPS, Flint AUX L/R Fuel, Like New California Airplane, NDH, ............................$249,950 Two Piper Warrior IIs

300 SFRMAN, 6,000 TTSN, King Digital IFR, GPS, Nice P/I..........................................$44,950

1979 Piper Warrior II 161 1500 SFOH, 6200 TTSN, Digital IFR, Century 1 A/P, Nice Paint and Interior, NDH...................$39,950 1976 Piper Warrior II 151 1100 SMOH, 0 STOH, 3260 TTSN, King IFR, Fresh Annual, NDH..................................$39,950

LD SO

Exciting Single-Seater Now Easier to Source Wicks Aircraft Supply, located in the heart of the Lower 48, has reached an agreement with Oshkosh-based Sonex Aircraft to supply the hardware kits for their popular new Onex (pronounced "one-x"). The low-cost aerobatic plane is the latest offering from the Wisconsin company, and since its Oshkosh introduction in 2011, the folding-wing Onex has shown that the single-place market is more viable than many have recently thought, bringing low-cost and efficiency back into fun, personal flying. "We're happy to provide the convenience of a one-stop hardware source for Onex builders," said Scott Wick, President of Wicks Aircraft, which also provides tools, finishes, instruments, and maintenance items to builders on an á la carte basis. "The Onex is a fun, finishable project, and we're here to help make sure builders have the proper high-quality parts they need, as soon as they want them." Mark Schaible, General Manager of Sonex Aircraft, said, "We are pleased to have Wicks Aircraft continue their long-

standing support of our builders by adding hardware for our newest kit, the Onex, to their experimental aircraft hardware kit offerings. Wicks has been a great partner through the years, offering great customer service to our factory and to our customers around the world. The Onex is an extremely easy to build aircraft, and purchasing hardware from a one-stop source such as Wicks makes building it just that much simpler." Wicks Aircraft Supply has been serving aircraft builders and maintainers since 1974 from its headquarters in Highland, Illinois (near St Louis). Quality product and fast, experienced, excellent customer service have kept the Wicks base loyal, even as new aviation enthusiasts continue to discover the Wicks Experience. For more information contact Wicks Aircraft Supply online at www.wicksaircraft.com or call their order line: 1800/221-9425, or help line: 618/6547447. Wicks is located at 410 Pine Street, Highland, Ill.

1976 Piper Archer II 181 King Digital IFR, Garmin 150 GPS, 2000 SFRMAN, 7400 TTSN, NDH ........$34,950

1967 Cessna 150 Texas Tail Dragger

1947 Piper J3 Cub

1500 SMOH, 4500 TTSN, King Digital Avionics, GPS, Hangared since 1980 by same owner, NDH, Very Nice,...... $19,950

585 SMOH, 6404 TTSN, Restored to Original Condition, ........................$29,950

Two Cessna 152s

1978 C152 0 SMOH, 10,050 TTSN, Digital VFR, NDH, ....................................$24,950 1980 C152 6700 TTSN, 1242 SMOH, New King/Garmin IFR, New Paint, NDH ..$29,950

LD O S 1967 Piper Cherokee 140 / 160 hp 2700 TTSN, 580 SMOH, 160 hp, Digital VFR, Original Paint/InteriorNDH....$19,950

1972 Grumman AAIA Lynx

1981 Cessna 172RG Cutlass

2752 TTSN, 903 SMOH, 0 STOH, Very Nice Paint/Interior, Fresh Annual,..$24,950

0 SMOH, 7800 TTSN, New Interior, Average Paint, Fresh Annual, One Owner, NDH,..........$49,950

Robert Coutches

(510) 783-2711 • fax (510) 783-3433 21015 Skywest Drive, Hayward, CA 94541

www.americanaircraft.net


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

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March 2012

InFlight USA Classifieds (All ads run for 2 months)

00

Classified Ad Rates: $45 for the first 20 words, $750 for each additional 10 words, photos $750 ea.

Phone: (650) 358-9908

Fax: (650) 358-9254

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THE L EGENDARY

P ITTS S PECIAL Story and photos by Sagar Pathak

Continued from Page 4 To give you an example of the dedication put into this airplane, the polished aluminum wheelpants alone took five weeks to craft. And the polished aluminum cowling took over four months to create. After five years of work, he had himself a prize-winning airplane. Unfortunately in 1999, the plane was severely damaged in a landing incident. Current owner, Barry Woods took over the famous planes and spent five years restoring it back to its' original prize-winning con-

dition and made it even more spectacular. The fact that both Model 12s are in such immaculate condition is in large part due to aviation mechanic extraordinaire Larry King, flying with Barry in the Green Model 12. King, who has more than 25 years experience in aviation maintenance, is also an airshow pilot and Certified Flight Instructor. When asked why people fly the Model 12, King said, "What they love about this plane is the awesome performance of the Russian M14P radial engine, putting out between

360hp-450hp, with an acceleration on take off of 0-60 mph in three seconds. It has all of the nostalgic bi-plane characteristics with jet performance." Early Pitts aircraft were originally designed to be homebuilt airplanes. But now just as many planes are built in the Aviat Factory in Afton, Wyo. as by avid homebuilders. The Pitts S-2C is an ideal aircraft for any pilot to get an introduction to unusual attitude flying. "Most private pilots are taught to stay away from stall/spin situations, and never experience

an actual spin until its too late. Pilots need to understand the aerodynamics of what causes a spin, and proper recovery techniques. A few hours of dual in a Pitts with a qualified aerobatic CFI, can give any pilot a much better understanding of spins, as well as the confidence to deal with any unusual attitude scenarios a pilot may encounter" says aerobatics Instructor, and airshow pilot Cory Lovell. "Just because you fly a Cessna 150, doesn't mean you can't learn to fly a Pitts," added Lovell with a smile.


Celebrating Twenty-Eight Years of In Flight USA

58

March 2012

AD INDEX ACT ..................................39 Aerozona Parts..................46 Aircraft Insurance Agency..27 Aircraft Magneto Service 46 Aircraft Specialties Services 19 Aircraft Spruce..................15 Airguide ............................32 Airport Shoppe ..............2, 3 Airtronics ..........................48 Alliance International Aviation46 American Aerobatics ........13 American Aircraft Sales ..53 Ameritech............................7 AMR&D ..........................16 AOPA ..................................9 Arizona Soaring................52

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"Still Specializing In First Time Buyers And Student Pilots Needs"

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JORGENSON-LAWRENCE AIRCRAFT SALES AND MANAGEMENT

1982 T-210, a true Miss America!

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Located at the beautiful Palo Alto Airport (PAO) in the Baylands Recreational Area where aviation, golf, nature and good food live in harmony creating a comfortable and convenient setting to select a new airplane. South of San Francisco along the west side of the bay, north of San Jose.

Also providing services as: • Expert witness for aviation based legal cases, appraisals, and bank repossessions • Guest Speaker for aviation related subjects • Aviation humorist and speech writer Larry Shapiro • Larry@LarryShapiro.com • Or Call Us! 650-424-1801 For more information about these planes and others, Please Visit Our Web Site: www.LarryShapiro.com

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March 2012 In Flight USA  

In Flight USA is the magazine that serves general aviation throughout the United States. with aviation news, features and monthly columns co...