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INDIAN SPRINGS

A M AG A Z I N E FO R A LU M N I A N D F R I E N DS O F I N D I A N S P R I N G S S C H O O L | S P R I N G 2 01 4


From the Top: Director’s Blog Shares Insights Into ISS News Join Indian Springs Director Gareth Vaughan every other Friday as he reflects on campus updates, student achievements, alumni gatherings, parent events, and other aspects of life at—and beyond—Springs. You can follow his Director’s Blog via Facebook or Twitter (we share his posts on the school’s official pages), on the ISS home page (www.indiansprings.org), or by email (simply enter your email address on his blog site and you’ll receive an update each time he posts). Have an idea for a blog post? Send it to him at gvaughan@indiansprings.org.

INDIAN SPRINGS LEARNING THROUGH LIVING SINCE 1952

DIRECTOR Gareth Vaughan ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND DEAN OF ACADEMICS David Noone DEAN OF STUDENT LIFE Jan Fortson DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Tanya Yeager DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT Beth Mulvey DIRECTOR OF ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Jack Sweeney DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE ADVISING Gunnar Olson DIRECTOR OF COUNSELING AND RESIDENTIAL LIFE Brian Rodgers ATHLETIC DIRECTOR Greg Van Horn DIRECTOR OF TECHNOLOGY Chuck Williams ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT FOR COMMUNICATIONS AND MAGAZINE EDITOR Mindy Keyes Black BOARD OF GOVERNORS 2013-14 Libby Pantazis P ’03, ’06, ’09, Chair, John Abbot ’80, Robert Aland ’80, Janet Perry Book P ’04, ’09, Myla Calhoun P ’11, ’13, Larry DeLucas P ’99, ’05, Alan Engel ’73, P ’03, ’12, Joe Farley ’81, P ’14, ’16, Clara Chung Fleisig P ’13, P ’16, Mike Goodrich Jr. ’90, Rob Henrikson ’65, Ben Hunt ’82, Jimmy Lewis ’75, P ’11, ’11, Ellen McElroy ’78, Catherine McLean P ’03, ’06, ’11, Eli Phillips, Scott Pulliam ’85, P ’16, ’17, Rusty Rushton ’74, P ’09 ’11, Frank Samford ’62, P ’90, John Simmons ’65, P ’96, Hanson Slaughter ’90, Fergus Tuohy ’96, Ex Officio, Alumni Council, Lesli Wright P ’11, ’14, Ex Officio, Parents Association © 2014 Indian Springs School. Indian Springs is published biannually in fall and spring. All rights reserved. 190 Woodward Drive, Indian Springs, AL 35124 | Telephone: 205.988.3350 | Indian Springs School Web site: www.indiansprings.org MISSION STATEMENT Indian Springs School seeks to develop in students a love of learning, a sense of integrity and moral courage, and an ethic of participatory citizenship. Inspired by the motto Learning through Living, the school community is committed to the belief that students can develop to their full potential by learning to balance individual achievements with the values and principles of democracy.

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INDIAN SPRINGS WELCOME

ALUMNI LIFE

2 Greetings from Libby Pantazis, Gareth Vaughan

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22 Lasting Ties Alumni Come Home for Fall Events Outstanding Alum Award 2014 ON THE COVER: We celebrate in pictures some of the special moments that have helped define us since 1952. The Campaign for Springs Eternal supports curiosity, creativity, and community for the next chapter in Indian Springs history.

FEATURE

4 High Marks Honors and Achievements 8 Giving Back Volunteer Projects Make a Difference

Making Springs Eternal 12 Our campus buildings play a vital role in enabling us to enhance the excellence of our programs, integrate state-of-the-art technologies, inspire our students, and prepare them for an increasingly global world. Learn about our thoughtful construction plans and the ways dedicated people are coming together to make Springs Eternal.

26 Noteworthy 32 Upcoming Events Alumni Weekend 2014 Sports 101

10 In the Classroom Proteins in Space

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“ ...ensure its place for future generations.”

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t gives me great pleasure to announce that construction will commence this summer on Phase I of the Campus Master Plan of Indian Springs School. Phase I involves the creation of new classrooms positioned with views of the iconic lake on the Springs campus. In addition, the entry into the campus has been redesigned for optimal security and welcome with the creation of a well-positioned guardhouse and new administration building. Rounding out the project are much-needed renovations to the Library, including vast upgrades to technology infrastructure. Planning continues for a new Art Center and Gallery and a new Dining Hall.

L I B B Y PA N TA Z I S Ch a ir, Indian Springs S chool Bo ard o f G o ve r n ors

Campaign Co-Chairs Lisa and Alan Engel ’73 and Rusty Rushton ’74, along with Gareth Vaughan, Head of School, Beth Mulvey, Director of Development, and a passionate Campaign Subcommittee, have spoken with more than 100 alumni, parents of alumni, and current parents about the Campaign for Springs Eternal. As a result of these efforts, a total of more than $14.5 million is now committed over the next five years to help make the new Campus Master Plan a reality and to increase the endowment of the school. Lead gifts from Gillian and Mike Goodrich ’63, Cecilia Matthews and the Estate of Alan Matthews ’68, Mary and Rob Henrikson ’65, and Judy and Hal Abroms have launched our efforts. The silent phase of the Campaign is now concluded. Now is the time to make your exceptional gift to Indian Springs School. Anticipate a contact from the ISS Development Office or a member of the Campaign for Springs Eternal Subcommittee, and enjoy our feature story, “Making Springs Eternal,” on pages 12-21 of this issue to learn more about the plan set forth by internationally recognized architects ArchitectureWorks of Birmingham and Lake|Flato Architects of San Antonio. Now is your time to be a part of the boldest renovation of a most excellent school. Help us bring this facility, which has served remarkable students and faculty for the past 60 years, up to the high standards necessary for the continued extraordinary program offered. On behalf of the Board, I offer my deep appreciation to those who remember the importance of Indian Springs School in their own lives, to those who value the role of the school in the lives of their children and grandchildren, and to those who continue to make it a priority and ensure its place for future generations.

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WELCOME

“ ...a unique atmosphere for learning through living.”

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amilies that know Indian Springs students and alumni know that our small community of premiere faculty and bright students creates a unique atmosphere for learning through living.

Legendary faculty Doc Armstrong, Mr. Stegner, Dr. Cooper, Mrs. Parker, and so many more challenged and continue to challenge our students to greatness. We think, we articulate, we explore. We persuade, we create, we dare ourselves academically, artistically, and athletically. Students examine and consider new ideas and new things. In doing so, they reach greater heights in all the areas in which they excel or inquire. By design, they are challenged to develop intellectually, personally, and in their civic responsibility. G A R E T H VA U G H A N Di r e c to r, In d i a n Sp ri n g s School

Preparing students to choose from among the best colleges and universities in the country is a by-product of our goal. Indian Springs students strive to be their best selves. I, and the faculty, challenge our alumni and parents to be their best selves for ISS. Contributions are the foundation of every independent school’s success, and ISS is no exception. We are able to be the school we are because of alumni and parent financial support. Springs will be Eternal—and must continue to be a haven for independence, intellectual freedom, and exploration for future generations: To secure this bright future, more of our older alumni, newer young alumni, and their parents will be needed to show their pride and commitment to ISS by supporting the Campaign for Springs Eternal. We begin construction on new classrooms this summer and will continue to plan for a new Dining Hall and ISS’s first Arts Center. This year, I will be traveling the region and country to ask for everyone’s support. Your passion for Springs will bring our beloved campus up to the quality of our alumni, students, and faculty.

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H I G H M A RKS Scholars. Artists. Athletes. Champions.

Photo: Michael Sheehan

Volleyball Team Wins Area Championship

Cross Country Teams Compete at State

The 2013 Varsity Volleyball Team was the 3rd team in ISS history to advance to the Elite 8 State Tournament by claiming the Class 3A, Area 8 Championship! Margot Balliet ’16 and Julianne Baker ’16 made the All-Tournament Team, and Alex Smith ’14 was chosen Most Valuable Player. Congratulations to all players and Coaches Christina Tetzlaff and Pete Arner!

The Girls and Boys Cross Country Teams advanced to the AHSAA Cross Country State Championships for their second year in a row after finishing third overall at the Class 3A Section 3 meet. Congratulations to both teams, Coach Will Rodgers, and top sectional finishers: Virginia Farley ’16 (3rd), Catherine Grady ’15 (8th), Hill Balliet ’14 (11th), and Eli Cohen ’15 (12th).

Student Fencer Places 2nd Nationally

ISS student fencer Slavin Mu ’16 placed 2nd in Division II Men’s Saber at the October North American Cup in Milwaukee, Wis. More than 170 fencers competed in the division. Mu has studied saber fencing since age 10 at the Birmingham Fencing Club and will compete this summer at the USA Fencing National Championships, July North American Cup in Columbus, Ohio.

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Boys Soccer Team Wins Lakeshore Shootout The Varsity Boys Soccer Team won the Gold Division of the 2014 Lakeshore Shootout in February. The event is one of the largest high school varsity soccer tournaments in the Southeast, and 3A ISS claimed three straight victories over 6A teams. Congratulations to the team and Coach Rik Tozzi, and a special shout-out to players Reeves Duggan ’14, goalie Ramsey Rossmann ’15, and MVP Rakim Ali ’16!

Senior Wins 7th in State in Breaststroke

ISS senior Arlen Fan ’14 finished 7th in the state in the 100-yard breaststroke event at the 2013 Swimming & Diving State Meet sponsored in December by the Alabama High School Athletic Association at Auburn University. Fan posted a personal-best time at the competition, which included schools in Divisions 1A-6A.

Photos: Trisha Crain

Double Take!

A highlight of the 2013-14 ISS Boys and Girls Basketball seasons was the teams’ back-to-back home wins on Jan. 17 over archrival Altamont! Jana Streyczek ’16 (pictured) scored 18 points, Lia Orcutt ‘14 added 14 points, and Alex Smith ’14 had seven rebounds to propel the ISS Girls to a 38-27 victory. Kenechi Ijemere ’14 (also pictured) scored 13 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, and Reeves Duggan ’14 scored 12 points (including an inspiring three-pointer from half court at the end of the third quarter) to lead the Boys to a 41-32 victory for Coach Greg Van Horn’s 350th win at Springs. Congratulations to both teams and to Coaches Van Horn and Pete Arner!


Math Team Places 1st in UA Math Tournament The ISS Math Team won 1st place in November in the Division 3 Team Competition at the University of Alabama Math Tournament in Tuscaloosa. Competing by solving problems that require knowledge of high school mathematics as well as ingenuity and teamwork, Christine Zheng ’14, Jingyu He ’15, Mike Jin ’15, Claire Tang ’15, Yuzhao Pan ’16, and Claire Chen ’16 also scored second overall among all three divisions. “This is a great showing for first-time participants,” says ISS Mathematics Teacher and Math Team Coach Tom Barr. In the individual problem-solving portion of the tournament, Tang, Zheng, and Jin each scored in the top 15% of the nearly 200 competitors from across the state.

Two Students Selected for 2014 Youth Leadership Forum Stella Davis ’16 and Meghan Marks ’15 have been chosen as members of the 2014 Youth Leadership Forum of Birmingham. An outgrowth of the successful Leadership Birmingham program for adults, the forum exposes young leaders to community needs, problems, resources, and opportunities. As part of the program, they will talk with adult leaders about issues affecting the Birmingham community and the challenges of addressing those issues.

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Four ISS Seniors Named Presidential Scholar Candidates Tara Markert ’14, Hill Balliet ’14, Patrick Scalise ’14, and Seth Perlman ’14 have been named as candidates for the 2014 U.S. Presidential Scholars Program. Founded 50 years ago by executive order of the President, the program seeks to recognize some of the country’s “most distinguished” graduating seniors. A total of 74 students from Alabama and more than 3,000 students nationwide were invited to apply based on their SAT or ACT scores or their nomination by a Chief State School Officer. A panel of educators will select 500 semifinalists in early April, and the U.S. Department of Education will announce the final selection of Presidential Scholars in May.

ISS Student Pianists Win Top Prizes Two ISS student pianists garnered top awards at regional competitions open to serious young musicians. ISS junior Sebastian Black ’15 won 1st place in January in the Piano Division of the 2014 Lois Pickard Scholarship Competition sponsored by the Symphony Volunteer Council of the Alabama Symphonic Association. Black performed Franz Liszt’s “Totentanz” (concerto for piano and orchestra) in the contest, which is open to students in five Southeastern states. Christine Zheng ’14 won 2nd place and alternate winner status in November in the Senior Division of the 2013 Alabama Music Teachers National Association Competition. Zheng played solo works by J.S. Bach, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Franz Liszt, and Argentine composer Alberto Ginastera in the statewide contest.

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Mock Trial Team Wins 4th in State Contest One of the four ISS Mock Trial teams won 4th place in the state at the YMCA Youth Judicial Conference hosted in November in Montgomery. Arguing for the defense, Jasmine Berry ’14 and Mack Krell ’14 (shown here) and teammates Sue Kwon ’14, Foster Noone ’14, Seth Perlman ’14, and Ellie Thomson ’14 narrowly missed representing Alabama in the national competition. Judge Michael Joiner ’75 has been an invaluable resource in training all the teams for the competition.

ONSTAGE

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Fall Musical: Once Upon a Mattress 1. Marty McGuire ’15, Matt Price ’15 2 . Sam Stallings ’15 3 . Michael O’Malley ‘16 4 . McKenna Barney ’16, Cameron McDonald ’14 5 . Katie Whatley ’14 6 . Ensemble. Fall Student Concert: 7 . Weiyang Xiong ’14 8 . Zaki Refai ’15 9 . Anna Welden ’15 10 . Jasmine Berry ’14. One-Act Plays: 11 . The Best Daddy by Shel Silverstein: Liz Jones ’18, Thomas Barr ’16 12 . Time Flies by David Ives: Julia Fleisig ’16, Connor McGarty ’15 13 . A Lonely Impulse of Delight by John Patrick Shanley: Henry Goff ’18, Caleb Wakeford ’14 14 . Burn by Dana Leslie Goldstein: Matt Price ’15, Marty McGuire ’15 15 . 27 Wagons Full of Cotton by Tennessee Williams: Riley Hogan ’15, Cori Mazer ’14 16 . Gee!: A Play about a High School Glee Club Without Any

of that Annoying Singing by Dean O’Carroll: Ensemble. (Photos courtesy Michael Sheehan, Eli Cohen ’15, Gabi Oser ’16, Ramsey Rossmann ’15)


2014 FINALISTS NAMED IN NATIONAL MERIT, ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARHIP PROGRAMS Seven ISS seniors have been named 2014 National Merit Finalists, and two of their classmates have been named National Achievement Finalists. Hill Balliet ’14, Arlen Fan ’14, Jack O’Malley ’14, Savannah Rodriguez ’14, Patrick Scalise ’14, Cole Senn ’14, and Christine Zheng ’14, who scored among the top 1% of the 1.5 million students who took the 2012 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/ NMSQT) as juniors, advanced to become Finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program. Kenechi Ijemere ’14 and Annabelle Neville ’14 were chosen as Finalists in the National Achievement Scholarship Program, which recognizes academically promising Black American high school students nationwide. Conducted by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation, both programs choose Finalists from their pools of Semifinalists based on high academic performance in grades 9–12. Scholarship winners will be selected based on abilities, skills, and accomplishments and will be announced later this spring. Congratulations to all finalists!

Bidding Farewell to a Front Office Favorite ... When Registrar Sue Hutchison started working at Indian Springs 28 years ago, she was looking for a job that was closer to home; she found a job that became a second home. “I tell everybody that when you start working Photo: Art Meripol at Indian Springs, either you like it and stay forever or you’re gone in a year or two,” she says. “It was surely right for me.” Hutchison retired at the end of December to spend more time with her family, particularly her daughter, who gave birth to a baby boy, Connor, in October. Hutchison treasured being here Photo: Michael Sheehan while her granddaughter, Arwen Hutchison ’12, attended Springs. “I loved being here with her through her high school years and getting to know all of her friends.” What she’ll miss most? “The community,” she says, without hesitating. “I love the faculty and the staff and their families. There have been so many wonderful people.” Please send your well-wishes to her at: 343 Highway 22, Montevallo, AL 35115 or shutch0423@yahoo.com.

… And Welcoming New Registrar Megan Folsom Megan Folsom comes to Indian Springs School from Primrose School at Liberty Park, where she Photo: Michael Sheehan maintained student records and held a number of other key administrative roles as Assistant Director. “I am really excited to be a part of Indian Springs School,” says Folsom. “The faculty and staff are truly dedicated to the educational development of the students.” Folsom graduated magna cum laude from Samford University in 2008 with a B.A. in Family Studies and Human Development. Folsom has also worked as Lead Early Preschool Teacher/Lead Preschool Teacher at Primrose School of Meadowbrook and as Office Administrator at Clark Financial Advisors in Birmingham. Welcome, Megan!

ISS Faculty Member To Speak at Literary Festival ISS Latin and English instructor and Poet-inResidence Douglas Ray will read from his collection of poems, He Will Laugh (Lethe Press, 2012), and take part in a panel discussion on current trends in poetry on March 22 at the Tennessee Williams / New Orleans Literary Festival. The annual event seeks to assemble accomplished names in the literary, theatrical, and cultural spheres. A Lambda Literary Fellow, Ray holds an M.F.A. from The University of Mississippi, where he edited The Yalobusha Review.

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GI VI N G B AC K Fall D-Day: MAKING THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE Springs students gathered early on a beautiful November Friday to tackle more than two dozen service projects for Indian Springs’ semiannual day of service. Making a difference was the theme of the day as student-faculty teams picked up trash along the Cahaba River, sealed handpainted rain barrels with polyurethane, boxed up ISS library books, cared for animals at the Greater Birmingham Humane Society, roofed a house for Habitat for Humanity, read to children at Oak Mountain Elementary School, and more. Organized by Fall Semester Commissioners of Citizenship Hill Balliet ’14 and Marty McGuire ’15, the day ended with remarks by Judge U.W. Clemon, the first African-American to serve as a federal judge in Alabama, and Cedric Sparks, executive director of the City of Birmingham Mayor’s Office—Division of Youth Services. Sparks charged students to take time to establish an agenda for education, the economy, health care, and other important causes. “Use your gifts to make this world a better place,” said Sparks. “Our community needs you. You are the difference.”

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1. Making Mexican tiles: Jalen Houston ’16 2. Polyurethaning rain barrels: Hannah Jane McCarty ’15, Liz Dillard ’15, Meghan Marks ’15, Sydney Morris ’15, Madeleine Thomas ’15 3. Landscaping around dorms: Chandler Pulliam ’17, Varun Yerramsetti ’17 4. Handcrafting bowls for charity luncheon: Maddie Smith ’17, Virginia Farley ’16 5. Volunteering at Humane Society: Katherine DePalma ’14 6. Boxing up ISS library books: Odetta Yang ’17, Vivian Wei ’17 7. Painting dorm mural: Gabi Oser ’16, Lexie Rueve ’17 8. Disposing of chem lab chemicals: Cori Mazer ’14, John Banks ’14, Ethan White ’15, Mac Farley ’14 9. Painting dorm mural: Grace Ji ’17, Amber Latimer ’17 8

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ISS PARENT SHARES BIOTECH EXPERTISE WITH ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLASS Left: D.J. Hunter ’15, Priscilla Jones ’15 Right: Elisabeth Michaelis ’14, Paul Langjahr ’16, Jaylan Jacobs ’16, Amnesty Club President Min Gu Kim ’15

Amnesty Club Collects 500+ Signatures at Write-a-Thon Event Students from Indian Springs School and Montgomery Academy turned out in December to take part in a Write for Rights Global Write-a-thon hosted by the ISS Amnesty International Club in honor of International Human Rights Day. The club collected 521 student signatures on letters prepared by Amnesty International or written by participating students seeking to protect human rights around the world. The signed letters will be sent to the Amnesty International Southern Regional Office and then on to appropriate officials and individuals, says Min Gu Kim ‘15, president of the ISS Amnesty International Club. “I think it’s very good that students are gathering and working together for human rights,” says Kim. “I loved how passionate the students were to learn about specific cases.” He says through Amnesty’s campaigning, tens of thousands of prisoners have been released from jail, rescued from torture, and aided in other ways.

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ISS Key Club Clears Courtyard for Midfield School Thirteen members of the Indian Springs School Key Club joined 2,000 volunteers from across the area for Magic City Miracle 2013, a day of service hosted last fall by local United Methodist churches. ISS students spent a weekend afternoon working at Midfield Elementary School, where they catalogued books in the school’s new database system and cleared an overgrown courtyard to make way for a kindergarten play area. Their contributions were nothing short of miraculous, says Jocelyn Neville, Librarian at Midfield Elementary and parent of Annabelle Neville ’14. “When the weather permits, we look forward to working on creating a child-friendly space for recreation and learning,” she says of the courtyard. “The work that was done by the Key Club has made a dramatic difference in helping us obtain available outdoor learning space and access to the library collection for the children of Midfield Elementary.”

DiscoveryBioMed Director and ISS parent Erik Schwiebert joined Springs’ Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management class as a guest speaker last fall to encourage students to develop business concepts that solve problems and, when possible, “invent” the future. DiscoveryBioMed, a Birmingham-based life sciences and biotechnology company that specializes in human cell-based drug discovery, was named 2012 Biotechnology Company of the Year by the Birmingham Business Alliance and received the 2012 Alabama International Business Award for Emerging Company of the Year. Schwiebert discussed the phases of the business life cycle, the challenges of yielding a return on investment in today’s marketplace, and the economic impacts of a product as simple as bottled water.

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I N TH E C LASS RO O M

Jingyu He ’15 loads a syringe with a protein that may be used to help develop a drug to treat cystic fibrosis.

Will Jones ’15 watches as Savannah Barrow ’15 fills a syringe with a protein that has multiple applications in DNA research.

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ISS Students Grow Crystals for Cutting-Edge Drug-Discovery Research

en Indian Springs School students gather intently around Debbie McCombs at the UAB Center for Structural Biology as she examines X-ray images of protein crystals that the students have grown as a practice round for a large, NASA-sponsored research program exploring the benefits of using microgravity to help design drugs to fight cancer and debilitating diseases. The teens are competing against nine other Alabama high school teams to create crystals that will grow best in a microgravity environment, and they’re curious—and a bit apprehensive—to see if their sample proteins produced crystals. “You actually have some precipitation in these proteins,” McCombs tells them after

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studying the images. “Just remember: When you’re working in science, you have to come in and expect that what you’re going to do is going to grow. Now am I always successful? About 20% of the time. But every day I have the idea that I will succeed.”

“Through this ‘Proteins in Space’ project, we may discover a much simpler and quicker way to crystallize proteins,” says Jack McGuire ’16, who is excited to be a part of the team representing Indian Springs. “It could greatly benefit the scientific community.”

The students’ official set of protein crystals for the experiment will soon be among 100 proteins growing in a variety of buffering solutions in glass capillary tubes aboard the International Space Station. Contributed by universities, pharmaceutical companies, and the National Institutes of Health for their scientific importance, the proteins were scheduled to launch from Kennedy Space Center via the SpaceX CRS-3 spacecraft in mid-March and return to earth by August.

ISS Board Member Larry DeLucas, who is director of the UAB Center for Structural Biology, principal investigator of the study, and a leader in the field of protein crystallography, believes that spacebased crystallography holds important keys to structure-based drug design. “The human body contains more than 100,000 proteins that play key roles in the function of the body,” he says. “The proteins evaluated in my lab are implicated in important biological processes and are


CAMPUS LIFE Indian Springs School science teachers Christina Tetzlaff, Bob Pollard, and Tanya Hyatt, who are faculty advisers for the ISS student team, feel that the project has been an incredible hands-on experience for the students involved. “Their experiences have given them a taste of the challenges and rigors of biochemical research, and I have been impressed by their fervor for the project and their diligence in the lab,” says Pollard. “It’s all about technique,” says Hyatt. “If one of our capillary tubes grows the best crystals, they’ll come back to us and say, ‘What was in it?’ The project has so much potential for our students.” To Tetzlaff, the key lesson has been that scientific research is an important journey that can be rewarding but also long and sometimes difficult. “Oftentimes there are setbacks, but the researcher needs to be patient and trust in the process. Is there any better way to prepare students to be future scientists?” Lab Supervisor Debbie McCombs shows ISS students a well plate for protein loading during their tour of the UAB Center for Structural Biology. pharmaceutical targets for many infectious and chronic diseases. In order to understand the function of proteins, we study them through the growth of crystals in which the molecules of the protein are arranged in regular, repeating patterns. Our goal now is to improve the quality of the crystals grown.” Many leading drugs today were created through structure-based drug design, but for a large number of important proteins, the difficulty of obtaining high-quality crystals remains a barrier for researchers, says DeLucas, O.D., Ph.D., a former NASA astronaut and Chief Scientist for the International Space Station. Ground-based experimentation is increasingly sophisticated but still produces “suboptimal” results. Microgravity environments have shown the potential to create larger, higher quality crystals, but past spacebased crystallization tests were limited in scope (typical missions were 10 days or less) and conducted under adverse conditions.

Connor McGarty ’15 rinses a syringe between protein loads.

“Access to the International Space Station will significantly improve the number of proteins that produce crystals of sufficient size to analyze,” says DeLucas. “Our main objective is to conclusively demonstrate the effect of microgravity on the size and quality of crystals for a variety of proteins of scientific value. What’s really exciting is that the success of the project will determine whether NASA continues the program.” A secondary goal has been to train high school students in both ground-based and microgravity experimentation, from their experience with cutting-edge laboratory research to their participation in post-flight X-ray analysis of the crystals grown on the International Space Station. At the conclusion of the data analysis, students from each school will present their results to an independent panel of judges via a science poster competition. Students from the top three schools will receive college scholarships from a $10,000 fund donated by The Alabama Youth Leadership Development Program (part of the Greater Alabama Council of Boy Scouts of America).

ISS Board Member and Principal Investigator Dr. Larry DeLucas (far right) poses with the ISS student team at the UAB Center for Structural Biology, which he directs. Students are: (front row, from left) Savannah Barrow ’15, Claire Tang ’15; (middle row) Sylvan Zhang ’15, McKenna Barney ’16, Jingyu He ’15, Connor McGarty ’15, Will Jones ’15; (back row) Marty McGuire ’15, Andrzej Richardson ’15, Jack McGuire ’16.

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F E AT U R E

MAKING SPRINGS

Springs Eternal: At a Glance PHASE 1: New Classrooms, Library Renovations PHASE 2: New Dining Hall (on same site at 1952 building) PHASE 3: New Arts Center, Gallery, Pavilion, and Studios

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F E AT U R E

ETERNAL Nearly 100 alumni, parents of alumni, and current parents have committed $14.5 million to Indian Springs School over the next five years to increase the school’s endowment and help make our new Campus Master Plan a reality. Turn the page to learn about what is in store for Springs and the ways this devoted, forward-thinking community is coming together to make Springs Eternal.

This illustration shows the design for the new ISS Administration Building. Courtesy Lake | Flato Architects.

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F E AT U R E

THE PLAN

“The firms we’ve chosen absolutely recognize the unique character of the school. The buildings will be beautiful yet modest and part of the natural landscape. We will be honoring the original architecture and respecting our connection to the outdoors.” —ISS Director Gareth Vaughan

Phase I: Classrooms Phase 1 of Springs Eternal will modernize our campus and classrooms to accommodate emerging technologies for greater flexibility and global connectivity. By bringing our buildings up to speed to match our philosophy, we keep Indian Springs School relevant for upcoming generations of students and stay true to founding Director Doc Armstrong’s philosophy of empowering students by keeping them curious and engaged with one another. HIGHLIGHTS:

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Removing 6 classrooms Adding 15 new classrooms (for a total of 22) Building new administration building Creating new academic center Renovating library TOTAL PHASE 1: 27,100 square feet

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Illustrations. Courtesy Lake | Flato Architects.

Phase II: Dining Hall Phase 2 will enable us to keep the Springs community strong by providing inviting spaces that make it easy and convenient for gathering. The new Dining Hall, which will remain at its inspiring lakeside location, will include outdoor dining, new appliances, and flexibility to accommodate groups of all sizes. HIGHLIGHTS:

Replacing current dining hall with new one

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Creating outdoor dining TOTAL PHASE 2: 35,300 square feet

Phase III: New Arts Center In Phase 3, we highlight the importance of creativity in the Indian Springs experience by locating our new Visual Arts Center at the heart of the campus. In addition to arts studios, the new facility will include an art gallery and outdoor art yard, showing our commitment to the idea that creativity is the path to ingenuity in all disciplines. HIGHLIGHTS:

Replacing 7 existing classrooms with new ones

Removing 3 existing art studios

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Building 5 new art studios

TOTAL PHASE 3: 17,400 square feet

Renovating music practice rooms

Lake | Flato Architects, the San Antonio-based firm working with ArchitectureWorks of Birmingham to design our new buildings, received a 2013 Educational Facility Design Award from the American Institute of Architects Committee on Architecture for Education for its design of Cranbrook Kingswood Middle School for Girls in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. The awards honor educational facilities that promote learning, integrate with the local environment, further a school’s mission, and demonstrate excellence in architectural design. IN DIAN

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F E AT U R E

THE MATERIALS WHAT IT IS:

Polycarbonate Paneling

WHAT IT IS:

Wood Soffit WHY WE LOVE IT: A soffit is the horizontal flat area between the roof overhang and a building, and because it holds vents that allow air to pass through, it is important for controlling heat and humidity. Paired with metal posts and a scored concrete sidewalk, this rot-proof, lowmaintenance architectural feature creates a clean-lined, modern connection between indoor and outdoor spaces.

WHY WE LOVE IT: In addition to inviting ambient light into open-air breezeways, translucent polycarbonate roofing panels provide insulation that keeps these areas cool in summer and warm in winter. These lightweight, maintenancefree panels are made from recycled components, and because they are easy to cut and drill, they take less time to install than many other types of panels.

WHAT IT IS:

Shiplap Cypress Siding

WHAT IT IS:

Skylight/Monitor Roof WHY WE LOVE IT: Skylights built in monitor (raised) roofs bring a healthy dose of natural daylight into indoor spaces, saving energy and reducing electrical lighting costs while also providing a positive impact on mood, attitude, and—according to a number of studies— academic performance.

WHY WE LOVE IT: Naturally durable and rustically beautiful cypress resists splitting and warping and outperforms more porous woods like pine and cedar when it comes to rotting and decay, which means fewer repairs. Designed with tongue-and-groove joints, shiplap siding also provides a tight seal against air and moisture.

Photos. Courtesy Lake | Flato Architects and Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects.


F E AT U R E WHAT IT IS:

Standing Seam Metal Roof WHY WE LOVE IT: Tough against extreme weather conditions including wind, rain, hail, and snow, standing seam metal roofs are lightweight and extremely durable. The eco-friendly metal is mold-, fire-, and rust-resistant. It also deflects heat, helping lower cooling costs. And because the panels lock together at the seams, they deter leaks.

WHAT IT IS:

WHAT IT IS:

Floating Ceiling

Gabion Bench

WHY WE LOVE IT: This contemporary architectural feature accommodates a variety of overhead lighting options and absorbs sound for a quiet working environment, perfect for the new ISS Board Room. Energy-efficient, a floating ceiling also reduces total square footage that needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer.

WHY WE LOVE IT: Built with legs made from wire cages filled with river rocks, Gabion structures have been used for centuries around the world to stabilize banks and slopes. Our Gabion benches will have cast concrete seats and will be located along boardwalks in place of railing. Ideal spots to enjoy Springs’ beautiful setting.

WHAT THEY ARE:

Native Grasses and Trees

WHAT IT IS:

Rain Garden WHY WE LOVE IT: Using natural landscaping features such as river rock paths and hearty perennial Louisiana irises, rain gardens protect rivers and lakes by filtering runoff and reduce mosquito breeding by removing standing water in flood-prone areas. They also create a habitat for birds and butterflies, cut down on garden maintenance—and enhance “sidewalk” appeal.

WHY WE LOVE THEM: Made to thrive in our humid climate and red clay soil, naturally hearty native plants such as muhly grass (shown here) and broom sage help prevent soil erosion and require less water, less fertilizer, less attention. We’ll add magnolia, cedar, maple, and Allée elm trees in strategic locations and groom the wooded area between the lawn and the lake, limbing up trees and underplanting to enhance lake views.

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THE COMMITMENT LEAD DONORS Innovative ideas from Architecture Works, Lake | Flato Architects, and Jeffrey Carbo Landscape Architects have provided a vision that is in keeping with both the distinctive spirit of the school and the natural beauty of the campus. Lead gifts from the estate of Alan Matthews ’68 and from Gillian and Mike Goodrich ’63, Mary and Rob Henrikson ’65, and Judy and Hal Abroms are allowing us to move forward in bringing our buildings up to the high standard of our excellent program.

The Faces of Change The Campaign for Springs Eternal is headed by a passionate and accomplished group of alumni, faculty, and friends of Indian Springs: • HONORARY CHAIRS: Donald Hess ’66 and Libby Pantazis • CHAIRS: Lisa Engel, Alan Engel ’73, Rusty Rushton ’74 • SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST: Robert Aland ’80, Joe Farley ’81, Scott Pulliam ’85, Mike Goodrich ’90 • NORTHEAST: Rob Henrikson ’65, John Abbot ’80 • MID-ATLANTIC: Ellen McElroy ’78 • WEST COAST: Kelly Bodnar Battles ’85 • PARENTS OF ALUMNI: Catherine and Emmet McLean, Sydney and Mike Green • CURRENT PARENTS: Scott Bryant ’82, Scott Pulliam ’85 • PLANNED GIVING: Allan Cruse ’59, Frank Samford ’62, Hanson Slaughter ’90 • DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE CHAIR: Frank Samford ’62 • STAFF: Gareth Vaughan (Director), Beth Mulvey (Director of Development)

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Clockwise, from top left: Gillian and Mike Goodrich ’63, Alan Matthews ’68, Hal and Judy Abroms, Mary and Rob Henrikson ’65

CAMPAIGN FOR SPRINGS ETERNAL

CO-CHAIRS LISA & ALAN ENGEL ’73 “My husband, Alan, and I are very proud to be part of this next phase for ISS. Springs has meant so much to us and to our entire family, and we want it to be an excellent choice for our grandchildren as well as all future generations. It is time to replace the classrooms and other buildings with state-ofthe-art facilities in the character of the school we love but with the capability to offer a unique educational model for the 21st century.” (Pictured): Lisa and Alan Engel ’73


CAMPAIGN FOR SPRINGS ETERNAL

COMMITTEE MEMBER ELLEN MCELROY ’78 “I am consistently moved by how our alumni from the ’60s and ’70s shared similar defining experiences with those who graduated in the ’80s and ’90s. Indian Springs is special to so many of us because of the friendships we made, the important world view that we gained, and the confidence that was instilled in us by demanding teachers. I am very proud to be actively part of the school as an alumna.”

F E AT U R E

Follow campaign progress and see our special video retrospective celebrating Springs Eternal: www.issspringseternal.org

NAMING OPPORTUNITIES Donors who contribute $100,000 or more have the opportunity to create an enduring legacy at ISS by naming a classroom, dining area, art studio, academic hall—and more. Currently, classrooms will be named to honor: • The Gamble Family, in honor of William ’03, Travis ’63, Tom ’60, and Chip ’58 Gamble • Frank Cantey (longtime ISS instructor and administrator), named by Caldwell Marks, Trustee of Indian Springs School • Rene and John Simmons ’65 PHASE I: • Academic Center: $2 million • Halls: $1 million each (Arts/ Science/Language/Music) • Gathering Lawn: $250,000 • Classrooms: $100,000 each

PHASE II: • Dining Hall: $2 million • Main Dining Room: $500,000 • Special Dining Area: $250,000 • Dining Deck: $250,000

PHASE III: • Arts Center: $1 million • Art Pavilion: $500,000 • Art Gallery: $500,000 • Art Yard: $250,000 • Studios: $200,000 each

Please contact Director of Development Beth Mulvey at bmulvey@indiansprings.org or 205.332.0591 for more information on any of these naming opportunities. Thank you!

JOIN US! We need your help to make Springs Eternal! We calculate that it will take twice as many

donors as those who contributed to our last capital campaign to create this enduring legacy. While it was primarily donors from the 1950s-’70s who made possible the construction of a new Science Center and two new dormitories in 2006 through the Learning Through Living Capital Campaign, many alumni from the 1980s and ’90s are also now able to express their affection for the school through generous gifts. In order to reach our goal of $20 million to $25 million for all three phases, we ask the entire ISS community—alumni, parents, grandparents, and friends—to join together in making a substantial commitment to the Campaign for Springs Eternal. Members of the campaign team will be in touch in the months ahead to tell you more and ask for your support. In the meantime, please contact ISS Director Gareth Vaughan (gvaughan@ indiansprings.org) or Director of Development Beth Mulvey (bmulvey@indiansprings.org) to learn more about how you can be a part of this important effort. Thank you for your support!

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Help us make Springs Eternal by joining us during 2014-15 at special events around the country! Festivities will start during Alumni Weekend 2014 with a celebratory dinner for the school’s top giving societies (Thursday, April 10) and a launch ceremony for all alumni, students, parents, and friends (Friday, April 11, at 3 p.m.) and extend through the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new classrooms in August 2015. Mark your calendar today to join Director Gareth Vaughan, Drs. Cooper and LaCasse, Coaches Van Horn and Gray, and other faculty and friends at stops along our coast-to-coast tour. To RSVP or get more information about individual events, please contact Beth Mulvey at bmulvey@indiansprings.org or 205.332.0591. Join us for as many events as you’d like to attend!

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2014-15 SPECIAL EVENTS APRIL 10, 2014 Directors’ Dinner, Alumni Weekend APRIL 11, 2014 Announcing Springs Eternal, Alumni Weekend Indian Springs School JUNE 13, 2014 Spring House Restaurant, Lake Martin, Ala., hosted by Margaret and Kip Porter ’60, Executive Vice President of Porter White & Company OCTOBER 11, 2014 San Francisco, Calif., with Bob Cooper and Mac LaCasse, hosted by Kelly Bodnar Battles ’85, CFO of Bracket Computing

NOVEMBER 15, 2014 Houston, Texas, with Lake | Flato Architects, hosted by Michael Payne ’84, Executive Director of BikeHouston

FEBRUARY 14, 2015 Washington, D.C., with Greg Van Horn and Hunter Gray, hosted by Ed and Patti Rogers, Chairman of BGR Group

DECEMBER 6, 2014 New York City, N.Y., with Douglas Ray, hosted by Leo Kayser III ’62 of Kayser and Redfern

FEBRUARY 28, 2015 Boston, Mass., with Lisa Balazs, hosted by Jordan T. Shin, M.D., Ph.D. ’85, Cardiologist

JANUARY 17, 2015 Naples, Fla., hosted by Mary and Rob Henrikson ’65, former CEO and Chairman of Metlife

APRIL 16–18, 2015 Alumni Weekend Indian Springs School AUGUST 16, 2015 Ribbon Cutting for New Classrooms Indian Springs School IN DIAN

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A LU M N I L I F E

L AST I N G T I E S

Stuart Whitehurst ’79

Leah Tharpe ’03

ANTIQUES 101:

School’s 5th Annual Fundraiser Casts New Light on the Value of Old Things Valuable chestnut table? Unfortunately no, inexpensive pine. Hand-painted porcelain? This piece, yes—but this piece, transfer print. Mantel clock from the 1850s? Probably closer to the 1920s. Rare antique print? Antique, you bet— but not as rare as you might think. Bearing antiques that ranged from books and brooches to cookie jars and candlesticks, more than 200 Indian Springs School alumni, parents and grandparents, faculty, and friends gathered on the ISS campus in late October to hear what ISS alumni and expert appraisers Stuart Whitehurst ’79 and Leah Tharpe ’03 had to say about the value and provenance of family heirlooms, artworks, and “found” curiosities from all over the world. 2 2

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In an era when many consumers choose IKEA over antiques, Whitehurst, a mainstay on PBS’ Antiques Roadshow and co-owner of Marvin & Whitehurst Appraisal Group, Inc., joked that he often calls himself the “Grim Reaper of Family Legends” because he all too frequently reveals that grandma’s great antique is, in fact—”not.” Walking and talking (Antiques Roadshowstyle) about guests’ pieces on display in the John Badham Theater, he revealed identifying marks; discussed when, where, and how items were made; and estimated current values, disappointing a few guests’ hopes (“If I use the words ‘cute’ or ‘sweet,’ be prepared for a low value!”) but delighting all with stories about trade secrets and market

fluctuations. “Fashion dictates what things are worth,” he admitted, “and we are slaves to fashion.” Whitehurst and Tharpe, a fine art appraiser at Tharpe & Fairchild, LLC, and editor-in-chief of The Curator’s Eye, dispelled myths about antique and fine art appraising and encouraged guests to examine antiques and fine art with a historian’s eye. After studying art and archaeology at Princeton, Tharpe earned her master’s in art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. Indian Springs’ 101 fundraiser series was developed five years ago by the ISS Parents Association and Development Office team as a fun way to combine an interesting, educational experience with


A LU M N I L I F E an opportunity to support the school’s Annual Fund. Wine 101 launched the series and was followed by Film 101, Food 101, and Music 101. Antiques 101 raised more than $50,000 for the school. Sports 101, the sixth annual event, will take place on Sat., Nov. 1, 2014, and will highlight new trends in sports medicine, sports journalism,

and sports law and interesting events in sports history. “Our 101 is a uniquely Springs event, a recognition that our community prizes learning and likes to have fun and be informed while raising money to support the school,” says Director Gareth Vaughan. “Of course our interesting and

diverse community has great fun when we get together. Even our fundraisers are different and educational. Be sure to mark your calendar for Sports 101 on Nov. 1!”

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1. Director Gareth Vaughan with Volunteer Wine Grab Coordinators Kiki Scalise, Kim Grumley, and Melinda Guillaume. 2. ISS grandparents Mary and Robert Lewis and parent Ivey Young peruse U.S. History teacher Dr. Richard Neely’s fascinating collection of artifacts. 3. Ronne (center) and Donald Hess ’66 with Stuart Whitehurst ’79. 4. Dr. Richard Neely (center) talks antiques with ISS parents Rune and Cathy Toms. 5. Jane Ellis and Clint Dillard ’84. 6. Gareth Vaughan welcomes guests in the John Badham Theater. 7. Audience members enjoying Whitehurst’s humorous anecdotes. IN DIAN

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Visram as a student at ISS.

2014 Outstanding Alum Shazi Visram ’95 with her son, Zane, and husband, Joe.

Happy Family Founder Shazi Visram ’95 Named 2014 Outstanding Alum Happy Family Organic Superfoods Founder and CEO Shazi Visram ’95 has been named recipient of the 2014 ISS Outstanding Alum Award, presented annually to a graduate who has made outstanding contributions in his or her field and community. Inspired by a friend’s struggles to find minimally processed food options for her baby, Visram launched Happy Baby organic products on Mother’s Day 2006. The line grew quickly into Happy Family, which provides organic, nutrient-rich foods—from yogurt to rice cakes—“made with a mother’s touch for all ages, all stages.” The products are now available in more than 20,000 stores (including Whole Foods and Target) across the country and around the world. For Visram, the daughter of entrepreneurs who owned hotels in Alabama, it all started with an idea. “I set out to change the way children were fed in our country, and that seemed like a huge— almost ridiculous—undertaking,” she says. “Given the traction that the company has had in the past few years, I can actually say that we are moving the needle and making a difference. I’m really proud of creating a bigger market for truly sustainable and healthy foods for babies and for their health.” In 2011, Visram was chosen Ernst & Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year for New York. The next year, she was named one of Crain’s New York Business 40 Under 40. Happy Family has also been identified for two years running as one of the fastest-growing organic food companies in the nation by Inc. magazine and in 2012 was called “Rockstar of the New Economy” by Fast Company. Last May, Visram sold the company to the French food group Danone for hundreds of millions of dollars. (The exact amount was not disclosed.) She remains CEO. Danone is an ideal corporate partner to take the business to the next level, she says, because the company provides research and development, consumer expertise, and a health and wellness focus.

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Visram says the natural beauty that surrounded her daily at Springs fostered in her a deep love of the environment and desire to incorporate sustainability into her career path and choices. Her interactions with other ISS students, many of whom remain her best friends today, also showed her the value of bringing together a diverse group of people with a variety of innovative ideas and viewpoints. “At Happy Family, we have a similar group of very smart, creative, and driven folks that are really excited to be a part of something bigger, to explore opportunities, and to constantly be thinking about creative solutions to challenges that come our way, which is something we did a lot at Springs,” she says. OAA Committee Chairman D.G. Pantazis ’03 says committee members chose to honor Visram with the 2014 award because of her passion, commitment, and creativity. “She is a wonderful example of the type of leader and entrepreneur that Indian Springs students aspire to be,” he says. “More importantly, her dedication to her family, and to other families worldwide, is truly inspirational.” After graduating from Indian Springs, Visram earned a Bachelor of Arts in History and M.B.A. from Columbia University. Today, she lives in Westport, Conn., with her husband, Joe, and their son, Zane. In addition to her work at Happy Family, she mentors aspiring entrepreneurs from low-income communities through the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE) and serves on the board of Hydros, which makes portable filtered water bottles. To any current ISS student who has an idea for a business or product that might make an impact, Visram says go for it. “Ideas have a tremendous amount of power, and if you’re very passionate about something, and you believe in it, and you think that it’s part of your path, then you owe it to yourself to try to make it happen. I’m so grateful that I did, because I think ultimately that failing at something you tried is not failure, but failure to try something— that’s the true failure.”


A LU M N I L I F E

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Legacy Family Reception and Holiday Choir Concert About 250 ISS alumni, parents, and friends joined ISS faculty and students for the 2013 Legacy Family Reception, Student Art Show, and Holiday Choir Concert on Dec. 12. The evening began with the second annual Meeting of the Mayors and ended with the traditional holiday concert, which included classical works, international folk songs, and holiday favorites. 1. Past ISS Mayors Kevin Tavakoli ’98, Frank Samford ’62, Alice Marson ’10, Sam Pointer ’81, Fergus Tuohy ’96, and Director Gareth Vaughan at the 2nd annual Meeting of the Mayors. 2. Rene and John Simmons ’65, Cheryl and Burk McWilliams ’65, and Alan Engel ’73 at the Legacy Family Reception. 3. Amy and William Barr with Tricia and Rotem Elgavish ’90. 4. ISS Concert Choir, led by Dr. Tim Thomas and accompanied by Dr. Alina Voicu, at the Holiday Choir Concert.

2013 Alumni Holiday Party Alumni from 1959 to the present gathered on Dec. 26 at the McWane Science Center for the school’s largest alumni party of the year. Taking advantage of McWane’s third-floor Winter Wonderland, alumni with young children and grandchildren enjoyed the Alumni Family Party as well.

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1. Michael Morris, Dr. Bob Cooper, Alexee Deep Conroy ’96 and husband Matthew Conroy. 2. Elizabeth Hodges ’09, Zachary Martin ’09, Kari Todd ’09, Auston Smith ’09. 3. Thomas McWilliams ’97, Burk McWilliams ’65, Rebecca and Jeff Cohn ’64. 4. Anuj Patel ’05, Lou Gordon ’03, Eddie Davis ’02, Lee Pantazis ’06, Nirmal Roy ’02. 5. Eboni Washington ’07, Eddie Davis ’02. 6. Madi Turner ’10, Sarah Hook ’10, Richard Baxley ’10. 7. Everett Smith ’10, Michelle Luo ’10, and Zane Wilson ’10. 8. Nora Olsen, daughter of Meg Olsen ’94, enjoys ice fishing with a new friend at the ISS Holiday Family Party.

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NOTE WO R THY CLASS OF 1966

Writes Mike Seltzer, “I did take Dr. Armstrong’s advice but modified it slightly. Instead of ‘moving out of the shallows and into the depths,’ I elected to move to the ‘heights.’ Yes, my wife, Kathy, and I moved last year to a mountaintop north of Asheville, N.C. We are enjoying hiking with our two beagles, and I am playing some golf and tennis as well. I also enjoy welding, woodworking, and wood turning. I retired after 30 years of solo ENT practice.”

CLASS OF 1970

The Rev. Canon Stephen Askew has been named Dean of St. Matthew’s Episcopal Cathedral in Laramie, Wyo. Since 2005, Askew has served as Canon to the Ordinary for the Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee. Prior to that, he served two churches in Tennessee and two in Alabama. He is married to Patricia Tanzer Askew. The couple has four children and two grandchildren.

CLASS OF 1978

Carole Griffin has opened a second Continental Bakery location in downtown Birmingham. Continental Bakery Downtown took over the space formerly occupied by Mix bakery and café in the One Federal Place building on Fourth Avenue North in January. The menu includes breakfast and lunch favorites from Mix, Continental Bakery, and Griffin’s popular café, Chez Lulu.

CLASS OF 1979

Stuart Whitehurst will visit Birmingham on Sat., June 21, as part of the Antiques Roadshow 2014 Summer Tour. A familiar face on the popular PBS series, Whitehurst is co-founder and co-owner of Marvin & Whitehurst Appraisal Group, Inc., and a 28-year veteran of the auction industry. Tickets are free, but ticket applications are due by April 7. Visit www.pbs.org/ antiques for more information.

CLASS OF 1980

ISS Board Member John Abbot has joined Telx, a leading provider of interconnection and data center services, as Chief Financial Officer. Abbot will help shape and drive key aspects of Telx’s financial investments and strategic direction. He previously served as Executive Vice President and CFO at Insight Communications. Prior to Insight, John worked for 12 years as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs. He received his M.B.A. from Harvard University, his master’s degree in engineering from Pennsylvania State University, and his bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Naval Academy.

CLASS OF 1982 Salient Partners, a $20 billion asset management firm based in Houston, has appointed Ben Hunt as Chief Risk Officer. Hunt was most recently a portfolio manager for Tiedemann Investment Group in New York City and is the author of Epsilon Theory, a popular weekly newsletter for money managers and investors that examines the capital markets through the lenses of game theory and history. Katrina Armstrong Randall, MD, MSCE, a world-renowned investigator in the areas of medical decisionmaking, quality of care, and cancer prevention and outcomes, was recently appointed as Massachusetts General Hospital’s physician-in-chief of the MGH Department of Medicine. She is the first woman to lead the Department. Armstrong served previously as chief of the Division of General Medicine and professor of Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Armstrong is a graduate of Yale University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and joined the University of Pennsylvania in 1996 as a physician-scientist fellow in the Division of General Internal Medicine. Throughout her career, she has received a number of awards and honors, including the FOCUS Award for the Advancement of Women in Medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in 2011. She is also the author or co-author of more than 130 peer-reviewed journal articles.

ISS alumnus David Oh ’87 visited the ISS campus in December to talk to 8th grade science students about the challenges—and thrill—of landing NASA’s Curiosity Rover on the surface of Mars. Oh, who served as lead flight director for the mission, hopes that Curiosity will still be “out there and going” 20 years from now. He encouraged those with an interest in science and math to pursue a career in the sciences: “Science and engineering change what we can do in the world and how we interact with it,” he said.

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Left: Incoming Board Member Hanson Slaughter ’90 with children John and Virginia at the 2013 ISS Legacy Family Reception. Right: Clara Chung Fleisig with her husband, Glenn Fleisig, and daughters Emily ’13 and Julia ’16

Alumnus, Parent Join ISS Board ISS is pleased to announce that Hanson Slaughter ’90 and Clara Chung Fleisig, MD, MPH, P ’13, P ’16, have joined the ISS Board of Directors. Slaughter is Executive Managing Director at Sterne Agee, where he serves as the head of the Wealth and Estate Management Group and as a director of Sterne, Agee & Leach, Inc. He earned his B.S. from the University of Virginia (McIntire School of Commerce) and his M.B.A. from Duke University. Active in the Birmingham community, Slaughter is also President of the Board of the Friends of the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. “Of all the educational institutions I have attended,” says Slaughter, “Indian Springs School has had the greatest impact on me in terms of individual growth. I am thrilled to be a new member of the Board of ISS. The Birmingham community is very lucky to have a school of this caliber in our own backyard.”

CLASS OF 1983

University of Montevallo piano professor Cynthia Perry MacCrae performed all 32 of Ludwig van Beethoven’s piano sonatas during a 10-recital series from August 2013 through February 2014 at the LeBaron Recital Hall (University of Montevallo) and the Alabama Piano Gallery in Hoover. MacCrae earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music from the University of Alabama and her doctorate in piano performance and literature from the Eastman School of Music.

CLASS OF 1984

Michael Payne was appointed Executive Director of BikeHouston in January. Payne previously worked for 17 years in the renewable energy industry with a focus on wind projects in the United States and Europe. Payne holds an M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University with concentrations in finance and marketing. Prior to graduate school he lived in Atlanta, where he served on the board of the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition and built up a software and IP services company.

Dr. Chung is an allergy, asthma, and immunology specialist at Birmingham Allergy & Asthma Specialists and former President of the Alabama Society of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. She is also Regional Co-Chair of the MIT Educational Council and was formerly the Board President and Executive Director of Hilltop Montessori School. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Kansas School of Medicine, she also holds a Master’s of Public Health in Maternal and Child Health from UAB. “When my husband and I first moved to Birmingham over 25 years ago, we interviewed talented high school seniors from all over Birmingham, including those from ISS, who wanted to attend MIT. Way back then, we hoped that the children we would someday have would be those bright & confident Indian Springs students.  Our kids did end up going to Springs, and we all became part of the ISS family.  As a new ISS Board member, I have the honor to give back to the extraordinary ISS community and to help shape its future, just as Springs has helped shape the future of our children.”

According to Alabama state news in USA Today, the Alabama Democratic Party has recommended Mark Sabel to President Barack Obama as one of six attorneys to consider for a vacancy on the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Sabel is a graduate of Swarthmore College and an attorney at Sabel Law Firm, L.L.C., in Montgomery, Ala.

CLASS OF 1985

Sanjay Khare has been named President of Janrain, a Portland, Ore., software company that provides customer profile management solutions. Previously, Khare was Executive Vice President at Vesta Corp., the leading provider of payment solutions for global mobile network operators such as AT&T, Vodafone, and China Mobile. Khare holds M.B.A. and J.D. degrees from Stanford University and earned his undergraduate degree in economics and statistics from the University of Chicago.

CLASS OF 1986

Mike Hase has teamed with chef/owner Ludovic Eveno and co-owner Rachel Knox to open the Agricola Street Brasserie in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dishes at the French-inspired restaurant, which opened last fall, feature fresh, locally sourced ingredients. IN DIAN

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CLASS OF 1994

A LU M N I L I F E

Baby Café Birmingham New Center Provides Support To Breastfeeding Moms

ISS alumna and OB-GYN Dr. Jesanna Cooper ’94 (center) has teamed up with pediatrician and ISS mom Dr. Beth Sahlie Scott (right), breastfeeding advocate and ISS mom Dr. Cathy Toms (left), and several other Birmingham-area partners to launch Baby Café Birmingham, part of a growing, nationwide network of breastfeeding drop-in centers that offer services to support breastfeeding mothers. Breastfeeding provides infants with important protection from a number of illnesses that can be fatal, says Cooper, so it’s no surprise that Alabama, which has very low breastfeeding rates, has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. A national study recently called Birmingham a “first food desert” based on mothers’ access to breastfeeding support. Birmingham Baby Café, which celebrated its grand opening on Feb. 21, is now open to the public from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday at Sixth Avenue Baptist Church, which donated space for the weekly meetings. A physician and lactation consultant are present at each meeting.

CLASS OF 1990

Laura Moon Hopson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at the University of Alabama, having received her degrees from Bowdoin College (B.A.), Columbia University (M.S.W.), and the University of Texas at Austin (Ph.D.). Her areas of interest and expertise are evidence-based practice, prevention of risk behavior among adolescents, social work services in schools, and school climate.

CLASS OF 1991

Adam Lichtenstein writes, “On Aug. 1, 2013, our twin daughters, Sophia and Netanya, were born at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.

Marshall (Jonathan) Urist, M.D., Ph.D., has joined Royalty Pharma (a healthcare private equity firm) as Vice President, Research and Investments. Dr. Urist spent the last eight years at Morgan Stanley in equity research, most recently as Executive Director and the senior biotechnology analyst.

CLASS OF 1995

At Night We Walk in Circles by Daniel Alarcón has been listed as a Best Book of 2013 by National Public Radio, BookPage, Bookriot, Flavorwire, and the San Francisco Chronicle. The novel, which also received enthusiastic reviews in The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times, was released in October. Matthew Berland is an Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D.in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University and completed a postdoc in Computer Science at UT Austin. He studies how people learn complex skills (like computer programming) from and with games. In doing so, he builds games and research tools for students, teachers, researchers, and museumgoers. Bestselling author, activist, and videoblogger John Green will receive a special recognition, the Innovators Award, in April as part of the 34th Annual L.A. Times Book Prizes for his dynamic use of online media to entertain and engage young adults. Green and his brother, Hank, launched Project for Awesome, a video sharing and charitable fundraising website, which raised more than $860,000 for charities in a two-day period in December 2013. The movie adaptation of Green’s bestselling novel The Fault in Our Stars is scheduled to open in theaters on June 6. Released by 20th Century Fox, it tells the story of two teenagers who fall in love in a cancer support group.

CLASS OF 1997

Paget Pizitz and Harriet Reis, coowners of Birmingham’s popular Melt food truck, plan to open a Melt restaurant in the city’s resurgent Avondale area. Along with their executive chef and partner Joey Dickerson, they will continue to operate the food truck (which they affectionately call “Matilda”). When it’s not out on the streets and at special events, Matilda will be parked outside the new restaurant.

UAB OPENS ABROMS-ENGEL INSTITUTE FOR THE VISUAL ARTS The Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts opened its doors in January to UAB art students and the general public. Named for principal donors Judy and Hal Abroms P ’72, P ’77 and Ruth and Marvin Engel P ’75 and designed by architect Randall Stout, UAB’s beautiful new art and art education facility houses three galleries, a sculpture garden, state-of-the-art classrooms, art and design studios, faculty offices, and storage facilities for the university’s collection of 700 art works. It is located across the street from the Alys Stephens Center on 10th Ave. South in Birmingham, part of UAB’s Arts Plaza. 28

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CLASS OF 1998

Sarah Urist Green, former curator of contemporary art for the Indianapolis Museum of Art, has launched The Art Assignment, a weekly PBS Digital Studios production. The interactive show features Green visiting artists around the country and asking them to create and demonstrate art “assignments” for viewers, who are then invited to share their completed assignments via social media. John Green ’95, her husband, is executive producer of the show, which they hope will expose a new audience to contemporary art.

A LU M N I L I F E Mia Swier is a Los Angeles-based Writer/Producer at Fox Broadcasting. Prior to joining the Fox Family, she was a producer at Showtime Networks for promotional content of series/theatricals, including Dexter, Homeland, Weeds, Californication, The Twilight Saga, and other series and documentaries. She also works red carpet events/ press for Fox and Showtime Networks. While attending New York University’s Steinhardt School for Media Studies and Television Production, she worked at various networks, including ABC, NBC, and USA Network and TV programs, including Saturday Night Live, Who Wants to be a Millionaire, The Tony Awards, The Daytime Emmy Awards, The Superbowl, The Thanksgiving Day Parade, and others. On the side, Swier is lead singer in the LA-based rock band Mad Moon Riot and bassist in the NYC-based all-girl tribute band Guns ’n Hoses.

CLASS OF 2005 CLASS OF 2000

Andrew Beenken, M.D., Ph.D., is an Internal Medicine Resident at New York Presbyterian Hospital—Columbia University Medical Center. He graduated from Yale University with a B.S. in Chemistry and received his M.D. and Ph.D. at New York University School of Medicine.

CLASS OF 2003

Birmingham-based rockers Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires have signed with the Seattle-based label Sup Pop Records. The group features Bains on guitar and vocals. The band cut their latest record, a follow-up to their debut, “There is a Bomb in Gilead,” last summer in Nashville. Alice Hawley, daughter of Beth and Kirk Hawley ’66, and Henry S. Long III ’01, son of Gina and Hank Long ’70, are excited to announce their engagement. Long is an attorney practicing with the Butler Snow law firm in Birmingham, specializing in corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, venture capital, and private equity work. He currently serves as President of the Rotaract Club of Birmingham and on the Studio by the Tracks Junior Board. Hawley is a counselor in private practice specializing in adolescent psychology, family counseling, and couples therapy. She is a member of the Ballet Guild of Birmingham and serves on the Birmingham Landmarks Junior Board. After their wedding on June 28, the couple plans to reside in Birmingham. Jason Riffe, a student at Union Theological Seminary and minister at Abyssinian Baptist Church, gave the invocation for the charter meeting of the New York City Council for 2014-2017 in January. The meeting was historic, as Melissa Mark-Viverito of the 8th District was voted in unanimously to be Speaker; she is the first Latina to hold the position. Writes Jason, “I delivered the invocation as Minister Jason S. Riffe of Abyssinian Baptist Church and prayed for the 23-member freshman class of this City Council, the agenda and vote, and unity among the Council. Council Member Inez Dickens of the 9th made the motion to enter the invocation into the record and thanked Abyssinian and Rev. Butts (the pastor of my church) for the work we continue to do in the community.”

ISS Board Member Rusty Rushton ’74 reports that UHP (UAB University Honors Program) alumnus Felix Kishinevsky was awarded Best Paper by a UAB student in obesity-related research by the Science Unbound Foundation. Papers by students at UAB, the New York Obesity Research Center at Columbia University, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine were considered. Felix, who completed a Psychology degree and 5th-year master’s at UAB and is currently completing the dual master’s in Health Care Management and MBA at UAB, conducted his research under the mentorship of Dr. Rosalyn Weller and Dr. Jim Cox (Department of Psychology). His paper “fMRI reactivity on a delay discounting task predicts weight gain in obese women” was published in the April 2012 issue of Appetite.

CLASS OF 2006

Shaina Shealy is studying for a master’s degree in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Writes Shealy, “My couch is open to visitors!”

CLASS OF 2009

Ben Thuss is co-founder of triptap (which does business as ezLife), a company that develops mobile software for hotels, allowing guests to access customer service, emergency information, and local attractions through the push of a button. Thuss and co-founder Matt Brodeur created the company through a business development class they took as students at High Point University. Two new partners, Hotel Assets Group and Pipeline Social Media Solutions, have signed deals with triptap. Thuss hopes to adapt the platform to include special offers and exclusive deals at participating hotels.

CLASS OF 2010

Sam Gregory designed the cover of the novel Cold Winter Rain,which was written by his father, Steven Gregory, and released in November 2013.

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M E MO RI AM Alumni Ray Hartwell ’65 died on Feb. 7 in Anniston. A graduate of Washington & Lee University, he served from 1969 to 1972 as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy as an antisubmarine warfare and nuclear weapons officer on the U.S.S. Lawrence. He earned a J.D. summa cum laude from the Washington & Lee School of Law and practiced from 1975 on with Hunton & Williams in Richmond, Va.; Brussels, Belgium; and Washington, D.C., where he was a senior partner in the firm’s global competition practice group. He is survived by his wife, Marianne Geeker; three sons from his prior marriage to Katherine Hock Hartwell, Ray V. Hartwell IV (Laurel), William S. Hartwell, and David F. Hartwell (Leslie Wilson); and one grandson. Dr. Richard Cunningham Crittenden ’69 died peacefully on Jan. 15 in Birmingham after a long struggle with colon cancer. A graduate of Washington & Lee University, he attended medical school at the UAB School of Medicine and practiced internal medicine in the Birmingham area for more than 30 years. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Miller Crittenden; two sons, Wink and Cosby (Caitlin); his mother, Mrs. Cond Glasgow Feddeman; two brothers, Tom Crittenden ’72 (Christi) and Malcolm (Kim); and a sister, Constance. Gary Barton ’70 of Albany, N.Y., died on June 25, 2013, at his residence. A graduate of Emory University and the University of Alabama, he was a retired librarian with the Dougherty County Public Library. Survivors include his wife, Gloria; two daughters, Mary Barton Prickett (Jarrod) and Caroline Barton Schmidt (Nick); his mother, Floetta B. Barton; and a sister, Kathy Barton Long. Rogers Bagley ’76 died on Feb. 9 in Arley, Ala. A graduate of Birmingham-Southern College, where he received a master’s in accounting, he was self-employed and a Master Mason. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Rose Bagley; stepson, Kent Hall (Gloria); and two grandchildren. Peter Fyfe Watson ’77 of Giles County, Tenn., died on Jan. 10 after a long fight with cancer. A graduate of Antioch College, he was a biotech and pharmaceutical consultant. He also served as assistant coach for the junior high girls soccer team at Richland School in Lynnville and previously coached in the county’s recreational soccer league. Survivors include his wife, Robin Shaw Watson; and two daughters, Georgia and Shelby.

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ISS To Recognize Outstanding Alum Joel Shin ’86 In Memoriam Indian Springs School will bestow a second Outstanding Alumnus Award in 2014 in memory of Joel Shin ’86, who died unexpectedly in January after suffering a heart attack at his home. A graduate of Harvard University and the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar, Shin was an international trade specialist and former campaign foreign policy adviser to President George W. Bush. (See full obituary below.) ISS History Teacher Dr. Bob Cooper will deliver remarks in his memory at the Outstanding Alum Award Presentation in May. “I always said Joel was the most outstanding student I ever taught,” says Cooper. “He was simply incredible.”

Joel Shin ’86 died unexpectedly on Jan. 21 after suffering a heart attack at his home in Arlington, Va. An international trade specialist and former campaign foreign policy adviser to President George W. Bush, Shin earned his bachelor’s degree, law degree, and a master’s in public policy from Harvard University and a master’s in comparative philology from the University of Oxford in England, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He was a principal at the Scowcroft Group, an international investment advisory firm, for 11 years before joining Evenflow Macro, a consulting firm in Washington, D.C., as a partner in 2013. Survivors include his parents, Dr. Myung Soo Shin and Betty Shin; and two brothers, Joseph Shin ’81 and Jordan Shin ’85. Betsy Blackmon ’93 died on Nov. 22, 2013, in Corpus Christi, Texas. A graduate of UAH, she was employed most recently by several energy companies and was involved with acquiring land for oil and gas exploration. Survivors include her father, Dr. John A. Blackmon; mother, Patricia L. Clem; stepfather, Jackson G. Shores, Jr.; stepmother, Dorian T. Blackmon; and a brother, John A. Blackmon II. Sarah Corry Markette ’95 died on May 14, 2013, in Birmingham. A graduate of North Georgia College and the University of Georgia, she worked as a psychiatric nurse at UAB. She is survived by her husband, Clinton Mark Edwards; her stepchildren, Lillian Rose and Charles Matthew Edwards; her parents, Charles and Ann Hendrickson; and her siblings, Marsha and Cliff Hill, Dale Hendrickson, Wesley Markette Pruitt, and Robert and Preston Hendrickson.


Friends and Family Former ISS Dining Hall Staff Member Martha George McClinton of Helena, Ala., died on Nov. 16, 2013. Survivors include her daughter, Sandra Campbell (Ron); son, Ricky McClinton; brother, Don Honeycutt (Ann); four grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. Edward Sweeney Ames, husband of Sarah Simmons Ames ’96, died on Oct. 3, 2013, after an unexpected massive stroke. A graduate of Lewis and Clark College and the University of Texas Law School, he practiced law, working in the Bexar County District Attorney’s office, and then went to work for his family’s retail gift business, Hanley-Wood. Survivors also include his parents, George and Annabell Ames; brother and sister-in-law, George Scott and Meredith Ames; and parents-in-law, Bettie and Tom Borton and Rene and John Simmons ’65.

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Pamela Ann Furnas of Hoover, Ala., mother of Matthew Furnas ’06, died on Nov. 22, 2013. A graduate of Denison University and Capital University School of Law, she was retired from Regions Bank, where she served as Vice President and Trust Officer. Survivors also include her husband, Howard E. Furnas III; brother, Craig T. Ferris; mother-in-law, Gail Abbott Furnas; and brothersin-law, Paul A. Furnas (Shannon) and Christopher C. Furnas (Donna).

Charlotte Lusco, mother of Leslie Leopard ’84, died on July 8, 2013, after an extended illness. A graduate of BirminghamSouthern College and the University of Montevallo, she worked as a teacher, vice principal, and principal until her retirement in 2000. Survivors also include her husband, former ISS Latin teacher John Lusco; two additional children, Keith Lusco (Ann) and Bobby Lusco; her brother, Bob Fowler; and seven grandchildren. Former ISS Board Member Leo Kayser died on Oct. 26, 2013. A graduate of the University of Michigan, he served his country during World War II as an officer in the Army Air Corps. For 60 years, he headed investment banking at Kayser & Company. Survivors include his son, Leo Kayser III ’62; his daughter, Deborah K. Strauss; a grandson, Kayser Strauss ’96; and two great-grandchildren. Whitney Leigh Norris Gentry, sister of Stephanie Norris Schambeau ’87, died Feb. 15 at her home in Vestavia Hills, Ala., after a brief illness. She attended Indian Springs in 1987-88 and made lifelong friends during that time. Survivors include her husband, Michael Gentry; three children, Isabella “Bella” Caroline, Livia Mae, and Michael “Cael” Leo; mother, Nancy Manning Norris Schillaci (Ben); father, Dennis Norris (Anne Platt); and sister, Stephanie Norris Schambeau (Kevin).

TO BE COMPLETE. Show your loyalty to Indian Springs School by making a gift to the 2013-14 Annual Fund. Your gift is so important. Did you know: • TUITION AND FEES COVER ONLY 81% of the funds needed to operate the school. • CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ANNUAL FUND ARE CRITICAL to the operating budget, helping fund financial aid, student activities, faculty salaries, library acquisitions, and technology initiatives. • THE SPRINGS FOR LIFE SOCIETY: A Commitment to Lifelong Giving is a giving society for those who pledge to contribute to the Indian Springs School Annual Fund in some way every year. Please take time today to give by visiting www.indiansprings.org/onlinegiving.

Thank you for your generous support!

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ISS ALUMNI WEEKEND SCHEDULE THURSDAY, APRIL 10 6:30 p.m. Directors’ Dinner (by special invitation to honor the school’s top giving societies) FRIDAY, APRIL 11 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Attend a Favorite Class or Two 11:30 a.m. Sing With the Choir – Concert Hall 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. Informal Lunch – Dining Hall 3 p.m. Announcing Springs Eternal 7 p.m. Alumni-Faculty Reception for All Classes – Aloft Hotel, Homewood, Ala. SATURDAY, APRIL 12 9 a.m. Run the ISS Cross Country Trails – Meet by Town Hall 9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Registration, Refreshments and Memorabilia – Town Hall Lounge Cool Things for Kids (for ages 3-11 – adult-supervised activities while alumni are on campus) – Blue Lounge 9:45 a.m. Campus Tours (led by current students) – Depart from Town Hall 10:30 a.m. ISSINFO (Q&A of ISS happenings) - John Badham Theater 10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Rehearsal by the ISS Concert Choir and Members of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra of Bach: Credo from Mass in B minor – Concert Hall 11:30 a.m. Alumni and Family Lunch – Dining Hall 1:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Tailgating and Soccer Games – Ray Woodard Field 1:30 p.m. ISS Girls vs. Altamont 3:30 p.m. ISS Boys vs. Altamont Evening Individual Reunion Class Parties (for class years ending in “4” and “9”) – Various Locations SUNDAY, APRIL 13 9 a.m. Continental Breakfast – Dining Hall 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. Brunch – Dining Hall 10 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Reflection by the Lake – The Hut 10:30 a.m. 50th Reunion Brunch – Director’s Home 3 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Performance by the ISS Concert Choir and Members of the Alabama Symphony Orchestra of Bach: Credo from Mass in B minor – Concert Hall REGISTER TODAY AT www.indiansprings.org/ 3 2 S P R I N G 20 1 4 alumniweekend2014

U P CO M I N G E VEN TS Alumni Weekend 2014 Celebrate Springs Eternal! Join us April 10-13 as we celebrate Springs Eternal with parties, campus tours, family fun, a reception for all classes, and the launch ceremony for the creation of Indian Springs School’s new classrooms. (See full schedule at left.) All events are free except the Saturday night Reunion Class Parties (for class years that end in “4” and “9”), and special Springs rates are available at area hotels. Visit www.indiansprings.org/alumniweekend2014 today to learn more and register!

Reunion Class Party Time! Alumni from class years that end in “4” or “9” will be celebrating Reunion Class Parties on Saturday, April 12! If you have not yet heard from your class agent about your party, use the contact information below to learn party locations and times: Class of 1959 M.D. Smith IV mdsmith@hiwaay.net Class of 1964 Leo Sullivan-Bashinsky lmsb3@aol.com Class of 1969 Monecia Miller, ISS Development Associate mmiller@indiansprings.org Class of 1974 Fred Wallace fwallace@eye-and-vision.com Class of 1979 Edward Shelswell-White edwardshelswellwhite@ icloud.com Class of 1984 E. Rachel Gould Fowler fowler2831@bellsouth.net Class of 1989 Dr. Sara Kim kimsara101@gmail.com

Dr. Claire Edwards edwardsc@montevallo.edu Niamh Tuohy Clarke ntclarke@att.net Class of 1994 James Spector jamesaspector@gmail.com Class of 1999 Monecia Miller, ISS Development Associate mmiller@indiansprings.org Class of 2004 Rachel Aland rachel.aland@gmail.com Sarah Abroms Kunin sabroms@gmail.com Bizza Theibert elizabeth.theibert@gmail.com Lake Trechsel laketrechsel@gmail.com Class of 2009 Collin Janich cjanich@indiansprings.org


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SAVE T H E DATE !

Dig out your favorite sports jersey and mark your calendar today to be our guest for Sports 101 on Saturday, Nov. 1! Hosted by the ISS Parents Association to raise money for the ISS Annual Fund, our 101 events celebrate the talents and expertise of ISS alumni, faculty, parents, and friends as the ISS community gathers for the school’s biggest fundraiser of the year. Funds raised support student scholarships, facility improvements, classroom needs, and more. Sports 101, our sixth annual 101 fundraiser, will feature:

Main Event

The Science of Baseball: Maximizing Performance and Preventing Injury Glenn Fleisig, Ph.D., P ’13, P ’16, Research Director, American Sports Medicine Institute

Choose-A-Class Options •

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Building Regions Field Ed Cassady ’76, Senior VP/CFO, Robins & Morton Keith Owens P ’17, President, MBA Engineers Sports TV: Starting the Golf Channel Phillip Hurst ’85, Founding Programming Director, The Golf Channel From Youth Hockey to NASCAR: Bringing You the Stories of Each Season Neely Harris Lohmann ’96, Senior Deputy Editor, ESPN The Magazine Sports Law: Representing Universities and Coaches in NCAA Infraction Cases William King P ’12, Sports Attorney, Lightfoot, Franklin & White, LLC

• • • •

Sports Medicine: From Prehab to Rehab Glenn Fleisig, Ph.D., P ’13, P ’16, Research Director, American Sports Medicine Institute Brad Goodman, M.D., P ’15, Alabama Orthopedic, Spine & Sports Medicine Associates Ethan White, M.S.P.T., P ’15, P ’17, Owner, EW Motion Therapy Ahead of the Game: Tales of High School Recruiting Luke Robinson ’91, Broadcaster, AHSAA Radio Network Minor League Baseball Teams of the ’50s and ’60s David Noone, Associate Director/Dean of Academics, ISS The History of American Football Paul McGee, Mathematics Teacher, ISS Alabama v. Auburn Sports Trivia Contest www.indiansprings.org/sports101


IndIan SprIngS School 1 9 0 Wo o d w a r d d r i ve indian Springs, aL 35124 205-988-3350 w w w. i n d i a n s p r i n g s . o r g

Help us stay in touch! Email indiansprings@indiansprings.org with your name, class year, and anything else you would like to share so we can keep our email records up to date. Thank you!

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Indian Springs School Magazine - Spring 2014  
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