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Who isn't? But while pondering mortality, The Mountain Goats maestro is making his best music and living his best life. By Charles Aaron, p. 9


2 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com


WHAT WE LEARNED THIS WEEK DURHAM • CHAPEL HILL VOL. 36 NO. 47

DEPARTMENTS

6 Durham is painting crosswalks that riff on Rice Krispies characters.

6 News

7 The Sons of Confederate Veterans threatened UNC with a lawsuit everyone knew it would lose. UNC offered them $2.5 million.

16 Food 18 Arts & Culture 22 What to Do This Week

9 John Darnielle of The Mountain Goats has taken up jogging in Maplewood Cemetery.

25 Music Calendar 29 Arts & Culture Calendar

16 Mitch is a good name for a dude in a dive bar. 18 Sonorous Road is becoming Pure Life Theatre, a necessary experiment in resource-sharing for independent theater artists. 19 From The Beatles to The Smurfs, Ron Campbell animated the golden age of Saturday-morning cartoons. 21 Lump’s Conner Calhoun sees queer beauty everywhere, whether it’s pop culture or ancient mythology.

Paul Scott wants the City of Durham to paint a crosswalk at McDougald Terrace (see page 6). PHOTO BY JADE WILSON

On the cover

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backtalk

INDY VOICES

A Matter of Respect RALEIGH NEEDS TO HONOR BLACK RESIDENTS’ HERITAGE BY HONORING CHAVIS PARK

The Problem with Diversity In a recent cover story, Jeffrey C. Billman wrote about Andrew McGuffin, a lawyer who was fired by the Social Security Administration’s Raleigh office in 2011 but prevailed last month in federal court after alleging that, as a veteran with PTSD, he was the victim of discrimination. Carol Brooke responds: “At the beginning, you paint an extraordinarily negative picture of McGuffin, starting with the condemnation that ‘Andrew McGuffin was not a star employee.’ You describe him as bitter, with wounded pride. But then you acknowledge what McGuffin actually proved in court: He was not a poor performer. In fact, the Social Security office discriminated against him and applied illegal performance standards. It appears that McGuffin is, as he put it, ‘a damn good lawyer.’ So why the condemnation of McGuffin, someone who has finally been vindicated after a grueling and lengthy court battle he shouldn’t have had to fight?” G. Ahearn offers a different take: “Can you imagine working with McGuffin? Oh yeah, he doesn’t work. That was my job for twenty-four years: pick up after the McGuffins. That’s the problem with diversity; you can’t favor special groups and still have equal opportunity.” Last week, Leigh Tauss wrote about Raleigh’s neighborhood conservation overlay districts, which the new city council is likely to scrutinize. William A. Allen III writes: “My wife, Ruth Heuer, and I have lived in Cameron Village since 1996. I was the organizer and first president of the Cameron Village Neighborhood Association. Ruth and I vehemently opposed the proposed NCOD because we advocate for density and progressive redevelopment. We are not afraid of change. To set the record straight, the Cameron Village NCOD proponents withdrew their request because opponents like us were overwhelmingly against it. We managed to get signatures on petitions to stop it from a majority of Cameron Village property owners. That same clear-headed majority voted in the new members of the Raleigh City Council.” Want to see your name in bold? Comment: indyweek.com Email: backtalk@indyweek.com Facebook: @IndependentWeekly Twitter: @indyweek

BY COURTNEY NAPIER

COURTNEY NAPIER is a Raleigh native, community activist, and co-host of the podcast Mothering on the Margins. NEXT WEEK: BARRY SAUNDERS, a former News & Observer columnist.

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few weeks ago, I read a story in The Washington Post about a historic moment for my family: The bones of freedman Smith Price were returned to Asbury United Methodist Church, where my mother’s family attended for generations, my parents married, and I was christened. Price, who donated the land the church was built on, was freed in 1791 and established a village of freed people just outside of Annapolis, Maryland. But in the 1980s, like most historically Black neighborhoods, this community was seen as “blight” and crushed under the heel of urban renewal. Despite residents asking the city for an archaeological survey, officials were too thirsty for the luxury townhomes that would replace their modest homes. As construction crews began demolition, they ripped into a basement, exposing bones and coffins. Luckily, local archaeologist Wayne Clark was there the moment the cemetery was sliced in two. He moved quickly, gathering what remained and transferring it to a museum storage site. There it sat for thirty years, until Janice Hayes-Williams—an Asbury church member, historian, and family friend— came to a meeting at the museum. By chance, Hayes-Williams asked if there were any bones from Annapolis at the museum, and the first set she was shown was that of Smith Price and his son. For me, this story is bittersweet because, while I’m thankful the priceless artifact was brought back into the prominence it deserves, I see the same struggle to preserve Black history right in front of me. Raleigh is in the midst of its own Smith Price saga, but the name is John Chavis. John Chavis Memorial Park has been a thorn in the Raleigh City Coun-

cil’s side for decades. What was once a jewel in the flourishing Chavis Heights neighborhood at the height of the Jim Crow era—with a baseball field, gymnasium, and pool that attracted Black families from all over the state—was stripped of resources after integration and left to deteriorate. Chavis, a Revolutionary War hero, never knew the chains of a master. A world-class teacher, he opened his first school in Raleigh in 1808, then opened more in surrounding counties. According to the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Chavis Park was built near the sight of the first school. Local activist Lonnette Williams believes that Chavis’s school lies beneath the park, between the original carousel building and the playground. Williams has fought for many years for Chavis Park to be restored to its former glory. “Even if the school isn’t there, this location was the gathering hub for the entire park,” she says. “Who knows what priceless artifacts we will find if we take the time to look.” Like in Annapolis, it’s taken a long time for Raleigh to give the park its due. Much of Williams’s advocacy has involved convincing the council and city staffers that the long-ago features the community described in the park actually existed. The event that launched Williams into advocacy came in 2007, when she got word from then-council member Russ Stephenson that the city wanted to raze the park and turn it in an aquatic complex. Williams was appalled. The community was never asked—and residents didn’t want it. Since then, Williams has been deeply involved in plans for Chavis Park’s renovation. It’s been an uphill battle, but the city recently broke ground on phase

one of the refit. Excavators and bulldozers are edging ever nearer to the area Williams believes is the site of the Chavis School. There are no plans in place for an archaeologist to be present. All I can think about are the thirty years it took for Smith Price’s bones to finally be returned to rest in Annapolis. Everyone has a right to see their heritage celebrated in the city in which they have sown their blood, sweat, and tears. Raleigh has memorialized plantations, enslavers, and Confederate soldiers. But when it comes to proudly recognizing the free Black people and their enslaved counterparts who built this city, it falls short. My life and my connection to my country is so much richer knowing the story of Smith Price. When I visit my aunts and cousins, I can drive to St. Anne’s cemetery and pay my respects to the man whose hard work and generosity provided the church that knit together a community and created my family. Imagine what the items potentially hidden beneath John Chavis Memorial Park could mean to the residents who created lifelong memories there. And imagine the soul-crushing pain of watching the powers-that-be drive a bulldozer through their connection to their heritage—our heritage. I hope for folks like Williams, folks who have given so much to Raleigh, that the city honors them by honoring their past. backtalk@indyweek.com INDY Voices—a rotating column featuring some of the Triangle’s most compelling writers—is made possible by contributions to the INDY Press Club. Visit KeepItINDY.com for more information. INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 5


indynews

Fear of a Black Crosswalk

DURHAM IS SPENDING MILLIONS ON PUBLIC ART. WHY WON’T IT PAINT A CROSSWALK NEAR MCDOUGALD TERRACE? BY THOMASI MCDONALD

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n August 2018, Paul Scott asked the Durham City Council to paint a dilapidated crosswalk in the McDougald Terrace housing project in the Pan-Africanist colors red, black, and green—a way to “instill self-pride” in the impoverished and violence-plagued community, he says. “I thought it would be a good look for McDougald Terrace,” Scott says. “Maybe if gang members saw those colors, they would lay down their gang colors.” Scott has often resorted to untraditional means to effect change. A decidedly unorthodox Baptist pastor, former Herald-Sun columnist, and founder of the Black Messiah Movement—which combines black liberation theology with social activism and argues that black communities need to become their own saviors—he spends Sunday afternoons in West Durham handing out books that celebrate black history. Scott says the city was initially receptive to his sidewalk proposal. Department of Transportation officials assured him “it wouldn’t be a big thing to get done between November and December,” he says. But then “they moved the carrot,” he says, asking him to get community support. So he started a Change.org petition that garnered about twenty-five signatures. From there, he says, he was told there needed to be a community meeting “to determine who wanted the crosswalk painted. This is a community who is never asked its opinion on anything.” Scott says he went through months of phone calls, emails, and meetings, but nothing came of them. Eventually, he decided to put his energy elsewhere. But in October, Scott began thinking about the crosswalk again when McDougald was the site of one of a string of high-profile shootings that killed two and injured eight in Durham in forty-eight hours. Then, last month, the neighborhood was again in the spotlight after a man was 6 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

Paul Scott, in front of one of Durham’s painted crosswalks shot to death in broad daylight not far from where Scott wants to paint the crosswalk. The violence, city council member Mark-Anthony Middleton wrote on Facebook, “is leaving in its wake a trail of young black bodies, heartbroken families, and a frightened community. What is possibly more ominous is that I believe we are creeping up on a dangerous inflection point. That point is where we become desensitized to the gun violence robbing us of our children because it happens so often. … It is time for true organizing and activism.” It’s easy to dismiss Scott’s proposal to use art to combat violence as an empty gesture. But at the moment, nothing else is stopping the gunfire in McDougald Terrace—not the police substation in the neighborhood, nor the heavy police presence, nor the perpetually closed Bull City United nonprofit, housed in a Ridgeway Street apartment, which aims to reduce gang violence.

PHOTO BY JADE WILSON

Perhaps the crosswalk could serve as a bridge between McDougald residents and city leaders—in synchronicity with Middleton’s call for “true organizing and activism,” or Scott’s plea for besieged communities to become their own saviors. In any event, it couldn’t hurt. At a minimum, says Travis Mann, who spends a lot of time in McDougald with his toddler son, the crosswalk would show that city officials are paying attention. Right now, Mann says, council members only visit “when it’s an election, or when some kid gets shot. As far as them coming out to hear from the community, hell no. So much happens in the projects that doesn’t get televised—every day, literally, something is happening.” Scott moved his proposal back to the front burner two weeks ago, when Cary officials unveiled a crosswalk celebrating the LGBTQ community. Soon after, Durham

officials announced the colorful painting of crosswalks titled “Snapping!, Crackling!, and Popping!,” riffing on the Rice Krispies characters. It’s one of three creative efforts that are part of SmART Durham, the city’s $10 million, multi-year public art and urban design project. Scott was incensed. “The only snap, crackle, and pop you hear in the hood are gunshots,” he says. “Cary does an LGBTQ crosswalk, and there’s no controversy. It was applauded. But if we want a crosswalk celebrating black history in McDougald Terrace, we have to go through bureaucracy, and it’s not fair.” For Scott, the crosswalk became a metaphor. City leaders could spend millions for public art but wouldn’t spend a fraction of that on the expression of black pride in one of the city’s most marginalized communities. So he fired off an email to council members: “You can’t imagine my astonishment when I recently learned that crosswalks are being painted in the gentrified areas downtown. What message does it send to the community when our officials pay more attention to the beautification of downtown than the areas that need it the most? Placing a crosswalk in McDougald Terrace could have helped saved lives instead of giving the well-off in Durham something to gaze at while they walk their poodles and sip Starbucks.” Council member Jillian Johnson responded on November 21, copying Scott on an email asking the city’s neighborhood services department to give him an update. Scott says he’s still awaiting word from the city. And he thinks he knows why his proposal has gone nowhere. “I think any symbol of black unity scares white people,” he says. “I think that’s the two-ton elephant in the room no one wants to talk about.” tmcdonald@indyweek.com


news

Surrendered Without a Fight THE SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS HAD NO CHANCE OF WINNING. UNC GAVE THEM $2.5 MILLION ANYWAY. BY JEFFREY C. BILLMAN

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he Sons of Confederate Veterans knew it was a lost cause. Ever since demonstrators had toppled Silent Sam in August 2018, the SCV’s North Carolina division had looked for ways to “have the memorial restored to its place of honour [or] to gain possession of the memorial and make an equally prominent public display for it at UNC’s expense,” leader Kevin Stone wrote in a letter to members last week. But the experts all told them the same thing: If they went to court, they’d lose. In fact, they didn’t even have the right to sue. “We could not get past the issue in North Carolina law of legal standing in the Silent Sam case so to bring a suit,” Stone recounted. “Even if we had filed suit, our complaint would have been challenged and dismissed immediately without result. After extensive consultation (with judges, retired judges, etc.), we were 100% certain that this would be the outcome.” But then—after outgoing UNC-Chapel Hill chancellor Carol Folt removed Silent Sam’s base from McCorkle Place in January—the UNC Board of Governors came to the rescue. Though UNC knew the SCV couldn’t prevail in court, Stone told his members, officials approached the neo-Confederates about making a deal. That kicked off months of secret negotiations, culminating in a controversial settlement announced last Wednesday—the day before Thanksgiving. According to Stone, UNC first proposed that the SCV lobby the General Assembly to strengthen the monuments protection law it passed in 2015; after that, though Silent Sam couldn’t return to campus, the SCV would get the monument and perhaps a half-million dollars. But the SCV failed to get lawmakers on board. At that point, Stone wrote, “we were despondent and thought that despite the exorbitant expense and almost certain waste of money and zero chance of winning, we were going to have to instruct our

Silent Sam, in his former glory

PHOTO BY JEREMY M. LANGE

attorney to sue just so we could say we tried honourably.” Before the SCV could file its lawsuit, UNC offered to settle. They reached an agreement, codified in a consent decree last week: The SCV would receive the monument plus $2.5 million for its care and the construction of a facility to house it. The money will come from “nonstate funds”; the facility can go anywhere except the fourteen counties that host UNC institutions. (Stone said he’d use the money “to build a small museum for the public [and] a comprehensive Division headquarters for the benefit of the membership.”) Stone called the settlement a “major strategic victory.” More accurately, UNC surrendered before the first shot was fired, despite knowing its opponent was hopelessly outgunned. The consent decree sidesteps the issue of standing by asserting that the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which donated Silent Sam to UNC in 1913, assigned its legal rights to the SCV. It then says the SCV is entitled to millions of dollars because the UDC’s gift

was conditioned on the monument being located on UNC grounds until, well, the heat death of the universe, apparently. That’s based on one word—“forever”—in the remarks of a UDC leader a century ago: “Accept this monument and may it stand forever as a perpetual monument to those sons of the university who suffered and sacrificed so much at the call of duty.” When Folt removed the monument’s base, the consent decree argues, UNC failed to uphold its end of the bargain. Stone’s letter was made public on Monday by T. Greg Doucette, a local attorney, former Board of Governors member, and INDY columnist. Doucette says he received it from an SCV member. Stone didn’t respond to the INDY’s request to confirm the letter’s authenticity, and he and SCV attorney Boyd Sturgis declined to comment on their negotiations with UNC. But soon after the INDY’s inquiries, Doucette received a message from Dropbox informing him that access to his file containing Stone’s letter had been disabled because the SCV had claimed copyright infringement.

Doucette first brought to light the peculiar circumstances of the settlement this weekend, after discovering that both the SCV’s complaint and UNC’s response were filed almost simultaneously in Orange County Superior Court on November 27— also the day Judge R. Allen Baddour Jr. signed the consent decree. However, court records show that UNC System interim president Bill Roper signed the consent decree a day earlier, and Board of Governors chairman Randy Ramsey signed it the previous week. In other words, this was orchestrated in advance—and designed to become public on a holiday weekend when few people were paying attention. UNC knew it was a bad look. A few years after killing an anti-poverty think tank and a civil rights center out of political spite, the Board of Governors— appointed by the Republican-controlled General Assembly—is handing Confederate fetishists $2.5 million to erect a shrine to a white-supremacist insurrection. Not because it has to. Because it chose to. UNC didn’t respond to the INDY’s request for comment, but former Board of Governors chairman Harry Smith told The News & Observer that UNC was already spending $500,000 a year to shelter Silent Sam and keep the peace between protesters. In the long run, Smith thought the settlement would be worth it. Stone told his members that UNC thought the fight wasn’t worth the hassle. “While they were not at all worried about losing,” he wrote, “the prospect of another media circus on campus really had them worried, especially given that they have a hostile faculty at UNC and a very nervous donor pool that shies away from any controversy.” jbillman@indyweek.com Additional reporting by Hannah Horowitz, Julia Masters, and Thomasi McDonald. INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 7


DOWNTOWN CARY

news

It Took a Village

BY THE THINNEST OF MARGINS, TAI HUYNH MADE HISTORY IN CHAPEL HILL BY JULIA MASTERS

Neighborhood Restaurant + Bar 160 East Cedar Street

Beer. Wine. Cider. Drafts. 120 E. Chatham Street

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8 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

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wenty-four votes. When everything was tallied, that’s all that separated Tai Huynh from Nancy Oates in the race for the fourth and final spot on the Chapel Hill Town Council. The difference between Huynh and sixth-place finisher Sue Hunter? Thirty-four votes. Between him and seventh-place finisher Renuka Soll? Eightynine votes. The November 5 election was razor-close, yet it produced a historic result. When he is sworn in Wednesday, Huynh will become the first Vietnamese-American elected to office in North Carolina. At twenty-two, he’s also only the third UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduate to sit on the town’s governing body. Incumbents Jessica Anderson and Michael Parker were re-elected last month. Huynh, a senior computer science major, joins fellow newcomer Amy Ryan on the council; both defeated the incumbent Oates. Huynh says his approach to public service was shaped by his upbringing. “My parents were refugees from Vietnam,” Huynh says. “Growing up, we didn’t exactly have much. But I think that shaped a certain sense of community, because we always had a community that supported us. When they first came over, they didn’t have jobs, they didn’t have anything, and the refugee community in America really puffed them up, got them their first jobs, drove them around, helped with groceries, things like that.” He was raised with a village mentality, with shared responsibility. His parents worked long hours while his grandparents and family friends took care of him. So even as an undergrad, he found himself wanting to give back. Huynh first became involved in town government about three years ago, after he formed a relationship with a Carolina Dining Services employee who lives in public housing, which in turn made him more

Tai Huynh

PHOTO COURTESY OF HUYNH’S CAMPAIGN WEBSITE

aware of the town’s affordable housing crisis. He wanted to help, he says, and he decided that the best way to make an impact was to become a member of the town’s housing advisory board. After his appointment, he became increasingly involved in activism in Chapel Hill, especially with issues surrounding racial disparities. Dissatisfied with the solutions in place, he decided to run for the town council. He says the results—narrow as his victory was—prove that the town is ready for change. “My main priorities will be increasing the affordability of our community,” Huynh says. “So increasing the affordable housing stock, decreasing the cost of living for our residents, especially for our moderate-to-low-income residents, and then increasing socioeconomic mobility, so trying to get together and develop a workforce development program.” After graduating this spring, Huynh—a Morehead-Cain scholar—says he’ll work full-time on his start-up, Acta Solutions,

which sells software to local governments to enable more community-driven, databacked decision-making. Huynh says the election showed how important it is for UNC-Chapel Hill students to get involved in the town’s government. The school has 19,117 undergraduates; only about 14,000 Chapel Hill residents voted on November 5. Students have the power to make a difference—and in Huynh’s case, they likely did. And while some students are registered to vote at their parents’ addresses, Huynh says he learned during the campaign that many simply don’t get involved because they’re overwhelmed by the many other things vying for their attention. That, he argues, needs to change. “There are so many issues that the town is involved in that impacts the day-to-day lives of students—housing, police, etc.,” he says. “So I think it’s high time for students to become involved in the community.” backtalk@indyweek.com


Midlife Midas The characters in John Darnielle’s songs wrestle with mortality, but The Mountain Goats maestro is doing just fine with his own

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By Charles Aaron

trolling around Durham’s Maplewood Cemetery as the sun sets on a balmy Black Friday, John Darnielle and I are talking about life, not death. After The Mountain Goats singer-songwriter and his wife of twenty-one years, Lalitree, became parents (Roman is eight; Moses is four), she began running for exercise. He did not. But recently, as she neared 5K-fit, her husband felt shamed (or inspired) into unmooring his indie-rock arse. Now, the ex-smoker faithfully jogs through this weatherworn resting place, and feels better than he has at any time in his fifty-two years. In other words, Darnielle is following the trajectory of many of his songs’ characters, who are scattered across about forty EPs and albums—including this year’s more sonically sophisticated In League with Dragons—and two novels: He’s facing the maddening grind of mortality, but instead of conceding to time, he’s putting in the road work for the next fight. The INDY caught up with Darnielle just after his European tour, before this weekend’s two-night stand (with Reese McHenry) at the Haw River Ballroom, to discuss making music in middle age, the possibility of him writing a rock opera, learning to guitar solo, and other twists in this mortal coil.

PHOTOS BY JADE WILSON

THE MOUNTAIN GOATS

Friday, Dec. 6 & Saturday, Dec. 7, 8 p.m., $34+ Haw River Ballroom, Saxapahaw hawriverballroom.com

INDY: So, really, how much did fear of your impending demise play into all this physical activity? DARNIELLE: [Laughs] Well, it’s like what that Free Solo guy [rock climber Alex Honnold] said, and I’m paraphrasing: “The purpose of your body is to do stuff.” For my thirties and forties, I basically did nothing. When we moved to Durham [in 2003], I joined a gym; I joined a dojo. Nothing. It didn’t take. It’s been a long process. So, don’t get me wrong, I’m not trying to cheat death. I strongly suspect you will die when your genes have programmed you to die. We’re about the same age, and I think about death and decay a lot. It’s weird. It is. My father died last year, and his wife followed shortly thereafter. I do ruminate on it, but now that’s mainly because I’m a parent. I think that’s the major thing that parenthood does to you. Before, I didn’t give a fuck INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 9


whether I lived or died, honestly. Some people would’ve been upset if I were gone, but they would’ve been fine. With children, you can’t imagine them existing in the world without you in it. I want to be there with them every minute. So, I do think about getting weaker—although I’m feeling “I just had the most stronger than ever now— and at some point, your bonkers-productive strength declines. But summer I’ve had since I’m like, “No, I have to be 1993, probably. I wrote strong for my sons!”

twenty-something songs.”

In the pop-music marketplace, it seems like it’s best to be young or almost dead. That’s when people find you the most interesting. That’s right, that’s right. When it comes to aging, I think Lou Reed navigated it about as well as you can and still made the records he wanted to make. I mean, I have a combative, Lester Bangs-like relationship to Lou Reed. I worshipped him when I was fourteen or fifteen. When I grew out of Genesis, that was my dude. Famously—to me—I had about forty Lou Reed records, including bootlegs. Of course,

10 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

if you love an artist that intensely, when you move on, you usually don’t care at all anymore. Like [Reed’s 1984 album] New Sensations, I could not relate to, “I am enjoying middle age.” That was the theme of the record. I mean, what a brave thing to do, if you’re the junkie poet guy, to go, “Hey, I’m married, I’m riding my motorcycle, and it’s kind of awesome.” It takes great artistic courage to say, “This song is great to me, and I don’t care what anybody else thinks.” If I have a song that’s too embarrassing or fragile—like, there’s a song that didn’t make the last album, “Witch Academy.” I thought that a lot of people would really hate that song. Why did you think people would hate it so much? Its emotional range was hyper-vulnerable. “Possum by Night” from the last album is a vulnerable song, but that one was just so— there was something about it. The melody was very keening, the song was very romantic, a little sentimental. It was about somebody leaving a town they didn’t want to live in anymore. See, now this is making me want to revisit it!


You talked earlier about listening a lot these days to early proto-progressive rock bands like Camel, Renaissance, and The Strawbs. A lot of those lesser-known guys were actually better bands than a lot of the stars of the scene. They didn’t have somebody to, say, get up there and wear a flower mask like Peter Gabriel. They just buried themselves in these long, complicated songs. Also, as a side note, I’m reasonably certain that I have the most complete Robin Trower collection in Durham—on vinyl. You’ve used specific subcultures as inspiration in the past. On the past three albums, there was wrestling on Beat the Champ, goths on Goths, and In League with Dragons started as a rock opera about an aging wizard. Have you ever wanted to follow through and make a full-on musical or opera? Could the next album be called Proggers? I don’t know, I approach things very slowly. I mean, I’ve got a big book I’m working on. To embark on something big and new means pushing everything to the side, and I just had the most bonkers-productive summer I’ve had since 1993, probably. I wrote twenty-something songs, and I kind of want to explore that zone. So, would I want to do a musical or opera? To start, I’d need a musical director, though I’d just get [Mountain Goats multi-instrumentalist] Matt Douglas. So, OK, I’ve thought about it. Early opera appeals to me because it was usually based on a story that was popular at the time or in myth. I listen to a lot of early opera, which is all Bible stories, and I don’t think there’s ever been a Jonah opera. Jonah is probably my favorite book in the Bible, and I actually have a new song, “The Shores of Tarshish,” that is a Jonah story, except that it takes place in Alabama. A lot of songwriters have notoriously tried musicals or operas—Pete Townshend, Paul Simon, Kanye, Randy Newman—with varying success. OK, I’m gonna take you back. I reviewed Randy Newman’s Faust for [San Francisco zine] Puncture in 1996! And remember, not that many people were reppin’ for Randy Newman in 1995 [the year Newman wrote the score for Toy Story]. But Faust is a good, good, good opera that only got presented a handful of times. It’s soooo cynical and amazing. James Taylor plays God, Don Henley plays Faust, Elton John is an angel. It’s really something. But would you do an opera or musical? I could see myself doing—of course, any sentence that starts with “I could see myself doing,” you know it’s never gonna happen.

So, “I could see myself doing” an opera using the kind of music I do, but more sophisticated. Working with collaborators, doing a Biblical story, sure, I can see that. Let’s get that funded! That’ll absolutely get bankrolled! [Laughs] The main problem, aside from the money, is that nobody wants to see that. Truthfully, what’s important now, and what’s been important for the past fourteen years [since Darnielle, bassist Peter Hughes, and drummer Jon Wurster became a trio], are the musicians and engineers I work with, who have made my stuff sound better and more able to express finer and finer feelings. The playing on the records, with the trio, started at a high level, and has just gotten better. Peter or Wurster’s response to the song in the moment is just as important to creating the song as the lyrics. When you have a drummer like Jon, he hears your stuff, he absorbs it, and his contribution elevates it and makes good on the promise of the lyrics. That is very real. On “Sourdoire Valley Song,” Jon has a fill after the last line of the song that’s the greatest thing on a Mountain Goats song ever. It’s just a quick, skipping ba-da-bum ba-da-bum ba-da-bum. I remember hearing that live in the studio for the first time, and I was like, “Oh my god.” People really respond to the song “This Year,” but a big part of why they like it is the piano part, and that’s [frequent studio Goat] Franklin Bruno; he wrote that part. Peter’s bass line on “Up the Wolves” is a giant part of what made that song what it is. You’re playing more live, on both guitar and piano. About a year and a half ago, on the song “Wear Black,” I asked Matt—he’s a serious jazz dude—to just improvise for a couple of minutes before we start the song. It’s exciting to me, and a couple of times on this past European tour, I joined him a little, sat in on piano. Now, I’m sure it sucked both times. My left hand is still a club. But I’m just looking to challenge myself to play better, to get better. On the song “Heretic Pride,” I set an intention to play a guitar solo on this past tour. I’m still not there. I soloed on that song twenty-one times and only played two solos I’d stand by. But then, I remember at the end of the tour, at the Fillmore show [in San Francisco], I did a solo on “Cadaver Sniffing Dog,” and Peter yelled at me, “That was a real one!” Congrats! Thanks, it only took me three weeks. When you really work at your craft, music can be so complex and amazing, you know? music@indyweek.com

Locally Made Market serves to showcase local artisans and their handmade goods We focus on diverse high quality and original work PLEASE JOIN US FOR OUR HOLIDAY MARKET

Sunday December 15 h from 12 4 pm The May on Inn Down own Cary 50+ Local Artisan Vendors | Giveaway for First 50 Shoppers Each purchase enters shoppers for more giveaways* Follow us @locallymademarket | www.locallymademarket.com * Limit 1 per household. Must be present to win.

INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 11


HOLIDAY

gift guide LETTERS BOOKSHOP Durham-based writer and illustrator Emily Wallace has your holiday gift-giving covered with this book for everyone – the driver in search of supper and superlatives, the tourist who cannot resist pulling over for every historical marker and roadside stand, and the kid who just wants to gawk at a peach-shaped water tower.

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART Gift of Membership $49.50 - $286.25 Price dependent on membership level selected.

This membership gift box set includes exclusive welcome perks: a set of magnets featuring member-favorite works of art and a voucher for a free cup of drip coffee at our on-site café. 2110 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh (919) 839-6262

313 W Main St, Durham, NC 27701 www.lettersbookshop.com

CEDAR CREEK GALLERY Blown Glass Ornaments $17-$125 A destination for treasures. 4,000 sf of pottery, glass, metal wood fiber and more by over 200 local, regional and national craftspeople. 20 Minutes from Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill. Open 10AM-6PM 7 days a week. 1150 Fleming Road, Creedmoor 919-528-1041 | www.cedarcreekgallery.com

12 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 12.04.19

RUNAWAY Tees $30 | Beanie $30 | Tote Bag $20 Runaway is back with a new temporary retail pop-up shop for the holidays. New limited edition apparel and goods will be available Dec. 7-28, many of which are in-store exclusives, urging folks to come by in-person to connect, shop and experience DURM®. Runaway Pop-Up Shop 359 Blackwell Street, Downtown Durham NC. www.runawayclothes.com


CAROLINA PERFORMING ARTS

BULL CITY ESCAPE Gift Vouchers / starting at $20.80 Give the gift of an unforgettable experience this holiday season! Perfect for family celebrations, team-building, and fun nights with friends. 3 exhilarating themes: A Study in Murder, Lunar Lockdown, Enchanted Kingdom.

Give the gift of an unforgettable experience with a Carolina Performing Arts gift card! From Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and Martha Graham Dance Company to the Soul Rebels featuring Big Freedia or pianist Lang Lang, there is something for every taste at CPA this season. carolinaperformingarts.org | 919-843-3333 Memorial Hall Box Office UNC–Chapel Hill | 114 East Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, NC

20% off with promo code: BCEHOLIDAY2019. 711 Iredell St, Durham | 919-627-8386 www.bullcityescape.com/gift-voucher

MAD ETHEL’S TATTOO & PIERCING Mad Ethel’s Tattoo & Piercing has moved! 711-B N. Person St, Raleigh Over 100 years combined experience. Come see what we can do for you! Holiday gift cetificates available. 919-900-8345 | www.MadEthelsTattoo.com |Or find us on Facebook

HORSE & BUGGY PRESS AND FRIENDS Art & Craft Gallery (est. 2017) Design Studio (est. 1996) focusing on book and publication design and occasionally utilizing in-house letterpress printing. A “main” wall features 7 thematic exhibits every year. Current show: Photoassemblage works by Lori Vrba and Dawn Surratt. 30 established artists and craftspersons from across the Southeast are showcased throughout the gallery.Paintings. Pottery. Photography. Jewelry. Glass. Prints. Book Arts. Fibers. A curated book stall features H&B books, artist monographs, and other hard to find titles. Unframed work is presented in flat file drawers and print bins. 1116 Broad Street. Durham. horseandbuggypress.com | 919 949 4847

NC STATE LIVE PRESENTS Yamato: The Drummers of Japan | $8 - $40 Give the gift of pure joy! Yamato brings exhilarating taiko drumming to NC State LIVE on February 28 at 8pm. These masterful rule breakers find innovation within tradition with women and men drumming side by side. Together they awaken something elemental to remind us all the power of live music. Stewart Theatre, 2610 Cates Ave, Raleigh | 919-515-1100 | go.ncsu.edu/Yamato

12.04.19 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 13


HOLIDAY gift guide

CHERRY PIE Named “Best Place to Buy Erotic Gifts” by INDY readers 11 years & counting, we’ve been a favorite Triangle destination for “naughty bits” for even longer. Always open late, we feature toys, gifts & games for discerning adults, several top lingerie brands at great prices, adult DVD’s and an exotic smokeshop. Whatever your flavor, Cherry Pie has gotchya covered this Holiday season!

KITCO Splash of Color Lamp Kit $149 A perfect gift for tinkerers and thinkers alike. The Splash of Color lamp kit combines a sophisticated, functional lamp design with the nostalgia of toys we grew up with. In the most direct sense: this is a bright idea, built by you. Get free shipping with coupon code INDYWEEK. Expires 12/25. www.kitcosets.com

TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS Raleigh – 6311 Glenwood Ave (919) 803-6392 Chapel Hill – 1819 Fordham Blvd (919) 928-0499

M&M ALPACA FARM Celebration Cape By SOL Alpaca 100% Baby Fine Grade Alpaca Handwoven with beautiful hand dyed yarn to create a soft, luxurious shawl to bring glamour to any outfit. $175 M&M Alpaca Farm is a family owned and operated farm with both suri and huacaya alpacas, Anatolian shepherd guard dogs, and a sprinkling of goats. We love when people come out to visit the farm! Come shop during open hours, but tours are by appointment only. Schedule yours today! 7084 US Highway 64 W, Pittsboro, North Carolina mmalpacafarmofnc.openherd.com | 336-465-8211

TRIPLE STOP HOLIDAY MARKET Dec., 7, 10-3, Downtown Durham

SPONSORED BY DURHAM ARTS COUNCIL

A full day of holiday shopping featuring over 100 local artists in 3 art galleries all within walking distance. Meet the artists, see demos and celebrate the season! Cecy’s Gallery, 417 Foster St. | www.cecysgallery.com The Artisan Market at 305, 305 E Chapel Hill St. | www.theartisanmarketat305.com 5 Points Gallery, 109 E. Chapel Hill St. | www.5pointsgallery.com

14 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 12.04.19


JEWELSMITH SS/22kt gold earrings | $575 Offering a wide selection of jewelry as well as custom design services, Jewelsmith is the perfect place for easy shopping. These handmade, bi-color metal (sterling silver and 22K gold) earrings are perfect for all occasions and fashionistas. Complimentary gift wrapping is always included. 2200 West Main St. Durham, NC 27705 919.286.2990 | www.jewelsmith.com

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART MUSEUM STORE Bloomingville Mobile | $98 17” black and gold metal mobile with stand; a beautiful gift for the art lover in your life. Curated by Raleigh’s artful shopping destination. 2110 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh | (919) 839-6262

HILLSBOROUGH GALLERY OF ARTS Handmade Mugs by Evelyn Ward | $42 each Local artist-owned gallery located in charming downtown Hillsborough, where you can find something unique for everyone on your list – pottery, glass, wood, jewelry, paintings, prints, photograph, sculpture, fiber and cards. Plus – just for the holidays – a huge selection of handmade ornaments! Open daily, with extended holiday hours! 121 N Churton St., Hillsborough (919)732-5001 | www.hillsboroughgallery.com

THE FLOURISH MARKET Speckled Acetate Earrings | $34 Enjoy gifting meaningful, do-good clothing and accessories to the women on your list this holiday season! At The Flourish Market, every product drives positive change, like these earrings made by women rescued from human trafficking. 307 W. Martin St. Raleigh, NC 27601 Downtown Raleigh | 984.202.5035 | www.theflourishmarket.com

12.04.19 • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • 15


indyfood

JOHNSON STREET YACHT CLUB 710 W. Johnson St., Raleigh 919-977-5015 jsyachtclub.com

The Last New Dive Bar

AMID DOWNTOWN’S HIGH-END COCKTAIL BARS, RALEIGH’S DIVES ARE A DYING BREED. ENTER THE JOHNSON STREET YACHT CLUB. BY LEIGH TAUSS

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n downtown Raleigh, dive bars are a dying breed. Sure, Slim’s isn’t going anywhere, but not everyone wants to have their eardrums ruptured on a Tuesday night. Elsewhere, true dives—dimly lit haunts with an unmistakable grime, the waft of stale tobacco from the patio’s cigarette graveyard, and more than one $3 beer—are hard to find in a downtown populated by an ever-increasing supply of high-end wine and cocktail bars. You can get your whiskey on at Fox Liquor Bar, but it’s going to cost you fourteen bucks. Johnson Street Yacht Club, the latest venture from Bittersweet’s Kim Hammer, may be the city’s last true new dive. That’s because you can’t just build a new dive bar. A dive bar cannot be fabricated; it must be born out of filth and desperation, baptized in PBR and sweat, branded in moonshaped burns on duct-taped bar stools. It can’t be realized with a vintage Doors poster and distressed oak bar. You can’t hock artisan pretzels and call yourself a dive. Johnson Street is, in some ways, a resurrection of The Office, the beloved neighborhood bar that occupied these black-painted walls until 2017. But it’s also its own species. Instead of an Addams Family pinball machine, there’s 007. The jukebox contains only female musicians. The décor consists of haphazardly strung Christmas lights and disposable-camera photos stuck to the ceiling alongside baseball cards. If you’re hungry, I hope you like pork rinds or pistachios. While there are irony-drenched “yacht clubs” lots of places, from Asheville to San Francisco to Greensboro, this isn’t a chain, though the basics are the same: Beer comes in a can, and the priciest drink (a $13 Johnny Walker Black) comes in a plastic cup. On a Sunday night, when I nestle into the corner of the bar and order a shot of whiskey with a Tecate chaser, the bar is mostly 16 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

Johnson Street Yacht Club PHOTOS BY JADE WILSON

full of industry folks—waitresses and bartenders fresh off shifts elsewhere. The guy next to me orders a shot, too. He introduces himself as Mitch. A good divebar name. “Dear sweet Evan Green,” Mitch declares. “Here we are.” Indeed. I glug and shiver. The yachtless club is a legacy of the great Raleigh dives of yore, Mitch says. Deep South closed in 2018, DIVEbar Raleigh some years before that. Just two blocks away, Cornerstone Tavern—a strip of oversized dance bungalows that lures a line of frat boys to its gates on weekends—is bribing patrons with free barbecue and Rice Krispies treats.

Nearby in Glenwood South, a five-hundredsquare-foot studio rents for $1,200 a month. “A dive bar is the great equalizer,” Andrew Baker, a Cancer with a rhinestone on his forehead, tells me over Fernet and Montenegro shots. Before he can explain, a pool stick slaps the floor as Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” blares through the speakers. A group gathers on the nondescript dance floor, and a guy in a patchwork sweater falls on his ass. Some people are eating cake on paper plates. It’s someone (allegedly) named Andrew Robb Rager’s birthday. (I’m too drunk to question if that’s really his name).

The entire bar migrates to the smoking patio, and a woman dressed as if Mad Max’s Furiosa were a mermaid is standing on the roof holding a paper lantern and a lighter. The delicate bubble of light gracefully floats up into the foggy black sky. Another bursts into flames before leaving the ground. “Put it out! PUT IT OUT!” a woman shouts. A true dive bar is where moments like this happen, and where they’re unscripted. Where the single-stall bathroom rarely has a line, and where you don’t need tattoos to feel welcome. Where all of the photos you take will be blurry, and where it’s always cool to buy a stranger a shot. ltauss@indyweek.com


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INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 17


indystage

PURE LIFE THEATRE HOLIDAY GALA Saturday, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., $45–$50 Pure Life Theatre, Raleigh purelifetheatre.com

Sharing Is Daring

SMALL THEATER COMPANIES PAYING FOR THEIR OWN REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE SPACES DOESN’T WORK. SONOROUS ROAD’S TRANSFORMATION INTO PURE LIFE THEATRE IS A NECESSARY ALTERNATIVE. BY BYRON WOODS

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Greene’s productions. When his company decidn a recent Saturday afternoon, Raleigh’s Sonorous Road Theatre ed to take 2020 to regroup instead of produce, she didn’t look like a playhouse in the forged ahead anyway. throes of a major transition. A gaggle of excitRonzel Bell, Royals-Mizerk’s music director for ed kids in Victorian costumes buzzed about Porgy and Bess at Justice Theater Project and A the lobby, awaiting a rehearsal of Mary PopMotown Christmas at Li V Mahob, was also instrupins Jr. in the historic Royal Bakery building mental in Pure Life’s genesis. “He had wanted to do the musical Purlie forever, on Hillsborough Street. At the same time, just down the hall, “Sips and Scripts” producer and I wanted to do Loving,” Royals-Mizerk says. Yvette Holder and playwright and fiddler Mac Both shows are now scheduled for Pure Life’s McCord were poring over musical cues for a first season. “We’d been working with each other reading of his Irish drama, Light at the Edge. for a very long time, and we wanted to keep workBut Mary Poppins Jr., which closed ing, in an environment where people love and last weekend, will be the final Sonorous respect each other.” Road production for the immediate future. They assembled a list of seasoned theater proMeanwhile, Holder’s company is one of the fessionals, roughly half from previous Li V Mahob regional groups whose works will be hosted shows, to lead the new group. They also reached out in this space by Pure Life Theatre, a new to stakeholders across the regional theater commucollective of stage artists that is taking over nity to build a collective where artists could meet, the theater and renaming it, then start- Deb Royals-Mizerk (third from left) with Pure Life members PHOTO BY JADE WILSON pool their resources, and learn from one another. ing to produce there in December before “We get so siloed in this community, we just assuming the lease in January. its Oberlin Road building in June 2017. Upfitting the for- keep our head down and do the work,” Royals-Mizerk says. More than just a promising season of musical theater, it’s a mer Royal Bakery building into a theater took more than “But if we can collectively work together—cross-producing, new vision of sharing and coordinating that the region’s inde- $70,000, which could have gone to staff positions and cross-promoting, cross-marketing, and sharing resources— managerial support. The understaffing led to what Mur- there are so many beautiful things I can see happening.” pendent theater community sorely needs. It’s increasingly clear that small theater companies indiThe first production under new management came on Sun- ray Wells calls a vicious cycle of exhaustion and burnout. day, December 1, in Honest Pint Theatre Company’s one-night She likens the experience to the final-week marathon of vidually renting rehearsal and performance spaces doesn’t stand of In the Boots of St. Nick, local actor David Bartlett’s around-the-clock preparations before a show premieres. work. The expense of needlessly duplicating creative infra“What if every week of your life was tech week? You structure was already a major problem when we diagnosed reflective and funny solo show about his experiences playing Santa Claus. After that, a holiday gala and fundraiser on can only do that for so long,” she says. Then there were it in 2015. Now, it poses an existential threat. December 7 will include a preview of Pure Life’s inaugural the financial hits that she and her husband, Josh, Sono“We have to evolve,” says Johannah Maynard Edwards, production, A Motown Christmas, which opens December 20. rous Road’s managing director, were taking. They say they executive director of the Women’s Theatre Festival. “And the fact that so many are willing to say we need to shake Sonorous Road’s artistic director, Michelle Murray pumped $100,000 of their own money into the theater. “We had to supplement the theater the entire time. We things up and take another look at how we do things makes Wells, seems tired but happy as she considers the impact her company has made during its four-year run. In its couldn’t continue to do that to our family,” Murray Wells me feel really optimistic about the spirit of generosity in our first year, the upstart company produced notable works says. Her new job this fall, heading the theater program at theater community right now.” for underserved audiences, including Duncan Macmil- Saint Mary’s School, meant that something had to give. A constellation of regional artists are signing on to the Around the same time, local theater veteran Deb Roy- vision. In addition to Pure Life’s first season, Honest Pint, lan’s drama for millennials, Lungs. Just as important, its original venue on Oberlin Road quickly became an als-Mizerk was experiencing the same difficulties that most Seed Art Share, and the Women’s Theatre Festival will important host for itinerant independent theaters—and itinerant theater artists do. After leaving the Justice The- produce in the space in the coming year. So will Jeghetto, the nascent Women’s Theatre Festival—as Durham’s ater Project in 2017, she struggled to find appropriate and JaMeeka Holloway-Burrell, and others. And Raleigh Little Common Ground Theatre faded before closing in 2016. affordable space for rehearsals and performances for emerg- Theatre and North Raleigh Arts and Creative Theatre are That year, three of the INDY’s top ten theater produc- ing playwright Moses T. Alexander Greene’s group, Li V making resources available to the new collective. It’s an Mahob Productions. Having caught wind of the feelers Mur- audacious initiative designed to outstrip previous theatritions were produced by or staged at Sonorous Road. But financial and logistical difficulties beset the compa- ray Wells had been putting out about turning over the the- cal-incubator efforts, and it might just save the show. ny after it had to find a new space when N.C. State bought ater to somone else, Royals-Mizerk pursued it as a venue for arts@indyweek.com 18 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com


indyart

RON CAMPBELL

Friday, Dec. 6–Sunday, Dec. 8 Studio 71 Frame Shop & Gallery, Hillsborough gallery71nc.com

The Saint of Saturday Morning

FROM YELLOW SUBMARINE TO RUGRATS, RON CAMPBELL ANIMATED YOUR CHILDHOOD

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on Campbell animated your childhood. As an animator and storyboard artist working in the golden age of Saturday-morning cartoons, he’s worked on everything from Scooby-Doo and The Smurfs to Rugrats. In the 1960s, he even animated the undisputed greatest band of all time while working on The Beatles’ Saturday-morning cartoon and their movie, Yellow Submarine. Now seventy-eight years old, the man who grew up reading about Hanna-Barbera and Walt Disney in a library in Victoria, Australia is on tour in the U.S., sharing his drawings in the traveling Beatles Cartoon Pop Art Show. It comes to Hillsborough’s Studio 71 Frame Shop & Gallery this weekend, and Campbell will be there 4:00–8:00 p.m. on Friday, noon–6:00 p.m. on Saturday, and noon–4:00 p.m. on Sunday. You can buy his work or even get an original. The INDY recently talked to Campbell by phone, and he had a lot to say about the state of animation today, the beauty of the Saturday-morning cartoon, and why it’s been so gratifying for him to get out of the studio and into the art gallery. INDY: Most people have heard of The Beatles’ Yellow Submarine, but your first involvement with the band came when you animated their lesser-known weekly cartoon series. Is it true you didn’t even know who they were when the show first started? RON CAMPBELL: [Laughs] I was a serious young man, you know, and I wasn’t taking much notice of popular music. Have you ever listened to songs of the fifties? There were hundreds of really stupid songs. I had, of course, heard of them, but when I asked [creator] Al Brodax what the name of the show that he was asking me to direct was, he said, “The Beatles.” My only thought was, “Al, insects make terrible characters for children’s cartoons.” We look back now, and we realize that The Beatles were so sig-

Ron Campbell (left) and some of his art from Yellow Submarine (above) COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Captain Caveman, Scooby-Doo. I loved Rugrats, adored The Smurfs, found Ed, Edd n Eddy hilarious. Anything that had a lot of explosions and fighting and violence and stuff, I didn’t like working on. I like my shows to be sweet, the kind of shows I wanted my own children to watch. nificant in popular music. They’re probably going to be listened to for centuries, like we listen to Mozart. The image of an artist or an animator is of a person in a lonely studio, frantically scribbling. With this exhibit, you get to go out on the road and talk with people. What’s that been like? One of the most striking features that has hit me is the cultural significance of the cartoons that we were making. There were children who were having horrible, unpleasant childhoods and children having wonderful childhoods and children having childhoods in between. But they all found sustenance, relief, inspiration, and joy in rushing to the TV on Saturday morning and watching our shows. And now, all of those children are adults, and they’re so happy to talk to somebody who helped make those shows and express their enthusiasm and nostalgia for them.

What’s your take on animation now? There is no animation being done anymore. It’s computer-generated stuff, and I feel a little sad for that. The computer does things that no human could ever do by hand, but there’s a softness and a sweetness to handdrawn animation. The computer-generated animation often has a sort of a cold, model-like perfection to it. I’m just an old man looking back. [Laughs] If I was a young man today, I’d have no interest in working in computer animation. It doesn’t jive with what inspired me in the beginning, which was, “You mean I can make drawings come alive?” It’s a completely different animal, and that’s wonderful. That’s what the young kids are doing. Hey, it’s their world, not mine. What were some of your favorite and least favorite shows to work on? Oh, my own show, of course, Big Blue Marble, which won a Peabody and an Emmy.

I was going to ask about Ed, Edd n Eddy, because I remember watching that after school. It was really weird. That was the very last show that was hand-animated, and I was directing the very last scene of the very last episode. I put my pencil down, and knew I was doing the last scene I would ever do. It was September 2008, and I started in August 1958. There I was, at the beginning of Saturday-morning cartoons, and I was there at the very end of Saturday-morning cartoons. Just an accident of history. What’s this tour mean to you? It certainly pays my electric bill, but I believe that if you really stop doing things, you just sit in your chair and melt away. So I’m doing it through fear of death. [Laughs] On top of that, I’m discovering this wonderful pleasure I get from meeting the audience in person and showing off my paintings. arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 19


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CONNER CALHOUN: WHISPERS FROM WIZARD MOUNTAIN

Through Friday, Dec. 13 First Friday performance feat. Spookstina and OPS: Friday, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m. Lump, Raleigh | lumpprojects.org

Magic Eye

QUEER BEAUTY IS EVERYWHERE IN THE ARTWORK OF LUMP’S CONNER CALHOUN BY JAMES MICHAEL NICHOLS

F

or many people, being queer is an inherently magical way of existing in the world. In fact, before it underwent several reinventions, the original Pride flag contained eight colors, including a turquoise stripe for “magic.” For Raleigh’s Conner Calhoun, this historical tenet of queerness is still central in their artistic practice and how they navigate the world. Calhoun’s exhibit Whispers from Wizard Mountain is on view through December 13 at Lump, the downtown-Raleigh gallery where they work as special projects coordinator. (Visit on First Friday for a musical performance by Spookstina and OPS and a tape release by Calhoun and Devon Tuttle.) The exhibit leads viewers on an ethereal, fantastical survey of Calhoun’s work, which is whimsical and disorienting, existing at the intersection of the fantasy genre and the overtly sexual queer experience. Calhoun finds fairies fascinating for their playful approach to gender and sees queer beauty everywhere, from the everyday to mythology. They are fascinated by the idea of the gay wizard, which has current as well as historical relevance. After all, Albus Dumbledore of Harry Potter and Gandalf of The Lord of the Rings, the two most wellknown wizard figures in modern popular culture, are gay—well, sort of. “Everyone called Gandalf a gay wizard because he is played by a gay actor, and Dumbledore is gay just because J.K. Rowling said he was one day in an interview, way after the Calhounor says. “But it was To fact,” advertise feature also my first experience where a gay charpet for acter wasarevered and adoption, beloved—a feeling of acceptance. please Which is complicated, contact because they aren’t showing any stereotypes, so how advertising@indyweek.com do other queer people become accepted who maybe do show stereotypes? The whole word “stereotype” is really complicated.” The exhibit is also partly inspired by illuminated manuscripts, which you can

“I walked the walls and not the labryinth” by Conner Calhoun PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

see in the ornate details of pieces such as “I walked the walls and not the labryinth.” “I started off making illuminated manuscripts as a way to sort of not only question things that are very religious and heavy, especially within the Bible Belt, but also using marginalia as a metaphor in thinking of queer people as being marginalized, but also being able to make really amazing things within the margins,” Calhoun says. “There’s a lot of metaphorical connection between the illuminated manuscript and this really colorful queer life that I’m living.” For Calhoun, Whispers from Wizard Mountain is an important blending of a body of work that spans a significant developmental period in their life. When asked what they wanted people to take away from the show, Calhoun says, “We are all morally gray, like my hair. I think wise wizards understand that, and we really should strive to be more like wise wizards. And to look more closely at things.” arts@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 21


WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK

12.04–12.11

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 & SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8

THE NUTCRACKER Carolina Ballet’s yearly Tchaikovsky tour of the Triangle starts this weekend as Carolina Performing Arts hosts its production with a live symphony orchestra in Chapel Hill, prior to its DPAC dates on Dec. 14-15 and a home stand in Raleigh Memorial Auditorium, Dec. 18-29. Founding artistic director Robert Weiss began integrating increasingly elaborate stage magic illusions years ago to keep the holiday classic from becoming too much a known commodity. Still, dance purists have long known that the stagecraft of sumptuous sets, glittering costumes, and cute adolescent dancers outflank the actual choreography. No matter: ultimately we go to The Nutcracker to submerge ourselves in spectacle and reconsider the very close proximity that the uncanny has to Christmas in E.T.A. Hoffmann’s unsettling, ancient tale. The performance is an opportunity to revisit, briefly, the sense of wonder we experienced when we first encountered the story. —Byron Woods UNC’S MEMORIAL HALL, CHAPEL HILL 2 & 8 p.m. Sat./2 p.m. Sun., $47+, www.carolinaperformingarts.org

The Nutcracker PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROLINA PERFORMING ARTS 22 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7

PURA FÉ, CARY MORIN, DEER CLAN SINGERS, LAKOTA JOHN & KIN This Saturday matinee showcases Native American musicians performing a wide spectrum of roots music. A founding member of the vocal group Ulali, Pura Fé brings gorgeously voiced folk tunes from Canada via North Carolina and New York City, instilling them with a rich spirituality and an activist bent. She’s mentored young Robeson County group the Deer Clan Singers, who share her Tuscarora heritage and passionately perform traditional social dance songs marked by complex and distinctive harmonies, and written songs with the Coloradobased bluesman Cary Morin. Morin’s blend of weary vocals and nimble fingerstyle guitar draws inspiration from both gritty acoustic blues and the Grateful Dead, while his songwriting mines socially conscious themes. Pembroke’s slide guitar wunderkind Lakota John Locklear, meanwhile, sounds twice his age while bounding from gospel to electric and piedmont blues, all backed by the Kin, his Lumbee family band. —Spencer Griffith THE FRUIT, DURHAM 1 p.m., $25, www.dukeperformances.duke.edu

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7

RECLAIMING MY TIME A thoughtful collaboration between the National Humanities Center and the Visual Art Exchange, this exhibition aims to celebrate, exalt, and give credit to women creatives who have been barred from artistic opportunity and renown due to racism, sexism, and ableism, among other prejudices. Curated by Roxana Pérez-Méndez, a UNC-Chapel Hill associate professor of art, this juried exhibition is a survey of femme creatives across the American South. The December 7 reception is an opportunity for the public to both meet some of the artists and to experience Reclaiming My Time before the exhibition—which has been on display since September— ends on December 30. This reception is free and open to all art-lovers. —Rachel Rockwell NATIONAL HUMANITIES CENTER, DURHAM 1–3 p.m., free, www.nationalhumanitiescenter.org


Kirk Franklin PHOTO COURTESY OF DPAC

FREE TO BE FEARLESS. TO HOLD THE POWERFUL ACCOUNTABLE. TO BE A VOICE FOR THE VOICELESS.

FREE TO TELL THE TRUTH. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10

KIRK FRANKLIN Gospel music megastar Kirk Franklin recently boycotted the Christian Music Association’s Dove Awards, the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN), and the Gospel Music Association for both its lack of diversity and for editing a piece out of his Dove Awards acceptance speech in which he asked the audience to send up prayers for Atatiana Jefferson, the twenty-eight-year-old black woman who was gunned down in her Texas home by a Fort Worth police officer. Franklin’s boycott is what happens when an artist with clout takes a socio-political stance without bastardizing their artistic legacy (unlike, for instance, the charades surrounding Kanye West’s recent foray into gospel music). Because there’s certainly a thing or two to learn from the thirteen-time Grammy Award-winning “Stomp” singer and soon-to-be-grandfather about how to navigate between the secular and spiritual while maintaining integrity. Released earlier this year, Franklin’s thirteenth album Long, Live, Love is a return to his crossover genius, breathing sanctity into R&B-leaning songs like “Love Theory” and “Just For Me” and clutching souls that were none the wiser or holier to begin with. For all those missions and talents, Franklin should forever be praised and celebrated. —Eric Tullis DURHAM PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, DURHAM 7:30 p.m., $45, www.dpacnc.com

WHAT ELSE SHOULD I DO? AMATEUR ON PLASTIC AT SHADOWBOX STUDIO (P. 32), CAMELOT AT MURPHEY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM (P. 31), CONNER CALHOUN AT LUMP (P. 21), RON CAMPBELL AT STUDIO 71 (P. 19), THE GLORIFYING VINES SISTERS AT THE FRUIT (P. 25), THE LOST CITY OF NEW YORK AT THE NASHER (P. 29), THE MOUNTAIN GOATS AT THE HAW RIVER BALLROOM (P. 9), MUSIC MAKER 25: ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION AT THE PINHOOK (P. 30), PURE LIFE THEATRE HOLIDAY GALA AT PURE LIFE THEATRE (P. 18)

TO CELEBRATE AND CRITICIZE. TO ADVOCATE FOR THE MARGINALIZED.

FREE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE. FROM CORPORATE INFLUENCE. NO PAYWALLS, NO SUBSCRIPTIONS.

FREE BECAUSE OF YOU. KEEP IT FREE. KEEP IT INDY.

Join the INDY Press Club at KeepItINDY.com.

INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 23


Chocolate Lounge & Juice Bar

Fri 12/6 Sat 12/7 Fri 12/13 Sat 12/14 Fri 12/20 Tue 12/31

Sadie Rock Justin Sykes & Friends Chocolate Covered Comedy Neville’s Quarter Alice Osborn New Year’s Musical Extravaganza

Music Performed from 6pm to 10pm Beer & Wine Served Daily Timberlyne Shopping Center, Chapel Hill 1129 Weaver Dairy Rd • specialtreatsnc.com

FR 12/6 CRANK IT LOUD PRESENTS OUR LAST NIGHT W/ I SEE STARS THE WORD ALIVE, ASHLAND ($20/$25) SA 12/7 SOUTHERN CULTURE

ON THE SKIDS W/ANDREA & MUD (15/$18) TH 12/12 TWIN PEAKS W/ LALA LALA AND OHMME ($18/$20)

FR 12/13 THE CONNELLS W/SURRENDER HUMAN AND LEMON SPARKS ($20/$23)

HORTON HEAT W/ VOODOO GLOW SKULLS, THE 5678'S, DAVE ALVIN ($25/$28)

SU 12/17 AD HOC PRESENTS DAUGHTERS/HEALTH W/ SHOW ME THE BODY($22/$25)

W/LALA LALA AND OHMME 5/3, 2020 THE RESIDENTS ($30/$35)

HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER W/LILLY HIATT ($26) 1/18, 2020 AMERICAN AUTHORS AND MAGIC

TH

12/5

King Dude / Twin Temple

PHUTUREPRIMITIVE / AN-TEN-NAE with N. DeNitto

1/20, 2020 CRACKER AND

CAMPER VAN BEETHOVEN 1/21, 2020 TOO MANY ZOOZ W/ BIROCRATIC ($18/$20)

12/8 TUES

12/10 WED

12/11 TH

12/12

Duke Science & Society presents

PERIODIC TABLES:

One Giant Leap: 50 Years of Apollo

THE MONTI STORYSLAM—MORTIFIED Redeye presents

GARCIA PEOPLES, DEEPER and SAMMUS

1/25, 2020 THE ROAD TO NOW PODCAST ($35)

SU 12/15 LYNN BLAKEY'S CHRISTMAS SHOW FT. ECKI HEINS, FJ VENTRE & MORE. OPENING: DANNY GOTHAM ($12)

1/30, 2020 YONDER

MOUNTAIN STRING BAND/ TRAVELLIN MCCOURYS

2/1, 2020 JAWBOX ($28/$30) 2/14, 2020 THRICE, MEWITHOUTYOU, DRUG CHURCH ( $26/$30) 2/15, 2020 COLONY HOUSE THE LEAVE WHAT’S LOST BEHIND TOUR W/TYSON MOTSENBOCKER ($15/$18) 2/17, 2020 KYLE KINANE THE SPRING BREAK TOUR($25/$28) 2/18, 2020 DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS ($26 / $30)

2/21, 2020

ARCHER'S OF LOAF ($25)

FRI

2/27, 2020 DAN DEACON ($15/$17)

STREET CORNER SYMPHONY SUN

12/15 FRI

12/20 SAT

Crank It Loud presents

THUNDER JACKSON

with J. Timber Motorco and The Sol Kitchen present

ERIC ROBERSON THE WUSSES

12/21 Beauty Operators

COMING SOON: M8ALLA, The Beast, G. Yamazawa, Sarah Shook & The Disarmers, Integrity, Art Alexakis of Everclear, Magic City Hippies, Michal Menert, Late Night Radio, Carbon Leaf, Beth Stelling, Blackalicious, Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana, Grayscale, Hot Mulligan, Over The Rhine, Lost Dog Street Band,AJJ, Jason Ringenberg, Blockhead,We Were Promised Jetpacks, While She Sleeps, David Wilcox, Gnawa LanGus, OM, Little People, Frameworks, Asgeir, Black Atlantic, Caspian, Shannon & The Clams, Kevin Morby

24 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

SOLD TH 12/5 JUMP LITTLE OUT CHILDREN

SA 12/7 SOLAR HALOS, DREAMLESS, WEIRD GOD ($10)

2/19, 2020 YBN CORDAE ($20/$22.50)

12/13

WE 12/4 LAURA STEVENSON W/ ADULT MOM ($15)

1/23, 2020 YOLA W/AMYTHYST KLAH ($20/$23)

WE 1/29, 2020 ANAMANAGUCHI ($18/$20)

FR 12/13 @CAT’S CRADLE

THE CONNELLS

W/SURRENDER HUMAN AND LEMON SPARKS SU 2/23, 2020 SLOAN ($25) FR 2/28, 2020 PALEHOUND ($13/$15; ON SALE 12/6) SU 3/1, 2020 HEMBREE TU 3/8, 2020 DAN RODRIGUEZ ($15) TU 3/17, 2020 BAMBARA ($10/$12)

FR 12/6 NEIL HILBORN W/ CARACARA ($20/$25)

($25/$30)

CAROLINA WAVES 2019 YEAR-END MIXER

5/11, 2020 BARNS COURTNEY ($22/$25)

WE 1/22, 2020 MARCO BENEVENTO ($17/$20)

FR 1/31/2020 BEACH FOSSILS ($18/$20) SAT

5/5, 2020 ANDY SHAUF W/ FAYE WEBSTER ($18/$20)

GIANT W/SPECIAL GUEST PUBLIC ($25/$28) ($22/$25)

AMIGO THE DEVIL

TWIN PEAKS

1/3,4,5, 2020 CAT'S CRADLE

FR 1/10 & SA 1/11, 2020 - TWO SHOWS

12/4

TH 12/12 @CAT’S CRADLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY SHOWS! 50TH ANNIVERSARY SHOWS!

WED

W/ANDREA & MUD

SA 12/14 HORTON’S HOLIDAY HAYRIDE FT. THE REVEREND

12/27,28,29 CAT'S CRADLE

RECENTLY ANNOUNCED: MDOU MOCTAR, ELLIS DYSON & THE SHAMBLES

SA 12/7 @CAT’S CRADLE

SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS

WE 12/18 AN EVENING WITH SAM TAYLOE (TIME SAWYER) & MIKE RAMSEY ($10)

TU 3/24, 2020 STEVE GUNN, MARY LATTIMORE & WILLIAM TYLER ($20/$22) MO 4/6, 2020 MIGHTY OAKS ($12/$14) TU 4/21, 2020 KATIE PUITT ($10) SU 4/26, 2020 SAMMY RAE & THE FRIENDS ($12/$15) LOCAL 506 (CHAPEL HILL)

1/18, 2020 BAILEN

ARTSCENTER (CARRBORO)

3/24, 2020 JAMES MCMURTRY W/BONNIE WHITMORE ($22/$25) MOTORCO (DUR)

SA 12/21 JON STICKLEY TRIO W/INTO THE FOG ($10/$12)

1/11, 2020 MAGIC CITY HIPPIES W/ARGONAUT & WASP ($17.50/$20)

FR 12/27 THE MERCH HOLIDAY PARTY : DJ VSPRTN

2/11, 2020 WE WERE PROMISED JETPACKS ($15/$17)

FR 1/3, 2020 THE BLAZERS ‘HOW TO ROCK’ REUNION ($15/$18)

3/6, 2020 ELLIS DYSON & THE SHAMBLES W/DOWNTOWN ABBY AND THE ECHOS ($10/$12)

SA 1/4, 2020 SUBLIMINAL SURGE / SNAKE SHAMING ($5)

RITZ (RAL)

(PRESENTED IN ASSOCIATION W/ LIVENATION)

TH 1/9, 2020 SONG TRAVELER’S WRITER’S NIGHT W/SAM FRAZIER, ABIGAIL DOWD, AND WYATT EASTERLING ($20)

1/25, 2020 THE DEVIL MAKES THREE W/MATT HECKLER ($25/$30)

SA 1/11, 2020 HEAT PREACHER & THE GONE GHOSTS W/TEXOMA ($7/$8)

FR 12/20 CHATHAM COUNTY LINE ELECTRIC HOLIDAY TOUR W/ BIG FAT GAP ($20/$22)

TH 1/16, 2020 QUETICO W/PHIL MOORE ($10)

FR 1/31, 2020 G LOVE AND SPECIAL SAUCE W/JONTAVIOUS WILLIS ($25/$30)

FR 1/17, 2020 MO LOWDA & THE HUMBLE W/ ARSON DAILY ($12/$15)

HAW RIVER BALLROOM

2/22, 2020 GARZA FT. ROB GARZA OF THIEVERY CORPORATION

WHERE THE MOON HIDES TOUR 2020 ($20/$23)

SA 1/18 $ SU 01/19, 2020 CARRBORO DJANGO REINHARDT FESTIVAL

2/27, 2020 TODD SNIDER ($25/$28)

TU 1/21, 2020 TALL HEIGHTS W/ANIMAL YEARS ($15/$17)

3/24, 2020 JOHN MORELAND ($15/$18)

3/21, 2020 BEST COAST ($25/$27)

FR 1/24, 2020 ILLITERATE LIGHT W/CAMP HOWARD ($12/$14)

4/20, 2020 SHARON VAN ETTEN W/JAY SOM ($28/$31)

3/27, 2020 SOCCER MOMMY W/ TOMBERLIN ($18/$20)

FR 1/31, 2020 DAMN TALL BUILDINGS ($14/$17)

5/1,2020TENNIS W/MOLLYBURCH ($18/$20)

3/28, 2020 ANTIBALAS ($18/$22)

TU 2/4, 2020 CHRIS FARREN, RETIREMENT PARTY, MACSEAL ($10/$12)

THE CAROLINA THEATER (DUR)

2/29, 2020 OF MONTREAL W/ LILY'S BAND ($17) 3/11, 2020 DESTROYER W/NAP EYES ($20/$23) 3/14, 2020 RADICAL FACE ($25/$28)

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WE 2/11, 2020 BAY FACTION W/SUPERBODY ($12/$15) WE 2/19, 2020 BLACK LIPS ($15) SA 2/22, 2020 TIM BARRY ($15)

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Your Week. Every Wednesday. indyweek.com


music 12.04–12.11

tk

PHOT0 TK

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8

THE GLORIFYING VINES SISTERS The Glorifying Vines Sisters close out Music Maker 25 by taking folks to Sunday evening church, carrying on five decades of family tradition rooted in the music and ministry of gospel quartets that flourished nearly a century ago. Based out of Believe in Jesus Ministries, a small church in Farmville, N.C. where vocalist and leader Alice Vines serves as pastor, the group performs regularly to congregations but is no stranger to the festivals and bars of the secular world. Along with Audrey Vines on vocals, the veteran outfit finds an array of extended family and friends joining in to sing or add instrumentation on familiar hymns and gospel standards. Though its tough to rival the power and spirit of the Vines’ moving a capella renditions, the regular additions of guitar, keys, bass, and drums lends a bit of a funky feel reminiscent of The Staple Singers. —Spencer Griffith THE FRUIT, DURHAM

7 p.m., $25, www.durhamfruit.com

The Glorifying Vines Sisters PHOTO BY TIMOTHY DUFFY

WED, DEC 04 CAROLINA THEATRE Robert Earl Keen, Shinyribs; $36-$66. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM Laura Stevenson, Adult Mom; $13-$15. 8 p.m. THE CAVE TAVERN Ariella; 9 p.m. DUKE CAMPUS: BALDWIN AUDITORIUM Duke Symphony Orchestra, Caroline Stinson; 7:30 p.m. THE FRUIT Music Maker 25: Pickers & Storytellers; Dom Flemons, Blind Boy Paxton, Jake Xerxes Fussell & Gail Caesar. $10-$25. 8 p.m. LOCAL 506 Mickey Factz; $12. 8 p.m.

MOTORCO MUSIC HALL Amigo The Devil, King Dude, Twin Temple; $15-$17. 8 p.m. NEPTUNES PARLOUR Chris Boerner Residency; $8-$10. 8:30 p.m. THE PINHOOK Karoshi, Sweet Homé, Gallus Mag; $10. 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Agnostic Front, Slapshot, No Love; $18-$20. 7:30 p.m. THE RITZ CHON, Between The Buried And Me, intervals; $25. 7 p.m. SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS RALEIGH Steep Canyon Rangers; 12 p.m. THE STATION Choo Choo Anoo; 7 p.m. UNC CAMPUS: HILL HALL Gamelan Nyai Saraswati Ensemble; 7:30 p.m.

THU, DEC 05 ARCANA Kevin Clark, Danny Grewen; 9 p.m. BLUE NOTE GRILL Pinky Wyoming, Duke LaCrosse; 7 p.m. CAROLINA THEATRE The Malpass Brothers; $19-$29. 8 p.m. THE FRUIT Music Maker 25: Lonnie Holley, Alexa Rose; $10-$25. 8 p.m. KINGS The Holderness Family; $20-$40. 6:30 p.m. MOTORCO MUSIC HALL Phutureprimative, An-Ten-Nae; $17-$20. 9 p.m. THE PINHOOK AA Bondy; $15-$17. 7 p.m. THE RITZ Incubus; SOLD OUT. 8 p.m. INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 25


Tonight, the band headlines with Dreamless and Weird God opening. —Bryan C. Reed [$10. 9:30 P.M.] THE CAVE TAVERN Blue Frequency, Galloway, Driftwood Soldier; 9 p.m. DUKE CAMPUS: BALDWIN AUDITORIUM Stephen Prutsman & Pamela Frank; $25. 8 p.m. THE FRUIT Music Maker 25: Pura Fé, Cary Morin, Deer Clan Singers, & Lakota John & Kin; $10-$25. 1 p.m. KINGS

Mannequin Pussy

“Drunk II”—the grungy lead single from Mannequin Pussy’s third full-length, Patience—finds vocalist Marisa Dabice exploring vulnerability (“Everyone says to me/ ‘Missy you’re so strong!’/ But what if I don’t want to be?”) while the Philadelphia quartet is at their lengthiest and most pop-leaning yet. The rest of Patience is a tour-de-force that adds lush textures to the band’s punklength blasts of fury, balanced with devasting examinations of toxicity and trauma. Kississippi and Stevie round out the stacked bill. —Spencer Griffith [$12. 8 P.M.]

Mannequin Pussy makes a stop at Kings on Saturday, December 7. PHOTO BY SCOTT TROYAN

FRI, DEC 06 THE ARTSCENTER Keller Williams; $32. 8 p.m. BLUE NOTE GRILL Chris O’Leary Band; $10. 9 p.m. CAROLINA THEATRE The Marcus King Band, Aaron Lee Tasjan; $30. 8 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE Our Last Night, I See Stars, The Word Alive, Ashland; $20-$25. 6:45 p.m. CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM Neil Hilborn, Caracara; $20-$25. 7:30 p.m. THE CAVE TAVERN M is We, Mean Habit, Gunline; 9 p.m. THE FRUIT Music Maker 25: Major Handy, Buckwheat Zydeco, Jr. & Ils Sont Partis; $10-$25. 8 p.m.

HAW RIVER BALLROOM The Mountain Goats; 7 p.m. both nights. $34. LINCOLN THEATRE Phish Concert Screening; 7 p.m. LOCAL 506 Get Sad Y’all; $10. 8 p.m. LUMP Spookstina, OPS; 6 p.m. MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL Handel’s Messiah; 8 p.m. both days. $57+. NIGHTLIGHT Minor Stars, Night Battles, Augurs, Blab School; $8. 9 p.m. THE PINHOOK Dreaming of the 90s; 9 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Old Habits; $10-$12. 8 p.m. RUBY DELUXE Velvet Sky, Snake Shaming, Subliminal Surge; $8. 8 p.m.

RUBY DELUXE Disco Deluxe: Holigay Edition; 11 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY NCCU Jazz Studies Faculty; $20. 8 p.m. THE STATION The Yardarm, Hank, Brendan; 8 p.m. WAKE FOREST LISTENING ROOM Blacksliders; $12. 7 p.m.

SAT, DEC 07 BLUE NOTE GRILL The Beauty Operators; $8. 8 p.m. ARCANA Russell Favret; 9 p.m. BINKLEY MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH Triangle Gay Men’s Chorus; Donation suggested. 7 p.m.

CAT’S CRADLE

Southern Culture On The Skids

With a career spanning nearly four decades, Chapel Hill’s SCOTS are a North Carolina staple, delivering jocular cowpunk that draws heavily on rockabilly and surf-rock. They’re best known for their prolific output, food-themed lyricism and mischievous live performances which they’ve taken everywhere from the NC prison system to late-night talk shows. Fellow Southern rockers Andrea Colburn and Mud Moseley will open. —Sam Haw [$15-$18. 9 P.M.]

BLUE NOTE GRILL The Gravy Boys; $10. 8 p.m.

CAT’S CRADLE BACK ROOM

Solar Halos

Earlier this year, Chapel Hill trio Solar Halos released its second album, Coiled Light, a a stunning platter of heavy, meditative rock that pulls from doom, psych-rock, and post-punk in equal measure. The driving rhythm section of drummer John Crouch and bassist Eddie Sanchez moves in seismic shifts, giving sturdy foundations for guitarist Nora Rogers’ crackling riffs. That Coiled Light focuses much of its thematic energy on the powers of nature and the insignificance of man makes its powerfully heavy sound more prescient for its political and environmental undercurrents.

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

26 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

THE KRAKEN Kraken Fest X; Morose Vitality, Hylic, Paezor, Blix, Shadow of the Destroyer, Feral Spectre, Moy’noq, Satyrnacht, Oculum Dei and Everwraith. 8:30 p.m. LINCOLN THEATRE Cosmic Charlie, Dark Side of the Dead; $15-$35. 9 p.m. LOCAL 506 Bleeding Hearts, Loose Jets; $10. 8 p.m. THE NIGHT RIDER Spaced Angel, Party Girl; $5. 7 p.m. NIGHTLIGHT Volume 33: Terri “Whodat” McQueen, Femi The Femme, DJ Don Play; $10. 10 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Ryan Johnson; 1 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Al Riggs; 3 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Tennessee Jed; 5 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Roosevelt Collier Band, The Heavy Pets; $12-$15. 7 p.m.


TEASERS 19th Annual Christmas Party Saturday Dec. 14th Free buffet Door Prizes

Special Entertainment Members in FREE 7-9

919-6-TEASER for directions and information

Zoe & Clyde perform at the NC Museum of History on Sunday, December 8.

An Adult Nightclub

www.teasersmensclub.com 156 Ramseur St Durham, NC

@TeasersDurham

Open 7 Days/week • Hours 7pm - 2am

TeasersMensClub

PHOTO BY SANDLIN GAITHER

RHYTHMS LIVE MUSIC HALL Jus Once; $21. 9 p.m. SHARP NINE GALLERY Juan Alamo; $20. 8 p.m.

SUN, DEC 08 THE FRUIT Music Maker 25: The Branchettes, Phil Cook; $10-$25. 1 p.m. LOCAL 506 The Muslims, Zealotrous, Sibannac, Snake Shaming; $8. 7:30 p.m. MEYMANDI CONCERT HALL Home Free; $23+. 2:30 p.m. MOTORCO MUSIC HALL Carolina Waves 2019 Year-End Mixer; $10-$12. 8 p.m. NC MUSEUM OF HISTORY

Zoe & Cloyd

Rooted in Appalachian bluegrass and old-time, but explorative of Jewish traditions, Zoe & Cloyd is the husband-wife duo of fiddler Natalya Zoe Weinstein and multi-instrumentalist John Cloyd Miller. The Asheville-based Americana

group released their third record I Am Your Neighbor in September, an album which features originals such as the climate-conscious “Looking Out For You And Me,” as well as renditions like the traditional klezmer tune “Berditchever Sher.” —Sam Haw [3 P.M., FREE]

MON, DEC 09 THE CAVE TAVERN Clark Stern, Chuck Cotton; 9 p.m.

TUE, DEC 10

Ava i l a ble Now !

CAVE TAVERN The Curls, Matthew Danger Lippman; 9 p.m.

THE PINHOOK Thirsty Curses, Solar Bear, Blue Frequency; $7. 7 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Pete Pawsey, Emily Stewart; 1 p.m.

[$45+. 7:30 P.M.]

POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Emily Musolino; 3 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Young Cardinals; 5 p.m. PULLEN MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH Triangle Gay Men’s Chorus; Donation suggested. 3 p.m. WAKE FOREST LISTENING ROOM Penne Sandbeck, Leah Kaufman, Isabel Taylor, Karyn Oliver; 1 p.m.

THE STATION The Peter Holsapple Combo Residency; 8:30 p.m.

THE WICKED WITCH VLVD, Chained, Circle Back, Thirteenth, Fever Strike; $13. 7 p.m.

2019/2020 ISSUE

NIGHTLIGHT Joseph Allred, Ralph White, Magic Tuber Stringband; $10. 8 p.m.

WED, DEC 11 THE CAVE TAVERN rickoLus, Scott (From the Monologue Bombs); 9 p.m. NEPTUNES PARLOUR Chris Boerner Residency; $8-$10. 8:30 p.m. POUR HOUSE MUSIC HALL Root Shock; $10-$12. 8 p.m. THE RITZ Disco Donnie, Sugar Society; $21-$28. 7 p.m.

F I N D O N S TA N D S T H R O U G H O U T T H E T R I A N G L E INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 27


BILL BURTON 12.5 12.8 12.11 12.14 12.15

Roxana Robinson (in conversation with Lee Smith) Dawson’s Fall 7pm Caroline McAlister Finding Narnia: The Story of CS Lewis and his Brother Warnie (a children’s event) 2pm Meet and greet with Sheila Ogle 4:30pm Tim Barnwell Tide Runners: Shrimping and Fishing on the Carolinas and Georgia Coast 11am Mishpacha 2pm Christmas Ghost Stories 7pm SOLD OUT www.quailridgebooks.com • 919.828.1588 • North Hills 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road, Raleigh, NC 27609 CHECK OUT OUR PODCAST: BOOKIN’ w/Jason Jefferies

28 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

12/6

KELLER WILLIAMS 12/7 12/7 12/14 12/20 12/21

13TH ANNUAL ELF MARKET NO SHAME THEATRE - CARRBORO TRANSACTORS IMPROV HOLIDAY MUSICAL CIRCLE 12 HOLIDAY SHOW BEAUSOLEIL CAJUN CHRISTMAS

Get tickets at artscenterlive.org

Follow us: @artscenterlive • 300-G East Main St., Carrboro, NC

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SEPARATION AGREEMENTS Mu s i c Bu s i n eDIVORCE ss Law UNCONTESTED In c o r p oBUSINESS r a t i o n / LLAW LC / MUSIC Pa r t n e r s h i p INCORPORATION/LLC Wi lls WILLS

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12.04–12.11

submit! Got something for our calendar? Submit the details at:

indyweek.com/submit#cals DEADLINE: 5 p.m. each Wednesday for the following Wednesday’s issue. QUESTIONS? spequeno@indyweek.com

Fine Contemporary Craft Craft. Curated by Mia Hall. Dec 6-Feb 1. Artspace, Raleigh. Press Prints. Dec6-Jan 10. VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. Doug Tabb: What Did I Just See? Sculpture. Dec 5-Jan 13. 5 Points Gallery, Durham. 5pointsgallery.com.

ONGOING 100+ Years of Earth and Fire: A Retrospective of Four Women Working in Clay Pottery. Thru Dec 7. Durham Art Guild, Durham. durhamartguild.org. Lety Alvarez, Pepe Caudillo, Allison Coleman Paintings. Thru Jan 25. Artspace, Raleigh. Anarchism and the Political Art of Les Temps Nouveaux, 18951914 Prints and graphics. Thru Dec 15. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now Contemporary Indigenous art. Thru Jan 12. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5

THE LOST CITY OF NEW YORK: STORIES OF GROWING UP IN THE 1950S AND 1960S In 2014, a box of negatives belonging to Frank Larson, a New York City bank auditor who had died in the 1950s, was discovered by his grandchildren. An amateur photographer, Larson’s pictures revealed a world of intimate midcentury life—snapshots of private moments on full-display in a city where you’re never really alone, as people worked, ate, and commuted. Prompted by live projections of Larson’s portraits, five NYC expats and storytellers—Harris Cooper Philip Costanzo, Iris Tillman Hill, Peter Lange, and Benjamin Reese—will recount stories from their childhoods, mixing in photographs from their own family archives. Of course, while the troubled romance of a John Cheever-esque NYC may have come and gone, the magic of the city still lives on; you need only ride the subway once to be reminded of this. This Center for Documentary Studies event, though, is meant to capture the snowglobe of a specific moment in time, and with Larson’s artful, populist pictures as backdrop, the task of being drawn into that snowglobe is not hard. The panel will begin at 6 p.m. but will be preceded by a 5:30 p.m. cash bar, and followed by a reception. —Sarah Edwards

NASHER MUSEUM OF ART, DURHAM 6-8 p.m., free, www.documentarystudies.duke.edu

The Art of Giving painting, sculpture, photography, glass art, jewelry, turned wood, pottery & fiber art. Reception: Nov. 29 6-9pm. Thru Dec 31. Hillsborough Gallery of Arts, Hillsborough. HillsboroughGallery.com.

“Times Square, 1954” PHOTO BY FRANK OSCAR LARSON

OPENING Art Basil & Holiday Bazaar Craft sale. Sun, Dec 8. 4 p.m. Attic 506, Chapel Hill. Ron Campbell: Beatles Yellow Submarine Animator Paintings. Dec 6-8. Studio 71 Custom Picture Framing, Hillsborough. gallery71nc.com. Coffee and Donuts with Karen Cain Lecture. Sat, Dec 7. 10 a.m. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill. frankisart.com.

Disposable Diaries: Caitlin Penna, Jade Wilson, Taylor McDonald Photography. Dec 6-28. Artspace, Raleigh. Elf Market Craft market and activities. Sat, Dec 7. 10 a.m. The ArtsCenter, Carrboro. artscenterlive.org. Festive 5 Points Mixed media. Dec 5-Jan 13. 5 Points Gallery, Durham. 5pointsgallery.com. Festivus Mixed media. Fri, Dec 6. 6 p.m. Local Color Gallery, Raleigh. localcoloraleigh.com.

Art of Mental Health Mixed media. Thru Jan 24. Rubenstein Art Center Gallery 235, Durham. artscenter.duke.edu. The Art of Resistance Thru Dec 13. UNC’s FedEx Global Education Center, Chapel Hill. Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures With guest curator Hannah Star Rogers. Other exhibits at NC State Libraries and GES Center. Thru Mar 15. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. John James Audubon: The Birds of America Ornithological engravings. Thru Dec 31. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org.

Scott Avett: INVISIBLE Paintings and prints. Thru Feb 2. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org. John Beerman: The Shape of Light Paintings. Thru Jan 25. Craven Allen Gallery, Durham. cravenallengallery.com. Megan Bostic: Undeveloped Memories Mixed media. Thru Dec 7. VAE Raleigh, Raleigh. Jaimon Caceres: Verdant Tranquility Colored pencil drawings. Thru Dec 31. Gallery C, Raleigh. Conner Calhoun: Whispers from Wizard Mountain Drawings, paintings, and sculpture. Thru Dec 13. Lump, Raleigh. lumpprojects.org. Kennedi Carter: Godchild Thru Jan 31. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com/durham. Cosmic Rhythm Vibrations Art inspired by music and rhythm. Thru Mar 1. Nasher Museum of Art, Durham. nasher.duke.edu. Stephen Costello: Places Sculpture. Reception: November 16, 5-7 p.m. Thru Jan 25. Craven Allen Gallery Durham cravenallengallery.com. Rosana Castrillo Díaz: Trust me. You are t/here. Mixed media. Thru Jan 12. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. Encantada | Enchanted Thru Dec 20. Duke Campus: John Hope Franklin Center, Durham. Fantastic Fauna-Chimeric Creatures Thru Jan 26. Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. A Few of Our Favorite Things Mixed media. Thru Dec 31. Cary Gallery of Artists, Cary. carygalleryofartists.org. Fleshmap: My Embroidered Bipolar Geographies Mixed media. Closing reception: Dec 7, 4 p.m. Thru Dec 7. Anchorlight, Raleigh. fleshmap.me. Coulter Fussell & Antonia Perez: Heirloom Quilts and mixed media. Thru Dec 28. Artspace, Raleigh. artspacenc.org. INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 29


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Hal Goodtree & Students: Photos. Thru Dec 15. Through This Lens, Durham. Holiday Exhibit Mixed media. Thru Jan 4. FRANK Gallery, Chapel Hill. frankisart.com. Harriet Hoover, Vanessa Murray, Rusty Shackleford Thru Jan 5. Oneoneone, Chapel Hill. oneoneone.gallery Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Mexican Modernism Paintings. Thru Jan 19. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. Law and Justice: The Supreme Court of North Carolina, 1819- 2019 Artifacts, images, texts. Thru May 31. NC Museum of History, Raleigh. ncmuseumofhistory.org. Maria Martinez-Cañas: Rebus + Diversions Mixed media. Thru Jan 12. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. Material Mixed media. Thru Jan 3. Durham Arts Council, Durham. facebook.com. Eleanor Mills: Wildflowers of Crested Butte, Colorado Photography. Thru Apr 18. Duke Campus: Lilly Library, Durham. Momentum @ Hamilton Hill 2D and 3D art. Thru Dec 31. Hamilton Hill, Durham. Mystical Logical Mixed media. Thru Dec 13. Lump, Raleigh. lumpprojects.org. NC Chinese Lantern Festival Lanterns. 6 p.m.-10 p.m. every day. Closed Mondays. 20. Thru Jan 12. Koka Booth Amphitheatre, Cary. New Orleans Second Line Parades Photos. Thru Dec 31. Love House and Hutchins Forum, Chapel Hill. southerncultures.org. Nuevo Espíritu de Durham: New Spirit of Durham Personal stories and images. Thru Jan 5. Museum of Durham History , Durham. cityofraleighmuseum.org. The Pattersons Mixed media. Thru Dec 7. Oneoneone, Chapel Hill. oneoneone.gallery. Kelly Popoff: At Home With Our Histories Paintings. Thru Jan 3. UNC Campus: Hanes Art Center, Chapel Hill. art.unc.edu.

Portraying Power and Identity: A Global Perspective Thru Jan 31. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com/durham. QuiltSpeak: Uncovering Women’s Voices Through Quilts Thru Mar 8. NC Museum of History, Raleigh. ncmuseumofhistory.org. Lynn Saville: Photos. Thru Dec 15. Through This Lens, Durham. throughthislens.com. Laura Lacambra Shubert: New Works Paintings. Thru Dec 29. Gallery C, Raleigh. galleryc.net. Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South Thru Dec 21 at Power Plant Gallery, Durham. Thru Dec 29 at Gregg Museum of Art & Design, Raleigh. powerplantgallery.com, gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. Sydney Steen: Fault Lines Vignettes. Thru Oct 25. 21c Museum Hotel, Durham. 21cmuseumhotels.com. Dawn Surratt & Lori Vrba: (en)compass Mixed media. Thru Dec 20. Horse & Buggy Press and Friends, Durham. horseandbuggypress.com. Teens, Inspired: Home Poems, mixed media. Thru Jan 3. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. Cheryl Thurber: Documenting Gravel Springs, Mississippi, in the 1970s Photos. Thru Mar 31. UNC’s Wilson Special Collections Library, Chapel Hill. ¡Viva Viclas!: The Art of the Lowrider Motorcycle Guest curator Denise Sandoval. Thru Feb 9. CAM Raleigh, Raleigh. camraleigh.org. What in the World Is a Grain Mummy? Egyptology and art. Thru Jan 8. NC Museum of Art, Raleigh. ncartmuseum.org.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6

MUSIC MAKER 25: ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION Gathering an intriguing cross-section of staff, associates, and longtime artists of the Hillsborough-based nonprofit Music Maker Relief Foundation, this panel—moderated by former National Endowment for the Humanities chair and current UNC-Chapel Hill folklore and history professor William R. Ferris—sheds light on Music Maker’s efforts to help preserve Southern voices in blues and folk traditions for the last twenty-five years. Music Maker founder and executive director Timothy Duffy is joined by Fat Possum Records general manager Bruce Watson, who Duffy credits for helping the Carolina Chocolate Drops reach a wide audience. Alabama Slim, a Freddie King collaborator and a veteran of deep South juke joints, also appears alongside soulful Native American singer-songwriter Pura Fé—who is a Music Maker Relief Foundation advisory board member—and the real-deal R&B queen Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen, who, in interviews, has referred to the Music Maker folks as family. —Spencer Griffith

THE FRUIT, DURHAM Noon, free, www.dukeperformances.duke.edu PHOTO BY TIMOTHY DUFFY

30 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

READINGS & SIGNINGS Cristina Bejan, Malachi Hacohen Intellectuals and Fascism in Interwar Romania (Bejan). Thu, Dec 5, 7 p.m. Regulator Bookshop, Durham. regulatorbookshop.com. Lola Haskins, Ephraim Scott Sommers Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare (Haskins). Wed, Dec 4, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Caroline McAlister Finding Narnia: The Story of C. S. Lewis and His Brother Warnie. Sun, Dec 8, 2 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Sheila Ogle The Pink House, Circa 1830: A Love Story. Wed, Dec 11, 4:30 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com.

Roxana Robinson Dawson’s Fall. Thu, Dec 5, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh. quailridgebooks.com. Roxana Robinson, Jill McCorckle Dawson’s Fall (Robinson). Sat, Dec 7, 2 p.m. McIntyre’s Books, Pittsboro. mcintyresbooks.com.

LECTURES, ETC. Lola Haskins, Ephraim Scott Sommers Poetry and music. Wed, Dec 4, 7 p.m. Regulator Bookshop, Durham. regulatorbookshop.com. Periodic Tables: One Giant Leap $5. Tue, Dec 10, 7 p.m. Motorco Music Hall, Durham. motorcomusic.com. Mab Segrest, Julia Pierce Wed, Dec 4, 7 p.m. NorthStar Church of the Arts, Durham. northstardurham.com.


stage OPENING 7 Stories: One Last Tale Storytelling. $5. Fri, Dec 6, 6:30 p.m. Kings, Raleigh. kingsraleigh.com. A Christmas Carol Musical. 7 p.m. Wed-Fri; 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. Sat; 2 p.m. Sun. $38+. Wed, Dec 11, Dec 11-15, 7 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. Camelot Burning Coal Theatre Company. Thu-Sat: 7:30 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m. Dec 5-22, Burning Coal Theatre at the Murphey School, Raleigh. burningcoal.org. Cinderella Raleigh Little Theatre. Musical. $25-$31. Thu-Fri: 7:30 p.m. Sat: 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Sun: 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Sun, Dec 6-22, Raleigh Little Theatre, Raleigh. raleighlittletheatre.org. Daddazz, Melissa MC Comedy. $25-$35. Sun, Dec 8, 7 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Disney on Ice: Road Trip Adventures Ice skating. Showtimes: 7 p.m. Wed & Thu; 7:30 p.m. Fri; 10:30 a.m., 2:30 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. Sat; 1 p.m. & 5 p.m. Sun. $13+. Dec 11-15, PNC Arena, Raleigh. thepncarena.com. FrUiTCaKeS Play. Fri & Sat: 8 p.m.; Sun: 3 p.m. $20-$22. Dec 6-22, North Raleigh Arts & Creative Theatre, Raleigh. nract.org. Funny is Funny Comedy showcase. $10. Wed, Dec 11, 8 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Tom Green Comedy. Showtimes: Fri 7 p.m., 9:15 p.m.; Sat 6:30 p.m., 9 p.m.; Sun 7 p.m. $25+. Dec 6-8, Raleigh Improv, Raleigh. Jen Kirkman, Tim Murray Comedy. 7:30 p.m. & 9 p.m. shows. $25. Sat, Dec 7, Motorco Music Hall, Durham. motorcomusic.com.

Julian McCullough Comedy. Thu: 8 p.m.; Fri-Sat: 7:30 p.m., 10 p.m. $17-$33. Dec 5-7, Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. The Nutcracker Carolina Ballet. Sat: 2 p.m. & 8 p.m. Sun: 2 p.m. $47+. Dec 7-8, UNC Campus: Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill. carolinaperformingarts.org. The Pump & Dump Show Comedy. $30. Thu, Dec 5, 7 p.m. Raleigh Improv, Raleigh. The Sinful Six Comedy. $10. Sat, Dec 7, 10:30 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com. Öktem Usumi, Ceytengri, Lütfi Urfali Drag performance. Fri, Dec 6, 8 p.m. Duke Coffeehouse, Durham. dukecoffeehouse.org. Wild Card Improv Improv comedy. $10. Sat, Dec 7, 6:30 p.m. The People’s Improv Theater (PIT), Chapel Hill.

ONGOING Céline Dion Live at the Gaza Strip Opera cabaret. 8 p.m. Thru Dec 7, Monkey Bottom Collaborative, Durham. themonkeybottom.blogspot.com.

Cinderella runs at Raleigh Little Theatre Friday, December 6–Sunday, December 22.

Ragtime Musical. Mon-Sat: 7:30 p.m.; Sun: 2 p.m. Thru Dec 16. Center for Dramatic Art, Chapel Hill.

A Snow White Christmas Musical. Thru Dec 8, Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. Durham. dpacnc.com.

Paint & Punchlines Food, drinks, comedy, and painting. $59. Wed, Dec 4, 5 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com.

White Christmas Musical. Showtimes: Tue-Thu: 7:30 p.m.; Fri: 8 p.m.; Sat: 2 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sun: 1 p.m. & 7 p.m. $33+. Thru Dec 8, Durham Performing Arts Center

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Musical. Thru Dec 24, Fletcher Opera Theater, Raleigh. dukeenergycenterraleigh.com. Jessica Michelle Singleton Comedy. $15-$23. Wed, Dec 4, 8 p.m. Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh. goodnightscomedy.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF RALEIGH LITTLE THEATRE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5–SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22

CAMELOT In dystopic times it’s tempting to discount the thought, but utopias are useful—regardless of how short-lived they sometimes are. Lest we forget, Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe’s 1960 musical adaptation of The Once and Future King details an epic disaster: the fall of King Arthur and the breakup of his Round Table. Yet most people’s memories of the Tony Awardwinning show remain positive. Why? Perhaps because a proof of concept is ultimately more important than the fate of any single prototype. To this day, the Kennedy administration is often cited as an American Camelot. (JFK reportedly loved the soundtrack.) In 2017, the L.A. Times wrote that President Obama “built a new kind of Camelot.” Three finite eras (including the show), all suddenly eclipsed. But the leaders in each had passionate ideas and ideals about creating and improving the future. They all got far enough that the world took note. And in their proofs of concept, each left behind their blueprints, and some hope. In this Burning Coal production, artistic director Jerome Davis leads a cast including Galen Murphy-Hoffman as Arthur, Natalie Reder as Guinevere, and Tyler Graeper as Lancelot; music director Mo Ortbal conducts the band. —Byron Woods

MURPHEY SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, RALEIGH 7:30 p.m. Thu.–Sat./2 p.m. Sun., $15–$25, www.burningcoal.org

FOR OUR COMPLETE COMMUNITY CALENDAR

INDYWEEK.COM

INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 31


screen SPECIAL SHOWINGS

Polar Express $13. Sat, Dec 7, 10 a.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh.

Barbershop $10. Sun, Dec 8, 6 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh.

Rocky Horror Picture Show $7. Fri, Dec 6, 12 a.m. Rialto Theatre, Raleigh. newsite. ambassadorcinemas.com/ rialto-theatre.

Black Christmas $5. Tue, Dec 10, 9 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Blood Beat $5. Fri, Dec 6, 10 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. A Christmas Story, Kiss Me Goodbye $10. Fri, Dec 6, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Concerto, Enigma Variations, Raymonda Act III $12. Mon, Dec 9, 6 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh.

Scrooged $13. Wed, Dec 11, 7 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Waves Time TBD. $8-$10. Fri, Dec 6, Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. White Christmas $8-$10. Mon, Dec 9, 7 p.m. Rialto Theatre, Raleigh. newsite. ambassadorcinemas.com/ rialto-theatre.

OPENING

Dial Code Santa Claus $5. Wed, Dec 11, 9 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse. com/raleigh.

Frankie—Isabelle Hupert stars as an ailing matriarch in this sprawling family drama. Rated PG-13.

Die Hard $3-$6. Thu, Dec 5, 9 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com.

½ Marriage Story—An amicable split turns supernova when lawyers get involved. One of the best movies of the year (but maybe don’t watch with your spouse). Rated R. —Glenn McDonald

Elf Wed: 6 p.m.; Fri: 12:40 p.m. & 6 p.m.; Sat-Sun: 12 p.m.; Mon: 10:40 a.m., 7 p.m. $8-$13. Dec 4-9, Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. The Grinch $3-$6. Thu, Dec 5, 7 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com. The Grinch $3-$6. Sun, Dec 8, 2 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com. Home Alone $10-$12. Fri, Dec 6, 7 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com. In The Good Old Summertime $3-$6. Thu, Dec 5, 2 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com. Inavasion USA $7. Wed, Dec 4, 7 p.m. Carolina Theatre, Durham. carolinatheatre.org. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang $13. Tue, Dec 10, 7 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. Love Actually Sat: 2:30 p.m.; Sun: 10:30 a.m. $13. Dec 7-8, Alamo Drafthouse, Raleigh. drafthouse.com/raleigh. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation $3-$6. Sat, Dec 7, 7:30 p.m. The Cary Theater, Cary. thecarytheater.com.

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Playmobil: The Movie—This riff on the Lego movie franchise has an all-star cast acting out a plot about a child who disappears into a Playmobil set. Not yet rated.

Black and Blue—A rookie cop captures a murder by corrupt cops, in this timely thriller. Rated R. Bridges—In this action thriller, the NYPD undergoes a manhunt so massive that police shut down all twentyone bridges leading out of Manhattan. Rated R. Charlie’s Angels—Producer and director Elizabeth Banks helms a new generation of the angels. Rated PG-13. Countdown—Apps may kill us all, and in this horror film, they do (the app in question is a countdown clock that predicts your time of death; not surprisingly, it may also be a killing mahine). Rated PG-13. Doctor Sleep—Stephen King sequel to The Shining. Rated R. Downton Abbey—King George V and Queen Mary pay a visit to the abbey and cause a flurry of activity in this spin-off of the television series. Rated PG. Ford v. Ferrari—Matt Damon and Christian Bale star in a biographical sports drama about a legendary race. Rated PG-13. Frozen 2— In search of the origins of her powers, Elsa and her sister Anna strike out beyond their frosty homeland. Rated PG.

Waves—An emotional movie about a suburban AfricanAmerican family navigating loss. Rated R.

The Good Liar—Sparks fly between an elderly couple who meet on a dating website. One of them, though, is a con artist. Rated R.

N OW P L AY I N G

Harriet—Kasi Lemmons stars in this biographical film about the heroic abolitionist Harriet Tubman. Rated PG-13.

The INDY uses a five-star rating scale. Unstarred films have not been reviewed by our writers. A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood—Audiences can’t get enough of the Mr. Rogers content, and for good reason. In this rendition, Matthew Rhys plays a jaded journalist assigned a profile of Fred Rogers, who is played by a perfectly-cast Tom Hanks. Rated PG. The Addams Family —In this star-studded new Addams installation, the macabre clan face-off with a reality television show host. Rated PG.

Hustlers—The true story of strippers drugging and stealing from Wall Street stock traders is the stuff think pieces are made of. Rated R. Jojo Rabbit—Black comedy about a German boy who discovers that his mother is hiding a Jewish girl in the attic. Rated PG-13. Joker—At first, the buzz around this star vehicle for Batman’s greatest villain was all about Joaquin Phoenix’s intense turn in a role Heath Ledger made famous. But as more details of the plot have emerged, there’s

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7

AMATEUR ON PLASTIC Butch Willis, the suburban Maryland outsider musician, gets a tribute with the documentary Amateur on Plastic, a collage of cable access footage and video ephemera showing an artist who is transfixing and earnestly strange. (Lyrics, delivered in a stumbling cadence, include, “I’m the kitty cat/I’m the kitty cat!”) First-time director Mark Robinson is a fellow musician in a handful of bands including Unrest, and is a close friend of Willis’; he also founded famed indie label Teen-Beat, which put out Willis’ albums in the nineties, and has been quoted as saying that Willis “was probably one of the lowest selling, if not the lowest selling, Teen-Beat act.” He means it lovingly; why else would he continue to obsessively evangelize Willis’ work, even years after Willis himself retired from music? Programmer Stephen Conrad brings this film to Shadowbox Studio sight-unseen, as a longtime Teen-Beat and Willis devotee. He suggests the uninitiated start with a Willis video on YouTube called “Forestville Rocks.” “Watch for two minutes and you will be a fan,” Conrad promises. Or, at least, you will learn what “throat guitar” means. —Anna Cassell

SHADOWBOX STUDIO, DURHAM 7:30 p.m., free, www.shadowboxstudio.org been a justified backlash about what sounds like an antihero myth for violent incels. Rated R. Judy—Renee Zellweger, in a role that will likely make her an Oscar frontrunner, plays Judy Garland during the last few years of her life. Rated PG-13.  Knives Out— A powerhouse portraits of the tension between American oligarchy and America’s promise—and also one of the wittiest films of the year. Rated PG-13. —Neil Morris Last Christmas—An unlucky department store elf falls in love. Rated PG-13. The Lighthouse—Birds caw, fog looms, and waves crash in this hallucinatory horror film about two lightkeepers trapped in a remote lighthouse. A campy art house flick that will leave you paranoid about both seagulls and other people. Rated R. —Sarah Edwards

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil— Angelina Jolie was perhaps born to do many things, but surely playing one of Disney’s greatest villianesses is one of them. Rated PG.

 Parasite—This highly-anticipated social satire from filmmaker Bong Joon-Ho is crammed with dark twists and intricate metaphors. Rated R. —SE

Midway—This WWII flick about Pearl Harbor and the subsequent Battle of Midway stars a fleet of hunks. Rated PG-13.

 Queen & Slim— A bad Tinder date turns into a nationwide manhunt after Queen and Slim kill a police officer in self-defense at a traffic stop. Rated R.

Motherless Brooklyn—Edward Norton plays a loner private detective with Tourette’s syndrome in this adaptation of the Jonathan Lethem novel. Rated PG. ½ Pain and Glory—In this auto-fictional exercise, the director Pedro Almodóvar is honest about his life but guarded about his psyche. Rated R. —Marta Núñez Pouzols

Terminator: Dark Fate—It’s like nothing after Terminator 2: Judgement Day ever happened as James Cameron returns to the fold of the classic sci-fi franchise. Rated R. The Warrior of Queen Jhansi—Based on the true story of Jhansi, a feminist icon who led a revolt against the British Empire in India in 1857. Rated R. Zombieland: Double Tap—A heartland sequel to the 2009 cult classic. Rated R.


indyclassifieds EMPLOYMENT CLINICAL DATA MANAGER PROGRAMMER II NEEDED – MORRISVILLE

PPD Development, L.P. seeks a Clinical Data Manager Programmer II in Morrisville, NC to work with clinical data management systems and programming tools to provide programming support in data management activities & deliverables. BS & 2 yrs exp. req’d. For full req’s & to apply send resume to global.recruitmentSM@ ppdi.com & reference Job ID: 164751

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HOUSING

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services LOOKING FOR SELF STORAGE UNITS?

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BOOK YOUR AD • EMAIL AMANDA: CLASSY@INDYWEEK.COM

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deep dive EAT • DRINK • SHOP • PLAY

The INDY’s monthly neighborhood guide to all things Triangle

Coming December 11:

TRIANGLE OUTPOSTS For advertising opportunities, contact your ad rep or advertising@indyweek.com INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 33


CROSSWORD If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “puzzle pages” at the bottom of our webpage.

su | do | ku

this week’s puzzle level:

© Puzzles by Pappocom

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above.

If you just can’t wait, check out the current week’s answer key at www.indyweek.com, and click “puzzle pages.” Best of luck, and have fun! www.sudoku.com solution to last week’s puzzle

34 | 12.04.19 | INDYweek.com

12.04.19

CLASSY AT INDYWEEK DOT COM Book your ad • Email amanda: classy@indywEEk.com


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back page CONTACT AMANDA: CLASSY@INDYWEEK.COM LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE

Book your ad • Email amanda: classy@indywEEk.com

INDYweek.com | 12.04.19 | 35


LEARN IMPROV COMEDY WITH METTLESOME!

JAZZ PIANO PLAYER NEEDED

Comedy classes, gift certificates available. thisismettlesome.com/lab

The Triangle Jazz Orchestra is looking for a piano player for our local 20 piece swing band. trianglejazzorchestra.com

IN SEARCH OF KIND LADY Older guy in the Raleigh area, 58yo, seeking an AA woman at any age with no problem with my age. Contact me rjones9945@aol.com or write PO Box 6326, Raleigh 27628.

EXPERIENCE

THE JAPANESE ART OF

D E E P R E L A X AT I O N

DANCE CLASSES IN LINDY HOP, SWING, BLUES At Carrboro ArtsCenter. Private lessons available. RICHARD BADU, 919-724-1421, rbadudance@gmail.com

WOMEN'S HEALTH STUDY (PRO00102284) Are you a woman at least 18yrs old & English-speaking? Were you in a relationship w/a partner who abused you, but have been out of that relationship for at least 1yr? • Must have smart phone and willing to be sent emails, texts.

HISTORY TRIVIA: T H E U LT I M A T E

OUTDOOR SPA ASHEVILLE, NC S A LT T U B S , M A S S A G E , W E T CEDAR SAUNA, DOUBLE COLD SHOWERS AND OVERNIGHT AC C O M M O DAT I O N S

We want to know— 1) Kind of symptoms you have & any patterns to those symptoms? 2) How easy or difficult it is to change symptoms? 3) What is it like to be in the study?

• Ground was formally broken for the Raleigh-Durham Airport on December 6, 1941. • The board of the NC Society for the Preservation of Antiquities (today’s Preservation NC) met for the first time on December 7, 1939, at the Carolina Hotel in Raleigh.

Financial compensation at the completion of each inperson session. Call 919-720-1294 if interested, for more information.

Courtesy of the Museum of Durham History

828•299•0999

WHAT IS THIS?

919-286-1916 @hunkydorydurham We buy records. Now serving dank beer.

S H OJ I R E T R E AT S .C O M Starting at 49.00

Well, it’s not an ad, but you’re still reading it! Contact Amanda at classy@indyweek.com to place YOUR ad

NOW HIRING beerista Fridays & Saturdays 4-8p

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UPCOMING SPECIAL ISSUES Dec 11

Gift Guide #3

Dec 18

Business Spotlight: Local Brands

Dec 11

Deep Dive: Outposts

Dec 25

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