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SOUTHSIDE 2014

A PUBLICATION OF

Craig Park Trail, Greenwood discover the SOUTHSIDE

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s ’ et

FRED ASTAIRE

DANCE STUDIOS INTERNATIONAL

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! e c n

a D

Premier

The Dance Studio in Indianapolis!

Enjoy quality time together, meet new people

and find new social confidence. Ballroom, Latin, Cha Cha, Salsa, Tango, Swing & More!

Certified Professional Dance Instructors (317) 783-3260 l 2002 E. Southport Rd. l www.fredastaireindianapolis.com


contents features

10 Calendar

The hottest summer events

14 Holiday Spirit Winter fun for the family

20 Culture Canvas The southside art scene

30 Head Starts Tips from hair pros

38 On The Mend

Where athletes go for rehab

42 Quality of Life Local hospice providers

50 Academic Aces Talented southside teens

58 In Good Taste Food and drink favorites

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Jockamo Upper Crust Pizza

guides

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8 WELCOME 12 ANNUAL EVENTS 18 ENTERTAINMENT

SOUTHSIDE

28 SHOPPING 46 HOSPITALS 46 SCHOOLS

76 56 ORGANIZATIONS 76 RESTAURANTS

Cover photo by Josh Marshall


TAKE IT TO BEN OR TAKE IT TO BEN! A Sign of Quality & Professionalism

Established 1977

6025 MADISON AVE. INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46227 317-787-5345

Ben Stallings

www.BeckServiceCenter.com

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SOUTHSIDE PUBLISHER Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells EDITORIAL EDITOR

Sherri Dugger COPY EDITOR

Katharine Smith CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Alisa Advani Melissa Fears Scott Hall Caroline Mosey Ashley Petry Jon Shoulders

THE DEALERSHIP ALTERNATIVE FOR QUALITY AND PROFESSIONALISM!

ART SENIOR GRAPHIC ARTIST

Margo Wininger ADVERTISING DESIGN

BIG ENOUGH TO DO THE JOB RIGHT, SMALL ENOUGH TO CARE!

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR Everything from OIL CHANGES to entire ENGINE CHANGES

Tina Ray, Julie Daiker, Kelsey Ruddell, Phil Manning CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andrew Laker Josh Marshall Photography By Melinda Scott Roberson Joe Saba Stock images provided by ©Thinkstock

ADVERTISING

3070 N. MORTON FRANKLIN, IN 46131 317-736-8800 www.BeckAutomotive.com

Established 1981

Ben Briggeman 6

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ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Christina Cosner ADVERTISING INQUIRIES (317) 736-2730

ADDRESS

30 S. Water St. Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-7101 ©2014 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.


Fletcher “Where Everybody Gets A Great Deal” www.fletcherchrysler.com

#1 Ram Truck Dealer in Indiana

Fletcher is the largest Dodge, Chrysler, Jeep & Ram dealer in Central Indiana with more than 500 vehicles to choose from.

At Fletcher Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram & Used Car Superstore, we take our commitment to this community seriously. We support the Chamber of Commerce and several area not-for-profit organizations. We also provide the highest level of service to our customers as demonstrated by our Five Star status. When you do business with us, we give back to our community. Thank you for your support.

15,000 sq. ft. showroom with over 250 used vehicles to choose from; all makes & models!

“Where Everybody Gets A Great Deal”

Fletcher

www.fletcherchrysler.com 3099 N. Morton St., (U.S. 31) Franklin, IN (317) 738-4170

8 miles south of the Greenwood Park Mall


welcome

I

ALL GROWN UP If you’re a native southsider as I am, you probably remember the glory days, like when PoFolks first opened its doors in the 1980s on south U.S. 31. Oh, that was a grand time, when cafeteria-line restaurants and all-you-can-eat buffets were the norm, and life seemed chockfull of one-stop options … steaming, cheesesmothered, gravy-covered options. Looking back, those days now seem charming, if nothing else, because each time a new restaurant opened, diners flocked to fill the space, standing in lines and suffering hour-long (or more) waits, just to get the southside’s latest edible offerings. My family regularly dined out on Friday nights, usually after taking in a local football game, and Sunday afternoons (after we children had endured Sunday school lessons on how to live selflessly) were dedicated to us mindlessly (and rather selfishly) squabbling with one another over where we wanted to eat. Our regular haunts, if I recall, were not many. There were MCL, Bob Evans, The Dutch Oven, Heritage House and—if my pop felt like driving—

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Johnson County

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WHITELAND

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BARGERSVILLE 144

FRANKLIN

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Gray Brothers in Mooresville. So when new restaurants like PoFolks opened—hot diggity dog!—we were there. With bibs on. These days, because the southside is filled with so many dining options, the opening of a new eatery nearly goes unnoticed. It certainly doesn’t receive the same fanfare and pre-opening chatter that southside restaurants used to enjoy. Nowadays, chain options—like Cheeseburger in Paradise, The Cheesecake Factory, BJ’s Brewhouse, Smokey Bones Bar & Fire Grill, Famous Dave’s and Max & Erma’s—are on nearly every corner. Top that list with the dozens upon dozens of local eateries like the ones we included in the restaurant section of this guide (Arni’s Restaurant, Ichiban Sushi Bar and Indigo Duck, et al.), and you’ll quickly find that making a decision on where to eat each weekend is less a matter of trying to pick the place you’re least sick of and more about flipping a coin to choose from the hundred-some options surrounding you. Which is to say: My, how the southside has grown. I can remember a time when the south region of Marion County and Johnson County was overlooked as a culinary destination. Nor was it revered for its shopping outlets or entertainment offerings. But let it be overlooked no more. If you’re new to the southside or you’ve lived here for decades, there’s always something or somewhere new to explore. The southside is teeming with talent, things to do, delicious food options, trend-setting boutiques and more. It’s time to take advantage of—and celebrate—all that the southside offers. Take a few minutes to look through this guide, discover the southside and then hit the streets and explore.

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EDINBURGH

Editor, SOUTH Magazine sdugger@indysouthmag.com

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PRePaRe to succeed

Roncalli High school is a catholic high school that embraces our student’s God-given gifts to help them develop faithbased goals and morals so that they may fulfill their intended vocation in life. our students are challenged in academics, the arts, athletics and service.

For more information regarding admission to Roncalli call 787-8277, ext. 243 or visit www.roncalli.org


southside calendar

WAMMfest Greenwood AUG. 16

The sounds of summer The southside heats up with outdoor music events When temperatures rise it’s time to get out and enjoy the great outdoors … along with some great tunes. According to Jeff Madsen, director of recreation at the Greenwood Parks Department, the summer concert series at the Greenwood Amphitheater (100 Surina Way, Greenwood) features shows on Saturdays nights from June through August and showcases “bands from Indianapolis and beyond,” he says. “It’s just a great family time. We think it’s one of the best things we do here.” Outdoor shows at the Greenwood Amphitheater, weather permitting, typically draw anywhere from 800 to 1,750 people on any given Saturday. Bring your own chair to catch your favorite bands. All shows at the Greenwood Amphitheater are free. For more information, visit greenwood.in.gov. 10

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More than 6,000 partygoers come out to celebrate with wine, art, music and microbrews at the annual WAMMfest held every August in Greenwood. Browse booths filled with arts, crafts, pottery and photography, sip wine from world-class Indiana vineyards and take in music performed on three stages. For more information, visit wammfest.com.


Escape to Mallow Run Winery (6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville, 317-422-1556) for a summer full of live music and good food every Saturday evening, to be followed up on Sunday afternoons with more music on the patio. “People can come and share a glass or bottle of wine with loved ones in a place that’s relaxing, laid-back and removed from the hustle and bustle of people’s hectic lives,” says Mallow Run’s Sarah Shadday. “We love to create that laid-back atmosphere that brings people together, and live music only enhances that experience.” Guests can enjoy the music from a table on the patio, but

Shadday suggests guests “take advantage of the beautiful summer evening and our spacious grounds and bring their picnic blankets or lawn chairs and spread out.” When weather permits, regular Saturday evening events can bring in anywhere from 400 to 600 guests and approximately 1,500 for larger concerts, she says. For more information, visit mallowrun.com.

»

The town of Franklin also gets into the act during summers with special outdoor events of its own. Strawberries on the Square gets things going in May, followed by Smoke on the Square in June and Beer and Bluegrass Festival in August. All events are held in downtown Franklin. For more information, visit discoverdowntownfranklin.com. MAY 23

JUNE 27-28

AUG. 22

Strawberries on the Square

Smoke on the Square

»Franklin’s longest-running fund-

»Smoke on the Square is both

raiser, Strawberries on the Square dishes up sweet strawberries, shortcake, whipped cream and a bottle of water, all for $5 per guest, says Megan Hart, executive director of Discover Downtown Franklin. The event also features a classic car cruise-in, kids’ activities, and, of course, music.

a barbecue competition and a festival. The two-day event features a classic car cruise-in, a kids’ area, games, food vendors and live music performances.

Beer and Bluegrass Festival »The Beer and Bluegrass Festival is co-hosted by Discover Downtown Franklin and the Johnson County Museum of History. The event offers a beer tasting and live music, as well as a car cruise-in.

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southside annual events Greenwood Freedom Festival

Johnson County 4-H Fair

Don’t miss these classic movies on the big screen at the HISTORIC ARTCRAFT THEATRE in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or historicartcrafttheatre.org. Celebrate the American spirit during the GREENWOOD FREEDOM FESTIVAL. Approximately 80 merchants, food and craft booths will be at the Old Town Street Fair. The kids’ zone features inflatables, live entertainment and other fun activities for the whole family. Information: greenwoodfreedomfestival.com The FRANKLIN FIRECRACKER FESTIVAL promises fun for the whole family. Activities include music, moonwalks, obstacle courses and kids games and more. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org Come to the JOHNSON COUNTY 4-H FAIR. Animals, food, exhibits by 4-H members and fun for the entire family. Information: johnsoncountyfair.com Grab your running shoes and get ready for the annual 5K run/walk during the GREENWOOD 5K TRAIL TREK. The race begins and ends at the Greenwood Community Center. The race course utilizes Greenwood trails around Craig Park and Valle Vista Golf Course. Information: greenwood.in.gov. Take a trip around the world and never leave Franklin during the FRANKLIN MULTICULTURAL FESTIVAL. Celebrate many different cultures through sights, sounds and tastes. Information: (317) 346-1198 or franklinparks.org. 12

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THE FRANKLIN FALL FESTIVAL offers a free outdoor concert, a street fair, baking contest, parade and more. Location: Downtown Franklin. Information: franklinparks.org. WINE AT THE LINE is an annual 5-mile run and 5K run/walk on the winery grounds and country roads of Bargersville. Registration includes a long sleeve T-shirt, commemorative wine glass, timing chip, food and beverage, and post-race entertainment. Information: (317) 422-1556 or mallowrun.com. Re-spook, re-wear, re-scare. Franklin is pairing up with the Johnson County Recycling District for the 8th annual HALLOWEEN COSTUME SWAP. Anyone can participate in this free exchange. Simply bring a clean, gently used costume to swap for another costume. Information: (317) 738-2546 or recyclejohnsoncounty.com.

Artcraft Theater

THE PUMPKINS IN THE PARK 5K RUN/ WALK and 1 mile family fun walk. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org. SANTA CLAUS IS COMING to the Greenwood Community Center to have breakfast. After breakfast visit Santa in his workshop for your own photo with Santa or buy a professional

Franklin Firecracker Festival

photo from Pro-Tek Photography. Information: (317) 881-4545 or greenwood.in.gov. Don’t miss BREAKFAST WITH SANTA, sponsored by the Franklin Parks & Recreation Department. Information or to register: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org. Enjoy a more traditional and relaxing holiday experience with SANTA AT THE JOHNSON COUNTY MUSEUM in Franklin. Photos with Santa will be available for purchase. Admission to the museum is free. Information: (317) 346-4500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org. Don’t miss the popular DADDY/DAUGHTER DANCE for girls ages 3 to 12 and their dads. The event features dancing, appetizers, sweets, photo opportunities, event CD and party favor. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org. GALA FOR THE GROVE, sponsored by the Center Grove Education Foundation, is a special event that benefits the foundation, which is a non-profit organization that bridges the gap between school programs funded with tax dollars and the need for additional innovative and imaginative programs to ensure that all students learn, grow and achieve their full academic potential. Information: (317) 8819326, ext. 1660 or centergrovefoundation.org.


EVENTS

keep the holiday spirit going

BY MELISSA FEARS PHOTOS BY JOSH MARSHALL

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THE HOLIDAY PARADE AND TREE LIGHTING — FRANKLIN —

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W

Winter in Indianapolis and surrounding areas is packed full of events and activities for residents of all ages. From shows to museums and elaborately decorated mansions to a visit with Santa Claus himself, there are plenty of ways to celebrate winter and get in the festive spirit. And if you think it all ends after Christmas, you’re wrong. We found a few gems to add sparkle to the dull days during the dead of winter. Here’s a listing of just a few of the season’s must-go-to events and celebrations.

Nov 22 - Jan. 4

Jolly Days Winter Wonderland is a treat for the whole family. Jolly Days offers a baby-play Snow Castle for the littlest visitors, a reindeer barn where families can help prep Santa’s reindeer for their flight, an indoor “ice skating” area for children to “skate” in their socks, an ice fishing area, holiday train, kitchen area to make holiday goodies, including traditional cookies, staff-facilitated snow ball fun and photos with Santa. Location: The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, 3000 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 334-3322 or childrensmuseum.org.

Nov 28 - Dec. 24

The Festival of Trees at Lanthier Winery in Madison puts on a dazzling display of trees decorated for the holidays. Time: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Free admission. Location: Lanthier Winery, 123 Mill St., Madison. Information: lanthierwinery. com or call (812) 273-2409.

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Nov 28 - Dec. 31

Enjoy the annual holiday train and poinsettia show in downtown Indianapolis. Location: Garfield Park Conservatory, 2505 Conservatory Drive, Indianapolis. Information: garfieldgardensconservatory. org or (317) 327-7184.

Dec. 6 and 13

Visit with Santa at the Johnson County Museum from 2 to 4:30 p.m.

Dec. 6

The Holiday Tree Lighting is one of the biggest events in Franklin. A parade, Santa at the Johnson County Museum, choral performances, carriage and trolley rides all lead up to the grand finale of the courthouse tree lighting followed by fireworks. Start location: Courthouse Square, Franklin. Time: 7 p.m.

Dec. 6

The Festival of Lights Parade in Columbus celebrates with floats, walking groups and thousands of twinkling lights, plus Santa’s arrival and fireworks. Free admission. Time: 6 p.m. Location: downtown Columbus. Information: facebook. com/columbuslights or (812) 390-6912.

Dec. 14

Enjoy breakfast with Santa Claus, which includes pancakes, sausage, eggs, fruit, juice, milk and coffee. Have your children visit with Santa and take your own photo.  Space is limited. Time: 9 a.m. Location: , 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Tickets: $3 residents; $5 non-residents. Information: (317) 881-4545.


keep the holiday spirit going

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Dec. 31

Celebrate the New Year with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. An evening of music and food will bring everyone together to ring in 2015. There will be music, dancing and a complimentary champagne toast at midnight. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

GR AB YOUR VALEN

TINE

Feb. 21

Don’t miss the popular Daddy/Daughter Dance for girls ages 3 to 12 and their dads. The event features dancing, appetizers, sweets, photo opportunities, event CD and party favor. You must register to attend. Location: Beeson Hall. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org.

Valentine's Dance

Johnson County Museum

PHOTO COURTESY JOHNSON COUNT Y LIBR ARY

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southside entertainment FAMILY FUN

FRANKLIN FLYING FIELD

AMC INDIANAPOLIS 17 WITH IMAX

3477 S. County Road 200 East, Franklin (317) 736-6633 franklinflyingfield.com

BUCK CREEK PLAYERS

2680 N. Morton St., Franklin (317) 738-3775 franklinskateclub.com

4325 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis (317) 784-0989 amctheatres.com 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis (317) 862-2270 buckcreekplayers.com

CANARY CREEK CINEMAS

870 Mallory Parkway, Franklin (317) 738-1041 canarycreekcinemas.com

GREENWOOD CINEMARK MOVIES 8

1848 E. Stop 13 Road, Indianapolis (317) 882-2685 cinemark.com

Legends Golf Club

FRANKLIN SKATE CLUB

HISTORIC ARTCRAFT THEATRE

57 N. Main St., Franklin (317) 736-6823 historicartcrafttheatre.org

HI-WAY LANES

400 N. Morton St., Franklin (317) 736-5177 hiwaylanes.com

INDIANAPOLIS SPORTS PARK

6701 S. Harding St., Indianapolis (317) 784-7447 indysportspark.com

Wilson St. Pierre Funeral Service & Crematory, Greenwood Chapel It is the details that make the Difference. From the paintings on the wall to the flowers on the front lawn, we always consider the comfort of the families we serve first. That’s why we offer a wide variety of options for both traditional burial and cremation. It’s why we have carefully decorated our facilities to offer home-like warmth and ensure accessibility for everyone. Greenwood Chapel Main Street & U.S. 31

Our families appreciate the packaged funeral selections we offer, These choices result in significant cost savings to you. We honor all existing prearrangements.

Walker Cottage Family Center Recipient of the For information regarding prearrangements, our facilities, Greenwood Chamber 2006 Pride & Progress Award or our other special services, feel free to call any of the St. Pierre’s,

any time, day or night.

(317) 881-2514 www.wilsonstpierre.com

The St. Pierre Family

(L-R) Steven R. St. Pierre, Michelle St. Pierre, Jill St. Pierre Pierle, Paul St. Pierre, Michael R. St. Pierre

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Also serving families in Franklin, Bargersville, Southport, Franklin Township, and Fountain Square.


PERRY PARK

451 E. Stop 11 Road, Indianapolis (317) 865-1833 indygov.org

RASCAL’S FUN ZONE

629 N. U.S. 31, Whiteland (317) 535-7600 rascalsfunzone.com  

REGAL GREENWOOD STADIUM 14 & RPX CINEMA

461 Greenwood Park South Drive, Greenwood (317) 884-1796 regmovies.com

RUTH LILLY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS

1400 E. Hanna Ave., Indianapolis Ticketing and event info line: (317) 788-3251 uindy.edu/arts

YOU ARE THE POTTER

1211 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood (317) 884-4905 youarethepotter.net

RECREATION BLUFF CREEK GOLF COURSE

2710 Old State Road 37, Greenwood (317) 422-4736 bluffcreekgolf.com

BUFFER PARK GOLF COURSE

3825 Foltz St., Indianapolis (317) 241-5046 bufferpark.com

CRAIG PARK

DAKOTA LANDING GOLF COURSE

6636 S. Franklin Road, Indianapolis (317) 862-8255 dakotalandinggolf.com

DEER VALLEY GOLF COURSE

SOUTHERN DUNES GOLF COURSE

5357 E. County Road 300 South (317) 738-4441

8220 S. Tibbs Ave., Indianapolis (317) 865-1800 southerndunesgolfcourse.com

HICKORY STICK GOLF CLUB

TAMEKA WOODS GOLF COURSE

4422 Hickory Stick Blvd., Greenwood (317) 422-8300 hickorystickgolf.com

4849 S. 450 West, Trafalgar (317) 878-4331 tamekawoodsgolf.com

INDEPENDENCE PARK

TIMBERGATE GOLF COURSE

2100 S. Morgantown Road, Greenwood (812) 526-6809 jocoparks.com

INDIAN SPRINGS GOLF COURSE

6721 S. County Road 200 West, Trafalgar

LEGENDS GOLF CLUB

2555 N. Hurricane Road, Franklin (317) 736-8186 thelegendsgolfclub.com

ORCHARD GOLF CENTER

251 N. State Road 135, Greenwood (317) 881-5067 orchardgolfcenter.com

OTTE GOLF & FAMILY FUN CENTER

681 S. Sheek Road, Greenwood (317) 881-4620 ottegolf.com

151 St. Andrews Ave., Edinburgh (812) 526-3523 timbergate.com

VALLE VISTA GOLF COURSE

755 E. Main St., Greenwood (317) 882-2955 vallevista.com

WHISPERING PINES GOLF COURSE AT JOHNSON COUNTY PARK

2949 E. North St., Nineveh (812) 526-0768 jocoparks.com  

WINDING RIVER GOLF COURSE

8015 Mann Road, Indianapolis (317) 856-7257 windingrivergc.com

ROYAL PIN SOUTHERN BOWLING CENTER

10 E. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 881-4545 greenwood.in.gov

1010 U.S. 31 South, Greenwood (317) 881-8686 royalpin.com

CYPRESS RUN GOLF COURSE

SARAH SHANK GOLF COURSE

7265 State Road 44 East, Franklin (317) 738-2555 cypressrungc.com

SMOCK GOLF COURSE

3910 E. County Line Road, Indianapolis (317) 888-0036 smockgolf.com

2901 S. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis (317) 784-0631 prssgolf.com discover the

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CULTURE

Art on the Trailways. Left: Point Defiance by Beth Nybecks. Right: Landing by Cecilia Lueza. 20

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On the

RISE When the culture mavens of Indianapolis talk about the arts, they don’t always face south. At least, not yet. BY SCOTT HALL

I

ndy’s southside isn’t known for cutting-edge contemporary galleries or palatial performance venues. But it does have an established population of creative minds, an influx of newcomers who are both business and media savvy, and friendly relationships among arts advocates, merchants and public institutions like the library and park systems. The result is a critical mass of artists and patrons who are starting to create a scene, and they’re doing so by collaborating on new events and finding innovative ways to engage with the broader community. The year 2009 saw the formation of the Greater Greenwood Arts Council as well as the launch of Greenwood Sertoma’s annual WAMM Fest, a celebration of art and beverages. The following year, interested Southport residents formed SoArts, an artists’ collective in the vein of the Greenwood-based Southside Art League, which is still going strong as it marks its 50th anniversary this year. “There’s plenty of art to be had,” says Angela Stelljes, vice president of the Greater Greenwood Arts Council. “A lot of it just falls under the radar.” The council is a registered nonprofit with a volunteer board dedicated to advancing and promoting the visual, performing and literary arts in the greater Greenwood area. Its strategy is not to compete but to complement the efforts of other organizations and individual artists, acting as a focal point for funding, information and coordination. “Our vision is to be a community connector,” says Stelljes, who brought arts administration experience to the area when she and her family moved to town four years ago. “We’re trying to support what’s here.” ‘WHAT DO PEOPLE WANT?’

An initial step in 2010 was to conduct a census and survey of local artists, the results of which are posted online. Continuing the data-driven approach, the group surveyed local residents about what they wanted to see in the vicinity, whether it be concerts, visual arts exhibitions, or classes and interactive events. “This is a really crucial piece for our organization,” PHOTOS PROVIDED BY GREATER GREENWOOD ARTS COUNCIL

Stelljes says of the survey, accessible at greenwoodarts. org. “Not just that ‘art is good,’ but what do people want? What does this community really want?” One of the group’s more visible initiatives is Art on the Trailways, a partnership with Greenwood Parks and Recreation that placed large sculptures along the paved path that follows Smith Valley Road from Main Street to Madison Avenue. With Franciscan St. Francis Health as the lead sponsor, the arts council conducted a national open call and selected three works for installation, marking the occasion in April 2012 with a day of activities dubbed “Arts Alive.” The council has been seeking funds to put new pieces on the trail in 2014, perhaps in conjunction with another public event. Since 2011, with support from the University of Indianapolis and in cooperation with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the council has staged two concerts at Community Church of Greenwood featuring the progressive string trio Time for Three. The arts council’s signature fundraising effort involves a partnership with Mallow Run Winery near Bargersville. A line of wines branded “Impression” features local artists’ work on the label and proceeds shared with the arts group. The first batch, introduced in 2012, is a pinot grigio with a painting by Greenwood artist Patty Coulter. ARTISTS FOR ARTISTS’ SAKE

Another upstart group, SoArts—officially known as the Southport Artistry Committee—fills a different niche. Like the arts council, it began with some nudging from local officials, with an eye toward economic development. But it functions fundamentally as a networking and support group for artists of various stripes, with 20 to 30 members who come from near and far to monthly business meetings at the Southport Community Center and monthly get-togethers at members’ homes for art-making and refreshments. A wall at the community center serves as the group’s main gallery, with a different member featured each month. There’s no fee to belong, but members are expected to organize or volunteer at events. “There are a lot of people looking for places to make and show their art,” says SoArts President Duane King, a graphic designer, multimedia artist and Southport native. “We’re always looking for ways to help people sell art, if that’s what they want to do. We want to help the artist teach, if that’s what they want to do.” Already, in collaboration with Southport Parks & Recreation, SoArts has been offering summer painting and drawing classes for kids and adults. A group exhibition titled “Seven Virtues” hung in 2013 at the Athenaeum in downtown Indianapolis, opening with a reception that included music, refreshments and charity fundraising. Like other arts groups, SoArts is tapping into preexisting local events to build its presence. For Southport’s annual Spring Festival, the group stages Artists in Action, a one-day art contest with discover the

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cash prizes for ages 16 and older. At the Southport Fall Festival, members staff a pumpkin-painting booth. “We’re a young group, and that gives us energy,” King says. “We’re always wanting to do something—right now.” Looking ahead, SoArts hopes to obtain nonprofit status, pursue some grants and establish a physical space of its own. King envisions something like the Harrison Center for the Arts on Indianapolis’ near northside, which offers several galleries, public event spaces and low-cost studio rental to both full-time and part-time artists. “We’d like to get a building we could call home,” King says. “That could really be a draw for Southport.” CULTURE ON CAMPUS

New arts organizations like these join an established roster of institutions that have enlightened and entertained local residents for decades. Greenwood Public Library displays local art and touts the work of local writers. Greenwood Parks and Recreation hosts a Summer Concert Series, among other events. The list also would include the University of Indianapolis, where the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center hosts more than 100 arts and cultural events each year, most of them free and family-friendly. Its European-style Ruth Lilly Performance Hall hosts numerous student performances as well as the annual Faculty Artist Concert Series, 20 free Monday night concerts of classical, jazz and contemporary music from September through April. A separate schedule of jazz concerts featuring local and national players runs throughout the season. In the visual arts, several professional and amateur exhibitions are mounted each year in UIndy’s DeHaan Center Gallery under the direction of adjunct faculty member and longtime local art impresario Mark Ruschman, the Indiana State Museum’s chief curator of fine arts. The university’s Department of Theatre presents four productions each season in the 700-seat Ransburg Auditorium or the more intimate black-box Studio Theatre, with a mix of comedy, drama, musicals, classics and edgy contemporary fare. A similarly eclectic mix is found onstage at Franklin College, which offers four productions each season in its black-box Theatre Margot, located in the Johnson Center for Fine Arts. The


ARTIST PROFILE

Duane King Duane King took all the shop classes at Southport High School, planning to be a mechanic, but he had long enjoyed a different kind of hands-on work. He recalls the moment it first occurred to him. “In sixth grade, I did a painting in art class, and everybody loved it,” he says. Later, with encouragement from longtime SHS art teacher Roger Gale and the support of his family, he changed course and went to Herron School of Art, earning a bachelor’s degree in visual communication. Now King works full time as a graphic designer for a major real estate firm, doing some Web and logo design on the side, but he spends his free time as a purveyor and promoter of fine art. He is president of the Southport Artistry Committee and a member of Southside Art League, Hoosier Salon and Indiana Plein Air Painters. His favorite medium these days is ceramic sculpture, through which he creates realistic forms of people, animals and other subjects. But as evidenced by his website, duaneking.com, he also paints and draws portraits, caricatures, cartoons and illustrations. King has further studied ceramics and oil painting at the Indianapolis Arts Center, exhibiting there as well as the State Fair, Hoosier Salon events and many small art fairs. He sometimes sells quickie portraits to passersby in order to draw attention to his ceramics. As he and his artist comrades know, selling original work has been especially tough since the 2008 economic downturn. “Sometimes you think, ‘Well, I should have gone to med school,’” he quips. King takes heart, however, in seeing positive indicators like the rising housing market. “Hopefully the same thing will happen with art,” he says. Photography by Josh Marshall

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ARTIST PROFILE

Donna Shortt Finding the right light is the inspiration that drives painter Donna Shortt. “When I see that morning light or that late afternoon or evening light, it brings out the colors in everything,” says the longtime Perry Township resident. “It could be a tree, or objects in a still life, or a person—it’s all about the light.” Shortt has had a lifelong interest in art, thanks to a Beech Grove High School teacher who encouraged her even after she graduated. Shortt did office work as her four children were growing up, but later, with more time and more work space at home, she ditched the day job to focus on painting, favoring oils and pastels. Her impressionistic works include still lifes and portraits, but landscapes are a specialty. She enjoys working outdoors with other artists through the Indiana Plein Air Painters. “I paint in 13-degree weather sometimes,” says Shortt, also a member of Southside Art League, Hoosier Salon, Indiana Artists Club, Brown County Art Guild, Chicago Pastel Painters, Pastel Society of America and the Indiana Artisan program. She actively shows her work and has won honors, including a best-of-show in the fine arts professional category at the 2007 Indiana State Fair and a 2008 purchase award from the Indiana State Museum. She sells original paintings through her own website, dshortt.com, and also sells print reproductions online through a company called Fine Art America. Shortt also teaches painting and drawing classes at SALI, an activity that helps her as well as her students to develop their craft. “There’s always something to learn,” she says. Photography by Josh Marshall

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center hosts several visual arts exhibitions each year showcasing both students and professionals, with accompanying receptions and artist lectures. On the music side is an annual schedule of free instrumental and choral concerts by students, faculty and guests in the Old Main building’s Custer Theatre. Franklin College also has partnered with the city and local restaurateurs to open the 66 Water Street Arts Cafe in downtown Franklin. Staffed and run by students and faculty, the space is open 3 p.m. to midnight daily, offering food, drinks and art exhibitions. Another pillar of local theater is the Buck Creek Players, an all-volunteer community theater company currently celebrating its 40th anniversary. Staging several productions each year in its converted former tennis facility on Southeastern Avenue, the nonprofit group offers opportunities to perform, help out or just enjoy.

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Among the grass-roots organizations, one of the most established is the Southside Art League Inc., or SALI, founded in 1963 and tucked away in a residential neighborhood on Greenwood’s East Broadway Street. The two-story brick building that houses the group’s class and work space is the former pump house for a hot springs spa that occupied the property a century ago. The smaller adjacent building is the Off Broadway Gallery, which contains an office and two display spaces where members can hang work for a nominal fee. One room is a rotating, themed group exhibition; the other spotlights individual members as well as artists from outside the organization. SALI’s membership in recent years has hovered around 200, which includes professional artists, hobbyists and supporters of the cause, some from as far as Zionsville. Led by a small governing board, the all-volunteer group sustains itself through corporate and public grants, member dues, and fees from classes, workshops and wall space. Members offer a range of painting and drawing classes for all ages, and they meet quarterly to discuss business and watch artist demonstrations. The group stages several public events each year, the largest being the Midwest National Abstract Art Exhibition. The call for entries is advertised nationally and has attracted submissions from as many as 30 states.

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OPEN TO EVERYONE

artists, “basically turning any Southport business into a gallery,” King says. Each collection can be tailored to the management’s tastes and available space, and the partner businesses can even turn a little profit through sales commissions.

ARTIST PROFILE

Matthew Sheek

‘WE’RE CATCHING UP’

Perry Township painter Donna Shortt, an active SALI member and teacher, is pleased to see new groups and younger arts supporters replicating successful programs and testing new ideas. “We need people who are not only artists but have a head for business, too,” she says. “It takes all kinds of people.” King expects more small groups like his to emerge, allowing local artists to share opportunities and inspiration. PHOTO PROVIDED BY JOHN SPURR

SALI is doing a good job of serving its members, board President Tom Leavitt says, but it has the capacity to do much more for the community. Its workshop building, for example, has a largely unused second floor awaiting renovation, if there were enough interest to expand the schedule of classes and events. Despite the many outreach efforts and opportunities to participate, the group still finds many local residents hesitant to get involved. “That’s the challenge—they assume that it’s a closed community,” Leavitt says. “I would like to see more people participate and have some fun with the arts.” One of the group’s innovative initiatives is the Art About Town program, which allows members to stage two-month solo

Landscape artist Ron Mack works with a student on her painting. He works in oils.

exhibitions at partner locations around town that have wall or floor space to offer. The current sites are Greenwood Public Library, Greater Greenwood Chamber of Commerce, Sassafras Tea Room, Winchester Place and VisionQuest Eye Care. Whiteland painter Matthew Sheek, a member of both SALI and SoArts, sold some work from his recent show at VisionQuest. He says this approach to exhibiting art bypasses the intimidation factor that keeps some folks away from other venues. “It’s not natural for some people to say, ‘Let’s go to the gallery and look at art,’” Sheek says. “This is putting art in places where people are.” In like fashion, the Southport group is starting a SoArts Venue program, looking for local merchants who want to freshen their décor with work from participating 26

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And gradually, he says, the Southside will build awareness and credibility for its homegrown arts scene. “The northside does have a lot of things already established,” King says. “We’re catching up. They just got a head start.” LINKS Greater Greenwood Arts Council greenwoodarts.org Southside Art League Inc. southsideartleague.org Southport Artistry Committee soarts.org University of Indianapolis uindy.edu/arts Franklin College franklincollege.edu Garfield Park Arts gpacarts.org

Matthew Sheek spent more than two decades in radio, working across the country and here in Indiana, where you might have heard the occasional traffic report from “Matt Joyce.” Five years ago, however, he got serious again about his first love: art. Eventually the Greenwood native and current Whiteland resident told his wife he was dropping the broadcast career to focus on painting. “She’s been very tolerant and absolutely fantastic in supporting me,” says Sheek, who holds a manual labor job to help with the bills but otherwise focuses on his acrylics and oil pens. As a dyslexic kid, he struggled a bit in school, especially with numbers, but he loved art classes at Shelbyville High School and seemed headed for a related career before being bitten by the radio bug. Still “80 percent rightbrained,” he now stands out as an abstract painter in a region where realistic and figurative work is far more common. He approaches his paintings by trying to distill the visual world into basic components. “I am not Brown County material,” he says. “I just try to go to a place of simplicity and try to break things down. I’m actually surprised by some of the things that come out on the canvas.” Sheek has sold work through the Southside Art League’s Art About Town program and through connections he makes on Facebook, to patrons as far away as Chicago, Houston and London. He has found camaraderie and helpful connections through his membership in local collectives like SALI and SoArts. “It’s given me a lot of opportunities,” he says. “It’s just a great way for people to be able to connect.” Photography by Josh Marshall


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SERVICES

HEAD COACHING

We asked a sampling of southside hair salons some questions about your hair. Here’s the short and long of their answers. »

BY SHERRI DUGGER COLOR CAFÉ PHOTOS BY STUDIO 1492 PHOTOGRAPHY

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TRANSFORMATIONS SALON & SPA PHOTOS BY BRIAN DEAL


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THE RESPONDENTS

The Color Café

1480 Olive Branch Park Lane, Greenwood, (317) 884-2222, thecolorcafe.com

Robert’s Salon & Day Spa

899 Loews Blvd., Greenwood, (317) 881-8207, robertssalonandspa.com

The Hair Lounge

3209 W. Smith Valley Road, Suite 107, Greenwood, (317) 410-8601, facebook.com/ ShearVanityHairLounge

Transformations Salon and Spa

8083 Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-1773, transformationssalonandspa.com

Urban Euphoria Salon

3113 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood, (317) 882-8400, urbaneuphoria.com

Wildflowers

1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 865-0187, wildflowerssalonindy.com

1

THE GOOD: The

best things to do for your hair are simple.

» THE COLOR CAFÉ: “Keep it conditioned so it looks healthy and beautiful.” » ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA: “Using pro-

fessional products and getting regular haircuts will improve your at-home results drastically.”  » THE HAIR LOUNGE: “Use professional

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» TRANSFORMATIONS SALON AND SPA: “The best thing you can do for your hair is getting a loyal stylist that you have 100 percent faith in and who gets you as an individual. A well-educated stylist is like a lawyer. They will educate, defend and protect your hair and never disclose your eC secrets, like your o lo rC afé real, natural color.” Th

products. Be educated on how to take care of your hair. Shampoo is to cleanse the scalp. Conditioner is moisture for the ends. Putting conditioner on your scalp can weigh your hair down. Great products go a long way for long hair.”

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Transformations Salon & Spa

» URBAN EUPHORIA SALON: “The best thing you can do for your hair is to have it trimmed regularly. Trimming every six to eight weeks will help hair grow better. Once ends start to split, there is no stopping it.” » WILDFLOWERS: “The very best thing you can do for you hair is using the salon products your stylist recommends.”


» THE COLOR CAFÉ: Using too much “heat, especially too high of heat from smoothing irons.” » ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA: “Not using a

product designed to protect your hair from damage while using irons, straighteners and dryers.” » THE HAIR LOUNGE: “Trying to lighten your hair is a bad idea. Heat, whether from styling tools or sun, is the quickest way to damage the hair.”

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» URBAN EUPHORIA SALON: “Over-processing is the worst thing you can do for your hair. Over-processing occurs when hair is lightened, exposed to heat or chemically processed to the point that it is compromised. Once hair is damaged in this way, cutting it off is the only solution.” » WILDFLOWERS: “Skipping cuts when

letting your hair grow. Split ends need trimmed or they keep splitting, preventing growth and resulting in breakage.”

» TRANSFORMATIONS: “Using hot tools (heat) on hair that is not completely dry or without using proper thermal protectant products.”

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The Color Café

3

We asked for the latest trends and the one classic hairstyle that will never die.

THE TRENDS.

» THE COLOR CAFÉ: The latest trends include “organic styles, uncontrived looks and a classic is the bob, which takes on many forms.” » ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA: “You will see a lot

of different classic styles, but updated and recreated with today’s coloring trends, such as Balayage or Ombré. Exciting and fun color are a big play this year for curly and straight looks.” » THE HAIR LOUNGE: “The Ombré is popular

right now. The bobs don’t ever seem to go out of style. Another popular trend is incorporating random pieces of crazy colors, either really bright or soft pastels.”

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» TRANSFORMATIONS: “Always the variation of the forever popular bob.” » URBAN EUPHORIA SALON: “The newest trend is a technique called Flamboyage. It is a new method of creating natural highlights or an Ombré effect. The bob is the all-time most popular cut. It will never leave.” » WILDFLOWERS: “Latest trends are Balayage color technique, more volume, short or long, and fun pastel colors. The classic Vidal Sassoon bob will never die, as it keeps getting updates every few years.”


5

4 No one knows the right amount to tip his or her stylist. And everyone’s too embarrassed to ask. Except for us. The answers were almost unanimous here: 15 to 20 percent. As Jenni Bashaw, owner and master stylist at WILDFLOWERS , says: “Tipping is totally up to the client. It is a service industry so I would say

Just what is it that we don’t understand about a stylist’s gig?

the same percentage you would tip any service provider.” Erin Carter at URBAN agrees. “A tip should be based on the quality of your experience,” she says. “Fifteen to 20 percent lets a service provider know that he/she made you feel valued as a guest.” EUPHORIA SALON

And “tips are always appreciated,” both THE COLOR CAFÉ’S Dowler and TRANSFORMATIONS’ Vivian Vandivier say. “Especially when a stylist puts heart and soul into the service,” Dowler explains.

» THE COLOR CAFÉ: Stylists have to “be able to interpret our client’s expectations with the limitations their hair presents; it’s more difficult than they think.”

“It sometimes takes more than one visit to achieve the look that you are going for. If you are making a big change, work with your stylist to get there.”

» ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA:

“How much education and training we really go through to know how to get the best result for each individual guest. We care; we invest so we can be our very best.”

» TRANSFORMATIONS:

» URBAN EUPHORIA SALON: “The job of a stylist is a roller coaster: emotionally draining, physically exhausting, rewarding, challenging, educating, inspiring and ever-changing.” » WILDFLOWERS: “It’s physical work.”

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6 What should we look for in the perfect one?

THE SALON:

Stylists agree: It’s up to you to do your homework on the salon you choose. You’ll want to ask questions, read online reviews and find out about the education and experience of the stylists you’re interested in choosing, as well as looking into the atmosphere and hospitality of the salon and its staff. Good customer service “starts at the front desk,” WILDFLOWERS’ Bashaw says. “A perfect salon should be clean, friendly, and stylists should stay educated on trends by attending classes.” “It’s great to go in a place and to see smiles on the stylists’ faces,” says Sarah Reese at THE HAIR LOUNGE . “Consistency is a must. As long as the client feels like they’re most important, then they’re in the right place.” A great salon cares “about you, your needs and about pleasing you,” says Vandivier of TRANSFORMATIONS . “They will care enough to invest in advanced education with their time and money. They will care enough to spend time looking at you and seeing you, listening and explaining until you know they get it and get you. They will work with you to achieve the look, teach you what products to use and how to use them to achieve these great looks.”

The Color Café

7

Short vs. Long Hair — Which Wins? THE LENGTH:

“It’s always very personal and an interpretation of a person’s image. Long is romantic and sexy; short is edgy and sassy.” » THE COLOR CAFÉ:

» ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA: “Hair that fits your face shape, lifestyle and styling habits. There are great long and short styles.” » THE HAIR LOUNGE: “They both have

their pros and cons. Short hair makes more of a statement. The down side is you have to style your hair every day. With long hair, if you don’t feel like styling it, you can throw it up in a cute braid or something.”

Transformations Salon & Spa

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» TRANSFORMATIONS:“Whichever one

looks best on you. What makes you happy.” » URBAN EUPHORIA SALON: “Each individual should wear the length and style of hair that makes him/her feel most confident.” » WILDFLOWERS: “It depends on what

looks best with the client’s facial shape and how much time they will commit to creating a great style every day.”


8

What is the one thing customers don’t understand about their hair?

9 THE HAIRCUT: How

can we help our stylist give us the cut we want?

Many of the answers were the same here. Most stylists want their customers to understand that there are always limitations to their hair. “Each person’s hair line, head shape and hair is unique, just like a fingerprint,” explains Dowler.

The answers were unanimous here, too. Bring pictures. Consult with your stylist. And be ready to discuss all the limitations of your hair. A good consultation is key, says Bashaw at WILDFLOWERS . “Tell them what you don’t like about your hair as well as your daily regimen for styling.”

Sarah Reese at THE HAIR LOUNGE concurs. “Pictures are great as ideas for a color or style,” she says, but all of that depends on your pre-existing color, your natural color and your hair type. A lot of the models and actresses have extensions. Also lighting and backgrounds change the way color appears.” Also, “when choosing a style, consider how much time you want to spend styling it each day,” advises Danielle Bueno at ROBERT’S SALON & DAY SPA . Another thing to consider, says Carter at URBAN EUPHORIA SALON, is “as you mature, the needs of your hair change. Hair typically becomes drier as we age. In turn, your hair care routine should evolve.” Vandivier of TRANSFORMATIONS urges her customers to never underestimate their hair. “Hair is amazing,” she says. “It is the one thing you wear every day and can make or break anyone’s wardrobe. Amazingly, hair is an investment, and it shows.”

According to Carter at URBAN EUPHORIA SALON, the answers can be found in “pictures, pictures, pictures!” she says. “They make communication between you and your stylist much easier. Then we know exactly what look you want to achieve.” But “remember you might not always be able to wear the style you’re hoping for,” warns Dowler at THE COLOR CAFÉ . That’s why, says Reese from THE HAIR LOUNGE , you need to bring “an open mind. Pictures are nice, but your hair will not look just like the picture. Listen to the suggestions we give you.”

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TRAINING The HydroWorx aqua-therapy area at Stones Crossing Health Pavilion helps patients with orthopedic and neurological problems and sports injuries.

Sidelined

A

When walking it off won’t work, local athletes seek the help of southside experts By Alisa Advani

ATHLETES OF EVERY level dread one thing most: injuries. There is nothing worse — except maybe losing the Super Bowl two times in a row — than sustaining a game-stopping, win-spoiling, career-stalling tear, pull or break. But if the worst should come to pass, never fear. The southside of Indy offers scores of physical therapists, orthopedic specialists and trainers able to help athletes on the mend. Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers (ARC) offers highly specialized physical therapists. “Our location is unique because we have therapists dedicated to specific conditions,” explains Jim Scifres, manager. “We have a concussion specialist, a general orthopedic therapist and several who focus on either women’s or men’s health. Behind the scenes, we are comparing

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notes and developing treatment protocols for the patient in a unique way.” Scifres tells the story of a young basketball player who came to ARC suffering from lower back pain. After discussing the case with Amy Robinson, an ARC physical therapist with an interest in women’s issues, the two discovered that some of the patient’s problems stemmed from repetitive imbalances that needed correction. “We got her back on the basketball court,” Scifres says. Physical therapists utilize a cache of tools to mend their clients. Weights, bands, balls and cardio equipment all contribute


Greenwood Christian Academy 2014 Boys Basketball Sectional Champions

pieces to the recovery puzzle, while the professional’s knowledge fills in the blanks. “Our combination of exercise equipment and excellent therapists ensures our clients first find normalcy in their everyday life and then we take that success and accelerate it,” says Scifres. Like Scifres, Community Hospital’s Mike Darosa works to return athletes to their game, and he says balancing, stretching and strengthening the body are all critical. “Physical therapy is the number one thing that will actually cure most athletes,” explains Darosa, who previously worked as a team physician for Purdue University, IUPUI and the Indianapolis Colts. “There are lots of things we can do to get them ready for their first session, like (making sure they) rest (and suggesting the use of) anti-inflammatories and braces.”

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The Pediatric Sensory Gym at Stones Crossing Health Pavilion, where children receive playbased therapy.

Darosa moved his practice in 2013 to the new Stones Crossing Health Pavilion, a $14 million, 70,000-square-foot facility that provides state-of-the-art mental and physical care on the southside. As a non-operative orthopedist, Darosa specializes in concussion management and musculoskeletal injury treatment—not thought to be common sports injuries. A torn meniscus or a torn rotator cuff might seem more common, he says, but “concussions can be as prevalent as knee and shoulder injuries.” And the treatment protocol for them is crucial.

“At the high school level, all athletes undergo a baseline neuro-cognitive test, called IMPACT. If that student sustains a concussion, we can compare their performance to baseline to be sure they are where they need to be before going back onto the field,” he says. “The initial treatment is rest. … After a rest period and cognitive testing, we take them though a series of steps that ramp up their mental and physical activity. At every turn be sure to protect their brain function.” Franciscan St. Francis Hospital, located in both Indianapolis and Mooresville, works with athletes to improve their game as well

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as avoid injuries. Should an injury occur, however, physicians can help with that, too. “We have a robust rehab program, which is in large part due to the success of our sports medicine facility,” says Joe Stuteville, media relations manager at Franciscan St. Francis. “We have a great synergy between physicians and physical rehab personnel. The partnership is both clinical and administrative, and it allows us to provide optimal treatment to the recovering athlete.” Pilates offers another option available to southside sports aficionados. The program, developed by Joseph Pilates, focuses on a body conditioning routine that builds flexibility, muscle strength and endurance. It puts emphasis on spinal and pelvic alignment, breathing and core stability. At Indy House of Pilates, Rachel Williams carefully analyzes the bodies of each of her clients with computer-like precision. “I figure out the imbalances in the body to find out the original source of the problem,” she explains. “An injury is usually in the making for some time.” Williams, no stranger to being sidelined from sports herself, spent years of her life confined to a bed or wheelchair after be-

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ing diagnosed with spinal stenosis. Pilates succeeded where medication, surgery and physical therapy delivered sub-optimal results. She has since dedicated her life to helping others with injuries. One of Williams’ clients, Chris Robb, came to the studio after sustaining a complete ACL tear, three meniscus tears and a complete MCL tear. “As a basketball player, I was done,” Robb says. “No running or cutting sports for me. I was able to do Pilates though. After working with Rachel, I gained back full knee flexion and much greater muscle strength.” The desire to play has not faded over time in 60-year-old Mary Gordon, an avid golfer. Although her progressive disc disease worsened each year, she longed to zip around the golf course. She soon found herself playing much less than usual because of the pain. After training with Williams for only a few months, she picked up her clubs and started playing again. Gordon no longer simply drives the golf cart around the course. “I can outdrive most men,” she says. “I am so glad I went home a different way to work one day and saw the sign for Indy House of Pilates. It changed my life.”

Chris Robb trains at House of Pilates under the instruction of Rachel Williams.

Accelerated Rehabilitation Centers 1273 N. Emerson Ave., Suite E, Greenwood, (317) 807-0770

Franciscan St. Francis Sports Medicine 610 E. Southport Road, Suite 101, Indianapolis, (317) 781-1133

ATI Physical Therapy 2421 N. Morton St., Franklin, (317) 738-4401

Stones Crossing Health Pavilion 3000 State Road 135, Greenwood, ecommunity.com, johnsonmemorial.org

Indy House of Pilates 6960 Gray Road, Indianapolis, (317) 750-3024

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HEALTH CARE

Hospice

Local providers give quality-of-life care to terminally ill patients By Alisa Advani

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care

C

CYNDI PAYNE HAS LOST both of her parents. Her mother, Sharyn Neibert, passed away last year after a long fight with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Richard Neibert, Payne’s father, suffered from leukemia and died in 2010. In both of these cases, Payne’s family called upon hospice to guide them through the dizzying labyrinth of caring for their terminally ill loved ones. “Toward the end of her life, my mom needed help 24 hours a day,” says Payne. “She had lost the ability to communicate, and her breathing was labored. Hospice gave us a chance to sit down and breathe.

It gave us a moment to relax so we could go on to the next day.” Hospice provided the same care during Payne’s father’s final days. “During Dad’s cancer, his nurses got him to laugh no matter how horribly he was feeling,” she recalls. “They were compassionate and kind. He needed humor, and his laughter made us feel better, too.” Hospice nurses, doctors, and social workers provide comfort and care to patients with terminal illnesses. These workers focus on helping the sick remain free from pain and discomfort, maintain their mental awareness, and live life as inde-


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pendently as possible. Hospice workers also provide support to surviving family and friends. WHEN TO ASK FOR HELP

Making the decision to switch a loved one’s care to hospice does not mean giving up. Choosing hospice means accepting that a person’s medical needs have changed, and the decision often comes after much introspection and several realistic conversations between families and physicians. “Hospice is for patients with a terminal diagnosis that are no longer going to pursue a curative treatment,” explains Carol discover the

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“Sometimes we educate, sometimes we counsel for grief, and sometimes we socialize. But all hospice workers have a mission to ease suffering.” —KAREN ZIELINSKI

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DEAD.

Your town. Your community. Your media company.

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Brackin, hospice manager at Franciscan St. Francis Hospice. Brackin oversees 35 fulltime staffers who attend to about 500 area patients and their families annually. When a cure is not possible, hospice affords patients the chance to maximize the remainder of their lives. In terms of finances, it is 100 percent covered by Medicare and Medicaid and at least partially covered by most commercial insurances. “Once the decision is made, the patient’s doctor will write a referral order,” Brackin says. “This order allows a hospice provider to evaluate the patient to make sure that they meet hospice criteria, which is a life expectancy of six months or less.” A DIFFERENT KIND OF CARE

Hospice differs from hospital care in that hospice is a philosophy—not a place. Care can be given in the patient’s home, in a nursing home, in an assisted living environment or at a family member’s home.  Brackin says hospice is about quality of life and not quantity of life. A hospice team will educate the patient and family on the disease process, care giving and symptom

Southside Hospice Services Franciscan St. Francis Hospice 421 N. Emerson Ave., Greenwood (317) 528-2092 Gentiva Home Healthcare 701 E. County Line Road, Greenwood (317) 788-0300 Vitas 3209 W. Smith Valley, Ste. 214, Indianapolis (317) 884-5416

management. The team of doctors, nurses, chaplains and social workers will support the whole patient, mind, body and spirit.  Karen Zielinski, a hospice nurse at St. Francis’ Greenwood location, has spent the last seven years providing holistic care to her patients. “Nurses fill many roles,” she explains. “Sometimes we educate, sometimes we counsel for grief, and sometimes we socialize. But all hospice workers have a mission to ease suffering.” Primarily, hospice caregivers assess symptoms and utilize pain and anti-anxiety medications, oxygen, anti-emetics and relaxation techniques to help patients “live


Hospice House

their lives fully until the very last minute,” Zielinski says. “Social workers counsel the bereaved, and dedicated volunteers provide a host of assistances, like massage, haircuts and companionship.” Because patients forgo hospital treatments and are allowed high-dose narcotics to combat pain, there is a general fear that hospice care may hasten death. Actual studies, conversely, suggest otherwise. In one study reviewed by the U.S. Government for Medicare, researchers followed 4,493 patients with either terminal cancer or congestive heart failure. They found no

difference in survival time between hospice and non-hospice patients with breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer. Interestingly, hospice care seemed to extend survival for some patients; those with pancreatic cancer gained an average of three weeks, those with lung cancer gained six weeks and those with congestive heart failure gained three months. A NEW CENTER

Groundbreaking for a new Hospice House, to be operated by Franciscan St. Francis Health, will take place in 2014. Hospice

House will be a comprehensive inpatient, nonprofit facility on Indy’s southside that will complement the health network’s existing home care program. The project has been in the planning stages for the past two years, while Greg Williamson, executive director of the capital care campaign, worked to raise the money. Its doors will be open to all—even those strapped to find resources to pay for these vital services. “The vast majority of people want to be at home,” says Zielinski. But when home is not available, Hospice House will provide yet another option. Richard Neibert spent his final days at home with his family while receiving care from his nurse, Thom Horn, who did everything he could to make his remaining time special. “My dad was a baseball talent scout,” Payne says. “We were going to take him to St. Louis for a game, but he fell and broke his hip. Instead of giving up, Thom contacted an agency that helps grant the wishes of the elderly. They arranged for him to see an Indians game here in Indianapolis. It was a beautiful day.”

from the ground up.

Helping your dream become a reality…

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southside hospitals

southside schools CENTER GROVE COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION

CENTER GROVE ELEMENTARY

2455 S. Morgantown Road, Greenwood (317) 881-1720

CENTER GROVE HIGH SCHOOL & ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 2717 S. Morgantown Road, Greenwood (317) 881-0581 centergrove.k12.in.us

COMMUNITY SOUTH HOSPITAL

1402 E. County Line Road, Indianapolis, (317) 887-7000, ecommunity.com/south

CENTER GROVE MIDDLE SCHOOL CENTRAL

4900 W. Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood (317) 882-9391

CENTER GROVE MIDDLE SCHOOL NORTH

202 N. Morgantown Road, Greenwood (317) 885-8800

EDUCATION SERVICE CENTER

4800 W. Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood (317) 881-9326

MAPLE GROVE ELEMENTARY

3623 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville (317) 881-0561

JOHNSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

1125 W. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-3300, johnsonmemorial.org

NORTH GROVE ELEMENTARY

3280 W. Fairview Road, Greenwood (317) 881-5653

PLEASANT GROVE ELEMENTARY

5199 W. Fairview Road, Greenwood (317) 887-8525

SUGAR GROVE ELEMENTARY

4135 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 887-4707

CLARK-PLEASANT COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

FRANCISCAN ST. FRANCIS HEALTH

8111 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 865-5000, franciscanalliance.org

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50 Center St., Whiteland (317) 535-7579 cpcsc.k12.in.us

BREAK-O-DAY ELEMENTARY

(Grades 2-4) 900 Sawmill Road, New Whiteland (317) 535-7536

CLARK ELEMENTARY

(Grades K-4) 5764 E. 700 North, Franklin (317) 535-8503

CLARK PLEASANT ACADEMY

129 U.S. 31, Whiteland (317) 535-3240

CLARK-PLEASANT INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

(Grades 5-6) 2111 Sheek Road, Greenwood (317) 535-3980

CLARK-PLEASANT MIDDLE SCHOOL

1354 E. Worthsville Road, Greenwood (317) 535-7121

PLEASANT CROSSING ELEMENTARY (Grades K-4)

3030 N. 125 West, Whiteland (317) 535-3244

SAWMILL WOODS ELEMENTARY (Grades K-1)

700 Sawmill Road, New Whiteland (317) 535-2069

WHITELAND ELEMENTARY

(Grades K-4) 120 Center St., Whiteland (317) 535-4211

WHITELAND COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

300 Main St., Whiteland (317) 535-7562

WHITELAND COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL – NINTH GRADE CENTER

222 Tracy St., Whiteland (317) 535-3855

EDINBURGH COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

202 S. Keeley St., Edinburgh (812) 526-2681 ecsc.k12.in.us

EAST SIDE ELEMENTARY

810 E. Main Cross St., Edinburgh (812) 526-9771


EDINBURGH COMMUNITY MIDDLE SCHOOL & HIGH SCHOOL 300 S. Keeley St., Edinburgh (812) 526-5501

FRANKLIN COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

998 Grizzly Cub Drive, Franklin (317) 738-5800 franklinschools.org

CREEKSIDE ELEMENTARY

700 E. State Road 44, Franklin (317) 346-8800

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CUSTER BAKER INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

101 W. State Road 44, Franklin (317) 346-8600

FRANKLIN COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

2600 Cumberland Drive, Franklin (317) 346-8100

FRANKLIN COMMUNITY MIDDLE SCHOOL

625 Grizzly Cub Drive, Franklin (317) 346-8400

NEEDHAM ELEMENTARY

1399 Upper Shelbyville Road, Franklin (317) 738-5780

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NORTHWOOD ELEMENTARY

965 Grizzly Cub Drive, Franklin (317) 346-8900

UNION ELEMENTARY

3990 W. Division Road, Bargersville (317) 346-8200

WEBB ELEMENTARY

1400 Webb Court, Franklin (317) 738-5790 GREENWOOD COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

605 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 889-4060 oak.gws.k12.in.u continues next page »

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317-738-HOME www.HometownFranklin.com Greg Leugers • Broker/Owner 72 E. Jefferson St • Franklin, IN 46131 discover the

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southside schools »continued from previous page

GREENWOOD COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

615 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 889-4000

GREENWOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

523 S. Madison Ave., Greenwood (317) 889-4040

NORTHEAST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

99 Crestview Drive, Greenwood (317) 889-4080

SOUTHWEST E LEMENTARY SCHOOL

619 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 889-4090

V.O. ISOM ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

INDIAN CREEK MIDDLE SCHOOL

801 W. Indian Creek Drive, Trafalgar (317) 878-2130 PERRY TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS

ABRAHAM LINCOLN ELEMENTARY

5241 Brehob Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-3800 6548 Orinoco Ave., Indianapolis (317) 789-3700 perryschools.org

CLINTON YOUNG ELEMENTARY

5740 McFarland Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-3400

DOUGLAS MACARTHUR

50 E. Broadway Ave., Greenwood (317) 889-4070

Elementary 454 E. Stop 11 Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-2500

WESTWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

GLENNS VALLEY ELEMENTARY

899 Honey Creek Road, Greenwood (317) 859-4200

8239 Morgantown Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-2800

HOMECROFT ELEMENTARY

NINEVEH-HENSLEYJACKSON UNITED SCHOOL CORPORATION

1551 E. Southview Drive, Indianapolis (317) 789-3500

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

JEREMIAH GRAY-EDISON ELEMENTARY

802 S. Indian Creek Drive, Trafalgar (317) 878-2100 indiancreekschools.com

5225 Gray Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-4300

INDIAN CREEK ELEMENTARY

MARY BRYAN ELEMENTARY

200 W. Pearl St., Trafalgar (317) 878-2150

4355 E. Stop 11 Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-2600

INDIAN CREEK HIGH SCHOOL & LEARNING CENTER

PERRY MERIDIAN HIGH SCHOOL

803 W. Indian Creek Drive, Trafalgar (317) 878-2110

401 W. Meridian School Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-4400

INDIAN CREEK INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

PERRY MERIDIAN MIDDLE SCHOOL

1000 S. Indian Creek Drive, Trafalgar (317) 878-2160

Franklin College

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

202 W. Meridian School Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-4100

PERRY MERIDIAN SIXTH GRADE ACADEMY

202 W. Meridian School Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-1300

1999 U.S. 31 South, Greenwood (317) 888-4401 central9.k12.in.us

ROSA PARKS-EDISON ELEMENTARY

DISCOVERY CHILD Development Center 1125 W. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-3361

SOUTHPORT ELEMENTARY

560 N. Emerson Ave., Greenwood, 46143 (317) 889-7780 especiallykidsinc.com

7525 Wellingshire Blvd., Indianapolis (317) 789-2900

261 Anniston Drive, Indianapolis (317) 789-3300

SOUTHPORT HIGH SCHOOL

971 E. Banta Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-4800

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SOUTHSIDE

ESPECIALLY KIDS INC.

GREENWOOD CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

5715 S. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis (317) 789-4605

835 W. Worthsville Road, Greenwood (317) 215-5300 gcak12.org

SOUTHPORT SIXTH GRADE ACADEMY

GREENWOOD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

SOUTHPORT MIDDLE SCHOOL

5715 S. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis (317) 789-1400

WILLIAM HENRY BURKHART ELEMENTARY

5701 Brill Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-3600

WINCHESTER VILLAGE ELEMENTARY

1900 E. Stop 12 Road, Indianapolis (317) 789-2700 SPECIALTY AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS

CENTER GROVE MONTESSORI

1674 W. Smith Valley Road, Suite A, Greenwood (317) 883-0335 centergrovemontessori.com 48

CENTRAL NINE CAREER CENTER

2045 Averitt Road, Greenwood (317) 881-9970 greenwoodchristian.com

INDIANAPOLIS SOUTHSIDE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY

4801 Shelbyville Road, Indianapolis (317) 786-7002 indianapolis23. adventistschoolconnect.org

OUR LADY OF THE GREENWOOD CATHOLIC SCHOOL

399 S. Meridian St., Greenwood (317) 881-1300 school.ol-g.org


RISEN LORD MONTESSORI

3758 Whiteland Road, Bargersville (317) 409-7052 school.risenlordlc.org

RONCALLI HIGH SCHOOL

3300 Prague Road, Indianapolis (317) 787-8277 roncalli.org

SAINTS FRANCIS AND CLARE CATHOLIC SCHOOL

5901 Olive Branch Road, Greenwood (317) 215-2826 francisandclare.org

SOUTHSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

329 W. Banta Road, Indianapolis (317) 683-7889 southsidechristian.info

ST. ROSE OF LIMA CATHOLIC SCHOOL

114 Lancelot Drive, Franklin (317) 738-3451 archindy.org

SUBURBAN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

722 E. County Line Road, Indianapolis (317) 888-3366 suburbanbaptist.org

TABERNACLE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

701 S. Main St., Edinburgh (812) 526-0191

SOUTH SOUTH SUMMER 2012

Indy’s southside magazine

SprIng 2013

Indy’s southside magazine

SOUTH Indy’s southside magazine

Summer 2013

Ted Bishop PGA president

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Taking the Lead

McGuinness Franklin Mayor Joe d Mayor Mark Myers and Greenwoo

FRANKLIN COLLEGE

101 Branigin Blvd., Franklin (317) 738-8000, franklincollege.edu

INDIANA UNIVERSITY-PURDUE UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS

420 University Blvd, Indianapolis (317) 274-5555, iupui.edu

Also inside:

southside bakeries, a

green home and one

man's experience at Richmond

Hill

wedding venues Also InsIde: Unique

Robinson | Meat markets

SOUTH SOUTH WINTER 2013

Fall 2012

Indy’s southside magazine

Indy’s southside magazine

Abigail Johnson

Joyce Nies

Greenwood lawyer passionate about family and community

Keeping up with the

McCartys her Joyce photographed at Blake. home with grandaughter,

ALSO INSIDE:

IVY TECH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Clay | sun King Brewery’s

Also InsIde:

A guide to southside

Indiana Dunes, comfort

foods and new section:

Authentic Indiana

adventures pizza | FarmIndy | Railroad

Also inside:

Father’s Day Gifts • Summer Cocktails •

Contemporary Treehouses • Outdoor Concerts

50 W. Fall Creek Pkwy. N. Drive, Indianapolis (888) 489-5463, ivytech.edu

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS

1400 E. Hanna Ave., Indianapolis (317) 788-3251, uindy.edu/arts

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SOUTHSIDE

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EDUCATION

ACADEMIC

Aces Their stories are varied. Their successes are many. Here, we salute five of the southside’s scholastic all stars. BY ASHLEY PETRY PHOTOS BY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELINDA

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Joel Flynn Center Grove High School

» As soon as he could walk, Joel Flynn started dancing his way toward Broadway. He was dancing competitively by the age of 4, and at Center Grove he was a standout in both the drama and choir programs, performing in productions of “Footloose” and “Cinderella” and singing with the top-ranked CG Sound System, CG Singers and Surround Sound choirs. “I’ve been performing ever since I can remember,” Flynn said. “I want to pursue it as a career for the rest of my life, and it’s something I can’t live without.” Flynn auditioned for the touring production of “Newsies,” making it all the way to the final audition in New York City. He said the audition was REPORT CARD a positive experience. “It definitely gave me a GPA: 3.97 positive outlook and gave FAVORITE TEACHERS: Jennifer me reassurance that I will Dice and Christopher Pratt, be able to pursue a career his former choir directors. “Both of them have been in the performing arts, on very influential on my Broadway and in musical journey through high school, theater,” he said, “just being and I’m really thankful able to be comparable to men that they’ve been there to support me and teach me.” and boys who are already working in New York.” FAVORITE RECENT READ: The Divergent series by Veronica Meanwhile, Flynn has his Roth eye on a college degree in WHAT’S PLAYING ON THE IPOD: musical theater, so he hasn’t James Blake neglected his studies. He took AP and honors classes and was a member of National Honor Society and Spanish Honor Society. One of his best academic subjects was English. “We wrote a statement about something positive that we believe in,” he said. “My statement was believing in the power of overcoming obstacles and not letting anything get in your way.” For students like Flynn, time management may be the most significant obstacle of high school. (He also served in student government and volunteered at a residential facility for atrisk teens.) Despite the scheduling hassles, Flynn said, extracurricular activities are an essential part of the high school experience. “You get to surround yourself with people who love the same things you do,” he said. “Find people you’re going to be friends with forever and find a niche that can help you get through any tough times you may have.” 

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SOUTHSIDE

51


Austin Montgomery Greenwood High School

» Austin Montgomery knows exactly what he wants to do when he grows up: serve his country. He is already a member of the Civil Air Patrol, an auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, and has applied to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He attended West Point’s Summer Leaders Experience in 2013, where he spent a week living the life of a West Point cadet. REPORT CARD “I never really looked into GPA: 4.56 the military until last year, and FAVORITE TEACHER: Becky Kehler, once I started looking into the his science teacher. “She academics, I really liked what always push(ed) us, and she I saw,” said Montgomery, (was) always prepared.” who hopes to major in FAVORITE RECENT READ: “Unwind” business at the academy. by Neal Shusterman Montgomery already has WHAT’S PLAYING ON THE IPOD: “Everything. lots of practice serving his Imagine Dragons. A lot community. At Greenwood of country music.” High School, he was president of the National Honor Society and active in the group’s community service efforts — including volunteering for Special Olympics events and helping with community cleanup projects. He also served as a school ambassador, helping new students get acclimated to the building. The physical rigor of West Point will be no challenge for Montgomery, a middle linebacker and fullback for the football team. (He was also a team captain and four-time winner of the scholar-athlete award, meaning he had the highest GPA on the team each year.) This spring he was back in action on the track team, focusing on shot put and discus. “My proudest accomplishment for sports was our football team,” he said. “We really came together as a family, and we all got along.” Montgomery balanced those activities with his academic achievements, which included several years of scientific research. During his senior year, he studied the effects of adrenaline on memory. During his sophomore year he studied the effects of nicotine on memory, and his test subject was an octopus who lived in the school lab. Meanwhile, Montgomery ran his own lawn care and snow removal business and sometimes worked at his father’s southside shop, Kam Hydraulics. “My dad is probably my role model,” he said. “I think he’s a really good man, and he’s set a good example for me in life.” Although time management was a challenge for Montgomery, he encourages younger students to follow in his footsteps and get involved in lots of activities. “High school is more fun when you’re involved in stuff, and it’s easier to make friends and enjoy school,” he said. “I like to be on the go and have things to do.”

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Amy Tam Center Grove High School

» Sometimes high school is all about finding the right fit. Amy Tam found it, but only in a roundabout way. When she joined Center Grove High School’s awardwinning robotics team, 1741 Red Alert Robotics, she first tried to help out with the physics and engineering of designing the robots — 5-foot-tall machines that compete in designated tasks, like throwing Frisbees. Although the team has made it to the world championship three years in a row, Tam eventually discovered that the technical aspects of robotics weren’t a good fit for her skills. Instead, one of the mentors steered her toward the team’s social media and graphic design efforts. “The mentors push(ed) me really hard, and I really REPORT CARD appreciate that. They don’t take no for an answer,” she GPA: 4.1 said. “I really appreciated how FAVORITE TEACHER: Amy Lapka, loving the mentors were with her art teacher. “I just really helping me find my strengths.” like how supportive she is of everybody. She’s a The graphic design role was a wonderful person, and she perfect fit for Tam, who exceled is really giving. I love her for in her art classes. During her that.” senior year, she took an Advanced FAVORITE RECENT READ: “Alice Placement class in studio art, in Wonderland” by Lewis which required her to create a Carroll. “Lewis Carroll was one of the most creative large portfolio of her artwork people that I’ve ever — primarily pencil sketches and read about. I really enjoy oil paintings. At the same time his writing and all of the adaptations that have come she juggled AP classes, such as out of it.” economics and calculus, with WHAT’S PLAYING ON THE IPOD: “A online courses in astronomy, lot of indie. A lot of pop. government and creative writing. The Killers. The Fratellis. “It’s tough because you And there’s a bit of Justin have to manage your time Timberlake in there.” really well,” she said. Tam also participated in community service activities, often through the robotics team. For example, the team arranged a robotics competition for middle school students, and the high school team planned the logistics, staffed the event and served as mentors. For Tam, finding her niche on the robotics team also shifted the focus of her career path, steering her away from a career in studio art. She plans to pursue a degree in industrial design, where she might design anything from cellphones to cars. “What it’s all about is designing how the world looks, because the world is run by artists nowadays,” she said. “I think it’s a worthwhile thing to pursue, and robotics had a lot to do with pushing me in that direction.”

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Madeline Wolf Greenwood High School

»The first time Madeline Wolf played basketball in elementary school, she hated it. When a classmate passed her the ball, she dropped it on the court and ran off, crying. But Wolf is nothing if not versatile. These days, she is a key player on the Greenwood High School basketball team, and she also plays on the volleyball team — where she switched from the hitter position to the setter position. “That was new to me and very different, but it was what the team needed, and I wanted to help my team,” she said. For the naturally independent Wolf, the chief lesson of school REPORT CARD athletics is that it’s OK GPA: 4.37 — even necessary — to rely on other people and FAVORITE TEACHER: Holly Wippermann, her English teacher. “She just makes collaborate with them to everything fun. We’re reading ‘The achieve a common goal. Scarlet Letter,’ and with everything She applies that lesson she does she incorporates to other extracurricular something fun and modern to make everything seem relevant, even activities, such as Spell when it feels like the most boring Bowl and the academic thing you’ve ever read. And she has teams for English literature, a lot of enthusiasm for what we’re doing, which affects everyone else.” history and art. “Mainly, I just really FAVORITE RECENT READ: The Harry Potter series, by J.K. Rowling. “I grew like to read, so that up with those books and those drew me to the English characters. It makes me feel like a kid academic team,” she again, and that’s a good thing. You said. “Each season they grow up and get stressed out, but you have that to fall back on.” have a different theme, WHAT’S PLAYING ON THE IPOD: “Just this and last year’s was year I started listening to One mythology, so we read the Direction, and all my friends make ‘Odyssey’ and ‘Antigone’ fun of me. I also love Taylor Swift and different plays.” and Ed Sheeran, and I have a lot of country music, too.” Not surprisingly, Wolf racks up volunteer hours at the library, where she helps out in the children’s section. And her class schedule is packed with opportunities for reading and writing, from literature courses to yearbook workshops. But, ever versatile, Wolf also challenges herself to excel in the sciences, such as biology and physics. “That has been a definite challenge,” she said. “But I think it’s good to have a competitive atmosphere and be challenged by your teacher and school to be a better student. That was good for me. But it was definitely difficult and frustrating at times.” Wolf isn’t yet sure where she’ll attend college, but she is looking at ways to combine her interests in writing and the sciences — for example, technical writing. In the meantime, she looks to her father for guidance. “He works so hard, and I know it. He comes home from work, and I know he’s tired, but he smiles for us anyway,” she said. “Seeing him work hard to provide for us makes me want to work hard in school and in sports to give something back to him.”

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Cameron Smock Roncalli High School

»In terms of extracurricular activities, Cameron Smock is what you might call a late bloomer. Although he was active on the student council, he just joined the group during his junior year. And as a senior, he finally decided to nurture his talent for the trombone by joining Roncalli High School’s marching and concert bands. REPORT CARD “The hardest thing to GPA: 4.45 do (in high school) was FAVORITE TEACHER: “I genuinely learn that it was cool enjoy all the teachers I’ve to be involved,” said had at Roncalli. I’ve been Smock, who was also lucky.” crowned homecoming FAVORITE RECENT READ: “The king. “I had to settle in Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini. “I liked the story of and get comfortable redemption and guilt, and and learn that it’s OK I really liked how it taught to be yourself and do about Middle Eastern culture what you want to do.” and how that mixed with American culture. It was cool Not that he wasn’t to see how those ideas came already keeping busy. together.” Smock played football WHAT’S PLAYING ON THE IPOD: Jack throughout high school Johnson, the Avett Brothers, and served for two John Mayer, Johnny Cash, Drake and “tons of country.” years as the team’s starting quarterback; now, he’s looking for opportunities to continue playing football in college. Smock also served as a peer mentor for Promise to Keep, an abstinence education program, and volunteered as a Eucharistic minister at his church. He exceled in AP and honors classes, such as biology, chemistry, psychology and physics. “I don’t know what I want to major in (in college), which is a major crisis for me right now,” he said. “But I know that eventually I want to be a doctor. I’m just weighing the options for how to get there.” Smock said he is lucky to have had a wealth of positive role models, from his parents and grandparents to his many teachers and coaches. “Coach Scifres does a good job of teaching us not just about football but also about life lessons and religious lessons, so it all ties together, and I think that’s really neat,” he said. Now, he hopes he can influence younger students to avoid his mistake and get involved in extracurricular activities as soon as possible. “Joining the band this year, I’ve met so many people that I’ve gone to school with but never talked to, and they are great people that I enjoy spending time with every day,” he said. “High school is such a self-discovery time, and you don’t know who you are until you’ve exhausted all the options, and you’ve realized what you enjoy doing and what you don’t enjoy doing.”

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southside organizations CHURCHES CALVARY BAPTIST

200 Sunset Blvd., Greenwood (317) 881-5743 cbc-gwood.org

CHRIST FELLOWSHIP OF INDIANAPOLIS

8902 S. Sherman Drive, Indianapolis (317) 882-0008 christfellowshipindy.com

CHRISTIAN CHAPEL

6828 W. State Road 44, Morgantown (317) 422-5624 christianchapelchurch.org

COMMUNITY CONGREGATIONAL

4592 N. Hurricane Road, Franklin (317) 736-4281 franklinccc.org

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN

305 N. Howard Road, Greenwood (317) 881-4477 concordia-lcms.com

EMMANUEL CHURCH

FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF BARGERSVILLE

101 East St., Bargersville (317) 422-5701

FIRST MOUNT PLEASANT BAPTIST

1640 W. Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood; (317) 535-9673 6602 S. Harding St., Indianapolis; (317) 535-9673, Ext. 203 eclife.org

952 W. State Road 44, Franklin (317) 736-6757 fmpbc.net

FAIR HAVEN CHRISTIAN

100 E. Madison St., Franklin (317) 736-6952

1476 W. 300 S., Franklin (317) 878-4670 fairhavencc.org

FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD

1035 Hospital Road, Franklin (317) 736-7793 franklinfirstassembly.org

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FRANKLIN

201 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 736-6753

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF GREENWOOD

99 W. Main St., Greenwood (317) 881-3064 firstbaptistgreenwood.org 56

Johnson County Community Foundation

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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

FRANKLIN CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

140 Branigin Road, Franklin (317) 736-7632

FRANKLIN MEMORIAL CC

1720 Graham St., Franklin (317) 736-8364 franklinmemorialcc.org

FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH

1600 Westview Drive, Franklin (317) 738-9822 friendship.embarqspace.com

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN

1300 S. Morton St., Franklin (317) 736-7849 gslcfranklin.org

GRACE AND PEACE BIBLE CHURCH

GREENWOOD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

23 N. Baldwin St., Bargersville (317) 517-8023 graceandpeacebible.com

525 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood (317) 881-1653 greenwoodumc.org

GRACE ASSEMBLY OF GOD

HEARTLAND CHURCH OF CHRIST

6822 N. U.S. Highway 31, Greenwood (317) 535-5640 graceassembly.org

GRACE UNITED METHODIST

1300 E. Adams Drive, Franklin (317) 736-7962 franklingrace.org

GRACEPOINT CHURCH

330 W. Whiteland Road, New Whiteland (317) 535-3512 gpindy.net

GREENWOOD CHRISTIAN

2045 Averitt Road, Greenwood (317) 881-9336 greenwoodchristian.com

GREENWOOD PRESBYTERIAN

102 W. Main St., Greenwood (317) 881-1259

1693 W. Main. St., Greenwood (317) 883-2687 preachthewordatheartland.com

HOPEWELL PRESBYTERIAN

548 W. 100 North, Franklin (317) 736-6829 hopewellpc.org

INDIANA MASONIC HOME

690 State St., Franklin (317) 736-6141 indianamasonichome.org

MOUNT AUBURN UNITED METHODIST

3100 W. Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood (317) 535-8555 mtauburnumc.org


MOUNT PLEASANT CHRISTIAN

SHILOH COMMUNITY

381 N. Bluff Road, Greenwood (317) 881-6727 mpcc.info

5117 E. Greensburg Road, Franklin (317) 736-4832 shilohcommchurch.org

MOUNT ZION ASSEMBLY

SMITH VALLEY UNITED METHODIST

201 E. Madison St., Franklin (317) 738-3715

NEW BEGINNINGS COMMUNITY

600 Ironwood Drive, Franklin (317) 494-6037 newbeginningscommchurch.org

PRINCE OF PEACE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

3050 W. Smokey Row Road, Bargersville (317) 535-7712 uccprinceofpeace.com

PROVIDENCE CHRISTIAN

4080 W. Road 100 N., Bargersville (317) 422-9331

ROCKLANE CHRISTIAN

4430 Rocklane Road, Greenwood (317) 862-4555 rocklanechristian.org

SAINT GEORGE LUTHERAN

10931 S. 600 West, Edinburgh (812) 587-5024 stgeorgelutheran.net

SAINT ROSE OF LIMA CATHOLIC

114 Lancelot Drive, Franklin (317) 738-3929 saintrose.net

SAINT THOMAS EPISCOPAL

600 Paul Hand Blvd., Franklin (317) 535-8985 stthomasjohnsoncounty.org

SECOND MOUNT PLEASANT BAPTIST

1540 N. 800 East, Franklin (317) 738-3581 secondmountpleasant.org

5293 Old Smith Valley Road, Greenwood (317) 881-1641 smithvalleyumc.org

SOUTHWOOD ASSEMBLY

8700 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis (317) 888-5683 southwoodassembly.org

STONES CROSSING CHURCH

7000 W. Stones Crossing Road, Greenwood (317) 893-2483 stonescrossing.com

NONPROFITS ABATE OF INDIANA, INC.

51 N. Baldwin St., Bargersville (317) 422-8040 abateonline.org

ARTCRAFT THEATRE

THE BOAZ PROJECT, INC.

JOHNSON COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES

622 N. Madison Ave. Greenwood (317) 889-7606 boazproject.org

THE COMMON THREAD COLLECTIVE

TABERNACLE CHRISTIAN

57 N. Main St., Franklin (317) 736-6823 franklinheritage.org

THY KINGDOM COME MINISTRIES

3091 S. Honey Creek Road, Greenwood (317) 294-6887 tkcministries.com

FRANKLIN HERITAGE INC.

FRIENDS OF THE GREENWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY

310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood (317) 881-1953 greenwoodlibrary.us/friendsgpl.asp

TRAFALGAR CHRISTIAN

UNION CHRISTIAN

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF JOHNSON COUNTY

1331 E. 300 South, Franklin (317) 736-4077

VICTORY BAPTIST

1340 Tracy Road, Whiteland (317) 535-4304 victorybaptistwhiteland.com

VILLAGE BIBLE

Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood (317) 414-9477 villagebiblechurch.net

731 S. State St., Franklin (317) 738-4544 jcseniorservices.org

THE SOCIAL OF GREENWOOD

550 Polk St., Greenwood (317) 882-4810 thesocialofgreenwood.org

UNITED WAY OF JOHNSON COUNTY

460 N. Morton St., Suite D, Franklin (317) 736-7840 uwjc.org

YOUTH CONNECTIONS

460 N. Morton St., Suite A, Franklin (317) 738-3273 youthconnections.org

GIRLS INC. OF FRANKLIN

200 E. Madison St., Franklin (317) 736-5344 girlsincjc.org

300 E. Pearl St., Trafalgar (317) 878-4161

JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

398 S. Main St., Franklin (317) 738-2213 jccf.org

SUBURBAN BAPTIST

198 N. Water St., Franklin (317) 736-5088 tabchristianchurch.org

5 E. Jefferson St., Franklin (317) 346-4561 childadvocatesnetwork.org

57 N. Main St., Franklin (317) 736-6823 historicartcrafttheatre.org

54 North St., Bargersville (317) 422-5682 thecommonthreadcollective.org

722 E. County Line Road, Indianapolis (317) 888-7289 suburbanbaptist.org

JOHNSON COUNTY CASA PROGRAM

780 International Drive, Franklin (317) 736-4454 habitatjohnsoncounty.org

HUMANE SOCIETY OF JOHNSON COUNTY

3827 N. Graham Road, Franklin (317) 535-6626 hsjc.org

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southside food+drinks

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Meat-free and Magnificent Covering the Spread All You’ll Ever Knead discover the

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Meat-free and Magnificent Not a meat lover? Not a problem. The southside is covered with kitchens that know a thing or two about preparing spectacular vegetarian dishes. Read on to discover some of our favorite meatless munchies (and no, salads didn’t make the cut). By Caroline Mosey

Chef’s Veggie Burger, $8.99 Wally Bolinger, owner of Fountain Square’s Red Lion Grog House, wanted to be sure there was a dynamite vegetarian option on his menu (a menu where fish ’n’ chips and other pub grub generally steal the spotlight). So he created the Chef’s Veggie Burger, a dense and flavor-packed mix of black and garbanzo beans, carrots, celery, herbs and panko bread crumbs, served on an egg bun. “I’m a meat eater myself,” Bolinger says, “but I eat a lot of the veggie burgers. They’re really flavorful.” Red Lion Grog House, 1043 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 822-4764, redliongroghouse.com

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Pate o’ the South What is pate of the South, you ask? Pimento cheese, of course, according to Karen Hewett, owner of the Indigo Duck in Franklin. This spreadable indulgence is a heavenly mixture of cheddar, Parmesan and cream cheeses laced with roasted red peppers and a hint of cayenne. Paired with crackers and benne seed wafers, it’s a true and tasty dose of the South on a plate. “It’s definitely a favorite on our menu,” says Hewett, “and I think it was imperative that we paid homage to a Southern staple.” Indigo Duck, 39 E. Court St., Franklin, (317) 560-5805, theindigoduck.com

Spinach Mushroom Etouffee Yats has established itself as a universal crowd-pleaser, and we get it: the laid-back vibe, great prices and soul-comforting Cajun dishes seem to make just about everyone happy, including vegetarians. “Our Spinach Mushroom Etouffee is a twist on our regular Cajun dishes,” owner Joe Vuskovich says. “It’s great comfort food.” The rich mixture is served over white rice alongside buttered bread, making it one of the tastiest bargains in town. Yats, 1280 U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 865-9971, yatscajuncreole.com

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Linguini con Portobello, $17.95 La Trattoria owner Tom Trotter may sell plenty of sizzling steaks at his Greenwood eatery, but there’s a meat-free showstopper on the menu that’s garnering a long list of devotees: stuffed portobello mushrooms. “We sell hundreds a week,” Trotter says. The dish starts with saucer-sized portobello mushrooms. “We stuff and bake them with a variety of cheeses, then toss noodles with oil, herbs and wine sauce and serve with the portobello on top.” La Trattoria, 201 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 859-0487

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Spinach Calzone, $8.49 Who doesn’t love a calzone? You can’t go wrong stuffing cheese and veggies into a flaky pizza crust. Brozinni Pizzeria folds its homemade pizza dough over a blend of spinach, mozzarella and ricotta cheese before sprinkling the whole package with garlic and baking. The golden result is served with special house marinara sauce for dunking. (“People come just for the marinara,” adds James Cross, owner. It’s that good). Bonus: Brozinni launched a mobile food truck, making it even easier to get your pizza and calzone fix. Brozinni Pizzeria, 8810 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 865-0911, brozinni.net

Can’t do gluten?

Chefs are starting to include delicious options (and even entire menu sections) that are gloriously gluten-free. Here, some of our favorite GF picks.

GF Gnocchi, $9 Cerulean, 339 S. Delaware St., Indianapolis.

Quesadillas de Huitlachoche, $7.99 Adobo Grill, 110 E. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Broken Yolk Pizza (on GF crust), $12 Napolese, 30 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis.

Chilean Sea Bass with Chimichurri, $23

GF Buffalo Chicken Burger, $11

Bonefish Grill, 1001 N. State Road 135, Greenwood.

Scotty’s Brewhouse, 1 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis. discover the

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Covering the Spread During the fall, any given Sunday (or Monday or Thursday for that matter) is game time. The southside has plenty of indulgent dishes to keep you satisfied as you cheer your team to victory. Here, we kick off our list of winning game-time grub. By Caroline Mosey

Pulled BBQ Chicken JOCKAMO PIZZA

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LOADED POLISH JACK HAPPY JACK’S HOT DOGS This hot dog lunch cart is stationed in Greenwood, serving Happy Jack’s heavily loaded dogs and sausages throughout the year. The Loaded Polish Jack is an entire quarter pound of locally sourced Indiana beef and pork on a steamed bun. The sausage gets topped with mustard, ketchup, chopped sweet onion, spicy Southernstyle chili sauce and shredded cheese. “It’s different from anything you’ve ever tasted,” says Jack Meeks, Happy Jack’s owner. “It’s enhanced by the Blue Ridge Mountain flavors of old family recipes, and our Polish sausage is satisfying and it’s always moist. If you go away hungry, it’s your own fault!” 189 W. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 397-6844

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IDAHO NACHOS

OAKEN BARREL

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Oaken Barrel has undoubtedly—although mistakenly—created the Cadillac of nachos. Swapping corn chips for crispy waffle fries as a base, the spuds are topped with tomatoes, black olives, onions, jalapenos, sour cream, salsa and, of course, lots of cheddar cheese. “It was a late-night concoction 19 years ago,” says Kwang Casey, owner. “The fire chief was hungry, so I went into the kitchen to make nachos but couldn’t find the chips. So I made them on waffle fries, and it was a big hit among the late night crowd.” When they decided to keep the new concoction on the menu, “we were trying to come up with a name, and someone yelled, ‘Idaho nachos!’ It’s been a best-seller since.” 50 N. Airport Parkway, Suite L, Greenwood, (317) 887-2287, oakenbarrel.com


THE ORIGINAL BEEFCAKE BURGERS

Burger fanatics can get their fix at Greenwood’s Beefcake Burgers, where you’re free to load up to five beef patties between buns. A refreshingly versatile list of free toppings ups the burger ante, and a wise selection can achieve the ultimate burger bliss. Owner Richard Payne likes to keep things classic when it comes to creating the ideal game-time burger. “I’d go with The Original,” he says. “It comes with three patties. Add on some grilled onions and mushrooms, and definitely a side of our onion rings.” 1642 S. Olive Branch Park, Greenwood, (317) 215-4192, beefcakeburgers.com

PEPPERONI PIZZA ARNI’S Few relationships run as deep and loyal as the one between pizza and the big game. And we get it—it’s a crowdpleaser you can eat with your hands, and it makes for decidedly delicious leftovers. The Arni’s crew has spent 40 years mastering the thin-crust creation. Despite a lengthy list of specialty pies and custom toppings, a triedand-true tradition still reigns supreme. “Our pepperoni pizza is the customer favorite,” says Kurt Cohen, owner. “We use ground pepperoni so you get more in every bite. It’s spicier and has more of a kick, too.” 1691 Curry Road, Greenwood, (317) 881-0500, meetyouatarnis.com

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PULLED BBQ CHICKEN JOCKAMO PIZZA Sports and barbecue make for a nice marriage, especially when said barbecue is locally raised and smoked. For Jockamo Pizza owner Mick McGrath, it’s important to stay away from prepackaged flavors. “We use pulled smoked chicken from Smoking Goose (in downtown Indianapolis), and we use our own homemade sweet, tangy barbecue sauce,” he explains. Piled high on a bun and served with sweet pickle relish and red onion (“and a wet-nap ’cause it can be messy!”), the pulled barbecue chicken sandwich is McGrath’s answer to game-time cravings. 401 Market Plaza, Greenwood, (317) 883-8993, jockamopizza.com

What about

THE WINGS?

No, we haven’t forgotten about this finger-lickin’ game companion. Below, a few versions you won’t want to miss. BBQ CHICKEN WINGS

10 count, $6.75

The Willard, 99 N. Main St., Franklin, (317) 738-9668

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MO’ FO’ THAI PEANUT BONELESS WINGS

TERIYAKI JUMBO CHICKEN WINGS

Scotty’s Brewhouse, 1 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 571-0808

Brozinni Pizzeria, 8810 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 865-0911

6 count, $8.50

12 count, $9.99


All You’ll Ever Knead Admit it: the smell of freshly baked bread wafting through the air is enough to pull you through any bakery storefront. Those artfully arranged display cases can tempt even the steeliest of resolves, and why shouldn’t they? Baking is the science that fills bellies and brings smiles to the masses. And here on the southside, we like our treats every which way: sweet, savory, topped with frosting, sprinkled with herbs and—always— made with love. By Caroline Mosey

Goodies Cupcakery

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Laura Goodlet

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Goodies Cupcakery

Laura Goodlet’s cupcake bakery in New Whiteland is a place that, even in her words, “radiates happiness.” Greeted by the sugary-sweet smell of freshly baked cookies and cupcakes, Goodies Cupcakery specializes in, yes, cupcakes. More than 40 flavors of them, in fact. She and her husband, Zach, started experimenting in the kitchen making cupcakes 10 years ago. After an unexpected separation from her company, the Goodlets decided to start selling their beloved cupcakes for a living. “Instead of hoping to find a job, we created our own,” she says. After remodeling their current New Whiteland location, the idea took off, one cupcake at a time. “We developed and enriched our recipes to make them just right,” she says. Top sellers include the Chocolate Thunda, a dark chocolate cupcake with truffle frosting, and the Fauxstess—a nod to the Hostess creamfilled version. But it doesn’t stop there. “We also make petit fours, brownies, cookies, fresh fruit Bavarian cream tarts, cake pops, cheesecakes and more,” Goodlet says. In the spring months, she loves incorporating fresh, local fruit into her menu. Keep an eye out for the strawberry shortcake—you won’t be disappointed. 301 N. U.S. 31, New Whiteland, (317) 300-8333.

Amazing Cakes of Indy Specializing in wedding cakes—and spectacular ones at that—Millie Green puts her years of experience into practice every day at her well-known bakery. She opened shop in 1994 and began making intricate, custom cakes for Indy’s southside. “Wedding cakes are our specialty, but we also do a lot of high-end birthday cakes and cakes for other special occasions,” Green says. Her repertoire includes multi-layered and sculpted cakes, many of which are expertly crafted using rolled fondant to make a smooth finish and canvas for decoration. “We have 30 flavors to choose from, but I’d say the most popular choice is our white cake with raspberry.” And those with food allergies or special diets, don’t fear—Amazing Cakes can accommodate you, too. Green’s expertise has opened some exciting opportunities along the way. “I’ve gotten to judge TV cake shows all over the country,” she says, most notably for the Food Network. She also belongs to the International Cake Exploration Society, where she served as president for two years. “Here, our quality is top-notch,” says Green. “We’re very particular about the finished product. It should taste as good as it looks!” 4102 S. Madison Ave., Indianapolis, 46227, amazingcakesofindy.com, (317) 782-0660. Millie Green discover the

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Cayla Childs prepares doughnut holes.

Long’s Donuts Now in its third generation of ownership, Long’s Donuts has built a name for itself that conjures thoughts of airy, melt-in-your-mouth doughnuts. “Our recipes are the exact same recipes that my grandfather, Carl Long, used to make 57 years ago when he opened his bakery on 16th Street,” says Cindy Rene. She and her husband, along with her two brothers, now run the legendary bakery, which has two locations—one in Speedway and one on Southport Road. “Every baked good is made from scratch and without preservatives, just the way you would make it in your own kitchen,” Rene explains. “We produce our doughnuts all day long so the doughnuts you’re getting at 8 at night are just as fresh as the ones you get at 5:30 in the morning.” The customer favorite is, naturally, the yeast doughnuts. “We don’t even bother putting them on trays in the cases,” Rene says. “They sell out too quickly!” If you manage to tear yourself away from the doughnuts, Long’s offers lots more by way of sweet treats. Brownies, eclairs, Danish rolls, cookies, pies and cakes are all in daily rotation. Some quick rules for newcomers: Don’t forget to bring cash (“It keeps the costs down for our customers,” Rene says) and don’t be daunted if you see a line to the cash register, as it moves at an impressive speed. 2301 E. Southport Road, Indianapolis, 46227, (317) 783-1442.

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Amelia’s

Semolina bread bakes in an oven that first steams it to provide a crisp crust, then bakes it slowly. Below left, Charlie McIntosh removes baked loaves from the oven; below, he places "city loaves" that have risen overnight onto a rack for baking.

A joint effort by uncle and nephew team Tom Battista and Charlie McIntosh, this Italian-influenced bakery got its start last June. Tucked inside Fletcher Place’s Bluebeard restaurant, Amelia’s was named for the first woman in their family to come to the U.S. from Italy. McIntosh has no shortage of training when it comes to baking. “I attended the King Arthur Baking Education Center in Vermont, the San Francisco Baking Institute and apprenticed at the Blue Dog Bakery in Louisville,” he says. His key to unbeatable bread? Using natural fermentation rather than commercial yeast. “The method does take more time,” he explains, “but in the case of bread, the more time you can give it, the more flavor it will have. Most breads bake free form, without a pan, and develop a substantial and flavorful crust with a soft, irregular crumb.” Amelia’s offers a variety of loaves, all baked fresh daily. Popular sellers are the semolina (made with durum flour and coated with poppy, sesame and fennel seeds), focaccia (coated with fresh garlic and herbs) and cranberry-walnut sourdough. You can purchase Amelia’s bread or by calling the store to place an order. 653 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, 46203, ameliasbread. com, (317) 686-1582.

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BAKE YOUR BEST

Kim Beaty-Nowacki of Cupcakes and Cookies by Kim shares her top baking tips when it comes to just-right cookies.

Kim Beaty-Nowacki

Use the best-quality ingredients possible. Use pure, Madagascar vanilla (steer clear of imitation vanilla) and the most flavorful chocolate you can find. I like Valrhona, Ghirardelli and Callebaut.

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Sift, sift, sift! It’s so important to sift your ingredients together to avoid uneven distribution in your final product.

Bring your butter and eggs to room temperature. It makes a big difference in how your ingredients come together when mixing.

Let your cookie sheet(s) cool between batches. If you put unbaked cookies on a hot or warm cookie sheet, they’ll start baking even before you put them in the oven, which is a recipe for unevenly baked confections.

Invest in an adjustable rolling pin. You can easily set the rolling depth so your cookies are always the perfect thickness.

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Kim’s Sugar Cookies Cupcakes and Cookies by Kim, beatycakes.com INGREDIENTS

1 cup (two sticks) real, unsalted butter, softened 1½ cups confectioner’s sugar, sifted 1 egg (at room temperature) 3 teaspoons Madagascar Bourbon Vanilla 2¾ cups all-purpose flour  2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon finely ground sea salt DIRECTIONS

Cream together softened butter and confectioner’s sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer. Crack the egg into a separate bowl, add the vanilla and whisk lightly until incorporated. Slowly add the egg/vanilla to the butter/sugar mixture and mix until the egg is thoroughly incorporated. In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder and salt, then add little by little to the mixture. You can tell the dough is ready when most of it sticks to the paddle, but not your fingers.  Roll out your dough to about ¼-inch thickness and use confectioner’s sugar for dusting as needed. Cut out your cookies and place about an inch apart on your cookie sheet. Bake at 400 degrees for 7 minutes. This recipe will yield 2 to 2½ dozen cookies.

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southside restaurants 66 WATER STREET ARTS CAFE

A nonprofit café, 66 Water Street Arts Cafe serves as a coffeehouse, art gallery and meeting ground for students of Franklin College and members of the Franklin community. Offers coffees, teas, specialty drinks and pastries prepared in-house. Open daily from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. 66 S. Water St., Franklin, (317) 739-0081

A PIECE OF CAKE

Cakes for every occasion and time-tested desserts are available at Greenwood’s A Piece of Cake, which has been serving the area for more than 20 years. Closed on Tuesdays and Sundays. Open Mondays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Wednesdays and Thursdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturdays 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 1275 W. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 887-2253, apieceofcakegreenwood.com

ACROPOLIS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

Family-owned and –operated, Acropolis Restaurant & Lounge offers plenty of Greek dinner specials nightly. House specialties include the “Roast Leg of Lamb,” served with bread and a Greek salad, and the “Acropolis Sampler,” which offers gyros, dolmas and rice pilaf. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 1625 E. Southport Road, Indianapolis, (317) 787-8883, acropolisindy.com

ANN’S RESTAURANT

Franklin’s oldest independently owned family restaurant, Ann’s Restaurant serves a diner-style menu with breakfast available any time of the day. Catering services available, as well as a banquet room for larger parties. Open Mondays through Saturdays 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. 77 W. Monroe St., Franklin, (317) 736-5421, annsrestaurant.com

ARNI’S RESTAURANT

An Indiana institution, Arni’s Restaurant first opened in 1965 in Lafayette. The popular pizza joint has now grown to encompass 18 restaurants throughout south-central Indiana. Choose from a menu loaded with the classics: pizza, pasta, soup, salads and burgers. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 am until 11 p.m. 1691 W. Curry Road, Greenwood, (317) 881-0500, meetyouatarnis.com

ATHENS RESTAURANT & STEAKHOUSE

Athens Restaurant & Steakhouse is a mom-andpop establishment that features authentic Greek dishes. If you get there and decide in favor of more traditional American fare, the restaurant is also known for its fried chicken and steaks. Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. through 9 p.m. 1800 Northwood Plaza, Franklin, (317) 736-8677   76

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Arni’s

AUNT JUDY’S COUNTRY KITCHEN

An independent “comfort food” establishment, Aunt Judy’s Country Kitchen serves two made-from-scratch entrées daily, as well as a selection of sandwiches, soups, salads and desserts made fresh daily. Take-out and catering available. Open Mondays through Fridays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m. 460 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-0046

BEEFCAKE BURGERS

A full-fledged hamburger joint, Beefcake Burgers serves up burgers stacked with multiple beef patties, starting with two (“The Double”) and maxing out at five (“Grab the Bull by the Horns”). The menu also includes tenderloin sandwiches, BLTs, hot dogs, hand-spun milkshakes and children’s selections. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 1642 S. Olive Branch Parke Lane, Greenwood, (317) 215-4192, beefcakeburgers.com  

BENJAMIN’S COFFEEHOUSE

Local artwork regularly adorns the walls of Benjamin’s intimate interior, and the menu features deli sandwiches, soups and salads, wraps and an assortment of dessert pastries. Daily lunch specials, delivery and catering available. Open Mondays through Fridays 6:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturdays 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. 49 E. Court St., Franklin, (317) 736-0048, benjaminscoffeehouse.com

BETWEEN THE BUN

Between the Bun uses handmade seasonings, spices and fresh ingredients to create specialty burgers and hot dogs. Try the “PB&J Burger” or the “Apple Bottom Burger.” Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.;

Sundays noon to 9 p.m. 102 S. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 300-8327, btbindy.com

BISTRO 226

Chef-owned and -operated, Bistro 226 uses locally grown ingredients for southern-style fine dining. Steak, lamb and seafood entrées like grilled mahi and jumbo king crab legs are available. Open for lunch Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dinner hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays 4 to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4 to 11 p.m. 226 S. State Road 135, Bargersville, (317) 422-4226  

BLIND PIG

With a menu including fried appetizers, wings, sandwiches and pizza, the Blind Pig throws live music, pool tables and drink specials into the mix for those wanting to make a night of it in a single location. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 3 a.m. 147 S. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-7892  

BONEFISH GRILL

Bonefish Grill offers a quiet interior with subdued lighting where the full gamut of seafood is available, from the “Bang Bang Shrimp” appetizer (if you can’t get enough, the Bang Bang is specially priced at $6 on “Bang Bang Wednesdays”) to lobster tails to shrimp and scallops. Open Mondays through Thursdays 4 to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4 to 11:30 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 1001 Indiana 135, Greenwood, (317) 884-3992, bonefishgrill.com  BROZINNI PIZZERIA Although Brozinni Pizzeria specializes in oversized, New York-style pizza by the slice, it also offers a full menu of family-friendly


Italian fare consisting of calzones, pastas, subs and more. Carry-out orders available. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 8810 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 865-0911  

BUCK CREEK WINERY

A family-owned vineyard, Buck Creek Winery makes and sells a large catalog of wines from dry reds to sweet whites. A list of locations selling Buck Creek wines is available on the website, where you can also find a calendar of upcoming events and live music nights. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sundays 1 to 6 p.m. 11747 Indian Creek Road South, Indianapolis, (317) 862-9463, buckcreekwinery.com  

CANNOLI QUEEN

Grinders, manicotti, chicken Parmesan and other authentic Italian dishes are offered at Cannoli Queen, as well as a “dolci” (sweets) menu with seasonal cookies, pastries and, of course, cannolis. Dishes are made daily from ingredients both locally grown and imported from Italy. Catering for parties, luncheons and special events available. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 8 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. 1279 N. Emerson Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-1908, cannoliqueen.com

CHINA BISTRO

With an extensive selection of Chinese, Thai and Vietnamese dishes, China Bistro offers a spacious dining area and touts the Orange Beef as one of its specialties. Daily dinner specials offered. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 7327 U.S. 31 South, Indianapolis, (317) 888-2888, chinabistroindy.com

THE CLAY OVEN

The Clay Oven serves up authentic Indian cuisine with no shortage of menu choices (there are 14 lamb dishes alone) and vegetarian options. Lunch buffet daily, and catering available. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 9:30 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 10 p.m.; Sundays 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5 to 9:30 p.m. 7415 U.S. 31, Indianapolis, (317) 888-2600, clayovenindianrestaurant.com

COFFEEHOUSE FIVE

Coffeehouse Five is a “for-benefit” coffeehouse, where proceeds from sales of the café’s pastries, mochas, lattes and coffees go directly toward support for local families through premarital and marriage counseling, addiction recovery programs and local food pantries. Open on Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. 323 Market Plaza, Greenwood, (317) 300-4330, coffeehousefive.com continues next page »

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southside restaurants »continued from previous page

THE COLUMNS BALLROOM & THE ATRIUM BANQUET AND CONFERENCE CENTER

Both venues offer full-service event catering for weddings, banquets and special events, as well as off-premise catering to any location. The Columns: 230 W. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 887-6631; The Atrium: 3143 E. Thompson Road, Indianapolis, (317) 782-4467, theatriuminc.com

ELLA’S FROZEN YOGURT

Customers can help themselves to a variety of frozen yogurt flavors and candy, cookie, cereal and fresh fruit toppings at Ella’s Frozen Yogurt. Event room and special package pricing available for parties, showers and meetings. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays noon to 9 p.m. 520 N. State Road 135, Suite A, Greenwood, (317) 985-3232. 8028 S. Emerson Ave., Suite W, Indianapolis, (317) 801-0055, ellasfrozenyogurt.com

FIRESIDE BREWHOUSE

A family-owned bar and restaurant, Fireside Brewhouse features classic American-style dining: burgers, steaks, ribs, pizza and pastas, as well as live music, karaoke events and DJ nights. Open Sundays through Tuesdays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Wednesdays 11 a.m. to midnight; Thursdays 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. 997 E. County Line Road, Greenwood, (317) 859-9505, firesidebrewhouse.com  

THE FLYING CUPCAKE

Keep your eye out for one of the Flying Cupcake’s two mobile cupcake trucks, Petunia and Penelope, usually parked at the Greenwood Park Mall on weekends from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Choose from regular, filled, jumbo, gluten-free and vegan cupcakes in a range of flavors. 1251 N. U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 396-2696, theflyingcupcakebakery.com  

GREAT AMERICAN GRILL AT THE HILTON GARDEN INN

With casual dining ambience, located inside the Hilton Garden Inn Indianapolis South/ Greenwood, Great American Grill offers cookedto-order breakfast daily and a full-service bar in the evenings. Open Mondays through Fridays 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 5 to 10 p.m.; Saturdays and Sundays 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 5 to 11 p.m. 5255 Noggle Way, Indianapolis, (317) 888-4814

THE GRILL BAR

The proprietors of The Grill Bar in Franklin aren’t joking when they say the restaurant offers the best burger in town. Expect all your pub food favorites here—chicken wings, tacos, burgers— as well as live music and karaoke weekly. 138 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 738-9936

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HAL’S FABULOUS VEGAS BAR AND GRILLE

JB’S EXPRESS

Get a taste of old-style Vegas glitz at Hal’s Fabulous Vegas Bar and Grille, which offers distinct touches like retro cocktails, a gambling-themed food menu and individual drink chillers on the bar top. Private party rooms available. Open Mondays through Saturdays 4 to 11 p.m. 1133 N. State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 888-3427, halsvegas.com

Home-cooked comfort food dishes are prepared daily at JB’s Express. Carry-out service and drive-through ordering, delivery and catering also available. Open from 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. daily. 100 Byrd Way, Greenwood, (317) 881-8888, jonathanbyrds.com  

HOUSE OF TOKYO

At Kabuto Japanese Steakhouse, the chefs come right to your table to prepare your meal hibachi-style, using a variety of meats, seafood, veggies and made-from-scratch sauces. Open for lunch daily from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Dinner hours are Mondays through Thursdays 5 to 9:30 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4 to 10:30 p.m.; Sundays 4 to 9:30 p.m. 8719 U.S. 31 South, Indianapolis, (317) 887-6000, indykabuto.com

Extensive menu of Japanese cuisine with deluxe sushi and sashimi dishes served daily at House of Tokyo. Seating for larger parties (up to 20 people) available. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 4:30 to 9:30 p.m. 172 Melody Ave., Greenwood, (317) 889-6037, houseoftokyo.net

ICHIBAN SUSHI BAR & SAMMY’S ASIAN CUISINE

A wide selection of Asian fare, from noodlebased dishes to teriyaki entrées to sushi and sashimi deluxe deals can be found at Ichiban Sushi Bar & Sammy’s Asian Cuisine. Party platters available, and happy hour sushi specials offered on Mondays from 5 to 7 p.m. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 5 to 10 p.m.; Sundays noon to 2:30 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. 8265 U.S. Highway 31, Indianapolis, (317) 883-1888, ichiban31.com  

INDIGO DUCK

Indigo Duck is an American-style bistro with southern and French influences. Main courses include scallops, bourbon brined pork loin and grilled duck, made from locally sourced ingredients. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 5 to 9 p.m. (also open for lunch on Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.); Fridays and Saturdays 5 to 10 p.m. Open for brunch Sundays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 39 E. Court St., Franklin, (317) 560-5805, theindigoduck.com  

JEFF STREET PUB

Steak and fish dinners, burgers, pizza and wings are all part of the menu selection in the Jeff Street Pub’s casual setting. Daily drink specials available at the bar. Open Mondays through Fridays 3 p.m. to 3 a.m.; Saturdays 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. 90 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 738-5350

JOCKAMO UPPER CRUST PIZZA

Regular “special” (smoked gouda, Kalamata olives and pine nuts) and “really special” (crawfish, imported grilled eggplant and Cajun sausage) toppings add a distinctive flare to the pies at Jockamo’s Upper Crust Pizza. Salads, starters and sandwiches also served. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 401 Market Plaza, Greenwood, (317) 883-8993, jockamopizza.com  

KABUTO JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE AND SUSHI BAR

KIM’S KAKE KREATIONS

Kim’s Kake Kreations specializes in cakes and large-order cupcakes for weddings, parties and special events, along with offering light sandwiches, soups and chef salads. Gluten and sugar-free options available. Open Mondays through Fridays 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturdays 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 5452 Madison Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 784-5253, kimskakekreations.com  

LA TRATTORIA

La Trattoria offers authentic Italian cuisine and steaks with plenty of the classics like chicken Parmesan, baked lasagna and ribeye, cooked to order. Carry-out available. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 4 to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4 to 10 p.m. 201 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 859-0487  

LAS CHALUPAS

Find spacious seating and plenty of Mexican fare, always served with chips and salsa, at Las Chalupas. Drink specials and vegetarian dishes are regularly offered. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 2993 S. Grove Blvd., Bargersville, (317) 535-3355

LONG’S BAKERY

Donuts, cakes, cookies and other sweets line the shelves at Long’s Bakery, where folks can arrive bright and early to receive their goodies straight from the oven. (Bring cash—it’s the only accepted payment.) Bulk orders welcome. Southport store open daily from 5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; 16th Street store open daily from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. 2301 E. Southport Road, Indianapolis, (317) 783-1442, 2300 W. 16th St., Indianapolis, (317) 632-3741


LOTUS GARDEN CHINESE RESTAURANT

Lotus Garden offers dine-in, buffet and carry-out Chinese cuisine with an array of seafood, poultry and chow mein courses. Lunch combo specials served daily, and banquet facilities available on-site. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 49 W. Mercator Drive, Greenwood, (317) 881-5531, lotusgardengreenwood.net  LOUIE’S AT STONES CROSSING Plenty of family friendly, American-style dishes are available on the Louie’s menu (where nothing is over $10), including burgers, BBQ pork, pizza, wraps and seafood platters. Local brews offered at the bar. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Fridays & Saturdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 2800 S. State Road 135, Suite 100, Greenwood, (317) 535-1044, louiesindiana.com  

MAIN ST. GRILLE

Main St. Grille offers an intimate interior with plenty of TVs often showcasing the latest sporting events. The menu features a wide selection of appetizers, like the “Kickin’

Shrimp” and the “Dragon Fingers,” and plenty of entrées including salads, flat breads and burgers. Local craft beers and daily drink and food specials offered. Carry-out orders available. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. 200 S. Emerson Ave., Suite F, Greenwood, (317) 215-4326, mainstgrillegreenwood.com

MALLOW RUN WINERY

Patrons can sip Mallow Run’s wine selection, ranging from dry whites to sweet reds, in the rustic tasting room or outside on the deck. Complimentary wine tastings daily, and live music is featured during warmer months. Mallow Run’s premium beef, raised locally by the winery owners, is also available for sale. Open daily from noon to 6 p.m. 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville, (317) 422-1556, mallowrun.com  

MRS. CURL ICE CREAM SHOP AND OUTDOOR CAFE

Get in line at the walk-up ordering window at Mrs. Curl for ice cream, sundaes and more than 25 shake and malt flavors, then pick a spot to relax in the red, white and blue-themed outdoor seating area. Burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and

kids meals also served. Open from Feb. 28 to Oct. 21 from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily. 259 S. Meridian St., Greenwood, (317) 882-1031, mrscurl.com

MUMBAI GRILL

Mumbai Grill offers Indian and Pakistani cuisine, including an extensive selection of specialty meat preparations and tandoori selections. Take out and catering available. Open Tuesdays through Sundays noon to 8:45 p.m. 916 E. Main St., #203, Greenwood, (317) 882-3333, mumbaigrillindy.com

M.W. WADSWORTH & CO. FINE CHOCOLATES

Enter into a nostalgic atmosphere with gourmet, seasonal and old-time candies galore at M.W. Wadsworth & Co. Discover more than a few hard-to-find sweets like specialty truffles and saltwater taffy. Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m. 154 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 560-5624 continues next page »

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OAKEN BARREL BREWING COMPANY

Choose from a Nouveau-American menu and Oaken Barrel’s own selection of inhouse beers. If you taste a winner during your meal, six-packs and growlers are also for sale. Banquet room and outdoor seating available. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to midnight; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 50 N. Airport Parkway, Greenwood, (317) 887-2287, oakenbarrel.com

PASQUALE’S PIZZA

Pasquale’s Pizza is known for its oven-baked sandwiches, garlic bread, pastas and Pasquale’s signature pizzas. Diners can stray from the beaten pizza path with the “Barbecue,” which includes black forest ham and a tangy barbecue sauce, or the “Seafood,” which is filled with Alfredo sauce and crab meat. Buffet hours are Mondays through Fridays 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and Tues. 5 to 8 p.m. Restaurant hours are Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 997 E. County Line Road, Greenwood, (317) 888-3535, theoriginalpasquales.com

PATRIOT GRILL

Patriot Grill offers country dining for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Senior menu available, and carry-out orders welcome. Also on the premises is the Ice Cream Shoppe, with 24 flavors of ice cream and other desserts. Open Mondays through Thursdays 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1265 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 851-8252, patriotstable.com  

PINOCCHIO’S ORIGINAL ITALIAN ICE CREAM

Each day, 37 of Pinocchio’s 130 flavors are served up in generous portions (never weighed or priced by the scoop) and always topped with an animal cracker. Choose from ice cream, sorbet, frozen yogurt and gelato. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 1011 N. State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 865-8844, pinocchiosicecream.com

PIPER’S CATERING AND RESTAURANT

Piper’s lunch menu includes soups, salads, sandwiches and a few specialty items like the Fusion Lettuce Wraps and Chesapeake Bay Crab Cakes. Casual fine dining dishes like homespun meatloaf and St. Louis-style ribs make up the dinner selection. All-occasion catering offered. Open for lunch Tuesdays through Fridays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dinner hours are Tuesdays through Thursdays 4:30 to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4:30 to 10 p.m. 2130 W. Southport Road, Indianapolis, (317) 888-7667, piperscatering.com 80

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PUERTO VALLARTA

Puerto Vallarta is a kid-friendly establishment featuring homemade salsa and classic Mexican dishes and sides. Family-style portions and kids meals are also featured on the menu, as well as vegetarian options and drink specials. Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 893 E. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 865-6100

RICHARD’S KITCHEN & MARKET AND RICHARD’S BRICK OVEN PIZZA

The market features local and international cheeses, hand-cut beef, fine wines and graband-go sandwiches and salads among other items, and the restaurant boasts traditional Neapolitan-style pizza baked in Richard’s woodfired brick oven. Catering available. Market is open Tuesdays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Richard’s Brick Oven Pizza is open Tuesdays through Thursdays 5 to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 5 to 10 p.m.; Sundays 4 to 8 p.m. 229 S. Main St., Franklin. Market: (317) 738-5451. Restaurant: (317) 738-3300, richardskitchen.com  

ROSCOE’S TACOS

Roscoe’s Tacos is a casual Mexican eatery serving up burritos, tacos, tostadas, nachos and sides. Tacos range from the four-inch “Lil’ Beef Taco” up to the seven-inch “Paul Bunyan Taco” with ground beef chili. Roscoe’s handmade sauces can be purchased by the bottle upon request. Greenwood store hours are Mondays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Franklin store hours are Mondays through Saturdays 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 642 S. Madison Ave, Greenwood, (317) 859-0043; 912 N. Morton St., Franklin, (317) 494-6173, roscoestacos.com

SASSAFRAS TEA ROOM

Patrons can sit among antiques, tapestries, oriental rugs and a fireplace while experiencing Southern-styled dishes at Sassafras Tea Room. Tables for the tea room’s English Tea service, which includes scones, sandwiches, sweets and plenty of tea, are by reservation only, Monday through Saturday starting at 2:30 p.m. Custom cakes for special occasions also available. Open for lunch Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 229 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 888-8449, sassafrastearoom.com

SHALLO’S ANTIQUE RESTAURANT & BREWHAUS

With more than 300 bottled beers and 40 brews on draft, it might be hard to argue with Shallo’s claim of having the Midwest’s largest selection of imported, bottled, draft and micro brews. While browsing the menu, which includes burgers, steaks, pasta and specialty sandwiches, customers can read descriptions of the antiques and knickknacks on display throughout the

building. Open Mondays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to midnight; Fridays and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 8811 Hardegan St., Indianapolis, (317) 882-7997, shallos.com

STONE CREEK DINING COMPANY

Choose from a menu of steak, seafood, pasta and specialty sandwiches while surrounded by a rustic, woodsy interior décor at Stone Creek Dining Company. Early bird menu offered for those wanting to beat the crowds. Private dining room available for up to 120 guests. Open Mondays through Thursdays 4 to 10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 4 to 11 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 911 State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 889-1200, stonecreekdining.com

STRANGE BREW COFFEE SHOP

Independently-owned Strange Brew offers coffee by the cup and by the bag, as well as pastries, cookies and muffins. Local artwork, some of which is on sale, along with mugs and other merchandise, adds to the casual atmosphere. Open Mondays through Fridays 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays 8 a.m. to noon. 4800 W. Smith Valley Road, Greenwood, (317) 881-5282, strangebrewcoffee.com

THAI SPICE

Authentic Thai seafood, noodles, stir-fried preparations and salads, all with five degrees of spiciness to choose from, can be found at local favorite Thai Spice. Separate lunch, dinner and carry-out menus offered. Catering available for banquets and corporate parties. Open Sundays through Thursdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturdays noon to 10 p.m. 2220 E. County Line Road, Indianapolis, (317) 881-2243, thaispiceindy.com  

THAT PLACE BAR & GRILL

The owners call That Place an “amusement park for adults” with live music, billiards, karaoke and a multitude of televisions. Pizza, wings and specialty salads featured on the dinner menu. Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. 8810 S. Emerson Ave., Greenwood, (317) 888-7100, thatplacebarandgrill.com  

TRULY LOVELY CUPCAKES

Various flavors of cupcakes are featured for each day of the week, at Truly Lovely Cupcakes, where customers can choose flavors like red velvet, snickerdoodle and triple chocolate. Coffees and soft drinks also served, and catering for special events is available. Open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays noon to 5 p.m. 399 S. State Road 135, Greenwood, (317) 889-1476, trulylovelycupcakes.com 


VINO VILLA

Vino Villa offers fine wines, cheeses and specialty meats. Choose from small plate appetizers and desserts in the second floor bistro. Free wine tastings regularly. Open Tuesdays through Thursdays 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. 200 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-9463, vinovilla.com

WHIT’S INN

A locally owned bar and restaurant, Whit’s Inn offers live music on most Friday and Saturday nights, as well as breakfast and lunch specials daily. Pizza, fried appetizers, burgers and steaks are among the items featured on Whit’s dinner menu. Open daily from 9 a.m. to 1 a.m. (bar occasionally open later). 1020 U.S. 31, New Whiteland, (317) 535-9511, atmywhitsinn.com

THE WILLARD

A wide array of American-style fare graces Willard’s menu; find pizzas, burgers, wings, tenderloin sandwiches and plenty of side options. Beverage selection includes a wine list and a selection of imported, domestic and local beers. Daily lunch and drink specials and carry out offered. Open Mondays through Fridays at 11 a.m., Saturdays at noon and Sundays at 1 p.m. (closing times depend on business). 99 N. Main St., Franklin; restaurant: (317) 738-9668; carry out: (317) 738-9991, thewillard.com

YATS

Simple is the name of the game at Yats, a Cajun Creole eatery that brings customers a rotating daily menu of seven to 10 dishes like étouffées, gumbos, jambalayas and red beans and rice. With no printed menus and no wait staff, patrons order at the counter from a chalkboard menu and seat themselves in the colorful, laid-back atmosphere. Take-out and catering also available. Open Mondays through Saturdays 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Sundays 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 1280 U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 865-9971, çyatscajuncreole.com

YIAYIA’S HOUSE OF PANCAKES

Traditional American breakfast fare is served up in generous portions at Yiayia’s; Greek-inspired lunch selections include salads, burgers and Greek and Mediterranean sandwiches. To-go orders welcome. Open daily from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1694 W. Main St., Greenwood, (317) 888-6800

YOKOHAMA

Japanese cuisine with an extensive dinner selection and sushi specials can be found at Yokohama. Call ahead ordering for pick-up available. Open for lunch Tuesdays through Fridays 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dinner hours are Sundays through Thursdays 4 to 9 p.m.; Fridays 4 to 10 p.m.; Saturdays 2:30 to 10 p.m. 67 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 859-1888, yokohamagreenwood.com  

CARE Ü CONNECT Are you a caring person who wants to give back, make a difference and connect to your community in a meaningful way? Charitable giving is a powerful way to help make our world a better place to live. When you want to make a difference, the Johnson County Community Foundation gives you easier and more effective ways to do it.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. WE CAN HELP. IT’S WHAT WE DO.

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Discover the Southside 2014