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RALEIGH 4|17|19

banned by facebook

Why doesn’t the world’s biggest social media platform want you to watch this politically charged music video? BY BRIAN HOWE, P.22

YOUNG IDEAS, OLD PROBLEMS P. 9

GO BIG, GO HOME, P. 10

THE INTERGALACTIC PATRIARCHY, P. 25


2 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com


WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK RALEIGH

VOL. 36, NO. 16

DEPARTMENTS

6 Property values in the census tract that includes Hayti have risen 133 percent since 2016.

6 News

8 A year ago, the average homeless family stayed at United Ministries of Durham’s downtown shelter for thirty-three days. Now? One hundred and sixteen days.

16 Food 18 Stage 22 Music

9 Raleigh’s youngest-ever mayor, Thomas Bradshaw Jr., was elected to a single term in 1971. Zainab Baloch is six years younger than he was.

25 Art 26 What to Do This Week

10 The tallest building in Raleigh is thirty-two stories. John Kane wants to go bigger.

28 Music Calendar 32 Arts & Culture Calendar

14 Ten minutes before a 911 call reporting a gas leak in downtown Durham, PS Splicing LLC called 811 to report damage to a gas line. 16 Every experienced pot smoker has had mundane foodstuffs elevated to giddy heights by a few preprandial puffs. But this was not “the munchies.” This was transcendental. 18 “The mounds of scrap, the way that everything falls into place, it already feels like art to me.” 22 The band SeepeopleS tried to promote the politically charged video for “New American Dream.” Facebook thought it was too political.

Michael O’Neill and Alexis Gideon in Out There, at CAM Raleigh April 22 (page 25) PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

On the cover

VIDEO STILL (DIR. PETE LIST) COURTESY OF SEEPEOPLES / ILLUSTRATION BY STEVE OLIVA

INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 3


4/17 MITSKI LD W/ JAY SOM SO OUT 4/18 TOM ODELL W/ LUCIE SILVAS 4/19 THE CHURCH ($25/$28) 4/20 THE DRIVER ERA W/ PUBLIC ($20/$23)

MO 5/13

TH 4/18

TOM ODELL

SA 4/20

THE DRIVER ERA

4/25 LAURA JANE GRACE & THE DEVOURING MOTHERS W/ MERCY UNION AND CONTROL TOP ($20 / $23) 4/26 "FRIENDS FEST": PEOPLE OF EARTH, LINNEY, DEX ROMWEBER, BBQ SAUCE 4/27 SARAH SHOOK & THE DISARMERS W/ JAKE XERXES FUSSELL ($15)

5/4 CRANK IT LOUD PRESENTS I DON'T KNOW HOW BUT THEY FOUND ME W/SUPERET

TELEKINESIS

6/12 REMO DRIVE W/ SLOW PULP, SLOW BULLET ($15/$18) 7/16 HOP ALONG ($17/$20) WE 5/1 @CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM

FR 4/19

THE CHURCH

STEVE GUNN

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KINGS (R AL)

LINCOLN THEATRE (RAL) FR 5/3

JUMP, LITTLE CHILDREN 4/17 THE WILD REEDS W/ VALLEY QUEEN ($14/$16) 4/18 TELEKINESIS W/ SONTALK ($13/$15) 4/19 CAROLINA JAMS SPRING SHOWCASE: JULIA., BARKER ROAD, MATTIE AND THE MASTERS 4/20 CARSIE BLANTON 7 PM SHOW 4/20 SEEPEOPLES W/ TRACKSUIT 10PM SHOW 4/21 VALLEY MAKER W/ TOMBERLIN ($12) 4/22 KOLARS ($12/$15) 4/24 THE BROOK & THE BLUFF W/ JAMIE DRAKE 4/25 ACID MOTHERS TEMPLE W/ YAMANTAKA // SONIC TITAN 4/26 BETA RADIO ($10/$12)

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8/1 DONAVON FRANKENREITER ($20/$24)

5/4 MARY LATTIMORE & MAC MCCAUGHAN W/ THE PAUL SWEST

8/7 MENZINGERS W/ THE SIDEKICKS, QUEEN OF JEANS

5/5 RUEN BROTHERS (10/$12)

8/8 NEUROSIS W/ BELL WITCH AND DEAF KIDS 8/27 ELECTRIC HOT TUNA W/ ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY ($45/$50)

5/6 PEDRO THE LION LD W/JOHN VANDERSLICE SO OUT 5/7 MURS W/ LOCKSMITH ($15/$17) 5/10 YARN

9/18 TINARIWEN ($30/$33)

5/11 JON SHAIN AND FJ VENTRE W/ ROD ABERNETHY ($12/$15)

10/1 MT JOY

5/14 DEAF HAVANA $12/$15)

10/6 BUILT TO SPILL - KEEP IT LIKE A SECRET TOUR ($28/$32) 10/23 OH SEES W/PRETTIEST EYES

7/29 WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS ‘THESE FOUR WALLS’ 10TH ANNIVERSARY W/ CATHOLIC 5/29 AN EVENING WITH CHARLIE PARR AND PHIL COOK

4/28 CHARLES LATHAM AND THE BORROWED BAND, SHANNON O'CONNOR, HEARTS GONE SOUTH ($7)

7/9 YEASAYER W/ STEADY HOLIDAY ($27/$30)

7/19 SUMMER SALT W/ DANTE ELEPHANTE, MOTEL RADIO

ACTION ($16/$18)

5/6 RIVERSIDE W/ CONTRIVE ($20/$25) 5/10 THE SCORE W/ LOSTBOYCROW, OVERSTREET

5/4 JOHN PAUL WHITE W/ERIN RAE ($25)

5/31 THE CONNELLS W/ LEISURE MCCORKLE ($20/$25)

5/5 JAPANESE BREAKFAST W/ EX HEX AND ETERNAL SUMMERS ($23/$25)

5/7ELI "PAPERBOY" REED($15/$18)

MOTORCO (DUR)

5/14 THANK YOU SCIENTIST W/KINDO AND IN THE PRESENCE OF WOLVES ($16.50/ $20)

TH 4/18 @CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM

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THE DRUMS

5/15 THE SUITCASE JUNKET ($10) 5/16 HENRY JAMISON W/SAINT SISTER ( $15) 5/17 MATTIEL ($10/$12)

5/21 TANK AND THE BANGAS W/ADIA VICTORIA ($20/$22) NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART

5/18 PILE W/ C.H.E.W. ($12/$15)

5/17 AN EVENING WITH DAWES

5/19 FILTHY FRIENDS W/ DRESSY BESSY

6/14 STEEP CANYON RANGERS WITH CHATHAM RABBITS

5/21 SHAME W/ DISQ ($14)

6/22 TRAMPLED BY TURTLES WITH DEER TICK

5/22 GHOST OF PAUL REVERE ($15) 5/23 MARTI JONES & DON DIXON W/ J.D. FOSTER ( $15) 5/24 SONS OF PARADISE, AFRICA UNPLUGGED, THE UP & UP ($10) 5/25 VIOLET BELL (FULL BAND) W/ LIBBY RODENBOUGH OF MIPSO AND TATIANA HARGREAVES ($8/$10) 5/31 THE SH-BOOMS ($12) 6/2 THE MYSTERY LIGHTS W/ FUTURE PUNX ($12/$14) 6/8 MATT ANDERSON W/ERIN COSTELLO ($15-$18) 6/12 EARTH W/HELMS ALEE ($15) 6/13 DYLAN LEBLANC ($12/$15) 6/14 EILEN JEWELL ($15/$18) 6/17 CULTURE ABUSE ($15/$18) 20 TH: JOSH ROUSE ($20) JULY 7: WAND W/ DREAMDECAY ($13/$15)

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backtalk

From the Rooftop

Last week, Leigh Tauss wrote about how Raleigh City Council member Stef Mendell was the only speaker at a Board of Adjustment meeting who voiced concerns about the noise potentially associated with a rooftop dining area atop Scott Crawford’s forthcoming Jolie bistro. Normally, the story pointed out, council members are discouraged from attending meetings of the city’s boards and commissions, but Mendell has a nearby condo that she rents out, so the rules didn’t apply to her. Ultimately, the BOA allowed Crawford’s dining area to go forward, albeit with some conditions, including that he build an eight-foot wall and not have any amplified music. “I don’t get people who want to live in a city but can’t deal with city noises,” writes Melanie Maybe. “Those French bistros get pretty rowdy,” adds Scott Dotson. And Elizabeth Wingfield: “Oakwood is full of crotchety old biddies who have nothing better to do than bitch.” Finally, Marcus A. Hutton: “Apparently the ethics of voting on an issue where there was obviously a huge conflict of interest for her didn’t faze her at all.” But Louis Stamm, who was at the BOA meeting and praised Crawford, says there’s more to it: “I live two houses behind Crawford and Son and would be one of the first affected by any late evening noise. I am also the resident liaison for the Person Street Partnership and Society for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood. Scott Crawford, Phillip Bernard [of the Person Street Partnership], myself, and other residents spoke and addressed our concerns during Person Street Partnership meetings prior to the February and March BOA meetings. I personally spoke to Eric Hodge via phone sometime in January about the residents’ concerns. “Prior to the BOA meeting in March, I happened to be sitting across the aisle from Stef Mendell and overheard her speaking to an attorney for Louis Cheery/Scott Crawford about her noise concerns. I introduced myself and told them that I would be speaking for approval of the variance and advised them of the prior conversations and discussions. As an owner, her concerns were legitimate, not unfounded, sincere,

“Oakwood is full of crotchety old biddies.” and the same as those of the residents who reside in the neighborhood. When we both spoke before the board, our acceptance was based on the conditions that were debated and discussed. City council member Corey Branch was not aware of any neighborhood concerns because all parties had in good faith been transparent and addressed issues and concerns together earlier. I did not bring this up at the BOA as there is a time limit for rebuttal. I mentioned that Scott Crawford had been a good neighbor because of his willingness to work with the residents and be open to discussion. There were several concerns from the residents, all addressed prior to the BOA.” Matthew Brown, the president of the Society for the Preservation of Historic Oakwood, argues that the outcome worked well for all parties: “Scott Crawford is indeed an excellent neighbor who has worked sincerely to address potential noise issues. Stef Mendell is an excellent city councilor who works hard to help businesses and residences coexist in harmony. Eric Hodge is an excellent city staffer. He received input from several neighbors, including our liaison Louis Stamm, and helped craft a good solution. The screening fence will not be ‘around the rooftop,’ but only on the east side, where residences are just across a driveway from the building. This is an example of the city government working as it should! (Yes, it took a while for Jolie to get its variances, but there were other issues beside potential noise.) Of course Branch never received any complaints. There has been no reason to complain! By way of background, there have been two other venues nearby that were so loud residents could not sleep at night! Scott Crawford and Stef Mendell and Eric Hodge and the nearby neighbors wanted to prevent a recurrence of those situations.” Want to see your name in bold? Email us at backtalk@indyweek.com, comment on indyweek.com or our Facebook page, or hit us up on Twitter: @indyweek. INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 5


indynews

Cracks in the Pavement

A HALF-CENTURY AGO, DURHAM CUT OFF HAYTI FROM DOWNTOWN. NOW, HAYTI LEADERS WANT TO RECONNECT THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD TO THE CITY’S CORE. BY ERIN WILLIAMS

Angela Lee, executive director of the Hayti Heritage Center

A

ngela Lee sits at her desk in the Hayti Heritage Center on Old Fayetteville Street. Through the window behind her, there’s a backdrop of cranes building apartments. To Lee, the center’s executive director, such projects don’t signal progress. They forewarn loss. After all, when she goes to work every day, she walks into the last remaining structure from historic Hayti. “When Hayti was a thriving community, along with Black Wall Street, we were all one,” Lee says. “There were houses and shops and commerce all the way from here to Parrish Street.” In 1970, as a part of the city’s Urban Renewal program, developers constructed 6 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

PHOTO BY BOB KARP

the Durham Freeway directly through the northeast part of the neighborhood. Urban Renewal displaced over four thousand families and five hundred businesses, and the freeway cut off Hayti from what’s now considered downtown Durham. City officials reneged on promises to replace the demolished buildings. The neighborhood has never recovered. Now, Lee and the Hayti Heritage Center are trying to reconnect the neighborhood to downtown—and bring the voices of Hayti residents into discussions about Durham’s future—by improving pedestrian access between the two. Using a $12,500 nonprofit grant, Lee plans to create a route from Hayti to the Black Wall Street Gardens

in the heart of downtown, and in the process do away with the false demarcation of N.C. 147 as the edge of the city’s urban center. “It will get people reenergized about their community to feel like they are not being rejected or disregarded by the city,” Lee says. “That has been a prevailing attitude because, well, we have been.” Hayti, wedged between Fayetteville Street and the Durham Freeway, began as a hub for freed slaves to settle after emancipation. By the early 1900s, it had grown so prosperous that W.E.B. Du Bois considered it a model for how black communities could thrive in the Jim Crow South. Today, housed in what was once Saint Joseph’s AME Church, the Heritage

Center stands tall, its steeple overlooking the Walgreens and the KFC across the busy five-lane road, lined with a cracked sidewalk void of pedestrians. It presides over a neighborhood of dilapidated buildings that house predominantly black residents, with an eviction notice rate nearly seven times Durham’s average. Lee is tired of watching development intrude on Hayti without incorporating the community itself. While the Heritage Center focuses on Hayti’s cultural significance, Lee has also advocated for longtime residents who have watched their community deteriorate as other parts of Durham thrive and who continue to be squeezed out as more condos go up and land values skyrocket. Lee points to Heritage Square, a shopping center down the street from the Heritage Center, which recently sold to a Texas developer for $12 million. “Do you think that that shopping center is going to remain a shopping center with small businesses?” she asks. “What ramifications does a purchase like that have? How will that impact Hayti?” Development in Hayti is inevitable. Durham is expected to add 160,000 new residents over the next quarter-century, and development has already begun to march south of the freeway. But while land values are rising rapidly—133 percent since 2016, according to a recent News & Observer analysis of the census tract that includes Hayti, which also includes some land north of N.C. 147—the median income for Hayti’s census tract is just over $18,000. Some residents whose families have been there for generations can no longer afford housing. According to DataWorks NC, 56 percent of the area’s residents are cost-burdened, which means that they pay more in rent than what is considered affordable based on their level of income. Hayti is one of twelve communities nationwide that were awarded a grant in 2019 through the nonprofit Safe Routes to


School National Partnership. The award provided a springboard for the Heritage Center to launch an initiative called Reconnecting Downtown: Restoring Hayti’s Connection to the Heart of Durham. With the grant, the Hayti Heritage Center will partner with Extra Terrestrial Projects—a nonprofit that promotes sustainable and equitable city infrastructure—as well as local developers, artists, and Hayti residents to plan a safe walking route along Fayetteville Street to the Black Wall Street Gardens on Parrish Street, which commemorates the African-American business community that flourished in Durham in the early twentieth century. Right now, it’s unsafe to walk almost anywhere in Hayti. Sidewalks are cracked and uneven, signage is lacking, and there are not nearly enough street lights, stoplights, or crosswalks. “People are going to be more reluctant to get out and move about freely, daytime or nighttime, when it is hazardous,” Lee says. A 2017 study in the Journal of Transportation Geography found that high-traffic volumes are a “known barrier to walking, bicycling, and access to transit, as well as a contributor to community severance and diminished social capital.” These high-volume roadways, the study found, were likely to be located near low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, as is the case here. “I am most concerned with Fayetteville Street,” says Tara Mei Smith, executive director of Extra Terrestrial Projects. “Because if you’ve ever tried to walk it, you’re like, ‘Am I trying to die?’” Hayti residents seeking to cross the freeway and access downtown without a car have but two options: Head west for a few blocks to Roxboro Street, or take Fayetteville. Residents have been advocating for improvements for decades. In 2005, a resident group put together the Historic Fayetteville Street Corridor Master Plan, a detailed study of infrastructure needs that sought to strengthen public safety initiatives, improve the corridor’s appearance and function, foster economic and small business development, increase homeownership, and make transportation enhancements. While the city has adopted some of the plan’s ideas, residents contend their neighborhood hasn’t gotten the same attention as others. “It is not that the [city] council doesn’t have the appetite for streetscape funding and streetscapes, for the other three gateways into downtown have all been funded, some more than once,” said Denise Hester, a member of the original 2005 Fayetteville Street Planning Group, at a city

council meeting last month. (The other gateways are Old Five Points, Ninth Street, and Angier-Driver.) “Not sharing our city’s booming prosperity by [investing in] infrastructure for Fayetteville Street, I fear, will only increase the growing economic divide that threatens our city’s future, and I think that divide is apparent to everyone in this room as it manifests itself in all kinds of unfortunate ways.” With the grant, Hayti residents can focus on improving their community and play an active role in assessing their community’s needs, the grant partners say. Smith and her team plan to engage residents in conceptualizing the most effective way to promote safety and accessibility. The goal is to complete the community assessment by September. Lee and Smith will eventually present their plan to the city’s departments of transportation and parks and recreation, with the hope that Hayti residents’ voices will be better incorporated into the city’s capital improvement plans for the area. “When we are thinking about new policy, it is really important to not repeat the mistakes of the past, and work to repair harm so that the descendants of the founders of our city can stay in place,” says Derrick Beasley, a local artist and consultant on the project. Willie Bigelow, a longtime resident of Hayti, remembers when the city tore down iconic institutions like the Biltmore Hotel and the Regal Theater, places the community built for itself in response to its exclusion from white institutions like The Carolina Theatre. “It’s like losing a friend from your childhood,” Bigelow says. “Now it appears that Durham is moving into the Hayti area instead of them adopting or connecting with Hayti.” The city has taken steps to preserve affordable housing in the area. Nearby, a third phase of mixed-income housing is planned for the city-backed Southside redevelopment on Lakewood Avenue. Over the next decade, the Durham Housing Authority plans to redevelop three of its properties in the area into mixed-income and, in some cases, mixed-use neighborhoods, including Fayette Place, a vacant property that sits near where Grant Street was bisected by the freeway. And earlier this year, Mayor Steve Schewel proposed a $95 million bond to fund all of this and more. “The city needs a new sense of urgency around implementing these equitable engagement strategies because once these things are built, we can’t go back, we can’t engage the community retroactively,” Beasley says. backtalk@indyweek.com

Last Wednesday, a gas-leak explosion near Brightleaf Square killed Kong Lee, the 61-year-old owner of Kaffeinate coffee shop, and injured 17 others. Buildings were destroyed, businesses closed, and lives were irreparably changed. If you’d like to help those affected, please join us in donating to a verified GoFundMe account benefiting the Durham Restaurant Workers Fund, Bull City Rebuilds, or the Lee Family Support fund. Thank you, Durham. Illustration by Patrick Norwood / Durham Bulls and proud Durham resident

INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 7


news

Permanent Solutions

WHY ARE PEOPLE STAYING THREE TIMES LONGER THAN THEY USED TO AT URBAN MINISTRIES OF DURHAM’S HOMELESS SHELTER? BY LEAH ABRAMS

T

declined last year to 792, compared with he average length of stay at Urban 826 in 2017. Ministries of Durham’s downtown UMD executive director Sheldon Mitchhomeless shelter has more than ell explained during an April 1 presentation tripled over the last fifteen months. In just over a year, UMD families went from staying an average of 33 days to 116; singles have increased their length of stay from 24 to 77 days. Joe Daly, UMD’s director of development, says the growing length of stay has to do with the shelter’s emphasis on the Housing First model, which focuses on finding clients stable housing and preventing further homelessness. With the city’s lack of affordable housing and the Durham Housing Authority’s long waitlist for Section 8 vouchers, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find a place for clients to live after they leave the shelter. “The Housing First model has also been adopted by the continuum of care in Durham—that’s a collection of public and private agencies and service providers helping to address homelessness as we see it in Durham,” Daly explains. “It’s really considered best practice at this point in terms of helping folks exit to permanent housing as quickly as possible.” Once a person experiencing Urban Ministries of Durham PHOTO BY STEVE OLIVA homelessness goes through this to the Durham County Board of Commiscontinuum of care, his or her total amount sioners that UMD clients often face mulof time in the system is tracked cumulatiple barriers to finding housing—little or tively. So if a UMD client leaves the shelno income, medical and mental health chalter but returns a few years later, each visit lenges, and criminal records that may bar counts toward the total length of stay. them from housing and voucher eligibility. On any given night in Durham, about 590 “As far as length-of-stay goes, we are people experience homelessness, whether definitely interested in getting those numthey are staying in a shelter, a car, or on bers to go in the other direction if posthe street. UMD offers 149 beds to men, sible, but there are just a lot of factors that women, and children, and it also keeps a are contributing to it,” Daly says. “Withreserve of 30 beds for cold winter nights. in the system, there are barriers to folks But the longer people stay in the shelter, getting housed: having the income to pay the fewer beds it has for new clients. As a for housing, the availability of vouchers, result, the number of people UMD served 8 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

landlords willing to take folks on, and even getting together the documents that they need to obtain that housing can literally take months.”

While long lengths of stay present challenges for other Durham shelters, including Families Moving Forward and the Durham Rescue Mission, neither has seen the sharp increase that’s occurred at UMD over the past year. Families Moving Forward, which serves families with children, tracks an average length of stay between 130 and 142 days, while the Durham Rescue Mission works with its clients for a much shorter amount of time: about 32 days. Daly thinks UMD’s spike might have something to do with the increasing amount of chronic homelessness it has seen

among clients over the past year. The most recent survey data shows that 31 percent of UMD’s residents are chronically homeless, meaning that they’ve been homeless for more than a year, or repeatedly over several years. “These folks are coming to us with more personal barriers and more of a difficult history to overcome in order to get them housed,” Daly says. “It’s tougher.” Given the state of the housing crisis in Durham, it may be difficult to prevent the sort of bottlenecking that UMD and other service providers are seeing. However, Daly thinks that a few of the city’s recent interventions are on the right track, including city-supported programs to help people expunge charges from their criminal records and to provide landlords with incentives to accept Section 8 vouchers. “But then we get back to the question of, well, we need more affordable housing,” Daly says. The city is ramping up its efforts, but it won’t be quick—or cheap. In his recent State of the City address, Mayor Steve Schewel proposed a $95 million affordable housing bond, which would build more than eighteen hundred affordable rental units, and, if passed, become the largest affordable housing bond in state history. Durham is also trying to prevent homelessness through eviction diversion, an effort to keep people out of shelters in the first place. Bringing the average length of stay down comes back to keeping people out of the cycle of chronic homelessness. For UMD staff, this is the goal. “Our hope is that once folks move on into that next step of their lives, they’re not ever having to return to stay with us within the walls of the shelter,” Daly says. backtalk@indyweek.com


news

Fresh Blood

RUNNING TO BE RALEIGH’S YOUNGEST MAYOR, TWENTY-SEVEN-YEAR-OLD ZAINAB BALOCH SAYS SHE’D OFFER “INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO OLD PROBLEMS”

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rowing up in North Raleigh, Zainab Baloch began volunteering at her local mosque in fifth grade, from there branching out to nonprofits and activism at N.C. State. She has a master’s degree in public administration from UNCChapel Hill but fashions herself more as a boots-on-the-ground organizer. She rides the bus from her Southeast Raleigh home to her job downtown at Even Responsible Finance, and she portrays herself as focused more on engaging with the community than climbing the political ladder. She did, however, run for Raleigh City Council in 2017, placing fifth in the freefor-all at-large race. This year, Baloch is mounting a long-shot bid for mayor, challenging the better known—and better financed—former city council member Mary-Ann Baldwin, former Wake County commissioner Caroline Sullivan, and Raleigh lawyer Charles Francis. The biggest difference between her and them: Baloch is twenty-seven years old, six years younger than Raleigh’s youngest mayor, Thomas Bradshaw Jr., who was elected to one term in 1971. (Baloch would also be the only Muslim and woman of color to serve as Raleigh mayor.) The INDY spoke with Baloch about her campaign last week. This interview has been edited for length and clarity, but you can listen to the entire conversation on INDYcast, the INDY’s podcast, which is available through Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. INDY: Why do you want to be mayor? ZAINAB BALOCH: I want to be Raleigh’s next mayor because I think our city can provide a platform for our future. We have a number of communities that are not represented right now in our city government. The lack of representation not only is preventing us from addressing those community needs, but it also keeps us from having innovative ideas to really bring about innovative solutions to old problems.

BY LEIGH TAUSS People are going to need places to live. You’re going to need a workforce. We’re seeing a shortage of workers downtown because they can’t afford to live near downtown, and people might not have transportation to get here because we don’t have the infrastructure. What about the city council’s new voluntary inclusionary zoning initiative to encourage developers to build affordable housing? It’s interesting because we’ve always pointed to the fact that [mandatory inclusionary zoning] is not allowed by the legislature. I feel like this is one of the issues, that we’re not looking at any other approaches. We’re just looking at what we know and what’s there. We’re not willing to take risks. But I personally just feel it’s not strong enough. It’s not strong enough, we’re not doing enough.

Zainab Baloch

COURTESY OF THE CANDIDATE

What got you into local politics? I never thought I'd be a politician. I've always been a community organizer. I went to a protest one day, and someone had suggested it, and I’d never thought about it. And I realized that the people who know the people on the ground are the ones who are able to make policies that represent them. It comes with the experience of talking to different community groups, different people of different races, religions, ethnicities, but also of different income levels, and understanding and being empathetic toward those issues and making policies that represent them. What policies would you make a priority? My platform focuses on mobility, security, and happiness. Raleigh has one of the worst upward mobility rates in the country. And what I truly believe in is the right to have that upward mobility. And that means you have the right to find a good job nearby. You have the right to have infrastructure that

gets you where you need to be, the right to thrive in your career choice. And then security, we see that right now, not all communities feel safe. And so under security, we are really talking about the right to find basic needs in your neighborhood. Southeast Raleigh is considered a food desert. What do you think of the affordable housing crisis in Raleigh? It seems like we’re building housing, but we’re not building any communities. Like we’re evaluating our impact just based on the number of units that we create versus [whether] we actually [impacted] a family’s life. When we talk about affordable housing, I think one thing is the terminology. We should really be talking about workforce housing, and what that looks like is a holistic approach versus just talking about income. We’re not creating enough housing for what we need. And with more people moving in, everyone who is moving in is not wealthy.

What would a different approach look like? First off, providing some type of incentives. But I also support creating mixed-use units and finding innovative ways to solve this problem. The first step is reaching out to people and figuring out what’s out there. Minneapolis just ended single-family zoning. That’s helping a lot right now. They’re the only council in the entire country to do that. [Single-family housing zoning] was put into place during segregation. So we as a city need to look at these policies that were put into place at a time that definitely wasn’t representative of everyone. And for us to continue using them is very clearly saying we don’t represent everyone. Most other candidates have held public office. What makes you qualified? I think that’s exactly what makes me qualified. Because right now, we have people in office who have the political experience. And I have experience in people. I have experience working with almost every type of community right now in Raleigh. And that brings unique experience. ltauss@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 9


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Raising Kane

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eveloper John Kane’s proposed forty-story skyscraper seems to check every box for Raleigh’s downtown growth and density plans. The three-acre lot at the intersection of Peace and Harrington Streets sits along a planned bus rapid transit line with no single-family housing nearby. The tower would be anchored by first-floor retail space and include a parking deck, offices, and more than four hundred residential units. It would loom over Capital Boulevard as the city’s tallest structure (the PNC building is thirty-two stories) and serve as a gateway to downtown. But that doesn’t mean the city council will go for it, says council member Kay Crowder—even if Kane agrees to include affordable units in the project. “They came and talked to me about it months ago, and I laughed,” Crowder says. “You always laugh when people ask for that much.” The proposal comes as the council considers making affordable housing a bargaining chip for developers in rezoning applications, and could be the initiative’s first big test. State law prevents Raleigh from mandating inclusionary zoning—i.e., forcing developers to include affordable units as a condition of building—but what Raleigh is considering would be voluntary, at least technically: If you want to rezone, you can boost your chances by volunteering to build affordable units. The city’s planning commission is reviewing Kane’s request to increase the height limit from twelve to forty stories, but the building hasn’t yet been designed, says Bonner Gaylord, a former council member and Kane’s managing director of operations. While Kane would like to include affordable units, Gaylord says, it’s difficult to make that promise as part of a rezoning application. Kane needs the city to approve his application before he can start the multimillion-dollar design process. That, in turn, has to happen before Kane can approach financial backers. Committing to an affordable component now, Gaylord says, could make it impossible to secure those financiers. “It’s hard to commit to affordable housing before you get financing,” Gaylord says. “It could be a poison pill for a project that we don’t know we’re taking, but down the road, it ends up killing the whole project.” Including affordable units could also drive up prices on the remaining units—“providing cheaper housing by making housing more expensive,” Gaylord says.

A forty-story project could have significant ramifications for utilities and traffic downtown, says planning commissioner (and former INDY columnist) Bob Geary. Adding an affordable component could be a way to mitigate those impacts, he says. “I do think this is an appropriate case where we can have affordable housing units offered as a condition of approval, that would help it a lot in my mind,” Geary says. “If you’re going to allow that many people to live at one location, they should be at varying income levels. We shouldn’t follow the market here exclusively.” Even so, he’s not sold yet on forty stories, and neither is Crowder. While Crowder insists the council won’t use voluntary affordability as a “hammer” to force a developer’s hand—courts would likely view that as illegal—she says the council could take affordable units into consideration, along with things like traffic enhancements and parking. “Forty stories is not a given,” Crowder says. “There would have to be a lot of community benefit for me to be open to forty stories where it is currently entitled to twelve.” “If the voluntary condition is adopted, it will be a big test,” says council member David Cox. “As far as it being a bargaining chip, I don’t know. We’re in new territory with this voluntary condition.” Kane isn’t the only developer eyeing high-density development in that part of downtown. Developer Bobby Lewis hopes to add a twenty-story hotel across the street from the new Publix on Peace Street, and another developer, whom Crowder declined to name, might ask for a forty-story rezoning just across Capital Boulevard from Kane’s project. The North Central Citizens Advisory Council backed Kane’s request in a 10–5 vote. “Really, it comes down to taking areas that are already designated for transportation projects like [bus rapid transit] and putting people in places where they can benefit from those projects,” says Dylan Bouterse, a North Central CAC member who supports the project. “This is not old Raleigh anymore. It’s growing up, and we can't stop it from growing up, but we can encourage it to grow the right way.” The planning commission will review Kane’s zoning request on April 23. A decision could come by June, according to chairman Rodney Swink. ltauss@indyweek.com

ILLUSTRATION BY STEVE OLIVA

A DEVELOPER WANTS TO BUILD RALEIGH’S TALLEST SKYSCRAPER. WILL THE CITY COUNCIL LET HIM? BY LEIGH TAUSS


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EMBODIED PRESENCE NC

GREGG MUSEUM OF ART & DESIGN

Support, healing, and advocacy for embodied living and dying

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Embodied Living With over 400 hours of Yoga Teacher training, professional experience working with individuals and groups in a therapeutic setting, and personal experience of learning to listen to my body’s wisdom after trauma, I am honored to support you in creating an embodied life. Embodied living means to realize, express, manifest, and encapsulate your deepest, truest self. Realizing your dreams, expressing your personality, manifesting your desires, and encapsulating your essence are all aspects of living an embodied life. With a warm, gentle presence and a large selection of diverse tools and techniques, I support you in becoming embodied now, reconnecting with wonder, and creating a life filled with intention and passion! Embodied Dying My training as a Sacred Passage End of Life Doula, fifteen years of studying death in both professional and personal realms, and earning a Masters in Social Work have prepared me to support you and your loved ones through an embodied dying process. Embodied dying means dying your way: knowing and deciding on your options, embracing the vast expanse of emotions that come at end of life, finding comfort, connection, and confidence with your loved ones and their continuation of life, and completing any unfinished emotional, spiritual, and practical business. Whether you are planning ahead, recently received a terminal diagnosis, or are a few weeks (or days) away from dying, I support you in embodying this process fully and planning for your legacy. Specific Offerings There are many ways we can do this work together: One-onone coaching and support, family meetings, grief and death rituals, exploring your identities, contemplating and planning for your death and legacy, finding ways to live with intention and passion, practicing listening to your body, personalized embodiment sessions (yoga, mindfulness, etc.), and much much more. I look forward to hearing from you!

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he Gregg Museum of Art & Design’s permanent collection of more than 35,000 objects includes textiles, ceramics, photography, self-taught art, industrial design, furniture, fashion, ethnographic materials and archaeological artifacts. This makes it one of the largest university museum collections in the region. Through the collection and rotating exhibitions, the Gregg makes art and design accessible, serves as a community classroom, offers educational experiences that complement the lab and classroom teaching at NC State, provides opportunities to the university and greater community for learning and research, and delivers pure enjoyment. The Gregg Museum also designs programs meant to enlighten, move, provoke, and inspire visitors and participants alike through a variety of workshops, residencies, and special activities, often affording the opportunity to interact directly with artists. Nearly all the museum’s programs are free and open to the public. The Gregg features new exhibitions several times a year, so return visits to the museum always offer new experiences. For more information, schedules and details about exhibitions and programs, please visit gregg.arts.ncsu.edu.

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Indy Best of the Triangle Winner for 10 years 304 West Weaver Street, Carrboro 919-929-3552 ncchiropractic.net

r. Chas Gaertner has been voted Best Chiropractor 10 times in the Indy, quite an accomplishment considering there are more than 100 chiropractors in the Triangle. NC Chiropractic celebrates 24 years in business this April, and four years since his move from Chapel Hill to a new location in downtown Carrboro in 2015. The office is between Weaver Street Market and the Carrboro Farmers’ Market. It’s an easy walk in town, or a quick one mile bike or bus ride from UNC or downtown Chapel Hill, and also has plenty of free parking. Dr. Gaertner has convenient, flexible hours so that business people, students, university employees, and local residents can make lunch or evening appointments, and he offers quality health care without a hassle or obligation to commit to any series of treatments. Dr. Gaertner’s approach is unique in that he combines traditional chiropractic techniques with neuromuscular trigger point therapy. He appeals to both newcomers, and experienced chiropractic patients, who seek more personalized interaction in understanding their care and treatment plans. “From children to the elderly, with headaches, shoulder or leg pain, or injuries from work or auto accidents, everyone feels better with chiropractic.” Dr. Gaertner has become known for his practical treatment with pregnant women who seek a drugless approach for problems and general discomfort. Also, he is certified in the Webster Breech Protocol to aid in correcting a baby in breech position. “The most flattering compliment is the referrals from M.D.s, PTs, and midwives, as well as massage therapists and yoga instructors, a positive indication of the increased understanding of chiropractic benefits.” Dr. Gaertner attributes his success to simplicity, a theme in both his business and personal life. Unburdened by receptionist, staff, or complex processing, you get the full attention of the doctor himself. His personal hand in every aspect of patient care, from scheduling to treatment, are what his patients have come to expect. Dr. Gaertner is easily available for patient emergencies, as he walks or bikes to and from work each day from his family’s modest home just a few blocks away. He enjoys an exceptionally happy life in Carrboro with his wife, Elaine, and two children, Greta and Van. INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 13


FIRE & FURY Here’s what we know about the explosion that shook Durham last Wednesday—and what we don’t By Sarah Willets

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An explosion triggered by a gas leak killed one, injured twenty-five, and damaged fifteen downtown Durham buildings last Wednesday.

n Saturday morning, Durham residents and officials gathered downtown for what was supposed to be a purely joyous occasion: a birthday party to mark the 150th anniversary of the Bull City’s incorporation. And while families enjoyed giveaways, performances, and a race to see which inflatable bull would make it down the American Tobacco Campus river the fastest, the celebration began on a somber note. “I want to start out with a few serious words about the events of the past week,” said Mayor Steve Schewel. “We all know Durham has had a tough week.” Three days earlier—on Wednesday, April 10, Durham’s actual sesquicentennial—and just a half-mile away, an explosion triggered 14 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

by a gas leak rocked Brightleaf Square, leaving a local business owner dead, twentyfive injured, fifteen buildings damaged, and many questions unanswered. Schewel described arriving at the scene just moments after a building at 115 North Duke Street, home to the Kaffeinate coffee shop and construction technology company Prescient, had exploded, sending out a boom heard miles away. “When we got there, our firefighters were already there standing as far as I am from you,” he said, gesturing to the crowd ten feet away, “in this incredibly, incredibly big fire— this huge blaze was blazing and they were standing there bravely putting their hoses on it, some of them having recovered just then from the huge blast that had knocked them down. … There were people on the ground who had been hurt by shrapnel and glass.”

City officials said Wednesday that the gas leak occurred when an unnamed contractor struck a gas line while boring into the sidewalk outside the building, and identified the person killed as Kong Lee, Kaffeinate’s sixtyone-year-old owner. As the INDY went to press Tuesday, the city was still investigating what caused the gas to ignite and level 115 North Duke Street. No one had yet taken responsibility for striking the gas line. A company called Fiber Technologies Networks LLC was the only company permitted to dig in the area at the time of the blast, according to city records. The permit authorized Fiber Technologies to work underneath many of downtown’s main arteries between June 27, 2018, and June 25, 2019. The reason for the work, according to the permit, was to “connect cell tower to aerial antenna poles.”

PHOTO BY PILAR TIMPANE

Prior to digging, companies are supposed to call 811, which then notifies utilities to mark their own lines aboveground. According to the 811 app, a company called PS Splicing LLC reported damage to the gas line at 9:28 a.m., about ten minutes before a 911 call was made reporting the leak. Under North Carolina law, a company that damages a gas line is required to report it. PS Splicing didn’t respond to messages from the INDY by press time. Louis Panzer, 811’s executive director, confirmed that PS Splicing also notified the agency it would be working in the area of the explosion on April 10. The News & Observer reported Monday that the CEO of PS Splicing, Don Smith, lost an eye and suffered burns to nearly half his body in the blast, but was not performing the work himself.


Last week, Crown Castle, which owns Fiber Technologies, said the company “hired a contractor who was installing fiber in the area prior to the incident.” On Monday, a spokesperson for the company would not confirm that PS Splicing was that contractor. Deputy city manager Bo Ferguson says the permit documents were prepared by a Charlotte-based engineering firm, Utilis, which may have hired subcontractors to do the work. (Utilis declined to comment further to the INDY, and a contact person listed on the permit could not be reached). “Because we don’t have any direct relationships with the subcontractors, it’s not uncommon that we don’t know who is doing the work,” Ferguson says. “That doesn’t change the fact that the people who fill out the permits are accountable to the city for complying with the permit, for

Above: The explosion shattered nearby windows. PHOTO BY BOB KARP Below: Durham firefighters rest after fighting the blaze. PHOTO BY TONY RYAN, COURTESY DURHAM FIRE DEPARTMENT

Before the explosion, firefighters evacuated about a dozen people from Kaffeinate, “no question” saving their lives, Schewel said Saturday. They spoke to everyone in the shop, fire chief Robert Zoldos said at a press conference last week, including Lee, the owner. Lee didn’t immediately heed an evacuation order, Zoldos said, and a firefighter went to get a police officer to make him leave the store he had run with his children since 2017. “That’s when the building exploded and collapsed,” Zoldos said. “The last we heard from our dad,” Lee’s children wrote on Instagram, “he called us to tell us there was a gas leak outside and to let our staff and customers know we would be closed for the day. He was going to close up and make a sign to put on our door in case anybody came by later.”

“The last we heard from our dad, he called us to tell us there was a gas leak outside and to let our staff and customers know we would be closed for the day.” complying with the license agreement, and for complying with all city, state, and federal applicable laws.” Whoever hit the line smelled the gas and called 911, but seemed to underestimate the situation, at least initially. “We have hit a gas service on North Duke between Main Street and Morgan Street,” an unidentified caller told 911 at 9:37 a.m. “We probably need a little police presence until the gas company can get here to shut the leak off. It’s just a gas service, but just to be safe until the gas company gets here.” The explosion occurred at about 10:07 a.m., according to fire officials, blowing out windows on surrounding blocks. It would be another hour before the gas would be shut off, because an employee who initially tried to shut it off was injured by the blast, according to PSNC, the natural gas company. The company has said it properly marked the gas line, but the scene was still inaccessible Monday morning, so that claim is impossible to verify.

Nine firefighters were injured, including one who suffered serious injuries and had to undergo surgery, as well as people in nearby offices and on a private bus that was on Duke Street. Their names and conditions have not been released. Two restaurants—Saint James Seafood and Torrero’s—were condemned, and several West Village apartments were uninhabitable. “We’re going to need to support [Lee’s] family and the family of all the people that were injured, going forward,” Schewel said Saturday, “and I know that we will as a city do that.” While it’s unclear exactly what went wrong Wednesday, it is clear that Bull City residents have heeded Schewel’s call: By Monday afternoon, nearly $200,000 had been raised online for people affected by the blast—restaurant workers now out of a job, families whose loved ones suffered injuries, and $140,000 for the Lee family. swillets@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 15


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indyfood

High Heaven

YOU NEVER GET OVER YOUR FIRST STONED HOT AND SOUR SOUP BY NICK WILLIAMS

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have long made it a mission of my life to seek the world’s rarefied culinary experiences. Very few, though, have been as stupefyingly profound as the first time I ate Hot and Sour soup while stoned. Many years ago, on a balmy spring night, I met up with some dear friends who happened to bear with them a sizable bag and helpful selection of paraphernalia. This event coincided with the end of a period where I had been abstaining from weed, so when presented with the business end of a two-foot Graffix, I decided to bite back into that apple with gusto. It was likely some ditch-grown Texas dirt weed, but to me it was nothing but the kindest of buds. I got extremely high. Several blocks of classic-rock radio later, our group coalesced at our old reliable, a brightly lit Chinese restaurant nestled in a dingy shopping center. I was high to the point that my friends had to sort of steer me inside and make sure I didn’t cause problems, but once we sat down, I put forth a game attempt at not acting like an insane person. The moment I tasted that soup, however, that facade was instantly shattered by the fact that I just started laughing and sort-of crying uncontrollably at how good it tasted. Every experienced pot smoker has had mundane foodstuffs—Doritos, Peach Snapple, Starburst, etc.—elevated to giddy heights by a few preprandial puffs. But friends, this was not “the munchies.” This was transcendental. I felt my mind dissolve, my sense of self carried away by pungent, umami-rich broth. The soup was like The Blob, a slick and glossy alien consciousness bent on absorbing my thinking brain, and I utterly succumbed. I may have experienced total ego death and become one with the cosmic soup force. Or, I may have just been super baked. Either way, it was a deeply pleasurable and humiliating experience. This formative meal occurred in my mildly wayward youth, when I was very good at

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS

smoking pot, fully capable of getting high and performing complex tasks like learning harmonica and graduating from college. I am now a thirty-eight-year-old dad, and I am very, very bad at smoking pot. The best I can hope for with weed, these days, is successfully talking myself down from an anxiety attack during a Primal Scream show (there was no bass in the mix and that was not OK).

But to this day I can conjure that warm, gauzy sensation with even the most cursory bowl of Hot and Sour soup. I smell the first vinegary punch and instantly feel just a little bit altered. Pillow-soft morsels of tofu and mushroom float by in their viscous, otherworldly broth, and I feel young and dumb and disreputable and—most important—sated. food@indyweek.com


HOTHOTHOTHOTHOTHOTHOT ANDANDANDANDANDANDANDANDANDANDANDAND SOURSOURSOURSOURSOUR

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SOUPSOUPSOUP Twenty minutes, including prep. Feeds four blunted heads generously. Unlike the vast majority of Chinese takeout delicacies, Hot and Sour soup is ridiculously easy to recreate at home. This 4/20, you owe it to yourself to whip up a quick batch of this dead-simple take on the classic American-Chinese version. As always, homemade chicken or vegetable stock is best, but store-bought is (sigh) acceptable … you lazy stoners. Ingredients: 3 tbsp vegetable oil 10 oz fresh shiitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced into thin strips 3 tbsp fresh ginger, minced 2 cloves garlic, minced Kosher salt and pepper 6 cups low-sodium chicken or vegetable stock 8 oz extra-firm tofu, sliced into strips 2 oz canned sliced bamboo shoots, drained 1/3 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup cornstarch, whisked with 1/4 cup water to make a slurry 1/4–1/2 tsp ground white pepper 4 tbsp unseasoned rice vinegar 1 jalapeño pepper sliced into thin rounds Chopped scallions, and pre-made crispy wonton skins for garnish Optional, but awesome: 1/4 tsp fuckin’ Monosodium Glutamate In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat the oil over medium. Add mushrooms, ginger, and garlic, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until softened and just beginning to brown, about five minutes. Add the stock, tofu, bamboo shoots, and soy sauce, and crank up the heat. When the mixture boils, lower the heat to medium-low. Simmer for about five minutes. Add the cornstarch slurry, vinegar, and white pepper, and stir gently. Continue to simmer for about two minutes. OPTIONAL: At this point—if you’d like to go on a flavor journey that may forever change you—feel free to add the MSG. Give the soup a taste, and don’t be surprised if your knees buckle and you sink to the kitchen floor in an umami-induced fugue state. Adjust seasoning. Ladle into bowls, topping each with a few rounds of sliced jalapeño, some chopped scallion, and a handful of the wonton skins. Settle in for some Buckaroo Bonzai or your weed-smoking film of choice. Slurp away. This recipe is adapted from one by Kay Chun for The New York Times INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 17


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Symphony of Rubbish

IN THE BELLY OF THE SCRAP EXCHANGE, PAIDEIA SWEEPS AWAY THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN MOVEMENT AND SOUND, MUSIC AND NOISE, AND PARTICIPANT AND WITNESS BY MICHAELA DWYER

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aitlyn Swett is taking stock of the socalled junk in the belly of the Scrap Exchange, where the arms of multicolored shirts dangle from a cardboard box like phantom limbs and yards of rolled fabric resemble exposed pipes. It’s an imaginative landscape of mess where creativity and lived history comingle. “The mounds of scrap, the way that everything falls into place, it already feels like art to me,” Swett says. For three nights this weekend, the movement-and-sound trio Paideia—whose core members are Swett, who lives in Durham; Blakeney Bullock, who lives in Winston-Salem; and Widow, who lives in New York City—will work with several interdisciplinary collaborators to explore the space and its varied contents, with one central question in mind: Who gets to belong? “I think of all the bits and baubles and scraps of things,” Swett says. “They've all had a life and are coming to a meeting place. It’s like what we’re doing. Everyone has their interest in this inquiry, and we’re coming together in a singular space to converse.” This new piece represents both a challenge to and an amplification of Paideia’s prior work, which Bullock describes as an “improvisational interaction between soundscape, sound collage, noise, and the body.” The trio’s name is a reference to a Socratic education model in which discussion is often conducted in a circle and emphasizes open-ended questioning and critical listening. This is how Paideia considers its relationship to its audience—not as divided, but as concentric parts of the same circle. “Each tier has different sorts of participation: a tier for movement, sound, and witnesses,” Bullock says. Swett, Bullock, and Widow have worked together in different ways and configurations over the years but solidified their presence as Paideia with two performances in Durham: Within the Sequence, at Monkey Bottom Collaborative in 2016, and Split Bill (with Cara Hagan), at Threehouse Studios 18 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

last year. They’re also the only group in the Durham Independent Dance Artists season that also fits in at the International Noise Conference, the big, annual noise music festival in Miami, where they performed this year.

ing the boundaries between movers and musicians. In our conversation about the new work, the word “collapse” keeps coming up, regarding both the boundaries between roles and the way the trio uses improvised movement and sound emotionally and kin-

Widow, Caitlyn Swett, and Blakeney Bullock In Split Bill, amplifiers, electronics, and contact microphones were spread across the room, and each part of the trio shifted fluidly between adding experimental sound and exploratory movement, smearing the edges of hierarchies and roles. They ended with an image that embodied this concept: Back to back, playing chimes, they stood or crouched at three different heights but all revolved in the same circle. Widow says Split Bill was a turning point in Paideia’s collaboration, further collaps-

PHOTO BY JON PFUNDSTEIN

esthetically, as a way of being together in the fullness of compassion and confrontation. “We err on the side of intensity—on the side of deeply felt emotion, opinion, and action,” Bullock says. Perhaps this intimate orbit is what enables the trio to open and expand. Each of them brings their own interpretation to that question, “Who gets to belong?” For artists and audience alike, it’s an inquiry meant to resonate at the personal-political intersection. Each member of the trio also invited two

artists to prepare a response that will manifest in two ways: physically, on each night of the performance, and as a written reflection incorporated in a post-performance zine. Some artists might produce monologues, while others might project images. It’s up to them. But it all arises from the structure Paideia is creating for the piece, a sort of algorithm that sets the timing and spatial cues while remaining concealed. It’s a way to introduce microcosmic mechanisms of power and control and make dynamics of belonging play out: membership, exclusion, attachment, and ownership. In keeping with Paideia’s interest in equilateral action, Swett says it’s important for the trio, over the course of the piece, to destabilize its self-created structure, too. In replicating and mutating these dynamics, a new, more collective world gleams into view. “What if we invited artists who make dynamic decisions and got to be with them in the space while they negotiate accountability among other people?” Widow says. “We thought that could be really exciting— like, what if we could build that ideal world?” The Scrap Exchange, with all its materiality, is another collaborator, another world-builder with political meaning. The assortment of objects is like a “physical representation of where capitalism has gotten us,” Bullock says. Placing a performance in this aftermath, in a space where consumer detritus meets creative potential, is a way of making labor and capital personal. Aesthetically, this interplay of bodies and objects might seem cacophonous; in a given moment, it might alienate or entice. There’s room to move close to the performers or to drift away down the aisles. Either way, a relationship takes shape between people and material forms. This “symphony of rubbish,” as Widow calls it, is about to whom and what we’re beholden, and how we decide. Belonging is, after all, intimately connected to power: who holds it, who wields it, and who upends it. arts@indyweek.com


stage

THE GREAT CELESTIAL COW ½

Through Sunday, Apr. 28 Murphey School Auditorium, Raleigh www.burningcoal.org

Sacred Cow

indyscreen

Triangle Confidential

A PLAY THAT BROKE GROUND IN 1984 NOW FEELS LIKE THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SOUTHERN GOTHIC AND SOUTHERN NOIR, EMBODIED IN TWO LOCAL SHORTS THE WELL-MEANING WORK OF AN OUTSIDER BY ZACK SMITH

BY BYRON WOODS

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n a week when our chief executive compared the odyssey immigrants endure to a vacation—“like, ‘Let’s go to Disneyland’”—Burning Coal Theatre Company’s production of The Great Celestial Cow administers a needed corrective to that jaded, fictive political narrative. In the 1980s, British playwright Sue Townsend witnessed the xenophobia and racism that Indian expatriates encountered in the United Kingdom. She also saw the

The Great Celestial Cow

PHOTO BY AREON MOBASHER

wrenching cultural disorientation and sometimes vicious intergenerational schisms that erupted when younger, more progressive women bridled at the sexism and caste-based prejudices of their elders. Life for Indian women in England was no vacation, and Townsend’s drama was an attempt, groundbreaking in its 1984 premiere at London’s Royal Court Theatre, to place their concerns on a national stage. Unfortunately, thirty-five years later, The Great Celestial Cow reads as the underdeveloped, episodic work of an outsider. To be fair, Townsend interrogates not only gender bias, but also the hierarchies between family members she saw in Leicester. For five years, the exhausted Sita (a vivid Seema Kukreja) and her children have been separated from their husband and father, who left India for

England before them, with his mother and sister. Cow shows how temporary separations can seed permanent estrangements. But Townsend leaves out too many dots in Sita’s downward spiral. In one scene, she’s taking part in a good-natured roast of her son, Prem, as a potential young husbandto-be. In the next, she’s having a psychotic breakdown in front of a mirror. Under Sonia Desai’s uncertain direction, there’s little subtlety in the disdain mother-inlaw Dadima (Snehal Bhagwat) and Auntie Masi (Maneesha Lassiter) have for Sita or their preference for Prem (a onedimensional Darius Shafa) over Sita’s daughter, Bibi (a promising Priya Singh). In his debut, Deepak Dhar doesn’t believably convey the love or menace of Raj, the family patriarch. Joey DeSena and Kelly Buynitzsky have the thankless task of playing brief, flat supporting roles— a racist greengrocer, a clueless British hippy. At least Pimpila Violette is amusing as the tasteless suitor whose arranged-marriage attempt is deftly derailed by Bibi. Neena Rai’s colorful costumes include an imaginative take on the goddess Kali, and Danielle James’s full-size rendering of Sita’s beloved cow, Princess, gives emotional presence to a symbol of lost holiness and community. But on opening night, Desai hadn’t solved the problems that a cascade of short scenes—with lengthy changes in between— pose to the show’s pacing. The region’s Asian population, along with its Latinx and African-American communities, rarely see their stories on stage. But a problematic script and an uneven cast make The Great Celestial Cow a largely squandered opportunity, at a time when we need to hear such communities tell their own stories. arts@indyweek.com

T

building in Chapel Hill, decorated by Snow— here’s a long, rich tradition of Southto establish some ground rules for the ern Gothic films, but Southern noir adulterous affair they’re trying not to have. is something different, and a rarer The showier of the two shorts, it employs species. Southern Gothic is essentially tragsplit screens, jump cuts, black-and-white ic, treating darkness as a normalized part sequences, and more as the discussion turns of society (see Deliverance), whereas noir is into some very unsettling confessions. It has essentially psychological, treating darkness a jazzy, unnerving rhythm that is sometimes as something that comes from outside of compelling and sometimes distracting. society; it exists in the tension between what we consider civilized and transgressive. Beyond Blood Simple, One False Move, Winter’s Bone, and Cold in July, few films use the South as a backdrop for stories about crimes that push people outside the comforts of society. But you can add a couple more to the list thanks to the new Southern Noir Film Hour, which debuts on April 25 at Motorco. It’s a double-feature of shorts by local filmmakers that take full advantage of their Southern setting— Cheat-Proof PHOTO COURTESY OF EDITH SNOW the Triangle, in particular—as a backGoing Down Slow (written and directed drop for visually lush stories about very bad by Pruitt) is the story of a married couple things, with the screenings preceded by a (Snow and Michael Howard) dealing with a performance from the band Swedish Wood bad turn after a difficult decision. StructurPatrol and followed by a Q and A with the cast ally, the film constantly cross-cuts between and crew. flashbacks and flash-forwards, in the tradiBoth shorts involve filmmaker Edith tion of such films as John Boorman’s Point Snow and crime novelist and filmmaker Blank. The fractured timeline is integral to Eryk Pruitt, an occasional INDY the payoff, though it occasionally undercuts contributor, who decided to independently Pruitt’s dark humor as the incident turns screen them in venues around the country into a bizarre reckoning for the couple’s relainstead of working the festival circuit. tionship. But the short beautifully employs Snow costars in both and is the director of sun-soaked back roads and riverside forCheat-Proof, which was written by Pruitt ests—that would be the Haw River—and the from a story they conceived together (as accident that spurs the plot will feel all too was Keepsake, Snow’s award-winning first plausible to Durham drivers. There’s a lot film). It concerns a couple (Snow and Jim to like in both shorts, and one can only hope Moscater) meeting in the kind of kitschy, they beckon other noir-ish filmmakers to country-western-themed diner you’d see in follow down their dark Southern path. a David Lynch or Jonathan Demme film— arts@indyweek.com though actually, it’s the former 501 Diner

SOUTHERN NOIR FILM HOUR

Thursday, Apr. 25, 6:30 p.m., $7 | Motorco Music Hall, Durham | www.motorcomusic.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 19


20 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com


INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 21


indymusic

SEEPEOPLES

Saturday, April 20, 10:30 p.m., $7–$10 Cat’s Cradle Back Room, Carrboro www.catscradle.com

Rock Banned

FACEBOOK BLOCKED SEEPEOPLES FOR POLITICAL SPEECH, BUT USERS DESERVE AS MUCH BLAME AS THE COMPANY’S POLICIES BY BRIAN HOWE

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or almost two decades, the New England indie band SeepeopleS has been as free with its speech on social and political issues as it is with its approach to genre. This was never a problem until the age of social media, which, as scandal is rocking its giants, is curtailing the open marketplace of ideas it was supposed to unleash. Around the time of the Iraq invasion in 2003, SeepeopleS singer Will Bradford wrote a punk song called “New American Dream,” with lyrics like, “I want to be the president and kill everyone / I want to be the president and play with nuclear bombs.” It wasn’t released at the time, but during Trump’s presidential campaign, Bradford realized the childlike ego and bloodlust he and many others saw in George W. Bush was far from out of date. Bradford was friendly with Pete List, an animator who worked on MTV’s Celebrity Deathmatch and Marilyn Manson’s “Astonishing Panorama of the Endtimes” video. List created a video for “New American Dream,” which is included on the band’s 2017 Hate EP. Though Trump inspired its release, he gets no more air time than the other global leaders whose atrocities are surveyed in cartoon form, including Obama. Like most working bands, SeepeopleS heavily relies on a sponsored Facebook account to promote its releases and shows and, in 2017, “New American Dream” went up on its Facebook page. As with anything critical of Trump, it elicited complaints and death threats from the MAGA crowd but no pushback from Facebook. But then, in the spring of 2018, it was revealed that British political-consulting firm Cambridge-Analytica had lifted personal data from millions of Facebook profiles without authorization for use in American political campaigns, including that of Ted Cruz. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had to testify before Congress, and everything changed. Within a week of the congressional hearing, SeepeopleS’ Facebook account was 22 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

Will Bradford of SeepeopleS PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST placed under review. By summer, the video had been removed (from Instagram, too, which Facebook owns), even though the band went through the authorization process to post political ads, something their video clearly is not. Even worse, the band’s entire ad account was essentially disabled: Anything they tried to post, no matter how innocuous, was dubbed political and denied. They were in Facebook jail for something they didn’t do. They still don’t know how to get out.

In theory, Facebook’s policy is aimed at eliminating political ads with hazy origins or deceptive content, but in practice, it may be a way for users to weaponize the site’s content-curation tools. While the people who complained about “New American Dream” may have been motivated by politics, Facebook’s motivation is perhaps scarier: cold, hard math. You could always make something disappear from your own timeline, but now, with enough blocks and reports, you can make it disappear from everyone else’s, too. Facebook created the conditions

for this to occur, but users on both sides of the political aisle have instrumentalized it. The site is the labyrinth, but the monster loose in it is us. As SeepeopleS heads to the Cat’s Cradle Back Room for a late show on April 20 (local band Tracksuit opens), we spoke with Bradford about what it’s like to inadvertently become a uniquely modern paradox—a band that lives in the past and the future, at once promoting like it’s 1990 and testing the waters of an unthinkable, inevitable world after Facebook.


INDY: How much did “New American Dream” have to do with Trump? WILL BRADFORD: We started planning the video before the election. The whole year Trump was campaigning, we were on tour, so we bumped into his rallies at least fifteen times. I was curious and certainly went to a few, and I might have gotten removed. [Laughs] It was about the cult of personality. Especially in Trump’s case, it was just power, watching all these people who were infatuated with this TV character, this big boss man. The song is really just an examination of people who lust after power, and the perspective that those people might be a little sick in the head. At the rallies, you realized power was the real sell. His followers certainly respond. It’s interesting that the video was treated as a political ad, which usually has a specific target or agenda, when it actually seems like a pretty panoramic portrait of political violence. Were you surprised that it caused controversy?

What happened when the video dropped? The video dropped in 2017, and every second of it was part of a Facebook ad. We had no issues. I mean, the death threats, and we definitely got reported a bunch, but it wasn’t until about a week after the Zuckerberg congressional hearing when things really changed. All of a sudden, we started getting notices that our account was under review. One morning, probably a month and a half later, the band and everyone who works with us woke up to, basically, “All your accounts will be deleted if you don’t take this off.” We were threatened with our private accounts being deleted, too. We had to go through this huge process to keep the accounts going, and then, it started to get weird. We tour a lot, and we started getting all our ads denied that had featured stuff from the video. We realized we couldn’t do anything with it and started to sponsor ads that had nothing to do with the video, nothing remotely political. And we would still get notices that we couldn’t post political content. That was the eye-opener, like,

“One of the death threats was from a guy from Raleigh. He went and bought all the CDs—which was nice, I appreciated that—and then sent me a video of gunning them down in his backyard.” I knew it would ruffle some feathers. We made a point of—I mean, Obama is in the video. We did put a few olive branches in there. The band has received death threats. That surprised me a little bit. One was from your neck of the woods, a guy from Raleigh. He sent the most extreme one. He went and bought all the CDs—which was nice, I appreciated that—and then sent me a video of gunning them down in his backyard. He said, “I can’t wait for your show in Raleigh.” That one, we actually had to call the authorities and make them aware of it. But I wasn’t too surprised, because the hate is palpable, and I’ve certainly felt it since Trump hit the scene. He set a precedent for bringing those people out of the shame corner. I was a little taken aback by how vicious it was, considering that the video is not reinventing any wheels. It’s just energy for the kids, nothing that hasn’t been said before.

“Wait a second, we resolved the issue under Facebook’s terms.” I had to send pictures of my passport, my license; I had to wait for codes in the mail. The regular mail. We went through this whole process where you must be authorized to post political content. Even after we resolved it, it didn’t change anything. If I took a picture of you and me hanging out and tried to sponsor that post, I would get the same notice, “Not Authorized for Ads with Political Content.” It became very apparent that we were in Facebook jail, a term that didn’t exist at the time, but which now is sort of a thing. What do you know about the rule that you were supposedly violating? It all comes down to this communitystandards thing. If you read it closely, technically—and I don’t know if this was the case before the Zuckerberg hearings,

deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming April 24:

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but it certainly was after—you have to be authorized to post any picture of a candidate or political leader. Which is hilarious, because you go on Facebook and it’s just nonstop inundation with exactly that, and I’m sure most of those people are not authorized. We did some research with our lawyer and came to the understanding that, in actuality, it didn’t have anything to do with the content. It really had to do with getting blocked and reported by users, which basically put our account into “poor health,” Facebook’s term. I thought, “There’s going to be some little punk at Facebook that I can hate,” but the reality, I think, is more horrifying. It’s really algorithm-and-math-based. It’s this perfect instrument of self-censorship. Whatever people don’t like, they can just make disappear. For anyone that needs social media to promote, you’re literally putting your livelihood on it, and it’s completely changed the way that we promote. The last two tours we did, we would ask the venue to host the ad, which worked for a few months. But now, the venues can’t even host the ads. They can get away with it in certain things if they don’t tag the band. We just had a venue in Atlanta that was determined to make it happen. I was like, “Look, man, I’ll send you more posters, just pretend it’s the nineties.” They were like, “No, we’ll figure out how to do it.” They couldn’t get an ad up, and they were pretty bewildered. I was like, “Yeah, that’s how it is, man, I’m sorry.” Are you going to have to change the name of the band? I don’t think so, nineteen years in. Honestly, other than the annoyance and everything, it certainly helped the band in some respects. We’ve been outspoken since the very beginning and unafraid of the consequences behind that. Part of me is sort of waiting for Facebook to collapse, for some other social media that will wipe them out. We felt like we were getting singled out, but when we started to make noise about it, people came to us from all over the spectrum saying it had happened to them, too, including a super-conservative band from Kansas City. Liberals, I guess, blocked and reported their stuff and made them disappear. I talked to a guy who had a landscaping business who said, “I made the mistake of ranting about Trump on my business account,” and they deleted his account. All this started happening after the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but that seemed like it was about user privacy, not political speech. What’s the connection? 24 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

I think that is the most infuriating part—that connection is a huge grey area that may not even exist. I don’t think they really had a clue how to fix it and get out of the public eye. I think they made a concerted policy that’s sort of, “We’ve got to keep Facebook milquetoast,” try not to ruffle anybody’s feathers. The connection is direct in that all this stuff happened immediately after, but I don’t think there’s any rational line to follow. What else are you doing to get around this in your promotion, and how have your fans responded to this situation? We get a lot more punk kids showing up at the shows. It’s definitely been noticeable that it resonated with a younger audience, which was the intention. The video was partly a history lesson for young kids to just see a profound image and be curious, like, “Who was that guy? Who did that?” Then, maybe, go look for themselves. It’s like you’re a test case for the future. How does a band promote without Facebook? You’re finding out now, but all bands will have to find out if Facebook finally succumbs to scandals and public hatred. Oh, I know. It’s interesting when you think about even just the last hundred years of provocative art, anything that pushed the norms. If those artists were here today, I don’t think they’d have a chance. For us, it’s basically meant a lot more work. We really are back to the nineties, with the art of street team— tracking down some dude in college who will hopefully put up posters in his dorm. bhowe@indyweek.com

music

The "New American Dream" video ANIMATION BY PETE LIST

REVIEW

PHONTE PACIFIC TIME 

Foreign Exchange Music; Mar. 29 “It’s about keeping your audience in the moment,” said Phonte Coleman, formerly half of the legendary North Carolina hip-hop duo Little Brother and currently the lead singer of soul outfit The Foreign Exchange, in a recent interview. “I’m trying to make it a little easier for my fans to follow the creative path I have in my mind.” For Phonte fans, one such moment occurred at the end of last month, when he dropped the four-song Pacific Time EP. It’s a groove-stocked cruise across the brand of bedroom-appetite jams he’s fond of and the rangy, up-tempo rap ballads he’s enshrined. To follow Phonte’s creative path, you should relate to Pacific Time as an ad-hoc curveball, especially for folks who’ve been begging for a follow-up to last year’s brief but rap-heavy No News Is Good News LP. Between regularly recording podcasts on Pandora with Questlove, doing voiceover work, and contributing to Comedy Central’s The New Negroes, one would think Phonte needs some time kick his feet up, but “Can We” plots him as the romantic laborer, pushing the night’s edge into sultry possibilities before getting in an Uber, instigated by guitarist Justin Hawkins. The LA-based singer/songwriter Devin Morrison lends his expertise and voice to “Beverly Hills." Small and succinct but soothing, “Ego” brings Phonte back home, with Lalah Hathaway on the passenger side, sugaring the harmonies and teasing what could have been a larger song. The whole project could have been larger. Phonte should probably be more popular. We should all live in California, hang out in Beverly Hills, and live on Pacific Time. We don't, but at least we get vacation-size doses like this. —Eric Tullis


indyart

PRINCESS: OUT THERE Monday, Apr. 22, 7 p.m., free CAM Raleigh, Raleigh www.camraleigh.org

Space Men

THE INTERGALACTIC PATRIARCHY EXPOSED IN PRINCESS'S INTERSECTIONAL SCI-FI ROMP BY JAMES MICHAEL NICHOLS

I

n the year 2028, a pair of artistic collaborators use their white-male privilege to build a rocket ship and escape the misogynistic dystopia of Earth in search of a better world. Clad in gender-bending outfits, they bumble their way across planet after planet, engaging in performances meant to question the role of men in the ongoing “cultural reckoning of misogyny.” These well-intentioned but flawed characters’ intergalactic journey puts their misconceptions to the test as they discover their roles in upholding patriarchal oppression. This is the premise of Out There, a multimedia performance piece by Princess, the duo of Alexis Gideon and Michael O'Neill. The pair originally began collaborating through art, video, and music while they were both living in Chicago. Geographically separated but still friends, after an eleven-year hiatus they reconnected and began making work together again, a couple of years ago. Out There, which the duo brings to CAM Raleigh on April 22, was born out of the climate surrounding the 2016 election, along with the Women’s March and #MeToo. It began as an album, with Gideon and O'Neill sending tracks back and forth across the country and recording music whenever they got together. About three-quarters of the way through, they began to feel that the work had a deeper narrative foundation, one that needed a video component and live performance to explore. In its live form, the finished video—which grew to include collaborators such as Le Tigre’s JD Samson, visual artist Jennifer Meridian, and the Brooklyn-based band TEEN—is paired with a performance by Princess. Gideon and O'Neill say the show is about encouraging men to think about ways in which they may uphold patriarchal systems and structures, particularly when it comes to micro-aggressive behavior. “I think that sometimes, when we talk about this stuff, we often just paint this grand picture of humanity and patriarchy and society and maybe even remove ourselves

Alexis Gideon and Michael O'Neill in Out There from them,” O'Neill says. “But whether it’s a relationship you’re in, romantic or a collaboration, the way we as men go about our lives, there’s a number of moments every day where you can examine your own patriarchal conditioning and male privilege.” On their first stop after leaving Earth, O'Neill and Gideon seem to discover a sort of drug-fueled utopia that revolves around hedonism and partying. While they initially think this world is wonderful, they soon discover that the culture is functionally built on the backs of women’s labor and exploitation. They try to help but are ultimately ineffectual, and they end up getting thrown into a prison. Of course, they escape. As they continue their journey on other planets, no matter where they go, every culture seems to be

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

embedded with patriarchal values and systems—a reality that women from all walks of life know well, even if the narrators don’t. “We wanted to shape the work to make a cultural commentary on our perspective, or at least, our role, as men in this moment, this movement,” O'Neill says. “We inherently understand the problematic perspective that it is two men, but we also didn’t want to be too shy or afraid of that, either, because it’s important for men to have a role within a feminist perspective or society.” Princess is also trying to contribute to a larger cultural conversation about challenging masculinity through the relationship of the two main characters in Out There. Beyond just playing with performative gender through clothing, they share a tender,

complicated relationship that illustrates a different way that men can engage not just with women, but with one another, and, by extension, with the world around them. “Something that dates back to the early days of Princess is that we’ve always talked about masculinity and the spectrum of manhood, how to play with gender within that,” O'Neill says. “How to understand masculinity in terms of its toxicity.” While Out There may not present radically new ideas, it is a nuanced and well-produced encapsulation of a quintessential tenet of intersectional feminism: If you have privilege, use it to amplify the experiences, lived realities, and voices of those with less of it than yourself. arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 25


WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK 4.17–4.24 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 & THURSDAY, APRIL 25

SHAMEL PITTS AND BOBBI JENE SMITH

Shamel Pitts and Bobbi Jene Smith were sharp enough to dance with Batsheva Dance Company—and then be tapped to teach founder Ohad Naharin’s challenging Gaga contemporary dance choreography—before striking off to create their own works. This double billing for Carolina Performing Arts begins with Black Velvet: Architectures and Archetypes, a formidable work of darkness and shadows that Pitts co-created with the fierce Brazilian performance artist Mirelle Martins; the work also features light and video mapping by Lucca del Carlo. Pitts has said the work “aims to share and reflect on the colorfulness of blackness—especially in regards to black women—in a relationship of love, compassion, and camaraderie.” Smith’s A Study on Effort, meanwhile, is an extended conversation, through choreography and music, between solo dancer Smith and violinist Kier GoGwilt, about the different forms and extremities of physical and emotional effort. —Byron Woods CURRENT ARTSPACE + STUDIO, CHAPEL HILL | 7:30 p.m., $27, www.carolinaperformingarts.org

From Shamel Pitts’s Black Velvet SATURDAY, APRIL 20

PHOTO BY ALEX APT

THURSDAY, APRIL 18

JOHN CUSACK

TELEKINESIS

MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM, RALEIGH | 7:30 p.m., $57+, www.dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM, CARRBORO | 8:30 p.m., $13–$15, www.catscradle.com

Record stores aren’t the same anymore; they can’t be. In a world before YouTube, and even before the Promethean dawn of the internet, record stores—along with college radio stations and grungy clubs and bars—were the primary points of access for new music. The shops were cultural epicenters, audio libraries with eclectic and somewhat approachable curators: community spots for those obsessed with innovative sounds and emerging genres. High Fidelity, Nick Hornby’s 1995 novel of an errant record store owner and disc jockey counting down his top-five lists of albums—and breakups—is a time capsule of that world. In 2000, John Cusack starred in the movie version, along with Jack Black, Tim Robbins, and his sister, Joan Cusack. Now, that film is somewhere between a cultural snapshot and social anthropology, a window into a world that, strictly speaking, no longer exists. Cusack is currently on tour screening the film and will engage in a moderated conversation with the audience afterward. —Byron Woods

26 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

Indie-rock bands increasingly are becoming fronts for individual music creators who mostly go it alone in the studio and recruit a rotating cast of friends for tours (see: Tame Impala). In this manner, Seattle-based indie-pop band Telekinesis is the brainchild of studio wizard Michael Benjamin Lerner, a drummer and songwriter who produced, recorded, and mixed the band’s fifth album, Effluxion. As is his penchant, Lerner created a collection of highly textured powerpop songs that sound instantly familiar—his voice has always sounded similar to Chris Collingwood’s of Fountains of Wayne—but in good way, like he’s figured out precisely how to evoke positive reactions from his audience without directly lifting other artists’ ideas. Which is just to say that Lerner’s infectiously catchy music is not an acquired taste; if you like indierock artists like The Shins and Death Cab for Cutie, you’re already hungry for Telekinesis. Sontalk opens. —Howard Hardee


THURSDAY, APRIL 18

JASON MORAN & THE BANDWAGON

Jason Moran has a new vision for jazz. His influences are eclectic, even adventurous: The pianist and composer has a style that spans genres and decades, integrating his mastery of old techniques, like a two-handed piano style ubiquitous in the jazz of the 1920s, with newer sounds from hip-hop, funk, and avant-garde jazz. His work raises questions about history, heritage, and what it means to carry old work into this century. He received wide attention for In My Mind, his reimagining of a famous 1959 Thelonious Monk performance, and his original work also speaks to the past. Some pieces are moody and thoughtful, while others crackle with energy. Whatever the style, Moran is a compelling performer. On Thursday, he’ll be joined by his backing band, the Bandwagon, which includes bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits. The Fruit, a warehouse space, is rawer than Moran’s usual haunts; expect the trio to fill it up with sound. —Elizabeth Szypulski THE FRUIT, DURHAM 8 p.m., $25, dukeperformances.duke.edu

Jason Moran PHOTO

COURTESY OF DUKE PERFORMANCES

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 & SATURDAY, APRIL 20

JAY PHAROAH

Former SNL cast member and stand-up comedian Jay Pharaoh was unmistakably at his best when he was nailing impersonations of Katt Williams, Barack Obama, Denzel Washington, and Jay-Z in front of a live studio audience every Saturday night at 30 Rock Plaza. Sure, he may have pigeonholed himself into being an impressionist-for-hire, but the SNL’s writers may have also been culpable in that mismanagement. And like many SNL alums, he attempted to translate his sketch routine talent into more scripted pastures. He wound up with White Famous—a Showtime sitcom based on the life of a crossover black comedian—which, unfortunately, only had a three-month shelf life. Now, it may seem as if the Virginia native has been relegated to lending his winning personality to Old Navy and Wix ads, but don’t let the shiny commercials fool you: He can still hold an audience’s attention, even if it isn’t under Lorne Michaels’s dominion. —Eric Tullis GOODNIGHTS COMEDY CLUB, RALEIGH 7:30 p.m. & 10 p.m., $25–$28, www.goodnightscomedy.com

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO?

AMAZING GRACE AT VARIOUS THEATERS (P. 36 ), ELEPHANT MICAH AT DUKE COFFEEHOUSE (P. 28), THE GREAT CELESTIAL COW AT MURPHEY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM (P. 19), PAIDEIA AT THE SCRAP EXCHANGE (P. 18), PRINCESS AT CAM RALEIGH (P. 25), SEEPEOPLES AT CAT’S CRADLE (P. 22), SINBAD AT MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL (P. 35), NATACHA SOCHAT AT THE CARRACK (P. 32), THE SOUTHERN NOIR FILM HOUR AT MOTORCO (P. 19), TIANA CLARK AND EMILIA PHILLIPS AT LOVE HOUSE (P. 34) INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 27


music 4.17–4.24

WED, APR 17 ARCANA: The Hill Country Cosmopolitans; Free. 8 p.m. CAROLINA THEATRE: The Tallest Man on Earth; $30. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE: Mitski, Jay Som; Sold out. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: The Wild Reeds, Valley Queen; $14-$16. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: The Glorious Rebellion, Dead Register, Codeine Haze; $5 suggested. 9 p.m.

THE PINHOOK: Kaleta & Super Mamba Band, Africa Unplugged, M8alla; $10. 8 p.m.

THU, APR 18 CAT’S CRADLE:

Tom Odell

[$25-$28, 8 P.M.] English singer-songwriterpianist Tom Odell has cited Elton John as an influence. You can hear it in his latest album, Jubilee Road, but just barely—it’s off-brand Elton John, turned all the way down, with none of the verve, the spectacle, or even the heart. The songs on the album tell stories, but not ones that stick with you. They’re broad and maudlin, reminiscent of Billy Joel’s most syrupy songs. —Elizabeth Szypulski CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Telekinesis, SONTALK; $13$15. 8:30 p.m.

DUKE COFFEEHOUSE, DURHAM | 9 p.m., $5, www.dukecoffeehouse.org

Elephant Micah

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

28 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

LINCOLN THEATRE: The Band of Heathens, Blue Cactus; $15. 8 p.m.

MOTORCO: The Secret Sisters, Brian Dunne; $20-$25. 8 p.m.

THE RITZ: Lil Baby, Blueface, City Girls, Jordan Hollywood; $50+. 8 p.m.

ELEPHANT MICAH

KINGS: Matt Phillips & the Back Pocket, Alison Shearer Band, Effigy Seed; $8-$10. 10 p.m.

MOTORCO: The Accidentals, Nantahala; $10-$12. 9 p.m.

POUR HOUSE: Universal Sigh, The Up & Up; $7-$10. 9 p.m.

Durham’s Joseph O’Connell already had plenty of slightly weird folk albums as Elephant Micah under his belt before the truly weird creative breakthrough of Genericana last year. Whereas previous albums were easy to compare to Will Oldham, this hilariously titled outing requires rarer references, like Arthur Russell lost in an alien landscape of analog synthesis, dubby bass, and concrete-music recordings. The album is about both the natural world (which includes sound waves as well as trees and stones) and the mediums, like magnetic tape, used to capture it. While he removes the seam between the organic and the mechanical, O’Connell also replaces it with his warm, questing voice. For this Duke Coffeehouse headlining show, he’s bringing in Indiana psych-rock band Thee Open Sex—whose swirl of collaborators center on Magnetic South Recordings mastermind John Dawson—and enlisting the A/V Geeks to add live projections to the smart-trippy proceedings. —Brian Howe

DURHAM FRUIT COMPANY: Jason Moran & The Bandwagon; $25. 8 p.m.

LOCAL 506: Monteagle, Swimming Bell; $7. 9 p.m.

NEPTUNES PARLOUR: Lazarus Pit, Smoocheyface; $7. 10 p.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20

conventional punk chops with equal flourish. Appropriately, the knotty powerpop of North Carolina punk devotee Personality Cult opens. —David Ford Smith

THE CAVE: Youth and Canvas; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. DUKE COFFEEHOUSE:

The Scientists, Personality Cult [$10, 9 P.M.]

A definitive cult band for those charting the spread of early post-punk, Australia’s The Scientists have only managed a handful of U.S. gigs in their forty-some-year history. Call it a hazard of constant lineup flux. Fresh off an unlikely 2018 run through the States, these pioneers continue to dial into sludgy psychedelia and more

POUR HOUSE: Local Band Local Beer: Noah Cross, Earther, The Old Sioux Summer; $5. 9 p.m. THE RITZ: Jamey Johnson, Natalie Stovall; $36. 8 p.m.

FRI, APR 19 CAT’S CRADLE: The Church; $25$28. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Carolina Jams Spring Showcase: Barker Road, Mattie and the Masters, JULIA.; $7-$9. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: Drunken Prayer, Kenny Roby, Clark Bloomquist; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. DURHAM FRUIT COMPANY: Jason Moran Fats Waller Dance Party; $15. 8 p.m. HAW RIVER BALLROOM:

Westmoreland “Cast Fire” Album Release [$15-$17, 8 P.M.]

John Westmoreland is a North Carolinian songwriter whose plainspoken lyrical style is often compared to Leonard Cohen. Recently, the Berklee grad has been digging into the story of his great grand-uncle, the labor activist and poet T-Bone Slim. Attendees will hear the fruits of this ancestral research, and also celebrate the release of Westmoreland’s debut solo album. —Josephine McRobbie KINGS: Capri, Hustle, Tanajah, Madrique, Rome Jeterr; $8. 8 p.m. LINCOLN THEATRE: Piece Of Time (Iron Maiden Tribute), Metallideth (Metallica/Megadeth Tribute); $8. 9 p.m. LOCAL 506: Groove Fetish, The Moon Unit; $7-$10. 9 p.m.


THE JUNGLE BOOK

4/17

PRESENTED BY VIRGINIA REPERTORY THEATRE

4/19-20 4/26 WED

4/17

THU

4/18

THE SECRET SISTERS Brian Dunne

THE SECRET SISTERS

w/ Brian Dunne THE ACCIDENTALS Nantahala

4/27 5/16 5/17-19 5/18 7/24

TIGERS BE STILL PRESENTED BY ONE SONG CHE APALACHE THE 4TH ANNUAL ALWAYS INSPIRING GALA POPUP BROADWAY (OLIVER!) VAUDEVILLE VARIETIES PRESENTED BY METTLESOME FAMILY-FRIENDLY TRANSACTORS IMPROV AN EVENING WITH BETTYE LAVETTE

Get tickets at artscenterlive.org

Follow us: @artscenterlive • 300-G East Main St., Carrboro, NC FRI

4/19

SAT

4/20

Okilly Dokilly performs at Motorco on Friday, Apr. 19.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS WED

THE MAYWOOD: Sun of Nile, Echo the Aftermath, I Am Maddox; $10. 9 p.m. MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM:

The Triple C’s Tour: Sir Charles Jones, Calvin Richardson, Omar Cunningham [$47+, 8 P.M.]

Sir Charles Jones, Calvin Richardson, and Omar Cunningham have more in common than the letter “C.” The three musicians are all practitioners of a Southern R&B that draws from soul, gospel, blues, and even a bit of country. It’s a style that feels smooth and familiar, even if you’ve never heard them play before—a throwback, but one that feels earned. —Elizabeth Szypulski MOTORCO:

Okilly Dokilly, Bear Ghost [$14-$16, 9 P.M.]

Upon releasing sophomore album Howdilly Twodilly last month, Okilly Dokilly may be asking to be taken a little more seriously—or at least as seriously as one can take a heavy metal outfit which finds both sartorial and lyrical inspiration in Ned Flanders. Despite alternately silly and dark quotes that comprise their songs—take “a nice glass of warm milk, a little nap, and a/total frontal lobotomy”

from “Reneducation”—the music legitimately bludgeons listeners. Bear Ghost opens. —Spencer Griffith THE PINHOOK:

The Durham Beat Party: Jooselord, BANGZZ, Real Dad, AZULZ, The Muslims [$7-$12, 8:30 P.M.]

Bull City gonzo arts and culture outlet, The Durham Beat, throws its own birthday celebration this week with an eclectic array of locals: AZULZ opens with soulful, sultry, piano-based beauty while Real Dad’s retro synthpop is dark and gorgeous. BANGZZ brings out the fangs with their feminist punk fury before rapper Jooselord Magnus, joined by his Krawzbonez Music comrades Konvo and Jovi Mosconi, brings the evening home with rowdy party vibes. —Spencer Griffith POUR HOUSE: Inner Circle, Mo Lowda & The Humble; $20-$25. 9 p.m. THE RITZ: The Purple Madness: Tribute to Prince; $15. 8 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY: Bill Easley Quartet; $20. 8 p.m. SLIM’S: Ghost of Saturday Nite, Sibannac, Monkey Knife Fight, Orphan Riot; $5. 8 p.m. THE STATION: Alex Thompson, Sonny Miles; Free. 8 p.m.

SAT, APR 20 ARCANA:

The Purple Party: A Prince Celebration [$5, 9 P.M.]

Celebrity deaths rain down so thick in the 2010’s, that even supernovas like David Bowie and Lou Reed start to feel like raindrops on the windshield of the news cycle. On the three-year anniversary of Prince’s passing, Arcana provides a space for fans of the mononymous legend to commiserate and celebrate his otherworldly legacy, which defies all forms of proper memoriam. DJ VSPRTN and Murad are on the decks. —David Ford Smith CAT’S CRADLE: The Driver Era, Public; $22-$25. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Carsie Blanton; $13-$15. 7 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: SeepeopleS, Tracksuit; $7-$10. 10:30 p.m. THE CAVE: Mitchel Evan and the Saboteurs, Jimmie Ray Swagger and the Fussy Eaters, JP Leon Band; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. DUKE COFFEEHOUSE: Elephant Micah, Thee Open Sex, A/V Geeks; $5. 9 p.m. DUKE’S NELSON MUSIC ROOM: Duke University String School: Chamber Music Concert; Free. 5 p.m.

4/24 THU

4/25 FRI

4/26

SAT

4/27

OKILLY DOKILLY Bear Ghost

OKILLY DOKILLY w/ Bear Ghost Viking Storm II with Hammer No More The Fingers Future Kings of Nowhere / Tooth / Gown Solar Halos / Pink Flag / Dry Heathens The Beast / Canine Heart Sounds Crank It Loud presents WICCA PHASE SPRINGS ETERNAL SmrtDeath / Fantasy Camp Southern Noir Film Hour: Cheat Proof and Going Down Slow with music from Swedish Wood Patrol Family Bizness Presents Pinnacle III “Heir of Victory” with LVitto, Jooselord, Imani Pressley, Shame, Kronoz Time, Mally Evans 12PM MOTORCO AND OYSTERS CAROLINA PRESENT OYSTER ROAST 7PM Jo Gore Stephanie Ray & Caroline Smith Hosted by Lena Tillett from WRAL (A portion of proceeds to benefit Compass Center)

COMING SOON: Girlpool, Gangstagrass, Hot Snakes, The Murlocs, John Paul White, Xiu Xiu, PJ Morton, Tim Heidecker & Gregg Turkington, Bear’s Den, Thank You Scientist, Hush Kids, Flotsam and Jetsam, Superorganism, Hot Mulligan, THAD, Slum Village, Mono, The Connells, Aaron West & The Roaring 20’s, Deicide, Origin, Mark Farina, Remo Drive, The Crystal Method, Remember Jones, Cavetown, Damien Jurado, She Wants Revenge, Mystery Skulls, Hop Along, Summer Salt, Dan Baird & Homemade Sin, The Rock*A*Teens, Escape-ism, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Sophomore Slump Fest, Warbringer, Sonata Artica, Nile Also co-presenting at Cat’s Cradle: Japanese Breakfast, Ex Hex and Eternal Summers (on May 5th)

Present this coupon for

Member Admission Price (Not Valid for Special Events, expires 01-20)

919-6-TEASER for directions and information

www.teasersmensclub.com 156 Ramseur St. Durham, NC

An Adult Nightclub Open 7 Days/week • Hours 7pm - 2am

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RECYCLE THIS PAPER INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 29


FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

T S BE

TH E

E L G N A I R T 2019

OF

Tom Odell performs at Cat’s Cradle on Thursday, Apr. 18. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

LINCOLN THEATRE: 420 Reggae Fest: TreeHouse!, Sons Of Paradise, Crucial Fiya, Evan Button, DJ Ras J; $10. 8 p.m. LOCAL 506: Boom Unit Brass Band; $8. 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Pour20Fest: Nappy Roots, G Yamazawa, Terminator X, Shame; $20-$50. 9 p.m. THE MAYWOOD: Billion Dollar Babies, Mostley Crue; $10. 9 p.m. MOTORCO:

W O N E V O T M AY 5 T H H G M U O O C R . H K T E E W Y D N I . W WW 30 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

Viking Storm II: Hammer No More the Fingers, Future Kings of Nowhere, Tooth, Gown, Solar Halos, Pink Flag, Dry Heathens, The Beast, Canine Heart Sounds [$15, 3 P.M.]

A decade after Hammer No More The Fingers curated the original Viking Storm, they’re bringing back some of that era’s most seminal Triangle acts for this all-day bash. Besides Hammer’s sharp riffs and playful rhythms, there’s Future Kings of Nowhere’s

urgent anti-folk anthems, Tooth’s brutal sludge, Pink Flag’s riot grrrl raves, Dry Heathens’ scorching twangpunk, and The Beast’s jazzy hip-hop. New pals Gown, Solar Halos, and Canine Heart Sounds join. Partial proceeds benefit Blackspace Durham. —Spencer Griffith THE PINHOOK: The Bar Exam Cypher: STLNDRMS, Josh Waters; 8 p.m. THE PINHOOK: Dreaming of the 90’s Dance Party; $5. 10 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY: Kate McGarry, Keith Ganz Quartet; $25. 8 p.m. SLIM’S: Grace Vonderkuhn, Sidewalk Furniture; $5. 9 p.m. THE STATION: Happy Abandon, Cranston Dean; Free. 8 p.m.

SUN, APR 21

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: Valley Maker, Tomberlin; $10$12. 8:30 p.m. LOCAL 506: Born A New, Weeping Wound, Basilica, Filth, Discerner; $10$12. 7:30 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Art Smashes Records; $6-$8. 8:30 p.m.

MON, APR 22

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: KOLARS; $12-$15. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: KAROSHI, Pool Boy, Sister,Brother; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. LOCAL 506: Crumb, Corridor, Indigo De Souza; Sold out. 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Folkfaces; $7-$10. 8:30 p.m. SLIM’S:

Zephyranthes, Table Tennis Dreamer, Owen Fitzgerald [$5, 9 P.M.]

If Beto O’Rourke doesn’t bring back The Mars Volta, the spacey prog-rock shredfests and noisy punk charges of shapeshifting Raleigh trio Zephyranthes are solid consolations. The slinky, slightly psychedelic jams of new Chapel Hill project Table Tennis Dreamer cross neo-soul and indie pop with John Waldo Wittenmyer’s chilled-out croon. Former Jokes&Jokes&Jokes leader Owen FitzGerald adds sparse, sullen Southern gothic solo tunes. —Spencer Griffith


TUE, APR 23 CAROLINA THEATRE:

Afro-Cuban All Stars [$35-$55, 8 P.M.]

It’s no understatement to say that Juan de Marcos González has singlehandedly changed the direction of Cuban music over the past forty years. The Afro-Cuban All Stars, which grew out of the sessions that produced the Buena Vista Social Club album in 1996, is the culmination of that work. The band brings together talented young musicians and sets them loose to recreate and reinterpret the vast breadth of Cuban music. —Dan Ruccia DUKE’S BIDDLE MUSIC BUILDING: Duke Chorale; free. 8 p.m. LOCAL 506: We Jam Econo: The Story of The Minutemen; free. 8 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Unaka Prong, BadCameo; $7-$10. 9 p.m. UNC’S MEMORIAL HALL: N.C. Jazz Repertory Orchestra & Branford Marsalis; $37+. 7:30 p.m. THE WICKED WITCH: Golden Pelicans; $8-$10. 8 p.m.

WED, APR 24

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM: The Brook & The Bluff, Jamie Drake; $10-$12. 8 p.m. THE CAVE: Krantz, 90 Proof Therapist; $5 suggested. 9 p.m. KINGS: Helltrap Nightmare, Mister Wallace; $10+. 8 p.m. LINCOLN THEATRE: Blue October; $28. 8 p.m. LOCAL 506: Unwed Sailor, Woodvamp, Tacoma Park; $8-$10. 8:30 p.m. MOTORCO: Wicca Phase Springs Eternal, SMRTDEATH, Fantasy Camp; $16-$20. 7 p.m. POUR HOUSE: Cousin Earth, Cosmic Superheroes; $7-$10. 9 p.m.

Juan de Marcos González and Afro-Cuban All Stars perform at The Carolina Theatre on Tuesday, Apr. 23. PHOTO COURTESY OF RIOT ARTISTS INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 31


art 4.17–4.24 ONGOING All the Pop: Thru Jun 2. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Keith Allen, Ben Hamburger, Kaidy Lewis, Carolyn Rugen: Thru Jun 8. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill.

OPENING April Showers, Art Flowers: Chris Graebner (paintings), Susan Hope (painted stained glass), and Lynn Wartski (mixed media sculpture). Apr 22-May 26. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. HillsboroughGallery.com. The Colors of the Spring: Paintings and sculptures. Apr 19-May 13. Golden Belt, Durham. Gemynii: Art show with food, drinks, and more. Fri, Apr 19, 6-9 p.m. Joe Van Gogh, Durham. Ayla Gizlice: Natura Naturans: UNC-Chapel Hill Undergraduate Honors Exhibition. Found objects. Apr 22-26. UNC’s Hanes Art Center, Chapel Hill. art.unc.edu. The Magic of the Sculptural Jewelry: Jewelry. Reception: Apr 19, 6-9 p.m. Apr 19-May 13. Golden Belt, Durham. Lynne Feiss Necrason: Sylvan Sculptures: Photography. Apr 19-May 11. Reception: Apr 19, 6-9 p.m.Through This Lens, Durham.

Judith F. Baca’s “Las tres Marías” (1976) is on view in Pop América at The Nasher. Read our review at indyweek.com. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NASHER 32 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

Amanda Barr: Group Hoarder Face Time: Performance art. Thru Apr 27. Lump, Raleigh. lumpprojects.org. Annual Photography Show: Apr 6-Jun 2. West Point on the Eno, Durham. apm.activecommunities.com. Jasmine Best: Screened In: Sculptural elements constructed with textiles, fabric, and sewing notions. Thru May 12. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. camraleigh.org.

Harriet Hoover: Attic Breeze Tests: Sculptures. Thru Apr 28. Horace Williams House, Chapel Hill. I AM A MAN: Civil Rights Photographs, 1960-1970: Thru May 31. Center for the Study of the American South, Chapel Hill. south.unc.edu. John James Audubon: The Birds of America: Ornithological engravings. Thru Dec 2020. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Karen Youth Art Group & Gesche Würfel’s UNC Advanced Photography Class: Group show. Thru Apr 20. FRANK’s Outreach Gallery, Chapel Hill. frankisart.com. Judy Keene: Numinous: Paintings. Thru May 4. Craven Allen Gallery, Durham.

Best of North Carolina 2019: Various artists and media. Thru May 14. Gallery C, Raleigh. galleryc.net.

Left-Handed Liberty: Multiple artists. Thu Jun 23. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu.

Beyond Despair: An Environmental Call for Art: Work from 33 artists about, including, and referencing the environment. Thru Jun 22. National Humanities Center, Durham.vaeraleigh.org.

Stacey L. Kirby: The Department of Reflection: Multimedia. Thru Aug 4. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. ackland.org.

Wim Botha: Stil Life with Discontent: Mixed media. Additional work on view at 21c Museum Hotel. Thru Aug 4. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Sophie Chunn: HagerSmith: Thru Apr 30. VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. vaeraleigh.org.

Sean Livingstone & Erica Gimson: From Here to Their: Paintings and cyanotype prints. Thru May 4. Horse & Buggy Press and Friends, Durham. mailchi.mp. Richard Lund: DREAMLAND: Paintings. Thru Apr 27. Artspace, Raleigh. artspacenc.org. Christian Marclay: Surround Sounds: Synchronized silent video installation. Thru Sep 8. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu.

Lien Truong: The Sky is Not Sacred: Multimedia. Artist talk: May 18, noon. Apr 19-Jun 22. Artspace, Raleigh.

Linda Ruth Dickinson: Resonant: Paintings. Thru May 24. The Mahler Fine Art, Raleigh. themahlerfineart. com.

UNC-Chapel Hill MFA Class of 2019: Sacred Wasteland: Group show with guest curator, William Paul Thomas. Apr 19-May 26. Ackland Art Museum, Chapel Hill. ackland.org.

Great and Small: Thru Apr 27. V L Rees Gallery, Raleigh. vlrees.com.

Michela Martello: Consequential Stranger: Mixed media. Thru Jun 1. Artspace, Raleigh. artspacenc.org.

Stephen Hayes: Legacy, Legacy, Legacy: Mixed media. Thru May 19. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh.

Chris Musina: Paradise: Paintings. Thru Jun 2. Oneoneone, Chapel Hill. oneoneone.gallery.


submit! Got something for our calendar? Submit the details at:

https://indyweek.com/submit#cals DEADLINE: 5 p.m. each Wednesday for the following Wednesday’s issue. QUESTIONS? cvillena@indyweek.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 19

NATACHA SOCHAT: BETWEEN PRESENCE AND ABSENCE (MAKING ROOTS) As a child of Cuban and Puerto Rican parentage, Natacha Sochat grew up in both Cuba and the South Bronx, and before she eventually landed in the Triangle, she lived, studied, taught, and worked in places like Germany, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts, where she earned a studio-art MFA from Tufts University. This restless geography forms the backdrop of her Carrack exhibit, Between Presence and Absence (Making Roots), which closes two days after this Third Friday reception. Using mediums such as paint, crochet, and sculpture, Sochat “explores the evanescent space between presence and absence as it pertains to being uprooted and making roots.” In the gallery, her striking paintings and rangy textiles are installed in such a way that, instead of standing apart as if life’s moments were partioned off so simply, they all communicate and clamor together in the manner of true lived experience. —Brian Howe

THE CARRACK, DURHAM 6 p.m.–9 p.m., free, www.thecarrack.org N.C. Artists Exhibition: Juried group show. Thru Jun 9. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. ralfinearts. org.

[re]ACTION: Artistic renditions inspired by scientific images. Thru Jun 23. Warehouse Artist Studios @ Golden Belt, Durham.

NCCU Digital Pre-Production: Digital animations as used in video game production. Thru Apr 30. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org.

reNautilus: Thru Jul. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com.

Susan Harbage Page: Borderlands: Documentary photos and found objects from the US-Mexico border. Thru Jul 28. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. PLANET eARTh: Thru Apr 28. Pleiades Gallery, Durham. Pop América, 1965-1975: Latin American pop art. Thru Jul 21. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Portraits of Durham: 64 local artists. Thru May 2. Durham Arts Council, Durham. Portraying Power and Identity: A Global Perspective: Thru Jan 2020. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com.

Susannah Sayler and Edward Morris: Their World Is Not Our World: Video installation. Thru Jul 7. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. Cher Shaffer: Art from the Holler: Folk art. Thru May 31. Alexander Dickson House, Hillsborough. She Likes Blue: Group show. Thru Apr. 311 Gallery & Studios, Raleigh. Small Treasures: Juried exhibit. Thru Apr 19. Cary Gallery of Artists, Cary.carygalleryofartists. org. Natacha Sochat: Between Presence and Absence: Mixed media. Thru Apr 21. The Carrack Modern Art, Durham. thecarrack.org. Tilden Stone: Southern Surreal: Furniture. Thru Sep 8. Gregg

Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. William Paul Thomas: Disrupting Homogeny: Portraits. Thru Jul. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com/ durham. Cheryl Thurber: Documenting Gravel Springs, Mississippi, in the 1970s: Photos. Thru May. UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library, Chapel Hill. Ely Urbanski: Prints on fabric. Thru Apr 30. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Where We Find Ourselves: The Photographs of Hugh Mangum, 1897-1922: Thru May 19. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Whispers & Echoes: Eduardo Lapetina, Arianna Bara, and Michael Salemi. Thru Apr 21. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. hillsboroughgallery.com. Within the Frame: Photos. Thru Jul 7. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org.

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Thursday, April 18, 2019 6 PM – 8 PM at Parizade Hosted by Kidznotes _____________________

Join author and Kidznotes founder Lucia Peel Powe for a special reading and book signing. Ms. Powe will be reading from her new book “You Can Take It With You: A Southern Grandma Spills the Beans about Growing Up (And, Consequently, Growing Old) in the South.” She reflects on a long and colorful life in this collection of essays following her experiences in Macon, Georgia to the Miss America Pageant to TV’s Romper Room.

BILL BURTON ATTORNEY AT LAW Un c o n t e s t e d Di vo rc e Bu s i n e s s L a w UNCONTESTED In c o r p o r a t i o n / L LC / DIVORCE Pa r t n e r s h i p MUSIC BUSINESS LAW Wi l l s INCORPORATION/LLC WILLS C o l l e c t i o n s SEPARATION AGREEMENTS Mu s i c

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bill.burton.lawyer@gmail.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 33


page THURSDAY, APRIL 18

POETRY ON THE PORCH: TIANA CLARK AND EMILIA PHILLIPS In Tiana Clark’s “Soil Horizon,” a white character makes a familiar, dense plea: “Can’t we / just let the past be the past?” I Can’t Talk About the Trees Without the Blood, Clark’s second poetry collection, published last year, explores this question through a series of formally imaginative poems (the book is broken into three parts, divided by the title: “I Can’t Talk,” “About the Trees,” and “Without the Blood”) that draw electric threads between living history and the past. In “Nashville,” which The New Yorker published, a vivid description of a farm-to-table meal corkscrews into a Southern city’s appropriations and racist history, which many of its inhabitants would prefer to believe was soundly in the past, even as they heap “hot chicken for $16” and “fried heat and grease from black food and milk” on a plate. Clark, a graduate of Vanderbilt University’s MFA program, will read alongside Greensboro MFA assistant professor Emilia Phillips, who is the author of three poetry collections, including last year’s Empty Clip. —Sarah Edwards

Tiana Clark

PHOTO BY DANIEL MEIG

4.17

Belle Boggs The Gulf 7pm

4.19

YA Panel with Brenda Rufener and Jaye Robin Brown, moderated by Amber Smith 7pm

4.21

Closed for Easter Sunday

4.22

Scott Reintgen Nyxia Uprising 7pm

4.23

Ali Standish August Isle 7pm

4.24

Anna Quindlen Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting 7pm www.quailridgebooks.com • 919.828.1588 • North Hills 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road, Raleigh, NC 27609 CHECK OUT OUR PODCAST: BOOKIN’ w/Jason Jefferies

RECYCLE THIS PAPER

34 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

LOVE HOUSE, CHAPEL HILL 5:30 p.m., free, www.southerncultures.org

READINGS & SIGNINGS Sally Nuamah: How Girls Achieve. Author Sally Nuamah in conversation with scholar, activist, and filmmaker Laura Edwards. Tue, Apr 23, 7 p.m. Regulator Bookshop, Durham. regulatorbookshop.com. Anna Quindlen: Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting. Wed, Apr 24, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. David Rowell: Music book Wherever the Sound Takes You. Sat, Apr 20, 4 p.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com. Samia Serageldin & Lee Smith: Creative nonfiction anthology Mothers and Strangers. Sat, Apr 20, 11 a.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com.

LECTURES ETC. Garrard Conley & Equality North Carolina: A Fireside Chat: Author Garrard Conley in conversation with The Trevor Project’s Sam Brinton. Wed, Apr 17, 6 p.m. NorthStar Church of the Arts, Durham. northstardurham.com. Experiments from DocX at the Center for Documentary Studies: Ruby Fridays. Fri, Apr 19, noon. Ruby Lounge at Rubenstein Arts Center, Durham. artscenter.duke.edu.

Ali Standish: Novel August Isle. Tue, Apr 23, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com.

me too. HBCU Tour: With Tarana J. Burke and Yaba Blay. Light refreshments. Thu, Apr 18, 6 p.m. NCCU’s HM Michaux Jr School of Education Auditorium, Durham. nccu.edu.

Orin Starn & Miguel La Serna: The Shining Path: Love, Madness, and Revolution in the Andes. Thu, Apr 18, 7 p.m. Regulator Bookshop, Durham. regulatorbookshop.com.

Jason Moran: Musician Jason Moran in conversation with spoken word artist Dasan Ahanu. Refreshments. Fri, Apr 19, noon. The Pinhook, Durham. thepinhook.com.


stage

OPENING Best of the City Roundup: Comedy. Wed, Apr 24, 8 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Between2Clouds to You: Variety show. Fri, Apr 19, 7 p.m. Arcade of Thrones, Raleigh. between2clouds. ticketbud.com. Comedy Overload: $5. Thu, Apr 18, 8 p.m. Pour House Music Hall, Raleigh. thepourhousemusichall.com. Comedy Showcase: Between2Clouds. Comedy. With host Mike Horn. Wed, Apr 17, 8 p.m. Arcade of Thrones, Raleigh.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20

SINBAD

Before the Kings of Comedy or Redhead Kingpin and the F.B.I., there was the true redheaded kingpin of them all, Sinbad. To many, he was the father-figure coach on A Different World, but newbies may know him as Milton on the FOX sitcom, Rel. As far as “clean comedy” is concerned, Sinbad ran with the torch that Bill Cosby, in all of his early anti-raunchy campaigning, ignited, but Sinbad did so with better panache, embracing popular culture—and with it, the black audience that supported him. Yes, his garish outfits predated Coogi sweaters and Steve Harvey’s ridiculous suits, but at least he had enough colorful punch lines to accessorize them. Have you ever heard the joke about how Sinbad was a one-time extra member of the Jacksons, and how Michael Jackson stole his signature scream from him when he screeched from getting a paper cut? Yeah, it’s unlikely that any of that is true, but just let Sinbad spin it and give him some laughs. He’s earned it. —Eric Tullis

Cruel Intentions: The ‘90s Musical: Wed, Apr 24, 7:30 p.m. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com. Duke Opera Workshop: These are a Few of My Favorite Scenes: Free. Apr 19: 8 pm. Apr 20: 3 p.m. Duke’s Baldwin Auditorium, Durham. music.duke.edu.

MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL, RALEIGH | 8 p.m., $32+, www.dukeenergycenterraleigh.com

The Monti GrandSLAM: Storytelling. $24. Thu, Apr 18, 7:30 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org.

Sinbad PHOTO COURTESY OF DUKE ENERGY CENTER

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

Tigers Be Still: Play. $10. Apr 19: 7:30 p.m. Apr 20: 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. 1songproductions.org. Your Healing is Killing Me: Playmakers Repertory Company. Play. $15+. Apr 24-28. UNC’s Paul Green Theatre, Chapel Hill. playmakersrep.org.

ONGOING 462 Stand Up Comedy Show: Comedy. $8. Sat, Apr 20, 9 p.m. The People’s Improv Theater, Chapel Hill. thepit-chapelhill.com Anastasia: Musical. Thru Apr 21. Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham. dpacnc.com.

Jay Pharaoh: Comedy. Apr 19-20. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com.

Godspell: $24-$33. Thru Apr 28. Theatre In The Park, Raleigh. theatreinthepark.com.

Shamel Pitts: Black Velvet: Architectures and Archetypes & Bobbi Jene Smith: A Study on Effort: Dance. Programs performed in succession each night. $27. Apr 24-25. Current ArtSpace + Studio, Chapel Hill. carolinaperformingarts.org.

How I Learned to Drive: Thru Apr 21. UNC’s Paul Green Theatre, Chapel Hill. playmakersrep.org.

The Great Celestial Cow: Play. Thru Apr 28. Burning Coal Theatre at the Murphey School, Raleigh. burningcoal.org.

INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 35


screen SPECIAL SHOWINGS 3 Faces: $3-$5. Sun, Apr 21, 2 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com. Clue: Apr 19-24. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Friday: Mon, Apr 22, 7 p.m. Schoolkids Records, Raleigh. schoolkidsrecords.com. High Fidelity: Conversation with John Cusack to follow. Sat, Apr 20, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh. com. Life of Brian: Thu, Apr 18, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Love is a Racket: Wed, Apr 24, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. The Masked Avengers: Wed, Apr 24, 8:15 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Miss Potter: Movies in the Morning. Discussion with Druscilla French to follow. Wed, Apr 24, 10 a.m. UNC Friday Center, Chapel Hill. fridaycenter.unc.edu. Purple Rain & Desperately Seeking Susan: Fri, Apr 19, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Up in Smoke: Sat, Apr 20, 4:25 p.m. Schoolkids Records, Raleigh. schoolkidsrecords.com. 36 | 4.17.19 | INDYweek.com

OPENING Breakthrough—Christian drama about a teenager’s near-death experience falling through ice. Rated PG. The Curse of La Llorona— Horror film based on the legend of the weeping woman. Rated R. High Life—Robert Pattison plays a father who, along with his baby, is stranded in deep space. Rated R. Penguins—Steve, a young penguin, searches for a mate in this Disneynature comingof-age feature. Rated PG.

N OW P L AY I N G The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Read reviews of these films at indyweek.com.

 The Aftermath—A handsome, creaky, dull period melodrama. Rated R.  Captain Marvel— Brie Larson is an intergalactic fighter who begins questioning who she is. Rated PG-13. ½ The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part—Though there’s a live-action subplot, the little plastic people and their incessant pop-culture references remain the heart and soul of the franchise. Rated PG. ½ Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse—Not only is it a good Spider-Man story, this animated film introduces welcome diversity to the tale of Peter Parker. Rated PG.  Us—Jordan Peele’s Get Out followup pairs a haunting atmosphere with humor and a chilling call to action.

OPENING FRIDAY, APRIL 19

AMAZING GRACE In 1972, Aretha Franklin recorded a live album of gospel classics at the New Temple Missionary Baptist Church in Los Angeles. Though Sydney Pollack was hired to make a concert film about the record, technical difficulties prevented a commercial release for decades. Finally, after forty-seven years, Amazing Grace has been completed, landing at select theaters (including The Carolina and The Rialto here in the Triagle). The daughter of a Baptist reverend, Franklin grew up playing the piano and singing in church; this album was a touchstone and a return to her origins. The audio version was a huge commercial hit, selling two million copies, but the film shows us a fuller picture of the virtuosic majesty and embodied, sweaty passion that characterized Franklin as a performer. If her voice is enormous and soaring on the record, on film, that largesse is even more apparent as we see her in the small interior of the church. Amazing Grace is a dazzling document of the Queen of Soul at the height of her career. —Laura Jaramillo

VARIOUS THEATERS, TRIANGLE-WIDE | Various times and prices, www.amazing-grace-movie.com

food & drink Botanist & Barrel Cider Dinner: $45. Wed, Apr 24, 6 p.m. Pompieri Pizza, Durham. pompieripizza.com.

and more. $40. Sat, Apr 20, 3 p.m. CrossTies Bistro and Beer Garden, Carrboro. crosstiescarrboro.com.

CrossTies Beer Garden Block Party: Benefit for The Eddy Pub Chef Isaiah Allen’s medical bills. Food and drink, music, raffle,

Holly Springs Farmers Market: Sat, Apr 20, 9 a.m. Holly Springs Cultural Center, Holly Springs. HSFarmersMarket.com.

Amazing Grace PHOTO COURTESY OF NEON FILMS

Literary Luncheon with Anna Quindlen: Ticketed luncheon with author Anna Quindlen to mark the release of her new book, Nanaville. $90. Wed, Apr 24, noon. Fearrington Barn, Pittsboro. fearrington.com.

You Can’t Spell BEERS without BEES: Benefit for Keep Durham Beautiful’s Pollinator Project. Honey beer, bee-related vendors & non-profits, and spelling bee. Sat, Apr 20, 1 p.m. Fullsteam, Durham. fullsteam.ag.


indy classifieds employment NOW HIRING BARTENDERS FOR AL’S PUB SHACK In Governors Village Chapel Hill. $5/hr. plus tips. Must be able to work nights and weekends. Please e-mail resume to al@alsburgershack.com.

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

FTCC HIRING FOR SEVERAL INSTRUCTOR POSITIONS: Fayetteville Technical Community College is now accepting applications for the following positions: Barber Instructor, Engineering Instructor (10-month contract), Industry Training Instructor (CATV), Industry Training Instructor (Electrical Systems) For detailed information and to apply, please visit our employment portal at: https:// faytechcc.peopleadmin.com/ Human Resources Office Phone: (910) 678-7342 Internet: http://www.faytechcc.edu An Equal Opportunity Employer

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body • mind • spirit

misc. events NATIVE JOURNEYS: MUSIC & DANCE FESTIVAL Join us for an exciting weekend at Frisco Native American Museum’s Native Journeys: Music & Dance Festival, April 27 & 28, 2019. Info: 252-995-4440 or https://nativeamericanmuseum.org/events/native-journeysfestival-music-dance/

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Traditional art of meditative movement for health, energy, relaxation, self-defense. Classes/workshops throughout the Triangle. Magic Tortoise School - Since 1979. Call Jay or Kathleen, 919-968-3936 or www.magictortoise.com

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deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming April 24:

CARY/APEX/MORRISVILLE

For advertising opportunities, contact your ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 4.17.19 | 37


crossword If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “puzzle pages” at the bottom of our webpage.

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© Puzzles by Pappocom

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HISTORY TRIVIA: *On April 17, 1865, Gen. William Sherman met with Gen. Joseph Johnston at today’s Bennett Place to discuss the terms of Johnston’s surrender. They completed the surrender process on April 26, 1865. *On April 19, 1877, the first agricultural research station in NC opened in a chemistry lab at UNC. In 1889, today’s NC State University took over the management of the station. Courtesy of the Museum of Durham History

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