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SOUTH Indy’s southside magazine

Summer 2013

Abigail Johnson

Also inside:

Father’s Day Gifts • Summer Cocktails • Contemporary Treehouses • Outdoor Concerts


Our greatest honor is caring for you. Our national rankings and health care honors are great sources of pride, but what inspires us most is helping those in our care lead healthy, active lives. Franciscan St. Francis Health – Indianapolis Healthgrades® Distinguished Hospital Award For Clinical Excellence™, 2013 Distinguished Hospitals for Clinical Excellence™ are those hospitals that perform in the top 5% nationally for overall clinical excellence. Franciscan St. Francis Health – Indianapolis Heart Center 5-Star Rated For Coronary Interventional Procedures, 2012 – 2013 5-Star Rated For Valve Surgery, 2012 – 2013 Franciscan St. Francis Health – Indianapolis Pulmonary One Of Healthgrades’ America’s 100 Best Hospitals For Pulmonary Care™, 2013 Ranked Among The Top 5% In The Nation For Overall Pulmonary Services, 2013 5-Star Rated For Overall Pulmonary Services, 2010 – 2013 5-Star Rated For Treatment Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 2013 5-Star Rated For Treatment Of Pneumonia, 2008 – 2013 Franciscan St. Francis Health – Mooresville OUTSTANDING

PATIENT EXPERIENCE AWARD™ 2009 – 2013

Healthgrades Outstanding Patient Experience Award™, 2009 – 2013 Ranked Among The Top 5% In The Nation For Outstanding Patient Experience, 2009 – 2013

Franciscan St. Francis Health – Mooresville Pulmonary Healthgrades Pulmonary Care Excellence Award™, 2013 5-Star Rated For Treatment Of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 2013 5-Star Rated For Treatment Of Pneumonia, 2012 – 2013

Inspiring Health Visit FranciscanStFrancis.org/Awards to learn more about our latest awards.

Scan to learn more.

THANK YOU FOR BEING OUR

INSPIRATION


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contents

on the cover

102

Feature Stories

88 Contemporary treehouses Customized and comfortable, these treehouses reach for the sky

94 The power of music

Abigail Johnson gives back to those who saved her

102 Dream house

Lanny Wilhelm’s 15,500-square-foot home

An outtake from the cover shoot. Read more about Abigail Johnson on page 94. Photos by JOsh Marshall

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contents

Departments

15

This & That

Southside news and views

21 In Style

Watches for men

25 Taste

Summer cocktails

34 Worth the trip

Kopper Kettle Inn Restaurant

40 Authentic Indiana Cinda b bags

44 Community Outdoor concerts

80

48 Health

72 Lifestyle

52 Good will

80 Profile

56 Travel

In Every Issue

Autism

Pastor Brian Peters

Indiana agritourism

62 Community Summer camps

66 Home trends The Stephenson home

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Hair trends

Norma Scifres

8 Welcome 112 Our side of town 118 South weddings 120 Calendar of events 130 A look back

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TIME DESIGNED

The C lassiC © d. yurman 2013

®


welcome

A

Strength in Numbers

As I’m sure most everyone has, I’ve been watching my fair share of news reports about the recent tornadoes that rolled through the Midwest, including the monster storm that hit the town of Moore, Okla., in May. It’s hard to wrap my mind around tragedies on such grand scales. It’s difficult to imagine the immense sense of loss … of life, of possessions, of future dreams and long-ago memories, of a sense of security, really. Events like these usually cause me to pause and reflect on life, with all its ups, downs, beautiful twists, ugly turns and life-sized mishaps wrapped up in one. I’m no stranger to loss. I’ve lost loved ones, family members, friends, pets, relationships and a few unwanted pounds. (OK, for that last one, I have celebrated.) When we endure traumatic experiences, we quickly go into recovery mode and begin counting our blessings. In recent weeks, I’ve seen Moore citizens expressing “At least we’re alive” sentiments over and over again on the television screen. It no longer becomes about what they lost, but, instead, about what they didn’t lose. I suspect this is how strong people make it through such unimaginable pain and loss. They look at the bright side, and then they hold on to one another a little bit tighter. True faces of courage also start to emerge with events such as these. We see once-average citizens doing what they know how to do best: Running into the face of storms or diving into the messy aftermaths to help those in need. Sometimes these do-

gooders save a life. Sometimes they save 12 lives. Storms like these will continue to disrupt—and, at times, shatter—our lives. On that we can count. But it has been said that without the valleys—those low moments in our lives—we wouldn’t know to appreciate the mountains, the successes and blessed times. Without illnesses, disease, accidents, and passing storms, we might never know to take notice of the heroes in our midst. As I read over the pages of SOUTH, I see the faces of several local heroes. In this issue, we’ve profiled southsiders like Pastor Brian Peters, Abigail Johnson, Rebecca Bickel and Norma Scifres, who have gone through their own valleys and now use those experiences to help others. I hope you’ll enjoy getting to know them. I also hope, by reading their stories, you can find comfort from their words and lives. We all have and we all will go through hard times. That’s why it’s good to know—with a little help from our friends—we can come out stronger on the other side.

Keep up with SOUTH happenings on Facebook. sdugger@indysouthmag.com

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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

SUmmer 2013 | Vol. 9 | No. 1

Publisher Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells

Editorial Editor

Sherri Dugger Copy Editor

Katharine Smith Contributing Writers

John Adams Alisa Advani Caroline Mosey Teresa Nicodemus Amy Norman Ashley Petry Jon Shoulders Ed Wenck

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger contributing advertising Designer

Amanda Waltz Contributing Photographers

Jennifer Cecil Mark Freeland Dario Impini Andrew Laker Josh Marshall Mike Wolanin Stock images provided by ©Thinkstock

C

THE CENTER FOR

COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY

Advertising Advertising Director

Christina Cosner ACCOUNT Executive

Miranda J. Stockdall 10

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Ethereal Day Spa & Salon

SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

reader services mailing address 2575 N. Morton St., Franklin, IN 46131

phone

(317) 736-7101

fax

(317) 736-2713

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SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES subscribe@indysouthmag.com (800) 435-5601

advertising inquiries southmail@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2769

story ideas

info@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2732

web site

www.indysouthmag.com

Single copy sales

experience...

rustic charm & fine wine on the southside

Sounds of Summer 2013 great food & live music every Saturday & Sunday

Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger, Marsh and Barnes and Noble locations.

Subscriptions

To subscribe to SOUTH magazine, please send $12 for 4 issues, or $24 for 8 issues to the mailing address above. Call (800) 435-5601 to subscribe by phone or place your subscription request online at indysouthmag.com.

Address Change

Please send any address changes to the address or e-mail address listed above.

Back issues

Mallow Run WINERY

open daily 12-6pm with complimentary tasting daily 6964 W. Whiteland Rd. | Bargersville, IN | www.mallowrun.com

317.422.1556

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To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. ©2013 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


Compiled by Ashley Petry

this & that

Independence Park Inset: Edwina Caito

Glamorous When Glamour magazine recently announced its nominations for the 10 most inspiring women in the nation, Edwina Caito was on the list. Thirteen years ago, she oversaw planning and fundraising efforts for Independence Park, the first park in Indiana to be fully accessible to people with disabilities. Now, she is hard at work again, attempting to raise $250,000 for park improvements — such as a recently opened outdoor music center for children with autism. Next on the wish list: more playground equipment. “When the park opened in 2000, the manufacturers weren’t making nearly as many pieces of accessible equipment as they are now,” Caito said. “Even if we’re taking baby steps, it’s nice to see the additions being made to the park, because it just does wonderful things for families.” Want to help? The Johnson County Community Foundation accepts donations for the Independence Park Fund at www.jccf.org/forms/give-to-the-foundation. SOUTH

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this & that

This Old House The Artcraft Theatre will soon have a much-needed annex

Q&A

for meeting spaces, offices

Brandy McCord

and storage — all because of a clever real estate switcheroo.

Ms. Wheelchair Indiana

The Franklin Development Corp. recently swapped properties

Ten years ago, Greenwood resident Brandy McCord, 33, was diagnosed with lupus and started using a wheelchair to get around. But her condition hasn’t held her back. During the statewide Disability Awareness Month celebration in March, she was crowned Ms. Wheelchair Indiana. In July, she’ll head to Texas to compete for the national title.

with a private owner, acquiring the former Madison Hotel at 48 E. Madison St. in exchange for a house on Main Street and a renovation grant. The FDC then handed the historic Madison Street property over to Franklin Heritage Inc. and the Artcraft Theatre, along with a $50,000 grant for exterior renovations. “This is something we have

Why did you enter the Ms. Wheelchair Indiana pageant? I thought it would be fun. And it’s a really neat program. It shows that people with disabilities can do things. I was pretty surprised to win, though, because the other participants were amazing women.

What are the greatest challenges for wheelchair users these days? Just making sure that places are wheelchair accessible — ramps to get in, accessible bathrooms. And also having people treat you like an equal, making sure they’re not talking down to you. When I was first disabled, I had some trouble with my friends, because they were worried that I wouldn’t be able to do certain things. I want to show people that individuals with disabilities can do all those things.

You’re on the waiting list for a kidney. What’s the status? My kidneys originally failed about six months after my diagnosis of lupus. I was on dialysis for about four years back then, received one kidney transplant in September 2006, and now that transplant is failing. I started the process (for a new kidney transplant) in December, and the wait is three to five years for my blood type.

You work as a regional re-entry coordinator for Corizon. What does that mean?

wanted for some time, because if we’re going to start doing anything like theater camps, we need additional space to house those kinds of functions,” said Rob Shilts, executive director. Another benefit of the threeway transaction is that two downtown buildings will be fixed up, potentially boosting nearby property values. “This couldn’t have happened better,” Shilts said.

Corizon is the medical company for the Indiana Department of Correction, and we provide medical, mental health and substance abuse treatments for all inmates in adult and juvenile facilities. I travel around the state to assist individuals with special needs.

What appeals to you about that job? I believe that in general people are good people, but sometimes they do bad things. Everyone deserves a second chance.

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48 E. Madison St., Franklin


this & that Behind the Music The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra spends its summers on the northside, but it still gets plenty of support from the South Group, part of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra Association. The group has about 150 members, and last year it raised more than $20,000 to support educational programs such as the Young People’s Discovery Concerts and the Maurer Young Musicians Contest. This year’s fundraisers include a garden tour and fashion show.

South Group’s Garden Tour Home

Want to get involved (and get exclusive behind-the-scenes access to symphony events)? Contact the ISOA at (317) 262-4068 or www.indianapolissymphony.org/support/ getinvolved/isoassociation.aspx.

Getting Steamy Earthtone Tanning now offers one of the hottest trends in wellness — an infrared sauna. Unlike a traditional sauna, which heats up the air around the body, an infrared sauna heats up the body directly. The benefits, according to sauna manufacturers, include relaxation, detoxification, lower blood pressure, improved circulation, skin purification, pain relief, wound healing and even weight loss. The jury is still out on many of those claims, but owner Shane Griggs said he’s been challenging his customers to ask their doctors about it. “It’s something new and different, and I believe it’s going to be the wave of the future,” he said. Sessions are $20 for 20 minutes, $30 for 30 minutes or $80 for five 30-minute sessions. 6835 E. Southport Road, Indianapolis; (317) 883-0100; www.earthtonetanning.com

tidbits Just charge it: When southside Girl Scout Troop 2334 started taking credit cards for cookie orders this year, sales soared 35 percent to more than 2,700 boxes. That’s a lot of Thin Mints.

Jennifer McAlpin, owner of Vintage Whimsy

In With the Old Everything old is new again at Vintage Whimsy, a Franklin shop that opened in February. Fifteen vendors stock finds such as architectural salvage, repurposed antiques and furniture made from reclaimed wood. “We have barn wood that’s been made into desks and end tables and

bookcases, and they’re really cool,” said sales associate Sara Hensley. If owner Jennifer McAlpin looks familiar, it’s because she also runs the monthly Johnson County Antique Market at the fairgrounds. 462 E. Jefferson St., (317) 736-9446, www.facebook.com/ VintageWhimsy

By August, a new gateway arch spanning U.S. 31 will welcome visitors to the southside. It is part of a larger effort by the Gateway Community Alliance to improve the local streetscape and attract new commercial investment to the area.

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this & that

Book Nook

Provided by Greenwood Public Library

“Me Before You” By Jojo Moyes

In “Me Before You,” Louisa “Lou” Clark lives a safe (read “mundane”) life in the poor section of an English town. She’s just learned that the café she works for is closing, so she’s looking for a new job since her family is in dire financial straits. After a few amusingly horrible job possibilities, she goes for an interview with Mrs. Traynor, the mother of Will, a quadriplegic man in his mid-30s. Traynor is looking for a companion for her son, who is deeply depressed. Most of this beguiling story is told from Lou’s perspective, but a few chapters provide some bystander insight from others who are in Will and Lou’s lives. Despite the absence of a chapter from Will’s perspective, you can easily see the transformation he’s undergone from the accident causing his paralysis to the man he is with Lou. “Me Before You” is a love story and a tale about inner strength. Reviewed by Susan Jerger, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

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“The Age of Miracles” By Karen Thompson Walker

“The Age of Miracles” is set in a world that suffers an extreme change when the Earth’s rotation begins to slow, causing days and nights to be longer with its every turn. The book focuses on how Justina, an 11-year-old suburban California girl, and her small circle of family, classmates, and neighbors cope in their new, uncertain world. Despite the huge disturbance, Walker focuses on the smaller shifts her characters experience, and she does so with sparsely beautiful prose. This book is wonderfully written, but the quietness of the story set within such chaotic times is at times unimaginable. If you can get over a gentler fantasy of what a slowing might really be like, “The Age of Miracles” is worth its quick read time. Reviewed by Sara O’Sha, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

“Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm” By Philip Pullman

In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the Grimm brothers’ first published book of fairy tales, Philip Pullman has released this newly translated collection of their work. He stays true to the original tales, at times quite gory, and follows each story with additional information. He cites who told the story to the Grimm brothers, gives examples of similar stories and offers a brief analysis of the tale. Pullman shares 50 of his favorite stories, including commonly known tales such as Rapunzel, Cinderella and Hansel and Gretel, as well as some lesser-known tales, such as “The Three Little Men in the Woods” and “The Devil with Three Golden Hairs.” Pullman has been receiving welldeserved glowing reviews for this work. Reviewed by Valerie Moore, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library


Watch Melissa’s story or tell us what your scar means at MyScarMeans.com. #MyScarMeans

Melissa Burns,

OrthoIndy and IOH patient


in style

Men’s ESQ by Movado Prescott. Chronograph stainless steel case and bracelet, silver dial. $550, J.L Johnson Fine Jewelers, 1263 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-7662, www.jljohnsons.com.

Father Time Black leather, stainless steel, silver, crystal … the options and accessories are many in men’s watches these days. And with Father’s Day just around the corner, now’s your chance to make the man in your life not only on trend … but also on time.

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in style

2

1

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1 Men’s ESQ by Movado Torrent. Stainless steel and rubber case and bracelet, black dial. $295, J.L Johnson Fine Jewelers, 1263 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-7662, www.jljohnsons.com.

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2 Rolex Submariner. Stainless steel 40mm wristwatch with black index date dial and black time lapse bezel. Oyster slidelock bracelet. $8,550, Reis Nichols, 789 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 883-4467, www.reisnichols.com.

3 Citizen Eco-Drive Technology. Retrograde 24-hour time, dual time, water-resistant, stainless steel case and black leather band. $275, J.L Johnson Fine Jewelers, 1263 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-7662, www.jljohnsons.com.


in style

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4 TAG Heuer Carrera. Stainless steel wristwatch with a white index date dial and white sub-dials. High polished bezel and case. Black leather strap. $5,300, Reis Nichols, 789 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 883-4467, www.reisnichols.com.

5 Tissot V8. Stainless steel chronograph watch. Black Arabic dial with silver sub-dials, black tachymeter bezel and brushed, high polished case. Brushed and high polished bracelet. $495, Reis Nichols, 789 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 883-4467, www.reisnichols.com.

J.L. JOhnson photos by andrew laker / reis nicols photos submitted

6 Citizen Men’s Bracelet Eco-Drive J810. Three-hand with date, stainless steel bracelet, stainless steel case, black dial, mineral crystal. $225, J.L Johnson Fine Jewelers, 1263 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-7662, www.jljohnsons.com.

7 Men’s ESQ by Movado Synthesis. Stainless steel case with “e” logo crown, black dial with silver-toned Arabic numerals and markers, black crocodile embossed leather strap with classic tongue buckle, Swiss quartz movement, mineral crystal. $250, J.L Johnson Fine Jewelers, 1263 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-7662, www.jljohnsons.com.

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EXPERTS AT SERVING OUR CUSTOMERS. AND OUR COMMUNITY.

Mike Combs Tricia Rake

Shirley Best

West Smith Valley Road and SR 135

882-8200

Š2013 The National Bank of Indianapolis

www.nbofi.com

Member FDIC


By Caroline MOsey // Photography by Josh marshall

taste

The Cocktail Club Long summer days give us plenty of extra time for savoring the sights, sounds and flavors of the season. And what better way to celebrate the warm weather than al fresco, with a delicious cocktail in hand and a great view? Here, some of our favorite spots to soak up the season.

Vino Villa

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taste

The Willard 99 N. Main St., Franklin, (317) 738-9668, www.thewillard.com

SIP Margaritas really need no introduction. Sweet, sour, sometimes salty— they’re the quintessential summer concoction. At The Willard in downtown Franklin, employees are regularly filling saltrimmed glasses with the crowd pleaser. “One of our most popular summer drinks is our Top Shelf Margarita,” shares Tony Priola, manager. A refreshing mix of Patron Silver, Cointreau liqueur, Grand Marnier, sweet and sour mix and splashes of lime and orange juice, the drink is topped off with slices of lime and served frozen or on the rocks.

SAVOR The restaurant’s veranda provides a relaxing atmosphere for indulging in those margaritas. “Our veranda is a great place to enjoy lunch, dinner or just drinks in beautiful downtown Franklin,” says Priola. “Some tables have a view of the Johnson County Courthouse and the Historic Artcraft Theatre. With 12 tables and 40plus seats, it’s a great extension of The Willard.”

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Top Shelf Margarita


taste

Revolucion 1132 E. Prospect St., Indianapolis, (317) 423-9490

SIP There’s nothing quite like a tropical cocktail to cut through the Hoosier heat, and Revolucion gets the job done right. Stop into this funky Fountain Square cantina and heed co-owner Roni Donaldson’s advice. “My favorite drink to have in the Tiki Bar is our mai tai,” she says. The drink is an overtly summery concoction of guava, orange, passion fruit and light rum, topped with a dark rum float to boot. Roni Donaldson

SAVOR Channel the slow-paced, laid-back attitude of the islands in the cantina’s outdoor Tiki Bar, complete with colorful lantern lighting, tiki totems and a thatched bar. “People love our Tiki Bar because it’s a bit of a secret,” Donaldson says of the bar that’s tucked away in the back, outside the regular bar. “Sipping a cool drink on a warm summer day, you can easily forget you’re landlocked in Indianapolis.”

Mai Tai

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taste Peach-Raspberry White Sangria

Vino Villa 200 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-9463, www.vinovilla.com

SIP This downtown Greenwood locale is a magnet for southside wine lovers, especially during warmer months when sangria specials emerge. Guests can indulge in a traditional red sangria, but the fan favorite remains the Peach-Raspberry White Sangria, overflowing with the ripeness of summer. “The recipe consists primarily of ginger ale, dry white wine (we use a Viognier), sugar, a splash of peach schnapps and fresh raspberries, blueberries and sliced peaches,” owner Paul Jacquin says. “Believe it or not, we started making the white sangria as a result of a rather prolific little peach tree in the front yard. We are blessed with several bushels of ripe tasty peaches that grow just a few feet from where they are served.”

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SAVOR Sweeten the experience even more by claiming a spot on the outdoor patio. “The patio is roughly 1,000 square feet of Travertine pavers, outfitted with wrought iron tables and chairs shaded by 100-plusyear-old maples and elm trees,” says Jacquin. With seating for 40, there’s plenty of space to sit back, savor the ambience and even catch some live music on certain evenings.


Want to host your own outdoor summer soiree? Below, tips from Vino Villa’s Paul Jacquin to pull it off without a hitch. » Save yourself lots of return trips to the

kitchen by staging the things you might need during your meal (such as extra water and wine, linens, and condiments).

» Nothing complements good food like peaceful sounds. Create audio ambience with outdoor speakers or live performances by local musicians.

» Create cozy seating areas to encourage conversation.

» Consider the direction your seating area faces and offer appropriate shade options for different times of day. An umbrella not only has the obvious task of providing shade, it also helps define your outdoor dining space.

» Outside can be dehydrating. Be

certain to provide plenty of iced beverages to keep guests refreshed.

» Never underestimate the importance of propane patio heaters to keep the dining experience positive and cozy on cool evenings. Even when nights grow cooler, a patio fire pit lets you entertain outside.

» Heavy metal holders keep napkins from blowing away before guests arrive. Or place lighter objects like napkins and paper plates in a holder with a decorative heavy object on top. Make wind less of an issue by skipping a tablecloth.

» Lighter appetites and casual dishes often accompany outdoor meals. Create an al fresco menu that features summer friendly salads and sandwiches. Keep food simple: salads, fresh fruit, cold drinks.

» To keep dairy-based dips chilled, fill a large bowl with ice and sprinkle it with kosher salt. Place the dip bowl on top.

» Keep bugs away from food with an upended wire-mesh colander. Keep a supply of bug repellent wipes or sprays on hand. Circle your party area with citronella candles. This has the added benefit of providing additional light when night falls.

» At twilight, make sure you provide

plenty of lighting. Paper lanterns draped from tree limbs or intertwined with foliage and decorative light strands add instant ambience to any evening party. Solar lights, which run on energy gathered during the day and snap on as darkness falls, create an energy efficient option.

» Candles and lanterns can provide for a romantic and elegant setting as well as a light source. A solution for cautious hosts: battery-operated candles provide you with the same warm light, with no worries of wind or dripping wax. SOUTH

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taste

John Daly

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taste

The Legends Golf Course

SAVOR

2555 N. Hurricane Road, Franklin, (317) 736-8186, www.thelegendsgolfclub.com

SIP Here, golfers (and golf-gawkers) unwind primarily with a frosty beer, but when it comes to mixed

The course patio offers guests a view of the manicured putting greens at The Legends, where golfers stay busy throughout the summer. Although the golf club is semi-private, the public is more than welcome to stop in for a drink and a sandwich and take in the scenery—and maybe even pick up a few tips on improving their swings.

drinks, the John Daly reigns supreme. “We offer a full-service bar and can make pretty much anything,” says Ted Davidson, assistant general manager. “We make a lot of John Dalys, which are a mixture of lemonade, iced tea and vodka. It’s the alcoholic Ted Davidson

version of the Arnold Palmer.”

If you’ve been in the ER at Community Hospital South recently, you’ve likely noticed some things have changed. Such as the amount of time you were actually there. Or weren’t there. That’s because with our new Express Care ER service, we evaluate every patient’s illness or injury quicker and promise you’ll receive quality care within 23 minutes when arriving between 1 pm and 11 pm. Those 23 minutes are well below the gold standard of 30 minutes. And to be seen that promptly during peak ER hours makes Community South the place to go to in an emergency. While we recognize every visit may be serious, those with severe conditions such as heart attacks and strokes are immediately admitted to a room and seen by a board-certified emergency physician. You’ll be glad to know patients with serious, but non-life-threatening, symptoms also receive the fastest care the South side has to offer. We have no intention of our emergency room turning into a waiting room. Visit eCommunity.com/south to learn more about our Express Care ER. Shorter wait. Faster care.

eCommunity.com/south

CHNB-3034_SouthExpressER_SouthMag.indd 1

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taste

By Caroline Mosey

WINE

DINE

FIND

It’s impossible to go wrong with fruit wines in the summer—the sweetness just goes perfectly with the season. Stop into Buck Creek Winery for a bottle of the award-winning Blackberry ($24 for 750 mL), so beloved by customers that the winery began selling it in larger bottles by popular demand. “One of our favorite ways to serve our Blackberry wine is with a slice of original cheesecake,” says winemaker Jeff Durm. “Have a small glass on the side and pour some right over the cheesecake. It’s phenomenal.” Smaller bottles are also available for $12.50. Buck Creek Winery, 11747 Indian Creek Road South, Indianapolis, (317) 862-9463, www.buckcreekwinery.com

Martha Hoover’s working her restaurant magic again, this time on South Meridian Street at the newest location of Napolese. The artisanal pizzeria boasts a menu filled with local ingredients from sausage to fresh cheeses to duck confit and ushers in new pizza creations to stay in step with the changing seasons. The downtown space occupies the former L.S. Ayres Men’s Shop, with 20-foot ceilings, an open kitchen and an area dedicated to high-end cappuccino service. One of three Napolese locations, this Meridian Street spot offers perks the others don’t: an exclusive cheese course and handmade cocktails. 30 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis, (317) 635-0765, www.napolesepizzeria.com

No time to make it to your local farmers market? Not to worry—Green BEAN Delivery will come to your front door. The organic grocery and produce service arranges for your customized orders to be delivered to your home on a regular basis of your choosing. Pick from bakery items, frozen goods, drinks, dairy products, meats and, of course, a huge selection of fruits and vegetables, arriving in bins of varying sizes to sync up with your family’s needs. Start compiling your personal produce bin by visiting www.greenbeandelivery.com or calling (317) 377-0470.

prep tip

Cooking without Heat

With temps soaring, turning on the oven or stove can seem pretty unappealing. No-cook dishes are the surest way to keep your cool, and one of the easiest—and tastiest—ways to cook without heat is by using acids to do the cooking for you. The acid found in citrus juices effectively “cooks” fresh fish and can be used for homemade ceviche. Follow these tips from Bluebeard chef/owner John Adams to whip up this refreshing dish.

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The basic elements of ceviche are fish, acid, aromatics and garnish, he says. “The trick is getting the flavor to balance with the salt, acid and aromatics, while at the same time producing a great texture with the fish.” Consider the fish you’re using—only use sashimi quality fish for raw preparations.   It is very typical to use onions, tomatoes, chilies, cilantro, garlic and lime juice, but Adams suggests you also try adding a

little soy sauce, yuzu, ginger, lemongrass or fish sauce for an Asian version. Lemon zest, tomato and balsamic vinegar offer an Italian version, and fresh lavender, chives, green olives, capers and shallots create a south-of-France flavor. Mix in very ripe avocado right before you want to serve. This will thicken the delicious juice that you will inevitably have and make ceviche even more delicious to eat.


taste

Flavor Infusion What’s the best way to impart intense flavor to food? Giving ample time for ingredients to marry and infuse in a just-right marinade always does the trick. Here, two marinade recipes that will take your next fish dish to a whole new level. By Caroline Mosey

Herbed Tuna Marinade Courtesy of Oaken Barrel Brewing Co., 50 N. Airport Parkway, Greenwood, (317) 887-2287, www.oakenbarrel.com

2 cups olive oil 1 tablespoon mixed peppercorns, whole 2 bay leaves, hand torn 1 teaspoon salt Pinch ground pepper 1 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 sprig fresh thyme Juice of one fresh lemon Mix all ingredients and pour over fresh, sushigrade tuna. Marinate for a minimum of one hour before grilling, turning tuna over to ensure you are marinating on both sides evenly.

Margarita Marinade Courtesy of Hal’s Fabulous Vegas Bar and Grille, 1133 N. State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-3427, www.halsvegas.com

½ cup Orange Curacao 1 teaspoon salt ¼ cup olive oil ½ onion, diced ¼ cup fresh cilantro ¾ cup lime juice 3 tablespoons garlic, minced 2½ cups fresh tomatoes, diced 1 jalapeno, diced 1 teaspoon sugar ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 ounce tequila Mix all ingredients except tequila and marinate firm white fish, such as grouper, in refrigerator overnight. In a hot pan, add extra virgin olive oil to coat. Sear one side of marinated fish. Flip, add 3 ounces of marinade. Cook 3 to 5 minutes. Then, add 1 ounce tequila of your choice. Let burn off, then plate and enjoy.

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worth the trip

Comfort Food Morristown’s Kopper Kettle gives the tiny Indiana town a heaping reputation By Sherri Dugger | Photography by Josh Marshall

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worth the trip

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With only a couple of gas stations, a

local hardware store and a Dollar General, Morristown isn’t known for much. Unless you’re in the mood for home cookin’. Two local restaurants, Bluebird Restaurant and Kopper Kettle Inn Restaurant, have given the small Indiana town a sweet-tasting reputation for miles around. Farmers converge on Bluebird every morning to discuss the weather over bacon, eggs and freshly brewed coffee. Across U.S. 52, on the south side of the thoroughfare, sits Kopper Kettle, where the thick scent of deep-fried chicken and catfish wafts out of the 19th-century structure daily.

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For 90 years, families from all over the region have come to eat at Kopper Kettle, which is housed in a Victorian-era home that was originally a grain elevator and later served as an inn for weary travelers. Carefully tended gardens, thick with regional plants and flowers, and furnished patios surround the restaurant outside, where weddings, receptions and other special events are sometimes held. Inside the front parlor, a crackling fireplace and a collection of vintage copper teakettles, along with the restaurant’s hostess, greet guests. The restaurant’s two floors (much of the second floor, where the current own-


Mount Pleasant Christian Church’s Community Life Center provides a friendly

and Christian atmosphere for people of all ages to grow physically and spiritually.

facebook.com/CommunityLifeCenter

ers live, is off-limits, but some rooms are open for guests to peruse) are filled with antiques, both functional and stylish, which were amassed by the restaurant’s original owners during their travels. Thanks to Chinese crests, marble and alabaster statuary, European stained glass and mismatched china, the quaint home is an accidental art museum, displaying fine art from all over the world. The décor in the main restaurant is decidedly Victorian, with lace place settings and flowery murals on the walls, while sconces, candelabras and chandeliers set the mood. But it isn’t just the ambience that brings

in diners by the dozens. It’s the food. Each meal begins with a warm cup of creamy onion or chicken noodle soup and a basket filled with crackers. Guests then take on course No. 2, homemade coleslaw or a house salad, which — if you choose wisely — features one of the restaurant’s housemade thousand island or blue cheese dressings, says Danyelle Moore, Kopper Kettle general manager. The rest of the meal is served familystyle; shareable bowls of mashed potatoes, corn, green beans, rolls and gravy accompany individual entrée choices, which include filet mignon, catfish or pan-fried

381 N. Bluff Road, Greenwood, IN (ASL Interpretation available @ 6pm service)

facebook.com/mountpleasantcc @mpccgreenwood www.mpcc.info


worth the trip chicken, pork loin or french-fried shrimp, among others. And, for added atmosphere, the food is served by waitresses wearing traditional peasant costumes. Each meal ends with dessert, first — a scoop of ice cream and chocolate syrup is included with every dinner — and second, a wet, warm washcloth to towel off after such a big meal. When leaving the Kopper Kettle, each guest receives a bag of homemade kettlecooked popcorn and a couple of suggestions from the hostess: “Tell your friends and family about us and have a great day!” The restaurant’s current owners, Leigh and Kristi Langkabel, who bought the property in 1997, initially began offering kettle corn to guests during the holiday season, Moore says, but the popcorn has since become an everyday staple. “Now you get it every time you go,” she explains. “The owners don’t really need to advertise their restaurant anymore. The popcorn is their advertising. It (the business the restaurant gets) is all (through) word of mouth.”

Arni’s TM

Indianapolis 96th St. & Gray Rd. 317-571-0077 Greenwood SR 135 & Curry Rd. 317-881-0500

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MeetYouAtArnis.com


travel

135 W. Main St., Morristown, (765) 763-6767, www.kopperkettle.com. Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

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Local producers, merchants and entrepreneurs By Sherri Lynn Dugger

cinda b

Indiana is abuzz with opportunities to manufacture, craft and build unique products. (continued)

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OUR NETWORK OF PHYSICIANS. YOUR TEAM OF SPECIALISTS.

FAMILY MEDICINE >

ORTHOPEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE >

SURGERY >

WOMEN’S HEALTH >

INTERNAL MEDICINE >

At Johnson Memorial Health, we have assembled a broad network of medical specialists to care for you and your family. Our specialists believe in providing you the best personal care teamed with the latest in medical knowledge and expertise. They also value being part of a network that gives their patients access to medical specialists. The network approach allows our physicians to give you the best care possible, right in your hometown.

PULMONARY MEDICINE >

Members of the Johnson Memorial Health Team H O S P I TA L

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johnsonmemorial.org

Soon we will see patients in our new Stones Crossing Health Pavilion on State Road 135 and Stones Crossing Road.

FAMILY MEDICINE > Dr. Doug Bullington, Dr. David Dunkle, Dr. Simon Feng, Dr. Diane Kolody, Dr. Gerald Mader, Dr. John Wiseman, Dr. Patricia Wiseman WOMEN’S HEALTH > Dr. Emily Cline, Dr. John Norris, Dr. Carrie Smith, Dr. Virginia Takagi, Dr. Joseph Beardsley ORTHOPEDICS AND SPORTS MEDICINE > Dr. James Friedlander, Dr. Martin Turner SURGERY > Dr. Michael Boyer, Dr. Dana Lindsay, Dr. David Wippermann INTERNAL MEDICINE > Dr. Ali Abedali, Dr. Gaston Dana, Dr. Andrew Houston, Dr. William Province II PULMONARY MEDICINE > Dr. J. Timothy Deppe

Client: Johnson Memorial Publication: South Magazine Issue: Spring 2013 Ad: Physician Network Ad 1 Size: 8.375” x 10.875”


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Bag lady For Cinda Boomershine, success was in the bag By Sherri Dugger

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When Atlanta-based interior

designer Cinda Boomershine created her first weekend travel bag, it was more out of necessity rather than with the idea of someday building a national brand. A frequent traveler, Cinda says she wanted a “weekend travel bag that was contemporary in design, functional and durable” … and at a reasonable price point. But the bag she wanted, she says, didn’t exist. So, in 2004, Cinda created the cinda b brand and designed her first bag. “The Weekender” was Cinda’s first design. Then came “The Overnighter” and “The Vacationer,” she says. Cinda quickly designed a few more bags and started selling her line of products at the Atlanta Gift Show, a semiannual event where the bags are still sold today. As her company grew—and as more women took notice of her stylish products—the manufacturing demands began to overwhelm her California-based provider. “It was 2008, and I was pulling my hair out because my manufacturer couldn’t keep up,” she recalls. “I wanted to do an American-made product. My mom used to sew my clothes when I was little. I know how to sew. It’s not rocket science. That was something I understood, and I

Cinda Boomershine

thought we should be able to do that here in the United States.” At the same time that she was looking around to expand, she received a phone call from Bob Hinty in Fort Wayne. “He had just lost some business at his factory,” she says. “He had fantastic sewers who had nothing to sew. I had a popular growing product. It was a wonderful moment.” Now Boomershine’s company manufactures handbags, totes and women’s accessories, and it is poised to become a wellknown national label, says Art Mandelbaum, the company’s president. Based out of Fort Wayne, the cinda b factory has the “capacity to make three thousand bags a day,” Mandelbaum says. “Sometimes we’re at capacity, and sometimes we’re not.” Approximately 150 to 200 people work in the facility’s manufacturing division, and the company produces two new patterns and six new styles of bags per season. “It depends on what people are asking for and what we need in the line,” Cinda says. The products, which can range in price from $8 (for accessories) to $170 (topof-the-line luggage), are sold at various trade shows, on the company website and through about a “thousand independent retailers right now,” Mandelbaum says.


“That number is growing by 40 percent per year. We keep doubling our sales in terms of dollars and sales.” In three to five years, “the average consumer will identify cinda b as a brand they know about,” Mandelbaum predicts. He attributes much of the company’s success to the products’ quality and price points and to its ability to ship quickly. “We keep a very lean inventory and yet we can make product very quickly and ship it out quickly,” he says. “We don’t have to worry about customs or transportation.” If you ask Cinda, the company’s success, she says, is thanks to her team. “None of this would be possible without everyone involved in cinda b,” she says. “I hope that we continue to grow. Made in America is such an important movement. The more bags we sell, the more people we can hire and the more food we can put on people’s tables.” Free tours of the factory are available for groups. For more information on cinda b, visit www.cindab.com.

Inside cinda b’s Fort Wayne factory.

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community

The southside heats up with outdoor music events By John Adams

Photo Provided by Greenwood Parks & Recreation

The sounds of summer

Zanna-Doo performs at the Greenwood Amphitheater

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Temperatures are rising, summer is here, and it’s time to get

Summer Concert Series At Greenwood Amphitheater My Yellow Rickshaw, June 8 The Big 80s, June 15 Toy Factory, June 22 The Bishops, July 6 The Blue River Band, July 13 Zanna-Doo, July 20 Parrots of the Caribbean, July 27 730 Club Band, Aug. 3 Lemon Wheel, Aug. 10 Tastes Like Chicken, Aug. 24

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out and enjoy the great outdoors … along with some great tunes. According to Jeff Madsen, director of recreation at the Greenwood Parks Department, the summer concert series at the Greenwood Amphitheater features 11 shows on Saturdays nights from June through August and showcases “bands from Indianapolis and beyond,” he says. “It’s just a great family time. We think it’s one of the best things we do here.” Outdoor shows at the Greenwood Amphitheater, weather permitting, typically draw anywhere from 800 to 1,750 people on any given Saturday, he says. Bring your chair to catch your favorite bands. And what will really be music to your ears? All shows, which begin at 7 p.m., are free. For more information, visit www.greenwood.in.gov.


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community Mallow Run Winery Jennie DeVoe, June 22 The Carmel Symphony Orchestra featuring The Wright Brothers, July 6 Polka Boy, Aug. 10

The Carmel Symphony Orchestra at Mallow Run Winery

Escape to Mallow Run Winery (6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville, 317-4221556) for a summer full of live music and good food every Saturday evening, to be followed on Sunday afternoons with more music on the patio. “People can come and share a glass or bottle of wine with loved ones in a place that’s relaxing, laid-back and removed from the hustle

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and bustle of people’s hectic lives,” says Mallow Run’s Sarah Shadday. “We love to create that laid-back atmosphere that brings people together, and live music only enhances that experience.” Memorial Day weekend kicks things off for Mallow Run, which has scheduled four special outdoor shows live on its lawn this summer. For the cost of entry ($15 per

person per show), you will find “the best of both worlds,” Shadday says, “drinking wine in a secluded, rustic farm setting while listening to music that brings back great memories and creating new ones.” Guests can enjoy the music from a table on the patio, but Shadday suggests guests “take advantage of the beautiful summer evening and our spacious grounds and bring their picnic blankets or lawn chairs and spread out.” When weather permits, regular Saturday evening events can bring in anywhere from 400 to 600 guests and approximately 1,500 for larger concerts, she says. The concerts begin at 7 p.m. For more information, visit www.mallowrun.com.

Photo by Jennifer Cecil

American English, Sept. 14


The town of Franklin is also getting into the act this summer with special outdoor events of its own. Strawberries on the Square gets things going in May, followed by the 2013 Smoke on the Square in June and Beer and Bluegrass Festival coming in August. All events are held in downtown Franklin. For more information, visit www.discoverdowntownfranklin.com. 2013 Smoke on the Square

The third annual Smoke on the Square is both a barbecue competition and a festival. The two-day event features a classic car cruise-in, a kids area, games, food vendors and a performance by local dance troupe, The Electric Impulse Cloggers, says Megan Hart, executive director of Discover Downtown Franklin. On June 28, the Blue River Band performs from 7 to 10 p.m. Ben Shively takes the stage in the afternoon on June 29, and The Snakehandlers perform from 6 to 9 p.m.

Photo Provided by Discover Downtown Franklin

Beer and Bluegrass Festival

Beer and Bluegrass Festival

The Beer and Bluegrass Festival is now seeing its second year in downtown Franklin, says Hart, and it is co-hosted by Discover Downtown Franklin and the Johnson County Museum of History. The event offers a beer tasting, which begins at 6 p.m. Pre-sale tickets cost $15; regular tickets are $20 per person. Wine will also be available for additional costs, Hart says. The festival, which takes place Aug. 23-24, offers a classic car cruise-in and music by the Flatland Harmony Experiment Band from 7 to 9 p.m.

Cell Phones game systems laPtoPs tablets

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health

Brandon, now 18, lives with Asperger syndrome, one of five known types of autism spectrum disorder. As Brandon aged, Rebecca says, she discovered the importance of using visual aids and positive reinforcement to help him learn and grow, and he now also takes medication and supplements to control his symptoms and mood swings. What is Autism? Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the fastest-growing developmental disorder in children in the United States. It includes three common disorders—autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder—as well as two more severe forms, Rett syndrome and childhood disintegrative disorder. ASD has long baffled physicians and researchers and overwhelmed young patients and their parents. No single blood test or brain scan can diagnose autism spectrum disorders; children are diagnosed on the basis of symptoms and behavioral tests. In the last decade, however, gains have been made in its understanding and treatment, and now resources for both parents and children exist.

Understanding Autism Ongoing research leads to new treatments for developmental disorders By Alisa Advani

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Rebecca Bickel, a social worker in Greenwood who specializes in the treatment and counseling of autistic children, began noticing unusual behavior in her own son, Brandon, when he was just 1 year old. “I was a new mom and in college, but I started noticing things,” she recalls. “It was clear to everyone that something was wrong with Brandon.” At first, his doctors considered a number of diagnoses, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. “He never slept, and he had very repetitive behavior,” she says. “His cars had to be lined up in a certain order, and he figured out how to take things apart very early—even deadbolts.”

Possible Causes A collection of conditions that can range in severity from social awkwardness to severe communication and intellectual disabilities, autism has been falsely linked to poor parenting, immunizations and emotional illness. Most recent efforts in pinpointing a cause have led some researchers to focus more specifically on genetics, but no conclusive evidence has been found to suggest genetics is the only cause. “Studies involving children that have undergone rigorous assessments and possess definite characteristics of autism have been working to define certain genomic patterns,” explains Dr. Andrew Miller, a psychiatrist who practices with IU Health on Meridian Street. “To the best of my knowledge, there has not been great discovery thus far in any particular patterns.” Miller further says there are other studies looking more toward environmental influences—such as toxins found in our everyday lives—that could be contributing to autism and the possible severity of the disorders. “The reason for this is because we are


Roncalli Salutes Our Perfect Rebels

Front Row: Thomas Shulse, Cori Allen, Joseph Below, Kyle Stretch, Cameron Smock, Emily Elliott, Cassandra Annee, Elizabeth Mckay Second Row: Robert Kile, Amanda Grahn, David Page, Peyton Schneider, Megan Yoder, Stephanie Asdell Third Row: Amanada McClellan, Joseph Wolf, Andrew Stallings, Mitchell Carroll, Christopher Brown Fourth Row: Brett Bennett, Michael O’Connor, Benjamin Shilson

Each year, over 90% of Roncalli High School juniors and seniors take the SAT and ACT standardized entrance exams for application to college. We are pleased to announce that 22 current students have received a perfect score on at least the Math and/or Language Arts portions of the SAT or ACT. Congratulations to these outstanding scholars, their teachers and their parents!

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Roncalli High School. 3300 Prague Road. Indianapolis, IN 46227. 317/787-8277


health

Treatments Research in recent years offers hope that specific learning techniques can lessen symptoms of the developmental disorders associated with autism. In children with the mildest cases of autism, these techniques resulted in changes in their brains that made them indistinguishable from those of unaffected children of the same age — essentially normalizing them, according to Geraldine Dawson in the department of psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The results, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, offer validation for the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a behavioral-intervention program that in-

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Rebecca Bickel with her son, Brandon

volves intensive engagement with children diagnosed with ASD. Some antipsychotic medications have been approved in the treatment of autistic disorders. These medications assist with managing anxieties likely experienced by

autistic patients. Other medications include antidepressants and mood stabilizers. Miller urges parents to provide newly diagnosed autistic children with a good daily structure and to employ strategic ways to communicate with them. From there, he utilizes a minimally invasive pharmaceutical approach to further help. Local Resources Autistic children and their parents have several places to go for support on the southside. Bickel runs a nonprofit organization called Different Like Me, through which, she says, she has witnessed success story after success story with autistic children. “We have the kids sit in a circle and introduce themselves and say three things they like,” she says. “At first they are all so nervous. But I watch them one by one open up and see that the other kids are just like them.” The Johnson County Autism Support Group also provides resources for families

Photo provided by rebecca bickel

all well aware there is a spectrum (of disorders),” he explains, “and if we become more aware of ways to control environments to aid in better outcomes, then this makes our ability to treat (patients with autism) with some effectiveness much better.”


health

with ASD children. The organization held its first fundraiser in 2004, and it now serves approximately 525 people throughout the county. Amanda Cooper, support group co-president for the last eight years, has an autistic son, Jack. Cooper stresses that the organization offers something for autistic children of every age. “We have golf tournaments, breakfast with Santa and speakers for the parents,” she explains. “We also run Camp Can Do for our older kids.” Traditional day camp activities include working with children on communication and life skills, which can lapse during the summer when school is not in session. During the school year, Kathy Stricker works tirelessly on behalf of the autistic kids who attend Center Grove Schools. As the director of special services there, she ensures that each child gets the individual attention he or she needs to succeed. “I am very proud of our special education services,” she says. “I have autistic kids who

go on to college, and I have children who wouldn’t speak, but now they do.” Stricker and a team of teachers and school psychologists work with parents to make sure that the same practices and habits developed in school are also carried out at home. No single plan fits all of her students. “After a functional behavioral assessment, we can address specific issues,” she explains. “Our plans are very organic and change with the student.”

Local Resources Dr. Andrew Miller, IU Health Methodist Medical Plaza South, 8820 S. Meridian St., Suite 225, Indianapolis, (317) 678-3030 Johnson County Autism Support Group, www.jcasg.org Different Like Me/Bickel Counseling, 390 N. Madison Ave., Suite 201, Greenwood, (317) 739-4269  Center Grove Schools Special Services, www.ssjcs.k12.in.us

UPCOMING EVENTS Ride the Spectrum for Autism Event Where: Little Trails Horsecamp, 8010 Skunk Hollow Road, Martinsville When: June 8-9 Cost: $100 per person, includes camping facility, 1 horse stall and Sunday Poker Run Information: Lona Huffman, (317) 840-2262, lhuffman@gmail.com

Walk Now for Autism Speaks Where: Celebration Plaza at White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St., Indianapolis, (317) 233-2434 When: June 15 Information: (317) 6605165, email: indianapolis@ autismspeaks.org

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good will

Offering free counseling in a comfortable space, Pastor Brian Peters has made Coffeehouse Five his mission.

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By Ed Wenck Photography by Jennifer Cecil

Family Man A Greenwood pastor and his wife sell lattes to help save marriages

Coffeehouse Five is tucked away in a corner of a building adjacent to the massive Community Church of Greenwood. The shop occupies a few hundred square feet of an 82,000-square-foot complex called The Gathering Place, a sprawling fitness and outreach center that houses, according to the website, “three basketball courts, (an) indoor soccer field, cardio and weight rooms, walking track and seating for 4,000.” Walking through the front doors of the building on Main Street in Greenwood, you’ll need to hang a left and walk toward the electric “OPEN” sign—or follow your nose. The small of fresh java is pervasive. The space is done up in the same kind of woody earth tones you’d expect at any shop of its ilk—light brown fabric tacked to the ceiling diffuses harsh fluorescent lights. Coffeehouse customers fill a mishmash of tables and chairs, and the barista behind the counter brews items from the chalkboard menu behind him. That barista, is, in fact, the man behind the concept of Coffeehouse Five. Pastor Brian Peters, whose closecropped graying hair and no-nonsense glasses make him look as if he stepped out of a 1964 Buick commercial, has a clear, intense look that says he has, on occasion, seen hard times. Ask Peters about the concept behind Coffeehouse Five, and he’s about as direct as it gets: He’s using those beans to fund counseling—mainly marriage counsel-

ing. He believes many of today’s children are in trouble, and the primary reason for that, he says, is divorce. “We wanted to do something to address that issue—and (the coffeehouse) fit both that need in the community and where my passions and experience lie.” Peters and his wife, Michelle, have been married for 28 years, but 17 years ago they found themselves separated and on the brink of divorce. Peters believes divine intervention prevented the breakup. “God didn’t allow that to happen,” he says. “We were reunited, rebuilt our marriage, rebuilt our relationship….” The mending of their marriage led to questions from friends: How did they do it? How did they keep it together? Peters felt that it was now his mission to learn more about marital stability. He left his career as an attorney and entered the seminary, got training as a counselor and looked for ways to share what he’d learned with the community. That’s where the coffee shop came in to play. “Number one: We want to provide marriage counseling free of charge,” he explains. “The number one obstacle for those seeking help through counseling is cost. This is especially true for folks who might be struggling with the family budget, realizing that something needs to be done, but making the therapy they need a backburner issue. After all, there’s car payments, mortgages, orthodontist’s bills. Couples often put their

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good will

—Pastor Brian Peters

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Brian Peters with his wife, Michelle

Photo provided by Brian Peters

“The number one obstacle for those seeking help through counseling is cost. This is especially true for folks who might be struggling with the family budget, realizing that something needs to be done, but making the therapy they need a back-burner issue.”

emotional needs behind the demands of the larger family’s economic realities.” The second thing Peters says he wants to do is “preserve the dignity of the process. I’m also a recovering alcoholic. I went through addictions programs, I went through 12-step programs, and my wife and I went through marriage counseling. In (all) of those settings, one of the things that I found was a lot of times they’re stuck away in a corner of a building somewhere that’s hard to find, hard to get to. In addictions counseling especially, they’re put in a basement someplace with nothing on the walls. There’s no dignity to the process.” Peters loved what he called the “coffee culture,” so there wasn’t a big logical leap from motive to execution: Create a coffee shop that served the locals, then turn around and use those revenues to provide counseling free of charge. “I

love coffee, I love hanging out in coffee shops. It seemed like such a natural fit,” he explains. Peters and his wife support themselves through the sale of lattes and offer their services to those in need at no cost. Sometimes folks meet in the shop, sometimes in the pleasant confines of the pastor’s office adjacent to the shop, but Peters hopes that one day he’ll be able to move the entire operation to a space with a much more visible storefront.


good will The Mission The pastor’s mission is more than couples counseling. The “Five” in the name stands for the five faith-based counseling initiatives he and his wife have undertaken: marriage counseling, premarital counseling, addictions counseling, a mentoring program in which established couples can help other folks just starting out (Peters points out that the first two years of matrimony are in the highest “danger zone” for divorce) and finally, tithing back to the community. Peters is trying to build the shop’s revenues to the point where 10 percent of what the store brings in can go to other groups serving the community in different ways. He mentions The Refuge food pantry in Greenwood as a target charity. The staff at the shop is all volunteer. Linda Minnix, who has known Peters since he was an associate pastor at CCG more than 10 years ago, had always wanted to work in a coffee shop. After her three boys were grown, she felt she finally had the time to sign up. Minnix works nine hours a week;

she is also on call, available whenever the Peterses need to get away from the business of brewing, whether to counsel a couple or celebrate a birthday. “The smoothies and drinks are great,” Minnix says. “A while back Brian brought some Ethiopian coffee that was just the best.” It’s not all about the coffee, though. She’s known separation and single motherhood firsthand. “Twenty-three years ago I had a divorce, and I wish something like what the Peterses provide would have been available then. I’m not saying it would’ve saved my marriage, but I wish I would have had access to something like this. Back then my church just wasn’t equipped to deal with my situation.” Like Minnix, none of the staff of helpers is a current congregant at Community Church of Greenwood. In fact, Peters has his own ministry right inside the shop; his One Hope Church meets at 5 p.m. every Sunday evening at Coffeehouse Five. 1495 W. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 3004330, www.onehopenow.com

A customer in one of the cozy spaces at Coffeehouse Five.

Original Italian Ice Cream

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Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards

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By Ashley Petry

Tour de fruit

(and other good eats) While temperatures are rising, vines around Indiana are ripening. Travel the state to sample what several Hoosier growers are harvesting.

Photos Submitted

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travel

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Ah, summer, when the land is most productive. What better time to reconnect with our farming heritage—and support local farms in the process? We’ve rounded up 10 of our favorite Hoosier destinations for agritourism, which encompasses everything from you-pick farms to estate wineries.

Best Road Trip With its wealth of watermelons and cantaloupes, Knox County has been dubbed the Melon Capital of the World. The local bounty is on display along U.S. 41 north of Vincennes, a stretch of road dotted with farm stands, apple orchards and plenty of old-fashioned roadside kitsch. Pose for a photo with the giant peach at the Big Peach Market, snack on homemade pies at Apple Hill Orchard and browse the colorful produce at Prairie Acres Restaurant and Farm Market. Along the way, you’ll find plenty of other stops to tickle your taste buds.

Big Peach Market 7738 N. U.S. 41, Bruceville; (812) 324-2548 Apple Hill Orchard 6235 N. Ford Road, Bruceville; (812) 324-9010; www.applehillorchard.webs.com; Mary Campbell bakes pies and cobblers at Apple Hill Orchard.

Best Conversation Starter The White Violet Center for Eco-justice, a ministry of the Sisters of Providence of St. Mary-of-the-Woods, focuses on the preservation, restoration and “reverent use” of natural resources. Free tours include visits with the alpaca herd and peeks at the organic farm and fiber arts facilities. You can even adopt an alpaca and pay it regular visits. Or work alongside the sisters on a multi-day volunteering vacation, where accommodations include both traditional guest houses and small hermitages made from recycled materials. 1 Sisters of Providence Road, Saint Mary-of-the-Woods; (812) 535-2930; spsmw.org/white-violet-center-for-eco-justice

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Prairie Acres Restaurant and Farm Market 14387 Old Highway 41, Oaktown; (812) 745-3207; www.prairieacres.net


travel

Best Historic Destination Historic Prophetstown, a 125-acre working farm at Prophetstown State Park, has two goals: preserving old-fashioned agricultural methods and teaching children about the origins of their food. In addition to touring the 1920s farmhouse and watching blacksmithing demonstrations, visitors can assist with daily chores such as feeding the Belgian mares and milking the cows. 43534 Prophetstown Trail, Battle Ground; (765) 567-4700; prophetstown.org

Best Gourmet Experience Tiny Roanoke seems like an odd place for one of the state’s best gourmet restaurants, but only in the middle of nowhere could Joseph Decuis create such an immersive experience. Overnight visitors check into the quaint Joseph Decuis Inn before touring the sustainable cattle farm, where the restaurant raises its own Kobe-style Wagyu beef. Nearby are the awardwinning restaurant and the Joseph Decuis Emporium, a shop carrying all-natural carry-out foods, fine wines and gourmet goodies from across the state. 191 N. Main St., Roanoke; (260) 672-1715; josephdecuis.com

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Top: Wagyu Beef. Bottom: Macadamia Nut-Crusted Sea Bass

r i v a t e

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a n k i n g

exPerience You can Bank on. At the Indianapolis area’s largest locally owned national bank, our private bankers have an average of 15 years banking experience. Experience that results in unprecedented service, the rare authority to make prompt decisions and unique, innovative solutions to enhance your ultimate financial goals. So call Tricia Rake today at 261-9755. Because she doesn’t apply formulas to determine your financial success. She applies experience.

Tricia Rake Vice President, Private Banker ©2013 The National Bank of Indianapolis 1924 Rake PB 4c_7.375x4.75.indd 1

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travel

Best Destination Dairy

Best Sensory Indulgence The seventh-generation Stream Cliff Herb Farm has long specialized in fresh and dried culinary herbs, as well as flowers. But instead of resting on its laurels, the farm has expanded in recent years, adding a winery and tearoom (where the chicken salad is, naturally, seasoned with the farm’s own rosemary and dill). If you can, snag a soughtafter reservation for the tearoom’s Candlelight Dinners. Previous menus have included dishes such as rosemary pork loin and chicken breast in caper-tarragon cream sauce. 8225 S. County Road 90W, Commiskey; (812) 346-5859; streamclifffarm.com

Located near Interstate 65 in northwest Indiana, Fair Oaks Farms is the perfect break on that long drive to or from Chicago — and also one of the state’s best-known agritourism destinations. Kids will enjoy the birthing barn, outdoor play area and interactive Dairy Adventure, which teaches about sustainable farming. Fair Oaks also offers tours and tastings at its cheese factory. Don’t miss the café, which serves the dairy’s signature grilled cheese sandwich. 856 N. Road 600E, Fair Oaks; (219) 394-2025; fofarms.com

Best Amish Getaway A weekend at the Amish Acres Historic Farm and Heritage Resort can include a guided tour of the 1873 farmstead, a buggy ride around the 80-acre farm, cheese and wine tastings in a barn loft, and family-style dinners at the Restaurant Barn. Hopefully you’ll still have time to browse the shops for hand-made quilts and freshly baked pies. Lodging options include the 62-room Inn at Amish Acres and 66-room Nappanee Inn. Or head northeast to Shipshewana, another Amish community, where the small Farmstead Bed and Breakfast offers a true Amish farm experience — breakfast fit for a hard-working farmhand, but no electricity in sight. Amish Acres: 1600 W. Market St., Nappanee; (800) 800-4942; amishacres.com; Farmstead Bed and Breakfast: 1300 N. Road 1000 W, Shipshewana; (260) 768-8086

A little closer to home No time to travel? These down-on-the-farm experiences are right in your own backyard. Almost. Conner Prairie, an interactive history park in Fishers, tells the story of Hoosier pioneers, most of whom were farmers. Visitors can tour the historic Conner farmstead, interact with farm animals in the barn and even make a meal the old-fashioned way during the Hearthside Suppers program. 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers; (317) 776-6006; connerprairie.org

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Traders Point Creamery, an organic dairy

farm on the outskirts of Zionsville, offers both guided and self-guided tours, which include visits to the milking parlor. The farm also offers cheese and ice cream tastings, weekly farmers markets and the unparalleled farm-to-fork Loft restaurant. 9101 Moore Road, Zionsville; (317) 733-1700; traderspointcreamery.com

Waterman’s Family Farm is known for its strawberries, tomatoes and corn, but you-pick options range throughout the season from peas to beets to salad greens to pumpkins. The latter are a popular choice during the annual Fall Harvest Festival, which offers hayrides, corn mazes and other autumn fun. 7010 E. Raymond St., Indianapolis; (317) 356-6995; 1100 N. Indiana 37, Greenwood; (317) 888-4189; www.watermansfamilyfarm.com


Best All-in-One Destination Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards has been farmed by the same family since 1843, and every generation has added its own touches. These days, the sprawling property houses the largest estate-bottled winery in Indiana, a new brandy distillery, a year-round farm market, a café and a children’s play area. You-pick options are available in season. Down the road is the Joe Huber Family Farm and Restaurant (no relation), which serves heaping platters of home-style food like country-fried chicken, honey ham, mashed potatoes and fresh baked biscuits. Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards 19816 Huber Road, Borden; (800) 345-9463; huberwinery.com Joe Huber Family Farm and Restaurant 2421 Engle Road, Starlight; (812) 923-5255; joehubers.com

Best Wild West Adventure The 400-acre Wild Winds Buffalo Preserve, which has a herd of more than 250 buffalo, offers daily tours, including an option to explore the preserve on horseback. With a bed-and-breakfast and café on site, the preserve offers meals ranging from buffalo sausage to Big Tatonka bison burgers. More adventurous visitors can stay in elevated safari tents, nestled in the same fields where the buffalo roam. 6975 N. Ray Road, Fremont; (260) 495-0137; wildwindsbuffalo.com


education

keep it campy

YMCA Camp at The Gathering Place

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The Greenwood Parks & Recreation Department has several camps in its lineup of summer offerings for kids. “We have two vastly different camps, an all-day camp for 8- to 12-year-olds runs all summer long,” says Jeff Madsen, director of recreation at the Greenwood Parks Department. “Then we have one-week camps for younger children.” The week-long camps offer a variety of topics, but the “cooking camp and the science camp are definitely the most popular,” Madsen says. In fact, they’re so popular that they often sell out. You can register for any of the following camps at the Greenwood Community Center (100 Surina Way) or by calling (317) 8814545 for more information.

Summer Camp 2013 What: A supervised day camp for children ages 8 to 12. T-shirts, snacks, craft projects, field trips and lunches on Fridays are included.

School’s out, but that doesn’t mean your kids don’t have plenty of opportunities to learn and explore. These southside camps are ready to teach youngsters about subjects ranging from cooking and sports to science and travel.

Advance Registration:

Advance Registration:

Call Nick Schwab at (317) 881-4545 When: Through Aug. 2 Time: Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost: $75 per week, $25 registration fee

Required When: June 24-27 Time: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Cost: $55/residents, $60/non-residents

Science Camp What: A hands-on experience with animals, plants and science experiments under supervised direction, for children ages 4 to 7. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

Required When: June 10-13 Time: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Cost: $55/residents, $60/non-residents Cooking Camp What: A kitchen-learning experience complete with supervised cooking skills for children ages 4 to 7. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

By John Adams

Virtual Travel Camp What: An exploration of the world and its many cultures for children ages 4 to 7. Location: Greenwood Community Center

Required When: June 17-20 Time: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Cost: $55/residents, $60/non-residents SOUTH

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Toddler Mini Camp What: A day camp designed to get your little one, age 2 to 3, moving and grooving on Tuesdays for four weeks. T-shirt included. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

Required When: June 4-25 Time: 10:15 to 11 a.m. Cost: $30/residents, $35/non-residents Beginning Tumbling Camp What: A day camp where children, ages 4 to 8, learn tumbling tricks and cartwheels. T-shirt included. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

Required When: Tuesdays, June 4-25 Time: 5:15-5:45 p.m. Cost: $20/residents, $25/non-residents

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education

Advance Registration:

Required When: June 10-13 Time: 6 to 7:15 p.m. Cost: $20/residents, $25/non-residents Toddler Song & Dance Camp What: This camp offers singing, dancing and just being silly for children ages 2 to 3. Location: Greenwood Community Center

Greenwood Parks & Recreation Department Camp

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Youth Soccer Camp What: A basic skills camp for children ages 6 to 12. T-shirt included. Location: Northeast Park Advance Registration:

Required When: July 15-18 Time: 6 to 7 p.m. Cost: $25 Pacers Basketball Camp What: The National Basketball Academy has teamed up with the Indiana Pacers to bring this summer basketball camp for boy and girls ages 5 to 17 to Greenwood. Bring a sack lunch. Location: Greenwood Community Center

Advance Registration:

Advance Registration:

Required When: June 10-13 Time: 7:30 to 8 p.m. Cost: $20/residents, $25/non-residents

thebasketballacademy.com When: July 22-26 Time: 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Cost: $199

Youth Basketball Camp What: Get your game on. Open for children ages 8 to 12. T-shirt included. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

Required When: Thursdays, July 11 and 18 Time: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Cost: $25 Youth Volleyball Camp What: Open for children ages 6 to 12. T-shirt included. Location: Greenwood Community Center Advance Registration:

Required When: Tuesdays, July 9-30 Time: 6 to 7 p.m. Cost: $25

Photo Provided by Greenwood Parks & Recreation

Dance Camp What: A day camp where ballet, jazz, tap and hip hop are taught to children ages 4 to 8. T-shirt included. Location : Greenwood Community Center


YMCA of Greater Indianapolis is also offering a number of day camps throughout Indianapolis designed to help children and teens “grow in spirit, mind and body,” according to the YMCA website. Dozens of half-day, full-day and overnight camping options are available this summer through YMCA at 30 locations throughout Indianapolis. Tiffany Downs, senior program director at the Y, says that the summer’s Out of Town offerings of sports For those looking to get out camps are the most of the house for more than just the day, The Y also offers popular among one- and two-week overnight young participants. sessions for kids ages 7 to 16 Camp-goers can at Flat Rock River YMCA in St. Paul beginning June 9. choose camps that teach aquatics, gymExciting activities such as archery, canoeing, horseback nastics, martial arts riding, mountain biking or ultimate Frisbee, and even rock climbing are available for the adventurous. or a preschool camp Three-night “mini-camps” that’s geared toward are also held for 7- to youngsters who 9-year-olds. Check out www. want to learn about flatrockymca.org or call (888) 828-9622 for more information. bugs, dinosaurs, farms and more. As part of the Y’s enrichment camp series, “some of our more popular camps that we run are a mini golf camp, a cooking camp, a CSI camp, a skyzone camp and a Legos camp,” Downs adds. Sports camps are held at the Baxter YMCA location (7900 S. Shelby St., Indianapolis) and at The Gathering Place (1477 W. Main St., Greenwood) through July 26. Sports camps are also offered at Arlington Elementary School (5814 S. Arlington Ave., Indianapolis) from June 23 through July 19. Day camp hours are from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, though campers can be dropped off early or picked up late to accommodate working parents. Call the Baxter YMCA at (317) 887-8788 or go online to Indymca.org to register.

The Gathering Place in Greenwood offers its own fair share of camps this summer, including the following. For more information, call (317) 884-0531 or visit www.thegponline.org. »C  hallenger Soccer

Camp, for boys and girls ages 3-15, June 10-14 » Pacers Basketball

Camp, for boys and girls ages 5-17, June 17-21 »E  xtra Innings Baseball

Clinics, ages 7-9, 9 a.m. to noon; ages 10-12, 1 to 4 p.m.; June 3-6 and June 17-20

»E  xtra Innings Softball

Clinics, ages 7-12, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., June 10-13 »S  hodan Karate Camp,

for boys and girls ages 7-13, June 17-21 »C  rosse Your Heart

Lacrosse Camp for girls, June 24-28

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home trends

A new chapter

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Just off Main Street in Greenwood

Empty nesters Tim and Julie Stephenson transform their home By Teresa Nicodemus | Photography by Josh Marshall

sits a cozy neighborhood where Tim and Julie Stephenson moved in 1991. There, the couple raised their children, daughter, Leslie, and son, Brad, in a quaint stone ranch, which offered a secluded yard and a wooded setting. More than 20 years later, the Stephensons are now empty nesters; the echo of their children’s laughter that once filled the home is replaced by visits from their adult children and the delights of seeing their 7-month-old grandson’s smiles. Since the children no longer live with them, the Stephensons decided to transform their family home into a place for entertaining guests, a retreat in the woods that would continue to surround them with serenity into their retirement years. “We considered selling our house and buying another house, but we really like our location,” Julie says. Before the renovation, the Stephensons say, everything in the home was outdated. “We kept things painted and maintained over the years, but we knew we had to do a major overhaul,” Julie says. They called upon interior designer Dale Hughes, of Dale Hughes Interior Design, and contractor Chris Duke, of Elite Homes, who helped them identify the most effective ways to redesign their home. “The economy dictates in many cases that it’s not the time to sell,” says Hughes. “The Stephensons opted to stay in their home and transform it. As we progress in our years, it’s important to think about how we will live and maneuver in our homes. The Stephensons’ home went through a major transformation. Now, the home is all one level, contemporary and beautiful. It is an excellent aging-in-place home.” With Hughes leading the design aspect of the home’s renovation and Duke coordinating contractors, the remodeling process was SOUTH

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home trends

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seamless. “They made a great team, and we never had to worry about anything,” recalls Tim. “Our home was stripped to the drywall. The timing was perfect. Julie’s parents were away in Florida during the remodeling, so we completely emptied the house, put the furniture in storage and moved into their condo; they returned the day we moved back home.” The newly stripped interior of the Stephensons’ home was like a blank canvas ready to be transformed with color, cre68

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ativity and texture. A neutral palette of taupe, olive and gray shades runs smoothly through the house. More than 18 shades of paint were used, creating a warm, calming effect. Every ceiling is carefully coordinated in a lighter shade matching the room’s tone and giving the home a peaceful, earthy flair, as opposed to the stark white ceilings before the home’s transformation. “The lady that cleans our house told me it feels like she is entering a spa,” Tim says. From the beautiful solid-maple flooring un-


After

derfoot to the glowing stones in the contemporary gas fireplace, the spa-like ambience is everywhere. The size of the home remained the same; however, two simple structural changes in the family room and master bathroom were among the key elements of the revitalization. The ’70s-look kitchen and sunken family room were formerly divided by a wall. The family room was transformed to a single, open concept great room, now a blended space level with the kitchen floor and unencumbered by the dividing wall. The massive stone fireplace with white shelving that flanked one side and claimed an entire wall was replaced with a sleek, modern gas fireplace complete with remote control. From the great room, the Stephensons can now step out into a lovely, four-season sunroom surrounded by windows. The second structural change took the master bathroom to new heights. High ceilings and a feeling of spaciousness greet you as you walk into the master bath. Whitewashed cabinetry glazed with rich brown

Pet a shark. Watch a dolphin show. Let butteries land on you. Get 1 ½ inches from a tiger. Plan your trip at indianapoliszoo.com and connect on Facebook.

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“Dale gave much thought to filling space efficiently with cabinetry and shelving. He thought of every little detail. We have the exact same space, yet much more storage capacity.”

After

—Julie Stephenson

After

accents contributes to the room’s elegance. Deep storage drawers tall enough to store bottles and accessories, tilt drawers for smaller items, and well-designed cabinetry create enough room to separate a his-andher area in the bathroom. Even the master bedroom closet was redesigned to maximize space. Shoe cubbies, shelving and double rods allow easy access to everything in the closet. “Dale gave much thought to filling space efficiently with cabinetry and shelving,” Julie says. “He thought of every little detail. We have the exact same space, yet much more storage capacity.” You might describe the Stephensons’ home remodel as a vibrant example of living simplified. In the kitchen, lovely, solid maple cabinetry in honey tones stretches to the ceiling, serving as a stylish backdrop to new stainless steel appliances. A decorative tumbled travertine backsplash curves around the kitchen, offsetting the hints of brown and black in the polished granite countertops. Black distressed cabinetry surrounds an L-shaped island. The last jewel to redefine the Stephensons’ home is a new, Tuscan-style, glass front door with scrolled wrought iron accents. “A beautiful front door is like a fine piece 70

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of jewelry for the home,” says Hughes. “It brings the home up to today’s standard and enhances the curb appeal. The Stephensons have taken an average home and reclaimed it. They take great pride in their beautiful home now.” “It’s nice coming home,” says Tim, smiling. “And we’ve started something. Our friends are remodeling their homes. We’ve started a movement.”

BEfore


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lifestyle

Head Coaching

We asked a sampling of southside hair salons some questions about your hair. Here’s the short and long of their answers. »

By Sherri Dugger Color Café photos by Studio 1492 Photography

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Transformations Salon & Spa photos by Brian Deal


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lifestyle

The Respondents

The Color Café

1480 Olive Branch Park Lane, Greenwood, (317) 884-2222, www.thecolorcafe.com

Robert’s Salon & Day Spa

899 Loews Blvd., Greenwood, (317) 881-8207, www.robertssalonandspa.com

The Hair Lounge

3209 W. Smith Valley Road, Suite 107, Greenwood, (317) 410-8601, www.facebook. com/ShearVanityHairLounge

Transformations Salon and Spa

8083 Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-1773, www.transformationssalonandspa.com

Urban Euphoria Salon

3113 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood, (317) 882-8400, www.urbaneuphoria.com

Wildflowers

1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 865-0187, www.wildflowerssalonindy.com

1

The Good: The

best things to do for your hair are simple.

» The Color Café: “Keep it conditioned so it looks healthy and beautiful.” » Robert’s Salon & Day Spa: “Using pro-

fessional products and getting regular haircuts will improve your at-home results drastically.”  » the Hair Lounge: “Use professional

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» Transformations Salon and Spa: “The best thing you can do for your hair is getting a loyal stylist that you have 100 percent faith in and who gets you as an individual. A well-educated stylist is like a lawyer. They will educate, defend and protect your hair and never disclose your eC secrets, like your o lo rC afé real, natural color.” Th

products. Be educated on how to take care of your hair. Shampoo is to cleanse the scalp. Conditioner is moisture for the ends. Putting conditioner on your scalp can weigh your hair down. Great products go a long way for long hair.”

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Transformations Salon & Spa

» Urban Euphoria Salon: “The best thing you can do for your hair is to have it trimmed regularly. Trimming every six to eight weeks will help hair grow better. Once ends start to split, there is no stopping it.” » Wildflowers: “The very best thing you can do for you hair is using the salon products your stylist recommends.”


2 The Bad: The

worst things to do for your hair.

» The Color Café: Using too much “heat, especially too high of heat from smoothing irons.” » Robert’s Salon & Day Spa: “Not using a

product designed to protect your hair from damage while using irons, straighteners and dryers.” » The Hair Lounge: “Trying to lighten your hair is a bad idea. Heat, whether from styling tools or sun, is the quickest way to damage the hair.” » Transformations: “Using hot tools (heat) on hair that is not completely dry or without using proper thermal protectant products.”

» Urban Euphoria Salon: “Over-processing is the worst thing you can do for your hair. Over-processing occurs when hair is lightened, exposed to heat or chemically processed to the point that it is compromised. Once hair is damaged in this way, cutting it off is the only solution.” » Wildflowers: “Skipping cuts when

letting your hair grow. Split ends need trimmed or they keep splitting, preventing growth and resulting in breakage.”


lifestyle

The Color Café

3

We asked for the latest trends and the one classic hairstyle that will never die.

The Trends.

» The Color Café: The latest trends include “organic styles, uncontrived looks and a classic is the bob, which takes on many forms.” » Robert’s Salon & Day Spa: “You will see a lot

of different classic styles, but updated and recreated with today’s coloring trends, such as Balayage or Ombré. Exciting and fun color are a big play this year for curly and straight looks.” » The Hair Lounge: “The Ombré is popular

right now. The bobs don’t ever seem to go out of style. Another popular trend is incorporating random pieces of crazy colors, either really bright or soft pastels.”

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» Transformations: “Always the variation of the forever popular bob.” » Urban Euphoria Salon: “The newest trend is a technique called Flamboyage. It is a new method of creating natural highlights or an Ombré effect. The bob is the all-time most popular cut. It will never leave.” » Wildflowers: “Latest trends are Balayage color technique, more volume, short or long, and fun pastel colors. The classic Vidal Sassoon bob will never die, as it keeps getting updates every few years.”


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The answers were almost unanimous here: 15 to 20 percent. As Jenni Bashaw, owner and master stylist at Wildflowers , says: “Tipping is totally up to the client. It is a service industry so I would say the same percentage you would tip any service provider.”

4 No one knows the right amount to tip his or her stylist. And everyone’s too embarrassed to ask. Except for us.

Erin Carter at Urban Euphoria Salon agrees. “A tip should be based on the quality of your experience,” she says. “Fifteen to 20 percent lets a service provider know that he/she made you feel valued as a guest.” And “tips are always appreciated,” both The Color Café’s Dowler and Transformations’ Vivian Vandivier say. “Especially when a stylist puts heart and soul into the service,” Dowler explains.

this yEar gEt dad what hE

rEaLly

wants

5 Just what is it that we don’t understand about a stylist’s gig? » The Color Café: Stylists have to “be able to interpret our client’s expectations

with the limitations their hair presents; it’s more difficult than they think.” » Robert’s Salon & Day Spa: “It sometimes takes more than one visit to achieve the look that you are going for. If you are making a big change, work with your stylist to get there.” » The Hair Lounge: “Our job may be fun, but most of us have no

health insurance. Standing on hard floors for eight to 10 hours a day with no breaks is hard on your body.” “How much education and training we really go through to know how to get the best result for each individual guest. We care; we invest so we can be our very best.”

» Transformations:

“The job of a stylist is a roller coaster: emotionally draining, physically exhausting, rewarding, challenging, educating, inspiring and ever-changing.”

» Urban Euphoria Salon:

» Wildflowers: “It’s physical work.”

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lifestyle

6 What should we look for in the perfect one?

The Salon:

Stylists agree: It’s up to you to do your homework on the salon you choose. You’ll want to ask questions, read online reviews and find out about the education and experience of the stylists you’re interested in choosing, as well as looking into the atmosphere and hospitality of the salon and its staff. Good customer service “starts at the front desk,” Wildflowers’ Bashaw says. “A perfect salon should be clean, friendly, and stylists should stay educated on trends by attending classes.” “It’s great to go in a place and to see smiles on the stylists’ faces,” says Sarah Reese at the Hair Lounge . “Consistency is a must. As long as the client feels like they’re most important, then they’re in the right place.” A great salon cares “about you, your needs and about pleasing you,” says Vandivier of Transformations . “They will care enough to invest in advanced education with their time and money. They will care enough to spend time looking at you and seeing you, listening and explaining until you know they get it and get you. They will work with you to achieve the look, teach you what products to use and how to use them to achieve these great looks.”

The Color Café

7

Short vs. Long Hair — Which Wins? The Length:

“It’s always very personal and an interpretation of a person’s image. Long is romantic and sexy; short is edgy and sassy.” » The Color Café:

» Robert’s Salon & Day Spa: “Hair that fits your face shape, lifestyle and styling habits. There are great long and short styles.” » The Hair Lounge: “They both have their pros and cons. Short hair makes more of a statement. The down side is you have to style your hair every day. With long hair, if you don’t feel like styling it, you can throw it up in a cute braid or something.”

Transformations Salon & Spa

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» Transformations:“Whichever one

looks best on you. What makes you happy.” » Urban Euphoria Salon: “Each individual should wear the length and style of hair that makes him/her feel most confident.” » Wildflowers: “It depends on what

looks best with the client’s facial shape and how much time they will commit to creating a great style every day.”


lifestyle

8

What is the one thing customers don’t understand about their hair?

Many of the answers were the same here. Most stylists want their customers to understand that there are always limitations to their hair. “Each person’s hair line, head shape and hair is unique, just like a fingerprint,” explains Dowler. Sarah Reese at The Hair Lounge concurs. “Pictures are great as ideas for a color or style,” she says, but all of that depends on your pre-existing color, your natural color and your hair type. A lot of the models and actresses have extensions. Also lighting and backgrounds change the way color appears.” Also, “when choosing a style, consider how much time you want to spend styling it each day,” advises Danielle Bueno at Robert’s Salon & Day Spa . Another thing to consider, says Carter at Urban Euphoria Salon, is “as you mature, the needs of your hair change. Hair typically becomes drier as we age. In turn, your hair care routine should evolve.” Vandivier of Transformations urges her customers to never underestimate their hair. “Hair is amazing,” she says. “It is the one thing you wear every day and can make or break anyone’s wardrobe. Amazingly, hair is an investment, and it shows.”

9 The Haircut: How

can we help our stylist give us the cut we want? The answers were unanimous here, too. Bring pictures. Consult with your stylist. And be ready to discuss all the limitations of your hair. A good consultation is key, says Bashaw at Wildflowers . “Tell them what you don’t like about your hair as well as your daily regimen for styling.” According to Carter at Urban Euphoria Salon, the answers can be found in “pictures, pictures, pictures!” she says. “They make communication between you and your stylist much easier. Then we know exactly what look you want to achieve.” But “remember you might not always be able to wear the style you’re hoping for,” warns Dowler at The Color Café . That’s why, says Reese from the Hair Lounge , you need to bring “an open mind. Pictures are nice, but your hair will not look just like the picture. Listen to the suggestions we give you.”

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EYE ON THE CURE One Greenwood woman loses her hair to raise money for cancer research

By Ashley Petry Photos by Josh Marshall SOUTH

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profile

W

Whenever Jim and Norma Scifres

took pictures of their infant daughter, Torey, something strange happened. No matter where or when the pictures were taken, the baby’s right eye always seemed to be glowing white. But the Greenwood couple didn’t think much about it. They didn’t know the glow was a telltale sign of retinoblastoma, a rare eye cancer that affects only about 300 children nationwide each year. Torey was lucky: The family’s pediatrician spotted the problem during her 6-month checkup. When she shined a light into Torey’s eye, she was supposed to see red at the back of the retina. But all she saw was that white glow shining back at her. She didn’t make a diagnosis, but she told Norma that her daughter needed to see a specialist right away. “Torey is our third child, and we’d seen that doctor a lot. We always made our own specialist appointments,” Norma says. “But by the time we got home that afternoon, the

Norma Scifres raised $3,000 for St. Baldrick's Foundation by shaving her head.

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pediatrician’s office had already made our appointment (with the ophthalmologist), so we knew something was up.” A series of tests, such as a CAT scan, confirmed the diagnosis. “It was very scary. We didn’t know how serious it was,” says Norma, a preschool teacher at Mount Pleasant Christian School. “There were a lot of unanswered questions, but we felt that God’s hands were on us and on her, so we were worried but also had a calmness.” The Scifres family had reason to be optimistic: Retinoblastoma is one of the most treatable childhood cancers, with a five-year survival rate of 93 percent. And Torey was fortunate to have just one tumor. Among children her age, about 42 percent of retinoblastoma cases are bilateral, with tumors in both eyes. Jim and Norma weighed their daughter’s options — surgery to remove the eye or chemotherapy to attack the tumor. They chose the latter, traveling to the Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia once a month for six months. “Her cancer was a stage two,” Norma says. “If it had been any worse, we would have gone a different route.” Torey finished her chemotherapy just in time for her first birthday party. She is


profile

Torey was diagnosed with retinoblastoma at 6 months old.

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profile

Jim and Norma Scifres with children, from left, Gabby, 11, Torey, 8, Colin, 14, and CJ, 5.

now 8, and although she needed surgery last year to correct some vision problems, she is cancer-free.

Fighting Back A few years after Torey’s ordeal, Norma and Jim took pledges to run the Mini Marathon, donating about $1,200 to the Wills Eye Institute. This year, Norma decided it was time to do something more. She had heard from other parents about St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a nonprofit organization that funds research on childhood cancers. In 2012, it funded more than $25 million in re84

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search grants. Its major source of revenue is volunteers — about 56,000 of them last year alone — who collect pledges by promising to shave their heads. This March, Norma did exactly that, teaming with seven other women from the Indianapolis area. The ringleader was Katie Vescelus, a mother of two from Noblesville. Her son Matthias, now 4, was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma at just 3 months old. (She, too, had noticed that telltale glow in his eyes.) When chemotherapy failed, Katie and her husband, Craig,


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profile

“You are your child’s only advocate, and sometimes you have to be persistent, but it’s OK. Go for it. Your children are too young to say anything themselves, so you have to say it for them.” —Norma Scifres

A friend snapped this photo of Norma and Torey right after Norma's head was shaved in March.

made the difficult decision to have their son’s eyes removed. “Every survivor of cancer has paid a huge price for survivorship, and Matthias’ price is a very tangible one,” Katie says. “The choices we were given — we were taken aback that there weren’t better options for these kids.” Wanting to support research into better treatment options, Katie gravitated to St. Baldrick’s Foundation. She first shaved her head last year, setting a fundraising goal of $2,000 but instead raising almost $6,000. At the same time, Matthias was named one of the foundation’s national ambassadors for 2013. 86

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“As a mother of a cancer survivor, it was a cathartic process,” she says. “And as a woman, it was liberating. I expected to feel unattractive, and I didn’t. I actually felt great.” When Katie decided to shave her head again this year, she was hoping to find one other woman with whom she could share the journey. Instead, she found seven — a neighbor, her sister-in-law, her son’s swim teacher and other retinoblastoma parents like Norma. Norma was excited to participate, she says, up until the moment the salon apron was draped around her shoulders.

“Then I was nervous,” she admitted, “but I was committed at that point.” In the end, Norma raised $3,000, and the team as a whole raised more than $14,000. Even better, she says, she has been able to share her story with other parents — and perhaps spread the message about the warning signs of retinoblastoma. “What I want every parent to know is, if you see something wrong, make sure you convey that to your pediatrician,” she says. “You are your child’s only advocate, and sometimes you have to be persistent, but it’s OK. Go for it. Your children are too young to say anything themselves, so you have to say it for them.”


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family

TREES Treehouses are treasures for the young and young at heart

By Teresa Nicodemus ♼ Photography by Josh Marshall

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The treehouse at Nancy Stoops’ Center Grove home. Stoops’ grandson, Casey Perry, 6, enjoys playing in the treehouse during a visit to his grandparents.

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T

The modern-day treehouse is no longer a makeshift “Little Rascals”-style fort with weathered wood planks forming a haphazard box in the trees. Treehouses today are customized and comfortable. From A-frames to “Swiss Family Robinson” bungalows in the trees, do-it-yourselfers and building contractors alike are bringing treehouses back in style. Forrest Carpenter, builder for Custom Homes by Cory, says treehouses are gaining in popularity as an increasing number of home buyers seek to build homes on larger, wooded plots. “There’s a movement now to purchase land and build rather than build in subdivisions,” Carpenter says. “Families are more apt to build treehouses in this setting.” For both kids and adults, “a treehouse is a great getaway, a retreat if you will,” he adds. “Treehouses offer a unique, whimsical experience for children and families.” Treehouses can be built in all shapes and sizes. “Some may be very rustic and just meant for a kid’s makeshift fort, while some are quite elaborate,” Carpenter explains. “In terms of comfort, some can be built to actually sleep in with some of the modern comforts, such as bunk beds and tables for dining.” For Nancy Stoops and her two grandsons, Cameron, age 10, and Casey, age 6, and their cousin, 5-year-old Jeremy, their treehouse in Bargersville is an enchanting place to play and learn about nature. The treehouse is “a place where I can see my grandchildren enjoying something,” Stoops says. “Every Sunday, my children and grandchildren are around me. It’s my SOUTH

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happiest time. The treehouse is a place where I know they are safe.” Her dream treehouse started as a sketch, and it became a reality after she hired a contractor to build the A-frame structure among two pine trees in her backyard. The cottage-style house, built of solid lumber with a cedar shake roof, is stabilized with cement posts. Stained a rustic brown and trimmed in dark brown, which blends easily with the surroundings, the tree cottage sports a window hatch and flower box to complete its fairy tale look. A deck with a secure fence surrounds the house, creating a perfect place to watch life in the trees. “The children go up to the treehouse and watch the birds,” Stoops says. “They have painted their own birdhouses, and we have feeders scattered among the branches. I have purchased a telescope that we will set up in the treehouse this year. One of my grandsons just got back from Space Camp. He’s very excited about the telescope. I think it’s important to make learning fun for children. What better place to learn about nature and the stars than in your very own treehouse?” Another grand treehouse sits in the countryside of Bargersville, the handiwork of Dr. Paul Winchester, director of neonatal intensive care at St. Francis Hospital. “When we joined the Indiana community in 2001, my children were in middle school,” he says. The same year that Winchester arrived, however, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. “I was cured through surgery, but it was a traumatic wakeup call,” he recalls. “I wanted to get something done for my children. My children were getting older, and I was not getting any younger. The treehouse was the first thing I could do for them, and it was the triumph of my convalescence through cancer.” Winchester finished the first level of the house in 2002, but it’s “never really done,” he says. “I’m always fixing something. When I remodeled my house with help from my contractor, we dressed up the treehouse. It matches the house now with the same siding.” The current treehouse spans four trees. The mainstay of the structure is a massive cottonwood tree. A sycamore tree, hackberry tree and box elder stand at the corners. “When we first built it, we were

Dr. Paul Winchester sits in his four-story treehouse in Bargersville. Winchester has slowly built each level over the course of several years.

eye level to a woodpecker busily making a hole for her babies,” Winchester recalls. “We witness the life cycle of the trees and can watch deer eating below us. It’s part of the mystique of being in a treehouse.” Since its first level was built, the treehouse has blossomed to include four levels of interesting art and ingenuity. A winding staircase within the treehouse and surrounding the cottonwood takes you to all levels. The second level is enclosed with clear plastic corrugated material for the walls and roofing, giving it a greenhouse feel. It’s open, bright and airy, complete with hatch windows. Black tubing wends its way down from the top level to the first level, a makeshift

phone for creative minds. The third level wraps around the thick stalk of the cottonwood as an overlook deck with a secure railing. Up the staircase again, and you are at the top level, aptly called the crow’s nest. In warmer weather, Winchester secures a hammock between two tree branches. “If you lie in the hammock here, you are at the canopy level of the trees,” he says. “There’s something magical about it. The treehouse sways and creaks in the wind like an old sailing ship. We’ve gone through tornadoes, high winds and a lightning strike, and yet the tree and treehouse remain unharmed. I’m not so sure if the treehouse didn’t help protect the tree.”


build your own Treehouses are customizable and individualistic, says Forrest Carpenter, of Custom Homes by Cory. “If you can dream it, it can be built,” he adds. “You just need the right location (trees that will properly support it) and a creative design.” Carpenter advises homeowners to do their research before building a treehouse. “Make sure you are compliant with any building covenants in your neighborhood,” he explains. Then start dreaming up what you’d like your home to look like or go online, where you can find a variety of design ideas.   He also suggests homeowners find a local contractor with treehouse construction experience. “It is important to compensate for tree movement, growth and to find the right size tree (or trees) to build your treehouse,” he explains. “Safety is always an issue in construction and especially in building a treehouse.”


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The Power of

Music

Riley kid Abigail Johnson shares her gift through song By Ashley Petry | Photos by Josh Marshall

{ summer | 95 }


I

In most ways, Abigail Johnson is a typical Center Grove fourth-grader. A student at Sugar Grove Elementary School, she loves Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber and enjoys playing Nintendogs with her friends. She makes artwork on Disney Create, reads American Girl books and plays with Boo the dog and Bubbles the hamster. She is also a Riley kid — a veteran of IU Health’s Riley Hospital for Children. In the past two years, she has channeled that experience into a major fundraising effort, but not with typical childhood fundraisers like bake sales and lemonade stands. Instead, Abigail has recorded two full-length Christmas albums called “Smile and Believe,” the proceeds of which support the hospital’s music therapy program. So far, the albums have raised more than $20,000. “I really wanted to help Riley kids,” Abigail said. “Whenever I was at Riley, the doctors and nurses took really good care of me, and I wanted others to have great care.”

‘Kinking and Twisting’

Scott and Martha Johnson first noticed a problem when Abigail was still a newborn. Every time they lay her flat to sleep, she thrashed around. As first-time parents, they didn’t know whether that was normal, but they suspected that it wasn’t. They videotaped the flailing to show Abigail’s pediatrician, and in the meantime they let her sleep sitting up in her car seat or swing. The pediatrician was concerned. After their appointment one day, the Johnsons were immediately referred to Riley for follow-up tests. Doctors quickly identified the problem, a condition known as malrotation. It occurs when the intestines aren’t positioned properly during fetal development. “Hers kind of crinkled up like paper and just got thrown in there, so it was kinking and twisting like a garden hose,” Martha said. When Abigail thrashed and flailed, she was simply trying to keep things moving through the kinks and twists in her intestines. Later that same day, Abigail underwent emergency surgery to correct the problem. A decade later, Martha still remembers handing over her daughter to a nurse who looked barely old enough to have a driver’s license. As the nurse carried Abigail away, Martha became distraught. Walking the hallways that evening, she bumped into a janitor — a woman who had seen many other families go through similar ordeals. { summer | 97 }


“It’s sometimes hard to hold her back. She’s a fighter. Obviously she has been a fighter since day one. … We celebrate that, because if she didn’t have that attitude, she wouldn’t be with us today.” —Martha Johnson

{ summer | 98 }

“She said, ‘You need to wipe those tears and smile and believe,’ so ever since then that’s been our family motto,” Martha said. “It gets you through the hard times, to have that positive attitude.” Fortunately, the surgery was successful. But Abigail still has to deal with an unrelated, genetic metabolic disorder, which has necessitated many other visits with Riley specialists.

‘Work Hard, Have Hope’

Every Christmas since Abigail’s surgery, the Johnsons have done something to support Riley and its patients. Often they brought gifts to the hospital, sending them to whichever child was assigned to the room where Abigail had once stayed. But as she got older, her parents started asking her how she wanted to support Riley. Two years ago, she announced her idea for a Christmas benefit album. “I really love singing,” Abigail said. “I’ve been singing ever since before I could talk.” Scott and Martha were hesitant about putting Abigail in the spotlight, and they worried about how the potential attention might affect her ego. But one day, Abigail’s producer asked her to make a choice: If she could be as famous as possible or raise as much money for Riley as possible, which would she choose? When Abigail chose fundraising over fame, her parents knew she could handle the spotlight. “It’s sometimes hard to hold her back,” Martha said. “She’s a fighter. Obviously she has been a fighter since day one. …


{ summer | 99 }


Martha and Scott Johnson with Abigail.


We celebrate that, because if she didn’t have that attitude, she wouldn’t be with us today.” The first “Smile and Believe” album came out late in 2011 and featured Abigail’s favorite holiday carols. Soon Abigail was performing — and telling her story — at Indianapolis Colts games and Riley fundraising events, such as the Miracle Ride and university dance marathons across the state. “Miracles happen when you really pull together and believe in a then-8-year-old and what she can do,” Martha said. The first album brought in about $10,000, which Abigail presented to Riley with a giant check, which was as wide as she was tall. The next year, she produced a second volume of “Smile and Believe.” This time she included two original songs, which she wrote with the guidance of her guitar instructor. One was called “Best Christmas Ever.” The other was called “Smile and Believe,” in honor of the Riley janitor who had helped Martha through a difficult day: When things are going wrong When things are getting ugly Beauty is all around you … When there’s something you want to achieve Work hard, have hope Smile and believe.

The second album brought in another $10,000, again for Riley’s music therapy program. “Some kids, their schools don’t have the money to have arts programs,” Abigail said. “And (music therapy) also distracts them from the medical stuff and things that are going on. They just can have a chance to do music.” Now the Johnsons are discussing plans for a third volume, although the timeline hasn’t been finalized, and Abigail is dreaming of creating an entire album of original songs — perhaps a few years from now. She said she hopes to be a singer when she grows up, but that isn’t her only ambition. After a school counselor came to her class and described her job, Abigail decided she wanted to do the same kind of work. “It sounded really cool to help kids feel better when they’re sad,” she said. In the meantime, Abigail looks forward to presenting the next giant check to Riley, and her parents look forward to meeting interesting people along the way. “It’s wonderful, the people we’ve met and the inspiration that we receive from them,” Scott said. “It drives us, too, because it’s a lot of work, but it’s fun.” Martha said she hopes Abigail’s story inspires other people to develop fundraising projects for Riley or other worthy nonprofit organizations. “Because of Abigail’s age when we started, it has really inspired and helped parents to believe that their kids can have crazy ideas and be successful with them,” Martha said. “It makes me very proud as a mother. It’s what keeps us going — her drive and spirit.”

Follow @AbigailProject on Twitter to keep up with Abigail’s musical adventures.

{ summer | 101 }


By Jon Shoulders Photography by Dario Impini 102

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Driven

by Design

Bargersville resident Lanny Wilhelm lets his passion for home renovation shine

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One brief glance 104

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into the life, career and interests of Lanny Wilhelm, and it becomes clear that he has an appreciation for quality and craftsmanship. It’s a philosophy that Wilhelm brought to bear in starting his postretirement classic automobile business, as well as in refurbishing his expansive Bargersville residence into a haven of customized comfort. The five-bedroom, 15,500-square-foot home is a testament to the notion that anyone can express his unique domestic vision without having to completely renovate or build from the ground up.


Wilhelm began a process of subtle yet effective rehab after purchasing the home, which sits on 18 acres and was originally constructed in 1996, in late 2004. Peter Whitten, a home designer at Kittle’s Design Studio on the northside of Indianapolis, has worked on several of Wilhelm’s homes. “This home has a classic continental sensibility,” Whitten says, “and that certainly speaks to Lanny’s taste. The fixed interior details created a fitting background for Lanny’s vision.” According to Wilhelm, new windows, shutters, paint and portions of the exterior

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brickwork helped to accomplish that vision. “Even though it’s just me here, I saw the opportunity to make some changes and turn it into somewhere I would really enjoy being,” he explains. Wilhelm waited until the bulk of the renovations were complete before moving into the home permanently in early 2006. After graduating from the University of Cincinnati in 1967, Wilhelm, who also grew up in Cincinnati, began a career in the trucking industry that spanned more than four decades. The work brought him to Indianapolis in 1982, when he joined Liquid Transport Corp. He eventually was named president. He was appointed a partner in the company in 1990.

“This home has a classic continental sensibility, and that certainly speaks to Lanny’s taste.‟ —Peter Whitten, Interior designer

Wilhelm retired in 2008. Around that time, he purchased a building in New Whiteland ostensibly as a storage facility for his collection of classic cars. But the space eventually became a place where classic cars were bought, sold, consigned and restored, and Masterpiece Classic Cars was born. The company now typically houses around 100 cars at any given time, from a 1931 Ford Victoria to a 1973 Chevrolet Camaro. Wilhelm spends many of his days in the Masterpiece showroom, where his brother, Dan, also works, and he says his home is the perfect place to relax after a hard day’s work. “It’s secluded and sits back from the road, which I really enjoy,” Wilhelm explains. Because of the home’s size, “everybody around here always used to think 106

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Opposite page: (Top) The foyer of Lanny Wilhelm’s 15,500-square-foot Bargersville home. (Bottom) The library, which comfortably surrounds its occupants in cherry wood paneling, boasts high-back leather chairs, towering built-in bookshelves and one of the home’s six fireplaces. This page: The formal dining room showcases earthy tones and high ceilings. SOUTH

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Peyton Manning lived here,” he says. ���I thought I might have to put a big ‘W’ on my gate or something.” Wilhelm spends much of his down time on the main level of the three-story home, where he regularly entertains. There, the space flows openly from the kitchen to the living area and sunroom. “I enjoy the open space and flow,” he says. “I’ve had over a hundred people here at once, and it didn’t seem too crowded.” Reworked dark granite countertops and a Sub Zero fridge fronted with wood that 108

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matches the kitchen cabinetry contributes to the cozy overall aesthetic. Earthy furniture tones and high ceilings can be found throughout the house, including the formal dining room. The library, which comfortably surrounds its occupants in cherry wood paneling, boasts high-back leather chairs, towering built-in bookshelves and one of the home’s six fireplaces. The master bedroom comes complete with a fireplace, a stationary bike in the spacious bathroom (all the bedrooms have their own bath-


The master bedroom boasts a fireplace, spacious bathroom, a built-in coffeemaker and walk-in closet that features plenty of storage and personalized door pulls.

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Opposite page: (Top) Wilhelm spends much of his down time on the main level of the three-story home, where he regularly entertains. There, the space flows openly from the kitchen to the living area and sunroom. (Bottom) The back exterior view of Wilhelm’s home. This page: The basement includes a home theater, which houses a 120-inch high-definition TV and plush red reclining stadium seating, as well as a pool table, bar, living area, sauna and gym equipment. “Sleepless in Seattle” and “Ghost” movie posters also are housed downstairs, along with Zelda, a fortune-telling animatronic curiosity housed in glass.

rooms) and a coffeemaker built into the small hallway leading from the bedroom to the roomy walk-in master closet. After a long day at his car showroom, Wilhelm often chooses to unwind via the home’s basement theater, which houses a 120-inch high-definition TV and plush red reclining stadium seating. Just outside the theater, “Sleepless in Seattle” and “Ghost” movie posters stand sentinel to the other permanent resident of the home: Zelda, a fortune-telling animatronic curiosity housed in glass casing that he purchased in Las Vegas and who, according to Wilhelm,

“never tells you the same thing twice.” The basement also holds its own spacious living area, a guest room, a gaming area with a pool table, exercise equipment, a sauna and a fully stocked bar. Wilhelm says he has fun decorating throughout the home’s lower level around the holidays with his eight grandchildren. “We always put a Christmas tree up down there and all kinds of kid stuff,” he says. Wilhelm also enjoys having his two sons and two daughters spend time relaxing in the home or out by the pool. While unwinding poolside, guests have a tranquil

view onto the home’s sprawling lawn and three-acre pond. Having reworked five of his own homes at different times in the Midwest, as well as three in Florida, Wilhelm certainly knows the renovation game by now. Like any true passion, he finds the process itself every bit as appealing as the finished product. “My youngest daughter would always ask me, ‘Dad, why can’t you just buy something and be happy with it?’” Wilhelm says. “But I’ve always loved the challenge of taking a home that’s kind of tired and turning it into a beautiful work of art.” SOUTH

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our side of town

Leadership Johnson County Wine Tasting March 9 // National Guard Armory

1. Susan McCarty and Tony Noora 2. Becki Meier and Otis Kerr 3. Adam Treibic and Bob Huechan 4. Dean and Dorcas Abplanalp with Susan Miller (right) 5. Joe and Ann McGuinness

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6. Loran Snyder, Jerry and Denise Ott, Tandy Shuck 7. Anthea McCormick, Danette Probst, Laura Roseberry 8. Rob and Brandi Henderson 9. Brad and Myrta McQueen 10. Chris Swartwout and Daryl Laface

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11. Paige and Nick Banos 12. Marci and Ryan Trares 13. Eric Feathers and Scarlett Syse

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Photos by Mark Freeland


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A Roaring Rebelation: The 1920s Roncalli Style

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April 27 // Roncalli High School

1. Guests enjoy a meal prepared by Roncalli High School cafeteria and catering manager, Lani Cummings, and her crew. 2. The Super Groove 5

3. Phil Milto and Rob Richardson 4. Laura Hollowell and auctioneer Bill Menish 5. Guests were enticed to purchase one of 200 silent auction packages. 6. Matt Nelson, Terese Carson, Mary Peyer, Jim Peyer

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7. Members of the Roncalli High School Jazz Band: Leah Biasi, Sam Young, Ben Shilson 8. Daniel Burkhardt, Lydia Hedrick, Jacob Byrd, Megan Schuetter 8

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Photos Provided by roncolli


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The United Way of Johnson County Annual Celebration March 21 // Johnson County Fairgrounds 1. Roger and Amy Greenwalt perform a bolero. 2. Carol Phipps and Loren Snyder announce the total money raised of $1,436,000. 3. Guests eat before the start of the celebration. 4. Danny and Judy Corsaro dance. 5. Speed Bump Barbershop Quartet, from left, Rick Hinson, Lyle Pettigrew, Ron Bailey and Liston Hinson, sing to guests 6. Master of ceremonies Loren Snyder 7. Milano Inn event coordinator Karen Rhoades serves Jeremy Wells of Human Services Head Start. Photos By Scott Roberson

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Franklin Boys and Girls Club charity golf outing

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May 30 // The Legends Golf Club

1. Amy Mettles celebrates after a birdie putt. 2. Ed Faught reaches out to catch his golf ball after sinking a putt. 3. Golfers wait in their golf carts for the event to begin. 4. Players check in outside the clubhouse at Legends Golf Club in Franklin. 5. Lynn Gray hits a tee shot 6. MIndy Rance shakes Rob Henderson's hand after awarding him the Indianapolis Indians tickets that he won at the silent auction.

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7. Franklin Boys and Girls Club Executive Director Teresa McClure announces the winners of the silent auction. 8. Clay Faulkerson hits a tee shot. 9. Attendees were treated to a buffet dinner. 10. Winners of the Franklin Boys and Girls Club charity golf event, from left, Mike David, Adam David and Rob Snider, pose with their winnings. Andrew Craft was also a member of their team.

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Photos by Mike Wolanin


Franklin Chamber of Commerce Cash Bash Feb. 23 // Indiana Downs

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1. 2013 Franklin Chamber Board of Directors. Front row from left: Melanie Zimmerman, David Clendening, Greg Taylor, Terry Miller, Brad Jones, Lisa Buening. Back row from left: Greg Moore, Dale Hughes, Jennifer Wilson, Steve Wohlford, Tina Gross, Angela Chamberlin, Tricia Bechman. Not pictured: Jeff Eggers, Steve Hood, Elaine Pesto, Tandy Shuck. 2. Lisa Buening

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3. From left, Jesse Ott, Loren Snyder and Steve Bechman 4. Gary Christie and Angela Chamberlin 5. Ron and Chrystal Ballard 6. Stephanie Wagner

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7. Stan Cramer and Gina Sims 8. Chris Purcell and Cindy Weddle

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weddings

Megan Gale and Philip Dennis Married March 9, 2013, at First Baptist Church of Greenwood Reception at The Atrium

Megan and Philip had their first date on Valentine’s Day of 2008. They were both still in high school. Three years into their relationship, Philip joined the U.S. Army National Guard. The two spent some time apart while he went through basic training, after which Philip continued his Reserve Officers Training Corps while simultaneously starting his junior year at IUPUI in the fall of 2011. Megan was starting her own degree program at IUPUI that same year. In February of 2012, the two attended the Military Ball, held at the JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis. On their walk back to the car, Philip dropped to one knee on a bridge overlooking the downtown canal, and, with ring in hand, he asked Megan to spend the rest of her life with him. The excited couple set their wedding date that very same evening. Photography by Rebecca Shehorn

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events

Compiled by Amy NOrman // photos submitted

Johnson County 4-H Fair | July 14-20

Ongoing Through June 29

Get drawing with the Draw Greenwood community art project. Check out drawing kits at the Greenwood Public Library and draw people, places, things, and events in the community. The project will culminate with a gallery show of participants’ work at the library. Kits will be available for all ages, and can be checked out through June 29. The Draw Greenwood show will be on view at the library July 3 - 31. Location: Greenwood Park Library, 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: www.greenwoodlibrary.us.

Through July 27

Experience science fiction fun and win prizes for reading this summer at the Greenwood

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Public Library. Summer Reading is an annual program, which encourages reading for all ages by rewarding hours read and providing programs on a common theme. Participants will receive prizes for reading 10 hours or more, and have a chance to win raffles for items including concert tickets, a Kings Island package, an e-reader, and gift cards. The 2013 theme, “It Came from GPL” will celebrate science fiction with a full calendar of related programs for the entire family. Starlight Movie Night on Friday, July 12 will feature a full evening of entertainment with the Greenwood Community Band, costumed actors, children’s games and crafts, and an outdoor showing of the movie Galaxy Quest. Participation in all Summer Reading activities and events is free and open to all. Location: 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: www.greenwoodlibrary.us.

June June 7-23

Set in the glamorous and seductive Hollywood of the 1940s, The Buck Creek Players’ “City of Angels” is an ingenious spoof of the classic film noir era and whodunit films. Tickets: $17 adults; $15 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 8622270 or www.buckcreekplayers.com.

June 11

Americana Downtown, hosted by Tim Grimm, will feature RJ Cowdry. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: $10 to $15 suggested donation. Location: Jackson Contemporary Art Gallery, 1030 Jackson St., Columbus.


events June 14

Bring your friends, family or anyone who would like the experience of traveling the rails on a miniature transportation network at Johnson County Park. The Indiana Live Steamers takes you on a journey through forested park land, over several bridges, across prairies and along creeks. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Cost: $2 per person. Location: Johnson County Park, 2949 E. North St., Edinburgh. Information: www.indianalivesteamers.org.

June 15

Meet your favorite PBS Kids characters in Military Park in downtown Indianapolis. The celebration features entertainment on three stages, activity booths, bounce houses, your favorite characters and more. Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: 601 W. New York St., Indianapolis. Information: www.wfyi.org.

The Friday Night Cruise-In on the Hope Town Square. There will be games and live entertainment. Food will be available for purchase from Chop Shop Cookers with all proceeds benefiting the Community Center of Hope and the Hope Food Bank. Time: 5:30 to 9 p.m. Location: 615 Harrison St., Hope. Information: (812) 314-1823 or www.communitycenterofhope.org.

Bring your lawn chairs and picnic blankets, spread out on the lawn and enjoy great pizza by the slice during Pizza & Wine Night while listening to live local music by The Richmonds. Free admission. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Wine available for purchase by the glass or bottle. All outside alcohol prohibited by Indiana law. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. Grab your best girlfriends and ride for a good cause, Turning Point Domestic Violence Services in Columbus, during the Girlfriend Ride. There are three rides to choose from: the 10K Pixie Tour, the 25K Pageboy Tour and the 50K Home Perm Tour. Time: 7:30 a.m. Location: Columbus Learning Center, 4555 Central Ave., No. 1600, Columbus. Information: www.girlfriendride.org. Smoke on the Square in Hope. Mark your calendars for the third annual barbecue competition. It is open to all levels of competitors cooking with wood (no gas). Prizes will be awarded in four categories. Entry forms are available by contacting the Community Center of Hope. A pulled pork meal will be available for purchase. There will be activities, vendors and entertainment. Time: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Information: (812) 546-4499, (812) 3141823 or www.communitycenterofhope.org. The Voices from the Past Storyteller Series presents “Freedom is My Home.” Time: 2 p.m. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org. The Big 80s band performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov.

Farmers Markets Every Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m., the Franklin Farmers Market offers locally grown fruits and vegetables, art and crafts, and fresh flowers. Location: Corner of Jefferson and Jackson streets in downtown Franklin. Information: (317) 346-1258 or www. discoverdowntownfranklin.com. Every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., the Columbus Farmers Market offers fresh produce grown by local farmers and gardeners, fresh-cut flowers, home-baked goods, coffee, tea, lemon shake-ups, local art and jewelry, herbs, hot peppers and local music. Location: Cummins parking lot, between Brown and Lindsey streets, downtown Columbus. Information: (812) 3713780 or columbusfarmersmarket.org. If you need some vegetables during the week, head to the Columbus Mid-Week Farmers Market, featuring fresh produce and plants grown by local farmers and gardeners. Time: 4 to 7:30 p.m. each Wednesday. Location: Between Jackson and Washington streets on Fourth Street in downtown Columbus. If you happen to be in downtown Indianapolis on Wednesdays this summer, stop by the Original Farmers Market at the Indianapolis City Market. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Location: 222 E. Market St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 634-9266 or www.indycm.com.

June 16

Celebrate Father’s Day at the Franklin Aquatic Center. Fathers get in free. Information: (317) 736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

June 20

Enjoy a Day of Play, which is a celebration of Franklin being named a “Playful City USA.” Games, hot dogs and activities will be in the park. That night, enjoy free admission to the aquatic center. Location: Province Park in Franklin. Time: 3 to 6:30 p.m. in Province Park; 7 to 9 p.m. at the Franklin Family Aquatic Center. Information: (317) 736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

June 22

Mallow Run presents Jennie DeVoe in concert on the lawn. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $15 in advance and are available at the winery or online at www.mallowrun.com. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. Toy Factory performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov.

June 22-23

Enjoy the 21st annual Indian Market and Festival, a two-day celebration of Native American art and culture. Meet more than 130 Native American artists and performers from more than 60 tribes. Try unique foods including the ever-popular Indian tacos. SOUTH

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events Indiana wine and classic American bluegrass music. Music by Cornfields and Crossroads. Free admission. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Wine available for purchase by the glass or bottle. All outside alcohol prohibited by Indiana law. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com.

Smoke on the Square, Franklin | June 28-29

There are activities for the little ones in the Dogbane Family Activity Area. Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost: $10 adults at the gate; $8 museum members; 17 and younger free. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org.

June 23

Legends of the Ring: Sugar Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns and Roberto Duran. Time: 5 p.m. Tickets: $57. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: www.livenation.com.

by the Kansas City Barbecue Society and brings professional teams from all over Indiana and the Midwest. Barbecue will be available for sale during lunch and dinner on Friday and Saturday. Enjoy the music of the Blue River Band from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday and The Snakehandlers from 6 to 9 p.m. Saturday. Time: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Information: (317) 346-1258 or www.discoverdowntownfranklin.com.

June 29

Celebrate with food and music with American roots. Come enjoy great eats paired with

Celebrate the American spirit during the Greenwood Freedom Festival. More than 80 merchants, food and craft booths will be at the Old Town Street Fair. The kids zone features inflatables, live entertainment and other fun activities for the whole family. Time: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Location: Old City Park, Machledt Drive between Madison Avenue and Meridian Street. From 4 to 10 p.m., a Hoosier Falcon Open Car Show takes place at the Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way. At 10 a.m., bring your lawn chair and enjoy the “Fun, Frolic & Freedom� parade. The Gordon Pipers and the Greenwood Community High School drum line are scheduled to perform. Free concerts take place on the Craig Park stage from 3 to 11 p.m. At 10:15 p.m. enjoy a fireworks display simulcast to the music on radio station WTTS 92.3. Glow necklaces will be sold at dusk with proceeds benefiting the Greenwood Freedom Festival. Information: www.greenwoodfreedomfestival.com.

June 29

O.A.R. performs on The Farm Bureau Insurance Lawn at White River State Park. Time: 6:30 p.m. Information: www.livenation.com.

June 28

Last Fridays Bluegrass is an open bluegrass jam for musicians of all ages. A mix of traditional bluegrass, newgrass, folk and gospel will be played. The public is welcome to participate or simply enjoy the music. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Fairlawn Presbyterian Church, 2611 Fairlawn Drive, Columbus. Information: (812) 344-2664. Bring a picnic and a blanket and enjoy the Greenwood Community Band, featuring a variety of patriotic classics. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Surina Square Amphitheatre, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood.

June 28-29

Smoke on the Square in memory of David Harness in downtown Franklin. This barbecue competition is a state competition sanctioned

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Greenwood Freedom Festival | June 29


July July 3

The Franklin Firecracker Festival promises fun for the whole family. Enjoy free swimming at the Franklin Memorial Swimming Pool if you wear a red, white or blue swimsuit from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Other evening activities include a performance by the Franklin Community Band, moonwalks, obstacle courses and kids games, the “Fastest Kid in Town” race and a free outdoor concert featuring Parrots of the Caribbean, the nation’s top Jimmy Buffett tribute show. The evening activities will be from 6 to 10 p.m. on the Indiana Masonic Home lawn. Norman P. Blankenship Jr. Fireworks Celebration at 10:10 p.m. Information: (317) 736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

July 4

Enjoy the Donatos Downtown Freedom Blast fireworks extravaganza shot off Regions Bank in downtown Indianapolis. Time: 9:45 p.m. Cost: Free.

July 5

Enjoy the Old-Fashioned Independence Day Celebration on the Hope Town Square. Food, games, live music and fireworks. Information: (812) 546-HOPE.

July 5-13

Bartholomew County 4-H Fair. Events daily. Times vary. Information: www. bartholomewcountyfair.com.

July 6

Mallow Run and the Carmel Symphony Orchestra present an evening of beautiful music on the lawn featuring The Wright Brothers. Tickets are $15 in advance and will be available at the winery or online at www. mallowrun.com. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. The Bishops perform during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov.

Let's dance!

If you’re a car buff, you don’t want to miss the 14th annual National Guard SOUTH

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events Association of Indiana Car Show. Time: 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: American Legion Mall in downtown Indianapolis. Information: www.ngai.net.

July 11

Gordon Bonham, Gene Deer and Benito DiBartoll perform as part of the JCB Neighborfest. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: 300 block of Washington Street in front of The Commons in Columbus.

July 12

Starlight Movie Night: Galaxy Quest. Travel to unknown territory with the hilarious sci-fi spoof Galaxy Quest, a night full of science fiction fun, including costumed actors, the community band, crafts, games, trivia and more. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Greenwood Library, 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information:www.greenwoodlibrary.us

Beer and Bluegrass Festival | Aug. 23-24

July 12

Americana Music Series, hosted by Tim Grimm, will feature Eric Taylor. Time: 7:30 p.m. Cost: $12 in advance; $15 at the door. Location: Unitarian Universalist Building, 7850 Goeller Road, Columbus. The Friday Night Cruise-In on the Hope Town Square. There will be games and live entertainment. Food will be available for purchase from Chop Shop Cookers with all proceeds benefiting the Community Center of Hope and the Hope Food Bank. Time: 5:30 to 9 p.m. Location: 615 Harrison St., Hope. Information: (812) 314-1823 or www.communitycenterofhope.org.

7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov. Enjoy a friendly game of baseball in its original form on the lawn at the Indiana State Museum. See the Indianapolis Blues take on the Indianapolis Hoosiers Vintage Base Ball Club. Time: 1 p.m. Location: 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or www.indianamuseum.org.

July 14

alive. Lonnie Lester Group performs Motown, funk and soul. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost: $6. Location: 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 2321637 or www.indianamuseum.org.

July 18

Bring a picnic and a blanket and enjoy the Greenwood Community Band, featuring a variety of patriotic classics. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Garfield Park Amphitheater, 2432 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis.

Enjoy an ice cream social on the steps of Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis. Time: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Cost: $3. Proceeds will benefit the Diabetes Youth Foundation of Indiana. Information: www.indianadairycouncil.org.

Paul McCartney brings his Out There Tour to Indianapolis. This is one of the few times McCartney has performed live in Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $72.15 to $274.50. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: www.bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

July 19

July 13

July 14-20

July 20

Enjoy great Hawaiian-inspired cuisine and authentic island music and dance. The Makani Girls and many friends make the trip from the big island of Chicago to perform. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. The Blue River Band performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time:

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Come to the Johnson County 4-H Fair. Animals, food, exhibits by 4-H members and fun for the entire family. Information: johnsoncountyfair.com.

July 17

Music returns to the Canal Café Terrace at the Indiana State Museum. The summer concert series features Indiana musicians who help to keep the state’s musical legacy

Have fun with all things Doctor Who at the family-friendly Doctor Who Day, which features fun stations, crafts, games, and more. Time: 1 p.m. Location: Greenwood Park Library, 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: www.greenwoodlibrary.us

Sure, Bargersville may be land-locked, but that won’t stop residents from enjoying a good old-fashioned fish fry. Live music by Benny Jenkins Bloodline. Free admission. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. Zanna-Doo performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time:


7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov. Bring your friends, family or anyone who would like the experience of traveling the rails on a miniature transportation network at Johnson County Park. The Indiana Live Steamers takes you on a journey through forested park land, over several bridges, across prairies and along creeks. Time: Noon to 4 p.m. Cost: $2 per person. Location: Johnson County Park, 2949 E. North St., Edinburgh. Information: www.indianalivesteamers.org.

July 25-28

Four action-packed days of racing lead up to the big race during the 2013 Super Weekend. July 26: NASCAR Nationwide Series practice and the fourth annual Hauler Parade. July 27: Grand-Am Continental Series qualifying and race; Grand-Am Rolex Series qualifying and race; Fan Pit Walk and Fan Fest. July 28: Nascar Sprint Cup practice and qualifying for the pole; Nascar Nationwide Series qualifying and race. July 29: Crown Royal presents The “Your Hero’s Name Here” 400 at The Brickyard. Racing starts at 1 p.m. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, 4790 W. 16th St., Speedway. Information: www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com.

July 26

Last Fridays Bluegrass is an open bluegrass jam for musicians of all ages. A mix of traditional bluegrass, newgrass, folk and gospel will be played. The public is welcome to participate or simply enjoy the music. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Fairlawn Presbyterian Church, 2611 Fairlawn Drive, Columbus. Information: (812) 344-2664.

July 27

Bring your lawn chairs and picnic blankets, spread out on the lawn and enjoy great pizza by the slice while listening to Tastes Like Chicken. Free admission. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. Parrots of the Caribbean performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov. SOUTH

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events

Indiana State Fair | Aug. 2-18

The JWI Biggest Block Party Ever features the best local and regional bands, including headliner the Hunter Smith Band. Food from downtown restaurants, beer and wine, and kids activities. All proceeds benefit the Columbus Area Arts Council. Time: 5:30 p.m. to midnight. Cost: $8 adults; children 12 and younger free. Location: Downtown Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539 or www.artsincolumbus.org.

Cost: Free. Location: 300 block of Washington Street in front of The Commons, Columbus.

July 30

Aug. 2-18

Students who attend Custer Baker Intermediate School and Franklin Middle School are invited to a Back to School Splash Bash. Cost: $2 per swimmer. Pool passes cannot be used for entry. No parents allowed. Information: (317) 736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org.

August Aug. 1

The Max Allen Band performs as part of the JCB Neighborfest. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

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Aug. 2-4

The fifth biennial Buck Creek Players PlayA-Part fundraiser. Time: Varies. Tickets: $25. Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 8622270 or www.buckcreekplayers.com.

The Indiana State Fair. Times: 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Thursday; 8 a.m. to midnight Friday; 8 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. Saturdays. Admission: $10 adults; children 5 and younger are free. Information: www.indianastatefair.com.

Aug. 3

Enjoy great Latin-inspired foods and music by Stacie Sandoval & Trio Con Paz during Summer Fiesta. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com.

730 Club Band performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov. It’s a rockin’ good time at the Eiteljorg when the best and brightest up-and-coming young female musicians take the stage. Bands from Girls Rock Indianapolis will showcase their talents. Time: 2 to 4:30 p.m. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or www.eiteljorg.org.

Aug. 4

Bring a picnic and a blanket and enjoy the Greenwood Community Band, featuring a variety of patriotic classics. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Surina Square Amphitheatre, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood.

Aug. 9

Friday Night Cruise-In on the Hope Town Square. There will be games and live


entertainment. Food will be available for purchase from Chop Shop Cookers with all proceeds benefiting the Community Center of Hope and the Hope Food Bank. Time: 5:30 to 9 p.m. Location: 615 Harrison St., Hope. Information: (812) 314-1823 or www.communitycenterofhope.org.

Aug. 10

Polka Boy is a 14-piece band with a cultlike following that plays a variety of music from polka and waltz to classic rock. Enjoy their eclectic style in a laid-back setting on the lawn at Mallow Run. Tickets are $15 in advance and are available at the winery or online at www.mallowrun.com. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. Lemon Wheel performs during the Greenwood Summer Concert series. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Greenwood outdoor amphitheater, 100 Surina Way. Information: www.greenwood.in.gov.

Aug. 13

The Black Crowes & Tedeschi Trucks Band perform at The Farm Bureau Insurance Lawn at White River State Park. Time: 6 p.m. Information: www.livenation.com.

Aug. 15-17

The Sportbike Freestyle Championship XDL heads to the Indiana War Memorial in downtown Indianapolis. Time: 4 to 9 p.m. Thursday; 4 to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets: Free Thursday; $10 Friday; $20 Saturday. Information: (317) 492-6455 or www.brickyard.com.

Aug. 16-18

For ticket info, music line-up and more, visit

wammfest.com

11:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Craig Park, Greenwood, IN

AUGUST 17, 2013

A Summer Celebration of Wine, Art, Live Music & Microbrew... and of course, great food!

Motorcycles on Meridian, one of the many exciting fan events surrounding the Red Bull Indianapolis GP, takes place at Monument Circle. Time: 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Information: www.brickyard.com. The 2013 Red Bull Indianapolis GP is a round of the MotoGP World Championship, the most prestigious motorcycle road racing series in the world. Practice takes place Friday with qualifying on Saturday. The race is Sunday. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, 4790 W. 16th St., Speedway. Information: www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com. SOUTH

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events Aug. 17

Celebrate summer with wine, art, live music and microbrew at the annual Wamm Fest, which takes place at Craig Park in Greenwood. Time: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Location: 10 E. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood. Information: www. wammfest.com. Bring your lawn chairs and picnic blankets, spread out on the lawn and enjoy great pizza by the slice with your favorite Mallow Run wine while listening to live local music by Wilson & Co. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. The Columbus Area Arts Council presents Rock the Park with REO Speedwagon. Time: gates open at 6:30 p.m. Location: Mill Race Park, Fifth and Lindsey streets, downtown Columbus. Information: www.artsincolumbus.org.

Aug. 18

Enjoy a wonderful evening of music and ice cream during the Concert in the Park & Ice Cream Social in Franklin. The Franklin Community Band will perform in the Rose Garden. Bring a picnic dinner, lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the show. Cost: Free. Time: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Information: (317) 736-3689 or www.franklinparks.org. Bark in the Park end-of-summer doggie swim. Location: Donner Park Aquatic Center, 22nd and Sycamore streets,

WAMM Fest | Aug. 17

Columbus. Information: (812) 3762680 or www.columbus.in.gov. Bring a picnic and a blanket and enjoy the Greenwood Community Band, featuring a variety of patriotic classics. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Surina Square Amphitheatre, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood.

Aug. 23

Sample craft beers from local breweries while enjoying live music on the Franklin courthouse square, sponsored by the Johnson County

At the Artcraft Theatre Don’t miss these classic movies on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org.

June 14 and 15: “The Court Jester” June 28 and 29: “Charlotte’s Web” July 12 and 13: “The Egg and I” July 26 and 27: “Raiders of the Lost Ark” Aug. 9 and 10: “Calamity Jane” Aug. 23 and 24: “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” Sept. 6 and 7: “Road to Morocco”

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Museum of History and Discover Downtown Franklin. Mallow Run will offer wine. People of all ages can enjoy food, a classic car cruise-in and bluegrass music from Cornfields and Crossroads. Time: 5 to 9 p.m. Cost: $15 in advance; $20 day of the event. Location: Johnson County Museum of History, 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org. Last Fridays Bluegrass is an open bluegrass jam for musicians of all ages. A mix of traditional bluegrass, newgrass, folk and gospel will be played. The public is welcome to participate or simply enjoy the music. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Fairlawn Presbyterian Church, 2611 Fairlawn Drive, Columbus. Information: (812) 344-2664.

Aug. 23-24

The Beer and Bluegrass Festival is now seeing its second year in downtown Franklin, and it is co-hosted by Discover Downtown Franklin and the Johnson County Museum of History. The event offers a beer tasting, which begins at 6 p.m. Pre-sale tickets cost $15; regular tickets are $20 per person. Wine will also be available for additional costs. The festival offers a classic car cruisein, and music by the Flatland Harmony Experiment Band from 7 to 9 p.m. Location: Downtown Franklin. Information: www. discoverdowntownfranklin.com.


The Women of Faith “Believe God Can Do Anything” conference, featuring Liz Curtis Higgs, Third Day, Lisa Harper, Mark Lowry, Angie Smith, Angela Thomas, Sheila Walsh and CeCe Winans, comes to Bankers Life Fieldhouse. Tickets: $99. Information: www.womenoffaith.com.

Aug. 24

Join Mallow Run for spicy Cajun cuisine and incredible foot-tappin’ Cajun/ zydeco music by Craig Brenner & The Crawdads. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com. The Columbus ArtFest features artwork from local, regional and national artists. Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Location: Washington Street in downtown Columbus. Information: www.columbusartfest.com.

Aug. 28

The NHRA celebrates with its fans during the Mac Tools U.S. Nationals Fan Fest on Monument Circle. Time: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Information: www.nhra.com.

Aug. 31

Tommy James & the Shondells, with opening act Groove Essentials, perform during the Hospice Community Concert. Proceeds benefit Hospice of South Central Indiana. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Mill Race Park, Fifth and Lindsey streets, Columbus. Information: (812) 314-8053.

Aug. 31-Sept. 2

Help Mallow Run celebrate its eighth anniversary with a good old-fashioned hog roast. Slow-roasted pork and sides, plus great live music. Time: Noon to 8 p.m. Saturday; noon to 6 p.m. Sunday and Monday. The music lineup is: Touch of Grass, 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday; Blue River Band, 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday; Acoustic Catfish, 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday; Area Code 812, 2 to 5 p.m. Monday. Cost: Free. Location: Mallow Run Winery, 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville. Information: (317) 422-1556 or www.mallowrun.com.

Visit indysouthmag.com for more listings. Confirm dates, times and locations by calling or visiting event website. SOUTH

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a look back

Behind the Wheel Donna Higdon in a John Deere 4020 at the Johnson County 4-H Fair tractor pull. Date unknown.

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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SOUTH | Summer 2013