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RALEIGH 5|15|19

s s o r G s i Th t a C d l O

Has Follo More Than wers You Raleigh loves Tucker.

A QUESTION OF FAITH, P. 8

Tucker doesn’t love anything.

LOVE BEHIND BARS, P. 9

By Leigh Tauss Page 10

MORE THAN MARTINIS, P. 16


6 Nea are a with

8 Rale patie abor

9 A ch Inst sam

10 Tuck

16 Ame mixe

18 “The killin pres

22 The the a norm

2 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com


WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK RALEIGH

VOL. 36, NO. 20

DEPARTMENTS

6 Nearly a third of those released from North Carolina prisons are arrested within a year. Of those, a quarter are arrested within three months.

6 News 16 Food

8 Raleigh gave $30,000 to a clinic whose doctor counsels patients about the “unmeasurable” consequences of abortion, including psychological and spiritual trauma.

18 Music 22 Arts & Culture 26 What to Do This Week

9 A chaplain allegedly told an inmate at Neuse Correctional Institution that no North Carolina prison has held a same-sex wedding, and Neuse didn’t want to be the first.

28 Music Calendar 33 Arts & Culture Calendar

10 Tucker is old, fat, and Instagram famous. 16 Americans usually think of vermouth as little more than a mixer for martinis. 18 “The most dramatic imagery I could spit out was actually killing God, to equate God with a domineering man’s presence, the patriarchy,” blues singer Adia Victoria says. 22 The House of Coxx’s new kid-friendly drag show embraces the art form’s capacity to promote social justice and normalize gender fluidity.

Nicole Pletcher is the general manager and co-owner of Apéro (p. 16).

On the cover

PHOTO BY ANDREA RICE

PHOTOS BY ANDREA RICE

INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 3


upfront

Keep It Strong. Keep It INDY. TWENTY-THREE YEARS AGO, THE INDY GAVE ME A JOB. IT’S SO MUCH MORE THAN THAT NOW. BY SUSAN HARPER

I

of local news, politics, and arts and culture As a publisher, this isn’t reassuring. started at the INDY in 1996 for the anywhere in North Carolina, and that matAt the same time, I continue to be blown same reason anyone starts working ters to the more than half-million Triangle away by the quality of the journalism we anywhere: I needed a job. I had student residents who rely on us. loans, rent, and health insurThat’s why I’m asking you to ance that covered almost nothjoin me in sustaining our jouring. I’d graduated from Duke two nalism through the INDY Press years earlier, and my contract Club. Just as we were different— job at the university was endthe buzzword then was “altering. The INDY—then The Indenative”—when I started, we’re pendent Weekly—was the first working hard to find new and company to offer me a position. different ways to keep our jourI was a sales coordinator maknalism vital and viable today. ing $17,000 a year, working in We’ve built a new website. We a converted duplex on Hillsborblast out paid emails from our ough Street that, I later learned, terrific clients. (You’ve subwe shared with quite a few mice. scribed to our email lists, right?) Today, the office is nicer, and We produce the two best guides three promotions later, I run the to the Triangle you’ll find, The place. I’ve stayed here not for the INDY’s Food & Drink Almanac paycheck, but because of how and FINDER. valuable this newspaper is to the The Press Club is our latest community it serves. Over the innovation—another way to reinyears, my appreciation for our vent an old business model that role has only grown. isn’t keeping pace with today’s We’ve always had challengrealities. But it only works with es, but the business was easiyour help. er two decades ago. I can still If you love and value this pubremember when personal ads lication as much as I do, please brought in $30,000 a month, visit KeepItINDY.com today when we had a huge classifieds to make a one-time or recursection, when our papers were ring contribution. (You can filled with page after page of also mail your contribution to ads. That was before businessPO Box 1772, Durham NC, es had the internet as a cheap27702.) In just the first week er alternative, before Craigslist of this campaign, more than a swiped our personals, before Pearson Harper, a rising junior at UNC-Wilmington hundred people have pitched the Great Recession smacked studying journalism, will hate that we’re printing this. in, committing over $14,000 us across the head, before Faceover the next twelve months toward our produce. And as other media outlets scale book and Google began sucking up digital $100,000 goal. That’s incredible! Now let’s back, the service our writers and editors advertising dollars. keep the momentum going. provide to the Triangle is more important According to a UNC study, the U.S. has Soon, we’ll match our members with all than ever. lost almost eighteen hundred newspapers sorts of benefits: tickets to events, discounts For me, this job has become an emotional in the last fifteen years. Earlier this month, at restaurants, even some cool merch. And proposition as well as a source of income. the entire staff of New Orleans’s The Timeswe’ll always repay your support with the And keeping this paper strong has become Picayune got laid off. In addition, over the finest independent journalism in the state. my mission. Despite the headwinds we last five years, several once-dominant altKeep it free. Keep it INDY. face, we’re still here because the INDY proweeklies have closed, including the Village sharper@indyweek.com duces some of the most powerful coverage Voice and the Boston Phoenix. 4 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

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Earlier th on the FA could no Authority Debora breaking been used nature lo years, mo door deal president Stone ar tion Fund chase the saying th park. Ins to be a qu same aft Creek—th ing at Cra Michael L the RDUA “The u part of M is tragic,” public be of our frie Last we City Coun able hou bond Du proposed “There area—a f lords—an Charlie F we love o “I think leading o itating de apartmen hoods,” w “What “Durham have to la In Mar tively kill among ot versity’s credited founding Allen writes: “I but I’d lik


backtalk

Public Be Damned Earlier this month, Leigh Tauss reported on the FAA’s ruling that local governments could not interfere in the RDU Airport Authority’s controversial quarry lease. Deborah Hage writes that this is “heartbreaking for the community. This land has been used for seventy years by Boy Scouts, nature lovers, hikers, and, in more recent years, mountain bikers. The behind-closeddoor deals made between the RDUAA, RDU president Michael Landguth, and Wake Stone are unforgivable! The Conservation Fund made a $6 million offer to purchase the land, and the RDUAA declined, saying they don’t want to sell it to be a park. Instead, they want to lease the land to be a quarry. That land will never be the same after a quarry. It sits on Crabtree Creek—the one that causes all the flooding at Crabtree Mall. The whole deal stinks. Michael Landguth, Dickie Thompson, and the RDUAA are corrupt. Period.” “The utter lack of imagination on the part of Michael Landguth and the RDUAA is tragic,” adds Buddy Kelly. “It’s like, the public be damned, we are going to take care of our friends.” Last week, Tauss wrote about the Raleigh City Council’s deliberations over an affordable housing bond, like the $95 million bond Durham Mayor Steve Schewel has proposed for his city. “There is no affordable housing in the area—a few exceptions with some slumlords—and it is getting worse,” responds Charlie Felicitas. “But it is capitalism, and we love our capitalism.” “I think it has yet to be seen if Durham is leading on affordable housing, or just facilitating developers’ ability to build luxury apartments in formerly affordable neighborhoods,” writes Christy Marshuetz Ferguson. “What a joke,” adds Caroline Crawford. “Durham leading in affordable housing? I have to laugh or I cry.” In March, when Duke University effectively killed light rail, we wrote a piece that, among other things, talked about the university’s history with its hometown, and credited Duke with being instrumental in founding starting Durham Central Park. Allen Wilcox, an early DCP organizer, writes: “I’ve let this slide for two months, but I’d like to clarify one point. Duke was

“You white haters of Trump have been educated out of your skins.”

not ‘instrumental’ in creating Durham Central Park. The park was founded as a grassroots organization, with support from many quarters. Duke has done great things for downtown revitalization, but Duke was not involved with the creation of the park. That said, I don’t want to appear ungrateful for what Duke has contributed. We’ve benefited from many volunteers from the Duke community on our regular workdays.” In last week’s Soapboxer, Jeffrey C. Billman argued that Donald Trump is a symptom of a larger disease, not its cause—“the culmination of a half-century of calculated cynicism … that stoked racial resentment, and three decades of Fox News and talk-radio propaganda that laid the groundwork for an army of angry, aggrieved white men”—and that defeating him will be only the first step toward a cure. “Yes, he didn’t elect himself,” writes Mark Ellis. “A critical mass of people voted for him, even after disability-mocking, the Access Hollywood video, war hero (and practically everyone else) insulting and belittling, a blatant narcissistic personality disorder, the list goes on. We’re doomed.” “This didn’t start in 2016,” writes Scott Dotson. “The push for more division has been going on for the last several decades. Few, if any, politicians benefit from consensus. Consensus gets them painted as weak at best, guilty of blood treason at worst. It’s about weaponizing biases and anger, with the intent of violence to silence the opposition.” And then there’s … whatever this is, from Daniel Brisbon: “You white haters of Trump have been educated out of your skins. You’ll be lynched for those skins, too, before too long. The coming Mau Mau won’t ask about where you went to school.” Want to see your name in bold? Email us at backtalk@indyweek.com, comment on indyweek.com or our Facebook page, or hit us up on Twitter: @indyweek.

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IHCPT Foundation Course (Online) Starts Aug. 12 | Register now through Aug. 9 For information, pricing, or to register for a program visit DukeIntegrativeMedicine.org Duke Center for Living Campus 3475 Erwin Road, Durham • (919) 660-6826 INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 5


indynews

Homecoming

ALMOST 750 PRISONERS WERE RELEASED TO DURHAM LAST YEAR. A NEW CITY PROGRAM SEEKS TO EASE THEIR TRANSITION. BY SARAH WILLETS

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or seven years, Cavin White’s family helped to support him while he was in prison, putting money in his commissary account, paying for phone calls, and visiting him as often as they could. When he got out, just before Christmas, he wanted to return the help. “You want to be able to pay your bills,” he says. “You want to support yourself. You want to support the ones that looked out for you while you were gone. You don’t want them taking care of you while you were gone and then get out and they’re still taking care of you. I was ready, like, I need a job. I need a job.” White, thirty-eight, had been preparing for his release, scouring newspapers to see what jobs were in demand and earning every certification he could, even if it meant being transferred to another prison farther from his family in Durham. After about ten transfers—taking him as far as coastal Craven County—he had credentials in HVAC, culinary arts, and brick masonry. He took business classes. He was ready. “I was thinking, if I come home, I got these credentials. Even though I know the felony is on my record, I should be able to find a job like that,” he says, snapping his fingers. “But it was completely different—opposite.” He applied for so many jobs, he lost count. He’d get excited about a prospect, only to have the interview eventually come back to his record. It’s not that he wasn’t willing to address it—he took responsibility for his manslaughter conviction and for changing his life in the intervening years. The problem was what would follow, usually some vague response like, “We’ll call you.” They never called. But thanks to a re-entry program the city of Durham has recently expanded to serve people coming home from every prison in North Carolina, that’s changed. Last month, White started a job doing HVAC and other work for the city’s General Services department. 6 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

Through the Welcome Home program, which launched in October, White got peer support to help him navigate the transition after prison. He was also connected to the city’s transitional jobs program, through which he got job training at Durham Tech before starting at General Services. (The city is trying to bring private employers on board as well.)

Cavin White

make that transition: a bus pass, toiletries, groceries, a cell phone, and a letter signed by Mayor Steve Schewel welcoming them and telling them they are “not alone.” In addition, they get twenty hours of peer support from a specialist who is formerly incarcerated, although relationships between participants and specialists last far beyond those twenty hours.

PHOTO BY BOB KARP

The program is part of a larger effort by the city’s Innovation Team to reduce economic barriers for justice-involved Durham residents. Last year, 743 Durham residents were released from North Carolina prisons. Welcome Home seeks to connect them to housing, employment, transportation, and advice so that they can successfully reintegrate into a community they sometimes left years ago, and avoid further contact with the criminal legal system. Each participant—forty-eight so far— gets a box of items (usually donated and packed by church groups) to help them

Peer support is a tried and true aspect of re-entry programs across the country, though those programs are often targeted at specific populations, such as people with mental illness or substance addictions. What sets Welcome Home apart is its wrap-around, hands-on nature. Peer-support specialists take participants shopping for a job interview outfit. They connect them to other city-affiliated initiatives, like the transitional jobs program and a license restoration and expunction clinic. They call halfway homes looking for beds for those who don’t have a place to go.

Welcom sixty days erating bo plan. The prisons in Durham’s ing into a well as th It’s a si the progr dents wit Welcome ter—Welc people w end of Ju if they’re Chuck Manning Sr., a program creatorning has a and one of its three specialists, says nothingofficers i like Welcome Home existed when he wasalready ou released in 2015 from the Durham jail after From th fourteen months. box of ite He estimates that he applied for eightypeer-supp jobs, but he struggled to get hired because ofrides, and his record. to Walma “You’re on an emotional roller coaster.job interv You’re happy to be free and be home, but youthrough t know you have a responsibility to take care For La of your family,” he says. from Man He knew how to cook, so he borrowed awas looki grill and put $145 he had saved up toward starting a catering business. (He didn’t have a driver’s license, so he hitched that grill to a cousin’s truck). Through that, he got connected to Bull City United, an anti-violence program, then to the city’s Innovation Team, and realized the motivational scriptures he used to hand out to other detainees in the jail were actually the beginning of a career helping others whose shoes he’d been in. But Manning says he wouldn’t be where he is today if he hadn’t found mentors who’d succeeded in making the same transition. In addition to the hurdles returning prisoners face finding jobs and housing, many don’t have licenses because of unresolved tickets, don’t have bank accounts, and don’t have experience with technology that becameLatetia B ubiquitous while they were locked up. It’s “I got h hard to know where to start—and easy to fallwait for back on the behavior that got them behindhear Chu bars, Manning says. of six, wh “When your head is spinning like that,at the No that’s when you tend to make some bad deci-tion for W sions,” he says. Manni According to the North Carolina Sentenc-when she ing and Policy Advisory Commission, of theaddress, a fifteen thousand people released from statewhen you prisons in 2015, 31 percent had been rear-believe yo rested a year later. Of those arrests, a quar-correctly. ter happened within the person’s first three Prior to months out of prison, underscoring theentailed s importance of early intervention. Researchon officia suggests that employment, housing, andmother li peer support can all reduce recidivism. ity unit, a


Welcome Home aims to reach prisoners sixty days before their release to start generating both trust and a post-release game plan. The program started out serving four prisons in the region, but with the help of Durham’s Local Reentry Council, it’s reaching into all fifty-six prisons in the state, as well as the federal complex in Butner. It’s a simple process. The LRC provides the program with a list of Durham residents with an upcoming release date. The Welcome Home team writes each a letter—Welcome Home has sent letters to 130 people who are set to be released by the end of June—and asks them to write back if they’re interested in participating. (Manning has also built relationships with parole officers in order to reach people who are already out of jail that the program missed.) From there, participants can pick up their box of items at City Hall and get assigned a peer-support specialist, who offers advice, rides, and networking help, and even trips to Walmart or Target to buy an outfit for job interviews, using a gift card provided through the program. For Latetia Bright, getting that letter from Manning made her feel like someone was looking out for her.

Latetia Bright

PHOTO BY BOB KARP

“I got home at Christmas, and I couldn’t wait for Monday to come just so I could hear Chuck’s voice,” says Bright, a mother of six, who spent five-and-a-half months at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women. Manning’s support also helped her when she needed to quickly change her address, a typically mundane process that, when you’re on parole, can lead the state to believe you’ve skipped town if it’s not done correctly. Prior to her release, Bright’s “home plan” entailed staying with her mom. But prison officials didn’t approve it because her mother lives in a Durham Housing Authority unit, and the DHA can—and sometimes

must—deny people admission for past criminal activity. So she moved in with her sister, whose lease was ending in three days. That meant Bright not only had to move on short notice but reach her parole officer during the holidays and register her new address before going anywhere. If she didn’t get permission in time, she’d be marked “absconded.” Bright frantically called her parole officer, and Manning started looking for a backup in case her sister’s new place wasn’t approved. In the end, Bright got approval to move in with her mom, but the prospect of going back to prison for no good reason frightened her. Since then, Welcome Home has helped Bright get unpaid traffic tickets waived and her driver’s license reinstated. She’s also planning to get her GED. Bright got a break a lot of former prisoners don’t: Her sister helped her line up a job doing housekeeping at a hotel. Almost all large employers conduct criminal background checks on applicants, according to the Second Chance Alliance, a statewide organization dedicated to addressing the causes and consequences of criminal records. A Northwestern University study found that applicants with records are 50 percent less likely to get a callback. The prospects are even worse for black applicants. According to the North Carolina Sentencing and Policy Advisory Commission, 53 percent of people who left the state’s prisons in 2015 were unemployed two years later. In addition, just 26 percent had graduated high school and 78 percent had a possible substance use problem. People who were unemployed, unmarried, didn’t finish high school, or used drugs were more likely to reoffend. Out of the forty-eight people served so far by Welcome Home, Manning says all but three have remained arrest-free. Research suggests that over time—up to four years for drug or property-crime offenders, according to a study in a 2009 American Society of Criminology journal—people with prior convictions become no more likely to commit a crime than the general public. For Manning, those second chances can be transformative. “One thing you lose in mass incarceration, in the school-to-prison pipeline, you lose a voice and power for yourself,” he says. “This program gives you back your power.” backtalk@indyweek.com

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INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 7


news

Leap of Faith-Based Funding RALEIGH GAVE $30K TO A CLINIC THAT PARTNERS WITH ANTI-ABORTION AND PRO-LGBTQ-CONVERSION ORGANIZATIONS BY LEIGH TAUSS

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he Raleigh City Council unanimously voted to give $30,000 to a faith-based health clinic last week, though several council members later said they were unaware that the clinic lists as partners an anti-abortion-rights organization and a church that promotes conversion therapy for LGBTQ people. Some council members say they regret the decision, though others point out that the clinic provides vital health care services to low-income refugees and immigrants. At last Tuesday’s council meeting, Kay Crowder asked the council Tuesday to give $30,000 from the city’s contingency fund to NeighborHealth, a nonprofit clinic founded in 2018 in Northwest Raleigh. According to the clinic’s website, its mission is to “[serve] Christ by loving our neighbors through the practice of excellent, compassionate and accessible health care.” NeighborHealth’s website lists among its partners Gateway Pregnancy Center, an anti-abortion-rights nonprofit on Hillsborough Street whose website warns women about the alleged physical, psychological, emotional, and “spiritual” consequences of abortion, and asks patients to consider: “How does God see your unborn child?” NeighborHealth also lists as a partner Church of the Apostles, a Raleigh ministry that invites congregants to connect with the program Beyond Imagination, which aims to “bring God’s healing and redemptive power to those who struggle with undesired homosexuality.” So-called conversion therapy has been banned for minors in several states and is strongly opposed by the American Psychiatric Association, which says the practice creates “a significant risk of harm.” Crowder said at the council meeting that NeighborHealth “takes care of an underserved community,” including those without insurance. The group was late to the city’s grant application process, she explained, so she wanted to give it leftover funds from the contingency fund. 8 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

Crowder told the INDY Thursday that she’d be “unavailable the rest of this week with Mother’s Day family obligations.” Crowder could not be reached on Monday. NeighborHealth CEO Sue Ellen Thompson says the clinic has seen seventeen hundred patients since it opened last year, 70 percent of whom are not insured. For the uninsured, care is provided on an incomebased sliding scale, but that money doesn’t fully cover the clinic’s expenses, so it has to rely on donations and government funding to make up the difference. Reproductive care accounts for less than 10 percent of the clinic’s services, Thompson says. Asked about the clinic’s approach to abortion and conversion therapy, Thompson says NeighborHealth “is not political.” It does not refer patients to Gateway or give that center money, she says. Instead, Gateway refers patients to NeighborHealth. Thompson told the INDY that the clinic does provide information on abortion, but she adds: “We would not promote abortion. We’re not gonna tell women they should get an abortion. But they have their right to choose, so we’re seeing them from a medical perspective.” Doug Briggs, the clinic’s head physician, says that he practiced medicine in China for over two decades, where he saw women who were forced to have abortions and then given the aborted fetus in a plastic bag. While he tells patients that abortion is an option, he says, “Generally, I would encourage them to keep their baby.” He also tells them about the “unmeasurable” consequences of abortion, which he says include psychological suffering, trauma, grief, suicidal thoughts, and spiritual issues. There are “a lot of women who had had abortions who are suffering psychologically,” he says, so he also provides post-abortion counseling. Studies claiming that women experience negative mental health effects following an abortion have been “critically refuted,”

Doug Briggs, NeighborHealth’s head physician according to the Journal of the American Medical Association. Research has found that women who have abortions do not experience more depression or anxiety than those who carry their pregnancies to term. NeighborHealth hasn’t dealt with abortion a lot, at least not yet. Briggs says he’s only consulted with one patient who was pregnant and undecided on whether to have the baby. He never consulted with her again, but he believes she was leaning toward carrying the pregnancy to term. Asked about NeighborHealth’s association with Church of the Apostles, Thompson says her brother was gay and died of AIDS in 1992. “We are in no way homophobic,” she says. Council members Stef Mendell, Corey Branch, and Nicole Stewart say they were

PHOTO BY LEIGH TAUSS

unaware of NeighborHealth’s connections when they voted to fund the clinic. Mendell says that, while the vote was a mistake, she thinks the clinic should keep the money because it provides affordable health care for uninsured patients, including immigrants. Branch says he’s looking into the matter. “I’m probably leaning towards [reversing] it,” he says. “But I need to have an in-depth conversation with Councilor Crowder.” This isn’t the first time the city has funded faith-based organizations. It’s given $737,000 to Catholic Charities since 2007, and it spent $3.1 million on Oak City Cares, a homeless outreach center on which the Catholic Diocese partnered. ltauss@indyweek.com


news

The Chains of Love

A DURHAM WOMAN SAYS A STATE PRISON WON’T LET HER MARRY HER FIANCÉE BECAUSE THEY’RE GAY BY JEFFREY C. BILLMAN

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n Monday, an attorney representing an inmate in the Neuse Correctional Institution in Goldsboro sent a letter to the prison’s superintendent and the N.C. Department of Justice threatening to sue if she was not permitted to marry her fiancée by June 13. According to the letter, sent by Elizabeth Simpson of the Durham-based Carolina Justice Policy Center, Sandy Dowell was informed earlier this month that the prison’s head chaplain “did not want to approve the marriage request because it was ‘same sex’ and had never been done in North Carolina prisons before.” The state Department of Public Safety did not confirm by press time whether a state prison has approved a same-sex wedding since gay marriage became legal in North Carolina in 2014. Neuse CI’s “Guidelines for Marriage Requests” require couples to “attend four premarital sessions with an ordained minister” and obtain the approval of the superintendent and the assistant superintendent of programs. Six guests can attend; no cameras are permitted. After the ceremony, the newlyweds are allowed a fifteen-minute visit. The guidelines also specify that the “entire processing time for a marriage” at the prison “may take up to four months.” “We started in November. Here it is May. We have yet to be approved,” says Amanda Marriner, Dowell’s fiancée, a former prisoner who lives in Durham. “It’s just being passed around. It’s like, we’ve been patient.” On November 26, according to the letter, Marriner and Dowell both wrote to Superintendent Morris Reid asking for permission to marry. Reid never responded. Nor did he respond to repeated follow-ups in writing, voice messages, and when Dowell spoke to him on prison grounds. Then, on May 4, the letter says, Dowell was told that the prison wanted nothing to do with a same-sex wedding. An official at Neuse CI said Monday that he was not authorized to comment. The DPS

As Dowell’s wife, Marriner will get to attend her next parole hearing in 2021— which, as an ex-offender, she wouldn’t otherwise be able to do. If Dowell is paroled, Marriner can be part of her home plan— again, something she likely wouldn’t be able to do otherwise. And as long as Dowell is in prison, Marriner will be able to call and get medical information if she gets sick or has to go to the hospital. (Dowell has COPD.) Marriner believes prison officials are dragging their feet about the wedding because of “homophobia” and because they don’t want to be trendsetters.

The state is in the process of converting Neuse CI to a men’s prison, Marriner says, which means Dowell will eventually get moved. So if the prison drags things out long enough, Marriner suggests, the superintendent of the next facility will be the one responsible for approving the prison system’s first same-sex wedding. “Both Sandy and Amanda went to prison after heartbreaking relationships,” Simpson says. “It is a testament to their resilience that they have learned to trust and love again. They deserve to get married, and it is their constitutional right to do so.” jbillman@indyweek.com

Sandy Dowell and Amanda Marriner did not respond to a request for comment on the demand letter by press time. Dowell and Marriner have been together since March 10, 2003, Marriner says. They were housed in the same dorm at the North Carolina Correctional Institution for Women, both serving lengthy terms for second-degree murder. Dowell had been sentenced to life for the 1992 killing of her roommate, with whom she was romantically involved; Marriner was serving sixteen years for the 1999 shooting death of her live-in boyfriend. In 2015, Marriner was released. After that, she says, Dowell grew distant. She’d previously had a longtime prison girlfriend before who’d gotten out and left her. Eventually, Marriner says, they broke up. But after a year apart, they reconnected last June. “I said, ‘That year of silence— you’re the only person I want to be with,’” Marriner says. By October, Marriner was back on Dowell’s visitors list. By November, they were engaged. They’re getting married for love, Marriner says, but also to get practical benefits. INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 9


This Gross Old Cat Has More Followers Than You Raleigh loves Tucker. Tucker doesn’t love anything. By Leigh Tauss Photos by Andrea Rice

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ucker wears a permanent scowl. His green eyes radiate annoyance. The twenty-twoyear-old, twenty-five-pound cat doesn’t like the baby stroller in which he rides around downtown Raleigh. He likes it even less when he has to haul his fat ass around the Capitol grounds in pursuit of strategically sprinkled treats. He really doesn’t like basking in the hot April sun or when excited children squeal and approach with huge smiles. And he certainly doesn’t like you. 10 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

“Tucker doesn’t enjoy anything,” says Tucker’s human assistant, Ron Kirk, as he pushes the portly pussycat in a stroller down Fayetteville Street. “He just has varying degrees of dislike.” Tucker is an old cat, a centenarian in people years, so you can ignore his grumpiness. You don’t even roll your eyes at the fact that he’s being pushed in a stroller. But to look at him, all grizzled and dandruff-ridden and generally gross, you wouldn’t imagine that Tucker had parlayed his almost-daily lunchtime patrols of DTR into something approaching celebrity status. But he has. Or, more accurately, Kirk has. Their @OakCityKitty Instagram account has more than seven thousand followers, and Tucker has better name recognition downtown than most local politicians. In the span of a few blocks, I watch him encounter—and mostly tolerate—more than a dozen adoring fans. “Is that Tucker?” asks one, leaning over the stroller to stroke Tucker’s head. “Hey buddy, are you having a nice day?” Tucker is not. Before we continue, let’s get this out of the way: I’m not a cat hater. Quite the opposite: I’m a cat lover. I have two of my own. I’m also the type to spend too much time trawling the internet for cats pics. So, despite Tucker’s general disinterest toward humanity, I, too, am preternaturally inclined toward fawning over him—just like everyone else on Fayetteville Street, it seems. The question is, why? Put another way: What is it about this formidable feline that elicits such happiness among strangers when they see him wobbling down the street? And why do pictures of Tucker lying on a treadmill or yawning in front of the history museum make us obsess over our phones, laughing and commenting and sharing them with friends? Is it that we’re so cooped up in our cubicles, plagued by the perpetual Mondays, that even the slightest break from drudgery can bring circus-sized joy to our hearts? Sort of. To put it more scientifically, says Duke University professor Negar Mottahedeh, the answer is that Tucker is a walking, breathing meme. “[Memes] are expressive of our emotions,” says Mottahedeh, who teaches a course on memes, or online objects molded by those who share it. “They express an iconography, things that language can’t always convey. You have expressed how you feel through an object, and that object then is passed on to someone else who does something else with it.”


Animals make especially popular memes because they hit close to home. For cat lovers, cat pics are like a cheeseburger to a starving man: They trigger a rush of instant gratification. “We’re so addicted to, essentially, what is the morphine drip of cats and dogs online,” Mottahedeh says. But there are thousands of pet accounts online. What makes Tucker stand out? He’s not a kitten, after all. He’s probably not what you’d consider adorable. He doesn’t do particularly cute or unusual things that go viral. So why has he become a meme? That’s harder to pin down, Mottahedeh says. Viral sensations are hard to predict and share few similarities. Online success depends in part on the will of the algorithm gods. It can also be a matter of luck—an influencer spreading the word. Tucker’s evolution into memedom didn’t happen overnight. Kirk met him in 2005, when Tucker, then a spritely eight-yearold, was a resident of the Orange County Animal Shelter. He likely would have been euthanized were it not for his utility; the staff used him to test out dogs for their compatibility with other animals. (If you

“ We’re so addicted to the morphine drip of cats and dogs online.” can get along with Tucker, you can get along with anyone, I suppose.) Kirk came to the shelter looking for kitty kinship following a bad breakup. There were all the usual candidates: young, cute, small, friendly. But Tucker was … different. For whatever reason, that appealed to Kirk. “He was a terrible cat when I first got him,” Kirk says. “Mean, aggressive. I thought somehow I got the worst cat in the world.” The way to Tucker’s heart, Kirk found, was through his stomach. With lots of caloric incentives—i.e., treats—Tucker’s nastiness began to melt away. But Tucker also began to pack on weight. By 2015, Tucker had ballooned to 32 pounds, which, according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, is the cat equivalent of a morbidly obese 544-pound man. But that doesn’t tell the whole story: Tucker is half Maine coon, the largest breed of domesticated cat. So he’s supposed to be big. Just not that big. A vet prescribed exercise, a foreign concept to a committed couch potato like Tucker. So Kirk introduced Tucker to the sidewalk outside his condo, next to Sono Sushi. Tucker promptly waddled back to the door. The next day, Kirk placed him three feet out, and to the door Tucker returned. Soon Tucker became comfortable lounging about ten feet away on the sidewalk, and eventually, with some treat motivation, he began to follow Kirk up and down the block, his belly swaying back and forth like a pendulum, nearly brushing the pavement. Passersby began to take notice; some mistook Tucker for a feral raccoon. Others asked Kirk, who was never big on social media, if Kirk was on Instagram. Kirk figured it might be a fun waste of time. In April 2016, Tucker premiered on Instagram posing coyly in front of the Capitol with the hashtag #fatcat. The post got fewer than a dozen likes, most from Kirk’s family.

Within a year, though, Tucker had amassed a thousand followers, both from word of mouth and people who’d encountered him IRL. His popularity really blossomed in late 2017, when Kirk forced Tucker into a Santa outfit. It was at that point, Kirk says, that Tucker “found his voice”—which is, of course, Kirk’s voice, although Kirk insists it’s Tucker’s voice—and expressed his profound displeasure in the costume in the caption. “No. This is unacceptable. Completely unacceptable. I did not agree to this, nor

do I give you permission to post this picture,” Tucker’s rant begins. “Do not share with friends. Remove it at once. Why do you continue to take pictures after I have presented you with my demands, human? Why are you laughing? Why is it still on my head? I hope you go shopping and get trampled. It would bring me joy.” “Tucker writes everything. I proofread,” Kirk insists. (If this seems weird, remember that Kirk is a guy who pushes his cat in a stroller down Fayetteville Street.) “Having an Instagram account from the point of view of a pissed off, overweight cat is a little more interesting than, here’s Tucker walking down the stairs.” Note: Tucker hates stairs. Tucker’s sarcasm and irreverence bordering on nihilism—“humanity’s collective IQ continues its death spiral towards nonexistence,” he posted with a close-up in January—caught on. Followers came by the thousands. So did the local TV news, and then more followers, and then invites to hang in the “selfie booth” at events, and then more followers, and now me, and probably more followers. A flight attendant from Oregon tracked Tucker down during a layover. Another woman supposedly flew from Buffalo just to see him. Tucker probably hates all of this. Kirk says he’s not going to try to monetize Tucker’s fame. After all, the old man could drop dead any day now. “People just enjoy seeing him,” Kirk says. “I’m glad that he’s able to provide such happiness.” If you want to catch Tucker before the Grim Reaper does, your best bet is around lunchtime on Fayetteville Street. Don’t let your kids pet without asking—Tucker’s been known to nip, though he’s missing teeth—but Tucker usually tolerates gentle worship. And don’t compare him to a dog; he finds that insulting, Kirk says. Tucker’s also cool with selfies. Just don’t expect him to smile. ltauss@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 11


Durham F R FOR

Duffers

“We didn’t want to be like what you see at Myrtle Beach, where [the course] is super kitschy, pirate-themed,” says Ben Owens, who cofounded downtown Durham’s new mini-golf course with his wife, Julie Bryce. Instead, on the American Tobacco Campus, Owens and Bryce created a sevenhole journey through the city’s history and lore, complete with inside jokes, puns, and debris from a truck that once found itself outwitted by the bridge. The course, says Owens, is “by Durhamites, about Durham, and, really, for Durham.” The inspiration for Bull City Mini, which opened Saturday, May 11, came two years ago and thirteen hundred miles away. On the first vacation Owens and Bryce took with their newborn, they found themselves at the Peter Pan Mini-Golf course in Austin,

keting officer) and parental duties, but they manage. Bull City Mini, Bryce says, is the “last thing on our lips at night and the first thing we talk about in the morning.” Eight days before opening—which falls on National Miniature Golf Day, of course— we hit the links. The indoor-outdoor layout is vibrant: The fourth hole sports the primary colors of the Durham flag; the fifth is bathed in the Eno River’s serene blues. Absent are rubber mats designating where to tee off; Owens and Bryce wanted to allow players flexibility and showcase the sleek aesthetics of the holes. This decision stems from their belief in promoting the work of locals, a fact demonstrated not only by the (non-B.Y.O.B.) menu, with its Triangle craft beer and Locopops and Wonderpuff cotton candy,

New downtown attraction Bull City Mini combines putt-putt fun and Bull City pride

F

BY LUCAS HUBBARD • PHOTOS BY JADE WIL SON

or golf fans, certain holes need no introduction—the landing-pad-island seventeenth at Sawgrass, for one, or the eleventh through the thirteenth at Augusta National, aka Amen Corner. With time, perhaps this list will include one of Durham’s own: the first hole at Bull City Mini, a wicked little par-two known as the Can Opener. It’s a replica of Durham’s low-hanging Gregson Street bridge, infamous for its propensity to peel the tops off trucks that try to broach its elevenfoot, eight-inch clearance. The putt seems straightforward: Just use the ramp of the truck bed, which ought to deposit your ball close to the hole. Any imprecision, though, and you’ll be trawling underneath the railroad overpass and limping toward the six-stroke maximum.

Ben Owens and Julie Bryce

One hole is a replica of the infamous, truck-peeling Gregson Street bridge.

Texas, where Owens had played in his youth. There, they experienced the joy of a summer family activity supplemented with snow cones and a liberal B.Y.O.B. policy. A native of the Triangle, Bryce vowed to replicate the experience in Durham. “The great thing about a crazy idea,” she says, “is you have the whole drive home” to make your point. Through conversations with mini-golf consultants—yes, they exist—and community stakeholders, the couple developed a plan for a course, soliciting designs for “Durham landmarks in miniature” and eventually choosing winners from sixty-five submissions. Owens and Bryce met while he was earning his engineering PhD at Duke. He handles operations and data; Bryce is the brains behind marketing and business development. It’s tricky to fit this in around their day jobs (Owens is a business-insights manager; Bryce is a fractional chief mar-

12 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

but also by the back of each scorecard, which highlights the people who made Bull City Mini a reality. Hole designs came from area artists, professionals, school kids, and medical students; Candy Carver painted the silhouetted streetscape mural, “Lady Durham,” while Britt Flood painted the Duke-Gardens-themed “Fore Get Me Not.” Point Concepts of Raleigh constructed the quaint-but-challenging holes. “I hope that when people come in, they see some part of Durham that they love, and they are reminded why they love living here,” says Bryce. Affordability and inclusivity are also paramount. Having spent almost half his life in Durham, Owens, wearing a “mini-golf is for everyone” T-shirt, says he’ll be disappointed “if we look up and we’ve created another thing that’s for twentysomething yuppies”—a valid concern for any venture with a frosé machine.


Top: Walking in Christian Laettner's shoes, Bottom: Batting for the Durham Bulls To mitigate that risk, Bull City Mini is focused on offering equitable jobs. They’ve applied for Living Wage Certification, and they hired many workers through StepUp Durham. They’re also intent on keeping prices reasonable: Mini-golf, Bryce says, “should be less expensive than a movie ticket.” For players five and up, a round costs seven dollars. Each hole comes with a placard that provides an opportunity to learn Durham history. Owens and Bryce engaged with Pierce Freelon, the founder of Blackspace and former Durham mayoral candidate, to make sure they prioritized the right stories. On the sixth hole, which commemorates the famous shot that Duke’s Christian Laettner made to beat Kentucky in 1992, the majority of the text focuses on the 1944 “Secret Game” between North Carolina College for Negroes (now North Carolina Central University) and the Duke School of Medicine, one of the South’s first recorded racially integrated sporting events. “[Freelon’s] point was, ultimately, what’s more important: that Laettner and Grant Hill had this fabulous shot, or that the Secret Game happened and was a crack in the wall

of racism in the South, and it happened in Durham?” says Bryce. “What should we celebrate?” Bull City Mini’s lease runs through October; if successful, Bryce and Owens want to eventually become “corporate America dropouts” and expand the operation to eighteen or twenty-seven holes. “For that to be possible,” Bryce says, “this needs to be beloved by the community.” The creators’ enthusiasm is infectious—there are Easter eggs all throughout the course, with new ones already being brainstormed. On the baseball-themed seventh hole (“Batter Up”), a replica “Hit Bull Win Steak” sign serves as a backdrop. The design resembles Skee-Ball more than a putting green; sinking a hole in one requires a carnival game’s confluence of skill and luck. None of us ace it on our first or second attempts; finally, after half a dozen tries, Owens gets the angles just right to score the grand prize. Bulls fans might already guess what follows. I won’t spoil it, but whether it’s a surprise or just a reminder of the city’s charms, it’s a fitting cap for this passion project. As Bryce puts it, “This is a love letter to Durham.” arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 13


Bridging the Gap

Creating change is an uphill climb. The new Durham nonprofit Upstream wants to make it easier. BY LUCAS HUBBARD

U

pstream Works Collaborative is hard to define. Co-founder Beth Katz describes the goals of her one-year-old nonprofit with terms more befitting a startup, aiming “to be the most responsive, adaptive, productive, innovative, supportive group possible.” The organization’s mission statement—“working together to support thriving and equitable communities”—is almost comically broad. Perhaps the clearest summary comes via negation: “I think of Upstream Works as a tool to get things done,” says cofounder Julia Katz, Beth’s wife. “I don’t think of it as a volunteer opportunity.” Essentially, Upstream empowers individuals to quickly respond to their community’s needs through charitable means—facilitating funding for projects, matching specialists with those with complementary skills, and bridging the gap between the nonprofit world’s false dichotomy of “community members” and “practitioners.” The name highlights the organization’s belief in “going upstream” to address the root causes of issues: not solving one-off problems, but finding and eliminating their underlying cause. The eleven-person nonprofit, featuring specialists in urban design, food equity, affordable housing, transit planning, and more, has already sparked a variety of signature efforts: Durham Bowls, which pairs local chefs with school nutrition managers to build healthier lunches in Durham Public Schools; Point4Health, a tactical urbanism project that improves grocery store accessibility for affordable housing residents in Maplewood; and Bull City Rebuilds, which raised nearly $38,000 for those families and businesses affected by the April 10 explosion on Duke Street. The idea began with conversations among co-founders Beth and Julie Katz and Linden Thayer. Beth Katz and Thayer pursue food equity through Food Insight Group, their B-corporation; Julia Katz 14 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

Members of the Upstream Works Collaborative inhabits the adjacent if distinct field of affordable housing. They were facing the same struggles in tackling community problems, as the litany of steps required— to access grants, engage the right local stakeholders, and even design a website and logo—quickly overwhelmed them. The inevitable outcome, says Beth Katz, “is not so much shortcomings on projects—it’s the absence of projects.” They could’ve launched separate nonprofits, says Julia Katz, but instead they built a more versatile solution. With Upstream, potential collaborators apply to join; if accepted, they can apply to develop a project (which must fit Upstream’s mission, focus on equity, and include interdisciplinary teamwork) or find fiscal sponsorship for grants or tax-deductible donations through Upstream’s 501c(3) status.

PHOTO BY JADE WILSON

Much of Upstream’s appeal, says Beth Katz, is in creating “a structure through which people can do their best work.” “There isn’t a job in everyone’s exact, perfect spot in their field,” says Julia Katz. By fostering discussions among individuals in divergent areas, Upstream enables them to find or build projects that match their passions. Additionally, this often independent work leads to “selfselecting,” says collaborator and designer Rebekah Miel. The collective structure allows for the sharing of resources, such as accounting and legal services, professional development, or even Adobe access. Miel created the Bull City Rebuilds GoFundMe in the immediate aftermath of the Duke Street explosion. Her initiative led to the “slightly terrifying” situation of having to equitably disburse thousands of dollars, but it also led to

something more: Less than two weeks after the blast, United Way, in conjunction with Upstream and other partners, started the Durham One Fund, which puts in place both a standing fund and a system for creating community response teams to help meet needs following future disasters. Miel’s success hints at the impacts Upstream might have: Durham Bowls isn’t just making tastier school lunches; it’s also addressing programmatic underfunding and the power of minor tweaks to combat budget shortfalls. Point4Health highlights a neighborhood’s food insecurity but also larger failings around accessibility, like the lack of a city policy requiring affordable housing for seniors to be next to a bus stop. Currently, collaborators aren’t paid, and Upstream has no office. But that also means it has less overhead and can be more selective in its projects. And with a startup’s flexibility, Upstream can launch ideas faster, as demonstrated by Bull City Rebuilds. Its goals will determine its structure, not vice versa. Upstream’s future isn’t clear: Its cofounders aren’t aiming for exponential growth, although they’ll need to grow to sustain their work. But Julia Katz, in explaining Point4Health, lands on the potential value this collaborative could have. As a member of Durham’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Commission, she knows that the city wants temporary changes to neighborhoods to demonstrate the desire for crosswalks and bike lanes. “Part of [Point4Health] is a first example of how a community can do it, but there are a lot of hurdles,” she says. “And so I’m showing the city: If you want people to do this, it needs to be made easier to do.” This is a corollary for Upstream’s efforts. Improving equity is nice, but the co-founders know precisely the uphill climb it requires. So together, they’re making it a little less difficult. backtalk@indyweek.com


Who We Are: The Center for Volunteer Caregiving provides companion care and escorted transportation for lower income older adults and adults with disabilities in Wake County to help them live independently for as long as possible. All services are provided at no charge by volunteers trained by The Center’s staff. What You Can Do: We currently have people waiting for services so new volunteers are needed. Volunteers provide friendly visits, telecare, transportation for medical appointments and basic needs trips (grocery, pharmacy, banking), light housekeeping, and caregiver respite. Volunteers who provide medical transportation use their own vehicle and will be reimbursed for mileage, if required documentation is provided. How to Volunteer: An online volunteer portal makes volunteering easy! See website for more information about volunteer opportunities and how to sign-up – www.volunteercaregiving.org Elaine Whitford, Executive Director 919-460-0567 caregiving@ctrvolcare.org

Who We Are: We are a non-profit that provides support to sexual assault survivors after a Sexual Assault Nurse Examination is completed in an emergency room or women’s advocacy center. This examination incorporates the collection of evidence for law enforcement, including clothing. What We Do: We aim to be a catalyst for hope and redemption by providing tote bags to sexual assault survivors. These tote bags contain a brand-new outfit, flip flops, toiletries, resources, and a love note from another survivor. Our goal is to let survivors know that they are not alone. What You Can Do: There are many ways you can join us in supporting sexual assault survivors, from providing clothing and monetary donations, hosting or attending a tote packing party, or arranging a fundraiser through your company or community. 107 Edinburgh S Dr. Suite 201 Cary, NC 27511 www.layersofdignity.com Follow us! @layersofdignity

Who We Are: Curamericas Global is a nonprofit that partners with forgotten communities around the world and in the US to save the lives of mothers and children by providing health services and education. We provide hope through health. What We Do: Curamericas Global brings sustainable changes to the healthcare systems in the communities we partner with by delivering effective, self-sustained programs that respond to the evidence and community priorities, reaching every individual in the community. Our data-driven methods and community-centered solutions bring us closer to our goal of seeing a world free of suffering from treatable and preventable causes. How You Can Help: Our organization would not exist without our supporters. Join us in saving lives by donating, volunteering in Raleigh or through international expeditions, and even running a virtual Mom-aThon to help us save lives. Take action and visit curamericas.org today. Andrew Herrera, Executive Director andrew@curamericas.org • 919.801.0612

Who We Are: Meals on Wheels is a nonprofit committed to enhancing the life of homebound seniors in Durham. What We Do: We deliver hot meals and a friendly visit to homebound seniors in Durham. We also deliver food for our clients’ pets, holiday gifts, birthday cards, toiletries, warm clothing, and other items. What Our Community Can Do: Volunteers pack and deliver the meals. In many cases the volunteer is the only social contact a client will have that day. The visit and friendly smile are so impactful! Food drives are welcome, as are donations of holiday gifts. Monetary donations are also welcome - and used to provide meals. info@mowdurham.org 919-667-9424

Who We Are: The Junior League of Raleigh is the local chapter of the Association of Junior Leagues International, an organization of women committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Since 1930, JLR has donated over $5.5 million to women and children in Wake County. What We Do: Now in our 90th year, our 1,500 members support community agencies around Wake County. Members volunteer 26,000 hours yearly with numerous community partner agencies. Our signature fundraiser, A Shopping SPREE! funds our Legacy Fund grant. Our Touch-A-Truck proceeds go to our BackPack Buddies program. What You Can Do: Join us to make a difference through volunteerism and to develop as a leader. Women 23+ are invited to join us for upcoming informational meetings. Visit jlraleigh.org to learn more about our Quick Impact Team, Julia Jones Daniels Center for Community and free Community Connect training sessions.

Who We Are: The Orange County Rape Crisis Center is a non-profit agency committed to its mission to stop sexual violence & its impact through support, education, & advocacy. We have served the Chapel Hill, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and surrounding communities for 45 years. What We Do: We provide free and confidential 24-hour crisis intervention services to survivors of sexual violence.Our services include our 24-Hour Help Line, advocacy and accompaniment, support groups, workshops, therapy, and therapy referrals. Additionally, the Center educates more than 13,000 children, adults, parents, & professionals each year about sexual violence: its impact, prevention efforts, and raising awareness.

Nonprofit Guide 2019

The Triangle’s nonprofits are essential to fostering and nurturing a healthy, engaged community. From organizations focused on helping children in need to those dedicated to protecting our environment, charities that provide services to the less fortunate to even niche journalism outfits that report deeply on education and health care, our nonprofits work tirelessly to make our region a better place to live. But they need your help to keep doing it. Join us in supporting these worthwhile nonprofits today. Jeffrey Billman Editor in chief

Who We Are: For 39 years, VAE Raleigh has encouraged diverse creativity through exhibitions, programs, artist funding, and events like SPARKcon. Our goal is to make the Triangle vibrant by fostering a sustainable and equitable creative community. What We Do: VAE organizes 70+ exhibitions and 50+ programs annually, as well as an open-source festival that draws 80,000 visitors with its unique mix of all things creative, weird, and wonderful. In addition to providing a platform for artists to showcase their talents, VAE helps artists fund their work by awarding $91,000 in grants, stipends and prizes every year.

What Our Community Can Do: Help us plant the seeds of help, hope, and healing in our community by donating today at ocrcc.org/donate or signing up to volunteer on our website!

What Our Community Can Do: Support the arts by supporting VAE! Our exhibitions are free and open to everyone. Creative people of all disciplines will find many ways to further their careers. Get in touch, become a member, sponsor our projects, come to our fun fundraisers (like our upcoming PROM), and let’s see how VAE can help you live your most creative life!

info@ocrcc.org Office Line: (919) 968-4647 Help Line: 866-WE-LISTEN

309 W Martin St, Raleigh, NC 27601 (919) 828-7834 vaeraleigh.org 5.15.19 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 15


indyfood

APÉRO APERITIF BAR & RESTAURANT 309 Blake Street, Raleigh 919-803-7475, aperoraleigh.com

Vermouth, Misunderstood THE APERITIF IS MORE THAN A MIXER FOR YOUR MARTINI BY ANDREA RICE

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As a recent vermouth convert, I was That’s how I thought of vermouth, too, here’s no vermouth in excited when I learned that Apéro had until a few years ago, when I was in Spain. America!” exclaims Giancarlo opened in Raleigh earlier this year. My companion and I had ordered wine at Mancino. Imagine my delight when I discovered our small hotel bar. A traveler next to us Mancino, an artisanal Italian vermouth that it not only carried vermouth but ordered vermouth and was asked if he wantmaker and importer, is leading a spring specialized in it. ed red or white, and with an orange peel or cocktail class at Apéro, a new aperitif bar The French have their own vermouth soda water. It was midday, and the drink and restaurant in downtown Raleigh. The culture, and the French happy hour conlooked refreshingly enticing. We were curilate April event had sold out—about thircept of Apéro—co-owned by Will Jeffers ous, so we inquired. Vermut, we learned, is ty professionals had paid $30 to be here— of Stanbury and Royale, Jesse Bardyn and deeply ingrained in Catalan culture, a ubiqwhich took Mancino by surprise. Americans Jeff Seizer of Royale, and general manager uitous standalone drink. Many bars make have never been big on vermouth, he says. Nicole Pletcher—features enticing, eclectic their own. I’ve been hooked ever since. “If you want to impress your guests,” small plates that draw on Spanhe continues, “stay away from gin ish, French, and Italian influences. and tonic and grab a really good Boards of cheese, cured meats, and bottle of vermouth, some marjopâté are main staples. ram and rosemary, and garnish Pletcher lived in Peru, Brazil, with April flowers.” Pakistan, and Connecticut before He passes around our first cocksettling in Raleigh, working at tail, a refreshing herbal concocDeath & Taxes and the Raleigh tion inspired by a G&T and made Wine Shop, and studying verof Bianco Ambrato (white vermouths, sherries, and quinquinas— mouth), lavender bitters, yellow an aromatized wine traditionally rose petals, and twists of lime zest. made of Peruvian cinchona bark or Mancino has been involved in gentian root. She noticed a hole in his family-owned business since he the city’s beverage scene for sherwas seven; he learned how to make ries and fortified wines, but when vermouth from his grandmother. she opened Apéro, she didn’t realize His family fortifies a low-cost table that vermouth would become the wine from northern Italy and aromain attraction. matizes it with forty botanicals. Pletcher introduces patrons To Mancino, vermouth is more to vermouth by introducing the than the family business. It’s an Vermouths and other aperitifs at Apéro PHOTO BY ANDREA RICE three different styles: dry (typically essential part of the world in which white), and white and red, which are both Mancino passes around his version of a he grew up, with aperitivos. The word sweet. The type you’re drawn to depends on martini, made with Mancino Sakura vermeans to open the palate, in the same way the type of liquor you drink. If you’re a bourmouth, a specialty bottle infused with cherthat a digestif like amaro closes the palate bon drinker, you’ll enjoy the richer, sweetry blossom extract from Kyoto. He makes after a meal. In Italy, he says, communities er—versus savory—viscosity of a rosso. Gin twenty-five hundred bottles of Sakura per are drawn together through aperitivo culdrinkers will go for the botanicals of a bianco. year—Japan imports a thousand, and a ture, a post-work, pre-dinner socialization “I don’t joke that vermouths are actually handful of bars and specialty wine shops, ritual centered on snacks and drinks. pre-batch cocktails,” says Pletcher. “They’re from London to Oslo to Raleigh, get the rest. Americans’ aversion to vermouth, made with sweet elements, bitter elements, Sakura’s flavor is reminiscent of lychee, but Mancino says, goes back decades, to when and citric elements—and so are cocktails.” the cherry blossom notes are far superior. low-quality varieties were used as mixers An added benefit: Vermouth cocktails It’s dangerously easy to drink. for martinis. tend to have about half the alcohol as As with any vermouth cocktail, chilling is That’s how Brittany Dunn, a bartender at liquor drinks, which is healthy for a city the secret weapon. Mancino says a martini The Oak, Kitchen & Bourbon Bar, had expethat runs on cars. glass should be small, so it stays chilled and rienced them: “I usually think bitter when I arice@indyweek.com sips like an espresso. think vermouth,” she says. 16 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

food

DRINK THIS

THREE VERMOUTHS, PAIRED WITH ITEMS FROM APÉRO’S MENU LA QUINTINYE VERMOUTH ROYAL, EXTRA DRY (France) Tasting notes: Refreshing, botanical, and citrusy, with savory olive brine-like qualities that fall onto the palate, with a long finish. Smells of a forest, invoking qualities of bergamot, rosemary, and lavender. Perfect for a dry martini, but use less booze—one ounce of vodka or gin and two ounces of vermouth. Pair with: A Caesar salad or roasted vegetables, or the ‘Nduja & Boquerones, a salami spread with marinated anchovies served with toasted bread.

CONTRADO BIANCO (Italy) Tasting notes: Sweet candied citrus with ginger notes. Smells of dried flowers and perfume with hints of fresh mint. A long, bitter, yet balanced fruity finish. Perfect on its own. Pair with: Charcuterie and fromage, or the smoked burrata with cranberry mostarda to balance the sweet and bitter.

LACUESTA VERMOUTH (Spain) Tasting notes: Rich on the palate, slightly caramelized yet herbal. Smoky on the nose, tastes of dried herbs, dried figs, prunes, and stewed fruit. Similar to an old-fashioned. Pair with: Crispy pork belly.


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MAY

SA 18 GLOWRAGE PAINT PARTY 8p SU 19 AFTON MUSIC SHOWCASE 5:30p

indymusic

TU 5/21 • 7P

TANK AND THE BANGAS “GREEN BALLON TOUR” W/ADIA VICTORIA

Hell Hath No Fury

TH 23 A NIGHT OF SONGWRITERS 7p FR 24 SISTER SPARROW & THE DIRTY BIRDS 7:30p

FR 31 FADE TO BLACK

(A TRIBUTE TO METALLICA) 7:30p JUNE

ADIA VICTORIA ON KILLING GOD TO SAVE HERSELF

SA 1 JOANNE SHAW TAYLOR

W/ THE BUZZARDS BAND 7p

FR 7 JUSTIN WEST W/ PINE BOX SA 8 TH 13 FR 14 SA 15 SU 16 WE 19 TH 20 FR 21

DWELLERS / KAYLIN ROBERSON / TAN SANDERS AND THE DERELICTS 7p GTOPIA FEATURING: AJ MITCHELL, SASHA SLOAN, AUSTIN BROWN 7p TECH N9NE 6:30p THE BREAKFAST CLUB 8 PM NIGHTRAIN (GNR TRIBUTE) & THUNDERSTRUCK (AC/DC TRIBUTE) W/ THE FIFTH 7:30p NAILS W/ MISERY INDEX / DEVOURMENT / OUTER HEAVEN 6p THE RECORD COMPANY 7p SCRANTONICITY (A WORKPLACE COSTUME & DANCE PARTY) 6:30p THE STRANGER – BILLY JOEL TRIBUTE FEATURING MIKE SANTORO 7p

CO M I N G S O O N

7/5 THE CLARKS 7p 7/13 GRASS IS DEAD & SONGS FROM THE ROAD BAND 8p

7/16 CHARLEY CROCKETT 8p 7/18 LATE SHOW- UM AFTER PARTY. DOOM FLAMINGO 10:30p

7/19 GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

AT KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE 5:30p

7/20 LONG BEACH DUB ALLSTARS

W/ AGGROLITES / MIKE PINTO 7:30p

8/9 STEPHEN MARLEY W/ DJ SHACIA PÄYNE & CONSTANCE BUBBLE 9p

8/10 MOTHER’S FINEST 7p 8/21 BERES HAMMOND – NEVER ENDING

8/31 9/15 9/20 9/29 10/4

W/ HARMONY HOUSE SINGERS 7p METAL POLE MAYHEM 8p BRENT COBB AND THEM 7p BLACK UHURU 8p NOAH KAHAN 7p

JIMMY HERRING AND THE 5 OF 7 7:30p 10/5 PERPETUAL GROOVE 8p

10/10

TRAOBA PRESENTS: THE 5TH ANNUAL

NELSON MULLINS BATTLE OF THE BROKER BANDS! 4:45p 10/30 MARIBOU STATE: ALBUM LIVE TOUR 7p 11/6 LETTUCE AT THE RITZ 8p

ADV. TICKETS @ LINCOLNTHEATRE.COM & SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS ALL SHOWS ALL AGES

126 E. Cabarrus St.• 919-821-4111 www.lincolntheatre.com 18 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

BY SARAH EDWARDS

Adia Victoria PHOTO BY SHERVIN LAINEZ

“I

don’t like being pretty or polished,” the blues singer Adia Victoria says, a few minutes before the call drops. She’s driving through fickle patches of mountain service, en route to visit her boyfriend’s family for Easter; after an hour of phone tag, we settle on texting, exchanging a few riffs and GIFs about I-26 traffic. But after I send a list of questions, several hours pass before she responds, late at night, with a photograph of her answers, handwritten in a loopy script and signed “Columbia, South Carolina.” It’s worth the wait. “I have always maintained that I consider myself, first and foremost, a blues musician,” the note begins. “Now, this is not to say that I should feel boxed in by preconceived notions of what the blues ‘sounds like’ but, rather, the work of the blues.” This kind of searing consideration marks Victoria’s work: She’s an artist who leaves no stone unturned, whether in her own introspection and musical process or in the stories she tells the world about that music. On the heels of her “Dope Queen Blues” tour, she is opening several shows for R&B group Tank and the Bangas, including one at Lincoln Theatre on Tuesday. Silences, Victoria’s second album, released in February, reflects her thoroughness. It also reflects her early twenties. She

was raised in a devout Seventh Day Adventist household in rural South Carolina, and the constant moral calculus and emphasis on the afterlife bore a heavy hand. By the time she dropped out of school at age sixteen, she had disavowed her parents’ religion and began a series of moves, first to Paris (according to a recent New York Times profile, she bought a plane ticket the day that George W. Bush was re-elected), then to Brooklyn, and finally to Atlanta, where she worked as a telemarketer. This period was, she said in a KEXP interview, a “wild, debaucherous time,” as she explored what a life free from religion might look like. Also, she began teaching herself to play guitar. It’s essentially standard by now for a musician in their early thirties or forties to release an album that reckons with a period of youthful debauchery: Perhaps they’re sober now, or converted, or clean, or otherwise domesticated—somehow better. Silences is a different entry into that canon: When Victoria adjusts her rear-view mirror, her backward glance is a complex tribute to the wild, searching time after she left the church. To that end, she creates characters to tell the story. “The album is a story about freedom and about reclaiming yourself, owning

yourself,” she says. “After my indoctrination in the church I was no longer in ownership of myself and my soul. I needed to use those characters to dramatize what I had to go through to get those claws out.” The devil—both the demons inside us and the pitchfork-wielding one from organized religion—necessarily plays a hand in that process of reclamation. When Victoria recites, on “Dope Queen Blues,” that “we are lost, in vain,” the line is less one of mourning than it is of raw incantation. There’s almost a Shakespearean quality to the narrative voice of Silences; it may be haunted by higher powers, but the response Victoria takes is nervy, as if she’s running a finger along a live wire. This danger is laid bare in “Clean,” a song about killing God. That’s not an interpretative reading. The first line goes, “First of all / There is no God / Because I killed my God.” “The most dramatic imagery I could spit out was actually killing God, to equate God with a domineering man’s presence, the patriarchy—kill it, get free of it,” Victoria says. “The big taboo, the big secret, is that it feels good. It doesn’t hurt you. It’s not like damnation is waiting for you; you can have fun. It dramatized what I went through in my twenties: coming out as an atheist, and then losing my mind.”

ADIA VICTORIA (WITH TANK AND THE BANGAS)

Tuesday, May 21, 8 p.m., $20–$22 | Lincoln Theatre, Raleigh | www.lincolntheatre.com


A

fter Atlanta, Victoria moved to Nashville, where members of her family live. It was there that she began experimenting with music more seriously and performing at open-mic nights; briefly, she enrolled in college but dropped out when she was approached by a producer. In 2014, she released a single on SoundCloud, “Stuck in the South,” a blistering track that threads cultural indictments with a sense of hazy disorientation, and, of course, her signature mention of hell: “I don't know nothin’ ‘bout Southern belles / But I can tell you something ‘bout Southern hell.” Holding Southern niceties up against the South’s ugly racism is a fixture of her songwriting; on “Nice Folks,” she issues an adjacent refrain: “It’s the same old nice folks bringin’ me down / And it's the same old nice folks watchin’ me drown.” This characteristic of her writing—along with her attention to ruination, symbolism, hypocrisy, and her practice of keeping one ear to the red-clay of Southern ground—have earned Victoria the descriptor “Southern Gothic” and frequent comparisons to the writer Flannery O’Connor. It’s not a comparison that comes out of the blue. “[O’Connor’s] ability to put a blade to the Southern mind and reveal the grotesque absurdities running through it has been inspiring and therapeutic for me,” she says. “Art gives me a safe space from which I am able to challenge the most closely kept aspects of an identity forged onto me—religion, sexuality, race, capitalism. No sacred belief was left unscathed in Flannery’s art.” Victoria’s 2016 debut album, Beyond the Bloodhounds, took a methodical three years; the following year, she released two EPs, Baby Blues and How It Feels. When it came time to produce a second full-length album, she enlisted the help of The National’s Aaron Dessner. And she had an idea about how she wanted it to sound. “Rhythmically, I was looking to have the instrumentation feel a little bit off balance, to go between playing an unsettling note or a difficult interval,” she says. “I wanted to make things feel a little less comfortable, to stretch people’s ears. I wanted Aaron to be OK with a woman making her art intentionally confrontational, or disturbing, or unsettling. I think that’s a very powerful statement for a woman to make.” Silences is, in turn, inflected with hypnotic vocals and eerie soundscapes that take hairpin turns between the lush

and the jagged. Victoria’s studied guitar work is cut with horns, electronics, and woodwinds. It’s not always possible to tell if she’s going to finish singing a whispered, wounded note, take it to the skies, or let it drop entirely. The album is named after a book of essays by the first-wave feminist writer Tillie Olsen, which grapples with the ways in which women’s creativity has been snuffed out. Such tie-ins are by no means unusual for the polymathic Victoria; throw a dart at a song and you’re bound to hit a literary reference. The title of Beyond the Bloodhounds was drawn from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs’s 1861 memoir. “Cry Wolf” was inspired by Sylvia Plath, while “The Needle’s Eye” was, Victoria says, inspired by “the letters and diaries of Virginia Woolf, who painstakingly recorded the crushing blows of manic depression—the anxiety, the paranoia. I believe she faced these fears head-on in order to create art that was unflinching and, in the end, fearless. ‘The Needle’s Eye’ is a character coming face to face with her demons.” Beyond attention to literary lineage, Victoria’s music also embodies a blues heritage that she has studied, honed, and advocated for. Holding her heroes close—Robert Johnson, Bessie Smith, and Victoria Spivey, to name just a few—she frequently uses the hashtags #reclaimingtheblues and #shitthebluestaughtme as she outlines, in performances and on social media, the ways in which blues music has been appropriated and erased to serve white interests. Olsen’s Silences, after all, was a text meant to excavate the lost voices of history, and Victoria’s Silences is a project no less ambitious: The sacred is not left unscathed. If the Catholic O’Connor’s work makes a case for what she famously described as a “Christ-haunted South,” Victoria’s music goes a step further—not only is Christ sacrificed, but God, in the form of a domineering man, is dead. And Victoria sings on. “I felt very much connected to the strength and conviction that birthed the blues,” her interview note closes out. “Beneath it all is the quest to lay claim to one’s own life. To truly belong to yourself while inhabiting a Black body is truly a radical endeavor. I want to break the blues out of the box White tastemakers have seen fit to confine it within. The Blues still has much work to do. xx, AV.” sedwards@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 19


music

music

REVIEWS

BRIEF

Life Preservers

TWO ENRICHING LOCAL EPS—PLUS, GRETA VAN FLEET’S POSTMORTEM ROCK STARDOM CASE SENSITIVE TWIN ½ Bull City Records; April 13

A year after the release show for its first single, Case Sensitive (Sierra Shell on vocals, bass, and keys; Chesley Kalnen on guitar; and Mary Koenig on drums and vocals) has returned with a studio record, the Twin EP, which demonstrates an expansion of its darkly melodic sound.

Twin’s angular atmosphere returns, first on “Dirty Habit,” led by a guitar riff distantly resembling Metallica’s “Enter Sandman,” and then on “Can You Stand It,” whose plodding tempo does nothing to reduce the energy conjured by Shell’s tuneful growling. Twin demonstrates how cohesive a sound Case Sensitive has in mind—one defined, as stated in its Bandcamp bio, as “eerie and ethereal.” But the moments when the carefully constructed aesthetic slightly breaks are some of the most exciting, like when Shell ironically sings, “count your blessings, count your money” on “Count Your Blessings,” or when “Can You Stand It” suddenly modulates from its ominous minor mode to a major key. Despite the branding benefits of consistency, it would be exciting to see Case Sensitive’s songwriting loosen into something more unpredictable and idiosyncratic. —Noah Rawlings

and seasons as subtle markers of evolving personal identity, with the effort of change expressed as equal parts exhilarating and exhausting. On the atmospheric dirge “Distance,” Chaisson reflects on a stale relationship by recalling the sensations of early infatuation at a backyard fire. Opener and standout “Hold Me Close” begins with a plucky, bittersweet banjo melody that’s as expressive as the lyrics are reserved. Hodge worries resignedly about how a changing self

DISSIMILAR SOUTH TREEHOUSE

Case Sensitive PHOTO BY SHANNON KELLY PHOTO



Case Sensitive seems to have recorded most of the songs on Twin with the logic that Lou Reed followed: “cymbals eat guitars.” That is, they keep the crash and ride to a minimum, leaving plenty of room for the vocals and guitar to resound. “Count Your Blessings” opens with guitar and toms that sound like they are emanating from the depths of a cavern. These resonant tones are strikingly juxtaposed with Shell’s clear, dry lead vocals. “Six Feet” is defined by snarling, pitch-perfect singing and doomy guitars clouded by cobwebs and sludge. The record takes a sudden turn with “Diet Coquette,” a kind of respite from the punchier rock songs. It’s painted in shades of night by a simple succession of synth chords and wistful vocals. While the languorous air seems to owe something to eighties ethereal wave, it also bears resemblance to the charttopping pop of Lana Del Rey, with melodramatically glamorous lines like, “I want a fabulous decline.” After this cool repose,

Dissimilar South is graduating college. The group formed in 2015 as a freewheeling, loudly queer, earnestly political Americana outfit, fostered in casual dorm-room jams at UNC-Chapel Hill. Rebecca Chaisson (harmonica, percussion) and Maddie Fisher (mandolin) graduated last year, while Blake Dodge (banjo) and Carter Hodge (guitar, banjo) are about to do the same. Their debut EP, Treehouse, produced by Mipso’s Wood Robinson at Nightsound Studios in Carrboro, marks this occasion with five coming-of-age songs that are tender, introspective, and fresh. On the 1995 song “Screwing Your Courage,” Jody Bleyle of seminal queercore band Team Dresch sang of the satisfaction of watching one’s body come to reflect one’s gender and sexuality more authentically (“It’s summer / The hair’s grown in on my upper thigh / Just like so much corn / In late July”). Dissimilar South also uses time

20 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

Self-released; May 3

Dissimilar South PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS affects relationships with others, singing, “Turn my mind to a time where I was kinder / Willing to share my life.” The other band members chime in on the chorus, a heartbreaking, supportive farewell: “So hold me close / I’ll let you go.” Treehouse is a warm and spacious recording, with carefully interlaced mandolin and banjo and lively percussion, but the vocal harmonies get special emphasis. The members back one another up beautifully on everything from the polished pop-country of “Moving On” to the playful, Righteous Babe-esque vocal gymnastics of “Wake Up.” Though each member is a songwriter and lead vocal duties are split, the EP is cohesive. Youth is a funny thing: We are equally cocky and unsure, ricocheting between our childhood memories and our fantasies of the future. On Treehouse, these conflicting feelings are deftly captured. —Josephine McRobbie

Greta Van Fleet

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

Do mild takes about Greta Van Fleet exist? Unless you avoid the internet at all costs, you already know the Michigan-born rock revivalists as one of the year’s truly polarizing pop-culture artifacts. Fans see the band’s members as larger-than-life superstars and staunch genre purists, here to save the hallowed tradition of seventies guitar rock from the Post Malones and Twenty One Pilots of the world. To seemingly every music critic on earth, it’s a Led Zeppelin CD case with nothing inside, an abstract algorithmic cash grab, or craven nostalgia purveyed by opportunists with the hair to match. Safe to say that tossing out spicy opinions about a clearly silly band can feel exhilarating, like obliterating a dunk on a low-hanging goal. This type of easy criticism, though, can be tone-deaf to how acts like this have successfully read the cultural temperature. For now, GVF’s greatest coup seems to be tapping into a large, invisible audience of rock devotees for whom very few observable new bands exist. You can see this with countless subgenres of rock. Many of the critically reviled alt-rock and emo aesthetics of the 2000s, which were all quickly suffocated by the death of rock radio, found surprising new life bonding together. Will Greta Van Fleet be the saviors of rock? No. Their music is not subversive or era-defining in the way that truly great rock bands are. But their undeniable mainstream success across younger demographics suggests that rock isn’t dead in the water, as people love to claim. More frequently. it’s just smuggled into other, hipper genres with superior marketing infrastructure. Of course, history assures that our current moment will become passé, and new, conventional rock may well return to the radio. But until then, GVF fills the space. Music is a continuum, and silly bands still make the world turn, whether we like it or not. —David Ford Smith

GRETA VAN FLEET

Thursday, May 16, 7:30 p.m., $53+ Red Hat Amphitheater, Raleigh www.redhatamphitheater.com


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INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 21


indystage

Big Happy Family

NO SITTER REQUIRED FOR THE HOUSE OF COXX'S NEW KID-FRIENDLY DRAG SHOW BY JAMES MICHAEL NICHOLS

O

ver the past six years, The House of Coxx show has been a pioneering force in the Triangle drag community. Founder Vivica C. Coxx, a beloved figure of the downtown Durham scene, dedicates much of her time to carving out space for LGBTQ folks and allies to forge connections, have necessary and difficult conversations, and appreciate drag as an art form. Now, Coxx is making an intentional effort to make her family’s entertainment showcases available to a wider variety of people, including children. Last month, Coxx added an earlier, allages show to her monthly drag showcase at The Pinhook, which takes place at 8:30 p.m. one Saturday per month (check the Pinhook’s website for details) in order to accommodate “our folks with bedtimes,” she says. The move makes sense, with drag becoming accessible to wider audiences through the cultural phenomenon of RuPaul’s Drag Race, but with drag shows often not starting until close to midnight. For Coxx, the early show is also about enabling younger demographics to be exposed to the idea of difference early on, normalizing gender exploration for kids. The INDY recently spoke with Coxx about the importance of breaking down barriers between queer culture and younger generations. INDY: Can you tell me about the all-ages show, and why having this option for everyone to experience drag felt important? VIVICA C. COXX: We’ve received a lot of feedback over the years that we’ve been doing this work and putting on shows at the Pinhook. And part of that feedback has always been, “Why does your show start so late?” Quite honestly, we knew that a late show would do well, and it would justify paying performers. Fast-forward to us selling out basically every show since September 2018 and realizing, actually, this is no longer sustainable—we will start losing people because it 22 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

is too full. People will say, “Why do I even come here if I’m not having a good time?” So, we decided to reduce the number of people who come to the late show by picking out some of those people and having them show up to the 8:30 show. But also, more importantly, we knew that it was important for our folks with bedtimes. We wanted them to feel like they had the opportunity to see a show and that we were available to them. We do all sorts of drag there, but all of it is palatable for a wide age-range. You already had one of these all-ages shows in April. How did it go? We had about one-hundred-forty people come out, which is actually a really good number. Some shows that are late or bands don’t even get one-hundred-forty. Why is it important for us to create space for younger people or children to experience drag as a cultural art form? Well, a lot of people think of drag as only breaking the rules and promoting negative behaviors, when in fact, I think of drag as a cultural art form that children should be experiencing, because it has been rooted in activism, social justice, and progress. And it shows not only that you can do whatever you want to do in life and be good at it, but also that you should be good to other people. And that’s what we try to put forward. But it’s really important because the children can see that whoever they want to grow up to be is OK and, here’s the kicker, their parents are agreeing to that. By a family member bringing a child to a drag show, they’re saying “Wait, this family member is OK with whoever I become, however I become that person.” That’s why it’s so powerful. Is there a story about an interaction you’ve had with a younger person at one of your shows that really stuck with you?

“I

think of drag as a cultural art form that children should be experiencing, because it has been rooted in activism, social justice, and progress.” Vivica C. Coxx PHOTO BY MATTHEW TROWER Yes, there was a show where a parent brought a child. It was just so much fun— the kids were laughing and giggling, but this family came up to me at the end of the show, because they wanted their child to have a hug from me. The child said “yes,” and we gave each other a hug. Well, I later got a message from the family that their child, who was assigned male at birth, found out it was OK for boys to wear skirts, and that boy has been wearing a skirt. Regardless of the gender identity of this child, they just wanted to wear a skirt and for it not to be complicated. And the family shared that bringing their child to a drag show had empowered the child to wear whatever the child wanted. That has always stuck with me.

Thinking about RuPaul’s Drag Race, the demographic that are watching drag through film and television is so much younger now. What are the larger societal benefits that we can hope will come from children seeing diverse gender expressions from a young age, and why is it important, from a community perspective, to be investing in that sort of ideology? I think the importance of children having exposure to different things is so we can reduce bullying in schools. If kids have already normalized difference, then, when someone is different, it’s no big deal. Maybe it’s even embraced and loved, and it can help to deal with a lot of the problems that we have in the school system, where teachers and


administrators feel powerless to stop bullying. Because how do you truly tackle it? But I do think that normalizing difference will help with that.

does everyone around them. That mutual respect that happens at a House of Coxx show, I believe, would’ve been so powerful for me as a kid.

What are you hoping that kids who come to your show will take away from it? That they are loved. I want the children to see that community exists. That art is theirs, too. That entertainment can be entertaining and that there are real people behind it. And coming to a drag show where it’s pretty intimate allows them to see that. But it also shows them that they’re important, and so

Anything else? Yes, I want to make sure its clear that this show is truly all-ages, and we want folks from all over the community to show up. But we have enjoyed the focus on kids. I think that’s the fun message to get out there: We want everyone, but it’s OK for kids to have a good time too. arts@indyweek.com

stage

BRIEF

What is the cost of vulnerability when being black and a woman in the United States are already spaces of systemic precarity? Choreographer and dancer Jasmine Powell explores a range of vulnerable realities through poetry and dance in Approximation of a Woman, which premieres at Hayti Heritage Center on Friday. Powell is joined by dancers Jaylun Moore, Keisha Wall, and Kristin Taylor Duncan in four solos—“Common Law Wife,” “Skinned Rose Flesh,” “She Walks with Bird,” and “Chokecherry Tree”—all inspired by the late Tiffany Austin’s poetry. In 2017, Austin approached Powell about working together, but Austin passed away before the collaboration was realized. After taking time away from the work, Powell returned to honor her collaborative vision with Austin. “So as much as Tiffany is not in the show, her words are in the show, and her voice is in the show. Her spirit is throughout the entire show, and, through that, we channel four specific women,” Powell says. Approximation of a Woman is Powell’s second Durham Independent Dance Artists, following Jasmine Powell PHOTO BY MICHAEL RODGERS 2016’s Shadows Chasing Light. “DIDA fits because I’m taking dance into places where dance isn’t normally seen. I know that Hayti is a historical landmark because I grew up going to it as well,” Powell says. “I’m working as a bridge to bring dance to the other side of the tracks; to bring those who follow DIDA to other parts of Durham, and to bring us all together and say that dance can happen anywhere. It’s OK to go out of your comfort zone to see it.” Though these stories are not Powell’s own, she has found pieces of herself in all of them. She offers them as meditations on black women’s vulnerabilities and invites audience members—no matter their gender, race, or ethnicity—to witness and experience. “From that experience, you will ponder, and from your pondering, you will question, and then you will have a conversation,” Powell says. Join her for a talkback session immediately following the show. —Jameela F. Dallis

JASMINE POWELL: APPROXIMATION OF A WOMAN Friday, May 17, 8 p.m., $10 Hayti Heritage Center, Durham www.didaseason.com

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24 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com


indyscreen

Temple for Trolls

SOMETHING GENUINELY SPIRITUAL SIMMERS BENEATH SATANISM'S MEDIA-BAITING PRANKS BY RYAN VU

T

he past few years have taught us not to doubt the political power of a good troll. Modern Satanism’s recent revival tends to be treated as an amusing curiosity. Director Penny Lane zeroes in on the political project behind the media-baiting antics, making Hail Satan? a funny, compelling portrait of a group that’s pushing the limits on just how far a prank can go before it turns into something else.

HAIL SATAN? 

Now playing

Hail Satan? PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES If there’s one thing twenty-first-century Satanism is good at, it’s looking the part. Satanic Temple co-founder and primary spokesperson Lucien Greaves, with his scarred right eye and permanently smug expression, is basically a real-life Bond villain. Lane lets him do most of the explaining, and he characterizes the enterprise in the language of Enlightenment liberalism. According to Greaves, ever since Anton LaVey’s Church of Satan in the 1960s, modern Satanism has been distinguished by its self-aware, atheistic understanding of Satan as a metaphor for freedom, not a supernatural deity. “Blasphemy isn’t just directed at other people to offend them,” Greaves says. “Blasphemy is very much a declaration of personal independence.” The Satanic Temple was instituted in 2013 to advocate for religious freedom, countering what its members see as the U.S. evangelical movement’s efforts to

undermine the Constitutional separation of church and state. The film’s main subject is the Temple’s nationwide campaign to block or remove statues of the Ten Commandments from state property. They’ve successfully accomplished this by counter-proposing their own monument: a statue of the demon Baphomet on the same grounds. In some of the funniest scenes, Greaves and other Satanists stand before GOP state legislatures, forcing them to recognize that if one religion is permitted to build a religious monument, any federally recognized religion can—and, in the U.S., there is no single official determination of a religion’s status. As Greaves says of the most famous episode, “We were giving the Oklahoma government a civics lesson.” A more radical push from within the movement comes from Jex Blackmore, head of the Detroit chapter, for whom “activism is a Satanic practice.” On the film’s evidence, she is the most skilled at choreographing theatrical spectacles, but as the organization grows and becomes more institutionalized, her preference for direct action over gaming the legal system is increasingly sidelined. That she’s also dropped from the film when she’s dropped from the organization feels like a missed opportunity. Hail Satan? is more effective at highlighting the contradiction between the Satanic Temple’s stated intentions, which at their stuffiest feel a bit like Dawkins-style atheism meets hashtag resistance, and the evident appeal of the group’s use of ritual. Satanism is not just an elaborate troll; it also satisfies a genuine spiritual need that modern liberal society can’t. arts@indyweek.com

deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming May 29:

CARRBORO

For advertising opportunities, contact your ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 25


WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK 5.15–5.22

FRIDAY, MAY 17

AN EVENING WITH DAWES

Don’t be misled or intimidated by the title, “An Evening With Dawes,” or its musuem setting: This is still just a good ol’ rock ‘n’ roll show, after all. And even if the denimbedecked LA dudes of Dawes have been tilting the balance of their sound a little bit away from folk-rock and a little bit toward triple-A indie over the last couple of albums (seemingly aided by the arrival of keyboardist Lee Pardini), their latest, Passwords, still offers more than enough reflective, poetic lyrics, gently picked acoustic guitars, and Laurel Canyon harmonies to keep their old fans satisfied. So don’t take the critical analyses of that album too seriously when they start making out like these guys have become the American answer to Radiohead, just because they picked up a couple of synths and hid their CSNY albums under their beds. —Jim Allen NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART, RALEIGH 8 p.m., $27–$40, www.ncartmuseum.org

Dawes PHOTO

BY MAGDALENA WOSINSKA

FRIDAY, MAY 17–SUNDAY, JUNE 2

THURSDAY, MAY 16–SUNDAY, MAY 19

THE LEGEND OF GEORGIA MCBRIDE

SWAN LAKE

HONEST PINT THEATRE COMPANY, RALEIGH 7:30 p.m. Friday–Saturday & 2 p.m. Sunday, $15–$22, www.honestpinttheatre.org

DUKE ENERGY CENTER, RALEIGH Various times, $39+, www.carolinaballet.com

The late, great Tammy Wynette put it best: “Sometimes, it’s hard to be a woman,” particularly if you’ve been an Elvis impersonator for years (“more Ed Sullivan than Graceland”), watching your act slowly go to seed in some Panama City dive. But when the owner of the bar where Casey struts those blue suede shoes brings in a low-rent lip-sync drag revue, the ersatz King finds himself at a crossroads. And when Rexy Nervosa, a performer in the troupe, can’t go on one night, Casey takes her place, and it pushes matters to a head. Matthew Lopez’s comic script dares to ask if a redneck het-boy can find true success and happiness in drag. And, if so, what’s he going to tell his pregnant wife? Co-artistic director Suzanne Hough directs a cast including Matthew Hager, David Henderson, and Jesse Gephart in this Honest Pint Theatre production. —Byron Woods

26 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

In 2005, Carolina Ballet artistic director Robert Weiss cast ripples in the dance world when he premiered his own version of the second-most-famous ballet in history. The “Black Swan” pas de deux, with its iconic thirty-two fouetté turns, which had become a balletic rite of passage? Out. The four cygnets? Gone, along with all those frilly tutus anchored by history to the midsections of the swan chorus. Small wonder that The New York Times was “impressed with the effectiveness” but “disoriented by the aggressiveness of [Weiss’s] revisions” to the historic work at the time. But in going his own way, Weiss crafted a more intimate version of the fairy tale, one based on Austrian writer and illustrator Lisbeth Zwerger’s wistful 2002 children’s-book adaptation, creating what London’s Financial Times called “one of the happier variations” on a long-celebrated work. This revival, which closes Carolina Ballet’s twenty-first season, runs for one long weekend only. —Byron Woods


SATURDAY, MAY 18

SHEILA E.

All it takes is a quick listen to the drum solo on “The Glamorous Life” to mark Prince-collaborator and stick impresario Sheila E. as one of the most accomplished and deft percussionists around. She’s in the league of Max Roach, Bernard Purdie, Chris Dave, and Questlove, but somehow, Rolling Stone ranked her only fifty-eighth in its tally of the hundred greatest drummers of all time. But this weekend, she gets her due as the International Musicians Summit’s keynote performer at Rhythms Live Music Hall. Previously known as the International Guitar Summit, the affair may seem foreign Sheila E. PHOTO COURTESY OF RHYTHMSLIVENC.COM to some of us, but it’s been a mainstay in showcasing great artists for the last eight years. Sheila E., armed with stilettos and timbales, is a veteran and an icon who brings glittery integrity to the three-day festival, especially in its new Lakewood venue, which could use some bolstering. —Eric Tullis RHYTHMS LIVE MUSIC HALL, DURHAM Various times, $62, www.rhythmslivenc.com

FIRST FRIDAY JUNE 7th 6PM-9PM 230 S. Wilmington St. Suite 105, Raleigh, NC FRIDAY, MAY 17

CAROL BURNETT

If you like the idea of picking the brain of a legendary woman in comedy but can only afford one DPAC ticket this week, you’ve got a real Sophie’s choice on your hands. With no disrespect to Chelsea Handler, who discusses her new memoir, Life Will Be the Death of Me, at DPAC on May 18, we’d have to go with Carol Burnett the night before. Burnett broke through her day’s barriers for women in comedy so that Handler could break through the new barriers of hers. An actor, comedian, writer, and singer whose career spans seven decades, Burnett created and starred in the Carol Burnett PHOTO COURTESY OF DPAC eponymous variety show that, starting in the 1960s, was the first of its kind to be hosted by a woman. The influence of its character-driven format remains a force in comedy programs today. In what’s billed as “an evening of laughter and reflection where the audience asks the questions,” Burnett will screen video clips from her shows with audience interaction, in the manner of the classic openings of The Carol Burnett Show. —Brian Howe DURHAM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, DURHAM 7:30 pm., $129+, www.dpacnc.com

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?

DON’T GET TROUBLE IN YOUR MIND AT UNC’S FED EX GLOBAL CENTER (P. 36), LADY LAMB AT KINGS (P. 28), JON LOVITZ AT GOODNIGHTS COMEDY CLUB (P. 35), JASMINE POWELL AT HAYTI HERITAGE CENTER (P. 23), MICHAEL PARKER AND LOUIS BAYARD AT MCINTYRE’S BOOKS (P. 34), ELY URBANSKI AT THE DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL (P. 33), ADIA VICTORIA AT LINCOLN THEATRE (P. 18)

Join us for a pre-release listening party of

BOULEVARDS new album

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Clothing and Gear presented by

Napoleon Wright II Becauseus

“Extreme times call for extreme creativity”

Plus DJ

- Jeremy Blair

and INDYCast Recording Live Onsite INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 27


music

Wilson, isn’t busy with them he’s got an extracurricular project all his own, playing rootsy tunes in singersongwriter mode backed by a stand-up bass man and a drummer. –Jim Allen POUR HOUSE: Local Band Local Beer: Girl Werewolf, Car Crash Star, Corroder; $5. 9 p.m. RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: Greta Van Fleet; 7:30 p.m. SLIM’S: Septicemic, Basilica, Corona Mortis; $7. 9 p.m.

FRI, MAY 17 ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE: It’s Gonna Be May Dance Party; 8 p.m. BLUE NOTE GRILL: Tony Holiday Band, Damico & the New Blue; $10. 7 p.m. THE CARY THEATER: Jason Harrod, Jody Carroll; $20-$25. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE:

Mattiel TUESDAY, MAY 21

LADY LAMB Aly Spaltro has been honing her craft for over a decade as Lady Lamb, but at one point she went by the extended moniker Lady Lamb The Beekeeper. That wordy stage name was a way to carve out some creative freedom when she lived in a small town in Maine, but it’s a good indicator of her M.O. as a songwriter. Spaltro delights in cramming a few too many words into each song, grazing dreamily on small moments and analyses to create intimate lyrics. On her latest, Even in the Tremor, she leans into this chatty style, spending an entire verse of single “Deep Love” describing the process of tenderly combing a knot out of her girlfriend’s hair. Combined with big pop sounds, these micro-moments of connection feel especially exposed, pushed to the level of anthem over swelling synths and strings. Fellow Brooklynites Katie Von Schleicher and Alex Schaaf open. —Josephine McRobbie

KINGS, RALEIGH

8 p.m., $15–$17, www.kingsraleigh.com

Lady Lamb

PHOTO COURTESY OF CATSCRADLE.COM

WED, MAY 15 CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: The Suitcase Junket; $10. 8 p.m.

NIGHTLIGHT: Idiota Civilizzato, Mutant Strain, Mind Dweller, De()t; $10. 9 p.m. THE PINHOOK: Student Health, Colorado, Hey Champ; $7. 8 p.m.

THE CAVE: Royal Johnson, Jalapeno; $5 suggested. 9 p.m.

POUR HOUSE: STIG, The Moon Unit; $7-$10. 9 p.m.

LOCAL 506: The Go Rounds; $10. 8 p.m.

SLIM’S: Dover and the Elevators, Sidewalk Furniture; $5. 9 p.m.

28 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

THE RITZ: Ella Mai; $33. 8 p.m.

THU, MAY 16 ARCANA: The Mothmen, Arielle Bryant; donations. 8 p.m. BLUE NOTE GRILL: Sugaray Rayford; $10-$15. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Henry Jamison, Saint Sister; $15. 8 p.m.

[$10-12, 8PM] Mattiel is a soul and rock frontwoman with a voice like Grace Slick and some pretty well-honed aural touchstones. Working with Atlanta garage rock veterans Randy Michael and Jonah Swilley, Mattiel channels sounds that signal everything from the orchestral country tales of Lee Hazlewood to the spunky and scenery-chewing garage rock of her friend Jack White. –Josephine McRobbie THE CAVE: The Yardarm, Antique Hearts, Dead Sea Sparrow; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. GIBSON GIRL VINTAGE: Charming Disaster, Curtis Eller; free. 8 p.m. KINGS: Fenty Formation: Rihanna X Beyoncé Dance Party; $5+. 10 p.m. THE KRAKEN: The Loose Lucies; free. 7 p.m. LOCAL 506: Salt Palace, Zephyranthes, Condado; $8. 9 p.m. THE MAYWOOD: TakeHeart, Unicron, Valleys, Discerner; $10. 8:30 p.m. MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL:

THE CAVE: Drunken Prayer, Juke Box Creeps, Cliff Mann; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. GIBSON GIRL VINTAGE: Thomas Strayhorn; free. 6 p.m. MOTORCO: Hush Kids, Lydia Luce; $12-$15. 7 p.m. MOTORCO: Mid-Year Music Mixer & Showcase; $10-$12. 10 p.m.

THE PINHOOK:

The Dave Wilson Trio [$10-$12, 9PM]

Neo-bluegrass boys Chatham County Line have been making a big splash for about a decade and a half now. But when the Raleigh pickers’ frontman, Dave

NC Symphony: Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 3 [$18-$74, 8PM]

Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Caroline Shaw has a distinctive way of alchemizing the classical canon. Much of her music draws liberally on older sources, including


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Tony the New

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FR 5/24 THE JAPANESE HOUSE W/ART SCHOOL GIRLFRIEND ($18/$20) SA 6/1 ABBEY ROAD LIVE (2 SHOWS- 4 PM & 9 PM)

R: Jason -$25. 8 p.m.

SU 6/2 THE DISTILLERS W/ STARCRAWLER($28/$30) FR6/7FRENSHIP W/GLADES ($15/$17) SU 6/9 THE LEMONHEADS, TOMMY STINSON ($25/$28) MO 6/10 GNASH W/ ANNA

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TU 7/16 BILL CALLAHAN ($22/$25) SU 7/21 THE GET UP KIDS W/ GREAT GRANDPA ($22/$26)

WE 7/24-SA 7/27 MERGE RECORDS 30 YEAR CELEBRATION TH 8/1 DONAVON FRANKENREITER ($20/$24) WE 8/7 MENZINGERS W/ THE SIDEKICKS, QUEEN OF JEANS

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AFRICA UNPLUGGED, THE UP & UP ($10)

SA 5/25 VIOLET BELL (FULL BAND) W/ LIBBY RODENBOUGH OF MIPSO AND TATIANA HARGREAVES ($8/$10) TH 5/30 HARDWORKER, MAGNOLIA COLLECTIVE, CASEYMAGIC FR 5/31 THE SH-BOOMS W/ BLOOD RED RIVER ($12) SA 6/1 SOLAR HALOS RECORD RELEASE SHOW W/ MAKE, MOURNING CLOAK SU 6/2 THE MYSTERY LIGHTS W/ FUTURE PUNX ($12/$14) WE 6/5 CAROLINE SPENCE W/ WHISPERER

FR 6/14 EILEN JEWELL ($15/$18) SA 6/15 DANTE HIGH W/ MOLLY SARLE

TROUBLE FUNK & JUS ONCE BAND

SU 9/15 BLEACHED ($15/$17)

THE HEATERS

ACTION ($16/$18)

MO 9/30 GENERATIONALS KINGS (R AL) WE 5/29 AN EVENING WITH CHARLIE PARRANDPHIL COOK

SPECIAL GUEST TIFT MERRITT

THE NOISEMAKERS/AMOS LEE

TH 6/20 JOSH ROUSE ($20)

SA 7/27 JOHN BUTLER W/ TREVOR HALL

SNEAKERS AWARD

MO 7/22 PRINCE DADDY & THE HYENA W/RETIREMENT PARTY, OBSESSIVES

WE 7/31 GABBY’S WORLD,

BELLOWS

TH 8/1 SCHOOL OF ROCK

ALLSTARS

SA 8/3 DELHI 2 DUBLIN TH 8/8 ANDREW BELLE ($15/ $17) FR 8/16 SIDNEY GISH TUE 10/1 THAT 1 GUY

SA 11/16 GAELIC STORM

SA 10/5 TYRONE WELLS ($17/$20; ON SALE MAY 17)

SUN 5/26

MO 7/29 WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS ‘THESE FOUR WALLS’ 10TH ANNIVERSARY W/ CATHOLIC

TU 7/23 BRUCE HORNSBY AND

WE 6/26 KRISTIN HERSH ELECTRIC TRIO ($18/$20)

SHEILA E

(INTERNATIONAL MUSICIANS SUMMIT)

DANTE ELEPHANTE, MOTEL RADIO

SU 6/16 LOS COAST

FR 10/25 STIFF LITTLE FINGERS

FR 12/6 OUR LAST NIGHT (ON SALE MAY 17)

HOP ALONG ($17/$20) FR 7/19 SUMMER SALT W/

TU 7/16

MO 6/17 CULTURE ABUSE ($15/$18)

SU 7/21 TIJUANA PANTHERS AND TOGETHER PANGEA W/ ULTRA Q

W/ THE AVENGERS

WE 6/12 REMO DRIVE W/ SLOW PULP, SLOW BULLET ($15/$18)

FR 6/14 STEEP CANYON RANGERS WITH CHATHAM RABBITS SA 6/22 TRAMPLED BY TURTLES WITH DEER TICK TU 7/2 COURTNEY BARNETT SA 7/13 ANDREW BIRD WITH

FR 9/27 RIDE (ON SALE MAY 17)

WE 10/23 OH SEES W/PRETTIEST EYES

FR 5/31 THE CONNELLS W/ LEISURE MCCORKLE ($20/$25)

WE 6/12 EARTH W/HELMS ALEE ($15)

SA 7/13 COLD CREAM, DE()T,

SU 10/20 THE BAND CAMINO W/ VALLEY (ON SALE MAY 17)

MOUNTAIN MAN)

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART FR 5/17 AN EVENING WITH DAWES

TH 6/13 DYLAN LEBLANC W/ ERIN RAE ($12/$15)

2020 CHAPEL HILL ROAD SUITE 33 • DURHAM, NC 27707 SAT 5/18

MOTORCO (DUR)

W/CHRISTIANE AND MKR

SA 9/21 WHITNEY W/ HAND HABITS (ON SALE MAY 17)

PENTHOUSE

FR 11/22 AND SA 11/23 (TWO

NIGHTS) SYLVAN ESSO "WITH" / PLUS MOLLY SARLE (OF

SA 6/8 MATT ANDERSON W/ERIN COSTELLO ($15-$18)

WE 9/18 TINARIWEN ($30/$33)

WE 10/16 MELVINS AND REDD KROSS W/ SHITKID (ON SALE MAY 17)

DPAC (DUR)

LINCOLN THEATRE (RAL) TU5/21TANK AND THE BANGAS W/ADIA VICTORIA ($20/$22)

SU 7/7 WAND W/ DREAMDECAY ($13/$15)

MO 10/7 LUNA PERFORMING

TH 9/26 JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND W/ SPECIAL GUEST AMANDA SHIRES

FR 6/7 JACK WILLOW ALBUM RELEASE SHOW

SA 6/22 MARK LEE (OF THIRD DAY)

SU 10/6 BUILT TO SPILL- KEEP IT LIKE A SECRET TOUR ($28/$32)

KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE (CARY)

FR 5/17 MATTIEL ($10/$12) SA 5/18 PILE W/ C.H.E.W., LATE BLOOMER ($12/$15)

SU 9/15 PENNY & SPARROW

TU 10/1 MT JOY

ARTSCENTER (CARRBORO) TH 6/27 THE SPILL CANVAS BOTTLE OF THE RED TOUR

SA 9/21 MANDOLIN ORANGE W/MOUNTAIN MAN

FR 6/21 NIGHT MOVES W/ COMPUTER SCIENCE

MO 9/16 CAT POWER WANDERER TOUR 2019”

SA 11/16 THE BLAZERS ‘HOW TO ROCK’ REUNION

TH 5/16 HENRY JAMISON W/SAINT SISTER ( $15)

TU 8/27 ELECTRIC HOT TUNA W/ ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY ($45/$50) W/ CAROLINE SPENCE

oose Lucies;

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WE 5/15 THE SUITCASE JUNKET W/ OWEN FITZGERALD ($10)

SU 5/19 FILTHY FRIENDS W/ DRESSY BESSY

USE: It’s ty; 8 p.m.

RT HALL:

TANK & THE BANGAS

FR 11/15 BLACK MIDI ($13; ON SALE MAY 17)

TRIO+

WE 8/7 AN EVENING WITH

LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND SA 8/24 OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW TH 8/29 CHAKA KHAN SA 8/31 MIPSO W/ BUCK MEEK SA 9/14 SNARKY PUPPY WE 9/25 RHIANNON GIDDENS AND FRANCESCO TURRISI RED HAT AMPHITHEATER (RAL)

FRI 6/14

SAT 6/15

MARCUS ANDERSONS LETS GO CRAZY SHOWTHE MUSIC OF PRINCE

FRI 6/21

GOOD ROCKIN SAM

SAT 6/22

JOHNNY WHITE AND THE ELITE BAND (JOHNNY WHITE RLMH MUSIC ACHEIVEMENT AWARD)

FRI 7/12

CRYSTAL GALE SUN 7/14

RUMOURS- ULTIMATE FLEETWOOD MAC TRIBUTE SHOW

FRI 7/26 • SAT 7/27

AARON MILLS PROJECT= FUNK AND JAZZ

SAT 8/17

THE GATLIN BROS

FRI 8/23

SOULE AND THE SUPERBAND-

MUSIC OF JAMES BROWN AND MORE

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90’S SUPERGROUPS HI-FIVE & SOLO

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MO 6/10 LOCAL NATIVES W/ MIDDLE KIDS

FRI 9/13

SAT 9/14

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RHYTHMSLIVENC.COM INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 29


5/18

POPUP BROADWAY (OLIVER!) VAUDEVILLE VARIETIES PRESENTED BY METTLESOME FAMILY-FRIENDLY TRANSACTORS IMPROV: SUM-SUM-SUMMERTIME NO SHAME THEATRE – CARRBORO

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SITTING PRETTY: A LIVE RADIO SHOW

5/16 5/17-19 5/18

RECENTLY ANNOUNCED: BoDeans, Cowboy Mouth

PRESENTED BY ODYSSEYSTAGE

6/5

THE SINGING OUT TOUR 2019 WITH CRYS MATTHEWS AND HEATHER MAE FEATURING JJ JONES AND JOE STEVENS

6/14

SONGS FROM THE CIRCLE 11

7/24

AN EVENING WITH BETTYE LAVETTE

THU

5/16

THU

5/16

Get tickets at artscenterlive.org

Follow us: @artscenterlive • 300-G East Main St., Carrboro, NC

RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE

THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS THIS

PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER PAPER

FRI

5/17

SUN

5/19

TUE

5/21

WED

5/22

7pm HUSH KIDS (Featuring Jill Andrews & Peter Groenwald) Lydia Luce 10pm Carolina Waves x BD ENT x Bimbe Fest Presents: Indie Mid-Year Music Mixer & Showcase with Krawzbonez (Jooselord/ Jovi Mosconi/ Nunafterhours/ 3AMSOUND/ Precyce Politix/ Blakk Trell). Hosted by K97.5’s Mir.I.am & Brian Dawson Crank It Loud Presents FLOTSAM & JETSAM SUPERORGANISM Simpson

SUPERORGANISM

Simpson Crank It Loud Presents HOT MULLIGAN Belmont / Kayak Jones / Fredo Disco Future Teens Nathan Bowles performs at the Pinhook on Monday, May 20.

THAD Kenny Roby

THAD

Kenny Roby

THU

5/23

SLUM VILLAGE Shame plus DJ Nevy

SLUM VILLAGE FRI

5/24

MONO Emma Ruth Rundle

Shame plus DJ Nevy

COMING SOON: The Connells,Aaron West & The Roaring 20’s, Deicide, Origin, The New Respects, Mark Farina, Remo Drive, Maimouna Youssef,The Crystal Method, Remember Jones, Cavetown, Damien Jurado, She Wants Revenge, Mystery Skulls, Hop Along, Chris Webby, Summer Salt, Dan Baird & Homemade Sin,The Rock*A*Teens, Escape-ism, Myq Kaplan,We Were Promised Jetpacks, Supersuckers, Sophomore Slump Fest, Sinkane, Bleached, flor, Boy Harsher, Genrationals, Kero Kero Bonito,Warbringer, Sonata Artica, Nilee

Also co-presenting at The Carolina Theatre of Durham: Criminal LIVE SHOW (on Oct 5th)

Present this coupon for

Member Admission Price (Not Valid for Special Events, expires 01-19)

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TeasersMensClub 30 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

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Watermark, her new piano concerto based on Beethoven’s third piano concerto, but she always approaches those sources with an irresistible lightness and grace. She’s like a folk singer and the Beethoven is the song she is rambling through, digressing from, and completely inhabiting as something entirely new and undeniably her own. —Dan Ruccia

THE PINHOOK: HAUS WERK; $7. 10 p.m.

MOTORCO:

Dylan Earl

Flotsam & Jetsam [$15–$18, 7:30 P.M.]

POUR HOUSE: Town Mountain, Ellis Dyson & The Shambles; $10-$12. 9 p.m. THE RITZ: Appetite for Destruction; 8 p.m. SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS RALEIGH: Anchor Detail; 7 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY: Orgaphonics; $20. 8 p.m. SLIMS:

[$7, 9:00 P.M.]

NC MUSEUM OF ART: Dawes; $27-$30. 8 p.m.

A word of warning: This twin bill teems with honky-tonk tearjerkers potent enough to refill your empty tallboy. Soaked in steel guitar, Dylan Earl’s traditionally minded tunes would’ve fit right in three decades ago when Dwight Yoakam was giving pop-leaning Nashville songwriters a boot in the ass. Two Dollar Pistols’ John Howie Jr. wallowed in heartbreak on last year’s sparse, aching solo debut. Earl also plays a free show in Carrboro for Townsend Bertram’s thirtieth anniversary on Saturday afternoon. —Spencer Griffith

NIGHTLIGHT: Piedmont Hill Toppers; 8:30 p.m.

THE STATION: The Dave Wilson Trio, Raven + Rose; 8 p.m.

Though not a household name like Metallica or Slayer, Flotsam and Jetsam might be the most tenacious act of the thrash era. Since 1981, the band has stayed active, releasing its thirteenth album, The End of Chaos, in January. Approaching their fourth decade,the band still hews closely to their original template. Though the production is richer, the riffs are still speed-driven and the melodies as dramatic as ever. —Bryan C. Reed

PHOTO BRAD BUNYEA

SAT, MAY 18 BLUE NOTE GRILL: Beatlesque; $10. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE: Citizen & Knuckle Puck, Hunny, Oso Oso; $22-$26. 7 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Pile, C.H.E.W.; $12-$15. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: BIG LAZY, LUD; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. UNC’S HILL HALL: Voices; 7:30 p.m. KINGS: Pat Junior, Oak City Slums, Cyanca, Tony G; $10. 8:30 p.m. THE KRAKEN:

Grand Shores [FREE, 7:30 P.M.]

After meeting as musicians in Paperhand Puppet Intervention, The Old Ceremony’s Gabriel Pelli and Kaira Ba’s Will Ridenour teamed up as Grand Shores, which conjures beautiful instrumentals that blend American and West African folk idioms via the former’s fiddle and guitar and the latter’s kora. Chessa Rich opens with dreamy, elegant keys paired to her soaring, stunning pipes. Rich also plays the Wake Forest Listening Room with Darren Jessee on Friday. —Spencer Griffith


LOCAL 506: TV Girl; $12-$15. 8 p.m.

MON, MAY 20

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL: N.C. Symphony: Biss Plays Beethoven; 8 p.m.

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Desmond Jones, The Oblations; $5. 8 p.m.

NIGHTLIGHT: Cosmic Liberation Front; $8. 10 p.m.

THE CAVE: Dexter Romweber; $5 suggested. 9 p.m.

POUR HOUSE: Porch 40 Album Release Party: Hustle Souls; $10-$12. 9 p.m.

THE NIGHT RIDER: Teenage Cenobite, Jetski, DJ Slex Tape; Donations. 8 p.m.

RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE: Raleigh Symphony Orchestra: West Side Story; $20. 8 p.m.

THE PINHOOK:

RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: PRIME Music Festival Day 1; $61+.

Durham banjo man Nathan Bowles just might be the most unique stylist on his instrument to come along since Bela Fleck. Part of his appeal lies in the fact that he’s equally comfortable digging into a traditional tune with both hands or taking things as far beyond conventional banjo territory as they can go, dipping into everything from jazz to jammy psychedelic overtones. —Jim Allen

RHYTHMS LIVE: Sheila E; 1:30 p.m. THE RITZ: Biz Markie; 8 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY: Michael Hawkins Quartet; $20. 8 p.m. SLIM’S: Toothsome Album Release with The Dinwiddies, Black Surfer; $5. 9 p.m.

SUN, MAY 19 ARCANA: 80 lb. Test, Midcentury Modular; donations. 9 p.m. BLUE NOTE GRILL: School of Rock Chapel Hill Showcase; free. 1 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Filthy Friends, Dressy Bessy; $15. 9 p.m. THE CAVE: Basic Bitches, Snake Shaming; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. MEREDITH COLLEGE’S JONES CHAPEL: Vox Virorum Men’s Chorus; $10 suggested. 3 p.m. LINCOLN THEATRE: Afton Music Showcase: Highly Gifted, Social Pariah, Electromanic, Jmax Driver, Tae Kwasii, Basha Binghi Reggae Concert, Ace of spade, AirCrash Detectives, Bender Street, Checkerboard Suede; $12-$15. 6:30 p.m. MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL: N.C. Symphony: Biss Plays Beethoven; 8 p.m. MOTORCO: Superorganism, Simpson; $17-$20. 8 p.m. NEPTUNES PARLOUR: Winter, Pearl & the Oysters; $10-$12. 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Day Party: Eric Sommer; $5. 2 p.m. RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE: Raleigh Symphony Orchestra: West Side Story; $20. 3 p.m.

Nathan Bowles Trio [$10, 8:00 P.M.]

SLIMS:

Al Riggs

[$5, 7:30 P.M.] Durham’s prolific Al Riggs delivers a solo set of new songs, showcasing yet another step in their constant stylistic shifts. Expect Riggs’ tender vocals, dense lyricism, and melodic melancholy to shine through. Singer-songwriter Sahara Smith teams with Pockets Sounds, the baroque pop project of eccentric indie hired gun, Michael St. Clair. Ravary, the solo project of Justin Ellis, opens. This same bill plays The Cave on Tuesday with MKR in the opening slot. —Spencer Griffith

TUE, MAY 21

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: shame, Disq; $14. 8:30 p.m. THE CAVE: Pocket Sounds, MKR, Al Riggs; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. KINGS: Lady Lamb, Katie von Schleicher, Alex Schaaf; $15-$17. 8 p.m. LINCOLN THEATRE: Tank and the Bangas, Adia Victoria; $20. 8 p.m.

RED HAT AMPHITHEATER: PRIME Music Festival Day 2; $61+.

MOTORCO: Hot Mulligan, Belmont, Kayak Jones, Fredo Disco, Future Teens; $15-$18. 6:30 p.m.

SLIM’S: Dave Wilson Trio, Trousers; $10. 4 p.m.

THE PINHOOK: Tacocat, Sammi Lanzetta; $12-$15. 8 p.m.

Mattiel will perform at Cat’s Cradle on Friday, May 17.

PHOTO COURTESY OF CATSCRADLE.COM

POUR HOUSE: Earth To Mars: The Bruno Mars Experience; $5-$10. 8 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY: Ti Harmon & Thrio; $17. 7 p.m.

WED, MAY 22

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Ghost of Paul Revere; $15. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: Expert Timing, Charlie Paso, Wrigleyville, Alright; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE: Steve Hobbs; 5:45 p.m. LOCAL 506: Pictures of Vernon, Ol Sport, Charm, Dollhands; 8 p.m. MOTORCO: Thad, Kenny Roby; $17-$20. 8 p.m.

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

NEPTUNES PARLOUR: Zen Mother; $10. 10 p.m. INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 31


On Stands Now

32 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com


art

5.15–5.22

submit! Got something for our calendar? Submit the details at:

https://indyweek.com/submit#cals DEADLINE: 5 p.m. each Wednesday for the following Wednesday’s issue. QUESTIONS? cvillena@indyweek.com

OPENING Bryant Holsenbeck & Kathryn DeMarco: We the Animals: Sculpture and collage. May 18-Jun 29. Reception: May 18, 5-7 p.m. Craven Allen Gallery, Durham. cravenallengallery. com. Smelt Art & Skittles Gallery Opening: Sixteen local artists. Gallery grand opening: May 18, 6-9 p.m. Thru Jun 29. Smelt Art & Skittles, Pittsboro. Spring Art Show: Group show. Sat, May 18. Santosa Healing Arts Studio, Moncure. santosahealingarts.com.

ONGOING 150 Faces of Durham: Photos. Thru Sep 3. Museum of Durham History, Durham. All the Pop: Thru Jun 2. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Keith Allen, Ben Hamburger, Kaidy Lewis, Carolyn Rugen: Thru Jun 8. Artist talk: May 10, 6 p.m. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill. Ancestry of Necessity: Group show. Curator, April Childers. Thru Aug 24. Reed Bldg, Durham.

FRIDAY, MAY 17

ELY URBANSKI: LAYERS There’s something very solitary about the work of Durham artist Ely Urbanski, who, in works such as the one pictured above, soaks articles of clothing in ink or bleach and then presses them onto fabric in her own low-tech monoprinting process. In the gulf between the humanity the garments so richly exude and its utter absence from the images, something wistful and lonesome grows. But Urbanski is far from alone at this Third Friday reception for her solo exhibit, Layers, at the Durham Arts Council. Work by more than one-hundred fifty artists teems in the galleries. The bulk of them are drawn from the DAC’s annual members’ showcase and its student/instructor exhibit, Our House, which features work in mediums from clay and photography to fiber arts. (The DAC is also currently presenting a pop-up exhibit of Jim Kellough’s lush Vine Paintings at the Durham Convention Center.) Layers and Our House remain on view through July 6, while June 8 is the closing day of the members’ showcase. —Brian Howe

DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL, DURHAM 6–8 p.m., free, www.durhamarts.org

A print from Layers by Ely Urbanski PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Annual Photography Show: Riverside High School student exhibit. Thru Jun 2. Reception: May 19, 2-3 p.m. West Point on the Eno, Durham. April Showers, Art Flowers: Group show. Thru May 26. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. hillsboroughgallery.com. Shib Basu & Peggy Van Arnam: Ink and Chains: Ink and crayon, jewelry. Thru May 28. Cary Gallery of Artists, Cary. carygalleryofartists.org. Best of North Carolina 2019: Various artists and media. Thru May 14. Gallery C, Raleigh. galleryc.net. Jasmine Best: Screened In: Sculptural elements constructed with textiles, fabric, and sewing notions. Thru May 12. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. camraleigh.org. Allison Coleman, Gabriella Corter, Angela Lombard: Thru Jun 27. Artspace, Raleigh.

Beyond Despair: An Environmental Call for Art: Work from 33 artists about, including, and referencing the environment. Thru Jun 22. National Humanities Center, Durham. vaeraleigh.org. Wim Botha: Stil Life with Discontent: Mixed media. Additional work on view at 21c Museum Hotel. Thru Aug 4. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Bull City Challenge: Group show. Thru May 31. Reception: May 17, 6-9 p.m. Bull City Art & Frame Co, Durham. Kathleen Deep: Still: Mixed media and photography. Thru May. The Centerpiece, Raleigh. Linda Ruth Dickinson: Resonant: Paintings. Thru May 24. The Mahler Fine Art, Raleigh. themahlerfineart.com. Durham Art Guild Members’ Showcase: Group show. Thru Jun 8. Reception: May 17, 6-8 p.m. Durham Art Guild, Durham. durhamartguild.org. Byron Gin & Andy Farkas: Paintings and prints. Thru Jun 1. Adam Cave Fine Art, Raleigh. adamcavefineart.com. Rachel Goodwin: Look Through This: Mixed media. Thru Jun 29. Reception: May 18; 5-7 p.m. Horse & Buggy Press and Friends, Durham. horseandbuggypress.com. Stephen Hayes: Legacy, Legacy, Legacy: Mixed media. Thru May 19. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. Dawn Hummer: By Her Hands: Thru Jun 2. Reception: May 17, 6-9 p.m. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. pleiadesartdurham.com. I AM A MAN: Civil Rights Photographs, 1960-1970: Thru May 31. Center for the Study of the American South, Chapel Hill. south.unc.edu. John James Audubon: The Birds of America: Ornithological engravings. Thru Dec 31. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Jim Kellough: Vine Paintings: Thru Oct 10. Durham Convention Center, Durham. durhamarts.org.

Stacey L. Kirby: The Department of Reflection: Multimedia. Thru Aug 4. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. ackland.org. Eric Kniss: Sifting: Thru Jun 8 VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. vaeraleigh.org. Left-Handed Liberty: Outsider art. Thru Jun 23. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. Christian Marclay: Surround Sounds: Synchronized silent video installation. Thru Sep 8. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Michela Martello: Consequential Stranger: Illustrations. Thru Jun 1. Artspace, Raleigh. Joy Meyer: A Few Hours After This: Paintings and video.Thru May 30. Reception: May 10, 6-8 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Chris Musina: Paradise: Paintings. Thru Jun 2. Oneoneone, Chapel Hill. oneoneone.gallery. N.C. Artists Exhibition: Juried group show. Thru Jun 9. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. ralfinearts.org. Oops! Happy Accidents: Art based on accidents. Thru Jun 2. Reception: May 17, 6-9 p.m. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. Our House: Durham Arts Council student-instructor exhibit. Thru Jul 6. Reception: May 17, 6 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham. Susan Harbage Page: Borderlands: Documentary photos and found objects from the US-Mexico border. Thru Jul 28. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. Pop América, 1965-1975: Latin American pop art. Thru Jul 21. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Portraying Power and Identity: A Global Perspective: Thru Jan 31. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com. [re]ACTION: Artistic renditions inspired by scientific images. Thru Jun 23. Golden Belt, Durham. INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 33


art

CONT’D

V L Rees: I Love Paris: Paintings. Thru Jun 29. V L Rees Gallery, Raleigh. vlrees.com. reNautilus: Thru Jul 31. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com. Susannah Sayler and Edward Morris: Their World Is Not Our World: Video installation. Thru Jul 7. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Cher Shaffer: Art from the Holler: Folk art. Thru May 31. Alexander Dickson House, Hillsborough. Katie Shaw: Residency. Thru May 31. Artspace, Raleigh. artspacenc.org. Southern Oracle: We Will Tear the Roof Off: Interactive sculptures. Thru Oct 31. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Kirsten Stoltmann: I am Sorry: Thru Jul 31. Lump, Raleigh. lumpprojects.org.

5.15 5.17 5.18 5.20 5.22

Tilden Stone: Southern Surreal: Furniture. Thru Sep 8. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. Eun-Kyung Suh: Lost and Preserved: Sculptures. Thru May 31. VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. vaeraleigh.org. Telling Realism: Cabinet of Wonder: Duke University MFA group show. Thru May 17. Power Plant Gallery, Durham. powerplantgallery.com. William Paul Thomas: Disrupting Homogeny: Portraits. End date TBA. Thru Jul 31. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com. Cheryl Thurber: Documenting Gravel Springs, Mississippi, in the 1970s: Photos. End date TBA. UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library, Chapel Hill. Lien Truong: The Sky is Not Sacred: Multimedia. Thru Jun 22. Reception: May 18, noon. Artspace, Raleigh.

Rob Christensen The Rise and Fall of the Branchhead Boys 7pm Jeffery Deaver The Never Game 7pm Chris Perondi The Big Book of Tricks for the Best Dog Ever 2pm Mason Deaver I Wish You All the Best 6pm Juliet Grames The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna 7pm Carrie Knowles Black Tie Optional: 17 Stories 7pm

UNC-Chapel Hill MFA Class of 2019: Sacred Wasteland: Group show with guest curator, William Paul Thomas. Thru May 26. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. ackland.org. Ely Urbanski: Layers: Monoprints. Thru Jul 6. Reception: May 17, 6 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham.

page

Christina Lorena Weisner: Explorations: Science sculptures. Thru Jul 28. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg. arts.ncsu.edu. Where We Find Ourselves: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922: Thru May 19. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Tim Williams: Pure Pigment: Paintings. Thru May 31. Reception: May 10, 6-8 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Within the Frame: Photos. Thru Jul 7. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org.

SATURDAY, MAY 18

RECYCLE THIS PAPER

www.quailridgebooks.com • 919.828.1588 • North Hills 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road, Raleigh, NC 27609 CHECK OUT OUR PODCAST: BOOKIN’ w/Jason Jefferies

BILL BURTON ATTORNEY AT LAW

MICHAEL PARKER AND LOUIS BAYARD A three-time recipient of the O. Henry Award, Michael Parker writes understated fiction about misfits and loners in work that moves between his native North Carolina and an expansive West that feels reminiscent of Cormac McCarthy’s. Prairie Fever, Parker’s latest novel, is set in early-twentieth-century Oklahoma and follows the fracturing relationship of two sisters who fall in love with the same schoolteacher. The book is out from Algonquin this month; previously, Parker taught at UNCGreensboro’s MFA program for thirty years. Louis Bayard is also a purveyor of historical fiction (fittingly, he penned The New York Times recaps of Downton Abbey during the show’s duration). His latest release, Courting Mr. Lincoln, takes a speculative approach to a relationship that has stumped and fascinated historians for more than a century. The story pivots between the perspectives of Lincoln, his friend Joshua Speed, and Mary Todd, who gets an overdue treatment as a complicated, spirited woman caught in the crosshairs of history. —Sarah Edwards

MCINTYRE’S BOOKS, PITTSBORO | 11 a.m., free, www.fearrington.com

Un c o n t e s t e d Di vo rc e

SEPARATION AGREEMENTS Mu s i c Bu s i n eDIVORCE ss Law UNCONTESTED In c o r p oBUSINESS r a t i o n / LLAW LC / MUSIC Pa r t n e r s h i p INCORPORATION/LLC Wi lls WILLS

C o l l967-6159 ections (919)

967-6159

bill.burton.lawyer@gmail.com 34 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

Michael Parker PHOTO COURTESY OF THE AUTHOR

READINGS & SIGNINGS Louis Bayard: Historical fiction Courting Mr. Lincoln. Sat, May 18, 11 a.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com.

Edward Espe Brown: The Most Important Point. Refreshments. Fri, May 17, 7:30 p.m. Chapel Hill Zen Center, Chapel Hill. chzc.org. Rob Christensen: Political history The Rise and Fall of the Branchhead Boys.

Wed, May 15, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Michael Croley: Short story collection Any Other Place. Thu, May 16, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. flyleafbooks.com.


Jeffery Deaver: Novel The Never Game. Fri, May 17, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Mason Deaver: Debut novel I Wish You All the Best. Sat, May 18, 6 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Juliet Grames: Debut novel The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna. Mon, May 20, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks. com. — Sat, May 18, 4 p.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com. Peter Guzzardi: Emeralds of Oz. Wed, May 15, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. flyleafbooks.com. Caleb Johnson & Kevin Powers: Novels Treeborne and A Shout in the Ruins. Mon, May 20, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. flyleafbooks.com. Carrie Knowles: Short story collection Black Tie Optional. Wed, May 22, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Michael Parker & Louis Bayard: Novels Prairie Fever and Courting Mr. Lincoln. Sat, May 18, 11 a.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com. Chris Perondi: The Big Book of Tricks for the Best Dog Ever. Sat, May 18, 2 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com.

LECTURES ETC. Michael Beschloss: Presidents of War: Tue, May 21, 7 p.m. Fletcher Opera Theater, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. Tammy Bird, Marina DelVecchio, Valerie Nieman: Over 40 and Female Agency: Authors in conversation. Tue, May 21, 7 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. flyleafbooks.com. Happy Hour with Sonny Caberwal: With Union social club founder Sonny Caberwal. Fri, May 17, 5:30 p.m. Vert & Vogue, Durham. vertandvogue.com. Navigating the Plastic Purge: Sustainability panel. Wed, May 15, 6 p.m. Chapel Hill Public Library, Chapel Hill. NCDOT Table Talk: Wake UP Wake County. Discussion on NCDOT’s 2050 comprehensive work plan. Wed, May 22, 7 p.m. Clouds Brewing, Raleigh. cloudsbrewing.com.

stage OPENING

Aladdin: Durham Ballet Theatre. $20. Sat, May 18, 2 and 6 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Asperger’s Are Us: Improv comedy. $20. Mon, May 20, 8 p.m. The People’s Improv Theater, Chapel Hill. thepitchapelhill.com. Carol Burnett: Comedy. Fri, May 17, 7:30 p.m. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com. Comedy Overload: $5. Thu, May 16, 8 p.m. Pour House Music Hall, Raleigh. thepourhousemusichall.com. Chelsea Handler: Comedy. Sat, May 18, 8 p.m. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com. Hello, Dolly!: Musical. $31+. May 21-26. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com. The Legend of Georgia McBride: Honest Pint Theatre. Play. May 17-18: 7:30 p.m. May 19: 2 p.m. Peace University’s Leggett Theatre,, Raleigh. theatre.peace.edu. Jon Lovitz: May 16-18. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Norway: Little Green Pig. Play. Free. 7:30 p.m. May 16-18. Duke Park, Durham. littlegreenpig.com. Oak City Comedy Festival: Comedy. With Gina Brillon. Wed, May 22, 9 p.m. Pour House Music Hall, Raleigh. thepourhousemusichall.com. Sum-Sum-Summertime: Family Friendly Transactors Improv. Improv comedy. Sat, May 18, 6 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Swan Lake: Carolina Ballet. May 16-19. Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com.

THURSDAY, MAY 16–SATURDAY, MAY 18

JON LOVITZ

Even though Jon Lovitz has the voice and bearing of a B-movie wise guy, he’s probably best known for playing hopeless aesthetes. If you grew up during his tenure on Saturday Night Live in the 1980s, then you probably remember him as the “Master Thespian,” a plummy fop exalting “Acting!” while wearing a satin smoking jacket. And if you grew up during the 1990s, when post-Simpsons Simpsons sitcom The Critic was on the air, then you probably remember him in animated form, proclaiming “It stinks!” about parodies of contemporary movies. By the time of the SNL fortieth-anniversary special in 2015, Lovitz’s star had faded enough for the show to jokingly include him in a list of cast members who’d died, cutting to his outraged reaction. But a steady stream of animated-movie voices, small roles in movies, and guest spots on TV shows have kept him in the corner of the public eye as he’s spent the last two decades honing his stand-up, which he brings to Goodnights for four shows in three days this week. —Brian Howe

GOODNIGHTS COMEDY CLUB, RALEIGH Various times, $30, www.goodnightscomedy.com Triangle Rising Stars: High school theatre awards. $10+. Thu, May 16, 7:30 p.m. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com.

Jon Lovitz PHOTO COURTESY OF GOODNIGHTSCOMEDY.COM

ONGOING 462 Stand Up Comedy Show: Stand-up comedy. With host Caroline Smith. $8. Sat, May 18, 9 p.m. The People’s Improv Theater, Chapel Hill. thepit-chapelhill.com. Beehive: The 60’s Musical: Theatre Raleigh. Musical. Thru May 19. Kennedy Theatre, Raleigh. theatreraleigh.com.

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

INDYweek.com | 5.15.19 | 35


screen

OPENING A Dog’s Journey—A dog (Josh Gad) learns heartwaming lessons, and it’s all vaguely Christian somehow. Rated PG. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum—Keanu Reeves kills anything that moves with high style and excessive punctuation. Rated R. The Sun Is Also a Star—Nicola Yoon’s YA novel about young love, the threat of deportation, and quantum physics hits the screen. Rated PG-13. The White Crow—Ralph Fiennes directs Oleg Ivenko as legendary Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev. Rated R.

N OW P L AY I N G The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Read reviews of these films at indyweek.com.

SPECIAL SHOWINGS Asbury Park: Riot, Redemption, Rock ‘n Roll: Wed, May 22, 7:15 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Austenland: Sun, May 19, 2 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. The Driver: $7. Fri, May 17, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Female: $7. Wed, May 22, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Maximum Overdrive: Wed, May 22, 9 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Raiders of the Lost Ark: $5. Mon, May 20, 7 p.m. Rialto Theatre, Raleigh. Red Joan: Fri, May 17, 2 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Running with Beto: Documentary. Fri, May 17, 7 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Who Framed Roger Rabbit & Space Jam: Fri, May 17, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. 36 | 5.15.19 | INDYweek.com

 Amazing Grace—A dazzling testament to the Queen of Soul at the height of her career. Rated G.  Ask Dr. Ruth— America’s sex therapist gets the same loving documentary treatment as Fred Rogers and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Not rated.  Captain Marvel—Brie Larson is an intergalactic fighter questioning who she is. Rated PG-13.  Hail Satan?— Reviewed on p. 25. Rated R. ½ Long Shot—The sex jokes and political satire both sag in this Seth Rogen-Charlize Theron rom-com. Rated R.  Tolkien—All the dots between The Lord of the Rings and the author’s life are connected in a strangely dispiriting biopic. Rated PG-13.

The Carolina Chocolate Drops PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTHERN DOCUMENTARY FUND THURSDAY, MAY 16

DON’T GET TROUBLE IN YOUR MIND: THE CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS’ STORY Don’t Get Trouble in Your Mind captures legendary North Carolina string band The Carolina Chocolate Drops at the height of their fame. Director John Whitehead traces the charismatic group from its beginnings at the Black Banjo Gathering in 2005 through high-profile performances and tours, touching on moments of synergy as well as fracture. The original trio, comprised of Rhiannon Giddens, Dom Flemons, and Justin Robinson were (and continue to be, in their respective solo projects) dedicated historians of African-American vernacular music, a passion showcased in scenes with the band’s mentor, Joe Thompson. The time the Drops spent learning the repertoire with the late master fiddler in Mebane would inform their Grammy-winning album, Genuine Negro Jig. The documentary is both a snapshot of a moment in time and a testament to the sweetness and pain of change. —Josephine McRobbie

UNC’S FEDEX GLOBAL EDUCATION CENTER, CHAPEL HILL | 5:30 p.m, free, www.global.unc.edu

food & drink Blues and Brews Festival: Local music and beer. $50$55. Sat, May 18, 5-10 p.m. Durham Central Park, Durham. durhambluesandbrewsfestival. com.

Second Chance Dine & Dance: Food, guest speakers, music, and more. $10-$45. Thu, May 16, 6-9 p.m. Haw River Ballroom, Saxapahaw. benevolencefarm.org.

Smoke, Wine, and Brew Fest: Enjoy cigars, wine, and local food and music. Sat, May 18, 3-10 p.m. Golden Belt, Durham. smokewineandbrewfest.com.

Spring Oyster Roast: With Oysters Carolina & Ryan Bathea. $35. Sun, May 19, 1-3 p.m. Botanist & Barrel, Cedar Grove. botanistandbarrel.com.

Summer Fest: Music, food, games, and more. Sat, May 18, noon-9 p.m. The Glass Jug, Durham. glass-jug.com.


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misc. notices

NOTICE TO CREDITORS HONEYCUTT ALL PERSONS, firms and corporations having claims against ELMA JOYCE HONEYCUTT, deceased, of Wake County, NC, are notified to exhibit the same to the undersigned on or before August 5, 2019, or this notice will be pleaded in bar of recovery. Debtors of the decedent are asked to make immediate payment. This 8th day of May 2019. Joanne H. Gibson, Executor, 8241 Allyns Landing Way, Raleigh, NC 27615. INDY Week: May 8, 15, 22, 29, 2019.

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classy at indyweek dot com

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crossword If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “puzzle pages” at the bottom of our webpage.

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# 30

© Puzzles by Pappocom

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CLASSY AT INDYWEEK DOT COM

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• Email amanda: classy@indywEEk.com


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back page CONTACT AMANDA: CLASSY@INDYWEEK.COM last week’s puzzle

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HIMALAYAN FRONTIERS CLOSING SALE UP TO 80% Triangle Town Center 919-649-9006 Handcrafted: Asian art, carvings, paintings Silver jewelry Meditation Crystals, Gemstones

EASEFUL/READY

Men’s nude Yoga, Triangle + Triad, NC http://www.meetup.com/Skyclad-Yoga-of-the-Triangle/

DANCE CLASSES IN LINDY HOP, SWING, BLUES

At Carrboro ArtsCenter. Private lessons available. RICHARD BADU, 919-724-1421, rbadudance@gmail.com

SMOKY MOUNTAIN WHISKEY CRACKERS ® available at: Saxapahaw General Store, Southern Season, New Hope Market, Special Treats, Heart of Carolina

ART SUPPLY STORE

LEARN TAI CHI IN 2019!

Improve balance, flexibility, strength. New classes start in May and June throughout the Triangle. Visit www.taoisttaichi.org for details. 919-787-9600

IMPROVE THE SOUND OF YOUR VOICE!

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ART RECEPTION FRI. 5/17, 6-9 PM!

food & performance, at Bull City Art & Frame Co. Brightleaf Square, 919-680-4278

HUGE ESTATE SALE

May 17-18, 9am-1pm, 122 N. Main St., Burlington. Furniture, kitchen wares, vintage clothing, art and more!

CECI N’EST PAS UNE PUBLICITÉ!

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contact amanda for ads!

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deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming May 29:

CARRBORO For advertising opportunities, contact your ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com

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INDY Week 5.15.19  

INDY Week 5.15.19