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WAKE’S SCHOOL-FUNDING DILEMMA, P. 7

KOOLEY HIGH REUNITES WITH RAPSODY, P. 22

BOB TROTMAN’S BIG BUSINESS, P. 28


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WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK RALEIGH

VOL. 35, NO. 16

DEPARTMENTS

6 Between 2003 and 2013, nearly twenty thousand people were deported from North Carolina under the 287(g) program. That didn’t affect crime rates at all.

6 News 20 Food

7 Wake County’s Board of Commissioners could give the school system everything it wants and more and still have lower tax rates than Mecklenburg.

22 Music 28 Arts & Culture 34 What to Do This Week

8 Twenty-four endorsements. Five thousand words. Everything you need to know about voting in this year’s primary elections.

37 Music Calendar 40 Arts & Culture Calendar

20 Ali Rudel of East Durham Bake Shop has found pie to be a life preserver at many points in her life. 22 Reunited with Rapsody and 9th Wonder, Raleigh hip-hop crew Kooley High is shining brighter than ever. 28 Artist Bob Trotman automates sculptures of bosses and underlings to illustrate the dehumanization of office workers. 30 Novelist Meg Wolitzer is better than more famous peers like Franzen and Eugenides. If the literature industry weren’t sexist, you’d already know that.

“Lisa” (2005), “Stu” (2004), and “Jane” (2005), part of Bob Trotman’s Business as Usual at the Gregg Museum (p. 28)

On the cover

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GREGG MUSUEUM

DESIGN BY STEVE OLIVA

INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 3


Raleigh Durham | Chapel Hill PUBLISHER EDITORIAL

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Allison H Triangle’ EDITOR IN CHIEF Jeffrey C. Billman somewha MANAGING EDITOR FOR ARTS+CULTURE Brian Howe some ang STAFF WRITERS Erica Hellerstein, Sarah Willets We beg MUSIC EDITOR Allison Hussey missed th FOOD EDITOR Layla Khoury-Hanold STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Caitlin Penna al phenom THEATER AND DANCE CRITIC Byron Woods acknowle DANCE CRITIC Michaela Dwyer the mid-c CHIEF CONTRIBUTORS Amanda Abrams, Jim Allen, toric ind Elizabeth Bracy, Timothy Bracy, Katie Jane conscious Fernelius, Curt Fields, Spencer Griffith, Julie H. Hamilton, Liz Hull,Laura Jaramillo, Debbie the ‘kitsc Matthews, Glenn McDonald, Niki McNeill, Neil for their i Morris, Hannah Pitstick, Noah Rawlings, Kevin J. Rowsey II, Dan Ruccia, David Ford Smith, Zack a little ho Smith, Chris Vitiello, Ryan Vu, Patrick Wall tiki move INTERNS Nick Gallagher, Ryan Elizabeth Haar, American Caitlin Sloan WW2 mi sour essa ART+PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Christopher Williams suggest th ART DIRECTOR Steve Oliva bar, she c add a spl CIRCULATION and selfCIRCULATION DIRECTOR Brenna Berry-Stewart her drink DISTRIBUTION Laura Bass, Nathan Fellers, Michael Griswold, JC Lacroix, Richard David Lee, On to Marshall Lindsey, Gloria McNair, Anne Roux, a state re Timm Shaw, Freddie Simons, Trudi Vass, 23 percen Herschel Wiley teachers a absent. A ADVERTISING ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Stephanie Miller are using SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Sarah Schmader as part of ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Kim Cordray, John Hurld, caring m Hanna Smith CLASSIFIEDS ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Amanda Blanchard the fact get sick p WWW.INDYWEEK.COM more abo P.O. Box 1772 • Durham, N.C. 27702 admonish DURHAM 320 East Chapel Hill Street, Suite 200 allowed to Durham, N.C. 27701 | 919-286-1972 Chuck RALEIGH 227 Fayetteville Street, Suite 105 “This wh Raleigh, N.C. 27601 | 919-832-8774 paint us a EMAIL ADDRESSES first initial[no space]last name@indyweek.com make less DISPLAY ADVERTISING SALES advertising@indyweek.com for class t RALEIGH 919-832-8774 DURHAM 919-286-1972 annual le CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING 919-286-6642 student c CONTENTS COPYRIGHT 2018 INDY WEEK ploy to di All rights reserved. Material may not be reproduced without permission. an effort t And, escape it, Confeder weird atta Black argument “A statue North Ca allowed f 4 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com


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in different ways—generational poverty, Allison Hussey’s recent story on the mass incarceration, the industrialization Triangle’s tiki trend and tiki culture’s of prisons, lack of access to housing, food, somewhat problematic history aroused owe jobs. How about disassembling that first? I some angry pushback. Willets think we need to leave them up! If we take We begin with Ron Oliver, who says we them down without addressing the cause, missed the “entire point of a pop-culturit’s just a cover-up!” al phenomenon. ‘Tiki’ is a twice-removed Aiden also wants to keep the statues, acknowledgment of an American trend in with a twist: “They are a reminder of the mid-century and, if anything, holds hisAllen, what white people did to try to maintain toric indigenous cultures in high regard, ane power and wealth. It was one of the consciously keeping them separate from Julie Debbie darkest periods in American history, and the ‘kitsch’ factor with a scrupulous regard eill, Neil the effects are still rippling through our for their importance to their people. Doing s, Kevin society today, sometimes tearing it apart. mith, Zack a little homework on the true history of the Wall Keep the statues, add new plaques beside tiki movement and its relationship to the Haar, the originals to remind us that these were American soldiers returning home from erected to support Jim Crow laws.” WW2 might have helped this otherwise Finally, Josephine Bass wants to give a sour essay have a bit of relevance. Might we ms revisionist history lesson to all you elites suggest the next time the author visits a tiki out there. After arguing that the Civil War bar, she could perhaps ask the bartender to wasn’t really about add a splash of humor slavery and that slaves and self-awareness to art “If you cannot actually loved their her drink?” avid Lee, masters, Bass writes: On to a story about leave, you are oux, “Jim Crow laws served a state report that said not free.” the purpose during 23 percent of the state’s those times to keep teachers are chronically the South from becoming one big sh--hole. absent. Ashley Walls White writes: “They Fact: the ex-slaves did not want to inteare using sick days they have been given r grate; they preferred their lifestyle, with as part of their benefits package. The state urld, their own people, as they do today. Proof: caring more about teachers won’t change nchard all the separate black this and black that— the fact that teachers and teachers’ kids schools, Washington caucus, beauty pagget sick pretty frequently. We should care eants, and on and on. Blacks for blacks by more about teachers, but we should also not blacks. admonish them for taking sick leave they are 200 “North Carolina was invaded and taken allowed to take.” over like all the thirteen states of the Chuck Kenney offers similar thoughts: Confederacy, because they followed the “This whole report has been framed to Constitution, which forbids war against paint us as villains. We have to pay for subs, k.com your neighboring states. North Carolina make lesson plans, and then play catch-up eek.com refused to furnish seventy-five thousand for class time we missed. We are also given 1972 soldiers to Washington to kill their annual leave days but can’t use them on neighbors. Now is the time to learn the student contact days. I see this as another real history and not the spin of the victors; ploy to discredit public school teachers in the real reasons the South seceded and the an effort to privatize the system.” North invaded and forced them back into a And, because we apparently can’t union at the point of bayonet. If you cannot escape it, we circle back to the subject of leave, you are not free!” Confederate monuments and our state’s OK, then. weird attachment to the Lost Cause. Black Raleigh makes an interesting Want to see your name in bold? Email us at argument for leaving the monuments be: backtalk@indyweek.com, comment on our “A statue isn’t the problem. The problem in Facebook page or indyweek.com, or hit us up North Carolina is that the same system that on Twitter: @indyweek. allowed for slavery still exists today, just INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 5


indynews A Big Lie

A NEW STUDY SHOWS THAT TURNING LOCAL COPS INTO IMMIGRATION ENFORCERS HASN’T MADE NORTH CAROLINA COMMUNITIES SAFER BY SARAH WILLETS

A witness in the 2012 Department of Justice investigation of immigration law enforcement in Alamance County FILE PHOTO BY JEREMY M. LANGE

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he federal 287(g) program, which deputizes local police to carry out some immigration-enforcement duties, is often touted by participating jurisdictions as a way to make communities safer. But that hasn’t been the case in North Carolina counties that are part of the program, according to a new study by the libertarian Cato Institute. The assessment is particularly relevant now, as the Nash County Sheriff’s Office just became the sixth local agency in North Carolina to join the program, and Alamance 6 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

County is seeking to rejoin it amid a push by the Trump administration to bring more local police forces into the fold. ICE currently has 287(g) agreements with seventy-six law enforcement agencies in twenty states. The study looked at crime rates from 2003– 13 for Alamance, Cabarrus, Cumberland, Gaston, Henderson, Mecklenburg, Wake, and Guilford counties and the city of Durham, which all participated in some iteration of 287(g) during those years. Since then, the Cumberland and Guilford County sheriff’s offices and the Durham

Police Department have ended their agreements with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. Alamance’s 287(g) agreement with ICE was terminated in 2012 amid a Department of Justice investigation into allegations of racial profiling. According to the report, 19,270 people were deported via the 287(g) programs in those places during that timeframe. Still, the analysis found that 287(g) participation had no effect on crime rates. “If North Carolina’s experience with 287(g) is any guide, signing up for the program won’t help you reduce local crime,” says Cato Institute immigration policy analyst Alex Nowrasteh. On the other hand, jurisdictions with 287(g) did have significantly more assaults on officers. Nowrasteh says it’s unclear what’s driving that increase because the crime data the Cato Institute received contained no details on the assaults or who committed them. “Besides otherwise law-abiding illegal immigrants who are deported as a result of 287(g) and their American friends, families, consumers, employers, and landlords, police officers in North Carolina also appear to be victims of this program that fails to reduce crime,” Nowrasteh says. Alamance County Sheriff Terry Johnson expressed an interest in rejoining the program last year. According to documents obtained by the INDY, Johnson wants to train eight deputies at the county jail under 287(g). Those deputies would be able to identify, interview, and issue immigration detainers for people in custody. “As sheriff of Alamance County, North Carolina, I am concerned about the potential threat posed to the citizens of Alamance County and our nation by those criminal illegal aliens that choose to victimize our citizens,” Johnson wrote in a March 2017 letter to ICE director Thomas Homan. “Having been involved previously in the 287(g) Delegation of Authority Program, I found it to be one of the best lawenforcement programs I have ever been involved with during my forty-five years in law enforcement. The program allowed us to curb criminal activity in our county and help ensure the safety of all our citizens.” It’s unclear what the status of the agency’s application is. Alamance officials

didn’t respond to questions for this story, and an ICE spokesperson said, “We can’t speak to any potential pending partners.” In an interview with Spectrum News last month, Johnson said his deputies wouldn’t be “going out looking for undocumented people to put in jail.” Johnson’s letter suggests he is interested in holding people for ICE longer than 287(g) would permit. Under 287(g), participating officers can issue what’s called an immigration detainer (or ICE hold) for someone in custody they believe may be subject to deportation. Without 287(g), ICE may send a local jail a detainer request, asking the facility to hold a person for up to forty-eight hours beyond when he or she would have otherwise been released. The same time limit applies when a local 287(g) officer initiates the hold. Multiple courts have ruled that holding a person under a detainer amounts to a new arrest and that the administrative warrants that come with the requests don’t amount to probable cause for an arrest under the Fourth Amendment. In the letter to Homan, Johnson says he is “prepared to commit whatever is needed to develop and maintain the detention model program and even be over a seventy-twohours holding facility.” In that last line, it’s likely Johnson is referring to signing an intergovernmental service agreement with ICE, in which the Alamance jail would hold people for ICE and—unlike under 287(g)—be reimbursed for housing them. The ACSO previously had such an agreement with ICE for about four months in 2007, during which time it was reimbursed $61 per detainee per day. More and more local agencies have been signing both 287(g) and intergovernmental service agreements. Economically, it makes sense. But the combination has watchdogs worried because it allows local law-enforcement officers to sign an administrative warrant (without any judicial oversight) attesting that the person is deportable, hold that person beyond the time a detainer request would allow him or her to be held, and get paid to do it. “It’s a big incentive for them to have all of it just in one place,” says Joshua Breisblatt, senior policy analyst for the American Immigration Council. swillets@indyweek.com


soapboxer Rock, Meet Hard Place

WAKE’S SCHOOL BOARD WANTS A LOT OF MONEY. SHOULD COMMISSIONERS GIVE IT TO THEM? BY JEFFREY C. BILLMAN

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n politics, nothing is a coincidence. Last week, with the issue of school funding—specifically, the Wake County Board of Commissioners’ 5–2 vote last year to provide $21 million of the school board’s requested $45 million in new funding—dominating the county’s upcoming primaries, interim schools superintendent Del Burns poured gasoline on the fire. He proposed that, this year, the school board ask the county for $58.9 million in new funding, far more than the county has ever given, and certainly more than the county’s budget gurus were planning on. Indeed, preliminary county plans, laid out in a PowerPoint ahead of a budget retreat earlier this year, envisioned giving the school system $29 million in new funds—enough to return Wake County to its highest-ever per-pupil spending, adjusted for inflation, according to deputy county manager Johnna Rogers. But the school board, if it goes along with Burns’s proposal, will be seeking twice that—and just in time for challengers to use the request as a cudgel against the incumbents ahead of the May 8 election. As Commissioner John Burns told me the day after the interim superintendent unveiled his proposal: “That’s a great big number. Timed well, I’ll add.” But it’s hard to blame the school system for seeking leverage. For years, the state legislature—which is constitutionally tasked with funding public schools—has neglected its duties, leaving local governments to pick up the slack. In Wake County, this problem was compounded by a Republican-led Board of Commissioners that, from fiscal years 2009–14, refused to raise property taxes, leaving the school system to languish during the depths of the recession, even as the state pulled back its funding. The GOP board did raise taxes in its last year in office, for fiscal year 2015, and the Democrats who took over thereafter have raised taxes in

each of the three years since. In that time, they’ve boosted the county’s teacher-pay supplement to the highest in the state and increased the county’s contribution to the school system by nearly a third. Currently, more than three-quarters of county property taxes go to schools. The commissioners have been playing catch-up. Critics, however, argue that they haven’t caught up quickly enough. Which is to say, they haven’t raised property taxes enough to meet the school system’s needs. But what kind of tax increases would the county have to levy to fulfill a request for $59 million? The county already anticipated raising its property tax rate from 61.5 cents to 63.33 cents this year (each additional cent works out to $10 in tax for every $100,000 in appraised value). But to meet the superintendent’s proposal, that rate would have to jump to 65.1 cents. To use round numbers, for a home appraised at $200,000, the tax bill would increase from $1,230 a year to $1,302 a year. But there’s more. The county also wants to put a billion-dollar school-construction bond referendum on the ballot in November. If it passes, that too will require a property tax hike. So might potential bonds for parks and greenways and Wake Tech. Together, those could add up to as much as 4 cents, bringing the tax rate to 69.1 cents and our hypothetical homeowner’s bill to $1,382. And that’s setting aside the fact that the school system is likely to come back asking for more money next year, and the year after that, and the year after that. Again, it’s not the school system’s fault; it’s that the legislature is foisting its responsibilities onto local governments, especially in big, urban counties, so it can cut taxes for rich people. According to an N.C. Justice Center report, state support for education dropped almost 9 percent between 2008 and 2017 when adjusted for inflation.

In other words, the real villains in this story are on Jones Street. But that doesn’t change the dilemma facing the commissioners over the next couple of months—or the next couple of years—and it certainly doesn’t change the political dynamics of the next several weeks: How much are commissioners willing to raise taxes? And how much new taxes are residents willing to abide? The flip side is that, even after four years of hikes, Wake’s property tax rates are still comparatively low. Both Mecklenburg (81.6 cents) and Durham (76.8 cents)

have significantly higher rates and higher per-capita tax levies than Wake. So yes, Wake could give the school system what it wants and still be a low-tax county. The commissioners have certainly made strides toward better-funded schools, but they’ve been wary of asking too much too fast of taxpayers. The General Assembly’s failures have put them between a rock and a hard place. Now it’s up to voters to judge how well they’ve pulled off the balancing act. jbillman@indyweek.com

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HOW TO VOTE IN THIS YEAR’S PRIMARY ELECTIONS

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tend to think of these endorsement issues as both one of the INDY’s greatest public services and a bane of my existence. There’s an immense amount of research to be done, sure, but there’s also a kind of pressure that comes with knowing that people care what we think, that the choices we make in these pages may affect the outcomes of elections. (In last fall’s contests, the INDY’s endorsed candidates won in every race in Raleigh, Durham, Carrboro, Hillsborough, and for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools Board of Education, and all but one contest in Cary and Chapel Hill.) So we endeavor to get this stuff right. Right, of course, is subjective. What I mean by that is we try to identify and support candidates who align with the INDY’s longstanding values of social justice, equity, and tolerance. For this reason, you’ll notice that we’ve declined to endorse in a few Republican primaries; we couldn’t find a candidate who met our requirements. We’re usually willing to support the lesser of two evils, but we’re only willing to only go so far. We also have to temper those progressive inclinations with assessments of pragmatism, competence, and effectiveness, which can sometimes muddy up otherwise clear ideological lines. In other words, there’s a chance you won’t like all of the picks we make. And

8 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

that’s fine. People who want to see the same political outcomes often disagree on how best to get there. Truth be told, there are several contests that we debated for hours and that could have gone either way. There are very good candidates who we like but are not endorsing. (Most primary candidates responded to our questionnaires, and some sent us videos stating their case; you can check out all of that at indyweek.com.) But we do hope that these endorsements offer you some insight into these contests and why we’ve backed these twodozen candidates for office, all of whom we believe would make outstanding public servants. One logistical notes: due to resource constraints, we opted not to endorse in Chatham County, choosing instead to focus on the areas we know best—Wake, Durham, and Orange, as well as the congressional and legislative races therein. We wish this weren’t the case, but there’s really no way around it. One final admonition: it’s easy to get hot and bothered at the perpetual outrages of the Trump administration. But it’s these local elections that often have the most impact on your life. Early voting starts Thursday in Wake, Durham, and Orange counties. Check out our early-voting guide on page 14 for locations and hours. Then get out there and vote. —Jeffrey C. Billman

U.S. HOUSE, DISTRICT 2, DEMOCRAT: WENDY ELLA MAY

Democrats have their sights set on George Holding’s seat, which is exactly the kind of district they’ll need to win to retake Congress. It won’t be easy—in 2016, Holding won nearly 57 percent of the vote—but three Dems have lined up to challenge the incumbent: Linda Coleman, a former Wake County commissioner and state legislator; Wendy Ella Mae, an army veteran; and Ken Romley, a businessman from Raleigh. Meanwhile, Holding has his own primary challenger from the right, Allen Chessler, an Iraq war veteran who says Holding “is not representing the people anymore.” (We declined to endorse Chessler because of his extremist anti-abortion and pro-gun views; we declined to endorse Holding because he’s a Donald Trump lackey as well as an anti-refugee bigot and anti-abortion zealot. They can both piss off.) Of the Democrats, Coleman, who ran for lieutenant governor in 2016 but lost to Dan Forest, is the best known. But our endorsement goes to Wendy Ella May, the first transgender woman to run for Congress in North Carolina. Mae’s status in the HB 2 state is exciting, but she’s not playing up her gender identity. She’s focusing instead on her policy priorities, which include universal health care, a livable wage, job creation, gun control, protections for LGBTQ citizens, and strengthening Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid. Mae’s resume suits her for public office, too: army veteran, career firefighter, faith leader, president of the LGBT Democrats of Johnston County, and second vice chairwoman of the Progressive Caucus of the North Carolina Democratic Party. We acknowledge she’s a long shot. She lacks the fundraising prowess of her fellow Democrats. But we think her candidacy is groundbreaking, historic, and worthy of recognition. We’re excited to support her. If she’s not going to win, however, our second choice is Ken Romley. An attorney and buttoned-down Democratic, Romley has a sizable war chest and seems to be the only candidate who can compete financially with Holding. According to federal election

data, Romley raised more than $430,000 in 2017, most of which came in the form of loans to himself. With that kind of backing, Romley could be a formidable challenger in the fall. Meanwhile, his family-man, middle-of-the-road persona could be attractive to the kinds of well-educated suburban Republicans who are fed up with Trump and willing to pull the lever for a moderate Democrat. Besides, Linda Coleman lost to rightwing nut job Dan Forest in a year in which Roy Cooper beat Pat McCrory and Josh Stein beat Buck Newton, both far stronger Republicans. She’s proven herself to not be a particularly strong candidate.

U.S. HOUSE, DISTRICT 4, DEMOCRAT: DAVID PRICE For decades, David Price has been a local institution. Indeed, he’s almost custommade for a district of liberal intellectuals. Price, a thoughtful and reliable progressive, deserves another term in Congress. If Democrats reclaim the House, Price’s tenure will position him well to pass meaningful legislation. (He introduced eleven bills in 2017, though none have passed the Republican-controlled House.) Of course, his longevity in office—with the exception of a brief hiatus from 1995–97, Price has been in Congress since 1987— could lead some folks to say it’s time for a change. So too could the fact that Price’s challenger, Michelle Laws, is an excellent candidate whom we would be inclined to endorse were she running in almost any other district. Laws, a former executive director of the state NAACP, would become the third African-American woman to represent North Carolina in the U.S. House should she be elected, and she has been outspoken about the lack of representation of black women in the Democratic Party. Although they are some of the Democratic Party’s most reliable voters—94 percent of black women voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016—they comprise just 3.6 percent of Congress members and 3.7 percent of state lawmakers across the nation, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. Laws wants to change that. Ultimately, we would be pleased with either Laws or Price representing North Carolina’s Fourth Congressional District. But we don’t think it’s time for Price to bow out just yet, and we believe that Price’s experience could pay dividends in the next Congress.


STATE

SENATE, DISTRICT 16, DEMOCRAT: LUIS TOLEDO

District 16 is a newfangled creation and thus an open seat. After much debate and consternation (and maybe a shot of whiskey and a game of rock-paper-scissors), we’re throwing in with the underdog, Luis Toledo. His answers to our candidate questionnaire were thoughtful, well-informed, and pragmatic. As a policy analyst at the N.C. Justice Center who previously worked at the U.S. Department of State and as an assistant state auditor, he has the chops and experience to be an effective legislator. He’s also a veteran, the son of an immigrant, was raised by a single mother, and, not for nothing, if elected he would be the only Latino in the General Assembly. His opponent, Wiley Nickel, is himself a strong candidate with a considerable upside and lots of money in his campaign coffers. He’s an attorney in Cary who previously worked for the Obama administration’s advance staff and traveled with former Vice President Al Gore. He too is smart and knowledgeable and would make an excellent lawmaker An added point in his favor is that he can raise tons of money, and since the winner of this primary has no Republican opposition and will automatically win the seat, Nickel could use his fundraising ability to do a lot of good for Democrats in their efforts to break the Republican supermajorities. Still, Toledo works in the policy world every day. He’s smart, capable, and progressive, and there’s something to be said for the diversity his election would produce.

HOUSE, DISTRICT 11, DEMOCRAT: ALLISON DAHLE Until recently, state Representative Duane Hall, an affable and reliably center-left Democrat, was a shoe-in for reelection. But that all changed in March, when the website NC Policy Watch, an offshoot of the N.C. Justice Center, published a bombshell report in which a number of sources accused Hall of sexual misconduct. Rather than follow the protocol favored by many other prominent figures and politicians caught up in the #MeToo movement—apologize and vow to reflect quietly and change—Hall went on the attack, vehemently denying the allegations, refusing to resign, and then floating the odd conspiracy theory that the article was payback for him dating and then breaking up with the daughter of the Justice Center’s executive director. Whatever the truth of the allegations, that’s where Hall lost us. Rather than engage in a difficult conversation like we’d expect from a pro-woman, pro-choice advocate, Hall refused to accept any responsibility or take the allegations seriously, instead chalking the entire story up to a political vendetta from a scorned lover.

And even if you were to give him every benefit of the doubt, the reality is that he is now effectively neutered as a legislator. After the allegations surfaced, Governor Cooper, House Minority Leader Darren Jackson, and party chairman Wayne Goodwin all called for Hall’s resignation; it’s impossible to see how he could be effective even in his own caucus after that. And it’s unclear if he even wants to do it anymore. He’s gone dark on social media and declined to respond to our candidate questionnaire.

We’re endorsing Hall’s primary challenger, Allison Dahle, a Raleigh native and former theater stage manager-turned disability advocate. Dahle didn’t expect to to have a chance when she threw her hat in the race, and she is not making the allegations against him a primary campaign issue. But she does believe that he should step down— and that the voters of his district are ready for a change. We agree. Here again, there are two Republicans squaring off in a primary for this blueleaning seat, Shawn Hamilton and Tyler Brooks, but we’re not endorsing either. Neither responded to our questionnaire, and we couldn’t find much about Hamilton online. Brooks is a lawyer for the radical anti-abortion Thomas More Law Center, so no thanks. One other note: Heather Metour will also be on the ballot in the Democratic primary, though she dropped out of the race for family reasons.

HOUSE, DISTRICT 35, DEMOCRAT: TERENCE EVERITT

HOUSE, DISTRICT 33, DEMOCRAT: ROSA GILL

Democrats need to gain four seats in the House to break the supermajority and restore Governor Cooper’s veto, and District 35 is a prime target. In the Democratic primary, we’re endorsing Terence Everitt, a Wake Forest attorney who ran against and lost to incumbent Christopher Malone in 2016. Everitt’s opponent in the primary, small business owner Adam Wright, has not run for the legislature before. Everitt, meanwhile, has gained the support of top Democrats, including House Minority Leader Darren Jackson and Representative Grier Martin. He should be a formidable challenger to Malone, especially if he is buoyed by an expected Democratic wave. Everitt won 47 percent of the vote in 2016. One of Everitt’s key issue areas is education, and he criticizes Malone for voting for budgets that underfund the state’s public schools while cutting taxes for the wealthy and out-of-state corporations. He also blasts Malone for siding with Duke Energy on coal ash cleanup. Simply put, Everitt believes that Malone has the wrong priorities. He’s right. No Republican in this race gets our vote. Again, we refuse to endorse any candidates opposed to abortion and LGBTQ rights. The Republican challenger to Malone, Issac Burk, is anti-abortion and anti-same-sex marriage. For those reasons, he can’t get our vote, and neither can Malone, a self-proclaimed “gun enthusiast” who believes Roe v. Wade should be overturned. Hard pass.

The nod in this race goes to incumbent Rosa Gill, who for the past eight years has served as the representative for District 33. Back in 2009, she was selected for the seat after then-representative Dan Blue replaced the late Vernon Malone in the state Senate, and she’s been there ever since. There’s no reason that change that now. Gill ran unopposed in the 2016 general election and won the primary with 64 percent of the vote. She’s a retired teacher and school administrator who served on the Wake County Board of Education for ten years and remains a fierce advocate for public schools in the General Assembly. (And god knows the legislature needs more of those.) Over the past year, she introduced legislation to increase penalties for hate crimes, support students with dyslexia, and give the Wake County school system the flexibility to determine its own start and end dates for the year. Gill’s opponents, Antoine Marshall and Shirley E. Hicks, are solid candidates. Marshall is a community development attorney and the vice president of the African-American Caucus of the Democratic Party; Hicks serves on the housing appeals board for Raleigh, has a Ph.D. in public policy, and performed her doctoral research on homelessness in Wake County. Those are good credentials, but they don’t top Gill’s experience.

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NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING FOR THE PROPOSED ROUNDABOUT ON MINERAL SPRINGS ROAD (S.R. 1917/1815) AT PLEASANT DRIVE (S.R. 1815) IN DURHAM DURHAM COUNTY TIP PROJECT NO. W-5517 The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting regarding the proposed project to construct a roundabout on Mineral Springs Road (S.R. 1917/1815) at Pleasant Drive (S.R. 1815) in Durham. The meeting will take place on Monday, April 23, 2018 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Story Church located at 100 Pleasant Drive in Durham. The purpose of the public meeting will be to gather input from the public on the conceptual design and their safety concerns at this intersection. The public may attend at any time during the above mentioned hours. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and listen to comments regarding the project. The opportunity to submit comments will also be provided at the meeting or via phone, email, or mail by May 8. Comments received will be taken into consideration as the project develops. Please note that no formal presentation will be made. Project information and materials can be viewed as they become available at http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings. For additional information, contact John H. Grant P.E., NCDOT Capital Region, Regional Traffic Engineer at 1561 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1561, (919) 814-4952, or jhgrant@ncdot.gov

WEDDING GUIDE

Highlighting wedding possibilities around the Triangle

ISSUE: 4/25 RESERVATIONS: 4/20

CONTACT YOUR AD REP OR ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM 10 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Caitlyn Ridge, P.E., Environmental Analysis Unit at ceridge1@ncdot.gov or (919) 707-6091 as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800- 481-6494.


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SHERIFF: CLARENCE BIRKHEAD

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the lambasting he receives from critics. But we don’t think Andrews has run an office reflective of Durham’s values. Birkhead, on the other hand, says he will be more transparent and accessible, will aim to keep people out of jail, will support an end to money bail, and will not hold people for ICE without a judicial warrant. We welcome those changes, and we hope he keeps his word. If not, in four years, we’ll be endorsing someone else.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY: ROGER ECHOLS

All three candidates running for district attorney in Durham are capable. All believe in mitigating the harms that can come from contact with the criminal justice system. Defense attorney Daniel Meier has gotten lost in the starker choice between incumbent Roger Echols and Satana Deberry, the executive director of the North Carolina Housing Coalition whose candidacy has excited voters who don’t think Echols has done enough to reform the office. Deberry’s candidacy is indeed exciting. She doesn’t have the typical resume for a DA candidate, and her supporters see that as a plus. It’s clear she’s committed to racial and social justice. But we can’t look past the fact that much of her campaign website was copied and pasted from the platform of Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner, and that, when confronted, she denied plagiarism, though she admitted that she borrowed heavily from Krasner. We believe Echols has begun much of the work that voters itching for more reform want to see, and a change in leadership at this point would be disruptive to that progress. In four years, he steadied what was a troubled office, gained the respect of colleagues in the court system, and instituted changes to handle cases more expeditiously, divert more cases from court, and incorporate restorative justice practices. He deserves a chance to continue what he’s started. If he gets another term, we hope he will be more aggressive in implementing these reform-minded changes.

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In the INDY’s 2014 endorsement of Mike Andrews, we wrote that since his appointment to the office in 2011, Andrews had “run a drama-free department.” We said he was respected and measured and that we saw potential for the agency to improve relationships with Durham’s Latino community. We weren’t alone; Andrews also received the endorsement of the People’s Alliance that year. Times have changed. This year, we’re endorsing Andrews’s sole primary opponent, Clarence Birkhead, a former Duke University and Hillsborough police chief who challenged Andrews in 2014. (So is the People’s Alliance.) It’s no secret that this publication has been critical of the sheriff’s office under Andrews. We have plenty of gripes: the conditions at the jail, where six people have died since 2013; the practice—ripe for a legal challenge—of honoring all requests from Immigrations and Customs Enforcement to keep people in jail so ICE can pick them up,; the aggressive pursuit of protesters involved with pulling down a Confederate monument last year; and the lack of dialogue with the agency’s ardent critics, for starters. We want to give Andrews credit for having a really hard job surely made harder by

Natalie Beyer Although students of color make up about three-quarters of the Durham Public Schools population, these students trail their white peers on standardized tests. They’re also suspended disproportionately and left behind at under-resourced schools while white families flee to charters. Addressing these disparities is why the school system last year hired its first direc-

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tor of equity affairs. And it’s why we believe the incumbents seeking reelection to the Board of Education should get another term. In District 1, incumbent Mike Lee thinks critically about the problems facing DPS and how to address them with solutions grounded in his experience as a parent. He’s advocating for restorative justice practices as an alternative to suspension, more mental health professionals and school nurses, and an “equity calculator” to ensure a just and effective distribution of resources. Lee’s opponent, Pebble Lindsay-Lucas, wants to see more school resource officers, which we think can cause more harm than good. She also dodged questions on our questionnaire about the rising popularity of charter schools is affecting DPS. We appreciate the District 3 incumbent Matt Sears’s background as an awardwinning teacher and his emphasis on working conditions for DPS teachers. His opponent, Katie Jones, is also a former educator. We’re backing Sears because of his commitment to equity, willingness to hold DPS leadership to account, support for replacing armed officers inside schools with individuals trained in de-escalation and emergency response, and attention to the critical role redistricting will play in the future of Durham Public Schools. In District 4, we think both candidates are qualified and hold the values we believe are important for DPS to become a more successful, equitable school district. Challenger Antonio Jones has experience in financial management and as a school treasurer. We like his focus on transparency, reversing declining enrollment, and addressing disparities in suspensions. But we believe incumbent Natalie Beyer has more concrete solutions to these problems. Beyer has long demonstrated a commitment to Durham Public Schools and an ability to stand on her principles. The Durham Association of Educators is supporting her for her attention to detail, tenacity, and willingness to call on white and middle-class families not to abandon public schools. While both candidates would do an admirable job, we endorse Beyer.

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ORANGE COUNTY

SHERIFF: CHARLES BLACKWOOD

Blackwood’s challenger, Tony White, worked for the Orange County Sheriff’s Office for nineteen years before retiring as an investigator in 2016. He wants to make internal changes at the agency to ensure that taxpayer money is spent wisely and all employees are giving an opportunity for advancement. He’d also like to expand the use of citations over arrest and believes the public should have access to some police body-camera footage, which we wholeheartedly endorse. While we appreciate White’s commitment to a more transparent sheriff’s office and measures to reduce the jail population, we do not believe he is as qualified as the incumbent. We endorse Blackwood.

sensus, but he is open to having his mind changed. We appreciate his attention to schools, affordable housing, and thoughtful development. And every board needs a contrarian.

BOARD OF EDUCATION: SARAH SMYLIE, BRENDA STEPHENS, HILLARY MACKENZIE, WILL ATHERTON

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Sally Greene Our endorsement for Barry Jacobs’s atlarge seat on the Board of Commissioners goes to Sally Greene. (Jacobs, who opted not to seek reelection, is likewise supporting Greene). We’re impressed by Greene’s experience as a three-term Chapel Hill Town Council member who crafted policies around housing and homelessness. She not only demonstrated a deep understanding of issues currently facing the board but also offered detailed approaches to addressing them, and given her time on the town council, we know she can deliver. For the District 2 seat, we’re endorsing incumbent Earl McKee. McKee has shown he isn’t afraid to challenge the popular con-

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Charles Blackwood began his career with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office in 1980 and has led the agency since 2014. He’s also a member of the 15B Judicial District’s Racial Justice Task Force and a recipient of the Order of the Long Leaf Pine. Like other law enforcement leaders in the Triangle since the 2016 election, he’s assured the community that his agency would not help ICE implement President Trump’s efforts to deport more people. Unlike other law enforcement leaders, however, Blackwood put it into policy. Since late 2014, his office has declined to hold people in custody at the request of ICE unless ICE submits a judicial warrant. Under his leadership, the OCSO also works closely with El Centro Hispano. Immigration enforcement is far from the only issue relevant to in this election, but the sheriff’s stance seems particularly germane given ICE raids in Orange County just last week. Blackwood also oversaw the creation of a program called Josh’s Hope, designed to let family members of people with mental health conditions or cognitive disability convey that vital information to the sheriff’s office. He also wants to establish a diversion center where people charged with low-level crimes could be referred to community support services rather than be locked up in jail.

standard graduation rates) and made note of the kinds of smart, pointed questions she would ask to move toward solutions. Similarly, Will Atherton is already involved with the school system through the PTA and seems to have done his research on the lack of diversity among teaching staff and students enrolled in academically gifted programs. We also appreciate his attention to strengthening programs that will connect students to careers. Finally, we’re endorsing the lone incumbent in the race, Brenda Stephens. With four terms on the board already and three new members coming in, her experience will be valuable. AH S A R Y L IE Y Y Y M S FOR Y F

Like other school districts, Orange County Schools are faced with a squeeze on resources spurred by declining state funding, aging buildings, and the rising popularity of charter schools. And you can add to that issues of equity highlighted by the debate last year over whether or not to prohibit the Confederate flag in the student dress code and fears brought on by the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Candidate Hillary Mackenzie is a leader in the Hate Free Schools Coalition, which pushed for the ultimately approved dresscode change, and an advocate for gun reform. She’s emphasizing a trauma-informed approach to working with students, restorative practices to reduce suspensions, and racial equity and de-escalation training for school resource officers. We think she’ll be a thoughtful and principled school board member. We’re also impressed by Sarah Smylie, a former public school teacher already involved in local schools. On her candidate questionnaire, she showed a deep understanding of issues facing schools today (for example, by pointing out racial disparities in the county’s otherwise

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Clerk of Superior Court is likely not a position most voters interact with or think about. Incumbent James Stanford has never been challenged for reelection before. Enter former Chapel Hill mayor Mark Kleinschmidt, a seasoned politician. Stanford has kept the trains running on time for seventeen years. He’s right to point out the unjust nature of increasing courts costs and fees, and we appreciate his support of the misdemeanor diversion program and his experience leading Administrative Office of the Courts committees. Kleinschmidt, the first openly gay mayor in Chapel Hill’s history who was defeated by Pam Hemminger in 2015, says he entered the race at the behest of local attorneys and other officials. There has also been a controversy swirling about whether, under Stanford’s leadership, the clerk’s office has made samesex couples jump through additional hoops when adopting. (In a statement, Stanford said the extra paperwork is a precaution against legal challenges.) That aside, we’re encouraged by the opportunities for criminal justice reform that Kleinschmidt sees in the position. He wants to bring in bilingual staff and mitigate the damage of failing to appear in court by implementing an automatic notification system. He says he would work with the district attorney to identify old warrants that could be dismissed and wants to set up an amnesty day so qualifying people with outstanding warrants can have them cleared. For these reasons, we endorse Kleinschmidt.


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BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: SIG HUTCHINSON (DISTRICT 1), MATT CALABRIA (DISTRICT 2), ERV PORTMAN (DISTRICT 4), JAMES WEST (DISTRICT 5), JOHN BURNS (DISTRICT 7) Instead of considering these five Democratic primaries as individual races, we’re instead going to address them collectively. After all, to a large degree, they’re being fought over the same issue: these five incumbents voted for a budget last year that granted the Wake County Public Schools System $21 million of the $45 million in new funding it requested. The challengers say that’s not good enough. We’re backing the incumbents, though not without some hesitation. There are some races that made for easier decisions than others, owing to the quality of the competition. In District 1, for instance, Jeremiah Pierce is a fine newcomer, but he doesn’t hold a candle to Sig Hutchinson, the board’s foremost advocate for greenways and greenspace. Similarly, in District 5, Robert Finch, a member of the county’s Open Space and Parks Advisory Committee, argues forcefully that the county is not adequately managing growth, but he also holds the seemingly contradictory viewpoints that the county pays too much in taxes and spends too little on schools,

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even though schools are where nearly all the taxes go. What’s more, there’s no good reason to oust James West, who has served well on this board for eight years and on the Raleigh City Council for eleven years before that.

Matt Calabria But in other races, our decisions were more difficult. It did not escape our attention that all five incumbents are men, and four are white men, and that the board has only one woman on it. That’s suboptimal, to put it mildly. More important, though, we believe the challengers would all make effective commissioners. In District 2, Lindy Brown is a former county commissioner who got into this race when everyone assumed Matt Calabria was going to run for the state House. She advocates for better school funding and affordable housing, and criticizes Calabria for supporting the multimillion-dollar renovation of a defunct golf course near his Fuquay-Varina house into a park. Brown is smart, credible, and versed in important issues facing the district and the county. But Calabria is one of the board’s standout progressives and a leader on issues related to poverty. The county can’t afford to lose him. In District 7, Vickie Adamson, who gave up a career in corporate finance to volunteer in her son’s public schools and who has held several leadership positions in the PTA, is a similarly attractive and progressive candidate. She also champions schools and says she wants to bring a mother’s perspective to the board. Adamson would make INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 13


YYYYYY VOTING GUIDE YYYYYY WAKE COUNTY

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: SIG HUTCHINSON (DISTRICT 1), MATT CALABRIA (DISTRICT 2), ERV PORTMAN (DISTRICT 4), JAMES WEST (DISTRICT 5), JOHN BURNS (DISTRICT 7)

DURHAM COUNTY

DISTRICT ATTORNEY: ROGER ECHOLS SHERIFF: CLARENCE BIRKHEAD BOARD OF EDUCATION: MIKE LEE (DISTRICT 1), MATT SEARS (DISTRICT 3), NATALIE BEYER (DISTRICT 4)

ORANGE COUNTY

CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT: MARK KLEINSCHMIDT BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS: SALLY GREENE (AT-LARGE), EARL MCKEE (DISTRICT 2) BOARD OF EDUCATION: SARAH SMYLIE, BRENDA STEPHENS, HILLARY MACKENZIE, WILL ATHERTON SHERIFF: CHARLES BLACKWOOD

U.S. HOUSE

DISTRICT 2, REPUBLICAN: NO ENDORSEMENT DISTRICT 2, DEMOCRAT: WENDY ELLA MAY DISTRICT 4, DEMOCRAT: DAVID PRICE

STATE SENATE

DISTRICT 16, DEMOCRAT: LUIS TOLEDO

STATE HOUSE

DISTRICT 11, REPUBLICAN: NO ENDORSEMENT DISTRICT 11, DEMOCRAT: ALLISON DAHLE DISTRICT 33, DEMOCRAT: ROSA GILL DISTRICT 35, REPUBLICAN: NO ENDORSEMENT DISTRICT 35, DEMOCRAT: TERRENCE EVERETT

YYYY WHERE TO VOTE EARLY YYYY DURHAM COUNTY

ORANGE COUNTY

HERBERT C. YOUNG COMMUNITY CENTER 101 WILKINSON DRIVE, CARY APRIL 26–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–7 P.M. APRIL 28: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 29: 1 P.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.– 1P.M.

DUKE UNIVERSITY BRODHEAD CENTER 402 CHAPEL DRIVE, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

CARRBORO TOWN HALL 301 WEST MAIN STREET, CARRBORO APRIL 21, 28: 9 A.M.–3 P.M. APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

CHAVIS COMMUNITY CENTER 505 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. BOULEVARD, RALEIGH APRIL 26–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–7 P.M. APRIL 28: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 29: 1 P.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.– 1P.M.

DURHAM COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS 201 NORTH ROXBORO STREET, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

EAST REGIONAL LIBRARY 211 LICK CREEK LANE, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M. NCCU ONESTOP 640 NELSON STREET, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M. NORTH REGIONAL LIBRARY 221 MILTON ROAD, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M. SOUTH REGIONAL LIBRARY 4505 SOUTH ALSTON AVENUE, DURHAM APRIL 19–21, APRIL 23–28, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–6 P.M. APRIL 22, 29: NOON–4 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

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ORANGE COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS OFFICE 208 SOUTH CAMERON STREET, HILLSBOROUGH APRIL 19–20, APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 9 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 21, 28: 9 A.M.–3 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

CHAPEL OF THE CROSS 304 EAST FRANKLIN STREET, CHAPEL HILL APRIL 21: 9 A.M.–3 P.M. APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–6 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M. EFLAND RURITAN CLUB BUILDING 3009 FORREST AVENUE, EFLAND APRIL 21, 28: 9 A.M.–3 P.M. APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–6 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M. SEYMOUR CENTER 2551 HOMESTEAD DRIVE, CHAPEL HILL APRIL 21, 28: 9 A.M.–3 P.M. APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–6 P.M. MAY 5: 9 A.M.–1 P.M.

WAKE COUNTY

WAKE COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS OFFICE 337 SOUTH SALISBURY STREET, RALEIGH APRIL 19–20, APRIL 23–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: 8:30 A.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.–1 P.M.

HUNT COMMUNITY CENTER 301 STINSON AVENUE, HOLLY SPRINGS APRIL 26–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–7 P.M. APRIL 28: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 29: 1 P.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.– 1P.M. LAKE LYNN COMMUNITY CENTER 7921 RAY ROAD, RALEIGH APRIL 26–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–7 P.M. APRIL 28: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 29: 1 P.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.– 1P.M. NORTHERN REGIONAL CENTER 305 EAST HOLDING AVENUE, WAKE FOREST APRIL 26–27, APRIL 30–MAY 4: NOON–7 P.M. APRIL 28: 10 A.M.–5 P.M. APRIL 29: 1 P.M.–5 P.M. MAY 5: 10 A.M.– 1P.M.

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a fine commissioner, but we’re sticking with John Burns, one of the board’s sharpest minds and outspoken members. Susan Evans would be a good commissioner as well. In fact, this District 4 race, against Erv Portman, was the one we struggled with most. A former school board member who chaired the school board’s finance committee and knows the ins and outs of its budgeting process, Evans fully understands the problems facing the school system and the choices the county will have to make. But here again, we’re siding with the incumbent, as we believe Portman’s been an effective policy maker, even if he’s sometimes more cautious than we’d prefer.

James West There’s merit to the argument that Wake County should better fund its schools. While most of the blame lies with the Republican legislature, which has largely shirked its constitutional duty to provide for a sound basic education, Wake’s property taxes are relatively low compared to Durham, Orange, and Mecklenburg counties. And that would still be the case if the county decided to give the school system what it asked for. Were our endorsements only focused on that one budget vote, we might well be backing the challengers. Instead, however, we’ve looked at the commissioners’ entire body of work, and there’s a lot to like. The board has increased education funding by about a third and has the highest teacher supplement in the state; after this year’s budget cycle, it will likely

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return per-pupil spending to county highs, adjusted for inflation. We’d encourage commissioners to be bold and push beyond that; taxpayers are willing to shoulder the

Erv Portman burden if they see results—and they will. Beyond school funding, the board pushed through a game-changing transportation bond that will bring Wake’s public transit system into the twentyfirst century (if a couple of decades late), tackled complex issues like affordable housing and food insecurity head-on, and passed nondiscrimination and living-wage ordinances for county employees (state law forbids the county from doing the same for private workers). It also enacted banthe-box legislation, a paid parental-leave policy, and hired an economic development officer whose mission is to work with underprivileged communities. Just last week, the board began discussing incentives to lure businesses to these neighborhoods and prod them into paying a living wage doing other socially responsible things. Just this week, the board passed sustainability guidelines for county construction projects, the culmination of three years of work. The dustups—the school-funding vote last year, the more recent fight over the Crooked Creek park project—get media attention, but, on the whole, this has been a very functional, diligent, pragmatic, and, dare we say, progressive Board of Commissioners. These five incumbents deserve another term in office. backtalk@indyweek.com


deep dive

EAT

ANDIA’S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM

EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

CARY/APEX/MORRISVILLE

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hapel Hill might have more cultural renown—it is, after all, the third peg of the Triangle—but Cary has more people. In fact, it’s the largest town and seventh-most populous municipality in North Carolina, and one of its fastest growing. Cary’s image as a bedroom town has bled over into adjacent Morrisville and Apex, which together form their own unofficial scalene servicing the southern edge of Research Triangle Park. Behind the decidedly suburban aesthetic lies a vibrant culture evolving from a fusion of families, affluent transplants, and tech millennials. It might not be a point of the Triangle, but denizens of this burgeoning recessed triangle needn’t go all the way to Raleigh or Durham for a pleasant outing.

10120 GREEN LEVEL CHURCH ROAD, #208, CARY; 919-822-1866 ANDISICECREAM.COm Three years ago, Andia and George Xouris opened The Freezing Point, an acclaimed ice cream catering company. But last year, they decided the name didn’t reflect the Xourises’ heritage or the fact that their ice cream was small-batch. So when they opened a brickand-mortar in summer 2017, it bore a new name: Andia’s Homemade Ice Cream.

BANANA LEAF

1026 RYAN ROAD, CARY; 919-468-9958; BANANALEAFCARY.COM Chef/proprietor John Hai brings decades of experience to one of the Triangle’s few panAsian and Cantonese restaurants. The stripmall setting shouldn’t detract from a wide menu that includes such house specials as House Black Pepper Lamb, Thai Style Sam Pai Seafood, and Peking Duck.

BREW N QUE

1222 NORTHWEST MAYNARD ROAD, CARY; 919-799-2023; BREWNQUENC.COM Lauded food truck owner Mike Markham brought his popular wood-smoked meats indoors, pairing them with an enormous selection of bottled and draft beers. Start off with the Redneck Nachos, or make way for The Big Cheesy, a grilled pimento mac and cheese sandwich stuffed with BBQ, sweet pickles, and barbecue sauce.

CORBETT’S BURGERS & SODA BAR

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PHOTO BY CAITLIN PENNA

BOND BROTHERS BEER COMPANY

202 EAST CEDAR STREET, CARY; 919-459-2670; BONDBROTHERSBEER.COM

Bond Brothers opened just last year, but it’s already staked a claim to being one of the Triangle’s best breweries. Beer freaks rave about the IPAs and barrel sours, while casual drinkers delight in the outdoor seating, replete with dogs and kids milling about and a food truck nearby. There are fourteen beers on tap, everything from Belgian strong golden ales to dark lagers to saisons to stouts to session IPA to Get Nice, a freaking malt liquor with blood oranges. We haven’t had a bad beer there yet—and it’s not for lack of trying.

126 KILMAYNE DRIVE, CARY; 919-466-0055; CORBETTSBURGERS.COM If you can’t seem to find that soda you remember liking as a kid, chances are it’s available at this modest burger joint, wedged into the bend of a strip mall. The food menu is straightforward: burgers, hot dogs, fries.

DANIEL’S RESTAURANT & CATERING

1430 WEST WILLIAMS STREET, APEX; 919-303-1006; DANIELSAPEX.COM A longtime local favorite, this hot spot in Apex has been attracting crowds since 1996. Owner Daniel Perry offers authentic Italian fare in a casual atmosphere at reasonable prices. Word to the wise: there’s no call-ahead seating, but reservations are highly recommended.

DANNY’S BAR-B-QUE

311 ASHVILLE AVENUE, CARY, AND 9561 CHAPEL HILL ROAD, MORRISVILLE; 919-851-5541 AND 919-468-3995; DANNYSBARBQUE.COM There are no frills in owner Danny Thompson’s Southern style, featuring meats slow-cooked over hickory wood.

GOOD HARVEST

1103 LEDSOME LANE, CARY; 919-977-3836; FACEBOOK.COM/ GOODHARVESTNC/ A just-opened Chinese hot pot restaurant with sleek, airy décor and fresh seafood.

HERONS

100 WOODLAND POND DRIVE, CARY; 919-447-4200; THEUMSTEAD.COM/DINING/ Five-star restaurants are rare in the Cary area, but Herons, in the upscale Umstead Hotel, ably fills the void. Original artwork and floor-to-ceiling windows are the backdrop for a sublime, locally sourced menu. It’s a pricey getaway, but you get what you pay for.

HOT POINT DELI

1718 WALNUT STREET, CARY; 919-460-6299; HOTPOINTCARY.COM This deli-in-name-only has undergone a number of ownership and location shifts over the years. Now settled into a larger facility along Walnut Street, it’s one of the area’s most popular lunch spots. Longtime favorites like the Max’s Bread Plate appetizer and the Salmon From Heaven entrée remain, while the tasty, well-apportioned dishes span American to Italian to Mexican offerings.

KALE ME CRAZY

302 COLONADES WAY, #209, CARY; 984-200-2960; KALEMECRAZY.NET So you’re trying to eat healthier? Join the club—and follow them to Kale Me Crazy, a self-professed “superfood cafe” that offers juices, smoothies, salads and wraps.

LA FARM BAKERY

4248 NORTHWEST CARY PARKWAY, CARY; 919-657-0657; LAFARMBAKERY.COM This Cary favorite is an authentic French bakery that features a French and American all-day menu as well as a popular Sunday brunch. Its quaint Preston Corners setting is filled with the smell of fresh baked bread and French press coffees. 4.18.18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 15


MAXIMILLIANS GRILL & WINE BAR

8314 CHAPEL HILL ROAD, CARY 919-465-2455; MAXIMILLIANSGRILL.COM This venerable, out-of-the-way restaurant is now in the able hands of Will and Margie Hennessee, who purchased it in 2015 after working there for almost twenty years. The upscale, global menu includes a long list of creative nightly specials, which are your best bets.

PEAK CITY GRILL & BAR

126 NORTH SALEM STREET, APEX; 919-303-8001; THEPEAKCITYGRILL.COM Situated in downtown Apex, the site of this handsome restaurant is a renovated general store that dates back to 1905. The booths were reclaimed from the pews of a hundredyear-old church. Owners Julie and Steve Adams offer up a robust meat-and-fish menu that includes nightly specials.

• Family Owned and Operated, Full Service Auto Repair • Serving the Cary Community since 1990 • Best Auto Repair in Wake County Finalist

TH

tr ia

10800 CHAPEL HILL ROAD, MORRISVILLE; 919-469-1724 Locals line up for lunch at this unassuming barbeque hut in the middle of a gravel parking lot off Highway 54. It’s the standard fare—pork BBQ, brisket, hush puppies— prepared with a traditional touch.

TOTOPOS

1388 KILDAIRE FARM ROAD, CARY; 919-678-3449; TOTOPOSFOODANDTEQUILA.COM This relatively new location has already earned loyal patrons with its vibrant atmosphere and well-prepared menu selections based on the street food of Mexico City. The tequila bar features more than eighty varieties.

DRINK

DOHERTY’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT

1979 HIGH HOUSE ROAD, CARY, AND 5490 APEX PEAKWAY, APEX; 919-388-9930 AND 919-387-4100 As popular for bar food as for pints, both Doherty’s locations in Cary and Apex feel like authentic Irish pubs—bangers and mash, anyone? The American bar trappings of large televisions, pub trivia, and live music round out the experience.

b e sngtle OF

SMOKEY’S BBQ SHACK

E

2018

234 E. JOHNSON ST., CARY, NC 27513 • (919) 380-0040 • WWW.CARYCARCARE.COM

FORTNIGHT BREWING COMPANY

1006 SOUTHWEST MAYNARD ROAD, CARY; 919-342-6604; FORTNIGHTBREWING.COM This craft brewery and pub specializes in UK ales inspired by owner Stuart Arnold’s native England. Fortnight opened in a twentythousand-square-foot building off Maynard Road, so it needn’t worry about expansion issues.

HIGHCRAFT BEER MARKET PHOTO BY JUSTIN COOK

PRO’S EPICUREAN MARKET & CAFE 211 EAST CHATHAM STREET, CARY; 919-377-1788; PROSEPICUREAN.COM A gourmet market and cafe offering Italian and French-European cuisine—think porchetta sandwiches, crepes, pasta, veal medallions with prosciutto—Pro’s Epicurean also has an excellent selection of local and international beers and wines from all over the world. 16 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 4.18.18

2716 N.C. HIGHWAY 55, CARY; 919-267-6593; HIGHCRAFTBEER.COM This purveyor of craft beer features a digital beer board and a plentiful selection of beer on tap, in bottles, and kegs.

PHARMACY BOTTLE + BEVERAGE

120 EAST CHATHAM STREET, CARY; 919-234-1098; FACEBOOK.COM/ PHARMBOTTLEBEV Occupying the renovated site of a former pharmacy next door to The Cary Theater, this downtown newcomer offers expansive beer and cider selections, including the


MORE FROM OUR ADVERTISERS CARY CAR CARE

234 E. JOHNSON STREET, CARY; 919-249-5475; CARYCARCARE.COM If you need a place to take your car and feel confident that you will receive excellent service, look no further than Cary Car Care. This family owned and operated business (since 1990!) treat all their customers like family. Every service is centered around their core values of communication, trust, relationships, service and community. All their technicians are ASE Certified who receive regular training to stay up-to-date with the latest in automotive technology. As an INDY Week Finalist for Best Auto Care in Wake County, they are tried and true with a smile.

METALLICITY

10410 GLOBE RD, SUITE 106, MORRISVILLE; 919-908-0030; METALLICITY-JD.COM Metallicity Jewelry Design is an appointment and internet-based jewelry shop that is bespoke, and design driven.

PHOTO BY TERENCE JONES PHOTOGRAPHY

option of eight-ounce pours and beer flights. Large sliding glass windows open up onto Chatham Street and outdoor picnic seating. About a dozen beer taps reside in a receded, white subway tile wall.

TRIANGLE WINE COMPANY

575 NEW WAVERLY PLACE, #103B, CARY, AND 3735 DAVIS DRIVE, MORRISVILLE; 919-307-3966 AND 919-462-1912; TRIANGLEWINECO.COM With locations in Cary and Morrisville, Triangle Wine Company has become quickly known for its vast array of beer and wine selections, plus the ability to sample a pint or glass while you shop. Limited indoor seating means many patrons make outdoor gatherings part of their shopping experience.

SHOP

ADORE DESIGNER RESALE BOUTIQUE 4226 NORTHWEST CARY PARKWAY, CARY; 919-481-3400; ADOREBOUTIQUES.COM

This high-end designer resale boutique has consistently won acclaim as Wake County’s best consignment shop (there’s a sister store in Raleigh).

From cutting edge to vintage-inspired, owners Lilla Taylor and Tony Nemyer strive to create something beautiful, functional and, like every individual, unique. Bring your own ideas to life with custom design creations or have them repair and restore worn pieces. Plus, take a look at their creative 3-D laser printed designs!

PARK WEST VILLAGE

3400 VILLAGE MARKET PLACE, MORRISVILLE; PARKWESTVILLAGE.NET If you are looking for a great place to shop, eat, and play, head over to Park West Village in Morrisville! This shopping mecca includes a community center with major retail anchors, restaurants and even a movie theater! Park West Village also hosts year-round events including a fall festival, Winter Wonderland, First Fridays, Acoustic nights and more! During the spring, take your lawn chairs and blankets and experience the free LIVE in The District Music Series from 6pm-9pm in front of Stone Theatre – Park West 14.

DOWNTOWN APEX

APEXDOWNTOWN.COM You won’t find a quainter, more welcoming small-town district than Apex. A downtown revival that began in 1995 has helped land it in the National Register of Historic Places. Today, antique and other specialty stores mix with stately church grounds and an impressive array of restaurants and creamers. Downtown Apex hosts a number of year-round events, including holiday-themed festivals, Founders Day in March, a large Pig Fest in June, and the Apex Music Festival in September.

DOWNTOWN CARY FOOD AND FLEA

ASHWORTH VILLAGE, CARY; DTCFOODANDFLEA.COM Crafters and craft beer, food trucks and folk-singers, and sundry artisans align inside Cary’s Ashworth Village on the second Sunday of each month for this growing street market.

IVY COTTAGE COLLECTIONS 2017 NORTHWEST CARY PARKWAY, MORRISVILLE; 919-462-3434; IVYCOTTAGECOLLECTIONS.COM The distinctive facade of this high-end shop has been welcoming customers since owner

PHOTO BY ADAM DAVID KISSICK

4.18.18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 17


Maximillians Grill & Wine Bar 8314 Chapel Hill, Road Cary, NC 27513 919-465-2455 | maximilliansgrill.com

SUPER SELECTION!

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CONTACT YOUR REP OR ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM 18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 4.18.18


Lisa Allen opened the store more than two decades ago. Fine gifts, jewelry, and other accessories are available alongside home furnishings. Allen even offers interior design services.

THE PERFECT PIECE

200 EAST CHATHAM STREET, CARY; 919-460-9841; FACEBOOK.COM/THEPERFECTPIECECARY Occupying an eleven-thousand-square-foot building in downtown Cary, this home decor and gift store focuses on furniture sold through the store’s consignment inventory. There are also vendors who occupy booths around the showroom.

PLAY

THE CARY ARTS CENTER

101 DRY AVENUE; 919-469-4069; TOWNOFCARY.ORG/RECREATIONENJOYMENT/FACILITIES/CARY-ARTSCENTER The town of Cary’s historic downtown arts hub has theater and live music galore, but it also offers invaluable educational and community resources, from summer camps and classes to open studio programs.

rented from the boathouse (at least in April through October). Scattered among the sweeping green spaces are shelters to reserve for gatherings, seven athletic fields, a challenge course, an amphitheater, and a playground.

BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE

8003 REGENCY PARKWAY, CARY; 919-462-2025; BOOTHAMPHITHEATRE.COM Named after a former Cary mayor, this sylvan performing arts venue sits along the north bank of Symphony Lake in Regency Park. Cary’s more modest version of Wolf Trap has seen more contemporary acts migrate to other area stages, including Raleigh’s Red Hat Amphitheater. But Booth is a setting that can’t be beat, and it still boasts popular draws and perennial events such as the Fourth of July celebration, summer Movies by Moonlight, and the N.C. Symphony Summerfest concert series.

TRIANGLE ROCK CLUB

102 PHEASANT WOOD COURT, MORRISVILLE; 919-463-7625; TRIANGLEROCKCLUB.COM Whether you’re a seasoned climber or a newbie looking to learn the ropes (see what we did there?), you’re bound to find the right challenge for you among the twenty-seven-thousand square feet of climbing walls at this facility.

TRIANGLE TABLE TENNIS CENTER

2900 PERIMETER PARK DRIVE, #200, MORRISVILLE; 919-388-0272; TRIANGLETABLETENNIS.COM Tucked away in commercial Morrisville is the largest table tennis center in the country, with twenty-five thousand square feet of professional playing space lined with forty tables to rent. There’s a fitness area, locker rooms, and robots to rent for individual practice. (Robots!) The center also houses the USA Table Tennis Hall of Fame.

THE UMSTEAD HOTEL AND SPA

100 WOODLAND POND DRIVE, CARY; 919-447-4000; THEUMSTEAD.COM The brainchild of Ann Goodnight and her husband, SAS founder and CEO Jim Goodnight, this five-star hotel is the most luxurious in the Triangle, if not North Carolina. The serene atmosphere extends to every inch of this pampered property.

WAKEMED SOCCER PARK

201 SOCCER PARK DRIVE, CARY; 919-858-0464; TOWNOFCARY.ORG One of the best facilities of its kind in the country, WMSP boasts eight well-manicured grass soccer fields and plentiful parking. The main stadium has a seating capacity of nearly ten thousand, and it’s home to the North Carolina Football Club.

THE CARY THEATER

122 EAST CHATHAM STREET, CARY; 919-462-2051; THECARYTHEATER.COM The town of Cary purchased and renovated the town’s first indoor theater, built in 1946. Today, a new marquee graces its brick facade, which fronts a multiuse facility showing vintage films interspersed with live acts.

CIPHER ESCAPE

250 DOMINION DRIVE, MORRISVILLE; 919-378-9362; CIPHERESCAPE.COM What better way to discern what your friends are made of than to be locked in a room with them while trying to beat the clock and escape? Cipher Escape offers that very opportunity, with a variety of themed “escape rooms” teeming with puzzles and clues.

FRED G. BOND METRO PARK 801 HIGH HOUSE ROAD, CARY; 919-462-3970; 7:30 A.M.–SUNSET DAILY This 310-acre suburban oasis, owned and exquisitely operated by the town of Cary, is a sprawling jewel for pleasure-seekers of any age. A community center and senior center near the park’s entrance sponsor year-round activities and are also available to rent. Numerous running and walking trails spiral throughout the premises and beyond. A 1.5-mile course encircles Bond Lake, where you can enjoy fishing or while away the day on a boat, kayak, or canoe

PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER

PHILLIPS FARMS OF CARY

6701 GOOD HOPE CHURCH ROAD, CARY; PHILLIPSFARMSOFCARY.COM The main crop of this long-standing family farm is tourists, who are invited to partake of the farm’s bounty four times per year. The first is the spring strawberry harvest, where you can pick your own berries or buy a container. September sees the return of the farm’s fall corn maze, while October brings the pumpkin crop and haunted farm tour every Friday and Saturday night. Finally, come buy your Christmas tree and other holiday greenery, beginning the day after Thanksgiving.

PHOTO BY D.L. ANDERSON

4.18.18 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 19


indyfood

EAST DURHAM BAKE SHOP 406 South Driver Street, Durham 919-957-1090 www.eastdurhambakeshop.com

Life of Pie

EAST DURHAM BAKE SHOP’S ALI RUDEL FINDS PIE WAITING AT EVERY FORK IN THE ROAD OF HER LIFE BY DEBBIE MATTHEWS

“W

managing the Chapel Hill farmers market While she was living in New York and hen we got to Durham, it and was preparing to start working at a honing her pie craft, Rudel met and married was like we were supposed nonprofit when a cancer diagnosis sabotaged a Florida boy, Ben Filippo, and they started to be here,” says Ali Rudel. her plans. Her new normal became all about talking about moving to an area that was She’s talking not only about her East Durself-education and survival. conducive to a growing family—a small, ham Bake Shop, which opened last month, While she was in treatment and recuperaffordable city that was also rich with but also about her family finding its home in ating, a traditional full-time job wasn’t feacultural opportunities. For Rudel, a vibrant the Bull City. When some people are handed lemons, they make lemonade. Rudel makes pie—ginger-lemon chess pie, to be exact. No matter what adversity life has served her, pie has been her life preserver, from lucking into a successful Brooklyn bake shop to moving to Durham, starting a family, fighting cancer, and ultimately finding salvation in the meditative craft of making pie. With the opening of East Durham Bake Shop, Rudel has arrived home. Since the age of fourteen, Rudel had never lived anywhere for longer than a year. She prided herself on not owning more stuff than could fit in her car. Her nomadic life led her to college at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn before she moved to Virginia, where she earned a degree in linguistics from the College of William & Mary. After graduation, Rudel returned to Brooklyn and began looking for a job. With previous experience as a barista, she was hired at a pie shop, Four and Twenty Blackbirds, owned by sisters Emily and Melissa Elsen. It went on to become one of the most famous Ginger-lemon chess pie at East Durham Bake Shop PHOTO BY CAITLIN PENNA bakeries in the country. Though Rudel was hired to sling sible. Once again, Rudel turned to pie. To her, food scene was also important, someplace coffee, she quickly became fascinated by all baking was a meditative process that prothat supported sustainable agriculture and things pie. After finishing a shift behind the vided a way to work from home and maxia farm-to-fork food chain. After growing up espresso machine, she haunted the kitchen, mize family time. The couple had its kitchen eating processed and fast food, she wanted to eagerly soaking up all the pie knowledge the certified for commercial cooking, and Rudel raise her kids on wholesome food connected Elsens had to share. As the business floursourced seasonal ingredients from the farmto its source. ished, so did Rudel’s baking skills. Before long ers and producers she met during her stint Rudel found that the Triangle checked she was baking pies to keep up with demand at the farmers market, spinning them into all the boxes: it was affordable, culturally and making them her own; Rudel’s recipe for fillings like ginger apple, malted pumpkin, diverse, and boasted a thriving food scene. salt-pork apple pie is featured in the Elsens’ and maple sweet potato. The East Durham Its temperate climate was also appealing. best-selling cookbook, The Four & Twenty Pie Company was born, and Rudel’s pies, Once they arrived, in 2011, Rudel took a job Blackbirds Pie Book. 20 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

with their delicate, flaky crust and creative flavor combinations, quickly earned her a dedicated following wherever she sold them, whether at Ponysaurus Brewing or farmers markets and pop-ups. In July 2016, the couple launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds to build a permanent bakery and cafe. By midAugust they had raised more than $24 thousand. In January 2017, they found a space at the intersection of South Driver Street and Angier Avenue, but it took well over a year to rebuild it from the ground up. When the renovations were finally complete, on March 21, they officially opened for business. At East Durham Bake Shop, Rudel continues her mission of crafting food with care and seasonal ingredients that are sourced as locally as possible. The name change also comes with an expanded menu. In addition to pies, Rudel, Filippo, and their team—all of whom you can see at work in the open kitchen—now also produce baked goods including scones, cobblers, crisps, and goldstandard chocolate chip cookies, along with savory items like galettes, hand pies, pot pies, soups, and salads. They’ve also earned a following for their laminated pastries, such as croissants (try the Videri chocolate variety) and the popular morning buns. Making laminated dough is a labor-intensive process that involves folding dough and butter over and over to create a dough that can have dozens or even thousands of layers. Most bakers use a machine called a sheeter, but Rudel and her team make the laminated dough completely by hand, which she admits is crazy. Change is a constant in everyone’s life. With pie as her constant, Rudel welcomes change with open arms and hands as she works through it one ball of dough at a time. food@indyweek.com


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WEDDING GUIDE

The INDY’s guide for whomever, wherever, however saying “I Do” means to you. Highlighting wedding possibilities around the Triangle

ISSUE: 4/25 • RESERVATIONS: 4/20

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AP R I L

WE 18 GHOST LIGHT 7p TH 19 OLD 97’S 7p FR 20 GLOWRAGE 8p

KOOLEY HIGH SU 22 ANDERSON EAST 7p WE 25 TODD SNIDER W/RORY CARROLL 7P

TH 26 ZACH DEPUTY

W/ COME BACK ALICE 7:30 p

SA 28 PIGEONS PLAYING PING PONG MO 30 THE CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS MAY

BLUE OCTOBER 7p MONEY BAGG YO 7p CARBON LEAF 7p ARTS ACCESS BENEFIT CONCERT - DOORS AT 1:30p SA 5 ID FT. B!TCH BE COOL/FREAKY/

WE 2 TH 3 FR 4 SA 5

MOONTYPE/ DWNLO (18+ ONLY) 9p

MO 7 KING LIL G 7p TU 8 AN EVENING WITH

BUCKETHEAD 7p MISTERWIVES 7p BILLY STRINGS 7p JUPITER COYOTE 7p STEELDRIVERS 7p THE CLARKS 7:30p SLUSHII W/ TBA 7p JAKE MILLER 8p THE PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW 6p

CO M I N G S O O N

6/1 IDLEWILD 6/2 6/7 6/9 6/13 6/22 6/23

(ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND TRIBUTE) 8p

WHISKY MYERS 7p TASH SULTANA 7p RECKLESS KELLY 8p RÜFÜS DU SOL 7p DAVID ALLAN COE 7p AMERICAN AQUARIUM

W/ TRAVIS MEADOWS (ON THE LINCOLN THEATRE STREET STAGE) 3p CHAD PRATHER 6p YACHT ROCK REVUE 7:30p

6/29 6/30 7/7 INTERSTELLAR OVERDRIVE W/ ABACAB 7:30p

7/10 BERES HAMMOND 7/14 7/27 7/28 8/10

Saturday, April 21, 9 p.m., $14 Lincoln Theatre, Raleigh www.lincolntheatre.com

Prodigal Prodigies

RALEIGH HIP-HOP CREW KOOLEY HIGH REUNITES WITH RAPSODY AND 9TH WONDER TO GLOW UP ON NEVER COME DOWN

SA APR 21

WE 9 TH 10 SA 12 TH 17 FR 18 TH 24 SA 26 TH 31

indymusic

KOOLEY HIGH

W/ HARMONY HOUSE SINGERS 7p CONTROL GROUP REUNION 7p TORY LANEZ 7p MOTHER’S FINEST 7:30p

PHISH AFTERPARTY

W/ THE MANTRAS 10:15p

11/14 ALLEN STONE

W/ NICK WATERHOUSE 7p

ADV. TICKETS @ LINCOLNTHEATRE.COM & SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS ALL SHOWS ALL AGES

126 E. Cabarrus St.• 919-821-4111 www.lincolntheatre.com

22 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

BY CHARLES MORSE

A

t a South by Southwest showcase promoting the debut of the Netflix documentary series Rapture, Rapsody told a capacity crowd at Stubb’s BBQ, “When you talk about me, don’t call me a female rapper, a ‘femcee,’ none of that! When you talk about me you say, ‘Rapsody, that motherfucker is a beast!’” The audience went wild as she went into “Energy,” the lead single from last year’s Grammy-nominated Laila’s Wisdom. Rapsody’s ascension to hip-hop prominence has been seen as a triumphant fairytale come-up by some, but it’s a testament to hard work and perseverance for those who have witnessed her rise. As Rapsody has built a position for herself closer to the top of the hip-hop mountain, her beginnings in Raleigh with Kooley High are the cement that provides her solid foundation. On March 30, the same day as the premiere of Rapsody’s episode of Rapture, Kooley High launched its fifth studio album, Never Come Down. Rapsody returns the fold of her original clique on “Grinning,” and Patrick Douthit—better known as 9th Wonder—steers the project as executive producer. As big as that sounds, the members of Kooley High address the reunion with level heads intact. “This has been years in the making,” says Thomas “Foolery” Kevin, one of Kooley’s beat makers. “So we’re not getting gassed. Rapsody and 9th have always been here with us. It’s not a situation where Rapsody left town and we haven’t heard from her, and all of the sudden she and 9th graced us with their presence after their successes.” Kevin and Douthit have been working with each other since right before Douthit’s appearance on Jay-Z’s The Black Album in 2003. At the time, Foolery was in the First Year Student program at N.C. State, which gives first-years with undeclared majors the chance to shadow alumni who work in fields that interest them.

Kooley High PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST “I knew I wanted to pursue music, but it was N.C. State—there isn’t even a music program over there,” Kevin says with a laugh. “But they offered me the chance to shadow

9th, and he taught me how to use FL Studio. I’d go back and show [producer] Sinopsis what I was learning, and everything that exists now sort of grew from there.”


“This has been years in the making, so we’re not getting gassed. Rapsody and 9th have always been here with us.” PHOTO BY BRETT VILLENA

In one of the scenes in Rapture, Rapsody goes back to N.C. State, where Foolery and Taylor “Tab-One” Burgess meet up with her in the Free Expression Tunnel. There, they discuss how she started making her abilities public due to their encouragement, which brought her to Douthit’s attention. “This is family,” she says in the scene. “These are my brothers. I owe my dreams to them because they helped it.” Over a decade after the formation of the crew, Kooley High is now the model for independent hip-hop hustle in the Triangle. Its members—Charlie Smarts (Alexander Thompson), Tab-One, Sinopsis (Dennis McCarter), DJ Ill Digitz (James Meyer), and Foolery—all carry on with other fulltime pursuits, but they’ve stayed dedicated to keeping Kooley High sharp. Even with Meyer and Thompson living in New York, the group carves out the time to create art consistently and at a high level—creating a name for themselves on their own time, not seeking cosigns from stars. Their model has become how hip-hop artists in the city operate. Artists like Pat Junior, Ace Henderson, and Danny Blaze follow Kooley’s example of not rushing things and making music that’s a reflection of self rather than surroundings. But no matter how humble the demeanors

of Kooley’s members may be, Never Come Down shows the team utilizing the inspiration and momentum of their friends’ success to push themselves to a new level. With Douthit at the helm of the operation, the creative standards during the record’s development were at an all-time high. “On [2015’s] Heights, we had quality tracks laying on the cutting room floor that we wanted to get out to the public,” says McCarter. “On this project, we had to really dig in and be original, because if 9th said it wasn’t going to work, then that was it, back to the drawing board.” Having Douthit as a coach is an opportunity that rising artists would die to have, but for Kooley High, working with him as a friend rather than as a record executive is something that the makes Never Come Down a special project. Douthit’s influence and no-frills feedback shines through in the finished product, with tighter and more robust production from Foolery and Sinopsis, seamless cuts from Ill Digitz and airtight songwriting from Charlie Smarts and Tab-One. “Me and [Tab] been rapping together for so long it just comes natural, whether I’m sending him a verse I recorded up here in New York or we’re in the same room together,” Thompson says.

The fact that Kooley High has so many moving parts that perform special tasks sets them apart from other rap groups. It’s not a crew of four rappers and a deejay, or three rappers, a producer, and a deejay. Each lyricist brings a unique style to the table, as does each producer, with Ill Digitz binding them all together in the mix. On songs like “Never Come Down,” Tab-One and Charlie Smarts trade lines that off their braggadocio styles. But they can easily switch to more sensitive themes, too, as on “Voila,” where Tab-One tells the story of how he met his wife. Under Douthit’s tutelage, they shine brighter than ever, but they don’t see that as a sign to sit back. “It’s great to get recognition for the work we’ve been putting in for years, but there’s still a lot more to be done and we’re not losing sight of that,” says Burgess. Though Kooley has never gone out seeking cosigns from big music-industry names, they’re at last surfacing on a national level with something more meaningful than a mention from a gatekeeper. In a hip-hop atmosphere that seems to be teeming with trolls and badly mixed SoundCloud links, this group of college buddies from North Carolina is capturing audiences on the merit of their best work yet. The family business is finally, fully booming. music@indyweek.com

Your week. Every Wednesday.

INDYWEEK.COM INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 23


24 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com


music Geek Wave

CAN THE DECEMBERISTS, A BRAINY FOLK-ROCK BAND POINTED TOWARD THE PAST, LEAP INTO THE FUTURE ON ITS SYNTHY NEW RECORD? BY HOWARD HARDEE

The Decemberists PHOTO COURTESY OF RED LIGHT MANAGEMENT

THE DECEMBERISTS

Thursday, April 19, 8 p.m., $35–$222 Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham www.dpacnc.com

K

nown for their ornate and verbose folk-rock, The Decemberists have always oriented themselves toward the past. Since forming in 2000, the Portland, Oregon band has mined the annals of pop music, from eighties college rock to traditional folk music—and sometimes even Black Sabbath. Chris Funk, the band’s guitar player, puts it this way: “We’re always going backward while attempting to go forward.” Indeed, The Decemberists—made up of Funk, lead vocalist and guitarist Colin Meloy, keyboardist Jenny Conlee, bassist Nate Query, and drummer John Moen—see themselves as a record-collector’s band, a group of musical scholars that didn’t shy away from referencing what came before them. Funk says his own musical journey started on saxophone while he was going to high school in Indiana. But as a child of the eighties—which he considers “a really interesting time for synthesizers and punkrock guitar and horrible-sounding drums”— he started going to rock shows in Chicago and was inspired to put down the saxophone and pick up the guitar. He’s since become a jack-of-all trades when it comes to string and traditional folk instruments, and he also plays synthesizers for The Decemberists. In fact, he’d been messing around with synths for months leading up to the recording sessions for the band’s new record, I’ll Be Your Girl, their follow-up to 2015’s What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World. “This is being pegged as the synth album, but we’ve used synths all along,” Funk says. “The synthesizers were things we already owned. We didn’t go shopping. It was like, what else do we have in the closet that we can use to expand the orientation of the songs?” The fresh sound is also a result of subbing out longtime producer Tucker Martine for John Congleton, who’s worked with the likes of Lana Del Rey, St. Vincent, and Spoon. That choice, Funk says, came from needing a producer who could bring a fresh approach to the band’s new material. “We had worked with Tucker for so long that it had become too comfortable,” Funk says. “There was the challenge of growing the sound and the experience. We had put a bunch of parameters around Tucker through our friendship, so the most obvious thing to INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 25


do was cut ties with him and try something new with someone we weren’t comfortable with. It was wanderlust, really.” In a firm but friendly manner, Congleton pushed the band to embrace an aesthetic thick with dynamic guitar and synthesizer textures. “He’s a very stylized producer, which means he’s a very good producer,” Funk says. “To me, those are the great producers—they find a voice in the way they sculpt sound.” The band was often in the dark regarding how, exactly, Congleton achieved certain tones and atmospheres, even though most of the members have production experience of their own. “I remember coming into the studio and being like, ‘Wow, what [effect] do you have on my guitar?’ And he said, ‘Don’t worry about it,’” Funk recalls. “He didn’t want to reveal his tricks, which was totally cool. He’s a wizard.” Congleton’s influence is especially apparent on the densely arranged singles “Once in My Life” and “Severed.” The latter begins with a krautrock-style mix of arpeggiating synth and heavy guitar riffs. It’s strikingly different than anything The Decemberists

music

BRIEF

MATT DOUGLAS

AFFIRMATION (WITH DISCOMFORT) SELF-RELEASED |  On the back cover of their album A Night at the Opera, Queen famously declared “No synthesizers!” It’s an attempt to claim a certain kind of rock authenticity, to assert the power of the studio and the band’s own technical virtuosity. Similarly, saxophonist Colin Stetson often boasts about how his unrelenting performances contain no overdubs. Matt Douglas’s new solo album, Affirmation (with Discomfort) make a similar, somewhat more muted, claim, stating that all the sounds on it were made “using only woodwinds.” Douglas is probably best known for having played with a host of notable Triangle bands over the past decade, including with The Hot at Nights, Hiss Golden Messenger, The Rosebuds, Chris Stamey, Six String Drag, and The Mountain Goats. Cearly, he knows his way around woodwind instruments, and he puts that vast store knowledge to work for his first proper 26 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

have touched on before. Such old-school electronic elements appear throughout I’ll Be Your Girl. Many of the songs clock in at under three and a half minutes, which is notable for a group with a long-standing affinity for multi-part folk epics. (There is one, however: the eight-minute “Rusalka, Ruslka/The Wild Rushes,” which is based on a traditional Russian mermaid tale.) But the album stops well short of being a complete reinvention of The Decemberists. “I don’t think we tried to turn the band completely on its ass or anything,” Funk says of the new direction. “You’re consciously making music for people who like your band, and you don’t want to ostracize fans, but you also get your creativity scratched. There are a lot of things to balance when you make a record.” The folky acoustic instrumentation and lyrical references to historical parables that define the band’s eight-album discography are still there, and Meloy’s singing voice remains central to the band’s fanciful sound. The Decemberists found a new path forward, but they just had to find a new guide to get there. music@indyweek.com

solo record, weaving together appealing textures and sinuous melodies from an ever-shifting array of instrumental colors and textures. The album is a series of vignettes describing, as Douglas puts it, the “(imagined) seven emotional stages predecessing the consignment to marriage.” His vision of these emotional states—uncertainty and evaluation, affirmation and commitment—is imaginative, if a bit oblique. The journey through these emotions isn’t necessarily straightforward, and each is shot through with plenty of interesting ambiguity. Take, for instance the opening track, “No. 1: Uncertainty,” which opens with a series of clipped, pulsing chords that sound like the ambient synths. The chords Douglas chooses seem half way between Bach and Philip Glass, lending the whole thing a tumbling, unsettled quality. When “normal” saxophones take over, the mood seems a little too joyous to be completely uncertain. “No. 2: Caution” does feel more, well, cautious, even if it’s the record’s most sonically adventurous track, with saxes layered in such a way that they sound like distorted electric guitars. “No. 7: Threshold,” meanwhile, is perhaps the most unsettled of the set, replete with odd dissonances and strange effects in an otherwise stately chorale. But the wonderful, unexpected layerings of “No. 8: Committed” bring everything to an raucously understated close, proving just how much sound Douglas can wring out of his chosen instruments. —Dan Ruccia


INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 27


indyart

BOB TROTMAN: BUSINESS AS USUAL Through Sunday, July 8 Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh www.gregg.arts.ncsu.edu

Big Business

BOB TROTMAN’S LARGER-THAN-LIFE, SOMETIMES AUTOMATED SCULPTURES OF BOSSES AND OFFICE WORKERS EXPOSE THE VICES BEHIND A SIGNAL AMERICAN VIRTUE BY JULIE M. HAMILTON

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alking into the Gregg Museum of Art & Design at N.C. State University, the first thing you see is a massive white man’s head suspended from the ceiling. Furrowed brows frame his beady eyes and veins protrude at his temples as if he’s watching your every move. This omnipresent “boss” literally looms over the exhibit, his resin face staring down at his subordinates in the galleries with an unflinching gaze. Reminiscent of the ancient Roman “Colossus of Constantine” statue, in which the subject’s scale communicates the godlike quality of the emperor, this piece, “Face Time,” emphasizes that the boss is to be feared and obeyed under all circumstances—or else. Running at the Gregg until mid-summer, Bob Trotman’s exhibit Business as Usual incorporates mixed-media and video art into dozens of figurative sculptures that occupy wall and floor space in several galleries, inviting viewers to observe the work from different angles. The exhibit critiques the toxic implications of big business by unmasking its prosperity gospel of greed and envy at the expense of human workers. Utilizing tropes of parody and satire, Trotman depicts underlying evils in an increasingly fascist economy by hyperbolizing the villains and the plebes with cartoon-like animation. “Making the bottom line the top priority puts enormous pressure on human values,” Trotman writes in the exhibition text. “It is a practice that has long characterized the corporate world, and now, increasingly, also characterizes government policy. What becomes of those who are caught up in this system, either as perpetrators or victims?” Originating from Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Trotman is a self-taught sculptor who works primarily in wood, resin, tempera, and wax. His process is labor-intensive. Beginning with extensive sketches, he builds an array of clay figures. He then 28 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

Bob Trotman: "Floor Man" (2011) PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GREGG MUSEUM scales the models from doll-size to largerthan-life and hand-carves blocks of wood into their final forms. Trotman uses wood as his primary medium because of the influence of carved religious figures, folk art, and ship’s mastheads. Drawing upon his undergraduate studies in philosophy, Trotman illustrates systemic abuses of power in business and government. His figures are anonymous white-collar workers, either strategically

climbing the corporate ladder or suffering under capitalism’s corruption, individualism, and materialism. They are dressed in the boring staples of work-wear uniforms: conservative pumps and pencil skirts, mass-produced suits and wingtips. As Michel Foucault observed, the structure of corporate business long ago adopted the model of a prison in which inmates are monitored by unseen authority figures and motivated primarily by fear. We observe

these effects in the expressions of Trotman’s figures, who are satirically characterized as terrified under the surveillance of their superiors (“Quorum”), drowning in despair (“Chorus: Kaitlin, Martin and Jane”), or selfmedicating (“Slow Drip”). Trotman encapsulates economic idolatry by incorporating monetary symbols, such as the seal on our currency, as well as bank vaults and safes. If the American dream is a religion practiced at the capitalistic church


Bob Trotman: "Face Time" (2018) PHOTO COURTESY OF THE GREGG MUSEUM of performance and competition, Trotman asks who benefits and suffers when the almighty dollar is worshipped. The details in his caricatured faces show that they have become hardened to the reality that people are expendable in the ecosystem of private enterprise. It’s also instructive to observe that his entire cast of employees is white— some of his sculptures are even titled “White Man”—reinforcing that racism and sexism are intrinsic byproducts of hierarchical work environments. Echoes of 9/11 are present in Trotman’s wall sculptures of employees standing on skyscraper ledges or hanging in midair as if hurtling toward the ground. Whether they are literal or symbolic, they horrifically recall an icon of American commerce collapsing at the expense of human life. We might also recall the sobering repercussions of the housing-market crash of 2008, with its drastic repercussions of incalculable financial loss. Trotman uses the form of the automaton—simple machines designed to function automatically and repetitively—to propose his concerns about the dehumanization of workers, slogging through the motions just to punch out at the end of a weary day. How

numb must workers become to climb the hierarchy toward financial success while secretly living lives of quiet desperation? Social and communal values are trampled by those in power, who have individualistic and personal agendas. Though it was made two years prior to Donald Trump’s election, “Trumpeter” seems like a particularly on-the-nose caricature of our POTUS as a CEO. From the shoulders down, we see a nondescript suited figure carved from wood. The head, however, has been replaced by a fiberglass trumpet connected to a motion-activated speaker. As you draw close to observe the details, the sculpture emits indiscernible squawking sounds—a caustic jab, implying that the bullying figurehead offers citizens nothing more than a farcical circus of noise. Thus, Trotman examines the consequences of stratified business models, particularly when they are enshrined as governmental practices. By continuing to justify the perpetual cycle of labor exploitation as an expendable, profitable resource, “business as usual” constitutes a haunting vice that is championed as a virtue in American economics and politics. arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 29


artificer

MEG WOLITZER: THE FEMALE PERSUASION Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m., free Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill www.flyleafbooks.com

Wolitzer Canon

NOVELIST MEG WOLITZER ISN’T AS GOOD AS FRANZEN AND EUGENIDES. SHE’S BETTER. IF THE LITERATURE INDUSTRY WEREN’T SEXIST, EVERYONE WOULD KNOW THAT. BY BRIAN HOWE

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n 2012, the novelist Meg Wolitzer— respected if not quite famous after three decades of publishing—wrote an essay in The New York Times Sunday Book Review. Playing off Simone de Beauvoir’s feminist classic The Second Sex, the article was titled “The Second Shelf: On the Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women.” “If The Marriage Plot, by Jeffrey Eugenides, had been written by a woman yet still had the same title and wedding ring on its cover, would it have received a great deal of serious literary attention?” Wolitzer began. “Or would this novel (which I loved) have been relegated to ‘Women’s Fiction,’ that close-quartered lower shelf where books emphasizing relationships and the interior lives of women are often relegated?” The persuasive answers that follow these two questions are a no and a yes, respectively. But this shouldn’t surprise anyone in a literature industry where novels by women are often burdened with a possessive noun while novels by men are just called fiction. Wolitzer deftly dissects the overt and subtle ways that the same kind of book is presented and received differently depending on the gender of its author. On the covers of men’s novels, SUV-size sans-serif titles idle eventfully on stark backgrounds; on women’s, frilly fonts flit around watercolors of sandals in the sand. (“These covers might as well have a hex sign slapped on them, along with the words: ‘Stay away, men! Go read Cormac McCarthy instead!’” Wolitzer writes, with her usual wry humor.) Long books by men are ambitious; long books by women are unfocused. (Reviewers, Wolitzer thinks, look to women for the “painted-egg precision of short stories,” not the big zeitgeist-y novel.) The double standards roll on, powered by gender imbalances not only in who gets published, but in who gets major prizes, who gets reviewed, and who reviews them. 30 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

Meg Wolitzer PHOTO BY NINA SUBIN

On the cover of her new novel, The Female Persuasion, which she brings to Flyleaf Books on Sunday afternoon, Wolitzer has gotten her “jumbo, block-lettered masculine typeface.” As a signifier of seriousness, it is deserved. The novel razors apart power and influence across age and gender almost as deeply as The Interestings, Wolitzer’s 2013 commercial breakthrough and one of the finest novels of the decade, did to talent and ambition across friendship and family, charting the fortunes of a group of performingarts-camp kids across their lives . Still, the marquee font is set on a festively colored (if undeniably powerful) background of nested triangles, as if someone in marketing at Penguin Random House had begged, “Please, Meg, just a bit of color.” If the cover gives you pause, the obliviously condescending quotes about The Interestings on the back will bring you to a screeching halt. No matter how many ingenious books Wolitzer writes, reviewers continue to seem startled that she has written a proverbial “novel of ideas” rather than a cookbook or a dishy beach read. “[I]t’s also stealthily, unassumingly and undeniably a novel of ideas,” says The New York Times Book Review, something no one would say about a novel covering this broad a tract of modern life and recent history if it were by a man. The ideas boom from the page; the stealthy thing, apparently, is that Wolitzer snuck in man-size thoughts with the Trojan hobbyhorse of her gender. But that’s nothing compared to this howler from Entertainment Weekly: “She’s every bit as literary as Franzen or Eugenides. But the very human moments in her work hit you harder than the big ideas. This isn’t women’s fiction. It’s everyone’s.” The Female Persuasion is the story of the complex relationship between Greer Kadetsky, an achieving but insecure millennial college student with a suppressed sense


of injustice, and Faith Frank, a famed second-wave feminist in the mold of Steinem for whom Greer eventually goes to work. The novel is set in a vividly recognizable contemporary world, with its own versions of Ms. and Jezebel; Greer’s halting activism buds from a campus sexual assault. On this ample diagram, Wolitzer schematizes the concords and conflicts of intergenerational feminism. I suppose the “human moments,” which are indeed wonderful, hit you harder than the big ideas if that’s what you expect of female writers. But can you imagine affixing a quote such as EW’s, even in relation to a prior book, to material such as this? Wolitzer writes the kind of prose old-guard literary gatekeepers approve of in men: decisive and fleet, with subjects charging hard through verbs, sinewy with confidence, spiky with wit. Her novels thrive on her incredible powers of observation, inference, and synthesis, cultural and psychological, and her idiosyncratic but apt metaphors and similes. On each page, a description draws an appreciative chuckle—a group of new college friends in The Female Persuasion clings together “like children inside a camel costume”—and a snarky aside draws a laugh, as when Greer is described as “appealing in a very specific way, small and compact and determined, like a flying squirrel.” Dormroom walls aren’t beige, they’re “the disturbing color of hearing aids,” and a sexual predator’s hair looks like “a circle of lawn that had been trapped and left to die under a kiddie pool.” Wolitzer is playing at the same level as her male contemporaries, but without the roaring blind spots of, say, Franzen, who can’t help but ruin a book as compelling as Purity by deploying an insane straw-woman character that by all appearances is his ex-wife. The moral objection to this vengeful caricature of a hysterical woman is obvious, and it’s compounded by an aesthetic one. Franzen (this is also true of Freedom) will write a micro-compression of some vector of history and culture that takes your breath away but then turn around and squander your trust in his intellectual control of material that is clearly getting the better of him emotionally. Even though sexist attitudes and practices function within and outside of Wolitzer’s books, she writes men with the same consid-

ered clarity with which she writes women. (And why not, after a lifetime of reading men writing about themselves?) Greer’s long-distance boyfriend, Cory, embodies the male learning process of the past decade; he’s a “good guy” from the start who still has to discover, embarrassingly late, things like manspreading and how turning Greer’s rating from a six to a nine when the boys in the hall rated her looks wasn’t as valiant as he thought it was in high school. The literary establishment probably has been wary of Wolitzer not only because of sexism, but also because of its corollary, fear—not what women can’t do, but what women might do. With a force they regard as masculine, she notices things a man would not, landing scarily heavy blows. They might strike in passing: Greer notes with irritation that her professor’s book is dedicated to his wife for “being willing to type my long manuscript for her hopelessly ‘butterfingers,’ husband never once complaining.” Or they might stretch out to booklength, as in Wolitzer’s brilliant, exasperated 2003 novel The Wife, about a talented writer’s absorption into her less talented husband’s career as a Great Man of Letters. As we chip away at the idea of “women’s fiction,” we should also be careful not to downplay the importance of what it can uniquely do. “This isn’t women’s fiction” is a strange protest if the term is used pejoratively, but in significant ways, this is women’s fiction—by and about women—which is part of what makes it worthy of reading by all. We need to understand that in a culture where pervasive imbalanced gender constructs are quaking apart with new energies, Wolitzer’s gender—and Gillian Flynn’s, and Tana French’s, and Jennifer Egan’s, and Nell Zink’s, and Jeanette Winterson’s, and Lydia Davis’s, and Elena Ferrante’s, and Chris Kraus’s—is a power she draws on, not a limitation she overcomes. In recent years, there has been a flood of blog posts about reading only books by women for a year. But you don’t even have to do this as some kind of ethical project. In light of where we’ve been and where we are, in light of fiction’s imperative to unleash truths and change perspectives, you can just read them because they’re better. bhowe@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 31


indystage

Before Sunset

THOUGH BRITISH ROYALTY IS SURGING IN POP CULTURE, MIKE BARTLETT’S PROVOCATIVE “FUTURE HISTORY PLAY” REMINDS US WE MAY BE LIVING IN ITS TWILIGHT BY BYRON WOODS

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under Elizabeth, the English version of a Bartlett finds both paths problematic. At can’t be the only American to have constitutional crisis is triggered. the outset of his play, Prince Charles, a de cast a longing eye across the pond Under Karen O’Brien’s peerless direction facto king before his coronation, is already toward a form of governance (or at for Burning Coal least a figurehead) Theatre Compamore adult than ny, Randolph CurDonald Trump. tis Rand rules the Queen Elizabeth stage as a robust II’s popularity has monarch who gives only grown among Bartlett’s blank her long-ago subverse full weight. jects in recent When pressed to years, following sign the abhorrent Helen Mirren’s bill, Rand gravely twin triumphs as intones, “Without the sovereign in my voice and spirthe film The Queen it I am dust. This is and on Broadway in not what I want, but The Audience. If the what I must.” Netflix series The We also graduCrown has revealed ally come to see royalty’s collecCharles’s Achilles’ tive feet of clay, it heel: his loneliness has also underas the sovereign, scored principles which his wife, of nobility, dignity, Camilla (Lilly Neland leadership that, Randolph Curtis Rand and the cast of King Charles III PHOTO BY MINA VON FEILITZSCH PHOTOGRAPHY son) cannot overhowever imperfectcome, but which other members of the royal ly embodied, remain worth striving for. family can manipulate. Lucius Robinson But in his self-styled “future history KING CHARLES III makes a welcome return to the regional stage play,” King Charles III, Mike Bartlett—part ½ as Prince William, and Chloe Oliver captisentimentalist, part cynic—reminds us that Through Sunday, April 29 vates as his calculating bride, Princess Kate. we’re now living in what is likely to be the Murphey School Auditorium, Raleigh Ben Apple’s uncanny turn as a chafing twilight of the crown. The growing debate www.burningcoal.org Prince Harry melds with newcomer Mya in recent decades over the role of royalty Ison’s solid performance as his girlfriend, will only escalate when a new sovereign Jess. Strong supporting work from Simon envisioning himself as far more active in must be named. Kaplan as a press secretary, Joey Infinito as a matters of state than his mother was. In Beyond that, in Bartlett’s view, the endrelentless prime minister, and Elise Kimple the wake of a newspaper phone-hacking game of monarchy will involve either a conas a portentous ghost lend a Shakespearean scandal (sound familiar?), Parliament has tinued long fade into irrelevance or a short, weight to a compelling tragedy ripped from passed a bill restricting freedom of the sharp shock to the political system that, as tomorrow’s headlines. press. When Charles refuses to sign the with recent American developments, splits arts@indyweek.com bill into law, a step that had been pro forma the populace in two. 32 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

stage

BRIEF

TOBACCO ROAD DANCE PRODUCTIONS: IN CONCERT Friday, April 13 PSI Theatre, Durham www.tobaccoroaddance.org

After four years and four iterations of Tobacco Road Dance Productions’ unique eight-month mentorship program, which brings together emerging choreographers and established dance makers, founders Stephanie Woodbeck and William Commander’s last showcase before handing over the reins was a good moment to take stock. It displayed their program’s strengths in generating successful new works—and works that raised questions about that success as well. The oral history of 1970s Southern quilters that composer Caroline Shaw incorporated into her piece Really Craft When You framed Kristin Clotfelter’s pensive, poignant solo, Verses. At first, she stood still, holding three flattened cardboard boxes. Then she looked and reached around and above her with simple gestures, echoing Shaw’s melancholic, homespun melody for clarinet, piano, and cello. As the women talked of quilts, Clotfelter seemed intent on collecting elements from the space around her, impressing them upon her body before attempting to place them in her boxes. When those efforts proved problematic, she tried to place herself in the boxes instead. The work ultimately asked how much of our history and ourselves can we truly preserve. Alyssa Noble and Allie Pfeffer’s risible duet And We’re Back took a page from Monica Bill Barnes’s recent work, exposing the labor behind a polished dance. When Pfeffer quizzed her partner on one move, Noble answered, “Do four of the best pirouettes you’ve ever done … then chase your tail until you feel you’re gonna puke.” And Caitlyn Swett’s Spine continued her recent interrogations into relationships both on stage and off as her character first rejected a dyad with Blakeney Bullock before an enigmatic rapprochement at the end. But Johanna Berliner’s Just Heckin’ Do It never transcended a dance-recital display of cuteness and whimsy, and we wondered where it had started eight months earlier—and why it hadn’t developed further than this. —Byron Woods


stage

IMPROV 4 PARKLAND

Sunday, April 22, 6 & 7:30 p.m., $10 ComedyWorx, Raleigh www.comedyworx.com

Cry Till You Laugh

THEATER KIDS KEEP LEADING THE FIGHT AGAINST SCHOOL GUN VIOLENCE AS A TEEN-DRIVEN COMEDY FUNDRAISER FOR PARKLAND BUBBLES UP IN THE TRIANGLE BY KATIE JANE FERNELIUS

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hen the Parkland school shooting happened in Florida, Jonathan Beyer, a sixteenyear-old sophomore at Apex High School, struggled to make sense of his feelings: sadness, anger, confusion. “I felt unsafe at school,” Beyer says. “Just a lot of contradicting emotions. To deal with that response to the shooting, I threw myself into organizing. Thinking, what could I do to try to change what is happening?”

personally believe that helping those affected Our Lives movement, calling for stricter by gun violence is a political act.” gun-control regulation. Here in the Triangle, Ben Pluska, a senior at Enloe and Beyer decided to organize in his own way: co-captain of Happy Accidents, an improv putting on an improv show by and for team that will perform at the fundraiser, says teenagers. The INDY’s guide for whomever, his team tends wherever, to steer away from politics, “I just wanted to try and combine my and but they all eagerly agreed to do this show my peers’ love forhowever the arts andsaying comedy and “I Do” means to you. when given the opportunity. theater with trying to help the victims of Highlighting wedding possibilities around the Triangle “In public school, teachers and students Parkland, and that’s how the idea was born,” are taught to leave your political opinions Beyer says. outside the conversation,” Pluska says. “But I The Improv 4 Parkland fundraiser has feel like this is turning over a new leaf.” two shows on Sunday. at OR 6 p.m. CONTACT YOURThe AD one REP ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM

WEDDING GUIDE

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CONTACT YOUR AD REP OR ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM

ove L WEDDING e indy? thGUIDE he The Estessentials PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SUBJECTS Beyer saw himself in many of the Parkland survivors. Not only were they high school students, like him, but they were also theater kids. In an interview with Wolf Blitzer on CNN, Cameron Kasky, one of the teen activists from Parkland, debunked the notion that they were paid actors with a selfdeprecating joke about his performance in Fiddler on the Roof. And Emma Gonzalez spoke about her experiences in drama class on the day of the shooting. Since the Parkland shooting in February, teens across the country have mobilized their communities as part of the March for

WEDDING GUIDE

Last month, Pluska participated in a features Cary, Garner, and Enloe high school Highlighting wedding possibilities around Triangle walkout at Enloe in the remembrance of the teams, while the one at 7:30 features Garner Parkland victims. His classmates are and two improv teams from Moonlight planning another this week, when they Stage Company, the Improvables and the will perform a song in remembrance of the Estesstentials. All proceeds will go directly to CONTACT YOUR AD REP OR ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM victims. survivors of the Parkland shooting. “It’s a comedy show. It’s nothing out of the Raleigh improv company ComedyWorx ordinary. But, for this show, we are trying to donated its theater free of charge, and the do more than make people laugh,” Beyer says. adult improv community offered to help “We’re trying to help people whose lives have the teen organizers in any way they could, been turned around by gun violence. Theater according to Beyer. kids have been at thewherever, forefront of this fight. “This event is to directly support The INDY’s guide for whomever, Let’s continue that.” the victims of gun violence more than to however saying “II Do” means to arts@indyweek.com you. advance a political agenda,” Beyer says. “But

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WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK 4.18–4.25

Durand Jones & the Indications PHOTO BY HORATIO BALTZ MONDAY, APRIL 23

DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS

The legend of Durand Jones & The Indications’ self-titled debut focuses on its barebones recording budget, exemplified by the use of a microphone repurposed from an American Idol-branded karaoke machine. Though that lo-fi approach lends plenty of grit to the 2016 LP’s vintage R&B gems, it doesn’t overshadow spectacular performances from Jones—a saxophonist and vocalist who, like the best soul singers, began singing in church—and his Indiana-based band, which borrows from the legendary playbooks of Booker T. & the M.G.’s, The Meters, and The Bar-Kays. Jones’s otherworldly cry opens the working-class anthem “Make a Change” as slinky guitar and organ ride atop an infectious start-and-stop groove that pairs perfectly with Jones’s percussive delivery, making for the album’s finest moment. Elsewhere, Jones, channeling his best James Brown, wails and shouts exhortations at his drummer on the impossibly funky “Groovy Babe” and then chases it with “Giving Up,” a classic slow-burning soul ballad. Though best experienced in intimate environments like the Cat’s Cradle Back Room, the Indications might soon outgrow such spaces. Holy Ghost Tent Revival opens. —Spencer Griffith CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM, CARRBORO | 8:30 p.m., $13–$15, www.catscradle.com

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?

THE DECEMBERISTS AT DPAC (P. 25), IMPROV 4 PARKLAND AT COMEDY WORX (P. 33), HAVEN KIMMEL AT ST. MATTHEWS (P. 44), KING CHARLES III AT BURNING COAL (P. 32), KOOLEY HIGH AT LINCOLN THEATRE (P. 22), LITTLE PINK HOUSE AT THE RALEIGH GRANDE (P. 44), THE MEMBER OF THE WEDDING AT VISUAL ART EXCHANGE (P. 42), LONG EXPOSURE AT THE CARRACK (P. 40), BOB TROTMAN AT THE GREGG (P. 28), MEG WOLITZER AT FLYLEAF BOOKS (P. 30) 34 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com


SUNDAY, APRIL 22–THURSDAY, MAY 3

SHAKESBEER II: THE BARD STRIKES BACK

“We’ve upped the ante on everything,” director Dustin Britt says about Bare Theatre’s all-new collection of comic Shakespearean sots, which embarks on a springtime tour of Triangle bars this week. Once again, adaptor Charles Keith scripts a mash-up of the Bard’s most famous boozers as we’ve never even remotely seen them before. Antony and Cleopatra get the Scorsese treatment before a ukulele orchestra (!) reframes a clutch of Shakespeare’s clowns in a five-minute mini-musical by—who else?—Cole Porter. A Hamilton parody is on tap, plus a Star Wars tribute in which the Rude Mechanicals from A Midsummer Night’s Dream present Pyramus and Thisbe in Space. Newbies Glenn Greggs and Benjamin Tarlton join Laura J. Parker and Camille Watson from ShakesBEER’s first incarnation. After an April 22 preview at The Pinhook, the bar crawl moves to Cary’s Fortnight Brewing (April 24 and 26), Hillsborough’s Mystery Brewing Company (April 25), Raleigh’s Imurj (April 30 and May 3) and Watts & Ward (May 1), and Durham’s Ponysaurus (May 2). —Byron Woods VARIOUS VENUES, TRIANGLE-WIDE 8 p.m., donations accepted, www.baretheatre.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 20–SUNDAY, MAY 6

PETER AND THE STARCATCHER

In the absolute morass of Peter Pan-related sequels, prequels, and re-imaginings—call them vampires, robots, aliens, punks, whatever, it’s still about boys who just won’t grow up—Rick Elice’s adaptation of Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s YA novel series about Pan’s origin is a welcome standout. The production deliberately employs the limitations of the stage to create a breathlessly paced and self-aware tale of a journey to a mysterious island, using minimalist props and lighting to convey everything from giant ships to enormous crocodiles. And there’s some hilarious slapstick as well, including an origin of sorts for Captain Hook that involves every possible inflection of a certain three-word saying. There might be too many Peter Pans in the world (literally and figuratively), but Peter and the Starcatcher is a treat for kids and kidsat-heart that won’t make you wish the boy would just grow up already. —Zack Smith NORTH RALEIGH ARTS AND CREATIVE THEATRE, RALEIGH 8 p.m. Fri. & Sat./3 p.m. Sun., $17–$20, www.nract.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 19

ERIC B. & RAKIM

While some may not understand the difference between hip-hop culture and rap music, Rakim, one of the all-time greatest emcees, is an innovator in both of the symbiotic realms. He was one of the pioneers that introduced multisyllabic rhyme schemes, way beyond the commercial genesis of The Sugarhill Gang’s single “Rappers Delight.” Last year, he delivered an amazing live-band performance at Durham’s Art of Cool festival with ZooCrü. Now he returns to Raleigh with renowned deejay and producer Eric B. Few hip-hop albums have been as influential as their debut, 1987’s Paid in Full, a blueprint for how a body of work should represent hip-hop. There, Rakim cemented himself as the definitive example of what an emcee should be: someone who moves the crowd, a mike-checker, a master of ceremonies, and a voice for cheering on the art form. When this dynamic duo takes the stage, witness what it looks like to live hip-hop. —Kevin J. Rowsey II THE RITZ, RALEIGH 8 p.m., $30, www.ritzraleigh.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 20–SUNDAY, MAY 6

HAND TO GOD

Once upon a time, a much younger Anthony Hopkins starred in a thriller called Magic—but it’s probably more accurate to say he shared the film’s billing with an eerie-looking ventriloquist dummy named Fats. Hopkins’s character has a magic act that’s failing until he adds a ventriloquism bit. Since it’s a horror flick, Fats saves the show, then decides to take over the act—and the rest of the magician’s life. Robert Askins’s 2015 dark comedy applies the same premise to a bunch of high schoolers in a puppet troupe at a small-town church in Texas. Along the way, Askins notes the similarity between the kids’ unhinged activities and the longest ventriloquism act in history: the one still playing everywhere, in which people put their own words into the mouth of Jesus. —Byron Woods THEATRE IN THE PARK, RALEIGH Various times, $16–$24, www.theatreinthepark.com INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 35


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MO 4/23 @CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM

DURAND JONES & TU 4/24

THE MAINE SUSTO

CAT'S CRADLE BACK ROOM

4/18 DR DOG W/ KYLE CRAFT ($27.50/ $30) 4/19 LYDIA LOVELESS W/ BRUXES ($15) 4/20 SUSTO W/ THE ROMAN SPRING ($12/$15)

RECENTLY ANNOUNCED: ROBBIE FULKS, THE REVELERS, KASH’D OUT WED JUN 29 @ 8:00 PM, $12/$15 THE NTH POWER WED/ Zoocrü JUN 29 @ 8:00 PM, $12/$15

WED 4/18

WED 4/18

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w/ POISON ANTHEM RICHARD w/ POISONBACCHUS ANTHEM& THE LUCKIEST GIRLS RICHARD BACCHUS & THE LUCKIEST GIRLS

FRI 7/1 LOOK HOMEWARD / THE MIDATLANTIC FRI 7/1 LOOK HOMEWARD / THE MIDATLANTIC ZOOCRÜ TUE 7/5 Crank It Loud: NOTHING /W/ CULTURE ABUSE TUE4/19 7/5GREAT Crank It Loud: NOTHING / CULTURE ABUSE THU WAILIN STORMS HUNDREDFTFACES PEACOCK / /The Artisanals STORMS / HUNDREDFTFACES FRI 4/20 DukeWAILIN Internal Medicine CharityProject: Auction FRI 7/8 SolKitchen & Residency The ArtAnnual of Cool SAT 4/21 FRI 7/8SURFER SolKitchen & The Art of Cool Project: BLOOD / Winter The Art of Noise #Durham The Art of Noise #Durham MON 7/11 Regulator Bookstore presents MON 7/11 Regulator Bookstore presents HEATHER HAVRILESKY: Ask Polly Live SAT 4/21 HEATHER HAVRILESKY: Ask Polly Live TUE 7/12 DANNY SCHMIDT / REBECCA NEWTON with WES COLLINS W/ WINTER TUE 7/12 DANNY SCHMIDT / REBECCA NEWTON with WES COLLINS THU 7/14 Storymakers: Durham, Community Listening Event SUN EAST POINTERS / Dead Sea Community Sparrow Listening Event THU4/227/14THE Storymakers: Durham, SAT4/237/16FlashPINKERTON / ST. ANTHONY MYSTERY MON Chorus: “Hit MeRAID With Your Best Shot”& THE by Pat BenetarTRAIN and SAT 7/16 PINKERTON RAID / ST. ANTHONY & THE MYSTERY TRAIN SUN JUL 17 “Blister In The Sun” by Violent Femmes SUN JULPM 17 @ 8:00 WED 4/25 National Day THEDNA RAGBIRDS @ 8:00 PM $12/$15 THU 4/26 SWEET THETEARAGBIRDS TRIO / Julie Williams $12/$15

THE NTH POWER

SURFER BLOOD

Crank It Loud presents SKINNY LISTER / Beans on Toast SAT 4/28 The Sol Empowered Tour featuring CHANTAE CANN with Special Guest, Laura Reed. Music by DJ Rem.e SUN 4/29 ADAM EZRA GROUP MON 7/18 MAIL THE HORSE MON 7/18w/ Jason MAILAdamo THE HORSE FRI4/30JULTake 22Back the Night Durham MON FRI5/1 JULPM 22JOHN COWAN @ 8:00 TUE MAD CLOWN & SAN E We Want You Tour with Sobae @ 8:00 PM FRI 4/27

THE THE RAGBIRDS RAGBIRDS @ 8:00 PMJOHN COWAN $25/$30 $25/$30

JOHN COWAN JOHN COWAN w/ DARIN & BROOKE ALDRIDGE TUE 5/1 w/ DARIN & BROOKE ALDRIDGE SAT 7/23 Girls Rock Showcase

MAD CLOWN & SANR E DS WE WANT YOU TOUR W/ SOBAE / ACE HENDERSON

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SAT 7/23 Girls Rock Showcase TUE 7/26 Motorco Comedy Night:

TUE5/37/26Cat’sMotorco Comedy THU ANDY /Night: ADAM COHEN Cradle WOODHULL Presents BOB SCHNEIDER / Mobley

/ ADAM SAT 5/5 Cat’sANDY er s Cradle WOODHULL Presents ALVVAYS /Release FrankieCOHEN Rose -P op Ma tt FRI 7/29 YOUNG BULL Album s"Show tr av el er er s tic SUN 5/6 tis ar BALI BABY Charles DaBeast -P op Ma tt e w/ FRI su7/29 YOUNG BULL Album Release at s"Show er mm w/ ALIX AFF / DURTY DUB el on av "C tis tic tr e ar at MON 5/7 Cat’s w/Cradle ALIX AFF / DURTYHOP DUBALONG / Saintseneca Presents "C on su mm

SUN COMING SOON: JULIETTE JAREDVibes & THE MILL,of a Rebellion WED 5/9JUL17 TOMORROWS BADLEWIS, SEEDS YARN, / Sun Dried / Roots SUN JUL17 COMING SOON: YARN, JARED & THE MILL, HAL NRBQ, LIZLEWIS, VICE, WINDHAND, Doors: 7pmJULIETTE FRI 5/11KETCHUM, MICHAEL IAN BLACK & NICK THUNE HAL KETCHUM, LIZ VICE, WINDHAND, Doors: 7pm&NRBQ, CODY CANADA THE DEPARTED, RUSSIAN CIRCLES, BAND OF SKULLS, Show: SAT 5/12 8pm Crank It& Loud Presents SLAUGHTER TO PREVAIL CODY CANADA THE DEPARTED, RUSSIAN CIRCLES, BANDMOTORCOMUSIC.COM OF SKULLS, Show: 8pm SISTER SPARROW & THE DIRTY BIRDS, KING, $12 ADV 723 RIGSBEE AVE DURHAM, TUE 5/15 KID KOALA’S Vinyl Vaudeville Floor Kids-COMPANY, EditionNC -ADRIAN SISTER SPARROW& QUICKSILVER, & THE DIRTY BIRDS, KING, DOYLE LAWSON THE RECORD LEGG, $12 ADV 723 RIGSBEE AVE DURHAM, NC MOTORCOMUSIC.COM $15 DAYAdiraOFAmram and the Experience / DJ Jester DOYLE LAWSON QUICKSILVER, THE RECORD COMPANY, LEGG, REBIRTH BRASS MY BRIGHTEST DIAMOND, KARLA ADRIAN BONOFF, $15 DAY OF &BAND, W O N COMING SOON: FRANKIE ROSE, HAMMERFALL, RODDY RADIATION (OF THE SPECIALS), LE BONOFF, !! ABMAIMOUNA REBIRTH BRASS BAND, MY BRIGHTEST KARLA IL ADIAMOND, TALIB KWELI, LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III V A W M SHANE SMITH & THE SAINTS, POND, YOUSSEF, O U N LB LE TALKING ALOUDON W& DANNY, TH" ILTAHB NEKWELI, ARDREADS, TALIB VIIIAMYSTIC TRACYANNE COLD CAVE, A ABORTED, BOWIE’S E HE M UWAINWRIGHT LB H" WTHA OLD H THE N GETE FANTASTIC TEMPLE&OF VOID, DARK TRANQUILLITY, EARTSALES H RESNEGRITO, E H T EUP KIDS, & "TH723 LD O H S E R RIGSBEE AVE DURHAM, NC MOTORCOMUSIC.COM H "THE T R D S. C O M The Threshold & The Hearth THE RAGBIRDS

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36 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

4/21 YUNG GRAVY

SOLD OUT

4/22 JOEY BADA$$ W/ BUDDY AND BOOGIE ($26) 4/24 THE MAINE W/ THE WRECKS, THE TECHNICOLORS ($23/$25) 4/27 SUPERCHUNK W/ROCK*A*TEENS ($16/$18) 4/28 THE AFGHAN WHIGS AND LD BUILT TO SPILL W/EDHARCOURT SO OUT 5/4 BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB W/PETE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT ($25/$28) 5/7 MELVINS W/ ALL SOULS ($20/$22) 5/8 BAHAMAS ($16/$18) 5/9 PANDA BEAR W/ GEOLOGIST ($22/$25) 5/10 WYE OAK W/ PALM ($16/$18) 5/12 NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS W/ FIONA SILVER ($20/$23) 5/18DAVID BROMBERG (SEATEDSHOW)

4/18 CAROLINA WAVES PRESENTS: OPEN MIC NIGHT HOSTED BY K97.5'S MIR.I.AM & DJ WADE BANNER. ($5, 18+ ) 4/19 WEAVES W/ STEF CHURA ($10/$12) 4/20 THE WHOM (LIVE AT LEEDS ERA WHO, MAXIMUM R&R) PLUS... THE SPRESSIALS (SPECIALS TRIBUTE) AND SWEET N SOUR (AMY WINEHOUSE TRIBUTE) ($10) 4/21 STEEL STRING ANNIVERSARY SHOW W/ THE DOGWOODS W/ SPECIAL GUESTS, PLUS THE LAST OF THE GREAT SIDESHOW FREAKS; AFTERPARTY WITH DJ MONTY MORRIS. ($12) 4/22 (AFTERNOON) BE LOUD TEEN SHOW 4/22 REED TURCHI & HIS KUDZU TRIO W/ JB BOXTER ($10/$12) 4/23 DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS W/ HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL ($13/$15) 4/24 MATTIEL (FREE SHOW) 4/26 PATRICK SWEANY ($12/ $15) 4/27 DEAD HORSES AND FRONT COUNTRY ($14) 4/28 LOMA W/ JESS WILLIAMSON ($12/ $14)

BLUE NOT Cats; 8 p.m.

6/23 DESSA W/ MONAKR ($20)

CAT’S CRA Craft; 8 p.m.,

7/7 QUIET SLANG ($13/$15) 7/17 PETAL & CAMP COPE ($13/ $15) ARTSCENTER (CARRBORO)

4/20 GREG BROWN ($28/$30) LOCAL 506 (CHAPEL HILL)

5/5 ROLLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVER ($10/$12) DURHAM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

9/29 JOAN BAEZ FARE THEE WELL TOUR. MOTORCO (DUR)

5/3 BOB SCHNEIDER ($20/ $23) 5/5 ALVVAYS W/ FRANKIE ROSE

SOLD OUT

5/7 HOP ALONG W/SAINTSENECA ($15/$17) 6/3 POND W/ FASCINATOR ($15) 6/15 TRACYANNE & DANNY (TRACYANNE CAMPBELL FROM CAMERA OBSCURA AND DANNY COUGHLAN FROM CRYBABY) ($18/$20) 7/17 THE GET UP KIDS W/RACQUET CLUB AND AGEIST ($22/ $26) NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART

6/8 FIRST AID KIT W/ JADE BIRD 6/16 SHOVELS AND ROPE WITH SON VOLT

5/21 OKKERVIL RIVER W/ BENJAMIN LAZAR DAVIS ($18/$20)

5/4 CAITLIN ROSE W/ THE KERNAL ($10/$12)

8/3 KISHI BASHI AND JAKE SHIMABUKURO

5/25PETER HOOK & THE LIGHT ($28/$31)

5/5 THE COLLECTION W/ THE PINKERTON RAID($12/$14)

8/18 TROMBONE SHORTY'S VOODOO THREAUXDOWN FEATURING TROMBONE SHORTY & ORLEANS AVENUE WITH GALACTIC, PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND, NEW BREED BRASS BAND WITH SPECIAL GUESTS CYRIL NEVILLE, WALTER WOLFMAN WASHINGTON

6/19 STEPHEN MALKMUS & THE JICKS W/ LYTHICS ($20/$23) 6/21 MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA ($23 /$28) 6/23 THE FEELIES ($20/$23) 7/11 KURT VILE AND THE VIOLATORS W/ DYLAN CARLSON ($23/ $25) 7/20 CREATE YOUR SUMMER TOUR FEAT. KARINA GARCIA, WENGIE AND NATALIES OUTLET 10/11 APARNA NANCHERLA ($22/$25) 10/12 NEIL DIAMOND ALLSTARS W/ LESTER COALBANKS & THE SEVEN SORROWS ($10)

5/9 GIVERS ($15) 5/10 FRANKIE COSMOS W/ FLORIST AND LALA LALA 5/11 THE MOTHER HIPS 5/18 PRISCILLA RENEA ($10/ $12 ) 5/19 AMERICAN PLEASURE CLUB (FKA TEEN SUICIDE) W/ SPECIAL EXPLOSION ($13/$15 ) 5/20 ICEAGE W/ EMPATH ($14/$16) 6/3 SUNFLOWER BEAN ($12) 6/5 POST ANIMAL ($12/$14) 6/7 THE REGRETTES ($10/$12) 6/10 WAND ($12) 6/11 BENT KNEE ($10) 6/17 MAPS & ATLASES ($15/$17) 6/18 YOUNG WIDOWS W/ NULL,

$10 advance / $12 dayWAILIN of STORMS $10 advance / $12 day of

LOCAL 50 Throw, Home Face; 6:30 p.m

MOTORCO 8 p.m., $12–$2

THE PINHO Kourvoisier, W Vonne, Nance

POUR HOU Showcase; 5-1

THU, A

BLUE NOT Lightnin’; 7-9

CAT’S CRA

7/28 THE MAVERICKS

4/30 COMA CINEMA ($12 / $15)

6/13 TOO MANY ZOOZ ($17/$19)

THE KRAK Americana Re Byrd & Friend

7/12 LAKE STREET DIVE 8/1 FATHER JOHN MISTY WITH SPECIAL GUEST JENNY LEWIS

5/6 BRONCHO W/ VALEN ($10/$12)

HUMBLE P Wolves; 8:30

6/23 MANDOLIN ORANGE

4/29 CONCERT IN MEMORY OF ANTHONY LENER

6/6 PARQUET COURTS W/ GOAT GIRL ($15/ $17)

THE CAVE $6–$8.

CAT’S CRA Bruxes; 8:30 p

5/19 NEW FOUND GLORY W/ BAYSIDE, THE MOVIELIFE, WILLIAM RYAN KEY ($25/$29)

6/3 TYLER CHILDERS ($18/$20)

WED, A

THE INDICATIONS

7/13 PIERCE PETTIS ($15)

FR 4/20

mu

RED HAT AMPHITHEATRE (RAL)

5/3 FLEET FOXES THE RITZ (RAL)

5/9 NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS W/LUKASNELSON& LD PROMISEOFTHEREAL SO OUT 5/15 TRAMPLED BY TURTLES W/ HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER 610: TASH SULTANA

SOLD OUT

6/27 BEACH HOUSE HAW RIVER BALLROOM

4/20 JEFF TWEEDY -- SOLO

SOLD OUT

5/12 TANK AND THE BANGAS LD W/ SWEET CRUDE SO OUT

CATSCRADLE.COM ★ 919.967.9053 ★ 300 E. MAIN STREET ★ CARRBORO

**Asterisks denote advance tickets @ schoolkids records in raleigh, cd alley in chapel hill order tix online at ticketfly.com ★ we serve carolina brewery beer on tap! ★ we are a non-smoking club

Weaves [$10–$12/8

We’ve gott anthems fo in the past Margaret G to Cardi B’s Yellow.” We has yet ano from last ye Wide Open rhythm sec Jasmyn Bur encouragem and celebra up on the ta your name, track’s refra an indigeno bolsters the howls and g articulation frustrations The rest of polished, p “Slicked” fo self-confide the admiss punch of “S you in pers —Allison H


music 4.18– 4.25

WED, APR 18

BLUE NOTE GRILL: The Herded Cats; 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE: Dr. Dog, Kyle Craft; 8 p.m., $28–$30. THE CAVE: SOON A.D.; 8 p.m., $6–$8. HUMBLE PIE: Peter Lamb & the Wolves; 8:30 p.m. THE KRAKEN: Shake Sugaree Americana Residency with Jonathan Byrd & Friends; 7-10 p.m., free. LOCAL 506: Boston Manor, Free Throw, Homesafe, Hot Mulligan, Save Face; 6:30 p.m., $15–$18. MOTORCO: The Nth Power, ZooCrü; 8 p.m., $12–$25. THE PINHOOK: ScienZe, Kourvoisier, Wreck-N-Crew, Chyna Vonne, Nance; 8 p.m., $10. POUR HOUSE: Local Hip-Hop Showcase; 5-10 p.m., $12.

THU, APR 19 BLUE NOTE GRILL: Carolina Lightnin’; 7-9 p.m., free. CAT’S CRADLE: Lydia Loveless, Bruxes; 8:30 p.m., $15. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM:

Weaves

[$10–$12/8 P.M.] We’ve gotten a lot of great anthems for powerful women in the past few years, from Margaret Glaspy’s “Situation” to Cardi B’s blistering “Bodak Yellow.” Weaves, from Toronto, has yet another with “Scream,” from last year’s excellent Wide Open. Over a tumbling rhythm section, frontwoman Jasmyn Burke offers potent encouragement to stand up and celebrate yourself, to “get up on the table and scream your name,” as she sings in the track’s refrain. Tanya Tagaq, an indigenous throat singer, bolsters the track with guttural howls and growls—wordless articulations of the pains and frustrations of the marginalized. The rest of the record is a polished, punchy collection (see “Slicked” for another ode to self-confidence), but it’s worth the admission price to get the punch of “Scream” delivered to you in person. Stef Chura opens. —Allison Hussey

Malian guitarist Sidi Touré makes his Triangle debut Thursday at Kings. HAW RIVER BALLROOM:

M. Ward

[$25–$27/8 P.M.] M. Ward is an indie-folk institution, but his most recent record, 2016’s More Rain, is a record of restraint. Ward sings in a smooth, subdued voice, accompanied by gentle instrumentals that are no more aggressive (or arresting) than his vocals. Though the tracks on More Rain are built around conventional folk song structures, the record blends affably into the background, almost giving it the quality of ambient music. With Laura Veirs. —Noah Rawlings

KINGS:

Sidi Touré [$13–$15/9 P.M.]

Based in Mali, guitarist Sidi Touré has earned a name for himself as one of this generation’s best musicians. His playing often evokes airy, open spaces, but you’re just as likely to hear him play in quick, knotty bursts; that unique dichotomy is part of what makes Touré’s work so compelling. This gig is Touré’s first ever in the Triangle. House and Land opens with an unusual and excellent blend of music that draws as much from old-time mountain traditions as contemporary experimental material. —Allison Hussey

LOCAL 506: Arctic Blonde, Indiobravo, Chrome-Plated Apostles; 9 p.m., $7. MOTORCO: Great Peacock; 9 p.m., $10–$12. THE PINHOOK: Cayenne the Lion King, OC from NC, B Squared, Blaze Belushi, Fin the DJ; 9:30 p.m., $10. POUR HOUSE: Local Band Local Beer: LaureNicole, Obsidian Darling, Merges; 8 p.m., $3–$5. THE WICKED WITCH:

Hubbble, Mitch Smith

inventive, often pastoral beats he crafts as Hubbble, David Huber keeps his circle tight and his plate full. Catch him go back to back with Durhamvia-Miami experimental club emissary Mitch Smith for a night of proper deep-cut dance selections. —David Ford Smith

FRI, APR 20 ALL SAINTS CHAPEL: Music For Me Fine: Skylar Gudasz, Django Haskins; 7:15 p.m., $65.

PHOTO BY ISMAËL DIALLO

BLUE NOTE GRILL: Duke Street Dogs; 6-8 p.m., free. THE BULLPEN: Che Apalache; 8:30 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE: Susto, She Returns from War, The Roman Spring; 8:30 p.m., $12–$15. CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): The Whom, The Spressials, Sweet N Sour; 8:30 p.m., $10. DEEP SOUTH: Sons of Paradise, Evan Button & the Tribe, Inner Prolific, Six Shots Later; 8:30 p.m., $5.

[$5/8 P.M.]

ARCANA: Ally J; 9 p.m., donations.

DUKE’S BIDDLE MUSIC BUILDING: Duke Chorale; 8 p.m., free.

Between his work as a cofounder of the tastemaking Durham hip-hop and arts collective Raund Haus and the

THE ARTSCENTER: Greg Brown; 8 p.m., $28–$30.

HAW RIVER BALLROOM: Jeff Tweedy, OHMME; 7:30 p.m., sold out.

BEYÚ CAFFÉ: Autumn Nicholas; 7 & 9 p.m., $15.

LOCAL 506: The Garden, Tijuana Panthers, Cowgirl Clue; 7:30 p.m., $15–$18. INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 37


THE MAYWOOD: Book of Wyrms, Witch Hazel; 9:30 p.m., $8. MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL: N.C. Symphony: The Music of Star Wars; 8 p.m. THE PINHOOK: Choked Up, Bangzz, Sidewalk Furniture; 6 p.m., $7. PRIVXTE Dance Party: THNDRKTZ, Oak City Slums, Trandle, Sunset Palette, X/olf; 9:30 p.m., $7. POUR HOUSE: Mike Dillon Band, Jonathan Scales Fourchestra; 8 p.m., $10–$12. THE WICKED WITCH:

Sarah the Illstrumentalist, Eggy Strange [$8/9 P.M.]

M. Ward headlines the Haw River Ballroom Friday.

Conversations, from Raleigh beatmaker Sarah the Illstrumentalist, is a lush and lovely piece of boombap sampledelia. Jazzy horn loops, water wooshes, and various other collaged sound snippets swirl together into truly otherworldly compositions. Opener Eggy Strange isn’t your typical emcee either.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GROUND CONTROL TOURING

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An Adult Nightclub Open 7 Days/week • Hours 7pm - 2am

TeasersMensClub 38 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

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The band’s 2015 album, The Dark Comedy, matched gritty, psychedelic lyricism with cosmic weirdo production a la classic Def Jux-era El-P. With Drozy. —David Ford Smith

SAT, APR 21 BEYÚ CAFFÉ: Trey Sorrells’ Quartet; 7 & 9 p.m., $13. THE BULLPEN: Roy Roberts; 8:30 p.m., free. CAT’S CRADLE: Yung Gravy, Jay Storm, BBNO$, DJ Engels; 9 p.m., sold out. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM:

Steel String 5th Anniversary Show [$12/8:30 P.M.]

A coterie of Carrboro favorites convenes to celebrate Steel String Brewery’s fifth anniversary. This bill features the soulful roots-rock of The Dogwoods—Skylar Gudasz, Josh Moore, Jeff Crawford, Ryan Johnson, and James Wallace—along with The Last

RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE

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of the Great Slideshow Freaks. What’s a better combination than music and beer? After the show, DJ Monty Morris spins soul, funk, and more on vinyl until close. In an busy local microbrewery market, Steel String is the real deal and has been for a while. Cheers to that! —Kat Harding DUKE’S BALDWIN AUDITORIUM: Duke Opera Workshop; 8 p.m., free. KINGS:

Newman

[$10–$12/8 P.M.] The Triangle has long been one of hip-hop’s Southern strongholds, if an undercelebrated one. Now, scene across the area feels like it’s bubbling over with creativity and innovation. That couldn’t be more evident in the packed lineup at a show sponsored by WKNC and Ten Steps Ahead. Newman, the showcase’s headliner, explores themes like poverty, religion, and drinking through a refreshing and honest lens. With Benny Okoto, Ace Henderson, Cloudy Nueve, and Chlo the God. —Nick Gallagher THE KRAKEN:

ChuckFest [FREE/6:30 P.M.]

This Kraken throwdown celebrates the life of scene veteran Chuck Hodson, whose dedication to Americana music included a nearly twenty-year run as a member of the genrehopping outfit Mebanesville. A multi-instumentalist fluent on guitar, bass, mandolin, and violin, Hodson also teamed up with black traditional string player Joe Thompson, singing and playing what Thompson called “old time country music.” —Grant Britt LOCAL 506:

Wood & Wire [$8–$10/9 P.M.]

Austin, Texas’s Wood & Wire has plenty to love for those who fancy themselves aficionados of all things bluegrass. The band matches speedy flatpicking with gentle vocal crooning, which is enough to get toes tapping in its own right. Steady bass and fiddle round out their sound. —Kat Harding

THE MAYWOOD: Thunderstruck, Neon Knights; 9 p.m., $10. MOTORCO: Surfer Blood, Winter; 9 p.m., $12–$14. POUR HOUSE: American Speedway, Sean K Preston, Viva Le Vox, Hearts & Daggers; 8 p.m., $8–$10. RUBY DELUXE:

Foxture [$5/8 P.M.]

Winston-Salem’s Foxture knows how to craft excellent dream-rock tunes and effortlessly balance texture and songcraft without soaking everything in reverb. Their style of melodic 2000s-era emo-prog isn’t exactly trendy right now, but give that decade’s revival just a few more years to come along. Local greats Animalweapon and Janxx prep the stage with their own unique takes on leftfield pop. —David Ford Smith RUGGERO PIANO: Raleigh Symphony Orchestra Free Spirits Ensemble: Our Latin Neighbors; 7:30-9 p.m., $10–$12.

SUN, APR 22 CAT’S CRADLE: Joey Bada$$, Buddy, Boggi, Dessy Hinds; 9 p.m., $26. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM:

Reed Turchi & His Kudzu Trio [$8–$10/8:30 P.M.]

On Just a Little More Faith, the latest LP from Nashville-based Reed Turchi & His Kudzu Choir, the North Carolina native finds his own voice while melding together his multitude of Southern influences more naturally than ever before. Toning down his funkier tendencies, Turchi favors acoustic hill country blues and swampy slide guitar, adding soulful vocals with a distinct gospel feel that the album’s title suggests. Kindred spirit and frequent Turchi collaborator JB Boxter opens. —Spencer Griffith DEEP SOUTH: Live & Loud Weekly; 9 p.m., $3. DUKE’S BALDWIN AUDITORIUM: Duke Opera Workshop; 3 p.m., free. LOCAL 506: The Brummies; 8 p.m., $10–$12. MOTORCO: The East Pointers; 8 p.m., $10–$12.

POUR HOUSE: Sunday Funday: Bones & Rose, Richard Bacchus Duo, Lyndy Blue Duo; 1 p.m., $5. Local Rock Showcase; 5-10 p.m., $12. ST. JAMES UNITED METHODIST CHURCH CARSON HALL: Raleigh Flute Choir Concert; 7 p.m., donations.

MON, APR 23

CAT’S CRADLE (BACK ROOM): Durand Jones & the Indications, Holy Ghost Tent Revival; 8:30 p.m., $13–$15. See page 34. KINGS:

Hovvdy

[$10–$12/8:30 P.M.] Hovvdy (“Howdy”) is one of the more recent additions to Brooklyn-based Double Double Whammy, which is already home to lauded indie pop acts Frankie Cosmos and LVL UP. Hovvdy bear the sonic and thematic marks of their label mates: their melodies are delivered in murmurs; songs are set in parking lots with friends, or in cars with friends; and earnestness is prioritized. Perhaps above all else, Hovvdy strives to convey intimacy, which they achieve via melodious, hushed vocals, lo-fi production, and slow guitar strumming. With Truth Club and Real Dad. —Noah Rawlings LOCAL 506: Wreckless Eric, Reese McHenry; 8 p.m., $10–$12. MOTORCO: Flash Chorus; 7 p.m., $7–$10. THE PINHOOK: Mama Played Mondays; 7 p.m., free. RUBY DELUXE: DJ Lord Redbyrd; 10 p.m.

TUE, APR 24 CAT’S CRADLE: The Maine, The Wrecks, The Technicolors; 7:30 p.m., $23–$25. LOCAL 506: Stronger Sex, Blueberry; 9 p.m., $7. PNC ARENA:

Bon Jovi

Weaves performs Thursday night at the Cat’s Cradle Back Room. PHOTO COURTESY OF BEESWAX BOOKING

part of a decade, the man born Jon Bongiovi had been trying to get his semieponymous band enshrined, and the boomer rocker’s well-documented bitterness seeped into This House Is Not for Sale, the band’s joyless and monochrome 2016 record. Now that Bon Jovi’s settled his self-styled score, can we go back to pretending his band doesn’t exist until “Livin’ on a Prayer” comes on when we’re hammered at karaoke night? —Patrick Wall

WED, APR 25 BLUE NOTE GRILL:

Walter Trout [$20–$25/8 P.M.]

In 2014, bluesman Walter Trout feared he wouldn’t be able to wake up another morning. But a liver transplant saved him, his power and glory restored the following year on 2015’s Battle Scars. For last year’s We’re All in This Together, Trout recruited fourteen blues

powerhouse friends—including John Mayall, Edgar Wineter, Warren Haynes, and Sonny Landreth—to celebrate his comeback. Criticised for playing torrents of notes when a few would suffice, Trout once replied “if you mean every note, why not play ten thousand?” —Grant Britt HUMBLE PIE: Sidecar Social Club; 8:30 p.m., free. THE KRAKEN: Shake Sugaree Americana Residency with Jonathan Byrd & Friends; 7-10 p.m., free.

[$26–$151/6:30 P.M.] Bon Jovi—the most enduring of the aggressive arena rock bands that dominated the airwaves in the eighties—was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame over the weekend. For the better

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4.18 – 4.25

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FRIDAY, APRIL 20

LONG EXPOSURE OPENING Art in the Heart of Hillsborough: Juried local art show with art vendors, live music, beer, and food trucks. Sat, Apr 21, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Alexander Dickson House, Hillsborough. www.historichillsborough.org. SPECIAL ARTFOR(US): Black EVENT on Black Project and Artspace present new work by Sherrill Roland. Thru May 12. Community conversation: Sat, Apr 21, 4 p.m. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. Bodies: 35mm film photography. Fri, Apr 20, 5-10 p.m. Dogstar Tattoo, Durham. www.dogstartattoo.com. DIY Fest: Local artists, makers, and zero-waste organizations. Kids’ activities, live demonstrations, handmade items, environmental presentations, music. Sat, Apr 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Scrap Exchange, Durham. www.scrapexchange.org. We See The Change: The Human Cost of a Warming Climate: Photographer James Robinson reception and artist talk. Fri, Apr 20, 5-8 p.m. Power Plant Gallery, Durham. Trees by Three: Carved wood by Larry Favorite, glass art by Susan Hope, and paintings by Ellie Reinhold. Apr 23-May 20. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. www.hillsboroughgallery.com. What Is Good Art?: Student artwork about ethics. Mon, Apr 23, 5:30-7 p.m. Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University, Durham.

ONGOING After Golden Leaf: One of Durham’s many contradictions is that even though half the buildings have “tobacco” in the name, you can’t smoke anywhere. In After Golden 40 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, an experimental philosophy of hotel life. The result is Thelen’s own Hotel Theory. Consisting of drawings, collages, wall paintings, and a new fiber piece, the exhibit tracks an artist “immersed in the colors and textures of the Oaxacan landscape and facing middle age” as he observes the lines of history, place, and personal identity from a rented room, a space (like middle age) that, in its nowhere-ness, offers fresh vantages. Thru Jun 1. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. www.21cmuseumhotels.com/ durham. —Brian Howe

Leaf, his thesis exhibit for Duke’s graduate program in experimental and documentary arts, photojournalist and documentarian Jeremy M. Lange turns his incisive lens and striking compositions on the shades of tobacco-industry history as they linger in an increasingly technologized and smoke-free city. The photos in the series sweep up the history of tobacco farming, the forging and dispersal of the communities that grew around it, the evolving landscape of North Carolina after big tobacco, and broader issues of discloation and memory in the post-industrial U.S. Thru May 4. SPECTRE Arts, Durham. spectrearts.org. —Brian Howe The Art of War: Art about contemporary military experience by Trish Brownlee, Alicia Dietz, and Folleh Tamba. Thru May 12. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. LAST Art to Live By: CHANCE Paintings by Michael Banks. Thru Apr 22. Alexander Dickson House, Hillsborough. www.historichillsborough.org. Elizabeth Bradford: Paintings. Thru Jul 31. Umstead Hotel & Spa, Cary. theumstead.com. LAST Between Dirt and CHANCE Sky: North Carolina sculptor Thomas Sayre (you might have caught his exhibit White Gold at CAM Raleigh in 2016) is nationally renowned for his large-scale outdoor sculptures, but you can get a more intimate look in this small gallery show, featuring mixedmedia works inspired by the cotton fields and farm buildings of the rural South as well as Sayre’s iconic earthcasts. Thru Apr 21. Craven Allen Gallery, Durham. cravenallengallery.com. —Brian Howe Business as Usual: Reviewed on p. 28. Thru Jul 1. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu.

Jim Lee: Images from DSLR cameras, flatbed scanners, cyanotypes, and other alternative processes. Thru Apr 29. Horace Williams House, Chapel Hill. chapelhillpreservation.com.

Gregg Kemp: “Rumor of a Tumor” PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CARRACK The blink-length interplay of light and time that creates a photograph is slowed to a dreamlike pace in pinhole photography, a lens-less method with ancient origins in which a small hole inverts an image inside a light-proof box. Searing an exposure onto film, it can capture elongated motion with an eerie depth of field. This show at the Carrack is anchored by a mini-retrospective of the pinhole photography of the late Gregg Kemp, Durham’s faithful chronicler of the sun, the moon, and other bodies in space, who cofounded World Pinhole Day (April 29, when this show closes). It also features pinhole work by MJ Sharp, Lisa McCarty, Dale Rio, Jon Twietmeyer, Kat Heller, and Luke Simmers. The exhibit’s organizers, Twietmeyer and INDY contributor Chris Vitiello, want to highlight pinhole photography’s accessibility as well as its strange beauty; you can try your hand in a temporary darkroom in the gallery from 1 to 3:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday in April. Go ahead, blink. You won’t miss it. —Brian Howe

THE CARRACK MODERN ART, DURHAM | 6–9 p.m., free, www.thecarrack.org Celebrating Nature: Botanical drawings by Preston Montague, wildlife photography by Ricky Davis, and pottery by Liz Kelly. Thru May 26. Horse & Buggy Press and Friends, Durham. horseandbuggypress.com. Changing Worlds Earth Month Exhibit: Pleiades artists respond to the beauty of the environment and our need to protect it. Also featured is New Orleans environmental

artist Ana Berta Hernandez. Thru Apr 29. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. PleiadesArtDurham.com. Earth Consciousness and Cultural Revelations: Mixed media artist Alyssa Hinton. Thru Apr 29. The Community Church of Chapel Hill Unitarian Universalist, Chapel Hill. Faith in Color: A Photographic Exploration of Race, Religion,

and America in Tribute to C. Eric Lincoln: Documentary photography by Evan Nicole Bell. Thru May 1. Duke Campus: Duke Chapel, Durham. Hotel Theory: Around the time he stepped away from his twenty-year tenure as founding director of Raleigh gallery Lump, Bill Thelen struck out for an artist residency in a hotel in Oaxaca. He brought two books with him, Huysmans’s decadent Against Nature and

Low Relief | Sensitive Situation: There’s been a changing of the guard at Lump, Raleigh’s best gallery for weird art, with Kelly McChesney handing over the directorship to April Childers. To get a sense of the perspective Childers will bring to the gallery, you could hardly do better than to check out her show (which was booked by McChesney before the leadership change), Sensitive Situation. Childers’s work integrates objects and images from pop culture and her personal life to shatter and rebuild the context of the everyday. Her show opens alongside one by Maria Britton, Childers’s partner in the itinerant LOG (Low Occupancy Gallery) project; Britton’s work in Low Relief blends painting, sewing, and sculpture to probe “femininity and feminism, high and low forms of art making, and dreams and disasters.” Thru Apr 28. Lump, Raleigh. lumpprojects.org. —Brian Howe


SPECIAL The Marriage of EVENT Paint and Collage: Mixed media by Bernice Koff. Thru May 10. Reception: Fri, Apr 20, 6 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org.

LAST Rock, Paper, Scissors: CHANCE Jewelry by Arianna Bara, fiber art by Ali Givens, and sculpture by Lynn Wartski. Thru Apr 22. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. www.hillsboroughgallery.com.

Mentor/Mentee: Lope Max Diaz & Luke Miller Buchanan: Lee Hansley Gallery celebrates twenty-five years in a Raleigh with, appropriately enough, an exhibit celebrating lineage. Luke Miller Buchanan studied with Lope Max Diaz at N.C. State’s College of Design. Putting their paintings side by side shows how the elder’s striking geometric designs influenced but found softer, more sinuous expression in the canvases of the younger artist. Thru May 27. Lee Hansley, Raleigh. leehansleygallery. com. —Brian Howe

Sentience: Paintings and drawings by Adam Cohen. Thru May 25. National Humanities Center, Durham. nationalhumanitiescenter.org.

Red Summer: Wendell A. White’s large-scale prints combining contemporary landscape portraits and historic newspaper accounts. Thru Jun 2. Duke Campus: Center for Documentary Studies, Durham. www.cdsporch.org.

The Shape of Fashion: Dress trends from 1800s to 1900s. Thru May 6. NC Museum of History, Raleigh. www.ncmuseumofhistory.org. Snippets: Paintings by David Molesky. Thru Aug 15. Gallery A, Raleigh. www.gallerya-nc.com. Solidary & Solitary: The Joyner/Giuffrida Collection: The most famed names in postwar abstract art— Mondrian, de Kooning, Pollock, Rothko—had very different ways of pushing painting past representation. They also had something in common: all were white. Of course, it isn’t that African Americans

weren’t making vital contributions to the course of art history; it’s that the white male canon-makers didn’t as readily embrace them. This touring exhibit at the Nasher is a spectacular corrective, highlighting the Africandiaspora abstract artists who refined this new way of seeing. They range from midtwentieth-century Abstract Expressionist Norman Lewis to contemporary iconoclasts such as Theaster Gates and Mark Bradford, whose twentyfive-foot-tall sculpture anchors the exhibit. Thru Jul 15. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher. duke.edu. —Brian Howe Spring Corridor Exhibition: Anna Vaughn Creech, King Nobuyoshi Godwin, Constance Pappalardo, and Sandra Wimbish. Thru Apr 28. Artspace, Raleigh. www.artspacenc.org. Step Right Up: Sculpture by Patrick Dougherty. Thru Aug 31. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. www.ackland.org.

The SuperNatural: We’ve lost sight of the seams, once considered inviolable, between nature, technology, and commerce. The SuperNatural explores how we see and shape the contours of our planet as the physical refuse of the industrial age shades into the digital refuse of the present. The show includes a generative digital video by Tabor Robak, a virtual reality installation by Jakob Kudsk Steensen, and photos by Lars Jan, among many others. Brooklyn artist Chris Doyle created “Dreams of Infinite Luster,” a digital animation. In it, “All the elements are rendered in gold, the color of lucre—the product, engine, and goal of capitalism.” Is a luxury hotel an odd site for post-capitalist critique? Sure. But, as we’ve said, what seams? Thru Jul 1. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. www.21cmuseumhotels. com/durham. —Brian Howe LAST Tenth Annual Small CHANCE Treasures Juried Exhibit: Juried by Bob Rankin. Thru Apr 21.

Cary Gallery of Artists, Cary. www.carygalleryofartists.org. Three Quilts: Fiber art by Martha Clippinger. Thru Aug 12. Durham Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org. SPECIAL Us & Them: Portrait EVENT paintings by William Paul Thomas. Thru May 10. Reception: Fri, Apr 20, 6 p.m. Durham Arts Council, Durham. www.durhamarts.org. Emily Eve Weinstein: Oil paintings and monoprints on handmade paper of scenes from Penland School of Crafts. Thru Apr 30. North Carolina Crafts Gallery, Carrboro. The Wild: Leah Sobsey, Joy Meyer, and Jeff Whetstone videos in downtown Raleigh’s Market Plaza. Thru Jun 27. BLOCK2 Video Series, Raleigh. Youth in Focus: Photographic quilts by the Corner Teen Center. Thru May 15. Carrboro Branch Library, Carrboro. www.co.orange.nc.us/library/ carrboro.

food Cooking the Books with Jeffery Deaver: Flyleaf Books, Al’s Burger Shack, and Mel’s Commissary present guest chef Seth Kingsbury of Pazzo Restaurant with author Jeffery Deaver. $100. Thu, Apr 19, 7-10 p.m. Mel’s Commissary, Carrboro. melscarrboro.com. Holly Springs Indoor Farmers Market: Sat, Apr 21, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Holly Springs Cultural Center, Holly Springs. www.hollyspringsnc.us. Rodeo on Rosemary: Spring food truck rodeo on Rosemary Street between Henderson and North Columbia. Sun, Apr 22, noon-4 p.m. Downtown Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill. Shojin Ryori Omakase: Omakase (chef’s tasting menu) meal. Wed, Apr 25, 5:30-9 p.m. Dashi, Durham.

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WEDDING GUIDE

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THE MEMBER OF THE WEDDING

Thirteen is a dangerous age for you, Frankie. You’ve far outgrown the smaller “left-over” kids. The older ones, who tell those “nasty lies” about what married folks do together, don’t want you around. Your older brother, Jarvis, has his fiancée, the beautiful Janice, and they’ll be married in two days’ time. Even Berenice, the cook and nanny, has her beau, T.T. But you? You’re precocious, bright, and lonesome enough to realize you have no one. Already, you somehow know a boyfriend’s not the answer for you. This disturbs you even more. Right now, you’re thinking Jarvis and Janice will be your grounding group—“the ‘we’ of me,” you’ve started calling them—and that they’re somehow going to take you away with them when they marry. Frankie, you’re about to get hurt. And we’re not going to be able to look away when you do. Star Pocket Theatre’s inaugural production stars Mackie Raymond in the title role of Carson McCullers’s classic 1950 drama. —Byron Woods

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For Colored Girls Who Have O ADVERTISING@INDYWEEK.COM PENING Considered Suicide/When the Assassins: Musical by Stephen Sondheim. $5-$15. Apr 19-22. William Peace University: Kenan Recital Hall, Raleigh. www.peace.edu. Comedy’s Best Kept Secret Tour: Dan Frigolette, Adam Gabel, Mia Faith Hammond, and special guests. $8-$10. Mon, Apr 23 & Tue, Apr 24, 8 p.m. Raleighwood Cinema Grill, Raleigh. raleighwoodmovies.com. Community Dance Concert: North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics Dance Ensemble. Sat, Apr 21, 7 p.m. Kathy, 1219 Broad Street.

Rainbow is Enuf: Presented by Justice Theater Project. Directed by Kyma Lassiter. $10-$15. Sat, Apr 21, 2 & 7 p.m. & Sun, Apr 22, 3 p.m. St Augustine’s University: Seby Jones Gallery, Raleigh. www.st-aug.edu. Hand To God: Play. $18-$24. Thru May 6. Theatre In The Park, Raleigh. www.theatreinthepark.com.

High Tea: A Succubus Sorority Showcase: Fire, fetish, and circus arts; burlesque and sideshow. $5. Thu, Apr 19, 8:30 p.m. The View at Legends, Raleigh. legends-club.com.

The Member of the Wedding: Inaugural production by Star Pocket Theatre. $15. Thru Apr 30. Visual Art Exchange, Raleigh. visualartexchange.org. Past Present: Transactors Improv show about how childhood and adulthood are linked. $10-$15. Sat, Apr 21, 8 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www.artscenterlive.org. Proof: Forest Moon Theater. $13-$18. Fri, Apr 20-Sun, Apr 29. Wake Forest Community House, Wake Forest. ShakesBEER II: The Bard Strikes Back: Shakespeare performed in bars across the Triangle. Free. Sun, Apr 22-Thu, May 3. Various venues. See p. 35.


Shaping Sounds: North Carolina Youth Tap Ensemble. $10-$15. Apr 21-22, 7:30 p.m. & Apr 22, 3 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. www.carolinatheatre.org. SITES: Loren Groenendaal: Sitespecific performance at Chicken Bone Park. Fri, Apr 20 & Sun, Apr 22, 6-8 p.m. Parrish Street Studios, Durham. SITES: Nick Africano: Sitespecific performance. $10 suggested. Thu, Apr 19, 8 p.m.midnight. Arcana, Durham. www.arcanadurham.com. Where Did We Sit on the Bus?: Brian Quijada’s off-Broadway one-man show examining what it means to be Latino in America. $15+. Apr 25-29. PlayMakers Repertory Company, Chapel Hill. www.playmakersrep.org.

ONGOING Adventure Road: A Story of Huck and Tom: Original adaptation of Mark Twain’s book with audience participation. $10-$15. Thru Apr 30. Kennedy Theater, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com/ venue/kennedy-theatre. Anything Goes Late Show: Saturdays, 10:30 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Bright Star: Don’t let the supposed simplicity of old-time music fool you; its composers only get there after they’ve whittled away everything inessential. What remains

is spare, direct, distilled, its emotional impact magnified. Comedian, playwright, and banjo picker Steve Martin and songwriter Edie Brickell’s 2016 Appalachian-based musical stemmed from their two albums of new folk music. It would be hard to imagine source material less likely for a Broadway project: roots-based ballads, reels, and anything-butshowtunes wrapped around a small-town World War II vet’s dreams of literary achievement, his move to the (comparatively) big city of Asheville, and the impact it ultimately has on a prominent editor. New York didn’t know what to make of it; despite a favorable review from The New York Times, the show closed after four months on Broadway. The touring production deserves a better reception here, closer to the sources of its improbable tale. $21-$45. Thru Apr 22. Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh. www. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. — Byron Woods Chicago: Musical presented by Hoof ‘n’ Horn. $10-$15. Thru Apr 22. Rubenstein Arts Center von der Heyden Studio Theater, Durham.

Harvey: Comedy by Elwood Dowd. $23. Thru Apr 22. NCSU Campus: Titmus Theatre, Raleigh. The House of Coxx Amateur Drag Competition: With Vivica C. Coxx. $10. Sat, Apr 21, 9 p.m. The Pinhook, Durham. www.thepinhook.com. Hush Hush: Audience confession comedy show. Wednesdays, 8 p.m. Thru Apr 25. Fullsteam, Durham. www.fullsteam.ag. The Improv Percolator Presents the April Showers Show: Featuring Danny Canoe, Get Off My Lawn, The Tami Taylors, and host Will Purpura. $12. Fri, Apr 20, 8 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. www.artscenterlive.org. Improv at the Varsity: Stand-up, sketch, and improv comedy. $6. Saturdays, 9:30 p.m. Varsity Theatre, Chapel Hill. improvatthevarsity.com. ½ King Charles III: Reviewed on p. 32. $15-$25. Burning Coal Theatre at the Murphey School, Raleigh. www.burningcoal.org.

The Dangling Loafer: $5. Third Fridays, 8 p.m. Kings, Raleigh. www.kingsraleigh.com.

½ Leaving Eden: Reviewed at indyweek. com. PlayMakers Repertory Company, Chapel Hill. www.playmakersrep.org.

The Harry Show: Ages 18+. Potentially risque games improv games with audience volunteers. $10. Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m. ComedyWorx, Raleigh. www.comedyworx.com.

Marie Antoinette: Play by David Adjmi. Presented by Meredith College Theatre. $5-$10. Thru Apr 22. Meredith College: Studio Theatre, Raleigh. meredith.edu.

Ben Apple and Lucius Robinson as Harry and William in the Burning Coal Theatre Company production of Mike Bartlett’s King Charles III (read our review on p. 32). PHOTO BY MINA VON FEILITZSCH PHOTOGRAPHY

INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 43


page READINGS & SIGNINGS American Sign Language Storytime: All-ages. With students from the Carolina Friends School. Thu, Apr 19, 10:45 a.m. Orange County Main Library, Hillsborough. www.co.orange.nc.us/library. Bridgefest Poetry: Heron Clan poets and open mike at Bridgefest. Sat, Apr 21, noon3 p.m. Bynum General Store, Bynum. bynumfrontporch.org. Anne Keene: With nonfiction book Cloudbuster Nine: The Untold Story of Ted Williams and the Baseball Team that Helped Win WWII. Sun, Apr 22, 3 p.m. Chapel Hill Public Library, Chapel Hill. chapelhillpubliclibrary.org.

screen

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

HAVEN KIMMEL Poems from the Heron Clan: Poems from the Heron Clan anthology poets and open mike. Thu, Apr 19, 6-9 p.m. The Oasis at Carr Mill, Carrboro. www.oasisatcarrmill.com. Meg Wolitzer: See story, p. 30. Sun, Apr 22, 2 p.m. Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill. www.flyleafbooks.com.

LECTURES ETC. All Deliberate Speed: School Resegregation in the South: Town hall discussion. Thu, Apr 19, 7 p.m. UNC Friday Center, Chapel Hill. fridaycenter.unc.edu. Tonya Armstrong: Psychologist and author of Blossoming Hope: The Black Christian Woman’s Guide to Mental Health and Wellness. Sat, Apr 21, 3 p.m. South Regional Library, Durham. www.durhamcountylibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

LITTLE PINK HOUSE Before its national release, Courtney Balaker’s feature film Little Pink House gets a one-night-only screening in the Triangle. Starring Catherine Keener and Jeanne Tripplehorn, the film is an adaptation of Jeff Benedict’s book Little Pink House: A True Story of Defiance and Courage. It’s based on the true story of Susette Kelo (Keener), an EMT who escapes from a bad marriage and then refurbishes her own cottage in New London, Connecticut, only for it to be seized by eminent domain to make way for private development at the whim of pharmaceutical giant Pfizer. Kelo rallies the neighborhood to fight the state government and the corporation all the way to the Supreme Court. Check out the Boston Globe review if you want a spoiler; otherwise, just know that this was a pivotal decision in the balance of home owners’ rights. —Brian Howe

RALEIGH GRANDE 16, RALEIGH 7:30 p.m., $12, www.cinemark.com/north-carolina/ cinemark-raleigh-grande 44 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

Be the Ultimate You: Workshop with entrepreneur, workshop clinician, and motivational speaker S. Bernard Mitchell. $15-$20. Sat, Apr 21, 2 p.m. Prince Hall Masonic Lodge, Raleigh.

To celebrate National Poetry Month, as part of its Faith and Arts series, St. Matthews Episcopal Church selected local favorite Haven Kimmel. That makes sense in a lot of ways: Kimmel’s varied output for adults and kids comes from a background that includes attending seminary as well as studying literature; she’s someone who has called “every minute of every day … a metaphor of God.” But in another way, it’s a surprising choice, as Kimmel is better known for best-selling memoirs (A Girl Named Zippy: Growing up Small in Mooreland, Indiana) and novels (The Solace of Leaving Early) about small-town life than she is for verse. Still, in many interviews, she has discussed poetry being her first love, so it should be interesting to hear what she has in store. —Zack Smith

The Monument Debate: Where We’ve Been, Where We Can Go: Blair L. M. Kelley (History, North Carolina State University) and Robin Kirk (Human Rights, Duke University). Thu, Apr 19, noon. Franklin Humanities Institute, Durham. fhi.duke.edu. National DNA Day: The DNA of Durham: Panel of scientists and clinicians from Duke University and Durham discuss their work. Wed, Apr 25, 7 p.m. Motorco Music Hall, Durham. motorcomusic.com.

ST. MATTHEWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH, HILLSBOROUGH

3 p.m., free, stmatthewshillsborough.org

SPECIAL SHOWINGS Aftermath: Premiere of film by students in the UNC School of Media and Journalism’s Documentary Multimedia Storytelling course about Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. Mon, Apr 23, 6:30 p.m. UNC Campus: FedEx Global Education Center, Chapel Hill. www.global.unc.edu. Loving Lampposts: Autism documentary followed by discussion. Sat, Apr 21, 2 p.m. Chapel Hill Public Library.

OPENING Final Portrait—Stanley Tucci wrote and directed this film about the friendship between critic James Lord and painter Alberto Giacometti (Geoffrey Rush). Rated R. ½ Foxtrot—Samuel Maoz’s gorgeous, tragic film asks what happens when a society (in this case, Israel) believes itself to be under siege for generations. Rated R.

I Feel Pretty—In this Amy Schumer-led comedy, an unconfident woman’s personality is turned upside down by a fall. Rated PG-13.

 Isle of Dogs—Wes Anderson’s animated fable is alternately respectful and baffling in its treatment of Japan. Rated PG-13.

Super Troopers 2—The Broken Lizard comedy team’s modern cult classic about inept state troopers gets a sequel. Rated R.

 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle—You’d need a lot of nineties nostalgia to see this reboot as anything but a generic jungle adventure. Rated PG-13.

N OW P L AY I N G The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Read reviews of these films at indyweek.com.  Black Panther— Marvel’s Afrofuturist breakthrough shows what black writers, actors, and characters can do with center stage. Rated PG-13.  Coco—This Day of the Dead-themed animated fantasy has one of Pixar’s richest worlds and weakest stories. Rated PG. ½ Darkest Hour— This Churchill biopic is bright and slight, but Gary Oldman turns in a tour de force performance as the UK’s iconic wartime prime minister. Rated PG-13.

½ The Post— Spielberg’s film about The Washington Post and the Pentagon Papers is a filmmaking master class and an ode to the free press. Rated PG-13.  The Shape of Water— Guillermo del Toro’s fable of the love between a mute janitor and a strange undersea creature is like a children’s book for adults, beautiful but morally simplistic. Rated R.  A Wrinkle in Time— Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of the classic novel is bold and messy, but with its diverse cast, it could be a touchstone for today’s twelve-year-olds. Rated PG.


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body • mind • spirit for sale holistic health TAI CHI Traditional art of meditative movement for health, energy, relaxation, self-defense. Classes/workshops throughout the Triangle. Magic Tortoise School - Since 1979. Call Jay or Kathleen, 919-968-3936 or www.magictortoise.com

massage FULL BODY MASSAGE by a Male Russian Massage Therapist with strong and gentle hands to make you feel good from head to toe. Schedule an appointment with Pavel Sapojnikov, NC LMBT. #1184. Call:919-790-9750

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TAX SEIZURE AUCTION Saturday, April 28 @10am, 201 S. Central Ave., Locust, NC. Selling Seized Property for NC Department of Revenue due to Unpaid Taxes. 2007 Lexus RX350, 1984 Corvette, 1971 Airstream, 1963 Ford Galaxie, other Vans, SUVs, Trucks, New Tools. 704-791-8825 ncaf5479 www.ClassicAuctions.com

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INDUSTRIAL AUCTION Saturday, April 21 @10am. 534 Jane Sowers Road, Statesville, NC. (2)53’ Tractor Trailer Loads Full of Hardware & Tools from Grainger. From Forklift to Electric Motors! Also, Assets from Cabinet Manufacturing Business. See website 704-791-8825 ncaf5479 www.ClassicAuctions.com

CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

Beyond Fences seeks plastic or igloo style dog houses for dogs in need, as well as indoor metal crates. To donate, please contact Amanda at director@unchaindogs.net.

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housing

Open House 2-5 PM, Sat 4/21 and Sun 4/22. 3230 Preacher Holmes Rd., Graham, NC. Unique 11 acre estate on Southwick Golf Course. Beautiful Custom 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 3544 sq. ft. home with 3 acre lawn overlooking pond, featuring estate fence with double gate entrance to golf course. 3-car Attached Garage, 3-car Detached Garage/ Workshop, Garden house, Carport, and Many Extras. $730,000. See Youtube ìGrining Estate.î For information or private showing Contact 919-819-4350.

TWO REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS-SALE A: HopeTree Retreat and Conference Center (Bedford County, VA). 84+/-Acres Offered in 5 Tracts. 2494 Camp Jaycee Road, Blue Ridge, VA 24064. Wednesday, May 9, 2PM (On-site). SALE B: Glory Road Retreat and Activity Center (Henry County, VA). 87+/-Acres Offered in 6 Tracts. 312 Glory Road, Axton, VA 24054. Thursday, May 10, 2PM (On-site). LOW MINIMUMSIDEAL FOR MULTIPLE USESTAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS OPPORTUNITY, visit woltz.com or call Woltz & Associates, Inc. (VA#321), Real Estate Brokers & Auctioneers 800-551-3588.

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Raleigh • 919.790.9750 Book your ad • Email kim: classy@indywEEk.com

INDYweek.com | 4.18.18 | 45


crossword If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “Diversions” at the bottom of our webpage.

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• Email kim: classy@indywEEk.com


Bolinwood Condominiums Affordability without compromise

Convenient to UNC on N bus line 2 & 3 bedroom condominiums for lease

www.bolinwoodcondos.com • 919-942-7806

To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com

To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com

last week's puzzle

YOUR WEEK. EVERY WEDNESDAY.

To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com

To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com

To advertise or feature a pet for adoption, please contact advertising@indyweek.com

Book your ad • Email kim: classy@indywEEk.com

MUSIC•NEWS•ARTS•FOOD INDYWEEK.COM INDYweek.com| |4.18.18 4.18.18| |47 47 INDYweek.com


DANCE CLASSES IN SWING, LINDY, BLUES, TAI CHI

At ArtsCenter, Carrboro. Private lessons also available. RICHARD BADU, 919-724-1421, rbadudance@gmail.com

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SPECIAL TREATS

Spring Art Gala, April 27-chocolate tasting, live music Details at FB:specialstreatschapelhill

YOU DESERVE TO LOOK AND SOUND FANTASTIC! WWW.LAURECEWESTSTUDIOS.COM

Weekly deadline 4pm Monday • classy@indyweek.com

IN HONOR OF EARTH DAY 2018 ORANGE COUNTY SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT RECOGNIZES THE HUNDREDS OF BUSINESSES RECYCLING ALL ACROSS THE COUNTY. THROUGH YOUR EFFORTS, THOUSANDS OF TONS OF CANS, BOTTLES, PAPER, CARDBOARD AND OTHER MATERIALS ARE TURNED INTO NEW PRODUCTS EACH YEAR. THESE LOCALLY GENERATED RESOURCES CREATE WEALTH AND JOBS, CONSERVE NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENERGY, SAVE LANDFILL SPACE AND REDUCE POLLUTION. THE SIMPLE DAILY ACTS OF RECYCLING AND REDUCING WASTE ARE MEANINGFUL TO OUR COMMUNITY AND PLANETARY WELL-BEING. THANKS TO ALL THE BUSINESSES AND EMPLOYEES WHO TAKE TIME EVERY DAY TO DO THEIR PART.

(AND REMEMBER – NO TRASH OR PLASTIC BAGS IN THE RECYCLING CARTS EVER!)

ORANGE COUNTY SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT (919) 968-2788 • RECYCLING@ORANGECOUNTYNC.GOV • WWW.ORANGECOUNTYNC.GOV/RECYCLING

48 | 4.18.18 | INDYweek.com

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