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The Legislature’s Equal Protection Problem, p. 6 Wake County’s Uranium Problem, p. 8 Tacos and the Authenticty Trap, p. 20 A Different Kind of Superhero, p. 25

raleigh•cary 8|17|16

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2 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com


WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK | RALEIGH

VOL. 33, NO. 33 6 Four times this year, courts have found the legislature in violation of the Equal Protection Clause. 8 From 2010–2014, Wake County found forty private wells with dangerous levels of uranium. Then it stopped testing. 10 Twenty years ago, Carrboro’s Squirrel Nut Zippers sold a million records (by accident) and sparked a national trend (which they wanted no part of ). 20 White people’s quest for authentic tacos can bury the authentic voices behind them.

DEPARTMENTS 5 Backtalk 6 Triangulator 8 News 20 Food 25 Arts & Culture 26 What to Do This Week 29 Music Calendar 33 Arts/Film Calendar

25 Katy Koop’s writing in The Amazing Cunt & Lil’ Bitch Take Raleigh needs seasoning, but the thought-provoking work can’t be ignored. Taco Market in Raleigh PHOTO BY BEN MCKEOWN

On the Cover: ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS WILLIAMS

NEXT WEEK: THE INDY ’S OUTDOORS GUIDE

INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 3


Raleigh Cary Durham Chapel Hill PUBLISHER Susan Harper EDITORIAL EDITOR IN CHIEF Jeffrey C. Billman,

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MANAGING EDITOR FOR ARTS+CULTURE Brian Howe,

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STAFF WRITERS (DURHAM) Lauren Horsch,

David Hudnall

STAFF WRITER (RALEIGH) Paul Blest ASSOCIATE MUSIC EDITOR Allison Hussey,

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ASSOCIATE ARTS EDITOR David Klein,

dklein@indyweek.com ASSOCIATE FOOD EDITOR Victoria Bouloubasis, vbouloubasis@indyweek.com LISTINGS COORDINATOR Michaela Dwyer, calendar@indyweek.com THEATER AND DANCE CRITIC Byron Woods CHIEF CONTRIBUTORS Curt Fields, Bob Geary, Spencer Griffith, Corbie Hill, Laura Jaramillo, Emma Laperruque, Jill Warren Lucas, Sayaka Matsuoka, Glenn McDonald, Neil Morris, Angela Perez, Hannah Pitstick, Bryan C. Reed, V. Cullum Rogers, Dan Schram, Zack Smith, Eric Tullis, Ryan Vu, Patrick Wall, Iza Wojciechowska INTERN Abigail Hoile

ART+DESIGN THE INDY’S GUIDE TO DRINKING BEER IN THE TRIANGLE

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backtalk

Argue, Don’t Ban

In response to last week’s Soapboxer, which discussed Senator Richard Burr’s attacks on opponent Deborah Ross over the issue of flag-burning, commenter cityfox writes: “If you’ve seen Richard Burr outside of a major GOP ‘give me your bucks bazaar,’ raise your hand! Oh my! Not many regular North Carolinians get to see or hear from Burr about jobs, affordable housing, or bringing home the bacon. What’s more, the ‘invisible’ senator was nowhere to be found when his party’s presidential nominee spoke in Wilmington. Huh? Guess Burr doesn’t want North Carolinians to know he supports Trump because the party told him who to back and how to vote. “Maybe Richard Burr can explain why an American flag lapel pin makes him more patriotic than anyone else. Patriotism is about loyalty to America, not allegiance to a political party over all else. Patriotism is about protecting the rights of all, including the incendiary and threatening comments of ‘Donny Dangerous.’ BTW, Governor McCrory didn’t shy away from saying he supports Trump.” Joe Swain of Carrboro, meanwhile, sees mixed signals in our pages on First Amendment issues. “I’m perplexed at the mixed signals the INDY is sending in the August 10 edition.  In Soapboxer, Jeffrey Billman voices a full-throated defense of the First Amendment in his analysis of Senator Burr’s attack on Deborah Ross and her record with the ACLU. But in TL;DR: The INDY’s Quality-ofLife Meter, you give +3 to the Elon students who tried to block an on-campus speech by Kathleen Parker, who dared to write a book the students don’t agree with.  Your meter writer and those students need to take to heart Billman’s words: ‘The First Amendment wasn’t meant to protect viewpoints everyone agrees with. It was meant to protect the radicals, the unsavory, those with dangerous opinions.’ Argue, don’t ban.” Last but not least: online last week we posted a story about local co-ops deciding to carry Driscoll’s berries despite the objections of farmworker advocates. Pro-Dude says the anti-Driscoll camp needs to “see the bigger issue here: the fact that there are labor laws in the U.S. that allow this kind of thing to happen in the first place. If you think the issue begins and ends with the Sakuma brothers, whom Driscoll buys a small portion of their berries from, then you are sadly mistaken. If you eat avocados, bananas, or really anything that didn’t come from a fair trade-certified farm, then it was likely as cheap as it was because of unfair labor practices. When in stores, I regularly hear customers complain about the high prices of produce. Terms like ‘Whole Paycheck’ come to mind. Well, if you want food grown responsibly, by workers who are treated fairly, then be willing to pay the price for it. Unfortunately, we have a very broken system, where underpaid people need cheap food to survive on, which is made cheap because they were produced or harvested by underpaid people. So stop focusing on the small issue, and start doing something about the larger problem.” Want to see your name in bold? Email us at backtalk@indyweek.com, comment on our Facebook page or INDYweek.com, or hit us up on Twitter: @indyweek. INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 5


triangulator ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS WILLIAMS

+THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY & THE EQUAL PROTECTION CLAUSE: A LOVE STORY

+COAL ASH & NORTH CAROLINA: A TIMELINE

The Equal Protection Clause is the last section of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution; it says that no state can “deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Like the entire Fourteenth Amendment, it was designed by Republicans to ensure basic rights for African-Americans after the Civil War. Fast-forward 150 years, and Republicans in the General Assembly seem to have had a falling out with Equal Protection. On four separate occasions this year alone, federal judges found them in violation of the Equal Protection Clause, culminating in last week’s ruling that 28 of the state’s 170 legislative districts are blatantly unconstitutional. And that isn’t all: the ACLU’s case against the state over HB 2 alleges that law violates the Equal Protection Clause as well. That one goes before a judge in November. Let’s take a trip down Memory Lane, shall we?

FEBRUARY 5: A three-judge panel in the Middle District of North Carolina found that the First and Twelfth Congressional Districts were racially gerrymandered. Later that month, the General Assembly was called into a special session to redraw the maps. JULY 1: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the Chad Barefoot-led redistricting of the Wake County school board and county commission was unconstitutional, in that it violates the equal protection clauses of both the federal and state constitutions. On August 9, U.S. District Judge James C. Dever III ruled that the 2011 Wake County maps would be used for the November election, spurring a new filing period for the Wake County school board and costing at least one Wake County commissioner, Caroline Sullivan, her seat, as she filed to run in a district that no longer exists.

A state toxicologist accusing the state health director of putting politics over public safety. A late-night press conference in which Governor McCrory’s chief of staff accuses the toxicologist of perjury. An “open editorial” in which that state health director sounds a lot like a McCrory campaign staffer. The resignation of the state’s epidemiologist because of that op-ed. All of this has happened within the last few weeks. To help you keep track of the state’s fastmoving and always-confusing coal ash debacle, we’ve created a timeline. We can’t wait to see what happens next.

February 2, 2014: Duke Energy employees

realize that coal ash is spilling from a coal ash pond into the Dan River near Eden. The spill contaminates seventy miles of the Dan with thirty-nine thousand tons of toxic coal ash.

August 20, 2014: The legislature passes a bill creating a Coal Ash Management Commission with oversight over the closing of Duke’s thirty-three coal ash ponds. Governor McCrory vetoes the bill on the grounds that it intrudes on his authority; his veto is overridden. McCrory takes the legislature to court. March 2015: Tom Reeder, the assistant secretary of what is now the Department of Environmental Quality, tries to change the language in a do-not-drink order to stress that the levels of toxins in the water do not exceed federal drinking-water standards. Also: the DEQ fines Duke Energy $25 million for the Dan River spill. April 2015: Regulators send nearly four hun-

dred do-not-drink letters to families living near Duke’s coal-powered plants. The letter says that the wells meet federal standards, but don’t mention that there are no federal standards for hexavalent chromium, a carcinogen associated with coal ash. State toxicologist Kenneth Rudo later describes the wording as, “Don’t drink the water, but we are overreacting.”

JULY 29: The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that North Carolina’s 2013 voter

July 2015: Randall Williams, the new state health director, meets with Republican legislative staffers, who express concern that the DHHS “alarmed people disproportionate to the risk.”

AUGUST 11: A three-judge panel on the U.S. Middle District Court, including Bush

January 30, 2016: The N.C. Supreme Court

ID law was discriminatory. Judge Diana Gribbon Motz wrote, “The photo ID requirement, the reduction in days of early voting, and the elimination of same-day registration, out-of-precinct voting, and preregistration ... were enacted with racially discriminatory intent in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and § 2 of the Voting Rights Act.” A double whammy.

appointee and HB 2 case judge Thomas Schroeder, unanimously ruled that twentyeight legislative districts are—you guessed it—racially gerrymandered and in violation of the Equal Protection Clause. But the judges decided that the districts wouldn’t be changed before November 8, meaning that the legislators who drew unconstitutional districts will get to run for reelection in those districts. Lucky us. ● 6 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

rules against the legislature in McCrory’s lawsuit.

February 9, 2016: After negotiating privately

with Duke, the DEQ reduces Duke’s $25 million fine to $6.6 million. Duke appeals.

March 2016: Williams and Reeder rescind the do-not-drink order. May 4, 2016: State epidemiologist Megan Davies gives sworn testimony saying she opposed the withdrawal of the do-not-drink order. June 6, 2016: McCrory vetoes a second Coal

Ash Management Commission bill. Although he says he expects the legislature to override the veto, lawmakers never do.

July 11, 2016: Rudo gives a 220-page deposi-

tion for a lawsuit filed against Duke by several environmental groups. In the deposition, he says state officials “knowingly told people that their water was safe when we knew it wasn’t.”

August 2, 2016: The Associated Press releas-

es a copy of Rudo’s deposition. That evening, McCrory’s chief of staff, Thomas Stith, calls a late-night press conference in which he accuses Rudo of lying under oath.

August 9, 2016: Williams and Reeder pen an “open editorial” in which they call Rudo’s work “unprofessional” and “inconsistent”; they also blame “special interest groups” and lament “inaccurate and unfair” media coverage of Rudo’s testimony. August 10, 2016: Davies resigns, saying she “cannot work for a department and an administration that deliberately misleads the public.” August 16, 2016: Erin Brockovich and the

Environmental Working Group, a D.C.-based nonprofit, send a letter to EPA administrator Gina McCarthy calling for the establishment of federal standards for hexavalent chromium in drinking water, citing the coal ash fiasco in North Carolina. ●


TL;DR: +DURHAM & HOMICIDES: A THING THAT KEEPS HAPPENING

Two months ago, C.J. Davis took the helm of the Durham Police Department. On Monday night, she got her first chance to show off her top-cop chops as she clued the city council into the latest crime report. It contained no surprises, but there was a glimmer of good news. Aggravated assaults—which have been on the rise in recent years—saw a 9 percent decline in the first six months of 2016 compared to last year. Overall, crime is down 10 percent. Less good news: homicides were up 31 percent. Violent crimes—murder, rape, aggravated assaults, robbery—stayed virtually the same. In the first six months of 2015, there were 1,079 violent crime incidents; the first six months of 2016 saw 1,077. Then again, miniscule as it is, that’s the first decline in violent crime the department has reported since 2013. As Davis said, “We’re gonna claim that.” They’ll claim this, too: property crimes—burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft—were down 12 percent, and burglaries alone were down 29 percent. But it wasn’t the crime stats that interested council member Steve Schewel. Instead, it was the moves the chief was making to address issues that arose during her predecessor’s reign. “One of the things, over the last few years, that I think the department has not done as well as it ought to be doing is in at least a couple of cases, how we have handled two young men who were suicidal with guns,” Schewel said. “Both of those young men died at the hands of our police officers. I don’t blame the individual officers on sight, [but] in my mind, neither Derek Walker or La’Vante Biggs … had to die.” Schewel also asked Davis what the department is doing to address biases in traffic stops that have disproportionately affected African-Americans in Durham. “We have to pay very close attention to our tactics and how they’re perceived by the community, utilizing data and intelligence to go after people who are committing crimes as opposed to spreading a broad net across the community,” Davis said. “Crime on one side of town is no different than crime on another side of town; it might just be different types of crimes, but we have to have an even hand.” l

PERIPHERAL VISIONS | V.C. ROGERS

+BATHROOMS & POLITICS: A CARTOONIST’S DREAM

Do you love cutting-edge political satire? Beautifully drawn, award-winning cartoons? Potty humor? Have we got a show for you. Starting Friday, the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists will present an exhibit at Horse & Buggy Press (401-B Foster Street, Durham) titled Bathroom Humor: National Cartoonists Take on HB2, curated by our very own Cullum Rogers. The show will feature more forty top-shelf cartoonists, including Pulitzer Prize winners Nick Anderson, Matt Davies, and Signe Wilkinson, as well as The News & Observer’s Dwayne Powell and the inimitable Mr. Fish, taking on issues of gender identity and governmental intervention into such affairs. It will run through September 25; September 26—not coincidentally—is the start date for both the 2016 Political Cartoon and Satire Festival at Duke University and the AAEC’s national conference in downtown Durham. In conjunction with Bathroom Humor, there’s also a panel discussion on HB 2 on September 23 at the Bryan Center, featuring Charlotte Observer cartoonist and Pulitzer winner Kevin Siers. Won’t you join a bunch of professional smartasses as they make fun of this state’s very special dumbasses? l triangulator@indyweek.com

THE INDY’S QUALITY-OF-LIFE METER -2

After Donald Trump, campaigning in Wilmington, says “Second Amendment people” could take care of Hillary Clinton, Pat McCrory and Richard Burr reiterate their support. What exactly does Trump have to do to get out of this race, just stomp a kitten on live TV?

-3

Trump’s (now former) North Carolina state director, Earl Philip, allegedly pulls a gun on a staffer. Maybe he looked like Hillary Clinton.

-1

Governor McCrory asks the U.S. Supreme Court to reinstate his voter ID bill after an appeals court ruled it violates the Equal Protection Clause. “Pleeeeease?” McCrory wheedles. “I’ll trade you an HB 2 for it.”

-2

The state’s epidemiologist quits, saying she can’t work for an administration that deliberately misleads residents about the dangers of coal ash. “Another One Bites the Dust” was subsequently heard thumping from the Executive Mansion as the gov celebrated weeding out one more conscientious scientist.

+2

House Majority Leader Mike Hager, famous for a Twitter beef with Montel Williams over HB 2, resigns from the legislature. “Another One Bites the Dust” was subsequently heard thumping from the INDY office.

+2

Despite 911 calls and witness accounts of a gunman, Raleigh police can’t confirm any shots were fired inside the Crabtree Mall Saturday. “We’ll be at the mall every day until we crack this case,” says the police chief, ordering her officers to convene again at Checkpoint Cinnabon.

+1

UNC scientists find that e-cigs aren’t the best way to quit smoking. But they are the number-one cause of looking like a D-bag.

-3

After a half dozen cars crash into a Raleigh man’s house since 2004, he considers moving. “This median strip was dirt cheap when I bought it,” he says, “but maybe it’s just not worth it.”

This week’s report by Jeffrey C. Billman, Paul Blest, and Lauren Horsch.

This week’s total: -6 Year to date: -22 INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 7


indynews

Hot Water

WAKE COUNTY FOUND DANGEROUS LEVELS OF URANIUM IN SOME PRIVATE WELLS. THEN IT QUIT TESTING FOR IT. BY DAVID HUDNALL

Last week, a little-known Bahama, N.C.based data-science nonprofit called Insightus issued an alarming report regarding uranium levels in private water wells in Wake County. Using obscure but publicly available state databases, Insightus found that chemical samples from private wells concentrated in the eastern part of the county—in and near towns such as Zebulon, Rolesville, and Wendell—routinely register dangerous levels of uranium. Or, rather, they did—until 2014, when Wake County abruptly removed uranium from the list of chemicals for which it regularly tests. The INDY has examined Insightus’s findings and confirmed its conclusions. Between 2010 and 2014, according to records maintained by the North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health, forty private wells in eastern Wake County were found to contain amounts of uranium in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency’s maximum contaminant level of 0.03 mg/L. (Chronic ingestion of drinking water with elevated levels of uranium contributes to kidney damage, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and may also correlate to increased cancer risks.) Uranium is typically thought of as a byproduct of nuclear plants. But there are no nuclear facilities near the contaminated wells. The closest, Duke Energy’s Harris Nuclear Plant, is clear on the other side of Wake County, in an area where tests of private wells have turned up no evidence of dangerous uranium levels. Instead, the presence of uranium in eastern Wake is almost certainly naturally occurring, owing to a rock formation called the

Rolesville Granite, which lies beneath the affected area. Many types of granite contain uranium. As the Insightus report notes, a 2009 study by Duke University found groundwater uranium concentrations “1 to 2 orders of magnitude higher in the Rolesville Granite than in the other rock types” of Wake County. Under certain conditions, granite bedrock will dissolve in groundwater, resulting in uranium being released into the pools from which wells draw their supply. In North Carolina, more than a third of

Nearly 10 percent of all wells tested in eastern Wake County since 2010 have shown dangerous levels of uranium.

8 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

all residents access their water from private wells; only three other states have more individuals who obtain their water this way. Under a law passed in 2008, new private wells in North Carolina are required to be tested, within thirty days of construction, for a variety of chemicals, including iron, mercury, arsenic, lead, and copper, but not uranium. The county health department obtains the water samples and sends them to a certified laboratory—either the state laboratory or a private lab certified by the state—for analysis. The lab then sends the report to the Department of Health and Human Services’ On-Site Water Protection Branch; the county sends a copy of the report to the well owner. Unlike public water systems, though, the safety of private wells is not continu-

ally monitored. After the initial test is complete, any further tests are strictly voluntary. Moreover, even when a private well test confirms dangerous levels of one or more chemicals, the well owner is not required to treat the water or cease using the well. And since the law only went into effect in 2008, many private wells have not been tested for contaminants at all. According to Wake County officials, in 2010, a resident along the Rolesville Granite took it upon himself to send a sample of his well water to the state lab for uranium testing. The test showed elevated levels of uranium. “Wake County then conducted a study of uranium levels in the eastern part of the county by testing sixteen wells in the area for uranium,” says county spokeswoman Jennifer Heiss. “Only two of those wells tested above the federal drinking water standard. Nevertheless, Wake County began requiring uranium testing of all new private drinking water wells in the Rolesville Granite rock formation shortly afterwards.” So, even though Wake was not required by state law to test for uranium, it began to do so in 2010 in response to evidence that the groundwater beneath the Rolesville Granite might contain unsafe levels of uranium. The reports revealed this hunch to be correct. Nine wells were found to contain unsafe levels of uranium in 2010; four in 2011; five in 2012; six in 2013; and fifteen in 2014. In all, just under 10 percent of wells tested in eastern Wake County since 2010—40 out of 425—have been identified as containing dangerous levels of uranium, according to the state lab that analyzed Wake County’s samples. (Oddly, the numbers the county initial-


indynews

ly supplied to the INDY were dramatically lower: 244 well samples taken, and only fourteen wells with unsafe levels of uranium. When the INDY pointed out the disparity, county officials revised their figures to 393 samples with thirty-eight at unsafe uranium levels. Heiss attributed the error to “data entry lapses.”) But then, in 2014, Wake stopped testing for uranium entirely. Its official reasons for doing so are elaborately bureaucratic. “In 2014, former Wake County Water Quality Division leadership directed staff to stop uranium testing based on interpretation of” county well regulations, Heiss says. These regulations are based on the aforementioned state regulations, which do not require uranium testing. “In order to require uranium testing, the Human Services Board would have to amend these regulations to include uranium.” In other words, despite mounting evidence of unsafe uranium levels in private wells, Wake suddenly decided that it was prohibited from further exploring this public health issue due to a technicality in the law that had always existed. What’s more, the county seemingly does not view uranium as a serious problem because it is naturally occurring and contained to one area. Per Heiss: “After multiple years of testing, it was determined that uranium presence in well water was limited to one part of

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the county and was not a countywide issue. It was also determined not to be tied to any known contaminant site, but to actually be naturally occurring in eastern Wake County.” Who made these decisions? The county has an unsatisfying response: “The decision was not made by a single person.” Heiss notes that Wake still offers uranium tests—they cost an extra $40—and that owners of wells found to contain unsafe levels of uranium are sent a form letter, written in consultation with a state toxicologist at the Department of Health and Human Services, advising them about the health risks. Composed in 2010, this letter, according to Heiss, is the extent to which the county sought counsel from the state on the uranium issue. According to state law, the DHHS should have all private well water sample results on file. Despite this, there is no indication that anybody at the state level has expressed concern about uranium in Wake County. Or, for that matter, in Franklin, Nash, and Johnston counties, into which the Rolesville Granite extends and where virtually no uranium tests have been conducted. A core question here remains, for now, unanswered: Why would Wake County take the proactive step of testing for uranium and then discontinue those tests when they revealed the very thing they were presumably concerned would be revealed? ● dhudnall@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 9


Squirrel Nut Zippers, taking a break from recording Hot in New Orleans PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

HOW CARRBORO ODDBALLS SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS SPARKED A MAINSTREAM MOVEMENT THEY WANTED NO PART OF: AN ORAL HISTORY BY ALLISON HUSSEY

Twenty years later, the swing music revival of the late nineties remains a perplexing hallmark of the decade. For a few years, bands that swung made a forceful showing on mainstream radio. Leading the pack was Carrboro’s Squir10 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

rel Nut Zippers, who cloaked raucous rock in fast-and-loose hot jazz arrangements. Its ebullient songs were as inspired by the Pixies as they were by Fats Waller and Louis Armstrong. Pop history has pegged Squirrel Nut Zippers as instigators of the swing revival, but the band predated the fad, growing from the same fertile indie scene that nurtured the likes of Superchunk and Archers of Loaf. The band’s first LP, The Inevitable, was released on Mammoth Records in March 1995, well before the swing trend hit a fever pitch. And the Zippers’ East Coast home kept them isolated from the West Coast “cocktail scene" that morphed into the new swing movement. For a week spanning the end of Octo-

ber and beginning of November 1995, Squirrel Nut Zippers posted up at Daniel Lanois’s Kingsway Studios in New Orleans to record its second album, Hot, which would propel the band to its strange national stardom. The Zippers never planned on hitting the big time, but an ambitious label rep and fortuitous timing helped the single “Hell” explode on mainstream radio, several months after the release of Hot in June 1996. The movement that helped the band sell more than a million records was a boon and a curse. Locked into a trend they wanted no part of, most of the band members felt like their project suddenly had a very short shelf life. The shadow of litigation, acrimonious departures, and the divorce of

Jimbo Mathus and Katharine Whalen, all of which caused Squirrel Nut Zippers to fall apart a few years after Hot, still hangs over the band. Only two members of the original lineup are on board for this year’s twentieth anniversary tour for Hot: front man Jimbo Mathus and drummer Chris Phillips. Relationships remain strained enough that Katharine Whalen, whose voice lent the band so much of its signature sound, declined multiple requests for an interview. But this isn’t the story of how it all fell apart. Rather, it’s a trip through the dizzy carnival ride that flung a handful of small-town oddballs, who had convened as a casual, one-off art project, into the center of a storm they never expected.


“WE WERE A GOOD I. LITTLE BAND.” Lane Wurster (Art director, Mammoth Records): The very first thing they did was that single Merge put out [1994's Roasted Right]. Mac McCaughan (Cofounder, Merge Records): For Merge, it wasn’t that weird, because it wasn’t terribly far from, say, an early Lambchop record. Katharine’s voice really set it apart, because she sounds so amazing. Tom Maxwell (Vocals, guitar, baritone sax, songwriting, Squirrel Nut Zippers): The discussion was, who do we sign with? Merge offered fifty-fifty deals, which was compelling, but Mammoth had a distribution deal with Atlantic. Lane Wurster: With The Inevitable, we gave that record away. That was the way we promoted it—send it around to people that we thought would like it instead of doing big ad buys or other promotional stuff.

Tom Maxwell: Something tectonic was happening, but we just were making money. We were getting a lot of wedding gigs. We could anchor little tours on it, and we played a lot. We got better, and we wrote new material. By the time we went to New Orleans, we had been touring the songs for Hot for like six months. We were a good little band, and definitely could put it across.

II. HAVE IT KINGSWAY Tom Maxwell: Jim Mathus came to me and Ken and said that he was going to New Orleans, and did we want to come along? It sounded innocuous, but actually it felt very momentous to me. I didn’t really understand why. And so we drove down in somebody’s shitty car and stayed with Jimbo’s high school friend. Jimbo Mathus: A man by the name of Glenn Graham was in one of my first psychedelic rock combos. He went on to be in Blind Melon, and he’s the drummer. We kept in touch.

the French Quarter, on the corner of Chartres and Esplanade. Dan Lanois had bought it after he made all that money producing U2. He made no attempt to turn it into a studio; he just moved a bunch of gear into it. Jimbo Mathus: It was ideal. There’s no distraction. You’re in an incredible space. You know it’s got haints all in it. Hell yeah. Tom Maxwell: I called Steve Balcom from the label and said, basically, “Look, we’re going to do our next record here.” Steve Balcom (Label manager, Mammoth Records): We loved that studio. It was an imperfect recording environment, but it was the perfect recording environment for that band. Chris Phillips (Percussion, Squirrel Nut Zippers): It was a magical place. The way it smelled, the way it felt when you walked in the kitchen door. It was all vibe. I certainly think that it created a creative space that encouraged everyone to enter their own fantasy world and be all that they could be as an artist. Mike Napolitano (Engineering and mixing): Kingsway kept you. It was impossible to do the thing that is the entrenched way of making records: control, control, control. Kingsway was not built for that.

Jimbo Mathus (Vocals, guitar, banjo, songwriting, Squirrel Nut Zippers): We really did a lot of heavy lifting with The Inevitable to get a sound that was cohesive, what we felt would really resonate. By the time Hot rolled around, the expectations were high.

Tom Maxwell: [Blind Melon] had recorded at Kingsway Studios, and he brought his friend Mike Napolitano, who just seemed to get it. And then Glenn says, “Yeah, you should go to Kingsway, where we made this record.” We go to this fucking mansion in

Sax appeal: Ken Mosher practices at Kingsway

Tom Maxwell cuts loose in the Lawrence Welk Show-inspired video for "Hell," which was shot in a day at Cat's Cradle. PHOTO COURTESY OF LANE WURSTER

PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Ken Mosher (Saxophone, guitar, songwriting, Squirrel Nut Zippers): Even going to Kingsway visiting, that would be like going to Buckingham Palace and going, “OK, we’re going to be living here soon.”

NITTY GRITTY III. HOT BAND

Tom Maxwell: We play the Black Mountain Music Festival. We meet this young, handsome violinist, who’s playing Irish music, named Andrew Bird. He comes up to us later and says that he’s had a dream—he was playing music with us, and that’s what needed to happen. We were like, “That’s great, sure!” Stacy [Guess, the band’s longtime trumpet player] didn’t even come to the show, because he was scoring. That was two weeks before we went down to record. Stacy had been our trumpet player for a year and a half. It felt kind of like an amputation. Jimbo Mathus: He was a heroin junkie who had retired for about nine years. But he got it back on and we fired him. There was no room for that kind of behavior. It was one of the most heartbreaking things I ever had to do. I’m the one that fucking fired him. He was an honorable man. He just couldn’t live in this world, apparently.

Katharine Whalen and Jimbo Mathus at Kingsway PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 11


Sparks fly from Ken Mosher's sax at the video shoot for "Hell." PHOTO COURTESY OF LANE WURSTER

Tom Maxwell: The idea was, “We’re not kicking you out, but this is incompatible, so you need to get your shit together.” In my mind, it was like, “Hey, this is such a good thing, that he’ll choose this over that.” That’s because I wasn’t hooked on heroin, and it hadn’t rewired my brain.

Ken Mosher: We voted four to two to continue the tour, to go to Chicago instead of just going back to Chapel Hill. I really was not sure that we were going to have a band if we didn’t continue on that tour. All of a sudden, it got real hard. It became work. I’m glad that we did what we did. But that was probably one of the last group decisions that we made that was a good one.

Shortly before the release of Hot, the Squirrel Nut Zippers got a big media boost that helped the record get off to a good start when it hit shelves in June. A Mammoth Records intern got the band connected with Bob Edwards, the host for NPR’s national Morning Edition program. Edwards liked the band and had them on the show, where they came off well and grabbed the attention of thousands of new ears. But while the Zippers did well on college and public radio formats, nobody from the band or Mammoth ever expected it to find mainstream success. The idea was that the Zippers could have a steady, mid-level career. However, a change in the national media landscape provided the band with its biggest break. Four months before the Zippers released Hot, President Bill Clinton signed the Telecommunications Act of 1996 into law. Part of the new legislation allowed for media companies like Clear Channel to buy up radio stations and other outlets. Clear Channel began dictating playlists to its stations, homogenizing Top 40 radio across the country. Many program directors, figuring they’d shortly be out of a job, began taking more risks with their music selections, coinciding with the rapid ascent of “Hell.” Back in the Triangle, Mammoth and the Zippers developed a good relationship with G105, making a splash with a morning rush-hour performance on The Showgram with Bob and Madison. The station’s program director, Kip Heinzmann, worked the band into the station’s rotation, which translated to regular plays and in turn boosted the band even more in its home state. The warm local reception spread throughout the Southeast, and the Zippers kept climbing. 12 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com


Dramatis Personae THE BAND: SQUIRREL NUT ZIPPERS Jimbo Mathus: Songwriting, vocals, guitar, tenor banjo, piano Tom Maxwell: Songwriting, vocals, guitar, baritone saxophone, clarinet, resonator Ken Mosher: Songwriting, guitar, alto and baritone saxophone, baritone ukulele Chris Phillips: Percussion Don Raleigh: Bass Katharine Whalen: Vocals, banjo, baritone ukulele THE LABEL: MAMMOTH RECORDS Steve Balcom: Label manager Tom Osborn: West Coast representative Lane Wurster: Art director ASSORTED PLAYERS Andrew Bird: Violin Duke Heitger: Trumpet Mac McCaughan: Cofounder, Merge Records Mike Napolitano: Engineering and mixing From left to right: Tom Maxwell, Ken Mosher, Stacy Guess, Jimbo Mathus, Katharine Whalen, Harry Wayne Casey of KC and the Sunshine Band, Chris Phillips, Lane Wurster, and Don Raleigh, at Duke Gardens for the Zippers' first official photo shoot PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Duke Heitger

Tom Maxwell: We had just played with Bird in Chicago, literally the week before, and asked him to come down [to play violin on Hot]. He was never a member of the band. He was around when we made records, because it was always a good idea to have Andrew Bird on your record. He was an idiosyncratic guy among a bunch of idiosyncratic people.

PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Chris Phillips: To me, it was much more about the tone than about creating any one specific type of music. I don’t think any of us thought about [that]. We were just pulling on our inspirations and doing with them what we could.

Jimbo Mathus: We were writing at alarming rates. We were on a real creative high wave. We were challenging one another. Most of those songs were brand new songs written within the year or so before the record was cut.

Ken Mosher: A day and a half into that project, we had recorded “Put a Lid on It,” really as a demo, and sort of abandoned that. We hadn’t recorded anything else, and it was like, “Jesus Christ, we have five days to record this record,” and we hadn’t even met Duke [Heitger, a New Orleans trumpet player hired to fill in for Stacy Guess]. Then, for the next three days, it was absolutely focused.

Ken Mosher: There were a lot of slow songs, and I remember thinking, “We need to write two or three more fast ones before we get in there, upbeat ones.” I worked with Jimbo and Tom equally at that time. Probably more with Jimbo, even.

Jimbo Mathus: We probably did four a day. We’d gear up, just like we do now. Saddle up, see what key it’s in, make sure everything’s straight, work on the arrangement real quick, do head arrangements. That’s it. Knock it down.

Tom Maxwell: We never told each other what to play unless it was a very specific line. You always just put it into the Zippers box and shook it up, and then something came out the other side that was way more sparkly than what you thought it was.

Ken Mosher: When we weren’t particularly good at playing, we tried to be clever as a band about creating scenes behind solos. Maybe the tempo wouldn’t change, but the percussion instrumentation would, and the whole tone of the players in supporting roles would change. We were just trying to be more clever in a studio way.

Andrew Bird PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Tom Maxwell: One challenge was, who the fuck is going to play trumpet on this record? We had the name of a guy that we were told was the guy. We’d never met him or heard him play. The morning he showed up, I was like, “Look, Ken, we need to go ahead and buy a bottle of bourbon, because if this guy sucks, we’re gonna want to get drunk. And

if this guy’s really good, then we’ll probably want to have a drink. Either way, we win.” We were walking back to Kingsway with a bottle of Maker’s Mark, and Duke Heitger’s like, “Hey, are you guys in the Squirrel Nut Zippers?”

INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 13


Devil's in the details: Jimbo Mathus shows off a beast he built. PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Duke Heitger (Trumpet): I arrived at the studio and everyone was kind of lounging around because they’d already laid a lot of their tracks down. We had our introductions, and then we got to work pretty quickly. They didn’t have charts or anything, so they would sing what they had in mind. Otherwise, it was left to me to come up with what I was going to play.

subtleties. There are moments that are really beautiful on Hot.

Tom Maxwell: Any time you hear any other musician play something that appears to be an answer to one of those trumpet lines, it prefigures the actual trumpet line.

Ken Mosher: Then we’re like, “OK, we’ll all go to the record company,” and they’re like, “You go.” I go to Steve Balcom’s office, knowing that we’ve already spent all our budget. I remember saying something like, “Look, if you look at Raleigh-Durham, and there’s maybe a million and a half people around here, we’ve sold twenty-five thousand records. If you extrapolate that nation-wide, we’re at a million records.” We both laughed, but he agreed to shell the money out to go remix it. Thank God!

Tom Maxwell: It was sounding more like a Wilco record than the Squirrel Nut Zippers. All of the liveliness was being sort of pushed out of it with compression and post-micing. It just wasn’t good, so we had to go back to the label and say, “We have to remix this.”

Ken Mosher: We thought we were going to be painstakingly trying to tell him what to do, or helping him write parts. He’s like, “Oh, I just play how I feel. Oh, I like the way this feels,” and just goes crazy. Duke Heitger: The music that the band played was a little different than my comfort zone. It called for a little reckless abandon on occasions, where maybe I would have been a little more reserved in a different setting. It’s a rock band. They were certainly a new look at melodies and changes for me. It was fun to tackle that. Chris Phillips: He was like a Howitzer gun going off. He was so fucking talented. I think he opened a lot of our minds to how learning your craft can really assist you in fulfilling your artistic vision. Duke Heitger: The Squirrel Nut Zippers were telling me, as we were having drinks after the recording session, “Oh, come on, join the band, we’re going places!” And as a professional musician, I’m thinking, “Ah, yeah, right, everyone says that.” Tom Maxwell: He comes from a world where he plays on steamboats and wears black pants and a white shirt. The idea that you would sit around and smoke pot 14 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

or drink alcohol in the studio setting was utterly beyond him. We were punk-asses driving around in a van. Why would he join the band?

Tom Maxwell: We were still cutting stuff live, but there were tons of mics that we put up that we ended up not using. We ended up using the more remote, kind of ambient microphones.

BACK TO THE IV. MIXING BOARD

Chris Phillips: We were a handful to deal with, and I think we had a lot of cooks in the kitchen sending [Paulson] in circles. I think that was tough for him, and it was hard for him to get a focus on the clear line through the mix. We weren’t totally satisfied with it.

Mike Napolitano: [Producer] Brian Paulson seemed to have something in mind already about how the record should be recorded and produced, and it was at odds with what they were feeling. He continued to put up microphones that I think nobody wanted but him.

Ken Mosher: We needed compression and oomph to make Hot sound like a modern record disguised with old instruments. I think we had sort of grasped some of the

Mike Napolitano: That’s when they called me and asked if I thought there was any way I could mix it. Brian had developed methods that he wanted to employ, whereas I didn’t have any experience to know, “Don’t do that.” They were describing what they wanted, and I didn’t have any preconceived notions that it shouldn’t be done. Steve Balcom: I probably was worried that things wouldn’t get done, but they did get done. And that’s the thing about that band— they would push it to the edge, and then they would always pretty much come through. Tom Maxwell: We take it to the label, and they’re very happy with it, and we’re very happy with it. We’re down in New Orleans, and I’m standing in the driveway with Ken and Chris P., and I’m like, “Guys, this is a really good record. It’s going to sell seventy thousand copies,” which is three or four times what we had sold with the first one, a number I

“Hillary and Bill came walking down the line. LL Cool J was standing right beside me. Hillary said, “Hello, James.” She knew his real name was James. I thought that was pretty good.”


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INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 15


It takes two: Jimbo Mathus and Tom Maxwell cut vocals. PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

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pulled completely out of my ass. Katharine always named the records, so I think she was just like, “Call it Hot!” That worked for us.

“HELL” BREAKS V. LOOSE

Tom Maxwell: In the fall [of 1996], I find a house in Pittsboro that is being rented for two hundred fifty bucks a month. I convince Ken that he needs to move from Saxapahaw to live in this house, and we can make a record there. Ken Mosher: After the great success of me talking the record label into remixing, we also talked the record label into just giving us the money to record, and then letting us set up our own recording studio in my house in Pittsboro. Tom Maxwell: We’re in there recording Perennial Favorites when the label says, “We need to have a meeting right now. It can’t wait.” And we were like, “What could this be?” Ken Mosher: Oh, Jesus Christ, we’re going to get dropped, and we have all this shit in our house. It’s gonna suck.

Tom Maxwell: Steve Balcom was there, and he was like, “You have a hit song.” And I was like, “Whose song is it?” Because that meant a lot, whose song it was. He was like, “It’s your song. It’s ‘Hell.’” Steve Balcom: “Put a Lid on It” was the song that we really thought was going to be the one. Tom Osborn (West Coast rep, Mammoth Records): We were working “Put a Lid on It” because Katharine’s got such a remarkable voice, and it really was a beautiful track. But I was so focused on working the modern formats, and not the non-com formats, that it didn’t fit into any of the conversations I was having. Unbeknownst to my bosses, and probably to their chagrin, I started working “Hell.” It was a day and an age where, if you got that KROQ add, the dominos would suddenly fall into place, which is exactly what happened. Tom Maxwell: [Osborn] goes to them like, “You’ve got to play this song, this song is a single, this song is a hit, play this fucking song, please play this song.” He just bugs them. No one told him to do it. He just knew that’s what needed to happen.


To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact rgierisch@indyweek.com Katharine Whalen and Tom Maxwell, outdoors at Kingsway PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

Steve Balcom: As a label, it wasn’t obvious to us that this was something that was going to work on a modern rock radio station, much less on a Top 40 station. Tom Osborn: [Being at a small label] afforded me this luxury of going, “Well, I just think that ‘Hell’ is a better song for radio. I’m going to go with that.” I wasn’t doing it with a flippant, fuck-you attitude. I had stations that were like, “Now look, I don’t want to play this song, but I have to play this song. If you call me again, I’m going to drop the song, but I’ll give it a test.” Tom Maxwell: [KROQ] played it during the lunch drive time as a joke—this is the story, anyway—and the phones never stopped lighting up. They did market research on it, the stuff they call “saturation research”— “How many times can we play this song until people call and scream at us to stop?” They couldn’t find the end point. Lane Wurster: We’d get the new Soundscan reports that would come out on Tuesdays. We’d be like, “Holy shit, this thing is really blowing up.” Tom Osborn: People gave it a shot, and it really did take off, because nothing sounded like that on the radio. It sounded so remarkably fresh at a time where music had really been incredibly stagnant.

Mike Napolitano: I was in Seattle, and Chris Phillips called me to tell me, “It’s going to be gold.” I thought it was a joke. “What do you mean it’s going to be? How do you know that?” It just seemed implausible to me, both that it would happen and that you could predict that it was going to happen. Jimbo Mathus: I was the bandleader. I have to kind of shrug it off. It has to be like water off a duck’s back. People had different reactions. I was just like, “Thank you, Jesus.” I think we deserve it, I think we stand out, I think the song’s great. Let’s go. We’ve got great songs here; let’s just keep our nose to the grindstone and work. Ken Mosher: We come [to Mammoth] and they’re like, “The record sold thirty thousand last week in L.A.” Their idea is to stop recording and go there immediately. And what, just go play at the airport? Tom Maxwell: But we have to go play Clinton’s inaugural ball. There’s this idea that we were a Cinderella thing when “Hell” hit, and we were somehow lifted from obscurity. But we had a nationwide touring base and were selling good records. The Clinton people had already asked us to do the thing before “Hell” became a hit, and we had already played the summer Olympics in Atlanta. We were getINDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 17


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“I’ve described it as redneck Camelot, and it kind of was.” ting prestige gigs. So we go up to D.C., and then we come back and do the “Hell” video. It was really breakneck. Jimbo Mathus: When we did the inaugural ball, they came around and saw all the bands. Hillary and Bill came walking down the line. LL Cool J was standing right beside me. When Hillary came by, she said, “Hello, James.” She shook his hand. She knew his real name was James. I thought that was pretty good. Ken Mosher: The likelihood of us having one hit was so unlikely. We didn’t even make the one-hit wonder shows, because it was so unlikely.

IN THE SWING VI. OF THINGS— AND OUT AGAIN Tom Maxwell: We had weird and interesting crowds. It was a tremendous mix of ages. Older people, middle-age people, kids. Punk people, oddball weird people. I described it once as like the Peanuts Christmas dance. Then, when “Hell” hit, the swing kids started showing up. I like it when people dance, but we saw people getting pushed out of the way, and it was kind of a drag. Steve Balcom: When we broke with “Hell,” we were the first one with a song as weird and different as this. And then, in our wake, here comes Brian Setzer in a Gap ad, and


Tom Maxwell and Jimbo Mathus take advantage of Kingsway's unorthodox recording environment. PHOTO BY ROGER MANLEY

here comes Swingers and Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, all of a sudden. There was a lot of pressure on us to kind of be a swing band, do swing tours. Chris Phillips: We were making constant, conscious decisions to avoid being attached to that movement. We felt like it was a fad. Ken Mosher: I remember having talks with Tom like, “Now we’re part of a trend, our careers are over.” And really, they were. But we didn’t need to obsess that hard about it. Really, our careers were over when we had a hit anyhow.

Tom Maxwell: We had a sell-by date stamped on us, and that really, really bummed me out. Jimbo Mathus: I didn’t really have that much thought about it. It seemed like apples and oranges to me. I’ve never been concerned with popular trends. Steve Balcom: As it continued to develop and we got into the next record, it started to fracture and disintegrate. Tom Maxwell: We finished Perennial in January of ’97, and they didn’t release it until August of ’98. So Hot was eight months old when the single broke, and then we toured it for another year and a half. It was horrible.

The band wasn’t making that much money. Once we went platinum, we renegotiated our contract to make a dollar and a quarter per CD sold, when the CDs were being sold for fifteen bucks. Ken Mosher: It was constant touring, and getting home and feeling like you just got off of a lunar mission. It was disorienting. I remember getting home from tours and not being able to speak to my wife for, like, a day. When we started, it really was just to put on one show [at Henry’s Bistro] because Cat’s Cradle wasn’t open, and everyone’s band either broke up or was taking a hiatus. Only in Chapel Hill would that have been as successful and launch a career.

Chris Phillips: I’ve described it as redneck Camelot, and it kind of was. That band was born under a good sign. From the very beginning, the band was so fortunate.

Tom Maxwell: You do the thing that you hear in your head. Nobody’s going to do it for you. Do it yourself. Look the way you want. Play the way you want. And then see how it works for you. It worked great for Archers of Loaf, and it worked great for Squirrel Nut Zippers, and it worked great for Ben Folds Five. And that’s the Chapel Hill thing: “Do you want to hear this? You better do it yourself.” l ahussey@indyweek.com

INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 19


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EL TACO MARKET

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JOSE AND SONS’ OSCAR DIAZ WARNS OF THE DOWNSIDE OF FOOD CULTURE’S AUTHENCITY OBSESSION BY VICTORIA BOULOUBASIS

“This plasticware is on point.” Oscar Diaz cuts through a huarache, his one-liner sharper than his white plastic knife, which is now bent after digging into the thick, chewy masa. Diaz runs the kitchen at Jose and Sons, the premier MexicanSouthern restaurant in downtown Raleigh, owned by brothers Charlie and Hector Ibarra, who grew up in Raleigh. But on this Monday night, we are seated in a booth at the more modest El Taco Market on New Bern Avenue. We’re here to talk tacos—not Instagram them or critique them and then Yelp about it. We’re here to discuss the insanely trendy idea of them. Diaz regularly pops in for the tripe tacos, but today, a strip of blue painter’s tape covers the word “tripa” on the Spanish menu board. El Taco Market owner Jacobo Ferrer says his supplier switched up the product, and he isn’t pleased with the current offerings. He’d rather suspend the tripe until he finds a better purveyor. Diaz seems disappointed. The two chefs have a longstanding appointment to trade cooking tips—a tripe technique for an octopus recipe. Faced with this offal absence, we settle for other staples on the Spanish menu board. A huarache with a hefty smear of refried beans, topped with strips of grilled beefsteak. A chorizo quesadilla, its crumbly meat outshined by a grand corn tortilla and stretchy Oaxacan cheese. And, of course, three standard tacos: al pastor, barbacoa, and chicken. “It’s nostalgic coming in here,” Diaz says of El Taco Market, “but it’s kind of funny. It’s a Mexican-American nostalgia.” A culinary school dropout, the Chicagoborn chef has worked in fine dining in Las Vegas (including a stint under Michelin stars) and Los Angeles. He often jokes that his parents didn’t leave the small town of Villa Hidalgo in Jalisco, Mexico, just so their American-born middle son could sling tacos for a living. But you can imagine how often Diaz, as a chef and as a Mexican-American,

gets asked where to get the best, or even worse, the most authentic tacos. That’s not a horrible thing to ask someone. And it’s not that Diaz never offers a helpful suggestion. But it makes him uneasy, as if the simple foods of his youth have become a gimmick. It’s symptomatic of a dissonance in the American obsession with tacos: the adoration of a dish from Mexico and the desire to master it, to become the experts, to find the best. It is common practice for food writers and enthusiasts to seek out places where they perpetuate the idea of discovery and adventure, as in a recent News & Observer article that followed two prominent white chefs to their favorite Raleigh taquerias, reducing the experience to a “quest” rooted in “taco obsession.” Diaz says he doesn’t want to be “a hater,” but he has a problem with this sort of thing. The perspective of that story, and many others like it, is strictly that of the eater—who usually happens to be a white dude. “If someone else writes the history book about you, that’s what is remembered,” he says. “If we don’t start controlling the narrative, someone else is. And then we become spectators of our own culture.” Taqueros are supporting characters in our communities. What we know about our neighbors is what we know about their food. It’s a beautiful lens, sure. But even when “discovery” comes with the best intentions, it can fail to truly represent a culture and the authentic voices of people who have historically been denied the opportunity to speak. “My parents, when they got here, they didn’t know anybody,” Diaz says. “They didn’t know the language. So they thought, ‘We’re going to try to make the least noise possible. Keep our head down. Stay low to the ground. Work work work.’ When you grow up one generation removed from that, it’s like, OK, maybe I just got hit by a car, but I won’t say anything. Walk it off. Go home and drink some Sprite, the Mexican cure-all!” Diaz grew up at a time when tacos weren’t


Salsa solidarity: Oscar Diaz of Jose and Sons dines at El Taco Market in Raleigh. PHOTO BY BEN MCKEOWN

trendy, and the only person lauding them on television was mega-restaurateur Rick Bayless, a white man who has built his career on bringing traditional Mexican foods to American palates. Was there ever a dearth of Mexican cooks and restaurant owners doing this themselves? No. But, as Diaz notes, Bayless made it fashionable—and expensive. Meanwhile, it took decades for the likes of chef Enrique Olvera (Cosme in New York, Pujol in Mexico City) to be considered a true magician at a flattop grill in a fine dining setting. “Growing up, you don’t see many people who look like you spotlighted,” Diaz, thirtyfour, says. “Your identity is kind of hidden. It’s not that I feel like no one else should make tacos. But maybe we should be the ones speaking out more for our own culture.” It’s this recognition that Diaz and other first-generation chefs, cooks, and immigrants wish the food-obsessed would consider. North Carolina has one of the fastestgrowing immigrant populations in the country, with migrants from Latin America steadily arriving. But the Ibarras and Diaz represent a Southern-born Mexican-American culture in Raleigh, one that’s changing the palates of gringos everywhere. It doesn’t have to be someone’s abuelita doing the cooking to make it authentic. “Now, it’s us vatos locos over here, and we have an opportunity,” Diaz says, referring to himself and the Ibarras. “We no longer have to do what people think they want us to do.” The chef-driven menu at Jose and Sons combines flavors from its proprietors’ multi-

faceted upbringings as first-generation immigrants, using Southern ingredients with Mexican techniques. The menu reads as a subtle history lesson, with braided corn husks on grilled cobs reminding diners that the popular ingredient is rooted in indigenous cultures on both sides of the border. Diaz hopes North Carolina’s diversity will eventually be represented as it is in Los Angeles, where cultures are so melded that everyone—Mexican, Korean, white, black—is an Angeleno. In L.A., Korean-American chef Roy Choi became famous for his bulgogi beef cheek tacos, a product of his upbringing. Rick Bayless didn’t have anything to do with it. Diaz is inspired by Ray Garcia, Esquire’s 2015 chef of the year, who runs Broken Spanish and B.S. Taqueria in Los Angeles. With ingredients like foie gras butter and black garlic, Garcia, a Mexican-American, has elevated not just the taco but also his Latino cohort. TV chef Ted Allen wrote of Garcia’s influence, “Latin Americans are not just rocking the line but also running the show with confidence and style.” To Diaz, this sort of acknowledgement feels belated, but it gives him hope that recognition will come to the hidden chefs in North Carolina’s taquerias. El Taco Market doesn’t get much love in the press. I haven’t seen it reviewed anywhere beyond Yelp. Perhaps its Spanglish name and its second menu, which caters to a more 1980s American palate—with a $4 burrito special and a drive-thru window—aren’t “authentic” enough. Which leads this gringa to ask Diaz

the dreaded question: What is authenticity, here at El Taco Market? “My uncle always told me that the sign of a good taquero is his salsas,” he says. “And Jacobo’s are amazing.” Ferrer laughs when I call him to verify the ingredients he uses in his salsas. Diaz had convinced me that the neon orange one included beer—the tangy aftertaste had a delicious, acetous bite to it. Ferrer, whose family modified some recipes when it took over the business two years ago, swears that I’m tasting the habanero and that absolutely no beer is used in his recipe. He’s secretive about his salsas: Diaz’s favorite is made with pure chili pepper and oil, like a chili oil at a Szechuan restaurant. It packs a ton of heat. Ferrer says ninety percent of the menu is his own invention. He kept the gringo menu because of the regular drive-thru customers it brings. He knows he represents a transition in Southern demographics. He has adopted Spanglish as his second language, and he welcomes collaborating with Diaz. “This is not a competition,” Ferrer says. “I may not be a trained chef, but we care about the same thing. We’re in this together.” “I like to see food from the minds of people who grew up in the culture,” says Diaz. “What do they want to create that reminds them of their grandmother? Or of what they learned on the line? That won’t necessarily be more authentic, but it will be more appropriate for our culture, as opposed to being obsessed with a culture and then becoming the voice of it.” l vbouloubasis@indyweek.com

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food

Hog Wild for Slow Food

PIGS ARE A BOOMING BUSINESS IN NORTH CAROLINA. AUTHOR BRAD WEISS ARGUES FOR MORE RESPONSIBLE PORK. BY VICTORIA BOULOUBASIS

Your Week. Every Wednesday. indyweek.com 22 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

North Carolina is home to more hogs than people, and pork is one of the state’s top agricultural exports. Pastured pork is a form of resistance against an industrial behemoth, one rife with poor practices and environmental disasters. To combat this, a small but growing number of people are raising hogs with consideration for the animals’ welfare as well as their flavor. Brad Weiss chairs the anthropology department at the College of William & Mary. In 2008, he began researching the unique demands of pasture-raised pork. His new book, Real Pigs: Shifting Values in the Field of Local Pork, is a deep dive into what it means to raise pigs while being conscious of their wellbeing, the environment, and a growing local economy in the South. The strands of Weiss’s research converged on the Cane Creek Farm booth at the Carrboro Farmers’ Market. He peddled pastured pork there as an employee and later met his interview subjects: farmers, butchers, chefs, and food activists. While much of his book is suited for a wonky academic, it also incorporates interviews that feature the expressive voices of the people who bring pastured pork to our plates. We spoke with Weiss in advance of his local book tour, which begins Saturday at Midway Community Kitchen in Chapel Hill. INDY: What inspired you to explore this idea of “real pigs” in North Carolina? BRAD WEISS: Pigs are iconic and central to the transformation that slow food wants to generate. In other words, slow and local food is taking [into account] more of the ecology and welfare of the animals. I found Eliza [MacLean of Cane Creek Farm] at the Car-

What surprised you most while doing this research? There are places that you think are emphasizing how important local food is, but they aren’t using it at all. Given how many retail outlets and consumers are aware, it’s surprising how hard it is to find local meat. That’s not because a big retail store is a bad actor, but it reflects how precarious these relationships are. Scale remains very much of a problem. It’s hard for even the biggest pasture-raised pork producers because there will just be some weeks where you can’t deliver as much.

rboro Farmers’ Market doing pastured pork, which I hadn’t heard of. As an anthropologist, I work on consumption, defined as a broad form of activity that helps you understand history. I knew there was something about pork that would allow me to make those various connections in a community across a broad landscape. There was an interesting tension in that people really, really liked pigs as animals, but really enjoyed pork as meat. That struck me as important, and not necessarily straightforward.

Your book features Firsthand Foods and NC Choices. How do companies and organizations like this support meat growers? What they are doing is absolutely necessary, which is moving to a model that says, go meet your farmer and buy whatever he’s got in his freezer. If you’re talking about feeding communities, towns, the county—as opposed to feeding clientele that can go to farmers markets and grocery stores—you’re talking about changing the system. It’s only going to be successful if it moves beyond individual farmers selling their phenomenal product. It’s about how to get food into institutions. How are you going to get a line of country sausage into a large grocery outlet so people will try it?

With this idea, how do you think the local food movement can grow? I am really interested in foodshed movements—people who are thinking less about local food and more about whole regions. One thing that slightly galls me is the notion that everything has to be so local that you


BRAD WEISS

Saturday, Aug. 20, 7 p.m. Midway Community Kitchen, Chapel Hill www.flyleafbooks.com Friday, Sept. 16, 7 p.m. Left Bank Butchery, Saxapahaw www.leftbankbutchery.com Friday, Sept. 23, 7 p.m. The Regulator Bookshop, Durham www.regulatorbookshop.com

might as well be there picking out your pig for slaughter. I don’t think that is helpful. Why not? Too many people think it’s the solution and that their personal choices are going to bring about a systemic transformation. That’s not how social change works, to think, “If we just get enough people to the Carrboro Farmers’ Market, we’ll change the food system.” It works fantastically well to serve who it works for. The market makes enormous efforts to bring it to people who wouldn’t normally have the access, but that’s minuscule. As long as direct marketing remains the model for the distribution of healthy food, there are going to be loads [of people] excluded from that process, one that isn’t necessarily meeting people where they actually live. Farmers are constantly looking for ways to tweak their production process to meet what consumers want.

residents is very small, and it’s diminishing. It sounds appealing to people who don’t come from the land. Who is your audience for this book? At some level, I would hope, and I’m sure that this is true, there are people who have been to the farmers’ market and are intellectually curious and will learn about how any market works. And I am trying to make a contribution to the anthropological literature on food, place, and value. Food has been thought of as a thing unto itself. I’m trying to say that it relates to a whole wider range of issues that doesn’t just relate to recipes, agricultural practice, or animal welfare, but also to class.

So it all becomes commodified. All food production in the United States is commodified. It’s not all grown on a scale where the idea is to maximize the efficiency of the process of production and create measurable units, like flats of bacon. But at the same time, you can’t produce anything outside of that structure. Our economy is based on that. The most artisanal, punk prosciutto you can eat is a commodity you can buy at $13 a pound, and you can’t skip over that.

Why did you use stories and interviews to highlight this research? Because of my commitment to oral history and folkloric tradition. And I wanted people to talk about stuff in their own words. When you read all of the profiles together, you see how these people are talking to each other. There’s this community and what I call cultural formation, a shared sense of concern motivating everyone. For example, everyone mentions that “connection.” That tells me that that term is doing a whole lot of work for people. I’m really not trying to get them to answer a question, but [to give them] a platform to tell me their story.

In the second chapter, you write that farmerpoet-activist Wendell Berry’s “essentialized ‘connections between eating and the land’ are problematic terms.” You’re discussing that within an academic framework, but it seems that you’re also speaking on a more social level. My only criticism of Wendell Berry is that he’s a little reductionist. It’s a very American ideal because Americans want to feel rooted and connected to place. In terms of migration, the percentage of people who come from two to three generations of Triangle

What did you learn about the sense of place in the Triangle? I lived there, and I wanted to feel more a part of the place. The community really does cultivate, celebrate, and promote civic life. The farmers’ market, farmers, and customers are a part of that. It’s a place that is not taken for granted. It’s really thought about and felt, and is one of the most civically engaged places that I have ever lived. I think that insight is hugely important to the local food scene. l vbouloubasis@indyweek.com |

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DECISION HEIGHT

HHH 1/2 Through Aug. 21 The ArtsCenter, Carrboro www.womenstheatrefestival.com

THE AMAZING CUNT & LIL’ BITCH TAKE RALEIGH HH Through Aug. 20 The Green Monkey, Raleigh www.womenstheatrefestival.com

Injustice League

SUPERHEROINES HISTORICAL AND FANTASTICAL POWER TWO MEMORABLE WOMEN'S THEATRE FESTIVAL SHOWS BY BYRON WOODS

There’s no shortage of popular entertainment about military basic training—at least for men. Plays on the topic include Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues and Black Angels Over Tuskeegee; an even broader range of films extends from Abbott and Costello’s Buck Privates to Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket. For women? Two comedies on screen: Private Benjamin and Jessica Simpson’s execrable Private Valentine—but you can add Demi Moore’s G.I. Jane if you consider Navy SEAL training a fair equivalent. On stage, nothing but obscurities. (Don’t count Dames at Sea. A single Broadway cattle call does not ten weeks of boot camp make.) We anticipated hearing little-known stories in the Women’s Theatre Festival, and Meredith Dayna Levy’s drama, DECISION HEIGHT, does not disappoint. Her fictionalized account of six women attempting to join the WASPs—Women’s Airforce Service Pilots—in 1943 is unfamiliar for a good reason: The government shuttered the controversial program in 1944 and kept all of its records sealed until 1977. Levy makes the cultural context of these brave women’s time clear from the outset. In her first letter to her fiancé, William, narrator Virginia (Katy Werlin) relates having to leave home under a pretext because her father would never consent: “After all,” she reminds William, “he had nearly pulled me out of University when he learned I was earning my student [pilot] license.” The others in the sextet are pursuing—or fleeing—different things. At one point, their well-seasoned flight instructor, Ziggie (a keen Laura Griffin) probes their reasons for flying in a series of lyrical questions: “Are you attempting to escape a small life? Do you fly to see what’s beyond the horizon? Do you fly because you feel heavy? Are you seeking another kind of baptism?” Though the text doesn’t entirely escape long-established tropes from the more familiar male accounts, the cultural differences of a ragtag group of misfits are conspicuously narrowed here. It’s been documented that in the 1940s, few minority women had pilot’s licenses, one of the minimum requirements for the program. The primary differences involve class, marital status, and religion. Eddie (Tara Williams), the rough-hewn daughter of a famous aviatrix, scandalizes the straitlaced Norma Jean (Libby Rounds) with her cursing and her atheism. Carol (Kimmy Fiorentino) is mildly hazed for her small stature, and smart-as-a-whip Alice (Kelly McDaniel) is the company’s envy—until she’s temporarily stigmatized when they learn she’s left a child back home.

Katy Werlin in Decision Height PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WOMEN'S THEATRE FESTIVAL

After predictable initial squabbles, the group makes a pact to keep the peace with one another. But the high-minded and unspecific terms of the contract seem a bit overwritten for these concrete surroundings. Still, the bonds formed through shared dangers, delights, and endless military details ring true. Director Emily Rose White finds the heart of the group, and sends it—and us—aloft. l l l

Katy Koop isn’t afraid to shake things up. Drusilla Is Dead, her regional premiere as a playwright in June, traced the psychosexual madness of Albert Camus’s Caligula back to a sinister childhood nursery. Koop’s new one-act features two self-styled vigilantes—with their own theme song, no less— who avenge the city’s sexual assaults through ultraviolence.

But after the audience snickered through the lyrics in the droll opening moments of THE AMAZING CUNT & LIL’ BITCH TAKE RALEIGH last Saturday, one member of this crime-fighting duo explored her increasing misgivings about its brand of justice. As she did, Koop’s script unexpectedly veered from dark comedy to darker psychological drama. Or at least that’s how it was all supposed to go. But when a crucial plot point got scrambled in an early scene, those tables turned well before the playwright wished, and more than she intended. The same two actors, Nicole Benjamin and Molly Riddick, play the title characters throughout the work. But confusion erupted after Koop and her sister, Sarah, ineptly codirected Evelyn Gualdron and Kyle Bullins, who play all of the supporting roles, through an unreadable first character change. The couple who’d just set the scene by telling us they never used to feel safe in their city were suddenly, inexplicably being tortured by sadists. We awaited their superhero saviors—until it gradually dawned on us that they were the ones inflicting the damage. Several scenes later, a single line defined Gualdron and Bullins’s second characters as sexual predators meeting their comeuppance. It's too little information, delivered far too late to support the scene and clue the audience into what was taking place. The production recovers from that authorial and directorial gaffe. After her rambling first monologue, Lil’ Bitch makes increasingly incisive discoveries as she probes her own psychotic psyche, questioning her unquenchable thirst for revenge. “I’ve never been happier and I’m scared shitless,” she confesses at one point. “I’m so happy, I’m not even me anymore.” Benjamin courageously stepped in during the last week of rehearsals to replace Kayley Morrison as The Amazing Cunt, the remorseless senior partner of the squad. The claustrophobic venue, a converted storage room in The Green Monkey, doesn’t give the actors adequate space to negotiate the script’s physicality. It does, however, convey some of the intimacy between two wounded women brought together by violence that then slowly tears them apart. When sexual assault is a pandemic in America, Koop raises uncomfortable questions about what true justice might actually look like to its survivors. While her writing needs more seasoning, the thought-provoking work on display here cannot be ignored. l Twitter: @ByronWoods INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 25


08.17–08.24 THURSDAY, AUGUST 18

JACKIE LYNN

Haley Fohr as Jackie Lynn

PHOTO BY JULIA DRATEL

In her newest project, Circuit des Yeux’s Haley Fohr has crafted an alter ego with a detailed backstory. Born in Franklin, Tennessee, Jackie Lynn fled her hometown for Chicago, where she ran a massive cocaine distribution ring with a man named Tom before dropping off the grid under a shroud of secrecy. The spirit of Jackie Lynn might be simpatico with outlaw country, but Jackie Lynn finds Fohr toying with bubbly synths that writhe under her low, gorgeous voice. Across its twenty minutes, the album is as mysterious as Fohr’s persona—on “Chicken Picken,” bright, fluttering synths swiftly disappear into the chatter of a crowd. Stylistically, Jackie Lynn is far from country, but Fohr draws from the genre’s ambitious, even reckless rebellion in this fascinating jaunt. Nathan Bowles takes a folksier tip, opening the show with his expansive and intoxicating solo banjo tunes. —Allison Hussey

JINA VALENTINE: APORIA

Jina Valentine, an assistant art professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, makes elusive art that is also startlingly concrete, bringing together the talismanic power of folk traditions and the raw, real reports of found items and text. In Aporia, her Preservation Chapel Hill show of drawings and mixed media (running for one more week after this reception), Valentine incarnates her empathy for black women who have lost children to police violence in objects that rise to the stark, corporeal presence of their subject matter. Representations of the news media feature in more than once piece— in “Testimony,” articles about police shootings copied out in caustic ink gnaw secret patterns into the paper, as if an answer to the problem might be found below. The word “aporia”

means an unsolvable contradiction, and Valentine’s work exhumes an urgent one from the heart of a state that decides who needs protection from whom. —Brian Howe HORACE WILLIAMS HOUSE, CHAPEL HILL 2–4 p.m., free, www.preservationchapelhill.org

“Aporia” by Jina Valentine PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

26 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

“Testimony” by Jina Valentine

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

THE PINHOOK, DURHAM 9 p.m., $10, www.thepinhook.com


WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK Simon Lee: Trust the Bus PHOTO COURTESY OF CULTURE MILL

+

+

+ SATURDAY, AUGUST 20

INTERNATIONAL BLOCK PARTY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 21

ANGRY FAGS

In Topher Payne’s dark, ripped-from-theheadlines comedy, Bennett is a brilliant young speechwriter who has recently broken up with his boyfriend and quit smoking. His boss—the only professed lesbian in the Georgia senate—is in the midst of a bruising re-election campaign against a religious conservative. A homophobe has beaten Bennett’s ex with a baseball bat, which the state of Georgia refuses to call a hate crime, and his boss has politically distanced herself from the assault. “I’m so tired of trying to be likeable,” Bennett says. “Real change doesn’t come from them liking us. That’s not how it happened for women, or black people, or the founding of this fucking country. Change doesn’t happen because the majority has warm fuzzy feelings about you. It happens because they see you’re not going to back down, and they get scared of the consequences.” Indeed, Bennett has been radicalized. When his housemate, Cooper, concurs, the two embark on a juggernaut of gay

vigilantism. Learn what wine goes best with gelignite when Mortall Coile Theatre Company’s artistic director, Jesse Gephart, directs an all-star staged reading featuring Germain Choffart, Olivia Griego, Chris Milner, and others. Proceeds go to the LGBT Center of Raleigh and the OneOrlando Fund, a charity formed after the June 12 killings in that city. —Byron Woods THEATRE IN THE PARK, RALEIGH 7 p.m., pay what you want, www.mctheatre.co

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20 & 27

TRUST THE BUS

Before the last episode of Trust the Bus, the summer series of mobile mystery performances by Culture Mill and its conspirators, we wrote about how well matched the collaboration with Australian dance company The Farm was (“Round and Round,” June 15, 2016). But the current pairing, with New York-based multimedia artist Simon Lee, is even more

apt. Lee’s prior projects include Bus Obscura, created for Art Basel in 2004. He turned a bus into a camera obscura, an optical device that led to photography, which uses a curved lens or a pinhole to project exterior images onto the inside of a room or box. As the bus moves through the streets, an overlapping panorama of the outside world creeps over passengers’ perceptions of the real thing. Now Lee has transformed Culture Mill’s biodiesel Bluebird bus in the same way, and you can behold Saxapahaw as you never have before on the next two Saturday nights. Locals Benjamin Trueblood, who makes ambient-inclined sound art derived from the natural world, and Kellie Ann Grubbs provide music. It’s a dreamlike ride along the threshold of the virtual and the actual, a piquant issue of our times. —Brian Howe SAXAPAHAW GENERAL STORE, SAXAPAHAW 5, 6, & 7 p.m., $5 suggested donation, www.culturemill.org

Some three decades and a world away from the current state of North Carolina politics, the City of Raleigh established its International Festival with the goal of promoting cultural understanding and celebrating diversity. Since 1987, the nonprofit International Focus has fulfilled that mission, expanded its scope, and overseen the group’s flagship event: an annual celebration of the world’s culinary, cultural, artistic, dance, and musical traditions, which takes place in October. This year, the group provides an all-day foretaste of the main event in its firstever International Block Party. In addition to a dizzying array of food and drink, with an emphasis on multicultural desserts, a bevy of special events will be on offer, including “Brew Local, Drink Global,” a beer-and-wine tasting with an international slant. The block party will also feature dance performances, food and history demonstrations, and a poster signing with Raleigh artist Bob Rankin. The family-friendly affair is free, a proposition that’s pleasing in any culture. —David Klein RALEIGH CITY PLAZA, RALEIGH 11 a.m.–7 p.m., free, www.internationalfocusnc.org/festival

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?

B.J. BARHAM AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE (P. 31), CONTEMPORARY COLOR AT SILVERSPOT CINEMA (P. 34), DECISION HEIGHT AT THE ARTSCENTER (P. 25), DRAW THE CIRCLE AT PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY (P. 34), QUOCTRUNG NGUYEN AT THE DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL (P. 33), DIANE REHM AT MCINTYRE’S BOOKS (P. 35), SEE GULLS AT KINGS (P. 29), TEARDROP CANYON AT THE PINHOOK (P. 29)

INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 27


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TU11/22PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT ($25)

SA 9/24 HIPPIE SABOTAGE SU 9/25 CARRBORO MUSIC FESTIVAL (FREE SHOW/ 8 ACTS) TU 9/27 DENZEL CURRY W/BOOGIE ($17/$19) WE 9/28: THE DANDY WARHOLS W/ SAVOY MOTEL ($24/$27) W/ THE LONELY BISCUITS

+nC Pride

TU 11/1 THE MOTET ($16/$19) FR 11/5 ANIMAL COLLECTIVE

TH 9/22 BUILT TO SPILL W/ HOP ALONG, ALEX G($20/$25)

FR 9/30 KISHI BASHI** ($18/$20)

Guide to

SU 10/30 NF ($18/$21)

SA11/19 HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER**($15/$17)

TH 9/29 JUDAH & THE LION

Queer ISSue

of MONTREAL

LOCAL H

TU 9/20 OKKERVIL RIVER W/LANDLADY ($18/$20)

FR 9/23 LOVE WINS BOOK DISCUSSION TO BENEFIT EQUALITY NC

SA 10/1 TOWN MOUNTAIN**($12/$15) MO 10/3 NADA SURF

W/ AMBER ARCADES($17/$20)

WE10/5ELEPHANT REVIVAL($15/$17) TH 10/6 TAKING BACK SUNDAY W/YOU BLEW IT, MAMMOTH INDIGO($35) FR 10/7 THE DEAR HUNTER W/ EISLEY, GAVIN CASTLETON ($18/$20) SU 10/9 LANY W/ TRANSVIOLET ($15) TU 10/11: THE MOWGLI'S W/ COLONY HOUSE, DREAMERS ($17/$19) WE 10/12 DIARRHEA PLANET** ($12/$15) TH 10/13 DANCE GAVIN DANCE ($18/$20) FR10/14:BALANCE & COMPOSURE W/ FOXING, MERCURY GIRLS

SA 10/15: BRETT DENNEN W/ LILY & MADELEINE ($22/$25) MO 10/17 SOILWORK W/

UNEARTH, BATTLECROSS, WOVENWAR, DARKNESS DIVIDED

($20/$23) TU 10/18 LUCERO W/CORY BRANAN ($20/$23)

WE 10/19 BEATS ANTIQUE W/ TOO MANY ZOO'S, THRIFTWORKS ($26/$29) TH 10/20 WILLIE WATSON & AOIFE O’DONOVAN**($22/$25) SA 10/22 TODD SNIDER W/ ROREY CARROLL ($24/$27) 10/25: ROONEY W/ROYAL TEETH, SWIMMING WITH BEARS ($16/$18; ON SALE 8/19)

WE 10/26 HATEBREED, DEVILDRIVER, DEVIL YOU KNOW ($25/$28) SA 10/29 DANNY BROWN W/ ZELOOPER Z ($22/$25&VIPAVAIL)

HARD WORKING AMERICANS

SU 9/4

TH 8/25

W/ ACTRESS

TH 8/25 @ HAW RIVER BALLROOM

2/1/17 THE DEVIL MAKES THREE ($22/$25) CAT'S CRADLE BACK ROOM

10/6: ASTRONAUTALIS ($15/$17) 10/8:HARDWORKER W/REEDTURCHI &THECATERWAULS($10/$12) 10/9: RIVER WHYLESS 10/11: SOLAR HALOS 10/12: CICADA RHYTHM / MICHEALA ANNE 10/13: DAVID RAMIREZ BOOTLEG TOUR ($13/$15) 10/15: GRIFFIN HOUSE ($18) 10/16: ADAM TORRES THOR & FRIENDS ($10/$12) 10/19: MC CHRIS ($14/$16) 10/21: SERATONES ($12/$14) 11/5: FLOCK OF DIMES ($12) 11/6: ALL GET OUT, GATES, MICROWAVE ($10/$12) 11/10: DAVE SIMONETT OF TRAMPLED BY TURTLES AND CARL BROEMEL OF MY MORNINGJACKET ($15; ON SALE 8/19) 11/16: SLOAN "ONECHORDTOANOTHER" 20THANNIVERSARYTOUR($20) 11/17: BRENDAN JAMES ($14/$16) LD 11/20MANDOLIN ORANGE SO OUT

8/18: SOCIAL ANIMALS W/JOE ROMEO&THEJULIETS,PEOPLESKILLS($10) 11/21: THE GOOD LIFE ($12/$14; ON SALE 8/19) 8/19: MELISSA SWINGLE DUO, 8:59S, COLESLAW ($8) 12/4: THE MOUNTAIN GOATS ($25; ON SALE 8/19) 8/20: WKNC PRESENTS... ECHO COURTS, THE NUDE PARTY, 12/9,10,11: KING MACKEREL & WAHYAHS, LESS WESTERN ($6/$8) THE BLUES ARE RUNNING 8/21: HONEY RADAR W/ NO ONE ARTSCENTER (CARRBORO) MIND ($8) 10/15: JOSEPH W/ RUSTON KELLY 8/24: MINDFLIP CARRBORO: 3 ($13/$15) DAYS OF LIGHT GATHERING PRE-PARTY 10/21: CALEB CAUDLE 8/25: THE VEGABONDS W/ BOY NAMED BANJO 11/8: ANDREW WK 'THE POWER OF LEFT ON FRANKLIN ($5/$10) PARTYING' ( $20/$23) 8/27: MILEMARKER W/ PUFF PIECES, MEMORIAL HALL (UNC-CH) COMMITTEE(S) ($12) 8/31: WIFISFUNERAL, SKI MASK 10/30: MIKE MILLS' CONCERTO FOR ROCK BAND AND SLUMP GOD, POLLARI STRING ORCHESTRA (TICKETS 9/1:SAWYER FREDERICKS AVAIALABLE VIA MEMORIAL HALL W/AMY VACHAL ($20/$25) BOX OFFICE/ CATSCRADLE.COM) MOTORCO (DURHAM) 9/2: HEADFIRST FOR HALOS & MESSENGER DOWN W/ DROP 10/3 BAND OF SKULLS THE GIRL, THE SECOND AFTER W/ MOTHERS ($20/$23) ($10/$12) 10/6: BLITZEN TRAPPER 9/8: CABINET W/KACY & CLAYTON**($17/$19) W/ BILLY STRINGS ($12/$15) 11/6 TWO TONGUES W/ 9/9: STEPHANE WREMBEL BACKWARDS DANCER ($16.50/$20) W/ BIG FAT GAP($20) 11/16: MITSKI ($15) 9/10: ELLIS DYSON & THE SHAMBLES KINGS (RAL) W/ RESONANT ROGUES ($10/$12) 11/19MANDOLIN ORANGE ($15/$17) 9/11: THE SAINT JOHNS ($10/$12) 9/13: MR DARCY 9/14: SETH WALKER 9/17: LIZ LONGLEY W/ BRIAN DUNNE**($12/$15)) 9/20: ARC IRIS ($10/$12) 9/21: GOBLIN COCK ($10/ $12) 9/22: BANDA MAGDA ($12/$15) 9/24: PURPLE SCHOOLBUS REUNION W/ PSYLO JO (CMF KICK OFF SHOW) 9/30: SUTTERS GOLD STREAK BAND IDLEWILD SOUTH ($10/$13) 10/1: THREE WOMEN AND THE TRUTH: MARY GAUTHIER, ELIZA GILKYSON GRETCHEN PETERS ($25/$28) 10/4: HONNE ($15) 10/5: ELECTRIC SIX / IN THE WHALE ($13/$15)

CATSCRADLE.COM ★ 919.967.9053 ★ 300 E. MAIN STREET ★ CARRBORO

**Asterisks denote advance tickets @ schoolkids records in raleigh, cd alley in chapel hill order tix online at ticketfly.com ★ we serve carolina brewery beer on tap! ★ we are a non-smoking club

NC MUSEUM OF ART (RAL)

8/20: GILLIAN WELCH 9/28: VIOLENT FEMMES THE RITZ (RAL) (TICKETS VIA TICKETMASTER)

9/24: GLASS ANIMALS 9/27: TYCHO 10/24:THE HEAD AND THE HEART 10/28: PHANTOGRAM HAW RIVER BALLROOM

8/25:HARD WORKING AMERICANS W/THECONGRESS**($25) 9/17: WILLIAM TYLER (SEATED SHOW; $15) 9/30: REAL ESTATE ($20/$23) 11/18 MANDOLIN ORANGE ($15/$17) RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE 9/17, 4 PM: THE CONNELLS W/ THE OLD CEREMONY, DAVID J - FOUNDING

MEMBER OF BAUHAUS / LOVE AND ROCKETS ($20)


music WED, AUG 17

ALLEY 26: Back Alley Bash; 7:23 p.m. • BLUE NOTE GRILL: The Herded Cats; 8 p.m. • JOHNNY’S GONE FISHING: The Kenny George Band; 7 p.m. • LOCAL 506: Swear Tapes, Dragon Time; 9 p.m., $8. • NIGHTLIGHT: Reflex Arc, Donkey No No, Chula, Brown Rice; 9:30 p.m. • POUR HOUSE: The Delta Saints, Ancient Cities; 9 p.m., $8–$10. • RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: Needtobreathe; 6:30 p.m., $25–$55. • RUBY DELUXE: Goth Night with DJ Bela Lugosi’s Dad; 10 p.m. • SLIM’S: Underdog; 9 p.m., $5.

THU, AUG 18 Doug Deming and the Jewel Tones

MIGHTY Within the same BLUES tune, guitarist Doug Deming can wow you with his pristine Charlie Christian licks, then cut your knees right out from under you with some blistering rockabilly. Harmonica wizard Dennis Gruenling specializes in hardcore back-alley Chicago blues. Expect to hear anything from Roy Milton to Wynonie Harris to Fats Domino in the Jewel Tones’ eclectic set list. With Mel Melton. —GB [BLUE NOTE GRILL, $10/8 P.M.]

08.17–08.24 charmingly bedraggled take on melodic nineties alt-rock, mixing in some Pixies aggro, a bit of Soul Asylum groove, and a good amount of the Goo Goo Dolls’ ingratiating, knuckleheaded mischief. Ivy Hill opens. —TB [THE CAVE, $5/9 P.M.] ALSO ON THURSDAY BEYÙ CAFFÈ: Baron Tymas; 7 p.m. • BLUE NOTE GRILL: Carolina Lightnin’; 7-9 p.m., free. • CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Social Animals, Joe Romeo & The Juliets, People Skills; 8 p.m., $10. • DEEP SOUTH: Adam Pitts; 10:30 p.m. • DUKE’S KIRBY HORTON HALL: Ciompi Quartet; 7:30 p.m., $10–$25. • IRREGARDLESS: Multiples; 6:30 p.m. • KINGS: Buffcoat and the Lacquer, Brian Paglia, The Trees; 9 p.m., $5. • LOCAL 506: Room Full of Strangers, Pleather, Car Crash Star, Sam Brown; 9 p.m., $8. • THE PINHOOK: Jackie Lynn, Nathan Bowles; 9 p.m., $10. See page 26. • RALEIGH CITY PLAZA: Kasey Tyndall, The Nasty Habits, The Roman Spring; 5 p.m., free. • RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: The Australian Pink Floyd Show; 7:30 p.m., $15–$60. • RUBY DELUXE: DJ Redbyrd; 10 p.m. • SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS (RALEIGH): Brassiousmonk, R.Ariel, Shanerico; 7 p.m. • THE STATION: Charles Latham, Omar Ruiz-Lopez, Reid Johnson; 8:30 p.m., $6. • WENDELL FALLS: Peak City Sound; 5:30 p.m., free.

Local Band Local Beer: Trunkweed

FRI, AUG 19

STONED First thing’s first: & ALONE Trunkweed ain’t local. The trio is from Baltimore, but there’s a charming, lazy modesty to its pinging guitars and stoned poetry that makes the band at least kissing cousins to the Triangle’s indie rock royalty. Think a lo-fi Superchunk that writes loud-quiet-loud punk songs about getting baked and being bummed. Essex//Muro and Raid the Quarry are the locals and the openers here. —PW [POUR HOUSE, FREE/9:30 P.M.]

Donna Blue Band

The Naturalists

HI Touring on the HONEY! inspiringly titled EP, Home Honey, I’m Hi, this Buffalo, New York, three-piece offers a

ROCK The Donna Blue REVIVED Band purveys classic rock covers, belting out power chords to re-create the sounds of Jeff Beck, Aerosmith, and Led Zeppelin. The band’s funky sidesteps include covers ofChaka Khan and a few more detours to get some Nirvana, The Pretenders, and Tom Petty in the mix. —GB [BLUE NOTE GRILL, FREE/9 P.M.]

Boom Unit Brass Band BOLD BRASS

Achieving a well-judged

CONTRIBUTORS: Jim Allen (JA), Elizabeth Bracy (EB), Timothy Bracy (TB), Grant Britt (GB), Ryan Cocca (RC), Allison Hussey (AH), David Klein (DK), Karlie Justus Marlowe (KM), Dan Ruccia (DR), David Ford Smith (DS), Eric Tullis (ET), Patrick Wall (PW)

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19

SEE GULLS/TEARDROP CANYON

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

WWW.INDYWEEK.COM Sharp 9 Gallery, plenty of spaces exist for rising musicians like drummer Donovan Cheatham, a NCCU senior, to lead ensembles of all shapes and sizes. This quartet, which he’s dubbed “The Rhythm Section,” features a handful of Triangle mainstays. —DR [BEYÙ CAFFÈ, $7/8 & 10 P.M.]

Friday night finds two local rock acts up against each other as they celebrate fine new releases. In Raleigh, See Gulls cuts loose with Curtain Call, the band’s second EP of punchy rock tunes. It’s a square follow-up to the band’s first effort, last year’s solid You Can’t See Me, drawing from the same well of bright vintage pop-rock. But while You Can’t See Me had a tense, occasionally even angry undercurrent, Curtain Call feels sharper, settled, and even more satisfied with itself. Opener “Boss Hog,” with Leah Gibson taking over on vocals, is a surly take-this-job-and-shove-it jam that’s immensely catchy. Elsewhere, Sarah Fuller leans harder into Angel Olsen-style yelps, delivering a great one-two punch with back-to-back tracks “I Want It” and “I Wrote It,” before closing out on a tender note with the sweet, swaying “You’re Here.” As See Gulls reassert themselves in the capital city, the relatively new Teardrop Canyon debuts its self-titled first LP in Durham. The band is the latest enterprise of Josh Kimbrough, once of Butterflies, and is unsubtle in its eighties influences. A massive, squealing saxophone line is the centerpiece of “Defeat,” while “Wait Too Long” is flush with gentle cascades of synths. Those tumbling synths, paired with the song’s swooping guitar highlights, make “Wait Too Long” the record’s prettiest song by far. “Getting Dressed Alone,” on the other hand, sounds like an outtake from Sean Lennon’s 2006 LP Friendly Fire, with Kimbrough’s sighing delivery lending the record a little more space between its dense layers. Lost in the Trees’ Ari Picker recorded and produced Teardrop Canyon, with his ear for detail translating well to Kimbrough’s synth-heavy rock. Teardrop Canyon is remarkably slick, balancing professional polish with just the right amount of fuzz and crunch. —Allison Hussey

HIGH A delightful FIVE! contribution to the lineage of family rock bands like the Cowsills and the Trachtenberg Family Players, The Rock N Roll Hi Fives consist of husband and wife Joe and Gloree Centano and their daughters, Ellie and Everen. Cockles-warming novelty aside, the family demonstrates a real aptitude for power pop of the Cheap Trick and Dwight Twilley variety. —TB [SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS (RALEIGH), FREE/7 P.M.]

SEE GULLS: KINGS, RALEIGH 10:30 p.m., $8, www.kingsraleigh.com

Keith Urban

TEARDROP CANYON: THE PINHOOK, DURHAM 9 p.m., $8, www.thepinhook.com

comingling of the reverential and the currently relevant, these local party-down mavens combine the energy and spectacle of traditional New Orleans Dixieland with a generous helping of hip-hop, contemporary R&B covers, and some premium Meters-style funk. The eight-

strong unit features several of the Triangle’s most gifted brass musicians and has earned a hard-won reputation for delivering the Crescent City’s sound at its rambunctious best. The Wiley Fosters open. —EB [POUR HOUSE, $5–$7/9 P.M.]

Donovan Cheatham JAZZ LIFE One of the many joys of North Carolina Central University’s fantastic jazz program is the constant sense of renewal it fosters. With sympathetic venues like the Beyù, the Shed, and the

Helgamite MITE-Y These VirginiaMETAL based doom merchants liberally sprinkle their emphatically rendered sludge feasts with experimental gestures hinting toward avant-garde jazz. Thematic preoccupations run to the D&D of it all, with just enough acid-damaged atmosphere on songs like “Snowdrifter” and “Shaman’s Veil” to make the journey worth taking. Fin’amor, Hercyn, and Bvnnies open. —TB [SLIM’S, $7/8:30 P.M.]

Rock N Roll Hi Fives

AUSSIE It’s hard out there for POP an aging country music star, even if you’re one with shaggy good looks and married to Hollywood royalty. Keith Urban’s ear for pensive, sensitive-guy singles like “You’ll Think of Me” and “Stupid Boy” once put him on the radio map, striking a pleasing contrast to the good-time vibes of peers Kenny Chesney and Rascal Flatts. Now, though, he seems to be chasing the bro-country dream du jour with drippy downers like “John Cougar, John Deere, John 3:16.” Brett Eldredge and Maren Morris open. —KM [COASTAL CREDIT UNION MUSIC PARK AT WALNUT CREEK, $29–$75/7:30 PM] INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 29


11 7 W MAIN STREET • DURHAM

919.821.1120 • 224 S. Blount St WE 8/17

8.23 8.18 8.19

8.20

8.21 8.22 8.23 8.24 8.25 8.26

OMNI

THE DELTA SAINTS / ANCIENT CITIES LOCAL BAND LOCAL BEER

TH 8/18

ESSEX MURRO

W/ SMLH

JACKIE LYNN (BITCHIN BAJAS) NATHAN BOWLES TEARDROP CANYON RECORD RELEASE ESTRANGERS / CALAPSE ILLEGAL PRESENTS HAUS PARTY EARLY: QUEER HEARTACHE POETS: KIT YAN / JESS X. CHEN DURTY DUB / AND HOW! SEVERED FINGERS / SILENT PIECE THAT’S THE JOINT BEST OPEN MIC IN THE TRIANGLE OMNI / SMLH BOOGIE DOWN SOUTH COMEDY SHOW MAPLE STAVE DRUG YACHT / TODAY’S FORECAST DREAMING OF THE 90’S DANCE PARTY

COMING SOON: TITUS ANDRONICUS / MAPLE STAVE CRYING / PORCHES / TOMBOI / BARS AND BEATS FESTIVAL HEARTSCAPE LANDBREAK / CAMPDOGZZZ / PWR BTTM KARL BLAU / LAKE / ALLISON CRUTCHFIELD / NAKED NAPS SHONEN KNIFE / QUINTRON AND MS. PUSSYCAT

FREE SHOW!!

TRUNKWEED / RAID THE QUARRY

BOOM UNIT BRASS BAND

FR 8/19

THE WILEY FOSTERS

DARREN KNIGHT

SA 8/20

AKA SOUTHERN MOMMA W/ GERARD HARAN

ALBUM RELEASE PARTY!! SIGNAL

SA 8/20

FIRE

W/ JAH WORKS, EASTERN STANDARD TIME 9PM SU 8/21

DARREN KNIGHT 5PM DARREN KNIGHT

AKA SOUTHERN MOMMA

W/ GERARD HARAN 4PM & 7:30PM MO 8/22

MARIAN MCLAUGHLIN TRIO HONEY MAGPIE / CITY BELOW

POVIC NATION PRESENTS:

TU 8/23

RASTA B. / TANGLEOMAX / JOOSE LORD WE 8/24 TH 8/25

SPACEMAN STU / MBALLA / DANNY BLAZE DAVI JONES / GLENNCOE AGENT ORANGE FEAT SNAKE & THE PLISSKENS / BLACK IRISH TEXAS

LOCAL BAND LOCAL BEER

FREE SHOW!!

LACY JAGS / HECTORINA / DRAG SOUNDS facebook.com/thepourhousemusichall @ThePourHouse

thepourhousemusichall.com

Brian Wilson PRETTY Last year’s biopic PET Love & Mercy told the emotional story of Brian Wilson, splitting its time between the mid-sixties period when Wilson wrote and recorded the Beach Boys’ brilliant Pet Sounds and Wilson’s struggles with his health in the eighties. Pet Sounds hits its fiftieth anniversary this year, and remains an unimpeachable part of the American music canon with its rich, gorgeous textures and miniature symphonies disguised as pleasant pop songs. The Beach Boys’ rifts and fractures are well documented over the decades, but here, Wilson presents his masterpiece backed by a band that includes longtime collaborators Al Jardine and Blondie Chaplin. It’s been a brutal year for losing musical heroes—now’s the time to bask in Wilson’s gentle, golden glow. —AH [MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM, $47–$108/8 P.M.]

Yarn

8/188/21 SA 8/20 SA 8/27

SU 8/28

SA 9/17 9/23 9/24 FR 9/30 SA 10/1 TH 10/13

THE WOMEN’S THEATRE FESTIVAL PRESENTS

DECISION HEIGHT NO SHAME THEATRE - CARRBORO THE CHUCKLE & CHORTLE COMEDY SHOW POMS COSTUMED DANCE AND

LIVE ELECTRONIC MUSIC COLLABORATION BY MAC MCCAUGHAN (SUPERCHUNK), SARAH HONER & AMANDA BARR WITH MARY LATTIMORE

THE MONTI: SEASON OPENER MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL

TH 8/18

BRIAN PAGLIA / THE TREES FR 8/19

FR 10/21 (CO-PRESENTED BY CAT’S CRADLE) FR 10/28 LEO KOTTKE

Find out More at

ArtsCenterLive.org

300-G East Main St. • Carrboro, NC Find us on Social Media

@ArtsCenterLive

30 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

DANGLING LOAFER (7:30 DOORS) SEE GULLS ALBUM RELEASE SHOW W/ NO ONE MIND (10:00 DOORS)

SA 8/20 SU 8/21

LOCALFEST DAY 1 LOCAL FEST DAY 2 (DOORS AT NOON) LIVE AT NEPTUNES WAYLEAVES

ROBERT GRAVES & THE GRAVE ROBBER

TU 8/23

AV GEEKS PRESENT

“GOTTA SING, GOTTA DANCE, GOTTA TEACH” WE 8/24 LIVE AT NEPTUNES SEABREEZE DINER

BLUEBERRY / TANGIBLE DREAM

TH 8/25

JIM LAUDERDALE TRIANGLE PLAYWRIGHTS PLAYSLAM PIEDMONT MELODY MAKERS CALEB CAUDLE

BUFFCOAT & LACQUER

FR 8/26 SA 8/27

STEVE HARTSOE & KEVIN THOMPSON SPECIAL KINGS ANNIVERSARY EXTRAVAGANZA!! GHOSTT BLLONDE / SUBURBAN LIVING WHITE LACES / SURF ROCK IS DEAD

7 STORIES WE 8/31 HORSE LORDS SU 8/28

HOTLINE / THE DINWIDDIES LIVE AT NEPTUNES EYES UP HERE COMEDY

DRIQUE LONDON • CHELSEA SHAG • BAND & THE BEAT ELLIS DYSON • HECTORINA • CYMBALS EAT GUITARS CINEMA SOLORIENS FT MARSHALL ALLEN

LOOSE That old adage STRINGS about not judging a book by its cover applies to music, too. For instance, that Southern Americana band whose rootsy sounds you’re soaking up just might be from Brooklyn. That’s true of Yarn, whose members moved their HQ from NYC to N.C. to better pursue their vision. The band’s blend of alt-country, folk-rock, and bluegrass even finds a place for a jammy element that helps to set the outfit apart from the mandolin-wielding legions. —JA [MOTORCO, $12–$15/9 P.M.] ALSO ON FRIDAY 2ND WIND: Skinny Bag of Sugar. • 618 BISTRO: Randy Reed; 7-9:30 p.m. • BERKELEY CAFÉ: Sarah Baumgarden; 8 p.m. • BLUE NOTE GRILL: Duke Street Dogs; 6-8 p.m., free. • BYNUM GENERAL STORE: Squier Red; 7 p.m., free. • CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Melissa Swingle Duo, The 8:59s, Coleslaw; 9 p.m., $8. • THE CAVE: Drum N Bass Dance Party; 9 p.m., $5. • DEEP SOUTH: Runaway Cab, Shun The Raven, Roar The Engines; 8:30 p.m., $8–$10. • HONEYSUCKLE TEA HOUSE: Friedman & Blatt’s Night of Ambient;

7 p.m. • IRREGARDLESS: Foscoe Philharmonic; 6:30 p.m. • KINGS: See Gulls, No One Mind; 10:30 p.m., $8. See box, page 29. • THE KRAKEN: The Piedmont 4, The Holland Brothers. • MYSTERY BREWING PUBLIC HOUSE: Waking April; 8:30 p.m., free. • THE PINHOOK: Teardrop Canyon, Estrangers, Calapse; 9 p.m., $8. See box, page 29. • RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: Fifth Harmony, Jake Miller, Victoria Monet; 7 p.m., $20–$80. • SHARP NINE GALLERY: Lovell Bradford Quartet; 8 p.m., $10–$20. • SOUTHLAND BALLROOM: Nance; 10 p.m., $10–$15.

SAT, AUG 20 Clash of the Decades DEF There’s always that DANCE one washed-up dude at the throwback dance party who still buys his clothes off Karmaloop, repeatedly does the “dab” as if he learned it from a YouTube dance tutorial, and swears that you’re not doing the correct version of the Percolator. For the second time in just over a month, Richmond, Virginia, party provocateurs DJ Lonnie B and Mad Skillz bring their fun Art of Noise night of hip-hop, pop, and R&B nostalgia back to Motorco, where that same loser might be scrutinizing your funkiest Pee Wee Herman moves against your most choreographed Kid ‘n Play steps. Ignore him and bask in the clash of two great music eras. —ET [MOTORCO, $10–$15/9 P.M.]

Greaver NEW The heavier end of EMO post-hardcore or post-emo usually receives short shrift among critics, who may want to put some distance between their current self and the emotional excesses of their younger days. So it’s nice that bands like Durham’s Greaver exist to remind us that this style is still dutifully being plumbed and improved upon. Greaver’s prog-tinged compositions and dual vocalists suggest the sonic blitz of bands like Touche Amore, with razor-edge vocals and evocative, crunchy leads. With Gillian Carter and Innerout. —DS [LOCAL 506, $7/9 P.M.]

Localfest HEAVY It seems like a SLATE different music fest occurs every week of the Triangle summer, many featuring a roster of regional or statewide talent. Localfest, now in its fifth iteration, amounts to an extended seminar on the many permutations of hard rock. Now a two-day affair, Localfest frontloads with a seven-act bill including extreme heavy metalists Invoke, Greaver’s scream-sung emotional hardcore, and headliners Society Sucker, who make a gargantuan roar. Sunday’s daytime show is less intense: check out The Bronzed Chorus, a long-running Greensboro duo purveying surprising, cerebral explorations, and the deadpan indie pop of Weird Pennies (of Raleigh)— that’s the name. Bare the Traveler, from Winston-Salem, might be an acquired taste. —DK [KINGS, $15/7 P.M.]

Party Illegal: Haus Party BEAT YR The experimental, FEET revolving cast of beat makers and DJs known as Raund Haus is a direct descendant of Durham’s longstanding dance refuge, Party Illegal. The collective’s interchangeability and its hard-on for curving, crushing, and alienesque production have turned all of its events into super sound spectacles. The challenge this weekend, however, will be figuring out how to turn all those head nods into footwork. This latest iteration includes ZenSoFly, Drozy, Tony G, Queen Plz, and Hubbble. —ET [THE PINHOOK, $5–$10/10 P.M.]

Signal Fire FIRE ‘PON What is it about ILM Wilmington that churns out innumerable bands that confuse third-rate, white-bread roots-rock-reggae with the good stuff that came out of Kingston in the sixties? Signal Fire is about as close to reggae as a tricolored, eleven-by-seventeeninch poster of Bob Marley, but its boring, baldhead, bombaclat music nonetheless seems perpetually popular with affluent stoner kids. Jah works in


mysterious ways. With Jah Works (no, really) and Eastern Standard Time. —PW [POUR HOUSE, $7–$10/9:30 P.M.]

Toynbee

RETRO In its name, Raleigh’s INDIE Toynbee references the cryptic Toynbee tiles, a series of puzzling messages found on hundreds of linoleum tiles embedded in asphalt throughout the U.S. and South America, and British historian Arnold J. Toynbee, the prodigious scholar for whom the tiles were likely named. Musically, Toynbee references the annals of alternative rock; its jangly pop recalls The B-52s and Miracle Legion, paired with a little bit of Hüsker Dü’s muscle. —PW [SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS (RALEIGH), FREE/7 P.M.]

Gillian Welch

DARK Gillian Welch isn’t DRAMA selling out massive arenas or raking in millions of dollars. But if there’s any justice in music history, she’ll go down as one of the finest songwriters of this century, period, not just in folk and Americana circles. Her writing ripples with a dark undercurrent, reaching deep inside and speaking to the lonely, the broken, the weary, the girls with the dark turns of mind. At her side is Dave Rawlings, her longtime collaborator who fills in with ghostly, gorgeous notes that make for flawless accents. Welch’s work is haunting, tender, and unforgettable in any context. —AH [N.C. MUSEUM OF ART, $20–$40/8 P.M.]

ALSO ON SATURDAY

BERKELEY CAFÉ: Jeff Mullins; 8 p.m. • BEYÙ CAFFÈ: Ti Harmon; 8 & 10 p.m., $7. • BLUE NOTE GRILL: Handsome Al and The Lookers, Emma Davis; 8 p.m., $8. • THE CARY THEATER: The Honeycutters; 8 p.m., $20. • CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Echo Courts, The Nude Party, Wahyas, Less Western; 8:30 p.m., $6–$8. • THE CAVE: M is We, These Weak Lips, Parafilm, Jokes&Jokes&Jokes; 9 p.m., $5. • CITY TAP: Tommy Edwards and Friends; 8:30 p.m. • CRAFTY BEER SHOP: Sleepy Tom; 8:30

p.m., free. • DEEP SOUTH: Autumn Brand, Waking April, Castle Wild; 9 p.m., $7–$10. • HONEYSUCKLE TEA HOUSE: Tea Cup Gin; 7 p.m. • IRREGARDLESS: Brent Stimmel; 11 a.m. John Bass, Greg Brink; 6 p.m. Capital Jazz Band; 9 p.m. • THE KRAKEN: WCOM Benefit; 7 p.m. • LINCOLN THEATRE: BJ Barham, David Ramirez; 8 p.m., $15–$25. See box, this page. • THE MAYWOOD: Prophets of Addiction, Last Call Messiahs, Hayvyn; 9:30 p.m., $10. • MYSTERY BREWING PUBLIC HOUSE: Christiane and The Strays; 8:30 p.m., free. • RUBY DELUXE: Luxe Posh; 10 p.m. • SAXAPAHAW RIVERMILL: Jonathan Byrd; 6 p.m., free. • THE STATION: Summer Sessions: Jazz Saturdays; 2 p.m., free. North Elementary, Those Lavender Whales; 8:30 p.m., $5. Loose Caboose Dance Party; 10:30 p.m., free. • STEEL STRING BREWERY: Hal Engler Quartet; 5 p.m.

SUN, AUG 21 Advance Base SEAS OF Owen Ashworth’s KEYS previous musical alias, Casiotone for the Painfully Alone, speaks to his preference for electronic keyboards and his doomy vantage point. Those elements remain a focal point in his new guise, Advance Base. He sounds something like Stephin Merritt’s less worldly, less snarky older brother, and somehow it’s perfect. With Hello Shark and John Davis & the Cicadas. —DK [LOCAL 506, $8–$10/9 P.M]

Durty Dub POP UP Will Darity, guitarist ROCK and lead player of the pert party band Durty Dub, is more than just a funky strummer—he’s a musical satirist who can coast any guitar riff into an improvised jam that’s just as ludicrous and entertaining as any Chappelle’s Show skit. That entire stock of jest comes into play when Darity and his bandmates start unpacking familiar tunes like Katy Perry’s “California Gurls,” taking cotton candy pop to its most sophisticated level. Also with And How!, The Severed Fingers, and Silent Piece. —ET [THE PINHOOK, $7/9 P.M.]

Mark Holland

SATURDAY, AUGUST 20

BJ BARHAM A smokestack, a .38 revolver, a burnt pecan pie, a hunter green Plymouth: all relics of Southern life and central iconography for the protagonists on Rockingham, the debut solo album from singer-songwriter BJ Barham. The eight-song record draws on Barham’s childhood in Reidsville, North Carolina, using character sketches of hometown folks to capture the hopes, dreams, realities, and disappointments of small-town America. Rockingham is rooted in the South, but Barham wrote it while touring Europe with American Aquarium, the alt-country band he’s fronted for over a decade. The group was less than two hours away from Paris when terrorists attacked a packed concert hall in November. The rush of voice mails, texts, and emails from concerned friends and family members struck a chord in Barham. Within days, he’d written the skeleton for Rockingham. An ode to the people and places that have influenced his life, the album possesses an innate contradiction: though it’s his first attempt at nonautobiographical writing, the songs are his most personal. American Aquarium’s 2015 breakthrough, Wolves, was wrought with honesty and openness. But Barham pushes himself even further on Rockingham as he depicts the people, town, and moments that helped shape him. Each of Rockingham’s tracks presents a fictional narrative of a different person, written from his or her viewpoint, all set in Barham’s hometown of Reidsville. In “O’Lover,” Barham voices a farmer whose soil won’t cooperate. “The last few years we bled her dry/There used to be cotton and tobacco/ Now nothing grows, no matter what we try,” he sings between threads of banjo and harmonica. Driven by desperation, Barham’s farmer takes a revolver and commits a robbery, justifying his action by declaring that he did it to survive. The hard-luck tales keep coming—on “Reidsville,” a man sells the Plymouth he built by hand in order to buy his girl a wedding ring and provide for their future, and on “American Tobacco Company,” Barham describes the slow suffocation of blue-collar labor. Rockingham reaches its pinnacle with “Madeline,” where Barham writes, “I wish I could tell you that the world is a safe place/But I have seen the darkest side of people.” Brimming with local pride, Rockingham is masterfully crafted, with sharp detail that plops the listener right into Barham’s scenes. If nurture is as critical to human understanding as nature is, then Rockingham inscribes Barham’s tabula rasa, pulling back the curtain for the most intimate glimpse into the songwriter’s background yet. —Desiré Moses LINCOLN THEATRE, RALEIGH 8 p.m., $15–$25, www.lincolntheatre.com

FOLK This Chapel Hill ROCK troubadour wasn’t always a solo act. Back in the heyday of nineties alt-rock, he and his twin brother, Michael, founded Jennyanykind and made it all the way to major-label land. But the homegrown approach is more hospitable to Holland’s artistic impulses these days, whether he’s working with Michael under the Holland Brothers banner or stepping out for his own endeavors, which tend toward an agreeably low-key amalgam of folk, rock, and soul. With John Harrison. —JA [THE CAVE, $3/8 P.M.]

3@3: Paper Dolls THREE Local 506’s 3@3 PEAT series of bands jamming out at three in the afternoon continues with this collection of area acts, most of whom lean toward melodic aughts alt-rock . Paper Dolls, hailing from Raleigh, are the poppiest of the bunch and bring a smoky sensibility to girl-groupinspired pop-rock. Nikol summons nu-metal crunch with fierce Flyleaf-esque vocals. Stammerings shred out prog-emo along the lines of Codeseven or Coheed and Cambria. —DS [LOCAL 506, FREE/3 P.M.]

Wayleaves SUPER With members of GROUP Polvo, The Cherry Valence, and a number of other known local outfits in tow, Raleigh’s Wayleaves sports enough talent that the band could exist without playing a note. When they do play, their sound is country-tinged rock that’s visceral and a lot of fun, if less complex than the sum of its parts. With Robert Graves and the Grave Robbers. —DS [NEPTUNES PARLOUR, $5/8:30 P.M.] ALSO ON SUNDAY BERKELEY CAFÉ: FreeRadikal; 6 p.m. • CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Honey Radar, No One Mind; 8:30 p.m., $8. • DEEP SOUTH: Live & Loud Weekly; 9 p.m., $3. • THE GLENWOOD CLUB: Capital Jazz; 3 p.m., $5–$15. • HONEYSUCKLE

TEA HOUSE: John Westmoreland; 1 p.m. • IRREGARDLESS: Gene O’Neill; 10 a.m. Zach Wiley; 6 p.m. • JOHNNY’S GONE FISHING: Bourbon Express; 7 p.m. • KINGS: Localfest; noon, $15–$20. • LINCOLN THEATRE: Powerful Pills; 8 p.m., $10. • THE MAYWOOD: Medium Well in Hell Fest II; 5 p.m., $15. • RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: O.A.R.; 6:30 p.m., $25–$50. • RUBY DELUXE: Localfest Afterparty; 11 p.m. • SLIM’S: Uncle Evan and the Drinkers, Dylan Earl; 9 p.m., $5. • ST MATTHEWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH: Thelonious NC; 3 p.m., $10. • WEST END WINE BAR-DURHAM: Eric Meyer, Noah Sager & Friends; 4-6 p.m., free.

MON, AUG 22 Lil Yachty BOPS AT It may have been the SEA simplistic, droning bomp-bomp-BOMP of D4L’s 2006 hit “Laffy Taffy” when music as threadbare as Lil Yachty’s last seized hip-hop’s collective consciousness to this degree. This time around, we have SoundCloud, and holy fuck do Lil Yachty’s fans use it—every single song on his debut mixtape, Lil Boat, has at least one million listens. But listens don’t translate to stage presence or skill. It remains unknown whether Lil Yachty, or his fans, particularly care. —RC [CAT’S CRADLE, $20–$23/9 P.M.]

Marian McLaughlin Trio WTFOLK What is experimental folk music? For Marian McLaughlin, it’s an adventurous combination of classical guitar, layered textures, and surprising bends of her clear, deliberate vocals, presented in a variety of musical configurations. In Raleigh, McLaughlin is joined by Tiny Rhymes cellist-singer Katie Weissman, and arranger Ethan Foote, whose musicianship largely colored McLaughlin’s quirky, lush 2015 record, Spirit House. Triangle-based folkies Honey Magpie and City Below open. —KM [POUR HOUSE, $8–$10/9 P.M.] INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 31


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DEEP SOUTH: Hank Murphy; 8 p.m., $5. • THE SHED JAZZ CLUB: Sessions at the Shed with Ernest Turner; 8 p.m., $5.

TUE, AUG 23 Bailen FOLK POP Harmony is Bailen’s game, and this four-piece lathers its exceedingly tasteful and risk-averse folk-pop with enough multi-part singing to satisfy the appetite of Peter, Paul & Mary junkies far and wide. It’s the kind of thing you like if you like that kind of thing. The Oblations and Mountain Lions open. —EB [LOCAL 506, $8/8 P.M.]

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ALSO ON MONDAY

RAPPERS Local hip-hop & PALS shows, particularly shows for one or two artists, are rarely “at capacity” events. It’s so rare that a “strength in numbers” approach to booking is the norm, and Povic Nation’s Black Out at the Pour House doesn’t buck the tried-and-true strategy. The showcase features eight different North Carolina emcees, from Durham’s Mballa to Charlotte’s Tange Lomax. Between Lomax’s ethereal singing and Danny Blaze’s trap bounce, there will be enough diversity to go around. Here’s hoping there’s enough time, too. —RC [POUR HOUSE, $7/9P.M.]

Drag Sounds SPIRIT OF In 1976, The Rolling ‘76 Stones released Black and Blue, a transitional record longer on grooves and jams than songs. Across the pond, in New York City, Television was recording Marquee Moon, a revolutionary record that sublimated avant-garde flourishes onto classic blues structures. Greensboro-via-Baltimore outfit Drag Sounds channels both of those bands during that period in equal measure, arcwelding The Stones’ insouciance onto Television’s erudition. The disheveled vibe on the just-released Sudden Comfort is, indeed,

instantly comfortable. Animal City and Robert Graves and the Grave Robbers open. —PW [RUBY DELUXE, DONATIONS/8 P.M.]

Omni ARE WE This offbeat NOT MEN Atlanta-based trio’s most obvious antecedent is Devo, with whom it shares an acerbic edge, a cool art-school sensibility, and a gift for catchy songcraft that ingratiates and alienates in equal measure. Omni’s recordings to date have been lo-fi, replete with atmosphere while occasionally threatening to subsume some very good ideas amid the strum and clatter. Regardless, Omni has the unmistakable feel of a gifted act with a bright future. SMLH open. —EB [THE PINHOOK, $10/9 P.M.]

Butch Walker PROD In 2011’s “SynthesizPRO ers,” Butch Walker takes a potshot at the titular technology and the artifice of rock ’n’ roll as a whole—he even name-checks Sacagewea—without coming off as a scold. Better known, and presumably compensated, for his production work than his accomplished solo stuff, Walker writes wry, memorable tunes in a host of styles and nails them all. With the Wind and the Wave and Suzanne Santos. —DK [LINCOLN THEATRE, $20/8 P.M.] ALSO ON TUESDAY SHARP NINE GALLERY: North Carolina Jazz Repertory Orchestra; 8 p.m., $10–$20. • THE STATION: Messer Chups, Straight 8’s, El Mirage; 8 p.m., $7.

WED, AUG 24 Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ ROOTS Singer-songwriter VETS Kevin Kinney has been the driving force behind Georgia-based roots rockers Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ since the eighties. His never-say-die work ethic has gone hand in hand with his eclecticism; the records D&C has

released in recent years have encompassed everything from hard-driving rock to trippy psychedelia. If you catch the band live, though, there’s a good chance you’ll get plenty of the roots-rocking glory that’s made them cult favorites for decades. With The Feeds. —JA [LOCAL 506, $15–$18/9 P.M.]

Al Riggs BRIGHT & Al Riggs is prolific. YOUNG The young singer-songwriter has released over fifteen albums in the last few years, alternating between ambitious art rock and emotional, self-conscious folk balladry inspired by literature, pop culture, and his own experiences as a queer young person. Start with this year’s Blue Mornings as an accessible intro to his idiosyncratic, often beautiful tunes. With Second Husband. —DS [RUBY DELUXE, DONATIONS/9 P.M.]

Seabreeze Diner FIZZ & On its Bandcamp FUZZ page, the bio of Raleigh’s Seabreeze Diner comprises just four words: “pop rocks and Coca-Cola.” It’s a pretty apt phrase: The quartet’s For Use With Care, recorded at Duck Kee and released in June, is affectionately effervescent, with nervy, jangling songs that twitch and shimmer. And the band’s given to frothy, volcanic eruptions, too, as with the surging choruses of “Anna Belle” and the seaside shake of “Wasted Summers.” Blueberry and Tangible Dream open. —PW [KINGS, $6/10 P.M.] ALSO ON WEDNESDAY BLUE NOTE GRILL: Blue Wednesday; 8 p.m. • POUR HOUSE: Agent Orange, Fea, Snake & The Plisskens, Black Irish Texas; 9 p.m., $12–$15.


art OPENING

SPECIAL Bathroom Humor: EVENT National Cartoonists Take on HB2: Visual commentary on NC House Bill 2. Aug 19-Sep 25. Reception: Aug 19, 6-9 p.m. Horse & Buggy Press, Durham. horseandbuggypress.com. Equine Abstractions: Paintings by Laura Hughes. Aug 24-Sep 24. Hillsborough Arts Council Gallery, Hillsborough. www. hillsboroughartscouncil.org. SPECIAL Flowers of France EVENT and Italy: Paintings by Sonia Kane. Aug 17-Sep 24. Reception Aug 19, 6-8 p.m. Page-Walker Arts & History Center, Cary. www. friendsofpagewalker.org. SPECIAL Natural EVENT Abstractions: Photographs by Michael Rosenberg. Aug 19-Sep 10. Reception: Aug 19, 6-9 p.m. Through This Lens, Durham. www.throughthislens.com. SPECIAL Out of Context: EVENT Mixed-media by Kathryn DeMarco, Linwood Hart, and Libby O’Daniel. Aug 19-Sep 10. Reception: Aug 19, 6-9 p.m. The Scrap Exchange, Durham. www.scrapexchange.org.

ONGOING

SPECIAL All That Glitters: EVENT Golden-hued artwork by Gordon Jameson, Sheila Stillman, and Samantha Henneke and Bruce Gholson of Bulldog Pottery. Thru Sep 4. Artist talk: Aug 18, 6-8 p.m. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill. www.frankisart.com. Altered Land: Works by Damian Stamer and Greg Lindquist: In Altered Land, Stamer and Lindquist apply a heavy coat of subjectivity to rural N.C. scenes. Stamer paints a barn with black-and-white horror movie starkness in “South Lowell 18,” and Lindquist spills

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR WWW.INDYWEEK.COM

08.17–08.24 angry psychotropic colors in his pointedly titled “Duke Energy’s Dan River” series. Thru Sep 11. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. www. ncartmuseum.org. —Brian Howe SPECIAL Aporia: Drawings EVENT and mixed media work by Jina Valentine. Thru Aug 28. Reception Aug 21, 2-4 p.m. Horace Williams House, Chapel Hill. www.chapelhillpreservation. com. See p. 28. SPECIAL Avant-Gardens: EVENT Mixed collage work by Lauren Worth. Thru Sep 19. Reception: Aug 19, 5-7 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org. LAST Phil Blank: Works CHANCE on paper. Thru Aug 19. Reception: Fri, Aug 19, 6-9 p.m. Bull City Arts Collaborative: Upfront Gallery, Durham. www. bullcityarts.org. Burk Uzzle: American Chronicle: One of N.C.’s most faithful chroniclers gets a career retrospective. Uzzle, born in Raleigh in 1938, started as a News & Observer shooter before hitting the big time at Life, photographing iconic scenes from the civil rights movement and Woodstock. Thru Sep 25. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. www.ncartmuseum.org. —Brian Howe Chihuly Venetians: From the George R. Stroemple Collection: Whereas many glassblowers content themselves with bongs and lampshades, Dale Chihuly has taken the form into the upper echelons of fine art with his sculptural fantasias. This private collection of Chihuly’s works is currently on tour. The collection focuses on Chihuly vessels inspired by Venetian art deco vases from the 1920s and ’30s, almost fifty of which are in the exhibit, arrayed around the centerpiece of the Laguna Murano Chandelier, a tour de force made of more than 1,500 pieces. Thru Oct 15. Captain James & Emma Holt White House, Graham. —Brian Howe Come Out and Play: Outdoor sculpture group show. Thru Sep 24. JimGin Farm,

Pittsboro. www.carrboro.com/ comeoutandplay.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19

Departures and Arrivals: Raleigh’s Gayle Stott Lowry is a painter of landscapes and architecture whose pictorial realism glimmers with hints of abstraction. Her new exhibit showcases work from travels in England, where her mind turned to the plight of refugees while researching her ancestors’ journey to the U.S. The context gives the work a lonesome patina—a misty valley, more than a view to behold, becomes a challenge to traverse. Thru Sep 3. Tyndall Galleries, Chapel Hill. www. tyndallgalleries.com. —Brian Howe Do You Have a Moment?: It’s a question that might send you scurrying when posed by someone clutching a clipboard on the street. It’s also the title of Jody Servon’s new show, which comes to life only when you respond to its prompts. Servon developed the exhibit during her summer residency at Artspace. The centerpiece is “Our Top 100,” in which visitors write down a song title and a recollection it sparks. The notes are posted on the wall, and each song is added to the playlist streaming in the gallery. The result is a collective memory mixtape for Raleigh, and an invitation to break free from isolating routines. Thru Sep 27. Artspace, Raleigh. www. artspacenc.org. —Brian Howe Durham by Ghostbike: In one of his mixed-media collages, Jeremy Kerman shows us a familiar downtown vantage through fresh eyes. Using bright colors, blocky shapes, and skewed perspectives remindful of a child’s drawing, he depicts the collision of old and new Durham, as historic brick jumbles with shiny ELF vehicles in front of the Organic Transit building. A“Ghost Bike” parking sign pays a tribute to a friend of the artist’s in particular, and to all the people being erased, literally or figuratively, from Durham. “Road Closed Ahead,” reads another sign; the question Kerman quietly asks is “for whom?” Thru Sep 17. Craven Allen Gallery,

QUOCTRUNG NGUYEN: SPACE OF OTHERNESS The painter Quoctrung Nguyen swirls his experience as a migrant into elegant abstractions in Space of Otherness, his new show in the Durham Arts Council’s Allenton Gallery. Works like “Utopia III” and “Heterotopia” suggest overlapping prints from the coats of fantastic animals, with textures furred, mottled, and fluid drawn into chaotic harmonies. Nguyen shares a Third Friday opening reception with two more new DAC shows: Lauren Jones Worth’s Avant-Gardens in the Semans Gallery and Moriah LeFebvre’s Hometown (Inherited) in the Pratt Gallery, which sticks around through Oct. 2 after the other two shows close Sept. 19. —Brian Howe DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL, DURHAM 5–7 p.m., free, www.durhamarts.org

“WU-XING V (THE FIVE ELEMENTS V)” BY QUOCTRUNG NGUYEN PHOTO COURTESY OF THE DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL

Durham. www.cravenallengallery. com. —Brian Howe LAST Garden’s Bounty: CHANCE Paintings by Elda Hiser, jewelry by Monica Hunter, and ceramics by Susan Luster. Thru Aug 20. Cary Gallery of Artists. carygalleryofartists.org. Grillo/Geary: The close relationship between spacesharing galleries Lump and Flanders bears fruit in this exhibit by Joe Grillo and Mike Geary. After being artists in residence at Flanders in July, where they collaborated on paintings, sketches, collages, and sculptures, Grillo and Geary display the works at Lump. Grillo was a founding member of avant-garde comics collective Paper Rad, and that rude, energetic punch is also evident in collages that blend drawing and pop-culture detritus into high-velocity overloads of visual information. Geary brings the same exponential repetition and distended perspective to his visual works as he brings to his tape-loop compositions. Thru Aug 28. Lump, Raleigh. www. teamlump.org. —Brian Howe

History and Mistory: Discoveries in the NCMA British Collection: This free exhibit is the first time in four decades that NCMA has curated an exhibit from its British holdings—and if you simply don’t care about pictures of random aristocrats in ruffs, the show also includes portraits by famous names like Anthony van Dyck and William Beechey. Thru Mar 19, 2017. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. www. ncartmuseum.org. —Brian Howe SPECIAL Hometown EVENT (Inherited): Photographic and mixed media work by Moriah LeFebvre. Thru Oct 2. Reception: Aug 19, 5-7 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org.

found objects that bulge from canvases—are like chunks of bedrock excavated from the subconscious. It’s art as pure artifact, contrasting the brightly lit social experiments of Jody Servon, which are also currently at Artspace. Thru Sep 5. Artspace, Raleigh. www. artspacenc.org. —Brian Howe

humor me!: Works about humor. Thru Aug 31. Visual Art Exchange, Raleigh. www. visualartexchange.org.

OFF-SPRING: New Generations: This exhibit, mostly photography, makes “ritual” its theme, and the offerings are alternately revelatory and rehashed from big-box postmodernism. “Off-Spring of Cindy Sherman” might have been a better title. Thru Sep 30. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. www.21cmuseumhotels.com/ durham. —Chris Vitiello

In the Footsteps Of...: Group photography show. Thru Sep 9. Halle Cultural Arts Center, Apex. www.thehalle.org. Its Some Kynd of Thing It Aint Us but Yet Its In Us: English artist Andrew Hladky’s dark, igneous enigmas—painted

J: the Comic and Pop Art of L Jamal Walton: Solo comic exhibit. Thru Aug 31. Holly Springs Cultural Center, Holly Springs. www.hollyspringsnc.us. Learned Behavior: Lamar Whidbee’s sculpture/painting hybrids made from found objects. Thru Aug 31. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www. artscenterlive.org.

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MASHUQ MUSHTAQ DEEN IN DRAW THE CIRCLE PHOTO BY DARCY COURTEAU

raleighwoodmovies.com.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24– SUNDAY, AUGUST 28

DRAW THE CIRCLE

Mashuq Mushtaq Deen has crossed through many worlds—from southern India to Connecticut to Brooklyn, from a conservative Muslim family into secular America, and from a butch bisexual woman to a transgender man. Since 2010, he’s been developing his autobiographical one-person show, Draw the Circle, in staged readings and workshop performances in venues and festivals in and outside New York. The one-week run of its world premiere opens PlayMakers Repertory Company’s 2016–2017 season; in it, Deen uses the words of his family members and friends to make a mosaic of his epic transformation from their varied points of view. —Byron Woods

PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY, CHAPEL HILL Various times, $15–$48, www.playmakersrep.org

Erin Oliver: Site-specific installation. Thru Sep 24. Artspace, Raleigh. www. artspacenc.org. LAST Sea Life: Sculpture CHANCE by Renee Levity, Brenda Holmes, and Nate Sheaffer. Thru Sep 25. Reception: Aug 19. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. www. PleiadesArtDurham.com.

Seeing Beyond the Structures: Portraits of the Landscape: Paintings by Adam Bellefeuil, Rachel Campbell, and Caitlin Cary. Thru Sep 16. Miriam Preston Block Gallery, Raleigh. www.raleighnc.gov/arts.

Southern Discomfort: The Art of Dixie: Work concerning the American South. Thru Sep 13. Gallery C, Raleigh. www. galleryc.net.

Spectrophobia: Photographs by Ian F.G. Dunn. Thru Aug 29. Flanders Gallery, Raleigh. www. flandersartgallery.com. LAST Useful Work: CHANCE Photographs of Hickory Nut Gap Farm: Ken Abbott’s color photographs of a family farm in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Thru Sep 10. Reception: Aug 18, 6-9 p.m. Duke Campus: Center for Documentary Studies, Durham. www.cdsporch.org. |

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Catherine Vosecky: Photographic works of reflected metal. Thru Aug 31. HagerSmith Design Gallery, Raleigh. www. hagersmith.com.

stage OPENING

Angry Fags: Play. Sun, Aug 21, 7 p.m. Theatre In The Park, Raleigh. www.theatreinthepark. com. See p. 26. Chump Suckas: Original comedy. $10. Thu, Aug 18, 8 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. www. goodnightscomedy.com. D.L. Hughley: Stand-up comedy. $35. Fri, Aug 19Sun, Aug 21. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. www. goodnightscomedy.com. Memphis: Musical. $22$26. Aug 19-Sep 4. Raleigh Little Theatre, Raleigh. www. raleighlittletheatre.org. Million Dollar Quartet: Musical. $31-$33. Aug 17-28. Kennedy Theater, Raleigh. www. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com/ venue/kennedy-theatre.

The Monti Storyslam: $15. Tue, Aug 23, 7:30 p.m. Motorco Music Hall, Durham. www. motorcomusic.com. My 2nd Act: Survivor Stories from the Stage: Stories from local women cancer survivors. $28. Sun, Aug 21, 3 p.m. Fletcher Opera Theater, Raleigh. www.dukeenergycenterraleigh. com. No Shame Theatre: Performances cast, staged, and shown in one night. $5. Sat, Aug 20, 8 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www.artscenterlive. org. Third Date Improv: $12. Sat, Aug 20, 8 p.m. Common Ground Theatre, Durham. www. cgtheatre.com. The Princess Talks: Comedic lectures by famous princesses. $10-$15. Thu, Aug 18-Sun, Aug 21. The Cary Theater, Cary.  The Roaring Girl: Play presented by Little Independent Theatre. $10-$15. Thu, Aug 18-Sat, Aug 20, 8 p.m. Burning Coal Theatre at the Murphey School, Raleigh. www. burningcoal.org. See Byron Woods’ review at indyweek.com Leroy Seabrooks, Ryan Brown, Grant Sheffield: Stand-up comedy. $8-$10. Thu, Aug 18, 7:30 p.m. Raleighwood Cinema Grill, Raleigh. www.

The Sinful Six: Dirty humor. Hosted by Lauren Faber. $5. Wed, Aug 24, 8 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. www. goodnightscomedy.com. Trust the Bus: Multidisciplinary, site-specific performances. Sat, Aug 20 & Sat, Aug 27, 8:15 p.m. Saxapahaw General Store, Saxapahaw. saxgenstore.com. See p. 27. Kenny Zimlinghaus: Stand-up comedy. $17. Sat, Aug 20, 8 p.m. Moonlight Stage Company, Raleigh.

ONGOING The Beautiful Beast: Paperhand Puppet Intervention. Thru Sep 5. UNC Campus: Forest Theatre, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.  ½ Decision Height: Play. Part of the Women’s Theatre Festival. $12-$15. Thru Aug 21. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www. artscenterlive.org. See Byron Woods’ review, p. 25.  ½ I Wish You A Boat: Play. $25. Fri, Aug 12-Sun, Aug 14. Ward Theatre, Durham. www.wardtheatrecompany. com. See Byron Woods’ review at www.indyweek.com.

screen

SPECIAL SHOWINGS

Chef: Movies by Moonlight series. Fri, Aug 19, 7 p.m. Koka Booth Amphitheatre, Cary. www.boothamphitheatre.com. A Fat Wreck: $8-$10. Wed, Aug 24, 8 p.m. Motorco Music Hall, Durham. www.motorcomusic. com. Footloose: Sat, Aug 20, 8 p.m. Lafayette Village, Raleigh. www. lafayettevillageraleigh.com. Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! Gotta Teach!: 16mm educational films. $5. Tue, Aug 23, 8 p.m. Kings, Raleigh. www.kingsbarcade. com. Hail, Caesar!: Sat, Aug 20, 2:30 p.m. Chapel Hill Public Library, Chapel Hill. chapelhillpubliclibrary.org. Home: Sat, Aug 20, 8:30 p.m. Durham Central Park, Durham. www.durhamcentralpark.org.

The North Carolina Gay & Lesbian Film Festival: Thru Aug 20. Carolina Theatre, Durham. www.carolinatheatre.org. Paddington: Thru Aug 18, 9:30 a.m. Northgate Mall, Durham. www.northgatemall.com. Penguins of Madagascar: Thru Aug 18, 9:30 a.m. Northgate Mall, Durham. www. northgatemall.com. The Princess Bride: Outdoor movie series. Thu, Aug 18, 7 p.m. Garner Performing Arts Center, Garner. www. garnerperformingartscenter. com. Space Jam: Thu, Aug 18, 8:30 p.m. Wallace Plaza, Chapel Hill. Spotlight: $6. Fri, Aug 19, 8:30 p.m. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. www.ncartmuseum. org.

OPENING Ben Hur—Can Jack Huston measure up to Charlton Heston in the title role? Well, the name is close enough. Rated PG-13.

Newsies: Musical. $35$80. Thru Aug 21. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. www.dpacnc.com.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24

CONTEMPORARY COLOR

CAPTION

PHOTO CREIT

CONTEMPORARY COLOR

Color guard has come a long way. What originated as a lockstep ritual performed by soldiers in honor of a nation’s flag became a synchronized group activity akin to marching-band, whose choreography incorporated the expert handling of sabers, rifles, and other symbols of war. With a cool quotient somewhere between Helping Hands Club and marching band, color guard hasn’t had much currency in high school hallways lately. But for some students, it’s crucial in strengthening fragile social bonds. David Byrne of Talking Heads fame grew fascinated with color guard performances and decided what was needed was live music, rather than canned accompaniment. And also, uh, better music. By enlisting the likes of St. Vincent, Nelly Furtado, Ad-Rock, Kelis, and Nico Muhly to write fresh tunes for color guard performances, Byrne transformed a rather stiff and regimented activity into a raucous spectacle of the human spirit. The documentary Contemporary Color focuses on a competition among ten high school crews accompanied by live performers. The hopes and dreams of the youthful participants will be front and center when the Full Frame Road Show brings the film to Silverspot Cinema. —David Klein SILVERSPOT CINEMA, CHAPEL HILL 7 p.m., free (reservations required), www.fullframefest.org


Hell or High Water—This neoWestern stars Chris Pine, Ben Foster, and Jeff Bridges. Rated R. Kubo and the Two Strings—This 3-D stop-motion fantasy adventure is set in ancient Japan. Rated PG. Our Little Sister—This 2015 Palme d’Or nominee from Japan is based on the manga Umimachi Diary. Rated PG. War Dogs—The Hangover trilogy’s director brings us an action comedy based on a Rolling Stone article about Afghan arms dealers. Rated R.

A L S O P L AY I N G The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Read our reviews of these films at www.indyweek.com.

update. Rated PG.  ½ Lights Out—A viral no-budget short about a monster that appears only in the dark becomes a surprisingly effective horror feature with a sensitivity to subtext. Rated PG-13.  ½ The Secret Life of Pets—This charming, beautifully crafted family movie falls apart in the final act. Rated PG.  Suicide Squad—The plot is throwaway thin, but this team of antiheroes brings much-needed levity and breadth to the DC Extended Universe. Rated PG-13.

 ½ Bad Moms—It’s The Change-Up and The Hangover for women. You’re welcome? Rated PG-13.

food

 ½ Florence Foster Jenkins—Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant carry their tunes, but this biopic of an opera singer who couldn’t sing never finds its melody. Rated PG-13.

$3 Dinners: Weekly revolving menu with vegan options. Free live music. Thursdays, 4 p.m; Thru Sep 1. Durham Co-op Market, Durham. durham.coop.

 Ghostbusters—Haters aside, the casting isn’t the problem here: The limp script is. Rated PG-13.  Jason Bourne—Matt Damon’s amnesiac assassin returns in an efficient, effective genre exercise with a disposable plot. Rated PG-13.  The Jungle Book— Disney’s animated classic gets a well-done, CGI-heavy

FOOD EVENTS

Chuy’s Green Chile Festival: Thru Sep 4. Chuy’s Mexican Restaurant, Raleigh and Cary. www.chuys.com. GRIMM Artisinal Ales Draft Night: Thu, Aug 18, 5 pm. The Glass Jug, Durham. Lunazul Tequila Dinner: Curated cocktail dinner. $59-$69. Wed, Aug 17, 6:45 p.m. Fairview at Washington

Duke Inn, Durham. www. washingtondukeinn.com/ Dining/fairview.asp. Natural Selections: Beer and science event. $25-$30. Fri, Aug 19, 7 p.m. NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh. www. naturalsciences.org. Raleigh Downtown Farmers Market: Wednesdays, 10 a.m. Raleigh City Plaza, Raleigh. Raleigh Restaurant Week: 30+ participating restaurants throughout downtown Raleigh. Thru Aug 21. www. godowntownraleigh.com/ restaurant-week. Wine Tasting: Hand-selected wine from Fearrington Sommelier Colin Williams. Saturdays, 3 p.m.; Thru Aug 27. The Goat, Pittsboro. www.fearrington.com/eateries/ the-goat. Wines of the Danube: $35. Thu, Aug 18, 6 p.m. The Fearrington Granary, Pittsboro. www. fearrington.com.

F O O D R E L AT E D Myron Mixon, Kelly Alexander: Discussing Myron Mixon’s BBQ Rules: The Old School Guide to Smoking Meat. Coal-fired ribs and beer. $75. Thu, Aug 18, 6:30 p.m. Roost Beer Garden, Pittsboro. www.fearrington.com. Brad Weiss: Real Pigs: Shifting Values in the Field of Local Pork. Local beer and BBQ available for purchase. Sat, Aug 20, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. www. flyleafbooks.com.

page READINGS & SIGNINGS Julia Franks: Over The Plain Houses, debut novel about reproductive choice in the south. Sat, Aug 20, 11 a.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. www.mcintyresbooks.com. Queer Heartache: Poetry. $3-$15. Sat, Aug 20, 7 p.m. The Pinhook, Durham. www. thepinhook.com.

Nancy Stancill: Mystery novel Winning Texas. Thu, Aug 18, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. www.quailridgebooks.com. Eric Mitchko: Preview of North Carolina Opera’s performance of Das Rheingold. Tue, Aug 23, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. www.quailridgebooks.com.

LITERARY R E L AT E D Robert Cassanova: Reading from Visual Rhythms of Art, Science and Religion and showing photography. Wed, Aug 24, 12:30 p.m. The Mahler Fine Art, Raleigh. www.themahlerfineart. com.

Curryblossom Conversations: Sacrificial Poets host an open mic event for works of music, poetry or anything in-between. Third Thursdays, 6-8 p.m. Vimala’s Curryblossom Cafe, Chapel Hill. www.curryblossom. com. Jeanette Stokes: Discussion of Following a Female Line. Tue, Aug 23, 7 p.m. Durham Main Library, Durham. www. durhamcountylibrary.org. Andra Watkins: Presentation related to memoir Not Without My Father. Thu, Aug 18, 7 p.m. Durham Main Library, Durham. www.durhamcountylibrary.org.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23

DIANE REHM No one sets out to be a voice in the right-to-die movement. One is chosen by circumstance. The grueling experience of tending to her husband during his protracted death from Parkinson’s disease made the Washington, D.C.-based NPR radio host Diane Rehm one of the nation’s most passionate advocates for a person’s right to a “good death,” as well as one of its sharpest political commentators. In previous books, Rehm has written with unflinching directness about her personal struggles with depression and other crippling ailments. In On My Own, she addresses the crises she faced in the wake of her husband’s passing and the lessons derived from having lived through the experience. To fill in the picture, Rehm also consulted close friends who had endured the loss of a longtime spouse. The result merges memoir with practical advice guide, full of comforting wisdom anyone can appreciate when grappling with the inevitable. —David Klein MCINTYRE’S BOOKS, PITTSBORO 2 p.m., free, www.fearrington.com

THE INDY’S GUIDE TO DRINKING BEER IN THE TRIANGLE

OUT NOW!

HELL OR HIGH WATER ANTHROPOID INDIGNATION

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employment Catering Servers, Bartenders, & Supervisors needed for all home UNC Football Games, Basketball Games and additional events throughout the year. Please email resume to rockytopunc1@gmail.com Visual artist looking for a personal assistant who can handle my bills, account receivable, payable, schedule my meeting, reply to e-mails. If you are interested, then I encourage you to apply today and forward your resume to danbrookscreative@gmail.com. I will get back to you as soon as possible.

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RESERVE For a list of other openNOW! positions please go to: www.pathwaysforpeople.org Publication date:

October 12 Deadline:

CALL SARAH FOR ADS! August 31

THE INDY’S GUIDE TO ALL THINGS TRIANGLE

Contact your INDY ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com for more info

Finder

THE INDY’S GUIDE TO ALL THINGS TRIANGLE

36 | 8.17.16 | INDYweek.com

RESERVE NOW!

Publication date:

October 12 Deadline:

August 31

EVENT SECURITY & STAFF JOBS Make $8.60 to $10.00/ hour!

Staff-1 has summer/ fall openings for event staff and event security personnel at area sports and entertainment events which include NC State Sports, Duke Sports, Durham Bulls Baseball, DPAC Events, and more. Our flexible part-time jobs are ideal for 2nd job seekers, military personnel, students and Retirees. This opportunity is perfect for the active and outgoing types. We also have fundraising opportunities available for groups. Staff-1 is the triangle’s largest provider of event staff and security personnel for sports and entertainment events.

Upcoming Open Interviews Staff-1 Durham: located at 915 Lamond Ave, Durham, NC 27701 • July 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, & 28 (4PM to 7PM) • July 16, 23, 30 (10AM to 2PM)

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INDYweek.com | 8.17.16 | 37


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8.17.16 30/10/2005

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BARTENDERS NEEDED MAKE $20-$35/HOUR Raleigh’s Bartending School 676.0774 www.cocktailmixer.com 1-2wk class

EXLEY HOME IMPROVEMENTS

For all repairs and upgrades. Your every need is covered: Electrical, Plumbing, Carpentry, Fencing, Additions, Decks and more. New lighting? Cabinets? Sinks? 30+ years experience. Call Greg at 919-791-8471 or email exley556@gmail.com

COMING TO ASHEVILLE?

Upscale Spa. private outdoor hot tubs, 26 massage therapists, overnight accommodations, sauna and more. Starting at $42. Shojiretreats.com 828-299-0999

919.286.6642

INTRO TO MUSHROOM FORAGING 8/20 www.frankhyman.com

KEEP DOGS SHELTERED

Coalition to Unchain Dogs seeks plastic or igloo style dog houses for dogs in need. To donate, please contact Amanda at director@unchaindogs.net.

NORTH RALEIGH PRIVATE PRACTICE THERAPY ROOM FOR RENT

Share common areas with 4 massage therapists. See www.therapeuticmassageoffices. com for more information. Contact Nancy 919-618-2232.

PATHWAYS FOR PEOPLE

Gain experience while making a difference. See our ad in this week’s INDY employment section!

TUTORING

Get your child ready for school w/tutor experienced in Durham Public Schools. Writing, reading, math. Michael, 919-886-3363

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Weekly deadline 4pm Monday • classy@indyweek.com GOT A MAC?

Need Support? Let AppleBuddy help you. Call 919.740.2604 or log onto www.applebuddy.com

T’AI CHI

Traditional art of meditative movement for health, energy, relaxation, self-defense. Classes/workshops throughout the Triangle. Magic Tortoise School - Since 1979. Call Jay or Kathleen, 919-968-3936. www.magictortoise.com

DANCE CLASSES IN SWING, LINDY, BLUES, CHARLESTON

At ERUUF, Durham & ArtsCenter, Carrboro. RICHARD BADU, 919-724-1421, rbadudance@gmail.com

GOOD MEN UNITE!

Celebrating first year of Men’s Skyclad Yoga, Triangle + Triad, NC http://www.meetup.com/Skyclad-Yoga-of-theTriangle/

KOL HASKALAH’S ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

Sunday Aug. 28th 10AM until noon, Murphey Hall, UNC Chapel Hill. Open to all. Come learn about Humanistic Judaism For more information: kolhaskalah.org

MARK KINSEY/LMBT

Feel comfy again. 919-619-NERD (6373). Durham, on Broad Street. NC Lic. #6072.

THE INDY’S GUIDE TO ALL THINGS TRIANGLE

Finder Contact your INDY ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com for more info

RESERVE NOW!

Publication date:

October 12 Deadline:

August 31

INDY Week 8.17.16  
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