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SCHOOL’S OUT

Republican lawmakers may dismiss them as “union thugs,” but the teachers who descended on Raleigh this week say they’re simply looking for respect

WAKE’S ELECTION SURPRISES, P. 7

TRASH YOU CAN EAT, P. 28

THE PEOPLE VS. CAM RALEIGH, P. 30


2 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com


WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK RALEIGH

VOL. 35, NO. 20

DEPARTMENTS

6 Eighty percent of the women held in America’s jails are mothers.

6 News 20 Music

7 In an election decided by two thousand votes, everything matters.

28 Food 30 Arts & Culture 34 What to Do This Week

8 Adjusted for inflation, North Carolina’s per-pupil spending declined by 9 percent from 2008–09 to 2016–17.

37 Music Calendar 40 Arts & Culture Calendar

20 Can a music festival like Moogfest help us start to unlearn white patriarchy? 28 Every year, restaurants and other food-service business in the United States waste about twenty million tons of food. 30 In response to the controversy over an exhibition of Margaret Bowland’s racially charged works, CAM Raleigh director Gab Smith acknowledges, “We are a small staff of three white people. We have to reflect the community better than we do.” 33 In theory, Deadpool 2 is about the formation of the X-Force. In reality, it’s about making jokes. Lots and lots of jokes.

Jasmine Lauer is an eighth-grade language arts and social studies at Pine Hollow Middle School in Raleigh (see page 8). PHOTO BY CAITLIN PENNA

On the cover PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAITLIN PENNA

North Carolina Heritage Award Ceremony & Concert Wednesday, May 23, 7:30 PM • Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts, Raleigh Tickets are $23.60. Call PineCone at (919) 664-8302 South Indian Performer and Instructor Asha Bala (with Leela School of Dance) Potters and musicians Glenn and Lula Bolick Master Fiddler Arvil Freeman (with Bryan McDowell) Soulful trumpet player Dick Knight (and The Monitors) Mandolin virtuoso Tony Williamson (with Noam Pikelny)

www.NCArts.org INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 3


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backtalk

Young Dolph-gate

self-righteous crusader. Coffee shops can Last Tuesday, the INDY broke a story about be edgy sometimes. Employees get busy and Larry Moneta, Duke’s vice president for tune out the music. You hear an overly salty student affairs, going into the campus Joe owe song? Politely complain and ask them to Van Gogh coffee shop, hearing a Young Willets skip it. Boom. Done. Brown and Simmons Dolph song he found offensive, complaining were simply doing their jobs (and well), to Duke Dining director Robert Coffey, and while Moneta swept in, took out his indigforcing Joe Van Gogh to terminate the two nant bad-day frustrations on Brown, and baristas working that day—even the one Duke opted for a careless, scorched-earth who had nothing to do with the playlist. The n, approach as a balm for his injury. Duke then internet promptly exploded, with the story ane Julie bullied Joe Van Gogh into a tough call, their appearing everywhere from The Washington Debbie contract and the positions of employees Post to The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. eill, Neil beyond Brown and Simmons at risk. MoneIn the week since, Duke’s president apolos, Kevin mith, Zack gized, JVG owner Robbie Roberts apologized ta and Duke handled this abysmally.” Wall Other commenters countered that the and cut all ties with the university, and Young song in question, “Get Paid,” is indeed proDolph flew the two baristas, Britni Brown fane. Apache13x says that “as an African and Kevin Simmons, to Miami for a concert American, the song was inappropriate for ms and gave them $20,000 for their trouble. the workplace. It was unintelligent to play it As you might imagine, our comments secthere for numerous reasons. Play it at home, tion lit up. Some brought up the racial elein your car, or on your phone. Anyone who ment, as Moneta is white and one of the art thinks that it is an appropriate song to be baristas is African American. Here’s Debavid Lee, played in the workplace is stupid! It’s not orah Bolling: “Two points: Duke Univeroux, about the genre, it’s about those particusity was founded in 1924 but did not admit lar lyrics. There is no excuse or no intelliAfrican American students until 1963; Afrigent defense for it being can-American teen Jorplayed there.” dan Davis was killed by CCLJ3465 thinks a white man in Florida r “Coffee shops can be that the baristas because he didn’t like urld, deserved to be fired: his loud rap music.” edgy sometimes.” nchard “What you buy, eat, Tamerlane: “What is wear, or listen to is a Duke? A bastion of rich, reflection of you and white privilege. ‘Massa’ your values. When you play that type of Moneta gave a solid demonstration of this, 200 music or do nothing to stop the playing effectively saying, ‘I don’t like black music, of that type of music in a public setting, it meaning uppity African Americans in gensays that you endorse the words, tone, and eral. And we’ll fire the poor white as well so message of the that song. The words are it will appear otherwise.’ The same people k.com unacceptable; I was offended just from liswith the same mentality bought and sold eek.com tening at home. How inappropriate for a human beings 160 years ago.” 1972 business. Had I been in a customer, I would Cja Sewell sees hypocrisy in Moneta’s have felt offended and upset and would previous calls for free speech on campus: have requested that it be turned off imme“This dude argues for white supremacists’ diately. If I had the power to fire and was right to speak at Duke and against vandalthere hearing that music, I probably would ism of white supremacist statues, but ‘vulhave also fired the individuals working that gar’ (black) lyrics in a cafe is free speech day because they displayed a severe lack of that needed to be crushed by the power of his judgment. You don’t have to be trained on office. At least he’s consistent.” what’s right and what’s wrong.” Robfulcher says the situation should have been handled better: “We don’t have to like Want to see your name in bold? Email us at everything we hear, and we don’t have to backtalk@indyweek.com, comment on our stay silent and bottled-up with our opinFacebook page or indyweek.com, or hit us up ions on such matters. But it does seem more on Twitter: @indyweek. human not to be a vindictive and hyper-

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indynews Jail Break

FOR THE SECOND STRAIGHT YEAR, SOUTHERNERS ON NEW GROUND CELEBRATES MOTHER’S DAY BY BAILING BLACK WOMEN OUT OF THE DURHAM COUNTY DETENTION FACILITY BY SARAH WILLETS

O

n Wednesday afternoon, the sun is beaming down on the courtyard of the Durham County Detention Facility, where about two dozen people are gathered. A small group forms a circle and begins a call and response, their words reverberating off of the jail’s high, gray walls. “If you can hear me, say power!” Serena Sebring bellows. “Power!” the group responds. “And transformation!” “Transformation!” “And miracles!” “And miracles!” “And miracles!” Sebring cries out, her companions responding in turn. They are here to make miracles happen for women of color locked up inside this jail because they cannot pay to get out. It’s the second year that Southerners on New Ground, a queer liberation group for which Sebring is a regional organizer, has held the Black Mama’s Bailout in Durham, raising money to purchase the freedom of black women, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who are mothers and caregivers ahead of Mother’s Day. Moments earlier, the first woman freed—Lisa Oxendine, a mother of two— had emerged through the jail’s glass doors. Sebring handed her a bouquet of flowers and led her to a social worker to talk about housing, employment, and any other needs she might have after eight days in the jail under a $1,000 bond on a charge of breaking into a truck. Sitting next to the social worker, Oxendine lifts the bouquet to her face and smiles, seeing a message written in marker on the brown paper wrapping: “We see you. We love you. Welcome home.” What was initially planned as a one-day action turned into four as the organization continued to collect donations and secure the release of women in the jail. By the end of Saturday, they had spent $18,900 on bail for nine women. 6 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

Black Mama’s Bailouts and similar actions were held across the country amid a growing call for bail reform. Southerners on New Ground, founded in Durham, held bailouts in seven cities this year. Last year in Durham, SONG freed fourteen women for Mother’s Day. “Time was passing. I was missing things like trying to find a job, my children,” says Sade Ray, the second woman freed this year, who was released after SONG paid the $400 in unpaid child support that kept her in the

ing trial for nonviolent crimes, according to the Prison Policy Initiative. Because of wage and wealth disparities, women and particularly women of color are less likely to post bail. Unable to get to work or pay rent, they may lose their home or job. Research also suggests people held pretrial are more likely to take a guilty plea. For Courtney Sebring, one of two money-handlers for the action and Serena’s daughter, seeing each person exit the jail felt “like when you see your family member

Sade Ray, left, laughs with SONG social worker Caranda Shubrick shortly after being released from the Durham County jail. PHOTO BY JENNY WARBURG jail, along with a probation violation, for forty-six days. Like Ray, who has five kids, 80 percent of women held in America’s jails are mothers, and the majority are women of color. Nationally, about 60 percent of women in local jails have not been convicted of a crime, and about three-quarters of them are await-

at a reunion that you haven’t seen in like ten years.” This work, she says, “resonates with me personally as someone who understands the inside population of the jail as a place where black folks and black women in particular are targeted to be kidnapped and held here. It feels really important to me to be able to be part of a campaign that is bringing

home some of the most important people in our community—black women, black mothers—who are so essential to our survival, our family structure, and do so much work to care for us.” In addition to bailing women out, SONG freed another two women by convincing judicial officials—who set bail amounts—to unsecure their bonds, meaning they don’t have to pay in order to get out, only if they miss court. “We’re finding out the power of just asking for a bond reduction works more often than you’d think,” Serena Sebring says. Sebring says the bailout is worth doing “on its own merit”—people get to go home. But it’s also part of a larger campaign by SONG to end the system of money bail across the South, including in Durham. Instead, the activists want to see pretrial-release alternatives that don’t put people under excessive supervision and investments in what they need to get to court, stay out of jail, and live safe, stable lives. “Bailouts are a tactic that allow us to do a few things,” Sebring says. “First and foremost, to visualize what it would like look if we were to win, if we were to end money bail. What that would look like is families being reunited. It would look like people going back to their lives. It would look like community support and resources being offered, and it would look like freedom, people coming out of cages.” That goal seems more attainable after last week, when Durham voters elected a new district attorney and sheriff who have been vocal about reforming the bail system and Google and Facebook announced they would ban ads for bail-bond companies. “In the context of the campaign, this week was kind of a huge watershed,” Sebring says, “and an opportunity for our community to really change the conversation about community safety here in Durham.” swillets@indyweek.com


news

The Dust Settles

WHAT TO MAKE OF LAST WEEK’S WAKE COUNTY COMMISSIONER RACES BY JEFFREY C. BILLMAN

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erhaps no one was more surprised by the results of last week’s Wake County Democratic primaries than Vickie Adamson. “I had a concession speech prepared but not a victory speech,” she says. “Everybody kept telling me you can’t win. But I did.” Indeed she did, though not by much— about two thousand votes out of sixtyone thousand cast. Still, she unseated a popular, charismatic, and better-funded incumbent in Commissioner John Burns and caught most local politicos—Burns included—flat-footed. That wasn’t the only surprise May 8 held. That former school board member Susan Evans defeated Commissioner Erv Portman wasn’t a shock, but the margin was jaw-dropping: 62–38. And Commissioner Matt Calabria, a young progressive thought to have a bright political future, had more trouble than he anticipated, holding off challenger Lindy Brown by a scant two thousand votes. Each contest had its idiosyncrasies. Burns was dinged by Adamson’s accusation that he bullied her in a public forum a week before the election—bad optics in what is shaping up to be a Year of the Woman. Calabria was aided by the Brown campaign’s ill-advised Facebook post lamenting tax increases to fund schools, which fed into Calabria’s line that she was more conservative than voters realized. And then there was Portman, who found himself in the untenable position of warning progressive primary voters against being too progressive. But these races also had connective tissue. These three incumbents—along with Commissioner Sig Hutchinson, who won his primary easily—are all straight white men who had all backed last year’s budget, which critics said underfunded schools. Their challengers—with the exception of Hutchinson’s—were all women running on a pro-schools platform, backed by two wellheeled liberal donors.

It’s hard to overstate the impact that Dean Debnam and Ann Campbell had on the county commissioner races. Both had supported the incumbents before, felt betrayed by their school-funding vote last year, and had the resources to do something about it. They and their spouses poured more than $100,000 into these contests, and their PACs—Debnam’s Wake Citizens for Good Government and Campbell’s Women Awake—raised at least $50,000. The Debnams and Campbells alone accounted for more than two-thirds of the money Adamson raised. In an email, Campbell says the results prove that Wake voters value gender diversity and education. “Looking ahead,” she writes, “all candidates on the ballot in Wake County in November … would be wise to demonstrate their commitment to public education.” (Debman could not be reached for comment by press time.) Hutchinson takes a more pessimistic view. “Wherein I was victorious,” he says, “I don’t think there were any winners. The big loser was the Wake County Democratic Party. It was an ugly and brutal fight. Large-money donors tried to influence the election, and they were successful.” Both Evans and Adamson face Republican opponents in the fall, though neither is expected to encounter much difficulty. The question is how they’ll change the board when they’re sworn in six months from now. “Primaries—and elections in general— tend to exaggerate differences,” Calabria says, sounding a conciliatory note. “We are all progressives dealing with common challenges. I think there is likely to be a lot more unity than some of the dialogue in the primary would suggest.” “The colleagues I currently serve with have each brought something unique and different to the table,” Holmes adds. “Moving forward, I anticipate that the board will be even better served by having more diversity of opinions.” jbillman@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 7


SCHOOL’S OUT

Republican lawmakers may dismiss them as “union thugs,” but the thousands of North Carolina teachers who descended on Raleigh this week say they’re simply looking for respect. Here are some of their stories. INTERVIEWS BY ERICA HELLERSTEIN, CAITLIN PENNA, AND SARAH WILLETS PHOTOS BY CAITLIN PENNA

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ast week, I asked my neighbor, a first-year elementary school teacher in Durham, whether she planned to go to the protests in Raleigh on Wednesday. Durham Public Schools—like more than thirty school districts across the state, including the Wake County Public School System, Orange County Schools, and Carrboro Chapel Hill City Schools— were closing on May 16, the first day of the General Assembly’s short session. Too many teachers had requested a personal day to participate in the protests; some fifteen thousand people, at least, were expected to rally for better school funding in front of the legislature that morning. My neighbor, however, would not be among them. This is not because she doesn’t support the cause. She certainly does—and she’ll be there in spirit, she told me. But, as it turns out, she has to get a summer job, and Wednesday was the only day she could find time for an interview. If you ask the Republicans who run the General Assembly, these teachers are ungrateful for what lawmakers have done for them in recent years. One state representative, Mark Brody of Union County, posted on Facebook last week that this would be a gathering of “Teacher Union thugs [who] want to control the education process!” Senate leader Phil Berger complained on Twitter that “Teacher strikes are illegal in NC, and in some respects what we’re seeing looks like a work slowdown, and looks like a fairly typical union activity, and the people of NC don’t support that sort of action.” House Speaker Tim Moore’s office, meanwhile, blasted out press releases highlighting recent increases in teacher pay. The total teacher-pay increase for 2017–18, one release noted, would be 11 percent, 8 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

and North Carolina has the second-fastestrising teacher pay in the U.S. But North Carolina still badly lags much of the country. Earlier this year, Education Week ranked the state fortieth in the country in overall quality, citing insufficient funding; a decade ago, the Tar Heel State placed in the top twenty. North Carolina is thirty-ninth in school funding, according the May 16 Coalition, which is organizing Wednesday’s protest, and thirty-seventh in teacher pay. “Thousands of North Carolina teachers work second jobs and many public school workers qualify for public assistance,” the coalition’s website explains. “Despite an economic recovery since the crash of 2008, NC state lawmakers refuse to invest in our public schools.” Adjusted for inflation, a report from the N.C. Justice Center pointed out last year, the state’s per-pupil spending was down nearly 9 percent in 2016–17 from 2008– 09, when the recession took hold. In that same period, per-pupil appropriations for teacher assistants have declined 36 percent; textbooks, 38 percent; school technology, 44 percent; and supplies and materials, 55 percent. Meanwhile, big, urban counties such as Wake have raised taxes to help their school districts meet their needs and provide teachers with livable wages. This, of course, isn’t just a North Carolina issue. Similar protests have taken root in red states across the country—West Virginia to Kentucky, Arizona to Oklahoma—places where educators feel unappreciated and disrespected, where they’re digging into their own pockets to buy school supplies and moonlighting to make ends meet. As the teachers the INDY interviewed for this week’s cover story will tell you, the same thing is happening here—and they’re sick and tired of it. And that’s what this protest is all about. —Jeffrey C. Billman

CARLA TAVARES

Carla Tavares is a third-grade teacher at Jones Dairy Elementary in Wake Forest. She came to North Carolina eleven years ago from Rhode Island, where she also taught. “We work more than forty hours a week. We work all night, all weekend. I substitute [during breaks] and I teach reading camp just to make ends meet. As a single parent, part of this is about being able to sustain my household. Being able to send my children to college. But I chose this profession because I feel like it’s a calling, and it’s part of my responsibility to advocate for the things that I believe are not right. We need our support staff, teacher assistants, not just cutting positions and expecting teachers to do more with less. I know what it’s like to be in a classroom where you don’t have what you need. I have spent a lot of money on books to accommodate my own needs in my classroom. “For me personally, it’s about the kids, and I would like to be able to feel like I’m respected as a professional. We don’t get treated as professionals. If you want your teachers to be happy, you want your schools to have a working community, and there are some things that go with the territory. I took a huge pay cut to come here. And to feel like I’m just within the last couple years making what I was making eleven years ago is pretty pathetic.”


Symone Kiddoo splits her time as the only social worker for Forest View and Southwest elementary schools in Durham. She also runs a construction company and a farm with her husband and works as a pool desk attendant at a YMCA and as a Girl Scout troop leader. “A lot of our kids go years without any kind of formal mental-health treatment. A kid can’t learn if he’s got anxiety or depression or ADHD or PTSD. They’re not focused on what’s going on in the classroom. They’re focused on what’s going on in their heads. “At one of my schools, I share the office with the school psychologist and then also the bilingual family liaison. If she wants to have a meeting, then the two of us need to leave; I can’t pull a student and talk to a student because there’s no privacy. There’s no confidentiality. We usually find somewhere else to go. Hallways, nurses’ station—which is where the bathroom is. They don’t have as good of a relationship with me because they don’t see me individually. They don’t feel heard or they don’t feel like their time is valuable. So there’s a lot of stuff that I think ends up going unaddressed for students when it comes to mental health or social-emotional needs because, one, there’s not somebody there that’s able to meet with the student, or, two, there’s just not enough space to do it in.”

SYMONE KIDDOO

SAM NGUYEN

Sam Nguyen is the gifted specialist at Seawell Elementary in Chapel Hill. She’s also a mom, tutors, runs a STEAM club, and facilitates teacher-development courses for Carrboro Chapel Hill City Schools. “If you ask any teacher what they’re here for, they’re here to do what’s best for kids and what serves them well, and that’s what I’m standing up for, because right now that’s not what’s happening, and I’m tired of not saying something. We give and we give and we know that it’s good and that’s why we keep doing it, but as I’ve entered mid-career, I’ve had to reassess. How much do I give without getting? “I think it’s a normal teacher thing that we’re so open to giving in that way that we also have to remember to take care of ourselves and advocate for ourselves. Especially with it being Teacher Appreciation Week, I can only take so many thank-you-for-whatyou-dos. It sustains my heart, but it doesn’t sustain my family. When it’s individual parents saying really meaningful things—those things still matter so much—but it’s the empty talk that we get from people who are in charge who really haven’t spent a day in our shoes and yet tell us how things are.” INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 9


PEt week of the

NCDOT TO HOST A PUBLIC MEETING IN MAY FOR THE PROPOSED SIX TO NINE MONTH CLOSURE OF ALSTON AVENUE BETWEEN EAST MAIN STREET AND LIBERTY STREET DURHAM, DURHAM COUNTY STIP Project No. U-3308 The N.C. Department of Transportation is currently working to widen N.C. 55 (Alston Avenue), install curb and gutter and sidewalks between N.C. 147 (I. L. “Buck Dean” Freeway) and U.S. 70 Business/N.C. 98 (Holloway Street) in Durham. A proposal has been made that will assist with accelerating completion of this project. The proposal would include closing Alston Avenue to through traffic between E. Main Street and Liberty Street, for a period of six to nine months. A public meeting to present the proposal and obtain feedback will be held at the Refiners Fire Community Church located at 1003 E. Main Street, in Durham, on Monday, May 21 st from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. The purpose of this meeting is to provide interested citizens with information on the proposal and gather public input. Interested citizens may attend at any time between 5:30 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Please note that a short presentation will be made at 5:30 p.m. NCDOT representatives will display maps and be available to answer questions and receive comments. Comments and information received will be taken into consideration as work on the project develops. Written comments or questions can also be submitted at the meeting or later by June 1, 2018.

NEMO is our Pet of the Week!

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http://www.apsofdurham.org/ dogs/nemo If you’re interested in featuring a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com 10 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

For additional information contact NCDOT Division 5 Project Manager Boyd Tharrington by phone at (919) 562-7000 or by email at btharrington@ncdot.gov. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this workshop. Anyone requiring special services should contact Diane Wilson, NCDOT Senior Public Involvement Officer by phone at (919-707- 6073) or by email at pdwilson1@ncdot.gov as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800- 494-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800- 481-6494.


Eli Seed is a high school English teacher at the School for Creative Studies in Durham. An educator for twenty-two years, he also runs a farm with his wife. “A lot of students come to us with very little of their own. We’re a pretty huge support system for a lot of kids. They’re hurting at home, and now that support system is being damaged as well. “My largest class right now is thirty-four students, and that’s as many students as I’ve ever had on a roster. We’re not able to do as many projects. We’re not able to do as many group-oriented activities because there’s just not space for it. A few years ago, I had another class of thirty-four, and I only had thirty-one desks. It was never a factor because there was always a minimum of three people absent. That’s the kind of thing that, with the right funding and staffing, people would be looking into that, and we would be providing services more effectively.” “My wife and I, we’re college sweethearts who have been married over twenty years and lived in the same house for over twenty years, and it’s an old house that was falling apart and we fixed it up. We’ve started a business. We have a little more than two-point-five kids and they’re all cute and spread out. If it wasn’t for the fact that I was a public school teacher, we would be just the apple of [Senate leader] Phil Berger’s eye, and he would want to hold us up as examples of a good ol’ American, North Carolina family.”

ELI SEED TURQUOISE PARKER

Turquoise Parker is a second-grade teacher at Eastway Elementary in Durham. In addition to teaching, babysitting, and tutoring, she is also a marching band instructor and competition judge. “I love Eastway so very much and one hundred percent of that is the children. I have a very strong passion for teaching racial and social justice to elementary kids and especially doing that with kids of color—and especially doing that with kids of color who are living in poverty and some of whom are homeless and are in a major life transition. Giving them that information and helping them to become critical thinkers is going to help them literally break barriers in their own lives, in their own families, change their world, change their entire trajectory. “I love to do classroom transformations, where I’ll turn my classroom into different things like I turned it into The Wiz, the yellow brick road. I turned it into a football stadium, a soccer field, the Olympics. We did a winter wonderland so it was snowy and icy all around the classroom. Last year, I did a surprise field trip with my class to Charlotte for the weekend, and it was the most amazing thing ever. For several of my kids, that truly changed their lives beyond words. The majority of them had never been out of Durham. “Literally all the things that make my classroom pop and are engaging and exciting and make you want to come inside are things that were donated— or we bought them.” INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 11


Sheryl Davis teaches fourth grade at Joyner Elementary Magnet School in Raleigh. She previously taught in Virginia for ten years and has been in North Carolina for two years. She has always had a second job. “I moved to North Carolina in the hopes of not teaching anymore. I was going to walk away. I moved to North Carolina and I got into retail. When I did that, something was missing. So I got into Wake County and I wanted to get back into teaching. And since I’m back in, I’m happy. But my fight in Virginia is the same fight I’m having in North Carolina: doing more with less. Doing what we’re expected to do, and each year things get less and less and less. This is my second year at Joyner Elementary School. It is fantastic. Our administration supports us; our parents are extremely supportive. However, teachers are very good at using what we have to do the best that we can. Every day we see children who need extra support. If someone falls and hurts themselves, we have a halftime nurse. We make do with what we have—we’re nurses, we’re counselors. We pull the weight when it’s not there. And we run a well-oiled machine with what we’ve got. “Ever since the day I walked into my own classroom I’ve had a second job. From Virginia to North Carolina I have had a second job. I work at PNC Arena at the box office. I also work at AMF bowling alley. The teacher down the hall teaches she yoga before school and sometimes after school. Probably very few don’t have some additional subsidy to their income. “I have had to purchase books and supplies to do science experiments. I just give everybody a fresh pencil, glue sticks, dry erase markers, tissues, wipes. I’ve never not used my own funds. We do it so well that people don’t realize how much of it is ours or how late we stayed up to make this experiment or this activity the best that we could possibly make it. A lot of it is, I put in the work in the background for you to see this on the front.”

SHERYL DAVIS YOHANNES KIBRET

Yohannes Kibret is a world history and American history teacher at Broughton High School in Raleigh. He also works at Your Pie in Cary. “I don’t have a lot of free time. I don’t spend a lot of time with friends or family. It’s time-consuming and it’s exhausting. “Every single child has a different learning style and they process information differently. If you have a classroom size of thirty-two or larger, it makes it very difficult to plan for the individuals that are in the classroom, so a lot of kids fall between the cracks because I just can’t give them the attention that they need to understand the lesson that I’ve planned. It also makes it very difficult to grade. “I wouldn’t have signed up for this if I knew to this extent what I was signing up for. There’s not a month that goes by where I don’t think at least once about leaving this profession. I love it. I love the kids and I love doing what I do. There are no boring days in this job, but I wasn’t expecting this as a sophomore in college when I picked my major. “I kind of knew what I was signing up for in terms of the salary. Just like everyone else, I understood that, but I did not expect to have a broken air conditioning, broken projector, paint chipping in my classroom, and class sizes of almost forty students.”

12 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com


NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING FOR THE EAST DURHAM RAIL SAFETY PROJECT DURHAM COUNTY TIP PROJECT NO. P-5706 The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting regarding the East Durham Rail Safety Project which proposes approximately 2.4 miles of railroad improvements and the construction of new bridges carrying Glover Road and Ellis Road over the North Carolina Railroad. The project also proposes the closure of the Wrenn Road railroad crossing. The meeting will be held on May 22, 2018 at the Hamner Conference CenterDogwood Room located at 15 T.W. Alexander Drive in Durham from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The public may attend at any time during the meeting hours. At the meeting, maps of potential alignments will be available for viewing along with project team members who will discuss the project, answer questions, and provide feedback. Please note there will be no formal presentation. The comments and information received will be taken into consideration as work on the project develops. The opportunity to submit written comments will also be provided at the meeting or can be done via phone, email, or mail by June 5, 2018. As information becomes available, it may be viewed at the NCDOT Public Meeting Website: http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings/.

YOUR WEEK. EVERY WEDNESDAY. FOOD • NEWS • ARTS • MUSIC

For additional information please contact Senior Rail Project Development Engineer, Undrea Major, by phone at (919) 707-4726 or by email at ujmajor@ncdot.gov or Consultant Project Manager, Ryan White, P.E., by phone at (919) 865-7374 or by email at ryan.white@stantec.com. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Lauren Putnam via email at lnputnam1@ncdot.gov or by phone at (919) 707- 6072 as early as possible, so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494.

INDYWEEK.COM INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 13


Andi Mariatugui is a fourth-grade English-language arts teacher at Eastway Elementary. On weekends, she leads tours at Durham Distillery. She previously worked in Chicago, where teachers are unionized. “I was always super grateful and active in my union in Chicago but hadn’t really realized quite how important it was until it was gone. We got paid for having a master’s degree and for getting extra-credit hours. I have a master’s degree and an ESL certification, and all of those things increased my pay, as they should. Here you don’t have that. So there’s less incentive here to seek those advanced degrees and extra certifications, and teachers still do it, which is amazing and shows teachers’ dedication here in North Carolina. That’s a big difference. “Speaking about physical items, we have completely run out of pencils. I have a pencil captain who’s in charge of keeping the pencils sharpened and passing them out but also collecting them and making sure we have the same number we started with because we can’t afford to lose any more at this point. I only have one pack left in my secret cabinet. Hopefully we make it through the next four weeks.”

ANDI MARIATUGUI

SHANA BRODERS

Shana Broders is a fifth-grade teacher at Wake Forest Elementary in Wake Forest. She also tutors during the week. “If you walked into a classroom that was supplied just with what the state gives you, it would be the saddest, little dreary place ever. Everything you see on those walls, the bright colorful anything, a teacher has bought and brought into that classroom. You don’t get posters, you don’t get letters, you don’t get anything. “[Teaching] does spread you thin. It does wear you down. I feel like I’m tired and I don’t have anything left to give to my own kids often when I get home. They get shafted for the kids I teach. But I specifically love it when you can open their eyes to something: ‘I never liked reading and then this year I found something I loved and I love reading now. I used to hate math but the way you teach it, I like it now or I understand it’— when you can help somebody understand something and then maybe find a love of learning they didn’t have before.”

14 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com


deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

CARRBORO

A

s associated with the Chapel Hill music scene as Cat’s Cradle is, the legendary indie music venue actually lives next door, in Carrboro, a small former mill town turned intimate, lively arts and culture haven that basically became a thing because Chapel Hill got too expensive for artists. It’s the place where post-grads settle down to push strollers through teeming little streets lined with restaurants, bars, and shops, and where the more discerning UNC undergrad ventures to escape from campus and see the coolest shows, and where hipsters and hula-hooping hippies mingle painlessly. Everyone in Carrboro thinks it’s ridiculous that it’s known as “The Paris of the Piedmont,” but everyone also knows why it’s called that—the town has a distinct blend of charm and grit you can’t find anywhere else in the Triangle.

EAT

110 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-929-2263; ACMECARRBORO.COM Acme’s slogan says it all: “Damn Good Food.” Southern comfort-food staples don’t get fussed over or fused into novel concoctions, but they sure do clean up nicely in high-end style. And with a menu ranging from whole-hog roast and pecancrusted fried chicken at dinner to fluffy omelets and ricotta donuts at brunch, it’s hard to go wrong.

106 SOUTH GREENSBORO STREET; 919-967-9784; GLASSHALFULLCARRBORO.COM An oenophile’s delight, Glasshalfull maintains a twenty-five-bottle wine list in addition to its on-site wine shop. It also pairs its wines with a fleet of plates inspired by, but hardly chained to, Mediterranean fare. Dig into seafood charcuterie or fried brussels sprouts with peanuts for a light meal, or go for a more substantial entrée, like duck confit with chorizo and green bean hash or North Carolina yellowfin tuna with cauliflower kimchi.

AKAI HANA

NEAL’S DELI

ACME

206 WEST MAIN STREET; 919-942-6848; AKAIHANA.COM When it comes to sushi and you don’t feel like settling for pretty good, head to Akai Hana, whose fresh, bright, beautiful sushi and sashimi are the best in town. Whether raw, cooked, or a combination (the roll menu is extensive), the food in this cleanlined, well-lit spot will have you nodding in appreciation.

MUST:

PIZZERIA MERCATO

408 WEST WEAVER STREET; 919-967-2277; PIZZERIAMERCATONC.COM

The term pizzeria is a bit of a misnomer here. Yes, Mercato makes expertly charred Neapolitan-style pies using ingredients from the farmers market down the street. But it’s really an upscale restaurant, founded by chef Gabe Barker (scion of the Magnolia Grill dynasty), who brings the same locavore spin on Italian tradition to pastas and salads, too. Mercato does takeout, but it’s really a sit-down place for a nice date, drinking sparkling Lambrusco and green decanters of water, in an elegantly rough-hewn industrial room—with an open kitchen, cinderblock walls, exposed ductwork, and metal decorations—that’s noisy and lively but not overwhelming. Though of course the pizza is the main draw, don’t forget to start with olives and crostini and finish with a scoop of gelato.

100-C EAST MAIN STREET; 919-967-2185; NEALSDELI.COM On paper, Neal’s is like any other deli. Sandwiches are stacked high and served with a fresh pickle, maybe a side of coleslaw or potato salad. But Neal’s goes beyond the usual cold cuts with a sharp attention to detail and seasonal fare. Most ingredients travel a short distance to the deli, and the house-made sides change with the seasons.

CARRBURRITOS

ONE FISH, TWO FISH POKE

ELMO’S DINER

PROVENCE

711 WEST ROSEMARY STREET; 919-933-8226; CARRBURRITOS.COM Burritos the size of your fists? Sign us up. This local standby is the go-to for fast, fresh, casual Mexican food that won’t leave you unsatisfied. Be sure to taste your way through the whole variety of house-made salsas. (We love the green salsa with flour chips and the smoky chipotle with the corn chips.)

PHOTO BY JEREMY M. LANGE

GLASSHALFULL

200 NORTH GREENSBORO STREET, 919-929-2909; ELMOSDINERCARRBORO.COM Elmo’s Diner’s atmosphere reflects Carrboro with a homey, all-inclusive vibe perfect for a casual date night, a big family dinner (with coloring sheets and crayons for the kids), or a groggy brunch. Breakfast is the star item, but you should definitely grab the apple pie à la mode or a malt.

ESPERANZA

370 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-617-1674; CALAVERAEMPANADAS.COM This empanada emporium nails its baked, puffed-pastry-wrapped specialty items with an enticing array of flavor combinations—and cheap! It also executes a succinct lineup of traditional Mexican fare with aplomb and offers a fine range of tequilas and specialty drinks.

370 EAST MAIN STREET, #140; 919-240-5532; ONEFISHTWOFISHPOKE.COM The American fad for poke has fully arrived in the Triangle. One Fish, Two Fish is one of three poké palaces to open here in less than a year, where you can munch on tuna nachos and hand-cut lotus roots for an appetizer, then find out what the fuss is about with a $10 bowl of poke fusion beyond fish, with pork, chicken, or vegetarian versions.

203 WEST WEAVER STREET; 919-967-5008; PROVENCEOFCARRBORO.COM The long-beloved French restaurant in the heart of the Paris of the Piedmont, Provence is traditional in its presentation (read: kinda fancy) but balances tradition with a hearty embrace of local flavors. North Carolina trout shares space on the menu with escargot and foie gras.

SPOTTED DOG

111 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-933-1117; THESPOTTEDDOGRESTAURANT.COM Accommodating carnivores and delighting vegetarians, Spotted Dog boasts that it has “the BEST Veggie BBQ in the world.” It’s a tall claim that Raleigh’s Fiction Kitchen would no doubt quibble with, but this casual lunch and dinner spot makes more than just a token gesture to plant-based preferences, fitting versatile stir-fry and grilled tofu salads next to the burgers (both meat and veggie). 5.16.18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 15


The Looking Glass Tasting Room Thank you for Nominating us as a Top 4 Finalist:

VOTE!

Carrboro Born, Orange County Raised

Best Bloody Mary

Best Vegan-friendly Restaurant

in Orange / Chatham County

Best Veggie Burger

in Orange / Chatham County

Best Wings

in Orange / Chatham County

Welcome to Orange County and NC’s destination shop for alt-craft beverages, the Looking Glass Tasting Room. Experience the region’s best selection of meads, organic wines, ciders, and seasonal beers. Local ownership, supporting local wineries and breweries, farm-to- beverage. Home bottle shop of the new Honeysuckle Meadery (coming June 2018) and Hillsborough’s Botanist and Barrel, Orange County’s first wineries. 20% of all profits go to our non-profit partner, Unique Places to Save, promoting land conservation, sustainable farming, and nature education initiatives across NC.

601 W. Main St. Carrboro Hours: Fri 5pm- 10pm, Sat and Sun 2pm -8pm 16 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 5.16.18

200 NORTH GREENSBORO STREET, #1A; 919-240-7937; TANDEMCARRBORO.COM This Carrboro newcomer already feels right at home, owned by a local chef-GM couple who stress their goal to offer “great food in a warm, relaxing environment.” With brunch, lunch, dinner, and a bar, Tandem is one of those mid-priced places you can always go, whether for brioche French toast on a lazy Sunday morning, a cheese board or salmon for a lighter or heavier lunch, or a steak for a dinner date.

TOM ROBINSON’S SEAFOOD

in Orange / Chatham County

111 E Main St Carrboro, NC 27510 (919) 933-1117

TANDEM

207 ROBERSON STREET; 919-942-1221; TOMROBINSONSEAFOOD.COM Located behind All Day Records, this unassuming shack-like structure supplies an unparalleled range of super-fresh N.C. seafood—salmon, shrimp, and mussels, along with less familiar items like croakers and mullets. It’s where serious seafood lovers from any number of cultures shop to prepare traditional meals. Bring cash. They’ll wrap up your dinner in newspaper and send you on your way with something special.

VENABLE ROTISSERIE BISTRO

200 NORTH GREENSBORO STREET; 919-904-7160; VENABLEBISTRO.COM This bistro from accomplished chef-owner Drew Moore breaks all the rules in all the best ways. Combine classic Southern dishes with Asian and Latin flair, and you’ll find Venable’s delectable menu, all in a contemporary atmosphere with handcrafted cocktails. Try the vegetarian banh mi or chicken from the rotisserie oven.

DRINK

B-SIDE LOUNGE

200 NORTH GREENSBORO STREET; 919-904-7160; B-SIDELOUNGE.COM After dinner at the Venable Rotisserie Bistro, head next door to this cozy wood-paneled lounge for warm vinyl on the stereo, solid wine on tap, adventurous cocktails, and tapas that are designed, like the space, to foster good times among friends.

BOWBARR

705 WEST ROSEMARY STREET; 919-967-9725; FACEBOOK.COM/BOWBARR Bowbarr has endeared itself to locals with creative and affordable specialty cocktails, a solid beer selection, a cozy back courtyard, astute DJs spinning deep cuts, and a dim yet colorful space. It’s also home to a great vintage photo booth.

GRAY SQUIRREL COFFEE CO. 360 EAST MAIN ST. #100; GRAYSQUIRRELCOFFEE.COM Gray Squirrel Coffee Company is a smallbatch coffee roaster, roasting in-house and serving finely crafted espresso drinks, drip coffee, and a small array of locally made baked goods. With two locations in the Triangle, their espresso bar & roastery is located in beautiful Carrboro, NC and a second location within the lobby of the Chapel Hill Public Library. 

LOOKING GLASS CAFE

601 WEST MAIN STREET; 919-967-9398; LOOKINGGLASS.COFFEE Looking Glass is first and foremost a coffeehouse, but it’s also suited for a leisurely lunch, and the wide selection of tea, Italian sodas, beer and wine, sandwiches, and pastries gives no reason to rush.

MILLTOWN

307 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-968-2460; DININGANDDRINKING.COM Milltown’s food menu is a can’t-miss mix of classic pub fare, but the real star is the beer list. With a regular rotation of drafts and an expansive selection of bottles, with beers from down the street and around the world, there’s plenty to excite any beer lover.

OPEN EYE CAFE

101 SOUTH GREENSBORO STREET; 919-968-9410; OPENEYECAFE.COM Open Eye takes care to train its staff in the finer points of coffee brewing and espresso pulling, and the attention to detail shows. Even with a smattering of baked goods, beer and wine, and teas to fill it out, the coffee is the menu’s focal point. That the shop is so spacious and welcoming only encourages lingering for conversation and savoring the cup. Fair warning: it gets packed.

ORANGE COUNTY SOCIAL CLUB

108 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-933-0669; FACEBOOK.COM/OCSC.CARRBORO Carrboro’s neighborhood watering hole is everything a local institution should be and nothing more: a crowd of familiar (or soon to be familiar) faces, a mix of ancient townies and eager students, strong and affordable drinks, friendly bartenders, and a hipster jukebox.

THE SPEAKEASY AT TYLER’S

102 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-929-6881; TYLERSTAPROOM.COM/LOCATIONS/ CARRBORO After eating dinner at Tyler’s, be sure to walk behind the mysterious doors that lead


EE CO.

Paint-it-Yourself Ceramic & Sculpture Studio

smalluse drinks, ally ons in oastery and of

Don’t miss out on the fun! Join us for: • Summer Camps • Birthday Parties • Kid & Adult Parties (919) 933-9700 www.glazedexpectations.com

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205 W Main St Suite 104 Carrboro, NC 27510 Top 4 Finalist

Spira Pilates Studio est. 2002

@spirapilates 919.260.4817 304 W. Weaver St., Suite 203 Carrboro, NC 27510

PHOTO BY JEREMY M. LANGE

to the Speakeasy. With dozens of taps to choose from and a more relaxed atmosphere than the restaurant, it’s the perfect place to hang out after a meal or for a night of general debauchery.

THE STATION

201 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-918-3923; STATIONCARRBORO.COM This watering hole and live-music venue brings

3-0669; in an eclectic crowd with its well-curated slate of live and DJ-generated music and a shifting RO lineup of football viewing, jazz Saturdays, trivia le is Tuesdays, and parties of all sorts. be and soon to wnies and STEEL STRING BREWERY e drinks, 106A SOUTH GREENSBORO STREET; ebox. 919-240-7215; STEELSTRINGBREWERY.COM

Named in homage to the region’s blues and bluegrass heritage, Steel String is an exciting landmark in a crowded local beer scene. It 9-6881; has the prerequisites (the Big Mon IPA is a ONS/ year-round treat) but excels with experiments in arcane saisons. The taproom isn’t as big as re to some of the region’s other brew-hubs, but its hat lead casual vibe and cozy patio space are inviting.

VECINO BREWING CO.

300 EAST MAIN STREET, SUITE C; 919-537-9591; VECINOBREWING.COM Located in the heart of Carrboro, NC next to Cat’s Cradle, Vecino offers over ten craft beers which are brewed on-site as well as a locally focused farm-to-bar food menu. At the heart of Vecino’s core values is giving back to the neighborhood and community. With their “brewing neighbors” program, Vecino selects one beer each month where 10% of sales goes to support a local charitable organization.

SHOP

ALL DAY RECORDS

112-A EAST MAIN STREET; 919-537-8322; ALLDAYRECORDS.COM A record collector’s haven, All Day specializes in niche fare, with an inventory of new and used vinyl full of rare gems and tomorrow’s legends. From private-press avant-garde LPs to dusty old country 45s, from deluxe soul reissues to the latest in underground rock ‘n’ roll, All Day’s got plenty to flip through.

2017 Finalist for Best Aesthetician: Angela Hugghins

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

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3 0 4 W E S T W E AV E R S T. # 1 0 4 , C A R R B O R O M O N A R C H B R OWA N D FAC I A L S . CO M 5.16.18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 17


outdoor sporting goods store, restaurants, and more to form a centerpiece of downtown Carrboro. The patch of grass on its southern boundary is an ever-crowded gathering spot.

CLIFF’S MEAT MARKET

100 WEST MAIN STREET; 919-942-2196; CLIFFSMEATMARKET.COM Cliff Collins, who says he’s “kin to half of Carrboro,” opened his shop in 1973. Find him there today and he’ll regale you with jokes and community history. The market meets the diverse needs of a changing Southern town. Meat is cut to order, and the shelves are smattered with a variety of Southern and Hispanic convenience items—including Rose-brand pork brains for the brave.

GLENN’S TATTOO SERVICE

PHOTO BY JEREMY M. LANGE

CARRBORO FARMERS MARKET

301 WEST MAIN STREET; 919-280-3326; CARRBOROFARMERSMARKET.COM Interested in some of the best locally grown produce in the area? Head straight for the Carrboro Farmers Market. All stands are run by farmers, and all produce comes from within fifty miles.

CARR MILL MALL

deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming June 20:

Hillsborough For advertising opportunities, contact your ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com 18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 5.16.18

200 NORTH GREENSBORO STREET; 919-942-8669; CARRMILLMALL.COM Inside a historic cotton mill, restored just enough to leave the patina on the wood floors, Carr Mill Mall gathers boutique jewelers and clothing shops, a locally owned

705-A WEST ROSEMARY STREET; 919-933-8288; GLENNSTATTOOSERVICE.COM If you’re new in town and you want to assimilate, you need to make sure you have a tattoo and/or piercing. (If you’re older and want to be sure to blend, try to get something in colors that look faded, like you’ve had it since you were eighteen.) Head directly up the stairs on West Rosemary into Glenn’s, Carrboro’s body-art standby, where an experienced, gruffly friendly staff can tat or pierce you up with a touch townies will recognize.

MAIN STREET MUSIC

204-A WEST MAIN STREET; 919-942-7666; CARRBOROMUSIC.COM There are plenty of stores that sell guitars. But Main Street’s inventory—also available online—is a treasure chest of vintage instruments from lesser-known brands.

MORE FROM OUR ADVERTISERS

THE LOOKING GLASS TASTING ROOM

601 W. MAIN STREET; 919 967-9398; LOOKINGGLASS.COFFEE The Looking Glass Tasting Room is Carrboro and Orange County’s favorite new gathering spot. A destination hub that celebrates North Carolina’s altcraft beverage movement, the Looking Glass Tasting Room serves locallysourced ciders, wines, beers, and meads in a comfortable, laid-back setting reminiscent of tasting rooms in great wineries everywhere. Learn more at lookingglass.coffee/tasting-room and uniqueplacestosave.org

MONARCH BROW & FACIAL STUDIO

304 W. WEAVER ST. #104; 919 260-1493; MONARCHBROWANDFACIALS.COM Monarch Brow & Facial Studio is Carrboro’s premier spot for semipermanent eyebrow makeup, organic facials, and eyebrow waxing. Angela Hugghins opened the studio after years of working for award winning salons in the Chapel Hill/Carrboro area. With nearly 20 years of esthetics experience and a degree in Studio Art, Angela’s clients trust her craft. To schedule a visit, go to monarchbrowandfacials.com


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PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER

SURPLUS SID’S

309 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-942-7127; FACEBOOK.COM/SURPLUSSIDS Part military surplus, part costume shop, part junk shop, all quirk. With an exhaustive inventory of old furniture, uniforms, costume props, and miscellany, you never know what you’ll find at Sid’s, but digging through it all is half the fun.

WEAVER STREET MARKET

101 EAST WEAVER STREET; 919-929-0010; WEAVERSTREETMARKET.COOP In addition to being a full-service co-op grocery store, Weaver Street Market is a community landmark and gathering space. Its salad bars, made-to-order cafe specials, and coffee shop offer fresh grub, while the front lawn offers an inviting and shady (if often crowded) space to hang out, play music, or hula-hoop it up.

WOMANCRAFT GIFTS

360 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-929-3300; WOMANCRAFTGIFTS.COM Featuring goods from more than seventy artists, WomanCraft has something for everyone, whether it be patchwork and sewing or ceramics and jewelry, and the added benefit of supporting local female artists and artisans.

PLAY

ANDERSON COMMUNITY PARK

302 N.C. HIGHWAY 54 WEST; 919-918-7364; TOWNOFCARRBORO.ORG/ 347/ANDERSON-COMMUNITY-PARK Among its fifty-five acres of leafy trails and spacious lawns, Carrboro’s largest municipal park also offers horseshoe pits, a fishing

pond, picnic areas, a playground, and a leash-free zone for your canine friend, not to mention baseball, basketball, and tennis courts.

THE ARTSCENTER

300-G EAST MAIN STREET; 919-929-2787; ARTSCENTERLIVE.ORG Few venues can claim they’ve hosted local photographers’ prints, turntablist Kid Koala, and Tibetan Buddhist monks in the same building (albeit separately). But The ArtsCenter, a hub for Carrboro’s eclectic and inclusive arts scene, showcases all that and more. The calendar is loaded with camps and classes for kids and adults to learn various skills, but it’s also full of local and national performances, which run the gamut from Americana and jazz to theater and comedy.

Burritos-Tacos-Nachos-Housemade Salsa-Margaritas! 711 W Rosemary St • Carrboro • carrburritos.com • 919.933.8226

CAROLINA NORTH FOREST

122 MUNICIPAL DRIVE, CHAPEL HILL; 919-883-8930; CAROLINANORTHFOREST.UNC.EDU Straddling Carrboro and Chapel Hill, Carolina North Forest offers 750 acres of woodlands, with ample off-road trails popular with hikers, runners, and cyclists. The Carrboro side has a dense trail network hemmed in by Bolin Creek.

CAT’S CRADLE

300 EAST MAIN STREET; 919-967-9053; CATSCRADLE.COM The landmark nightclub, famous for hosting your favorite indie band before they blew up, is practically a prerequisite for lists like these. And, yes, it’ll always be that storied club where Nirvana and Public Enemy played back in the day. But with an expanded showroom and a great-sounding second venue in its Back Room, Cat’s Cradle is still a consistent home for the nationally renowned and local talent you’ll brag about seeing decades from now.

! V OT E

212 West Main Street • Carrboro, NC 27510 (919) 942-4048 • www.nccraftsgallery.com

Open 7 days a week! Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Best Place to Buy Locally Made Art in Orange/Chatham County

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MOOGFEST

Power Switch

Can Moogfest help us unlearn the power of patriarchy?

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n December, Moogfest announced its first wave of programming with a twist: all of the performers and presenters identified as nonbinary or female. While lauded by many, the festival’s decision wasn’t without controversy. Caroline Polachek, who was announced in that first wave, dropped out of the festival, citing her anger at being unnecessarily othered without her permission. “Gender is not a genre,” she wrote on Twitter. That’s true, but gender and other identity factors have become something of a new guidepost for conscientious consumption. How often do we seek out art made by those whose lives look different than our own? Whose voices get prioritized on label rosters, magazine covers, and festival lineups, and why? What other unlearning of the patriarchy do we still have left to do? It’s easy to tie curatorial decisions like this one to the #MeToo movement, wherein those abused by men in positions of power have reclaimed their strength by publicly speaking out against those who did them harm. But a more accurate truth, at least in the music industry, is that people from traditionally marginalized backgrounds are 20 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

now making the art that’s more suited to our times. Artists like Kelela explore intersecting identities through sound, while others, like Norway’s Jenny Hval, lay bare stark personal truths about everything from self-doubt to menstruation. Chelsea Manning, the transgender soldier-turned-information-activist who had to drop an interview with the INDY last-minute, delivers the festival’s keynote address on Saturday afternoon. But the men of Moogfest have plenty to offer, too—Jon Hopkins builds immensely beautiful worlds with sensitive, spiritual touches. KRS-One has been a leading figure in hip-hop for nearly three decades, while Mouse on Mars has made a music career out of dissolving the boundaries between different strains of electronic music. On Monday, the festival added Moses Sumney, whose 2017 album Aromanticism is a stirring rumination on intimacy. A single music festival can’t fix centuries of toxic power dynamics or their trickledown effects. But it can at least push us toward thinking about pulling those systems apart, offering an extra spark in the long march toward gender-blind equality. —Allison Hussey


M O O G F E S T

Sights Unseen

Lower your lids and open your third eye with the sublime spiritual techno of Jon Hopkins BY BRIAN HOWE

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f 2013’s Immunity promoted Jon Hopkins from respected niche taste to noted techno auteur, his brand new album, Singularity, enshrines him as one of today’s most visionary, ambitious producers. We reached the Moogfest headliner, who heroically stepped in on deadline day and took our call in an airport lounge after Chelsea Manning cancelled her interview with us, to learn more about the spiritual dimensions that are so clearly but abstractly present in his music, how his two similarly named albums related to each other and thrust toward a trilogy, and his holistic approach to albums in an age that tends to favor the track.

of colors from the same track. Sometimes at shows you see people standing with their eyes shut, and I love that. In some ways, that’s the purest approach.

INDY: Your albums are such deep listening experiences and they happen so much in controlled stereo space. How do you translate that to a live show? JON HOPKINS: The first step is separating every sound out. Often, I’ll reduce a lot of the stereo complexity or it just becomes messay. So even though it may sound emotionally similar to the record, a lot of layers have been taken out. I’ve also revisited tracks from Immunity and primed them to sit alongside the new ones.

Your music feels like a brain to me. It’s very psychological in some way. But I also understand from the recent New Yorker article that this album follows a seeking period in your life. Can you tell us about your life leading up to this record and how it seeped in? Yeah, I think every record I make is a distillation of what’s happened not just when I’m writing but, particularly, before that. It was a period of burnout following too much touring and the insomnia I developed. Seeking solutions plunged me deep into meditation, which is something I was familiar with already. But I learned new types, transcendental in particular, and I also just found myself having a lot of visionary experiences with natural psychedelics. It was this opening up of consciousness. Whatever mood, whatever transitions that are occurring in the brain, they will come out in the music whether you like it or not. In a way it made for a potentially riskier album in that it’s quite a lot more open-hearted and wears its heart on its sleeve, to use two cheesy heart references. With the last record, [Immunity]—in London particularly, it’s a safer bet to make a sort of dark, heavy thing than it

And I assume you build in visual elements? Yeah, that’s a big part of it. It’s a good opportunity to really think about how these tracks should look, which is something I don’t really think about while writing. That’s interesting because to me, your music is so visual. But you’re not even thinking about the visuals when you’re making it. Yeah, it’s funny, I’ve noticed that people have very different responses to the visual side. A lot of people see very specific things. I don’t. To me, they’re kind of like dimensional abstract spaces and shapes, complex, almost like buildings or rooms with objects in them. I’ll meet one person who gets one landscape from it and another who gets a whole series

That must be cool to see people with their eyes closed and imagine all the different things they’re seeing—everybody in their own world with this piece of music that you made. That’s the beauty of music. It’s a language that says things you can’t say in words, but one where people hear different things. I always find it remarkable, the effects of music on the brain.

Jon Hopkins PHOTO BY STEVE GULLICK is to make a sparkly, spiritual record. I became very convinced that I had to do exactly what I felt. It was an amazingly complicated process at first but as I got towards the end of it, things just started seeming to fall into place. It ended up being as magical an experience to write as I hope people will have listening to it. I always had this latent sense that, OK, this is someone who does yoga or reads Carlos Castaneda. [Laughs] I have got the book, I haven’t read it yet. I need to read it.

You’ll love it. Great tour reading. So, Immunity, Singularity—it feels like a trilogy forming. You’re absolutely right. I even have the third name. Are you sharing that name yet? [Laughs] No! The second one’s been out a week. Fair. Can you talk about how those concepts relate to each other, and also how they differentiate those two albums, Immunity and Singularity? INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 21


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I haven’t thought about them in relation to each other that much. So much of this happens on instinct. There was an element of using music almost as a shield back then. The name Immunity came from this feeling I get when music’s going well. If you’re writing something and it really, truly lights you up, the world feels like a different place, hopeful and positive. So that was music as a shield and as a release, maybe. There’s quite a lot of aggression in the music as well, and there is on this album, too, particularly in the first half, but with Immunity there was more nihilism, maybe less clarity about what I really wanted to transmit. On this one, the concepts are bigger. Immunity was kind of looking in, introverted, while Singularity has a feeling of vastness. In a way they’re completely opposing. It should be interesting to see how you resolve that opposition on the third part of this trilogy. I know that it’s going to have to be very different. I feel like with this one, I’ve taken this exact combination of styles, at least rhythmically, as far as I can.

Well, as long as the title ends in “-ity,” we’ll be fine. So Jon, I always have this sense that you approach albums holistically, not as like collections of tracks. How does that whole start to come into view for you? Yeah, that’s really important to me. People ask, ‘Why do you bother doing this when no one listens to it that way?’ My response is always, I can’t really make it my business how people consume it. All I can do is make it exactly how I see it being made. At the beginning, of course, you have no real idea, but really quite early on, it starts forming into a whole, and I can imagine the kind of line graph of it. It will become apparent what the first track is, and it just allows you to sonically piece together a narrative. The songs should work in isolation, but the way they affect each other can exponentially improve the experience. For me, an hour is the perfect amount of time. I just love that format. There are people who refused to listen to the singles because they’ve heard me talking about this, which is just lovely. bhowe@indyweek.com

MOOG

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activism toward a more open government? On the surface, not much, which makes Chelsea Manning—who rocketed toward international recognition when she was imprisoned in 2010 for leaked scores of confidential documents about the United States’ wars in Iraq and Afghanistan—seem like an odd choice for Moogfest’s keynote address. But her advocacy for openness transfers pretty seamlessly to creative communities that likewise benefit from enthusiastic exchanges of ideas. President Barack Obama commuted Manning’s sentence in his final days in office, and since re-entering civilian life almost exactly a year ago, Manning has plunged herself headfirst into progressive activism. Her list of causes feels almost interminable: a free press, Palestine, labor rights, and universal healthcare all have her favor, unlike fracking, racism, transphobia, the current president, To advertise or and feature a pet for Enforcement. adoption, and Immigrations Customs pleaseher contact advertising@indyweek.com She touts causes on Twitter with cheery, emoji-adorned #WeGotThis encouragements. What most of her missives have in common, though, is a dedication to fostering connections among all people, regardless of race, class, gender, or nationality. Now, Manning is working on a book about her time in prison as she’s mounting a bid for a Senate seat in Maryland. At Moogfest, however, she’ll focus on discussing how

Chelsea Manning PHOTO BY ELIZABETH JANE COLE privacy laws and a perpetually morphing digital world will shape creativity. Manning’s busy schedule and engagement with so many social justice causes indicate that she’s not content to settle down and take it easy, despite having spent the last few years in a government wringer. If she can continue to channel that energy into meaningful action— whether it’s in Washington, D.C., online, or both—Manning stands to grow into one of this generation’s most powerful advocates against oppression. —Allison Hussey


M O O G F E S T Circular Listening

MAY

TH 17 STEELDRIVERS 7p

A new audio system installed at The Armory wraps the audience in 360 degrees of music BY NICK GALLAGHER FR MAY 18

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hen Hans Scharoun set out to design a new home for the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra in the early 1960s, he was inspired by his observation that people listening to street performances naturally arrange themselves in a circle. Scharoun went on to develop a concert hall with seating patterns that surround the stage, giving the audience unprecedented clarity to hear every pluck of a violin string, every bellow of a horn, and every boom of a bass drum. Decades later, researchers at Virginia Tech and Meyer Sound are exploring ways to bring immersive audio engineering into the twentyfirst century with a novel spatial audio system that makes its debut at Moogfest. The immersive sound design system—called Audio Cubed, or A3—will be employed for nine sets at The Armory. The setup, which uses twenty-four independent speakers to create a multi-dimensional sound, is the culmination of a partnership between Virginia Tech’s Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT), and Meyer Sound, an innovative audio-engineering company in Berkeley, California. Preliminary research for the A3 system took place in Virginia Tech’s Cube, a multidisciplinary facility used for sound experiments and cutting-edge art installations. The Cube can utilize up to one hundred-fifty speakers, leading Virginia Tech to claim that it’s “home to one of the largest multichannel audio systems in the world.” Ryan McHugh, a graduate student at Virginia Tech who serves as a marketing and publicity coordinator for the A3 program, says those speakers can be arranged in nearly limitless combinations in order to closely mimic sounds in the natural environment. “You hear in spatial audio all the time. There’s

THE CLARKS

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sound above you, beneath you, around you,” McHugh explains. But it’s difficult for performers to replicate that sensation in real time, especially since most venues traditionally place outward-facing speakers only at the front of the stage. A3 is different in that its speaker arrangement allows the audience to experience a 360-degree field of audio. That wider range of immersion and flexibility is useful across genres, from the aggressive industrial doom metal of Author & Punisher to lush classical compositions from Valgeir Siguðsson. Both artists worked with audio engineers Tanner Upthegrove and Mike Roan to rehearse songs that they created specifically for their sets at The Armory. Meanwhile, the German electronic duo Mouse on Mars and the experimental hip-hop group Shabazz Palaces traveled to Berkeley to practice with Meyer Sound in preparation for their A3 performances. McHugh explains that the field of spatial audio engineering is still in its early stages— most spatial audio work has been experimental and research-oriented, and it’s especially rare for these types of systems to be employed at such a large scale for popular performances. A3 also represents a new nexus between art and science, a kind of avant-garde approach to a scientific inquiry about how to best replicate sounds in a controlled environment. McHugh thinks these experiments can scale up, too. “They’re looking at putting [A3] in bigger halls, coliseums, huge venues, with hundreds and thousands of speakers that would all be specifically designed for an acoustic, sonic, 360-degree experience,” McHugh says. “We feel that we’re kind of on the cusp of what the next step is in concert experience.” music@indyweek.com

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M O O G F E S T

Deep Cuts

Kelela's future pop transformatively draws on the music of the African diaspora BY STEPHANIE SMITH-STRICKLAND

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n October 1, 2013, electro-R&B futurist Kelela Mizanekristos debuted her inaugural mixtape, Cut 4 Me. The thirteen-track effort, released through Los Angeles-based indie label Fade to Mind, was a deliciously grimy, synthinformed foray through dubstep, R&B, hiphop, and a fusion of other adjacent genres and futuristic sounds. As a young transplant to New York City, where the world of underground clubs and niche pockets of subculture had opened me up to new iterations of multidimensional blackness—many of which I felt finally reflected my own experiences—Cut 4 Me felt intimate and absolutely soul-searing. The project became a soundtrack to my newfound sense of freedom: I had finally left the small, white town of my childhood and migrated out of the South, where I’d attended university. I had also entered my first real relationship with a woman, and through wonderful friends, I was slowly coming to terms with being queer—and the fact that being so as the daughter of an African immigrant wasn’t the end of the world, or the end of my relationship with my mother, as I always secretly feared it might be. Living and partying in Brooklyn was my first real exposure to a community of creatives from the black diaspora (and beyond), who didn’t see my broad interests and tastes as the trappings of the “weird” black girl, as had frequently occurred in my childhood. In fact, discovering these communities and falling in love with musicians like Kelela, who fearlessly rejected world-imposed labels and announced their presence by being uncompromisingly themselves, made my own desire for self-discovery feel more pressing and necessary than ever before. Born in 1983, in Washington, D.C. to immigrant parents, Kelela’s childhood as a 24 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

second generation Ethiopian-American was informed by an innate familial connection to the African diaspora. The music of Miriam Makeba was just as commonplace as the sounds of New Jack Swing and the electric energy of Janet Jackson. She would also fall in love with R&B singers like Kelly Rowland and experimentalists like Björk, whom she has cited as an enduring influence. These interests were also supplemented by a driving curiosity and desire to discover the cultural movements and moments happening around her. She first became enamored with electronic music through a random Napster download. In her Fall 2017 Fader cover story, the singer shared that her parents immigrated from the Horn of Africa during the seventies. Both attended university on affirmative action scholarships for African students. As Kelela related to writer Lakin Starling, the young couple met through a campus student movement that advocated for radical institutional change. This progressive, change-minded ethos is a quiet hallmark of Kelela’s music and her interaction with the world as an artist and intellect. Yet far before the days of Cut 4 Me, 2015’s Hallucinogen, or last year’s Take Me Apart, Kelela was an aspiring singer who believed her journey was destined to start when she was accepted to the prestigious Duke Ellington School of the Arts. As she told Fader, she was unable to attend due to the high tuition costs. Instead, she spent formative years in D.C.’s spoken word and performance cafés. She grew interested in jazz music and soon taught herself to scat and sing difficult jazz standards. She also became a fixture in and around Mt. Pleasant, the neighborhood where D.C.’s underground punk and metal scene thrived. And though she has said that the white, male-dominated

Kelela PHOTO COURTESY OF PARADIGM TALENT AGENCY nature of the scene could sometimes feel restrictive, it also became a space for experimentation. Like her experiences, Kelela’s work is innately global, spanning continents, disparate sonic landscapes, and experimental new genres. In channeling these interests, her music transforms into something that is inclusive and celebratory of otherness in an organic way. As far back as Cut 4 Me, Kelela has worked with a global roster of artists and producers with whom she creates a bridge that sonically connects the black diaspora and provides a glimpse into the promise of its future sounds. Hallucinogen, for

instance, features production from Londonbased Night Slugs founder Bok Bok, who melds wildly different genres like Detroit house, Chicago footwork, and drill music with gqom, a South African strain of house music that’s finally enjoying some welldeserved popularity stateside. Los Angeles’s Daniel Pineda and Asma Maroof—together known as Nguzunguzu—also work within a similar scope, combining classic R&B with genres like zouk and kizomba, which originate from Angola. Kelela’s work with Venezuelan producer Arca, whose Frankenstein-esque pseudo-hip-hop productions have attracted the


attention of Björk and Kanye West, also take global cues. Her latest project and debut studio album, Take Me Apart, continues the groundwork Cut 4 Me and Hallucinogen laid. Hazy, future-facing, and ultimately beautifully empowering, Take Me Apart is a deeply Afrofuturist work that explores our relationships with love, loss, and autonomy in a vulnerable, relatable way that takes you apart and puts you back together in the best way possible.

MOOG

For many of us who feel that the spaces we can occupy safely are places on the fringe, artists like Kelela truly embody the beauty of otherness and cross-cultural experiences. In her careful hands, the things that at one time might have made some of us painfully other are broadened and transmuted into something joyous and blindingly ethereal. music@indyweek.com

BRIEF

Jenny Hval PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BILLIONS CORPORATION

Bloody Brilliant Jenny Hval opens her 2015 record Apocalypse, girl with a set of instructions. “Think big, girl. Like a king,” she says with a slow, intentional patience on “Kingsize.” A few seconds later, she poses the question, “What is soft dick rock?” It may be a jarring start for those unfamiliar with Hval’s work, but it’s a hallmark of her talent for pushing listeners out of their comfort zones. Hval isn’t just a gifted experimental musician with a knack for wry turns of phrase. She’s making some of the most unusual and affirming music of this decade. Hval’s work can be called “feminist,” but it’s far from any splashy girl-power pop anthems. Rather, Hval seems most concerned with exposing the intimate and often uncomfortable truths of living as female, vacillating between harsh sonic prickles and gentle reassurances. Apocalypse, girl dug into ideas of expectations within gender roles (“What is it to take care of yourself? What are we taking care of?” she asks on “That Battle Is Over”), while 2016’s

Blood Bitch was a loose concept record about female vampires and menstrual periods. She’s unafraid to explore sex and sexuality, addressing it with an engrossing, flat frankness. When Hval inverts our ideas of sex, romance, and intimacy, as she does on songs like “Conceptual Romance,” the results are mesmerizing—even the insecurity of selfdoubt can be liberating for Hval. “It can be about refusing to accept the self as we know it—refusing to be owned by people who look at you, or to be pigeonholed,” she said in a 2015 interview with Pitchfork. Next week, Hval releases a new EP, The Long Sleep, which she concludes with another fleck of tenderness. “I want to tell you something. I just want to say, thank you. I love you,” she murmurs. Her soft, professed adoration feels almost as disarming as hearing her speak about cocks or taking birth control with rosé— and therein lies Hval’s clever power. —Allison Hussey

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Sk

Disc dive

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n an in Discw Olson, Umfang, r tions abou “If you first intro I think a think tha thing that else,” Bur it’s actual humble w Concei 2014 by B and Chri making D music an sentimen foundatio were built and play rich, from or white. the endles not just th Discwo cally elev but they h include a tities. As stretched EACH OT In line female an tapped se year’s fest Saturday n and NYC and Satu heading u and profe Burgess-O “Vinyl 10 has a pai Synth Pat Friday an 26 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com


M O O G F E S T

Skip-Proof

Discwoman shakes up the white male hegemony that betrays the diverse origins of techno BY DAVID FORD SMITH

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n an interview last year with The Fader, Discwoman cofounder Emma BurgessOlson, who also performs under the alias Umfang, reflected on her early misconceptions about the history of dance music. “If you went to Resident Advisor as your first introduction to electronic music, which I think a lot of people still do, you would think that it’s a white, European-invented thing that’s not really connected to anything else,” Burgess-Olson said. “To realize that it’s actually American and that the roots are humble was really powerful.” Conceived in Brooklyn in the summer of 2014 by Burgess-Olson, Frankie Hutchinson, and Christine McCharen-Tran, the tastemaking Discwoman collective foregrounds music and activism in this staunch punk sentiment of radical inclusivity, the same foundation that American house and techno were built on. Anyone should be able to make and play this music. You don’t have to be rich, from a reputable family, heterosexual, or white. It is populist, and it should reflect the endless variety of experiences out there, not just those of white male record nerds. Discwoman’s initial goal was to specifically elevate female-identifying deejays, but they have since expanded their brand to include a wider variety of oppressed identities. As their website screams in giant stretched-out electric-blue type: “AMPLIFY EACH OTHER.” In line with its endeavor to highlight female and nonbinary artists, Moogfest has tapped several Discwoman affiliates for this year’s festival. Umfang plays the Pinhook on Saturday night, and Philadelphia’s DJ Haram and NYC’s Stud1nt play there Thursday and Saturday, respectively. Haram is also heading up a panel about navigating DIY and professional music circles on Thursday. Burgess-Olson is scheduled to run a free “Vinyl 101” workshop on Saturday. Stud1nt has a pair of panels, a technical Intro to Synth Patching workshop that runs twice on Friday and Sunday as well as a mysterious,

descriptionless panel on Saturday called Morphic Energies. Though she has since deejayed gigs at European hotspots like London’s Corsica Studios and Berlin’s Berghain, BurgessOlson originally hails from Kansas City, Missouri. She nourished her love of dance

key spot was Bossa Nova Civic Club, the reputable Bushwick dance venue that would eventually host the first Discwoman event in 2014. It was a two-day festival showcase of twelve female-identifying deejays, and was the spark the three needed to take things further.

Emma Burgess-Olson PHOTO COURTESY OF MOOGFEST music in the city’s warehouse rave scene, eventually linking up with McCharen-Tran and Hutchinson when she migrated to New York in 2010. Though the experimental dance scene was obscure and highly insular in those days, a series of influential parties, labels, and collectives began to re-energize the city. One

Over the past few years, Discwoman has evolved into a multi-headed organism that includes a booking agency, management company, and traveling party series. Burgess-Olson is still involved in primary decisions, though thanks to her busy touring schedule, she’s ceded day-to-day operations to the other founders. They’ve also brought

on a few new members to the still-small crew, such as Toronto’s Ciel and Berlin’s Mobilegirl. Earlier this year, they partnered with producer Physical Therapy and his label Allergy Season to release Physically Sick 2, a sprawling forty-four-track Bandcamp-only compilation of raw and vital underground house and techno. It’s a wellcurated set—it would be difficult to locate a modern dance compilation with more diversity and style. On top of that, proceeds from Physically Sick 2 sales go to the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund, an organization that, according to the compilation’s liner notes, serves to help those who otherwise could have to wait in prison for months without being charged because of “a racist, backwards design that disproportionately punishes people of color and the poor.” The record is the sequel to last year’s Physically Sick, which came out the day before Trump’s inauguration and featured rising talents like Yaeji and Octo Octa. Burgess-Olson, who helped curate both compilations, drew initial inspiration for the series not just from Trump but also from a particularly unfortunate example of oppression. A Pennsylvania dance festival in November 2016 booked by Boiler Room, a live-music-streaming service with which Burgess-Olson was affiliated, ended dramatically on its second night due to excessive force from local police. The incident was quickly was characterized as racially motivated. Incensed, Burgess-Olson and her collaborators gave all of the proceeds to the ACLU, the NYC-based LGBTQ primary-care center Callen-Lorde, the National Immigration Law Center, and Planned Parenthood. The collective’s ability to pair its distinct retro iconography and rhetoric with meaningful activism is admirable. Together, the Discwoman ensemble is a spectacular set of creative artists and a fine model of what a music collective can strive for, both aesthetically and politically. Get familiar. music@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 27


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The Waste Land

LOCAL CHEFS GET CREATIVE WITH FISH EYES, STEMS, AND OTHER SCRAPS TO TAKE ON THE FOOD-WASTE EPIDEMIC LAYLA KHOURY-HANOLD

“I

the cauliflower, preparing the florets for a Bottura, and other high-profile chefs to help to light over the last few years. According to ’ve had about a twenty percent side dish and peeling the stalk’s thick skin, change the way people think about, consume, the James Beard Foundation’s Food Waste success rate with the fish eyecutting it into sticks, and stir-frying it with and cook food. Culinary Instructor Program, sixty-three balls,” Eric Montagne says of his turmeric and dried mango powder. It’s a dish The Triangle’s chefs are also challenging million tons of food, valued at $218 billion, experiment turning fish scales and eyeballs Kumar can imagine adding to her vegetablethe notion of what constitutes waste, using is wasted every year in the United States, a into chips. heavy menu, which already features dishes kitchen scraps not only to run their kitchens third of it by restaurants and other food-serMontagne, the former executive chef at that echo her mother’s ethos. Kumar uses more efficiently and push themselves vice businesses. the now-shuttered Standard Foods, has leafy greens like chard, collards, and bok choy creatively but also to make a difference in To raise awareness of these startling staalways had an eye on the trash pile; he transin abundance. She juliennes their stems and creating more sustainable and equitable tistics, Dan Barber of New York’s Blue Hill formed the blood lines of bluefin tuna into adds them to the veggie mix destined for food systems. and its sister restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone tapenade and repurposed sunchoke peels in her “bird’s nest” pakora. She soup, butter, and garnishes. uses leafy carrot tops to infuse Between consulting gigs, he oil and lend a parsley-like flanow cuts fish at Locals Seavor and a pop of color to panfood, which is known for susseared scallops in lemongrass tainable sourcing. Seafood coconut broth. Last summer, sustainability is important to she riffed on creamed corn, Montagne, not only as a chef transforming corn silks and but also as a lifelong fisherhusks into a rich corn-cream man. After he’s done filleting custard that she used in place “ugly fish” like sheepshead, he of cheese to bring creaminess turns to the discard pile, makto a fresh tomato dish. ing fish livers into pâté, curing Beyond the plate, Kumar roe, smoking eggs, and dehyis interested in figuring out drating eyeballs, then frying how to take waste from resthem until they puff into chips taurants, farms, and group to ten times their original cery stores and put it on the size. school lunch tray, an issue Chefs have always been a she became acutely aware of thrifty bunch; with razor thin during an advocacy training margins, part of running a organized by the James Beard successful restaurant is using Foundation last fall, and one every part of the ingredient. that she hopes to address after The mentality of never throwa JBF Chefs Boot Camp for ing anything away and honorPolicy and Change she will ing the ingredient’s integrity attend this summer. is also ingrained in culinary Garland’s pakora contains the stems of leafy greens like chard, collards, and bok choy. PHOTO BY JEFF BRAMWELL “It’s complicated because it school. As a result, most involves infrastructure—how chefs who do scratch cooking food is delivered, federal guidelines, and the Food waste isn’t an issue unique to chefs, Barns, has launched WastED, a series of popuse animal bones and vegetable scraps to institutional structure of everything,” Kumar or even strictly a first-world problem; repurup dinners where he serves plates composed make stock, turn meat scraps into sausage says. “It’s a huge and daunting problem, but posing “ugly” food and using the whole ingreentirely of kitchen scraps and “ugly produce.” or charcuterie, and compost produce waste. its solvable because all of the resources are dient has long been essential to people’s Massimo Bottura, who runs the top-rankBut what about everything else—the scraps there, whether they’re natural or finansurvival and has shaped many of the world’s ing Osteria Francescana in Modena, Italy, that toe the line between edible and inedcial. It’s a matter of putting the right peocuisines. Cheetie Kumar, chef-owner of Garhas made headlines for turning food waste ible and the impact that restaurant-kitchen ple together to change the way things are land, learned early not to throw anything into thousands of meals to feed the underwaste can have in creating a more secure organized.” away. Both of her parents were raised in privileged. And chef-television host Anthofood system? Chef Sean Fowler has also found creative India with extremely modest means; Kumar ny Bourdain produced Wasted! The Story It’s an issue that chefs, restaurants, and ways to translate scraps like collard stems remembers her mother using every part of of Food Waste last October, tapping Barber, culinary organizations have steadily brought 28 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com


and corn husks at Mandolin. Once he’s done braising collard greens, Fowler ferments, dries, and smokes the stems, using it in place of kombu (dried seaweed) to impart umami to a Southern-style dashi, flavor vegetarian gravy, or add a funky tang to ranch dressing. Fowler uses cobs and husks to make a stock to add depth to creamed corn and corn bisque. He roasts and cooks cobs down into flavored jelly, serving jalapeno-corn-cob jelly with biscuits and blueberry-corn-cob preserves on a cheese plate. And he limits what he throws in the trash with a robust composting program on Mandolin’s urban farm, feeding scraps like lettuce ends, tomato cores, bruised apples, and post-Halloween rets for a jack-o’-lanterns to his chickens, who supply hick skin, eggs to the restaurant. ng it with “There’s a tremendous niche for using It’s a dish food waste to feed livestock on a larger vegetable- scale,” Fowler says. “If you could use food res dishes waste as feed for pigs, I think the pigs wind mar uses up healthier and the quality of the pork can d bok choy be better because you can be very selective stems and about what you’re feeding them instead of stined for feeding them corn and soy, which is a wastekora. She ful use of natural resources.” s to infuse Like Fowler, Andrea Reusing is a proy-like fla- ponent of composting both at home and at or to pan- her restaurants, Lantern and The Durham. mongrass “There’s a pious sense of being a do-goodsummer, er, but it really changes the way you cook,” med corn, Reusing says. “You don’t necessarily think silks and of everything as garbage. There’s tons of rn-cream stuff that you would throw away, but when d in place you see it all in a big pile in the compost, you eaminess think, no, we could actually use that.” h. To wit, Reusing recently left intact the e, Kumar stringy stems of spigarello, then battered uring out and fried the heirloom broccoli into what from res- she describes as a beautiful, goth-looking and gro- flower tempura. At Lantern, she regularit on the ly uses cherry pits to impart an almond-y, an issue cherry flavor to ice cream and panna cotta. aware of At The Durham, peach leaves are steeped in y training Cognac, brandy, vermouth, and red wine to mes Beard create a peach wine that Reusing says tastes , and one peachier than a peach, even if you can’t smell dress after the peach on the leaves. For special events, Camp for shrimp heads are deep fried to create an she will appetizer that eats and tastes like a supercrunchy shrimp potato chip. because it While Reusing agrees that pushing the ure—how boundaries of the edible is a great way to s, and the address food waste, and she applauds how g,” Kumar foodie-ism has changed the way consumblem, but ers absorb information, she’s also sensitive ources are to chefs and diners sensationalizing waste. or finan- “Say we made chicken feet really popuright peo- lar—or a cockscomb may be a better examhings are ple—and all of a sudden, I’m talking five years from now, tomorrow’s cockscomb is d creative like yesterday’s pork belly,” she says. ard stems food@indyweek.com

DEMIC

INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 29


indyart

MARGARET BOWLAND: PAINTING THE ROSES RED Through Sunday, June 17 CAM Raleigh, Raleigh www.camraleigh.org

The White Elephant in the Room

HOW DID CAM RALEIGH BOTCH ITS HANDLING OF THE MARGARET BOWLAND CONTROVERSY SO BADLY, AND WHAT CAN IT DO TO MOVE FORWARD? BY CHRIS VITIELLO

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et’s dig in. What would it mean if you were a ten-year-old black girl and you came to CAM

Raleigh?” This is what Monét Noelle Marshall, a Durham-based performing artist and arts activist, asked those gathered for the pop-up conversation she spearheaded at the museum Saturday. Issues of race, power, and representation in art had already been heatedly raised around Brooklyn-based painter Margaret Bowland’s solo exhibition, Painting the Roses Red, and a contentious “CAMversation” with guest curator Dexter Wimberly and other panelists on April 24. At the core of the issue is a museum that didn’t anticipate or respond well to criticisms, a guest curator who scoffed at community concerns, and an artist whose seemingly willful naïveté about the highly charged nature of her work precludes meaningful conversation. Bowland, a native of Burlington, North Carolina, is white; her oil portraits often depict black subjects with paint on their bodies, sometimes in what can only be described as whiteface. Triangle communities reacted strongly to the work, with many finding it racially problematic at best and traumatic at worst. When community members raised questions about these issues online and described their trauma at the CAMversation, which more than two hundred people attended, they found Wimberly patronizing and dismissive of their interpretations or emotional experiences. Marshall and the cast of her theater installation Buy My Soul and Call It Art—which is being restaged at VAE on May 19 and 20 in response to Bowland’s work— took up the task of asking those questions in their pop-up conversation Saturday. It was yet another example of people of color doing intellectual and emotional labor to deal with a white problem. “It’s your first time coming to the art museum and this was the first thing you saw,” 30 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

“Isn’t It Romantic” by Margaret Bowland COURTESY OF SUSAN AND DENNIS SULLIVAN/CAM RALEIGH

Marshall asked about that hypothetical tenyear-old. “What do you think you would feel?” Attendees responded with words such as “frightened,” “intrigued,” “conflicted,” “assaulted,” “embarrassed,” “worried,” and “made a mockery of.” But in interviews throughout Bowland’s career (she canceled a scheduled interview with the INDY this week on her manager’s advice) and in the brochure CAM provides, Bowland uses antonyms for these words. She says she’s “affirming the resilience and fierceness of humanity” by using whiteface on black subjects, showing how the world projects identities upon them (though it’s easy to argue that this is exactly what Bowland is doing). She is raising her subjects to the level of “aristocrats.” She’s simply saying, “You’re beautiful!” And she talks about her close personal relationships with some of her subjects and how they apply their own body paint. But it’s difficult to reconcile her innocent stance with the actual content of the pictures. Many are of women in princess dresses or wedding gowns or nude. Their surroundings are dim, surreal, even phantasmagoric. When Bowland paints a young African-American girl coming out of a watermelon (a picture not in the CAM show) or wearing a crown of cotton, it becomes absurd for the artist to insist her paintings are not about race and refuse to discuss it. Bowland—like her friend and curator, Wimberly, who is African American—seems to believe her studio is an autonomous zone in which contemporary racial issues can’t intrude, that her subjects are stripped of all social context when she picks up her brush. “The color of someone’s skin is one of the first visual facts our mind records,” Bowland told the Huffington Post in 2015. “And in that second, a door opens and a rush of information fills our unconscious. The conscious mind must then fight past this onslaught to get back to apprehending the person standing before us.”


And in a 2014 interview with the same site, Bowland bent a Saul Bellow quote to imply that white people are oppressed, too: “[Bellow] says, ‘Repression is not precise. You repress one thing; you repress the thing adjacent.’ The white adults who raised me had no idea of what they were paying through the repression of their souls by the world order in which they lived. But damage was done.” To Bowland, we’re all just humans underneath—but this is a rather deluded idea in a country that still does not recognize the full humanity of people of color. It sounds like white privilege run amok in a Brooklyn studio, and most people at Saturday’s pop-up conversation weren’t buying it.

ly. The April 24 panel discussion about the show, thrown together only after the pushback began, was a disaster. “I was asked to come here and give my opinion on what I thought of the work,” panelist Gemynii said on Saturday. “And the curator literally rolled his eyes as I spoke. … I was told that we weren’t art-literate enough to speak that night. I was basically told that my opinion as a black woman didn’t matter from a black man. That hurt, and I’ve yet to hear from CAM about follow-up conversations or about what’s going to be done.” Wimberly, who ostensibly ran the discussion that night, still doesn’t seem to feel responsible for perspectives like Gemynii’s.

this work because of other things that don’t have a lot to do with this work.” Wimberly admonished the other panelists, saying that people in other communities haven’t had these issues. (Bowland, for her part, claims she has only heard complaints about her work from white people until now.) Wimberly accused the panelists of censorship, misconstruing their complex questions about cultural appropriation and identity as a simple edict to forbid white artists from making work about black people. Gemynii responded that black people are tired of having white people tell their stories and, gesturing at the walls as an example, asked why white artists are con-

W

hile an artist might be able to avoid being held accountable for his or her etical tenwork, a museum partially funded by public ou would dollars is a different story. ords such onflicted,” “I don’t care about Margaret Bowland as ried,” and an individual artist,” Marshall said on Saturday. “I’m more interested in systems, and Bowland’s in what does it mean for an institution that interview has a mission to curate art for a wider commanager’s munity to be responsible for the art they provides, bring in.” se words. Most art museums have staff curators or ience and curatorial boards that include a wide range whiteface of art historical and community perspecthe world tives, but CAM Raleigh has largely farmed gh it’s easy out its curation since the board fired the Bowland is museum’s first director, Elysia Borowyo the level Reeder, in 2013. (Borowy-Reeder has ng, “You’re gone on to expand a vision of social justice close per- through art at the Museum of Contemporary er subjects Art Detroit.) In this case, CAM’s failure to anticipate reactions to this work in the Tripaint. r innocent angle and provide context might have been a e pictures. bigger mistake than booking the show at all. dresses or Imagine, for example, how different roundings CAM’s role would seem if it presented Bowric. When land in a group show of other works dealing American with race and representation, with critical picture not commentary, rather than letting the paintwn of cot- er’s race be the white elephant in the room. st to insist “There’s the brochure presented with the d refuse to artist’s descriptions of the paintings, but there’s no commentary from the museum on d curator, the walls in the space,” one audience member an—seems said on Saturday. “I just was at an exhibit of mous zone sculptures at the Met Breuer and what made sues can’t that exhibit powerful was the curator’s compped of all mentary about the pieces. It talked about r brush. race and bodies in really interesting ways. one of the “I feel like the museum allows this artist to ” Bowland speak, but it doesn’t say anything about the nd in that work,” the audience member continued. “It’s f informa- a lost opportunity to push back. The museconscious um could present the work and critique it at slaught to the same time.” on stand- CAM compounded the fallout from the initial controversy by handling it so poor-

“‘Nakedness Has No Color' And Knows No Border” by Margaret Bowland LOAN COURTESY OF MARGARET BOWLAND/CAM RALEIGH

“If someone looks at a painting and they experience trauma and it makes them feel debased and silenced and angry and brings up all of this past hurt—I’m a curator, not a clinical psychologist,” he told the INDY in a phone interview last week. (Read our full interviews with Wimberly and CAM director Gab Smith on our arts blog.) “And we’re all living here in America, right? I’m not trying to be a jerk. But we are surrounded by traumatic things all the time. And I believe that people are reacting to

sistently given prestigious opportunities to do so. Wimberly said he obsessively studied black history as a young man but insisted that the night’s discussion wasn’t about black history. The event had been billed as “Who Gets to Interpret Race and Power?”

I

n some respects, CAM is getting off easy. The controversy fits into a larger narrative of artist-activist responses to white

artists depicting black bodies. The brightest flashpoint was the 2017 Whitney Biennial and the painting “Open Casket” by Dana Schutz, which shows the dead, mangled face of Emmett Till, an African-American teenager who was lynched by two white men in Mississippi in 1955 for allegedly flirting with a white woman—a claim that was later admitted to have been fabricated. Artist Parker Bright stood directly in front of Schutz’s painting for hours, essentially blocking it from view, wearing a T-shirt with “Black Death Spectacle” written on the back. In an open letter, Berlin-based critic Hannah Black called for the painting’s removal and destruction. “Although Schutz’s intention may be to present white shame,” Black wrote, “this shame is not correctly represented as a painting of a dead Black boy by a white artist—those non-Black artists who sincerely wish to highlight the shameful nature of white violence should first of all stop treating Black pain as raw material. The subject matter is not Schutz’s; white free speech and white creative freedom have been founded on the constraint of others, and are not natural rights. The painting must go.” Black’s words could have just as easily been written about Bowland, who claims the same shaky justification of empathy as some kind of racial exemption. And like the Biennial curators, CAM Raleigh has avoided the very issues the show purports to explore. But so far, no one has picketed CAM’s entrance or staged an action or a protest in front of the work. That could still happen, but the temperature seems to be dropping as the conversation shifts away from present trauma and toward productive futures. Smith knows CAM Raleigh needs to change. “We are a small staff of three white people—we acknowledge that,” Smith told the INDY. “We acknowledge that it’s a huge privilege to do this work. ... [W]e have to reflect the community better than we do. And we need our community to help us with that.” Community members, in online exchanges and at the pop-up conversation, want to see changes in the structure of the organization as well as its policy around exhibits. An advisory board or curatorial board could be formed quickly yet strategically to open the organization to different communities and to make its programming considerations more transparent and accountable. “Art is powerful,” Marshall said at the close of the pop-up conversation Saturday. “We need to be responsible with whatever amount of power we have ... challenging who we are upholding and suppressing, and [asking], who’s at the table and who isn’t?” arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 31


indystage

Casting Lots

ADDING EIGHTEEN ACTORS TO MIKE WILEY’S BLOOD DONE SIGN MY NAME CHANGES SO MUCH MORE THAN THE LENGTH OF THE PLAYBILL

stage

DRY POWDER 

Through Sunday, May 27 Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh www.sonorousroad.com

BY KATY KOOP

A

To see them just feet away, chanting white as an older man looking back on his work cast of one turns to nineteen in supremacist rhetoric while costumed by (Mark Phialas). As the lights go down, nearly Mike Wiley’s new ensemble verJenny Mitchell in full Ku Klux Klan garb every character comes out onto the detailed sion of his adaptation of Timothy and lit in Cailen Waddell’s stark red and blue thrust stage, sitting on benches just inches Tyson’s Blood Done Sign My Name, currently lights, or to see Marrow (JaJuan Cofield) away from audience members, each with a in its premiere run at Raleigh Little Thebeaten and shot repeatedly as his famicopy of Blood Done Sign My Name in hand. atre. The play, like the book, revolves around ly members sob the racially motithrough their tesvated 1970 murder timonies—these of Henry “Dickie” are not things you Marrow in Oxford, can walk away North Carolina. from without feelTyson, who was ing something of ten at the time, the trauma surdetails his memorounding Marries of the events row’s death. surrounding the While previmurder and what ous iterations of he learned in interBlood Done Sign views as an adult. My Name partly While the play still aimed to educate features archiaudiences about val footage—this something few histime projected on tory books reportset designer Sonya ed, this new version Drum’s dilapidatreads as a master ed “Welcome to class in being an Oxford, N.C.” sign— ally, if a flawed one. and gospel music, Raleigh Little Theatre’s ensemble production of Blood Done Sign My Name Tyson looks back now sung by mulPHOTO BY DENNIS BERFIELD on himself as a boy tiple voices, that shooting at African will be familiar to BLOOD DONE SIGN MY NAME Americans his age audiences of the ½ with an air rifle and one-man show, the Through Sunday, June 3 ineptly trying to new adaptation Raleigh Little Theatre, Raleigh comfort a friend by is otherwise very www.raleighlittletheatre.org saying maybe Mardifferent. tin Luther King In the original, Jr.’s death would be Wiley performed a for the best; the author also reckons with his As the older Tyson, Phialas serves as a more or less linear sequence of events. But father’s refusal to march in solidarity with watchful narrator, striding through a barhere, he places the focus on Tyson and his Marrow’s mourners. bershop inspired by one of the businesses book to frame the story more freely. Tyson The message is clear: even though societal owned by Marrow’s alleged murderers, the speaks to characters and watches himself change isn’t neat or instantaneous, in the sevTeel family. Under Joseph Megel’s direction, as a ten-year-old getting used to a new home enties or today, you have to be willing to try. the ensemble creates a visceral, captivat(Benjamin Cashwell), as a young man interarts@indyweek.com ing experience that is almost overwhelming. viewing Oxford residents (Justin Toyer), and 32 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

BRIEF

ind

Di

IF THE THE S OF TH

BY GLE PHOTO BY AREON MOBASHER

Television and film keep reminding us that the rich are not like you and me. There’s hardly any need to think back to the grisly after-hours proclivities of Wall Street monster Patrick Bateman in American Psycho. Contemplating Taylor Mason’s thousandyard stare on Showtime’s Billions will suffice. Ultra-high functionality—plus a fundamental (and usually fatal) social disconnect—figure into high-profile financial narratives from The Bonfire of the Vanities to The Big Short. So at first, we think we know where playwright Sarah Burgess is headed in her 2016 drama Dry Powder. Its title is the term of art for an investment firm’s unencumbered capital. As Burgess demonstrates, it also refers to the explosive relationships that develop among the competitive top officers at a private-equity firm. Seth (an agile Chris Hinton) is the company’s rising rainmaker, but when his latest gem-in-the-rough acquisition—a rescue plan for a California luggage maker on the verge of a major innovation—exposes a bit too much of his touchy-feely side, his s nemesis, Jenny (Michelle Murray Wells), the b always-calculating numbers person, looks r to shoot it down or corrupt it from within. When she warns Seth, “There is a hawk on upon the my shoulder. You can’t see it, but it’s always instead of there,” we probably should be concerned for was a ha his long-term health. was), then But in this production, on opening nation of weekend, we weren’t. Though the show’s filthy, fun sound design includes Morphine’s “Sharks,” The De director Mark Filiaci hadn’t fully sharpened olds as a s Jenny’s teeth or those of Seth and Jenny’s superpow boss, Rick (Dan Oliver). We also confronted can be sh the contradiction of a supposedly coldly ed, decap analytical Jenny who nonetheless keeps incinerate overheating in scenes with her peers. pool is als Still, in a genre that usually demonizes opens up a financial types, Burgess serves up a fitting delivers a reminder of who the demons actually are—and just how close they are to home. (“You’re s you sure y —Byron Woods

A


indyscreen

DEADPOOL 2 

Opening Friday, May 18

Die Laughing

IF THE FIRST DEADPOOL WAS A HALFHEARTED R-RATED SPIDER-MAN, THE SUPERIOR SECOND ONE IS A CONTROLLED COMIC DETONATION OF THE SUPERHERO-MOVIE TEMPLATE BY GLENN MCDONALD

Love the indy?

A

sequel to the surprise 2016 blockbuster, Deadpool 2 is one of those rare follow-ups that improves upon the original, expanding its ideas instead of repeating them. If the first movie was a halfhearted R-rated Spider-Man (it was), then the new one is a controlled detonation of the superhero-movie template: filthy, funny, and cheerfully ultraviolent. The Deadpool series stars Ryan Reynolds as a suicidal wiseass mercenary whose superpower is that he can’t be killed. He can be shot, stabbed, lacerated, suffocated, decapitated, eviscerated, mutilated, and incinerated, but he can’t actually die. Deadpool is also aware that he’s in a movie, which opens up another layer of meta comedy as he delivers a steady patter of fanboy in-jokes. (“You’re so dark,” he says to one villain. “Are you sure you’re not from the DC Universe?”)

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS

Plot-wise, Deadpool 2 is ostensibly about the formation of the super group X-Force and its battle against the time-traveling cyborg Cable (Josh Bolin). But this movie isn’t about what it’s about. The talky script (cowritten by Reynolds) deploys plot elements only to serve the film’s more noble purpose of making us laugh. Hundreds upon hundreds of gags crash down in a delirious cascade of dirty jokes and disposable pop culture. Jokes about LinkedIn and body cavities and Arby’s. Jokes about melanoma and strap-ons and dubstep. Jokes about Basic Instinct and Flashdance and Yentl. Jokes about Dave Matthews and Pat Benatar and Enya. At times, the script achieves the giddy density of peak TV comedies like 30 Rock; you’re afraid to laugh because three more punch lines will slip past.

Not all the jokes land, and the movie sometimes tries too hard to offend. For instance, I counted at least three jokes about pedophilia and sexual violence against kids. Really? We’re doing that now? For laughs? These aren’t throwaway lines, either; they’re graphic and directed specifically at a fourteen-year-old character played by a sixteen-year-old performer. Call me old-fashioned, but that’s fucked up. On balance, though, Deadpool 2 is a seriously funny comedy and a genuinely good time at the movies. It’s fearless in a way that the first film only pretended to be. I laughed more at this superhero story than at any other multiplex comedy in recent memory. Avoid spoilers, watch for some great cameos, and hang around for the post-credits scenes. arts@indyweek.com

e Support th businesses that ... support us

S hop ! l a c o l INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 33


5.16–5.23

WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK

Sleeping Beauty PHOTO BY CHRIS WALT PHOTOGRAPHY THURSDAY, MAY 17–SUNDAY, MAY 20

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Your Week. Every Wednesday. indyweek.com 34 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

In fairy tales, the names tell you something. In the ancient story, adapted in the 1890s by Tchaikovsky and choreographed by Maurice Petipa for the Imperial Ballet of St. Petersburg, the sleeping beauty is named Aurora. The rescuing prince is Désiré. But before that dawning of desire, there are the others, including King Florestan (the flowering) and the fairies whose blessings, through they are valuable, cannot save Aurora’s life: Candide, for grace; Coulante Fleur de Farine, for flowing beauty; Miettes qui tombent, or scattered bread, for generosity; Canari qui chante, the singing canary, for musicality; and Violente, or force, for strong will. The evil fairy godmother? Carabosse, a disfigured face. The one who saves the princess and the kingdom is Fee des Lilas, the lilac fairy. In this 2008 version for Carolina Ballet, choreographer Robert Weiss adds two characters: Carabosse’s companion, the Raven, and a stage-length Dragon, a puppet animated by multiple dancers, that the Prince must defeat before he can bestow the reviving kiss. —Byron Woods MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM, RALEIGH | 8 p.m. Thu.–Sat./2 p.m. Sat. & Sun., $33–$92, www.carolinaballet.com

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?

BLOOD DONE SIGN MY NAME AT RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE (P. 32), THE BULL MEETS THE BAYOU AT THE CARRACK (P. 40), LEESA CROSS-SMITH & NAIMA COSTER AT FLYLEAF BOOKS (P. 44), DRY POWDER AT SONOROUS ROAD THEATRE (P. 32), MOOGFEST IN DURHAM (P. 20), OAK CITY COMEDY FESTIVAL IN RALEIGH (P. 42), SENIOR NIGHT AT WALLTOWN CHILDREN’S THEATRE (P. 44)


Arvil Freeman, Glenn and Lula Bolick, Asha Bala, Tony Williamson, and Robert Knight

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE N.C. DEPT. OF NATURAL AND CULTURAL RESOURCES

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

NORTH CAROLINA HERITAGE AWARDS

Every two years, the North Carolina Arts Council hands out its Heritage Awards to North Carolina artists who have made a lasting impact on the state’s culture. Its winners always demonstrate the many different talented, eclectic voices of North Carolina craftsmanship, from Appalachian ballad singers and Vietnamese-American weavers to shipwrights at the Outer Banks. This year, the honorees include South Indian dancer Asha Bala, fiddler Arvil Freeman, and Glenn and Lula Bolick, whose trades include pottery, storytelling, and music. There’s also renowned mandolin player Tony Williamson, plus trumpet player Robert “Dick” Knight of the soul band The Monitors. The evening includes performances from the honorees as well as the artists discussing their work. It’s a joyous affair celebrating North Carolina’s rich cultural legacies, one that’s as informative as it is entertaining. —Allison Hussey FLETCHER OPERA THEATER, RALEIGH | 7:30 p.m., $20, www.ncarts.org

FRIDAY, MAY 18

FRIDAY, MAY 18

THE AFROBOMBASTIC EXHIBIT

At 9:30 last Thursday night, my phone lit up with a message from artist Michelle GonzalezGreen: “I changed the focus of my exhibit.” Then another: “I just had a long convo with a homeless brother. I need to say something more.” Gonzalez-Green’s new art and design studio and gallery, The584, will be charged with this kind of urgent, quick-response artmaking and devoted to creative communities of people of color. This makes Gonzalez-Green’s space at 116 East Main Street—named after the South Bronx apartment block that her grandmother lived in for fifty-seven years—the first African-Latina-run art site in downtown Durham. The first show in the new space, The AfroBombastic Exhibit, has its opening reception Friday evening. It includes an African infinity mirror, mixed-media work about Hurricane Maria’s impact upon Puerto Rico, ink portraits on lighted butcher paper, and intergalactic ancestral portraits. DJ Yammy will provide the tunes at the opening; keep an eye on the INDY for an upcoming story about this exciting new space. —Chris Vitiello THE584, DURHAM | 6–10 p.m., free, www.the584.com

ROB LOWE: STORIES I ONLY TELL MY FRIENDS LIVE

Rob Lowe has long had tangential ties to Durham. His breakout film, St. Elmo’s Fire, was written by a Duke alum, and his son Matthew graduated from the university in 2016. Now the enduring actor returns to the Bull City for his live show based on his memoir, Stories I Only Tell My Friends. Lowe’s memoirs are genuinely entertaining stuff, filled with oddball tales—about working with Chris Farley on Tommy Boy and the never-aired finale of Lowe’s post-West Wing series, The Lyon’s Den, in which his character goes psychotic and jumps out a window—and the oddly sincere, self-deprecating humor that’s kept his career alive in a changing Hollywood, bouncing back from the original celebrity sex-tape scandal and whatever that 1988 Oscar opening where he danced with Snow White was supposed to be. In recent years, Lowe has developed a knack for self-parody on such TV shows as Parks & Recreation, The Grinder, and the supernatural-hunting docu-series The Lowe Files, and his live show promises to be literally the most entertaining celebrity “night with” tour ever. (You kind of had to watch Parks & Rec to get that last joke. Trust us, it’s worth it.) —Zack Smith DURHAM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, DURHAM | 7:30 p.m., $35+, www.dpacnc.com

SATURDAY, MAY 19

BIMBÉ CULTURAL ARTS FESTIVAL

For nearly fifty years, Durham’s annual Bimbé Cultural Arts Festival has celebrated the legacies and contributions of African Americans to the vibrant fabric of the city. From jazz, blues, and dance to Black Wall Street, there’s plenty to celebrate. But as the city has grown and its priorities have shifted, Bimbé has been shuffled northward, out of the city center and into Rock Quarry Park near the Durham County Stadium. This year, nineties R&B trio SWV heads up the musical offerings, while the rest of the festival has plenty of family-friendly games and activities as well as food and informational booths. If one day of fun isn’t enough, you can pregame with the free Basketball Classic at Southern High School on Thursday night, and teenagers with a valid high school ID can enjoy a free pool party at the Campus Hills pool on Alston Avenue Friday night. —Allison Hussey ROCK QUARRY PARK, DURHAM | Noon, free, www.durhamnc.gov INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 35


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PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT

RECENTLY ANNOUNCED: THE WALLS GROUP, MURDER BY DEATH WED JUN 29 @ 8:00 PM, $12/$15 WED @ 8:00 PM, $12/$15 Moogfest with AmberJUN Mark /29 Madame Gandhi /Sassy Black THU 5/17 AMBER/ Tess MARK FRI 5/18 Moogfest with Torres / Kyoka / Suicideyear Roby MADAME GANDHI /SASSY BLACK SAT 5/19 Moogfest with Fatima Al Qadiri / Georgia / Helen Money / Ono FRI 5/18 TORRES w/ POISON KYOKA ANTHEM / SUICIDEYEAR / TESS ROBY w/ POISONBACCHUS ANTHEM RICHARD & THE LUCKIEST GIRLS RICHARD BACCHUS & THE LUCKIEST GIRLS SAT 5/19 FATIMA AL QADIRI FRI 7/1 LOOK HOMEWARD / THE MIDATLANTIC GEORGIA / HELEN MONEY / ONO FRI 7/1 LOOK HOMEWARD / THE MIDATLANTIC THU 5/17

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WAILIN STORMS / HUNDREDFTFACES HAMMERFALL / Flotsam & Jetsam / Mechabull / Era Gone WAILIN STORMS / HUNDREDFTFACES MON Chorus: “Livin & La Vida Martin FRI5/21 7/8FlashSolKitchen TheLoca” ArtbyofRicky Cool Project: FRI 7/8and SolKitchen &byThe Art of Cool Project: “Enter Metallica The Art Sandman” of Noise #Durham The Art of Noise #Durham WED 5/23 RODDY RADIATION (of The Specials) MON 7/11The Regulator presents Scotch BonnetsBookstore / The Spectacles MON 7/11 Regulator Bookstore presents HEATHER Polly Live THU 5/24 ROBBIE FULKS / HAVRILESKY: Alan Barnosky Ask HEATHER HAVRILESKY: Ask Polly Live DANNY SCHMIDT / REBECCA NEWTON with WES COLLINS DANNY SCHMIDT / REBECCA NEWTON with WES COLLINS Storymakers: Durham, Community Listening Event Storymakers: Durham, Community Listening Event PINKERTON RAID / ST. ANTHONY & THE MYSTERY TRAIN PINKERTON RAID / ST. ANTHONY & THE MYSTERY TRAIN W/ ALAN BARNOSKY SUN JUL 17 JULPM 17 FRI 5/25 SHANE SMITH & THE SAINTS / Corey Hunt Band SUN @ 8:00 THE RAGBIRDS @ 8:00 PM THE Love RAGBIRDS WED 5/30 Universal - Mallarme Chamber Players with Kaira$12/$15 Ba $12/$15

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music 5.16–5.23 WED, MAY 16 HAW RIVER BALLROOM: Margo Price, Erin Rae; 8 p.m., $22–$25. THE KRAKEN: Jonathan Byrd & Friends; 7-10 p.m., free. LOCAL 506: High Volume Hangs; 9 p.m., free. POUR HOUSE: Of Good Nature, Mike Pinto, Sons of Paradise; 8 p.m., $10–$12.

THU, MAY 17

CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Amy Rigby, Charles Latham; 8 p.m., donations. LINCOLN THEATRE:

The SteelDrivers [$14.50–$25/8 P.M.]

Having famously helped launch Chris Stapleton’s career, The SteelDrivers also take an unconventional approach to what’s nominally considered bluegrass. Or at least that’s the implication of The Muscle Shoals Recordings winning the genre’s Grammy. While lacking the swampy soul suggested by that 2015 LP’s title, the Nashville outfit assumes a gritty, bluesy edge. —Spencer Griffith LOCAL 506: Jenny Don’t And The Spurs, The Dirty Little Heaters, Drunken Prayer; 9 p.m., $10–$12. MOTORCO: Moogfest: Amber Mark, Madame Ghandi, SassyBlack; 6:30 p.m., $229+. POUR HOUSE:

Local Band Local Beer: Hank, Pattie & the Current; Town Mountain [$3–$5/9 P.M.]

Progressive pickers Hank, Pattie & the Current are at their best when crafting modern acoustic music that disregards string band stereotypes to meld together bits of classical, jazz, and Latin with Pattie Hopkins Kinlaw’s soulful vocals. With a hefty dose of honky-tonk, Asheville quintet Town Mountain sticks more to hard-driving bluegrass traditions while revealing rock influence on unexpected covers. —Spencer Griffith

Iceage stops at Carrboro’s Cat’s Cradle Back Room on Sunday. THE WICKED WITCH: Bero Bero, Language Grab, VAXXERS, Slowbias; 8 p.m., $10.

FRI, MAY 18 ARCANA:

Jaguardini

[DONATIONS/8 P.M.] Darkwave, embodied by bands like Dead Can Dance and Depeche Mode, existed decades before The Great

Chillwave Boom of the late 2000s. But contemporary darkwave acts like Jaguardini can best be seen as the shadowy doppelgangers of chillwavers like Neon Indian. Jaguardini has the chillwave proclivity for showy analogue synths and hyper-compressed drum samples. But instead of singing about psychedelic trips in the sunshine or other summertime shenanigans, Jaguardini delivers dark

PHOTO BY STEVE GULLICK

anecdotes about sleeping pills and painful romantic excursions. With Ships in the Night and Peachelope. —Noah Rawlings

CAT’S CRADLE: David Bromberg Quintet; 8 p.m., $23–$26. CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Priscilla Renea; 8 p.m., $10.

THE ARTSCENTER: John McCutcheon; 8 p.m., $24.

COASTAL CREDIT UNION MUSIC PARK AT WALNUT CREEK:

BEYÙ CAFFÈ: George Freeman Jr; 7 & 9 p.m., $14.

Post Malone

CARRBORO TOWN COMMONS: Freight Train Blues: Cool John Ferguson, Pee Wee Hayes; 6:30 p.m., free.

A white rapper pontificating about how you shouldn’t listen to hip-hop “if you’re

[$58/7 P.M.]

looking to think about life,” and spouting a list of exclusively white artists who are “exceptions,” should destroy said rapper’s career. But instead it galvanized Post Malone’s, with fans pushing his latest album, beerbongs & bentleys, into the number one Billboard 200 spot, ousting J. Cole and making for a bitter example of gentrification in hip-hop. 21 Savage opens. —Charles Morse INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 37


KINGS:

Nance

[$12–$15/8 P.M.] When it comes to filling rooms, Nance is one of the best in Raleigh hip-hop. He packed out Lincoln Theatre on his own last summer, and has opened for some the most notable rappers to make their way through the Triangle. His forthcoming album, No Excuses, features guest appearances from Well$, Danny Blaze, and 3AM, all amazing live performers, so this release show should be one for the books. —Charles Morse

TH 5/17

FR 5/18 SA 5/19 SU 5/20 TU 5/22

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38 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

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CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM:

POUR HOUSE: Backup Planet, Cosmic Superheroes, Vibe and Direct; 10 p.m., $8–$10.

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POUR HOUSE: Lincoln Durham, The Ghost Wolves; 8 p.m., $12–$15. SAXAPAHAW RIVER AMPHITHEATER: A Different Thread; 6 p.m., donations.

LOCAL 506: We Were Sharks, Boys of Fall, My Life on Film, The Second After; 8 p.m., $10–$12.

CELEBRATION OF NC SONGWRITING: 7P NANCY MIDDLETON, SAM FRAZIER, ABIGAIL DOWD, KIRK RIDGE 6-8P DUKE STREET DOGS JAMES ARMSTRONG 9P $10 1-3P PINECONE BLUEGRASS JAM 8PM ELLERBEE CREEK BAND 3-8P 4TH ANNUAL ROCK THE CURE $10 SUGGESTED 7:30P TUESDAY BLUES JAM WITH CLARK STERN

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MOTORCO: Moogfest: Fatima Al Qadiri, Georgia, Helen Money, ONO; 6:30 p.m., $229+.

THE STATION: Nige Hood, Defacto Thezpian, Jooselord Magnus; 9:30 p.m., $7.

BEYÙ CAFFÈ: Darnell “Showcase” Taylor; 7 & 9 p.m., $16.

PHOTO BY HEATHER CANTRELL

LOCAL 506: Get Sad Y’all Emo Night; 9 p.m., $10.

LINCOLN THEATRE: The Clarks; 7:30 p.m.

SAT, MAY 19 The Sea and Cake stop at The Pinhook with Jim Elkington on Sunday.

CAT’S CRADLE: New Found Glory, Bayside, The Movielife, William Ryan Key; 7:30 p.m., sold out. CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): American Pleasure Club (fka Teen Suicide), Special Explosion, Family Vision; 8 p.m., $13–$15.

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spirit to the end of the evening, or (b) recover from a threeday hangover via dancing, friends, and food. Nightlight’s head chef de cuisine, Aaron Smithers, will be whipping up some top-shelf snacks as a handful of North Carolina deejays and NYC’s Rheji Burrell spin records. —Noah Rawlings

CAT’S CRADLE: Okkervil River, Benjamin Lazar Davis; 8:30 p.m., $18–$20.

[$14–$16/7:30 P.M.]

THE PINHOOK: Mama Played Mondays; 7 p.m., free.

Active since the early nineties, Thrill Jockey stalwarts the Sea and Cake are progenitors of the omnivorous style of Chicago indie, instantly recognizable for energetic motorik percussion, prog atmospherics, and carefully layered melodies. For the new Any Day, the group has moved from the quartet to a threepiece, and any attempts to assert that this has “tightened” their sound is belied by the album’s open and expansive feel, topped by the gentle lyricism of vocalist Archer Prewitt. —Josephine McRobbie POUR HOUSE: The Morning Bells, Sezessionville Road; 1 p.m., $5. RED HAT AMPHITHEATER:

Primus, Mastodon [$22–$252/6:30 P.M.]

almost lethargic voice pierces through overdrive-tinged riffs and roaring horns and strings, aptly towing the line between careful restraint and full-on extravagance. Despite the album’s pop sensibilities, the lyrics are still as dark as a moonless night sky, veering from intimate internal reflections to broader, farreaching critiques of culture and violence. Empath opens. —Nick Gallagher MOTORCO: Hammerfall, Flotsam And Jetsam, Mechabull, Era Gone; 7:30 p.m., $25–$70.

NEPTUNES PARLOUR:

Voight-Kampff [$7/9:30 P.M.]

How would you test a guitar tone to determine if it’s a human or an android? Would you subject it to a spectral analysis, looking for those micro-inflections that only a true human can produce? The subtle rhythmic variations away from a quantized beat? Something else entirely? Or, would you just say “That’s a silly idea concocted in a Blade Runner fever dream”?

PHOTO BY MADI CLARK

St. Louis’s Voight-Kampff attempts an answer with their Joy Division-inflected rock songs. —Dan Ruccia NIGHTLIGHT:

Moogfest Hangover Day Party [$5/2 P.M.]

Moogfest concludes on Sunday afternoon, but that’s no reason to let the musical merriments end. In Chapel Hill, Nightlight hosts the ideal event for those wishing to either (a) extend a festive

MON, MAY 21

THE PINHOOK:

The Sea and Cake

Ruby Boots performs at The Pour House Tuesday night.

experimental prog—while somehow making their fusions palatable to metalheads and mainstream rock fans alike. All Them Witches open. —Patrick Wall

At first blush, it seems a bit of an odd-couple pairing for a co-headlining tour: the loose-limbed, goofy-ass alt-metal of Primus and the searing, self-serious progmetal of Mastodon. But both bands tease at heavy metal’s boundaries—Primus incorporating elements of post-punk, funk and jazz, and Mastodon diving headlong into its collective love of knotty

POUR HOUSE:

Andrew Bryant, which conjures similarly haunted, moody atmospheres while Bryant’s ragged voice paints stark vignettes with vivid lyrical details. In the opening slot, Alabama native Will Stewart brings even more literate, introspective roots rock that mines the Deep South’s thorny past and knotty present. Bryant also plays Neptune’s on May 23 with Christiane & The Strays adding a sweetened dose of twang. —Spencer Griffith

Ruby Boots

POUR HOUSE: Riverbend Reunion, Andrew Scotchie; 9 p.m.

Like her Nashville outlaw country buddy Nikki Lane, Australian expat Ruby Boots (née Bex Chilcott) performs a certain swaggy earnestness inherent in the genre’s playbook. On “I Am a Woman, she sings in a confident a cappella, “I am a mountain/I’m the challenge you seek.” For her second album, Don’t Talk About It, Chilcott enlisted the enigmatic and rowdy session crew The Texas Gentlemen, employing blustery T-Rex licks and distorted vocals to distinguish the album as something refreshingly playful. Blue Cactus opens. —Josephine McRobbie

WED, MAY 23

[$10/7 P.M.]

TUE, MAY 22 CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM:

Andrew Bryant, Will Stewart [$8–$10/8:30 P.M.]

Fans of underrated Southern gothic rockers Water Liars will find plenty to love in the solo work of the Mississippi outfit’s multi-instrumentalist

KINGS:

Pillorian

[$12–$15/8 P.M.] Last used in the United States in 1905, the pillory is a device built for public humiliation, a wooden frame that locks over a person’s neck and hands to expose an offender to public scorn and physical abuse. Oregon black metal trio Pillorian takes its name from the device, and its aural assault befits its namesake. Its twisted black metal fuses haunting melodies with avant-garde structures, dark folk elements and sinister walls of furious sound. With Bedowyn and Mo’ynoq. — Patrick Wall THE KRAKEN: Jonathan Byrd & Friends; 7-10 p.m., free. MOTORCO: Roddy Radiation, The Scotch Bonnets, The Spectacles; 8 p.m., $10–$12. NIGHTLIGHT: Mike Compton & Joe Newberry; 8-10 p.m., $20.

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art

5.16–5.23

OPENING Accessible Arts with Artsplosure, Arts Access, and Artspace: Day of inclusive art, dance, and music for people with and without disabilities. Sat, May 19, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. SPECIAL The Bull Meets the EVENT Bayou: Level Artist Collective. Reception: Fri, May 18, 6-9 p.m. Artist talk: Sunday, May 20, 5-10 p.m. The Carrack Modern Art, Durham. www.thecarrack.org. SPECIAL FRESH Preview EVENT Exhibition: Work by N.C. artists. May 17-26. Reception: Thu, May 17, 5 p.m. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. Night Bright Community Festival: Interactive light murals by Austrian artist collective OMAi. Part of You Are Here. May 17 & 18, 6:30 p.m. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. www. ncartmuseum.org. SPECIAL Worlds Apart: EVENT Photography by Yousuf Zafar. May 19-July 7 Reception: Fri, May 19, 5-7 p.m. Craven Allen Gallery, Durham. cravenallengallery.com.

ONGOING April/May Show: Mixed media by Carol Retsch-Bogart and photography by Bill McAllister and Sam Wang. Thru Jun 3. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill. www.frankisart.com. Artspace Corridor Exhibition: Member artists Jane Cheek, Autumn Cobeland, Arsis Fruritch, Joyce Watkins King, and Susan LaMantia. Thru Jul 28. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. LAST Boats of the Times: CHANCE Mixed media. Thru May 20. Skylight Gallery, Hillsborough. skylightgallerync.com. Business as Usual: A massive white man’s head hangs from the ceiling, with furrowed brows, beady eyes, and veins protruding at the temples. This omnipresent “boss” watches over Winston-Salem 40 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

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artist Bob Trotman’s exhibit, which incorporates mixed media and video art into dozens of figurative sculptures that critique big business by unmasking its gospel of greed and envy at the expense of workers. In wood, resin, tempera, and wax, the handcarved figures range from doll-size to larger-than-life. The details in their caricatured faces show that they have become hardened to being expendable in an ecosystem of private enterprise. Echoes of 9/11 and the 2008 financial crisis are also present. And sometimes, Trotman uses the form of the automaton to propose his concerns about the dehumanization of workers. Though it was made two years prior to Trump’s election, “Trumpeter” seems like an on-the-nose caricature of our POTUS as a CEO. A trumpet connected to a motionactivated speaker stands in for the figure’s head. As you draw close, it emits indiscernible squawking sounds, implying that the bullying figurehead offers citizens nothing more than a farcical circus of noise. Thru Jul 1. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts. ncsu.edu. —Julie M. Hamilton

SUNDAY, MAY 20

THE BULL MEETS THE BAYOU In a global, digital age, art, like everything else, risks turning into an unmoored commodity in virtual space. That’s why shows like The Bull Meets the Bayou are so refreshing, reasserting that art emanates from real communities in certain times and places and then strengthening those communities by forging bonds between them. The exhibit, curated by local artist Jaclyn Bowie, presents the works of Durhamites alongside New Orleans’s Level Artist Collective. Featuring collaborative installations, videos, sculptures, paintings, drawings, and a library of artist books and zines, the exhibit has a variety of events before its June 2 closure. The New Orleans artists will be present on Third Friday as well as for this Sunday-night artist talk, which also features a Durham Cinematheque film screening, music by Tescon Pol, and puppetry by Jeghetto. Future events include a May 29 panel discussion on artists supporting artists and a June 2 closing reception. —Brian Howe

THE CARRACK MODERN ART, DURHAM 5–10 p.m., $5 suggested donation, www.thecarrack.org

“Vulnerable Embrace” by Rontherin Ratliff

Elizabeth Bradford: Paintings. Thru Jul 31. Umstead Hotel & Spa, Cary. theumstead.com. Celebrating Nature: Botanical drawings by Preston Montague, wildlife photography by Ricky Davis, and pottery by Liz Kelly. Thru May 26. Horse & Buggy Press and Friends, Durham. www.horseandbuggypress.com. Coalesce: Watercolor Society of NC Central Region exhibit. Thru Jun 27. Sertoma Arts Center, Raleigh. parks.raleighnc.gov. SPECIAL Coastal Moods: Oil EVENT paintings of the Southeastern N.C. coast by Nancy Hughes Miller. Reception: Sat, May 19, 3-5 p.m. Thru Jun 30. Little Art Gallery & Craft Collection, Raleigh. littleartgalleryandcraft.com. Hotel Theory: Around the time he stepped away from

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his twenty-year tenure as founding director of Raleigh gallery Lump, Bill Thelen struck out for an artist residency in a hotel in Oaxaca. He brought two books with him, Huysmans’s decadent Against Nature and Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, an experimental philosophy of hotel life. The result is Thelen’s own Hotel Theory. Consisting of drawings, collages, wall paintings, and a new fiber piece, the exhibit tracks an artist “immersed in the colors and textures of the Oaxacan landscape and facing middle age” as he observes the lines of history, place, and personal identity from a rented room, a space

(like middle age) that, in its nowhere-ness, offers fresh vantages. Thru Jun 1. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. www.21cmuseumhotels.com/ durham. —Brian Howe Chad Hughes: Oil paintings. Thru May 31. Bull City Art & Frame Co, Durham. bullcityartandframecompany. com. Latino Arts Collective Exhibit: Thru Jun 8. Halle Cultural Arts Center, Apex. www.thehalle.org. Light the Woods with Sound: Local neon artist Nate Sheaffer suspended hundreds of pieces of glowing tube high in a clutch of trees, timed to flash in various patterns with looping music. The neon pieces consist of rings and coils that drip

from the boughs; there are also glass eggs that glow and fade like fireflies. But the piece is more than lulling to look at; it’s also fun to play with. Joe Caterinicchio designed six sound beds in different genres that are keyed to different patterns in the light sculpture. You can play keyboards, drum pads, or a theremin to add sound and change the light, creating a complex, exciting interplay between pattern and chaos. Fridays and Sundays are the best nights to try it (register on the Dix Park website), while on Saturdays, local musicians such as Missy Thangs, David Mueller, and Sunset Palette give experimental concerts with the setup. Thru May 27. Dorothea Dix Campus, Raleigh. —Brian Howe

The Lovers: Pink crepe myrtles quiver in spectral layers. Curtains rustle in glowing purple rooms. An antique mirror rests in a water-stained sink. Windows and doors beckon into other worlds. Such is the imagery found in Joy Meyer’s large-scale video installation. Thirteen channels of video and sound, augmented with objects such as faux-fur rugs, neon signs, and vintage TV sets, create an immersive environment that draws on themes from speculative fiction, epistemology, feminism, and the tarot (the show is named after the deck’s sixth card) to test the edges of space and time, love and desire. Thru Jun 9. Lump, Raleigh. www.lumpprojects.org. —Brian Howe


LAST Gayle Stott Lowry: CHANCE New paintings. Thru May 20. Eno Gallery, Hillsborough. enogallery.net. Mentor/Mentee: Lope Max Diaz & Luke Miller Buchanan: Lee Hansley Gallery celebrates twenty-five years in a Raleigh with, appropriately enough, an exhibit celebrating lineage. Luke Miller Buchanan studied with Lope Max Diaz at N.C. State’s College of Design. Putting their paintings side by side shows how the elder’s striking geometric designs influenced but found softer, more sinuous expression in the canvases of the younger artist. Thru May 27. Lee Hansley, Raleigh. leehansleygallery. com. —Brian Howe SPECIAL Not in My Backyard: EVENT MFA thesis exhibition by Jeanine Tatlock. Thru May 24. Reception: Thu, May 17, 5-7 p.m. UNC Campus: Hanes Art Center, Chapel Hill. art.unc.edu. Painted Ladies: Actresses from the Pre-Code Era: Oil paintings by Kevin Peddicord. Thru May 27. Imurj, Raleigh. Pop-Up Market: Twenty local vendors of handcrafted goods. Music by The River Otters. Sat,

May 19, noon-6 p.m. Durty Bull Brewing Company, Durham. Debbie Quick: PNC Pop In Artist in Residence. Beaded drawings and figurative sculptures. Thru May 26. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. Red Summer: Wendell A. White’s large-scale prints combining contemporary landscape portraits and historic newspaper accounts. Thru Jun 2. Duke Campus: Center for Documentary Studies, Durham. www.cdsporch.org. LAST Sacred Art of the CHANCE Sand Mandala: Tibetan Buddhist Monks of Drepung Gomang Monastery construct a sacred sand mandala. Thru May 19. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Sentience: Paintings and drawings by Adam Cohen. Thru May 25. National Humanities Center, Durham. www. nationalhumanitiescenter.org.

Mondrian, de Kooning, Pollock, Rothko—had very different ways of pushing painting past representation. They also had something in common: all were white. Of course, it isn’t that African Americans weren’t making vital contributions to the course of art history; it’s that the white male canon-makers didn’t as readily embrace them. This touring exhibit at the Nasher is a spectacular corrective, highlighting the African-diaspora abstract artists who refined this new way of seeing. They range from mid-twentiethcentury Abstract Expressionist Norman Lewis to contemporary iconoclasts such as Theaster Gates and Mark Bradford, whose twenty-five-foot-tall sculpture anchors the exhibit. Thru Jul 15. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. —Brian Howe Spring Sublime: Thru Jun 11. FRANK’s Outreach Gallery, Chapel Hill.

Snippets: Paintings by David Molesky. Thru Aug 15. Gallery A, Raleigh. gallerya-nc.com.

Step Right Up: Sculpture by Patrick Dougherty. Thru Aug 31. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. www.ackland.org.

Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection: The most famed names in postwar abstract art—

Structure: VAE Photographers Forum exhibit. Thru Jun 14. Litmus Gallery, Raleigh. www.litmusgallery.com.

The SuperNatural: We’ve lost sight of the seams, once considered inviolable, between nature, technology, and commerce. The SuperNatural explores how we see and shape the contours of our planet as the physical refuse of the industrial age shades into the digital refuse of the present. The show includes a generative digital video by Tabor Robak, a virtual reality installation by Jakob Kudsk Steensen, and photos by Lars Jan, among many others. Brooklyn artist Chris Doyle created “Dreams of Infinite Luster,” a digital animation. In it, “All the elements are rendered in gold, the color of lucre—the product, engine, and goal of capitalism.” Is a luxury hotel an odd site for post-capitalist critique? Sure. But, as we’ve said, what seams? Thru Jul 1. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. www.21cmuseumhotels.com/ durham. —Brian Howe Sweet Dreams: Opening exhibition for new gallery located inside 311 Gallery. Thru May 26. V L Rees Gallery, Raleigh. vlrees.com. Three Quilts: Fiber art by Martha Clippinger. Thru Aug 12. Durham

Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org. LAST Trees by Three: CHANCE Carved wood by Larry Favorite, glass art by Susan Hope, and paintings by Ellie Reinhold. Thru May 20. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts. www.hillsboroughgallery.com. Watermark: Weaving and other traditional methods of hand-work by Dawn Hummer. Thru May 25. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. PleiadesArtDurham.com.

LAST What Is Good Art? CHANCE 2018: Student artwork about ethics. Thru May 17. Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University, Durham. The Wild: Leah Sobsey, Joy Meyer, and Jeff Whetstone videos in downtown Raleigh’s Market Plaza. Thru Jun 27. BLOCK2 Video Series, Raleigh. Working Classics: Landscapes in oil by Steve Hessler. Thru May 31. NC Crafts Gallery, Carrboro. www.nccraftsgallery.com.

food & drink Craft Beer Tastings: Free craft beer tasting with White Street Brewing. Thursdays, 5 p.m. Thru May 18. Barley Labs, Durham. www.barleylabs.com. Dinner to Benefit No Kid Hungry: Multi-course dinner with host chef Thomas Card in support of No Kid Hungry’s work to end childhood hunger. Guest chefs: Steven Greene of The Umstead Hotel, Scott James of The Angus Barn, Michael Lee

of MSushi, and Colin Bedford of Fearrington House. $85. Thu, May 17, 6-9 p.m. Counting House, Durham. Got to Be NC Festival: North Carolina agriculture and food. Local marketplace, antique tractors, farm animals, live music, carnival rides and games, barbecue cookoff. May 18-20. NC State Fairgrounds, Raleigh. www.ncstatefair.org.

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stage

Oak City Comedy Festival coproducer Matt White PHOTO COURTESY OF OAK CITY COMEDY FESTIVAL TUESDAY, MAY 22–SATURDAY, MAY 26

OAK CITY COMEDY FESTIVAL

Your week. Every Wednesday. ARTS•NEWS•FOOD•MUSIC INDYWEEK.COM 42 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

Institutions such as Goodnights have made Raleigh a stopping place for many of the finest comedians in the world. Now, the city’s branding itself as a center for comedy with the new Oak City Comedy Festival, which features both local and national voices over five laughfilled days. Guests and performers include veteran local comic Mike Mello, “N.C.’s Funniest Person” J Bliss, Wilmington’s Blaire Postman, Charlotte improv group Now Are the Foxes, and Raleigh improv and sketch groups Spectral Spouse and Dear Sirs. Events are spread out across bars and comedy clubs throughout downtown Raleigh, giving audiences a chance to experience not only a variety of comedians but also the city’s variety of venues, from Sonorous Road Theatre to Neptunes. Most events are $10; visit the Oak City Comedy Festival website for schedule, tickets, and times. —Zack Smith

VARIOUS VENUES, RALEIGH | Various times, $10+, www.oakcitycomedyfestival.com


OPENING Improv Night: Presented by Venus Flytrap Comedy. Fri, May 18, 8 p.m. The Wicked Witch, Raleigh. wickedwitchraleigh.com. It Can’t Happen Here: A Celebration: Staged readings of Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here. Sat, May 19, 6 p.m. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. www.PleiadesArtDurham.com. Raleigh Gets LUEWWD!: Theatrical and competitive women’s arm wrestling by the League of Upper Extremity Wrestling Women of Durham. In conjunction with Feminine Spectrum. Fri, May 18, 6 p.m. VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. Transactors Improv for Families: Dancing with Daffodils: Celebrating spring in an all-ages comedy show. $6-$10. Sat, May 19, 6 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www.artscenterlive.org.

ONGOING Anything Goes Late Show: Saturdays, 10:30 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. ½ Blood Done Sign My Name: Reviewed on p. 32. Thru Jun 3. Raleigh Little Theatre, Raleigh. www. raleighlittletheatre.org. LAST  The CHANCE Changeling: In the seventeenth century, a couple of swells named Middleton and Rowley wrote a play about people using sex as a bargaining chip, a lever, an escape route, a weapon— anything but a token of love. One half is set in a castle where everyone wants somebody murdered in exchange for sex or vice versa, the other in an insane asylum. The linked plots are a rather disgusting roundelay of sexual coercions and assaults, triple betrayals and love quadrangles, disguises and virgin swaps. The dispiriting point seems to be that women who want to have sex with people their families didn’t choose deserve the bad ends they meet. In the twenty-first century, Little Green Pig director Jaybird O’Berski injected his anarchic spirit into this archaic material and left us on our own to figure out what to make of it. The play is staged in two rooms. In the castle scenes, the text, read at headlong speed, is

sometimes hard to parse, particularly in Shelby Hahn’s mutter as the loathsome DeFlores. A crisp, vivid Rebecca Bossen owns this act as Beatrice-Johanna, scheming to get DeFlores to kill her fiancé. Scholarly articles about seventeenth-century sexual mores complicate BeatriceJohanna’s rape, but to us, it is just rape, staged with triggerwarning-worthy brutality and followed by a clown orchestra playing The Pixies. Meanwhile, the asylum scenes are a kind of Borscht Belt music revue. This part of the show is fun—if you can handle copious dick jokes. The garish onslaught is hypnotic; we kept settling in and then being startled, like wait, what am I watching, and why? It’s pure O’Berski-style extremity: half classic and half modern, half sparkly and half ugly, half serious and half crazy, half wonderful and half terrible. It deserves either all the stars or none (which we averaged out to three). Is O’Berski trolling us? Maybe, and while this is far from our favorite Little Green Pig show, that’s what keeps us coming back. $10-$17. Thru May 19. Culture Mill Lab, Saxapahaw. —Brian Howe

very tall order: channeling Janis Joplin, the gritty, damaged, transcendent goddess of rock, blues, and gospel, in sequences on stage and off. In Randy Johnson’s 2013 Broadway musical biography, a two-act homage with a live band, a veritable pantheon of AfricanAmerican musicians who fundamentally influenced Joplin’s music have their moments as well: Etta James, Nina Simone, Odetta, and Bessie Smith. But it’s Joplin’s electrifying live shows—or exorcisms, as she grappled with a darkness that ultimately overcame her in a heroin-andalcohol overdose at age twenty-seven—that Ferrari must convey. $30+. Thru May 20. Fletcher Opera Theater, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh. com. —Byron Woods

The Dangling Loafer: $5. Third Fridays, 8 p.m. Kings, Raleigh. www.kingsraleigh.com.

Wakey, Wakey: “We’re here to say goodbye,” reads the epigraph from Wakey, Wakey that Manbites Dog Theater selected to promote the Triangle premiere of Will Eno’s play. If the quotation is unusually profound, it’s because it not only cuts to heart of Eno’s play about memory, mortality, and letting go, but it also underscores that this is the venerable Durham theater’s final production before it closes in June after thirty-one seasons. There will be time for remembrance, so for now, let’s linger in the present with this apt, ambitious sendoff. In this 2017 work by a major playwright—Beckett’s American heir apparent—a wheelchair-bound man faces the end and reflects on his life with Eno’s typical idiosyncrasy and eloquence, a rich character emerging from freewheeling digressions and tangents. Manbites cofounder Jeff Storer directs local stage veteran Derrick Ivey in the role Michael Emerson put such a strong stamp on; Lakeisha Coffey plays care-worker Lisa. $5-$20. Manbites Dog Theater, Durham. www.manbitesdogtheater.org. —Brian Howe

 Dry Powder: Reviewed on p. 32. $16-$20. Thru May 28. Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh. Hamiltunes: Hamilton karaoke. $10 suggested donation. May 17 & 18, 7 p.m. Burning Coal Theatre at the Murphey School, Raleigh. www.burningcoal.org. The Harry Show: Ages 18+. Potentially risque games improv games with audience volunteers. $10. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m. ComedyWorx, Raleigh. www.comedyworx.com. Improv at the Varsity: Standup, sketch, and improv comedy. $6. Saturdays, 9:30 p.m. Varsity Theatre, Chapel Hill. improvatthevarsity.com. LAST A Night with Janis CHANCE Joplin: NC Theatre usually favors single-week productions of hit Broadway musicals. But in this changeup, a coproduction with Connecticut’s Ivoryton Playhouse, audiences have three whole weeks to see New York’s Francesca Ferrari fill a

Open Mic Stand-Up Comedy at Durty Bull: Fridays, 8 p.m. Thru May 18. Durty Bull Brewing Company, Durham. The Sunday Show: Monthly comedy showcase. Featuring Maddie Wiener, JD Etheridge, Brandy Brown, and Nik Cartwright. Sun, May 20, 8 p.m. Mystery Brewing Public House, Hillsborough. www.mysterybrewing.com.

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screen MONDAY, MAY 21

LEESA CROSS-SMITH & NAIMA COSTER Writer conversations about first novels can be pro forma affairs, given to truisms about persistence and hot tips about the market. But Leesa Cross-Smith, a Louisville-based fiction writer, and Naima Coster, who teaches writing at Wake Forest University, should have deeper things Naima Coster to talk about. Their PHOTO BY JONATHAN JIMÉNEZ PÉREZ acclaimed debuts have intriguing parallels: both are multiple-perspective novels about art, family, and mortality. In Cross-Smith’s Whiskey & Ribbons, a ballerina loses her police-officer husband before their son is born and begins raising the child with her husband’s brother, who is searching for his biological father. And in Coster’s Halsey Street, a struggling artist returns to Brooklyn to care for her sick father and finds everything changed—Bed-Stuy reshaped by gentrification, her mother reclaiming roots in the Dominican Republic. The books form a diptych about how new families form and old ones heal. —Brian Howe

FLYLEAF BOOKS, CHAPEL HILL

7 p.m., free, www.flyleafbooks.com

READINGS & SIGNINGS Leesa Cross-Smith and Naima Coster: Discussing their debut novels. Mon, May 21, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. www.flyleafbooks.com. Ralph Hardy: With middlegrade novel Argos. Sat, May 19, 2 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. www.flyleafbooks.com. Beth Holmgren: With biography Warsaw is My Country. Wed, May 16, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. www.flyleafbooks.com. A Literary Luncheon with Paula McLain: Lunch, book signing, and reading from Love and Ruin: A Novel. $75. Wed, May 23, noon. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com. Kevin Powers: With A Shout in the Ruins. Fri, May 18, 6:30 p.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. www.mcintyresbooks.com. Jeanne Yocum: With The SelfEmployment Survival Guide. Thu, May 17, 7 p.m. North Regional Library, Durham. 44 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

LECTURES ETC. Art for Lunch: Rob Fucci: Peck Collection Research Fellow on “Old Paper, New Research: Using Historical Watermarks to Study Drawings in the Ackland Art Museum.” Bring a bag lunch. Wed, May 16, noon. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. www.ackland.org. The Faith Community and Climate Change: Talk by Stephen Jurovics, author of Hospitable Planet: Faith, Action, and Climate Change. Sun, May 20, 1 p.m. Eno River Unitarian Univ. Fellowship, Durham. www.eruuf.org. Happy Hour at Vert & Vogue: With art dealer and curator Teka Selman. Free drinks. Fri, May 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Vert & Vogue, Durham. vertandvogue.com. Sister Cities: The Glory of Greece: Virtual tour of the history of Greece presented by Durham County Library. Sat, May 19, 2 p.m. Southwest Regional Library, Durham. www.durhamcountylibrary.org.

FRIDAY, MAY 18

SENIOR NIGHT If you missed Senior Night when it screened in the Southern Documentary Fund’s in-progress series last year, here’s a chance to see Durham filmmaker David Mayer’s short, now completed, as part of a well-rounded evening of entertainment rich with local interest. Centering on Riverside High School basketball player Anthony Peak during his senior year, the elegiac film tells the story of the last game of the season, balancing the glory of the sport against the bittersweet feeling of moving on. And who doesn’t love docs set in our own city? At Walltown Children’s Theatre, the screening is bolstered by a poetry reading by Zach Goldberg and an original dance choreographed by Cynthia Penn Halal, Walltown’s artistic director, with a reception with the artists to follow. —Brian Howe

WALLTOWN CHILDREN’S THEATRE, DURHAM 8 p.m., $15–$25, www.walltownchildrenstheatre.org

Senior Night

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FILMMAKERS

SPECIAL SHOWINGS Advertising at the Edge of the Apocalypse: Documentary on the consequences of advertising, commercial culture, and American consumerism. Presented by the TriangleArea Green Party. Wed, May 23, 6 p.m. The Oasis at Carr Mill, Carrboro. oasisatcarrmill.com. Senior Night: Premiere of documentary about a Riverside High School basketball player by Durham filmmaker David Mayer. With poetry by Zach Goldberg and dance by Cynthia Penn Halal. $15-$25. Fri, May 18, 8 p.m. Walltown

Children’s Theatre, Durham. walltownchildrenstheatre.org. Truth Underground: Documentary on spoken word poets. Thu, May 17, 6:30 p.m. UNC Campus: Nelson Mandela Auditorium, FedEx Global Education Center, Chapel Hill.

OPENING Book Club—Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen, and Mary Steenburgen play friends in a book club whose lives are changed by Fifty Shades of Gray. Rated PG-13.  Deadpool 2— Reviewed on p. 33. Rated R. Disobedience—Rachel Weisz plays a woman who returns to the Orthodox Jewish

community that shunned her in this film by Sebastián Lelio (A Fantastic Woman). Rated R. Pope Francis: A Man of His Word—A new documentary by Wim Wenders. Rated PG. The Rider—Chloe Zhao injects cinematic poetry into the story of a young rodeo cowboy with a career-ending injury. Rated R.

N OW P L AY I N G The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Read reviews of these films at indyweek.com.  Black Panther— Marvel’s Afrofuturist breakthrough shows what black writers, actors, and characters can do with center stage. Rated PG-13.

 Isle of Dogs—Wes Anderson’s animated fable is alternately respectful and baffling in its treatment of Japan. Rated PG-13.  Lean on Pete— Andrew Haigh’s film about a boy trying to save his horse is quiet, slow, sad, and gorgeous. Rated PG-13.  RBG—Forgot those Avengers. This doc about pioneering Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the best superhero movie of the year. Rated PG.  A Wrinkle in Time— Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of the classic novel is bold and messy, but with its diverse cast, it could be a touchstone for today’s twelve-year-olds. Rated PG.


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Beyond Fences seeks plastic or igloo style dog houses for dogs in need, as well as indoor metal crates. To donate, please contact Amanda at director@unchaindogs.net.

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC

NOTICE FOR DIVORCE I, Berecia Christopher Morris of 4230 Garrett Rd apt 6M, Durham, NC am attempting to contact Basil Winston Morris to inform you of a request for absolute divorce. You are required to respond no later than 40 days following May 16, 2018. I can be reached indefinitely at 718-790-3015 and/ or by email jahcoyamane@ yahoo.com

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CLA S S Y AT I N DY WE EK DOT C O M INDYweek.com | 5.16.18 | 45


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7

6 8 7 6

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2

bang for your buck!

If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “Diversions” at the bottom of our webpage.

6 classy 5 9 8 at indyweek 2 4 dot com

1 2

9

crossword

5

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# 46

su | do | ku

this week’s puzzle level:

© Puzzles by Pappocom

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above.

4

1

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6 2 2 6 17 5 5 6 21

1 9 5

1 57 4 8 7 3 8 9 4

5

7 MEDIUM 7 6 9 3 4 2 1 8 5

# 47

7 1 6 5 9 8 4 3 2

9 8 3 4 1 2 6 5 7

4 5 2 6 3 7 8 1 9

2 7 1 3 4 9 5 8 6

#5 6 4 8 1 7 5 2 9 3

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2 4 6 3 1 8 7 9 5 If you just 8 7can’t 5 9 6wait, 4 3 check 2 1 out the current 3 9 1 week’s 7 5 2 4answer 6 8 1 8 2 4 3 5 9 7 6 key at www.indyweek.com, 6 7 8 2 1 5 4 3 and click9“Diversions”. 4 5 3 6 9 7 8 1 2 Best of luck, 5 2 4and 1 8have 9 6 fun! 3 7 6 1 9 5 7 3 2 8 4 www.sudoku.com 7 3 8 2 4 6 1 5 9

1 6

46 | 5.16.18 | INDYweek.com

5

4 2

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8 7 2 7 4 5 6

6

5 8 1 5 9 8 7

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5 2 #6

# 48

1 9 7 2 8 4 3 6 5

5.16.18

solution to last week’s puzzle

Page 12 of 25

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# 48

4

5 3

6 1 8 9 4 1 8 4 8 2

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4 2 5 8 6 1 9 3 7

5

8 6 2

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30/10/2005

2

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CLASSY AT INDYWEEK DOT COM 4 3 5 2 8 3 4 9 6 7

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DANCE CLASSES IN SWING, LINDY, BLUES, TAI CHI

At ArtsCenter, Carrboro. Private lessons also available. RICHARD BADU, 919-724-1421, rbadudance@gmail.com

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in Timberlyne Center, FB: specialtreatschapelhill. Home of Smoky Mountain Whiskey Crackers™

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C L A S S Y AT I N D Y W E E K D O T C O M

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