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LEARNING HAS

NO LIMITS. BAYH COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

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AFTER 150 YEARS

OF TRAINING TEACHERS,

WE KNOW OUR WAY

AROUND A CLASSROOM. BAYH COLLEGE OF EDUCATION Teaching and Learning | Educational Leadership | Communication Disorders and Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology

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WELCOME

We are Indiana State educators, and we are excited about the future. Parents and educators alike see a changed world, and their schools and social services must respond in kind. At the Bayh College of Education, we are surrounded by dynamic students and faculty who are prepared to enact those transformations. Our close-knit community of teachers, researchers, and lifelong learners is uniquely suited to cultivate the next generation of educators. Leading by example, our instructors inspire students to take their A-game to the classroom. We immerse our students in robust practicums—the backbone of our programs. We show them how to access the vast resources our connected world provides, finding new ways to engage learners. Our graduates stride confidently into professional roles as teachers, counselors, school psychologists, speech-language pathologists, principals, and superintendents. Our alumni embrace diversity, champion innovation, instill kindness, create caring involved communities, and change lives for the better—one child, one school, one family at a time. We’d be thrilled to have you join us. Here’s a glimpse inside our world.

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HISTORY

A beacon of learning— then and now. Indiana State University has a 150-year foundation of preparing educators and continues to be an innovative leader today. A spark of light during the dark days following the Civil War, the Indiana State Normal School in Terre Haute helped usher in a modern era. The idea in 1865 was to train teachers—and send them back to their communities to enlighten young minds all over the state. “This really served a class of Hoosiers who had no access to higher education,” said Dan Clark, associate professor of American history at State. The difference was especially felt in under-served rural areas. “They couldn’t afford to attend the private academies. They were poor kids. Kids from the country, kids from the sticks,” Clark said.

graduate as extraordinarily trained teachers, speech-language pathologists, principals, superintendents, and more—all who change the lives of their students in large school districts and small, urban areas and rural. The Normal School became the Indiana State Teachers College in 1929, Indiana State College in 1961, and Indiana State University in 1965. No matter the name—after 150 years, Indiana State’s Bayh College of Education serves as a catalyst for innovation, creativity, and growth. It has stayed true to its founding, while embracing positive change and advancement.

Today, the Bayh College of Education’s students continue to come from all over the state. They

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TEACHING AND LEARNING

Teaching is a way of life. Bayh College of Education alumni transform classrooms. As educators, they: ■

 ustomize instruction to accommodate a variety C of learning styles.

 pply best practices in project-based learning to A engage students.

 elcome parent/community involvement in a W process they see as holistic and inclusive.

 nderstand the importance of inclusion and are U prepared to acknowledge and adjust to diverse cultures in and out of the classroom.  se multiple forms of assessment to capture and U recognize the merits of all students.  apture data to help shape evidence-based C improvement programs.

“The teaching education program was the main deciding factor in my decision to attend State. The fact I was in a classroom observing by second semester of my freshman year was terrific.” —Allison Giesting, elementary education major

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“I WANT OUR STUDENTS TO TAKE RISKS, QUESTION WITH ENERGY, AND EXPLORE THROUGH RESEARCH AND LEARNING.” —Dr. Georgianna Duarte, chairperson and professor, Department of Teaching and Learning, Ph.D. Curriculum and Instruction, Early Childhood Learning

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FACULTY SPOTLIGHT: GEORGIANNA DUARTE

Without teachers, there would be no other professions. A friendship with a Benedictine nun inspired Dr. Georgianna Duarte to redirect her dreams of becoming a journalist to become an advocate for children’s rights. “I never would have gone into education if not for recognizing those in my life as mentors. Sister Roseann was the one who opened my eyes to human rights through the lens of children,” Duarte said of the nun she still visits in Pennsylvania. “I always thought I would be a journalist and travel the world, but I have had the opportunity to write several books and articles. Through my own curiosity and will, I traveled the world anyway.” Duarte started her career as a teacher at Head Start and Migrant Head Start and later worked in inner city schools and as a consultant in Indian Head Start. For more than 40 years, she has served as a consultant for the Office of Head Start in Washington, D.C. She would also serve as faculty at New Mexico State University and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee before going to the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, where she spent nearly half of her 41-year career as a professor until her retirement in 2015. Duarte spent a brief time working at Migrant Head Start and traveling to the Middle East before the opportunity at Indiana State led her back into higher education. “My background is in early childhood, but it has always focused on language issues, which is really talking about equity and human rights. Social justice has always been my focus, and I’ve always had my eyes on children’s rights,” she said. “It’s taken me all over the world—Western Africa, the Middle East, Nepal, and years collaborating in Peru and Chile. I have been in bilingual education for almost my entire career, and I think my early experiences working with children who have come to this country from refugee status opened up my path of interest.”

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TEACHING AND LEARNING FACULTY

“Professor Marilyn Leinenbach has by far been my greatest role model at Indiana State. I love how I could instantly tell how much she loved her job and how much she truly wanted each of her students to succeed. She helped me and many other students through difficult times and experiences in TOTAL. Most importantly, she taught me to love math and love teaching math. I truly believe I am a better teacher because “Dr. Robin Burden is a of her guidance.” wonderful professor. She —Marlee Short, elementary education major takes time in class to help you understand content, she gets to know you on a personal “One of my favorite professors at level, and she demonstrates Indiana State in the college of the kind of educator that we education is Dr. Melissa Nail. Dr. Nail should all strive to be.” goes out of her way to help students —Caitlyn Isenberg, elementary education major

if they are struggling and gives wonderfully constructive feedback. Personally, she helped me get started on my Honors thesis last semester. She also recommended me as a presenter for the Critical Questions in Education Conference taking place in New Orleans this spring. She helped me draft a proposal, and because of her guidance, I was accepted! I would not be where I am without her.”

—Brittany Vancil, elementary education major

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BEST

Scholarships with built-in personal growth yield endless rewards. For exceptional scholars majoring in education, the college has created the BEST program: Bayh College of Education Scholars to Teachers. Their reward is an enhanced learning experience: ■

 utside reading and resources draw them deeper O into the subject matter. J ournaling and discussion groups prompt reflection on their vocation. Service projects strengthen ties to the community.  tudent mentoring and outreach develop S leadership skills.  hadowing exercises reveal an array of S career options.

Two themes embedded throughout the program are “Transforming Lives and Communities” and “Inclusive Excellence.” BEST Scholars participate in local, state, national, and global educational activities and programs, culminating with required student teaching in a diverse setting: either abroad, in one of the Navajo Nation schools, or in a culturally diverse setting.

You can learn more about the program at indstate.edu/education/best.

 ampus engagement allows for valuable C networking opportunities.

“Given this critical time in education, we need to intentionally recruit and scaffold passionate young people to develop leadership and service.” —Dr. Pamela Gresham, BEST Scholars program director

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TOTAL

Becoming the TOTAL teacher. Indiana State’s future educators experience a teacher’s life—more than 300 hours of it—before their student teaching semester. The TOTAL, Teachers of Tomorrow Advancing Learning, immersion experience puts them in elementary classrooms from 7:30 in the morning until “whenever” in the afternoon, as full-time interns at local schools.

The TOTAL approach to practicums applies evidence-based practice: ■

Intensive, bell-to-bell time in front of real classrooms starts sooner and lasts longer.  ield experiences are stronger when they F intertwine theory and practice.

Bayh College of Education’s one-of-a-kind program develops students into dedicated teachers much earlier in their college careers.

“They come in and they’re nervous and just don’t know what they’re in for. And once they get into it, they realize this is what they want to do for a career, and they go for it 100 percent.” —LeeAnne Bamberg, TOTAL coach teacher, Vigo County School Corporation “My TOTAL semester finally gave me the ‘This is what I’ve been waiting for’ feeling.” —Cora Jo Cox, elementary education major

“I feel like I’m prepared to use all kinds of different strategies in my classes because of what I’ve learned as a TOTAL intern.” —Brittany Parrett, elementary education major

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CHILL

For aspiring teachers, stage fright happens. That’s why there’s CHILL. For a student teacher facing the first week managing a roomful of rowdy middle-school students, it’s easier said than done. That’s one reason education students at Indiana State formed CHILL. Colleagues Helping Implement Lifelong Learning is a peer-to-peer mentoring program that helps pre-service teachers overcome the nervousness that often precedes their first solo flights in real classrooms.

“It’s our job to give students an edge, and I think we’re doing that with CHILL,” said Della Thacker, club sponsor and associate professor in Teaching and Learning. CHILL has grown into a multi-faceted networking program. As graduates and more advanced students go into the field, they come back as mentors for first- and second-year students.

“It’s great for students who are just starting out in the secondary education program to get some help. We even have CHILL members who are now teachers come to our meetings to hear what we have to say and give advice.” —Rachel Poer, English teaching major

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EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

What education leaders need now. The training to self-renew. We’re asking more of our administrators than ever before. In the effort to improve education, leadership must implement new practices and programs that rejuvenate their institution’s culture— all while meeting expectations of parents, students, colleagues, and their community. The scholar-practitioner model is an educational method focused on the practical application of scholarly knowledge. Bayh College of Education’s Educational Leadership professors have enhanced the formula, creating degree programs that draw out the best from adult learners. Here are some highlights: ■

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Assignments are built on field-based observations. Inquiry-based learning starts by posing questions, problems, or scenarios—rather than presenting established facts and preordained knowledge.

Data-driven approaches bring certainty to team members working to enact change. A cohort structure does more than collaborate: Members challenge and support one another. Diverse perspectives from around the world provide depth and insight. Positivity and passion tap into the stream of ideas, support, and advice flowing from the college’s online professional network. T op accreditation and advanced foundational studies attract high-achieving participants and faculty. Varied course delivery allows all of the above. Flexibility for the working professional student’s career goals, work, and family obligations.


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“IT’S ALL SO RAPID THAT IT KEEPS ME ALIVE. I LOVE TO CHECK WHAT’S TRENDING AND USE THAT INFORMATION IN MY CLASSROOM BECAUSE THE STUDENTS WANT TO KNOW THAT WE ARE NOT STILL RELYING ON THE SAME OLD INFORMATION. IT ALL KEEPS ME ENERGIZED AND EXCITED AND LOVING WHAT I DO.” —Dr. Mary Howard Hamilton, professor, Department of Educational Leadership

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FACULTY SPOTLIGHT: MARY HOWARD-HAMILTON

Embracing change sparks teaching moments. The evolution of higher education continues to bolster Dr. Mary Howard-Hamilton’s desire to learn and grow in her field. “We’re beginning to move into a society now where we have to recognize each other for our unique gifts. These are gifts we bring to make the campus better, stronger. They push our faculty to be more accepting of uniqueness and our administration to think outside the box to make sure everyone is included,” said HowardHamilton, professor of educational leadership. It is the constant change and transitions in higher education, as well as society, that have driven Howard-Hamilton to remain steadfast in her writing, research, and starting substantive and difficult conversations in her classes since she first arrived on Indiana State’s campus 12 years ago. “I love how our world is changing, but yet we still see similarities to things that I was exposed as a young scholar in the ’70s and ’80s,” she said. “I see everything recycling, and it’s fun to be able to talk to my students about current political and educational situations and connect those situations to where we’ve already been.” The rise of social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram allows for rapid dissemination of information that may sometimes be dizzying for some, but for Howard-Hamilton, they are educational tools to engage students. “It’s all so rapid that it keeps me alive,” she said. “I love to check what’s trending and use that information in my classroom because the students want to know that we are not still relying on the same old information. It all keeps me energized and excited and loving what I do.”

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EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP FACULTY

“Dr. Terry McDaniel was extremely supportive of me personally and professionally. His enthusiasm for my success continues to be uplifting. His influence in school district-level leadership throughout the state of Indiana can be measured in the number of leadership positions occupied by ISU graduates in which he “Dr. Amy French takes the time to create mentors. Dr. McDaniel truly unique and engaging ways of presenting is an amazing educator.” the material in class to create meaningful —David Marcotte, educational administration major discussion. Her willingness to get to know each student individually and provide “Dr. Bobbie Jo Monahan support and assistance with course work, is truly the best college student affairs work, and sometimes life professor I have ever had in general encourages me to improve at any of the colleges I myself every day.” have attended over the —Mitchell Furtner, student affairs and higher education major past 25 years. She really does care about the success of her students. She is absolutely cheerful. Her positive outlook is contagious. You can tell that she really wants you to succeed. She has been more than helpful and supportive of the projects I have undertaken. Her suggestions and aid have been invaluable. She has made me seriously consider a doctorate through ISU.” —Joe Bachan, school administration and supervision major

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Woodrow Wilson Foundation MBA Fellows in Education Leadership Indiana State continues its efforts to improve student success in classrooms across the state by welcoming the Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellows in Education Leadership. The MBA in Education Leadership is a unique program designed in partnership with Indiana State’s Scott College of Business and the Bayh College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership along with support and leadership from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. This exciting MBA program recruits and prepares a new generation of educational leaders who have the

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knowledge, skills, and tools to significantly improve learning in Indiana’s schools. Blending clinical practice in schools with innovative business school course work, the MBA in Education Leadership is designed to ensure graduates have the knowledge and skills not only to guide schools and districts in a changing education environment, but also close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between the country’s top-performing schools and those around the world.


LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION

It begins here: the Indiana Principal Leadership Institute. Indiana State’s Department of Educational Leadership, the Indiana Association of School Principals, and the state of Indiana have created a sophisticated post-graduate program that helps principals and their schools achieve more. The result is a two-year, intensive professional development program—IPLI. It is an immersive, non-traditional, multi-faceted journey, meant to deepen principals’ leadership skills while putting them to work improving their own schools.

“Research tells us that the best professional development is job-embedded, ongoing, active, and connected to data,” said Dr. Linda Marrs-Morford, IPLI director. “We took great care to include all those elements into an experience that is really about lifelong learning and professional synergy.” In just the first four cohorts, more than 159,000 students in 69 counties have been touched by the work of the 239 IPLI principals and their teachers.

“I have personally watched as our principals have returned from the seminars and regional meetings with data-driven, best instructional practices, collaborative links with principal colleagues throughout the state, and better reflections of their growth as school leaders.” —David Hoffert, superintendent, Warsaw Community Schools

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COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND COUNSELING, SCHOOL, AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Specializing in bridging gaps. Every day, the Department of Communication Disorders and Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology touches the lives of more than 1,000 students and clients through their courses and clinical training. They offer accredited graduate programs in school psychology, school counseling, clinical mental health counseling, and speech-language pathology along with an undergraduate program in communication sciences and disorders and a minor in counseling.

Opportunities for non-majors. In addition to its graduate degrees in counseling, the department offers counseling as a minor. This curriculum is a great fit for students entering any field that emphasizes working with people, including human resources, health care professions, criminal justice, and teaching. Students learn counseling techniques for individuals and groups, which can be applied to executive leadership, human resources, employee training, marketing research, health care professions, teaching, and a host of other fields.

“Our wonderful clinic, the international trips we offer, intensive community engagement, and small faculty-tostudent ratios produce outstanding beginning clinicians.” —Dr. Linda Sperry, department chairperson and professor

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“I ALWAYS REMIND MYSELF AND MY STUDENTS THAT COUNSELORS FORMING SUPPORTIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE PEOPLE THEY HELP IS WHAT WILL MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE IN THEIR CLIENTS’ LIVES.” —Dr. David Johnson, assistant professor, Department of Communication Disorders and Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology

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FACULTY SPOTLIGHT: DAVID JOHNSON

Helping students be better counselors. What started out as a research interest brought Dr. David Johnson to the classroom to work with students as they prepare for careers as counselors. When Johnson steps into a classroom at Indiana State, he’s keenly aware of his responsibility to his students—and the future clients they will counsel. “A lot of my research, teaching interests, and previous professional interests have centered on the training of counselors and understanding what helps students the most as they seek to start a career as a counselor,” said Johnson, assistant professor of counseling. “In my mind, as long as I can relate what I’m doing to helping my students be better counselors, then I am motivated to continue what I’m doing.” A former therapist for abused and neglected children, Johnson understands counselors’ most powerful tool is themselves and the bond they form with their clients. “If someone doesn’t grasp this idea, I think he or she could wind up doing a lot of lecturing and giving a lot of advice. Most clients who seek counseling have had a lot of people do that. They need something more,” he said. “I always remind myself and my students that counselors forming supportive relationships with the people they help is what will make all the difference in their clients’ lives.”

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COMMUNICATION DISORDERS AND COUNSELING, SCHOOL, AND EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FACULTY

“Dr. Bridget Roberts-Pittman has been very helpful through my time at ISU. She is always available to answer clinical or academic questions. She assisted in the application of the content we learned in the classroom to our clinical practice. She was more than willing to help me navigate the doctoral application process. She took time to read through my application materials and answered any question I had “Dr. Carrie Ball’s commitment to throughout each application.” her students and the profession —Katrina Myers, clinical mental health counseling major of school psychology has been a guiding example for “Without Dr. Anna Viviani’s me throughout my graduate clinical supervision and career. Her patience, expertise, academic guidance, I would and compassion have been not be the professional I am indispensable in guiding me on today. As both a faculty my path to achieving my goals.” member and director of —Michael McCarthy, school psychology major our program, she still finds time in her schedule for her students. She supported my efforts to seek out leadership opportunities, assisted me in professional development endeavors, and made sure I was in an environment that cultivated my clinical skills. She puts her heart into ensuring each and every one of her students succeeds and that Indiana State has one of the best clinical mental health counseling programs in the country.” —Francesca McCarthy, clinical mental health counseling major

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Molding students’ minds and communities’ lives. The Bayh College of Education lives what it teaches through involvement with the community and schools statewide. One-on-one tutoring at local schools, therapy services for children in student- and professionalstaffed clinics, and conferences and events that offer fresh ideas—learning reverberates far beyond the classroom walls of University Hall. “We are preparing students to be teachers, administrators, and counselors, so they must be involved in their communities if they are to be effective in those roles,” said Dr. Denise Collins. “We have a responsibility as citizens to participate in the lives of our communities and use what we learn to best prepare practitioners to work in those communities effectively.” Education is not a field where the best outcomes are derived in isolation, and students and faculty in the Bayh College possess particular skills and expertise that are of value to their communities. “We can only deliver the highest quality programming for students if we are immersed in real conditions of practice,” said Dr. Brad Balch.

“We have to be in our partner schools, involved in professional development for teachers and programs for students in order to achieve the highest standards in education. Our partnerships are a two-way commitment, and it is an absolute privilege to be a part of it.” Service efforts: ■

Counseling student clinicians

Center for Mathematics Education

Project Read!

Sycamore Readers

Chi Sigma Iota

Camp Bruce

Sycamore Educators Day

Counselor Day on Campus

Focus on Inclusion Conference

Professional Development Schools

 uke Energy Power of Reading and D Power of Math Summits Law and Leadership Conference

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NORMA AND WILLIAM GROSJEAN CLINIC

The Grosjean Clinic unites experiential learning, community service, and clinical practice. He came to the Rowe Center for Communicative Disorders to recover a treasure. A stroke suddenly left him unable to communicate—to find or use the right words, read a cherished book, or write a note to a loved one. “But after 13 weeks of treatment with me, he made incredible gains and, even more importantly, rediscovered his confidence,” said Haylie Dugan, a speech-language pathology graduate student. “I learned so much—not just about the profession, but also about life.” It’s these clinical experiences that make the Norma and William Grosjean Clinic—home to the Rowe Center for Communicative Disorders, Counseling Clinic, and Porter School Psychology Center—a special place for emerging clinicians like Dugan. Undergraduate and graduate students put classroom knowledge to work as they spend hours helping clients—and experiencing the reward of improving lives. “We’re so very fortunate that we can give our students real experience with real clients,” said

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Dr. Anna Viviani, assistant professor. “And all while being mentored in the moment with live supervision from licensed professionals in the three disciplines.” Together, students at the centers help provide critical services in speech-language therapy, mental health counseling, and psychological and educational evaluations of cognitive and emotional disabilities. “Our amazing clinic offers intensive community engagement for students and faculty,” said Dr. Linda Sperry, chairperson of the Department of Communication Disorders and Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology. “Opportunities for real-world experience and multiple levels of supervision enable us to produce outstanding license-eligible clinicians.”


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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CENTER

Helping each student create a bright future—including those who are taking their first step (literally). Since 1970, Indiana State’s Early Childhood Education Center (ECEC) has offered exceptional childcare and child development programs for children six weeks to six years old. When Tracy Ford enrolled her young daughter and son, she knew they were in good hands. “The teachers were excellent,” Ford said. “Sarah and Colin had a hands-on experience—they could touch things, experience smells, discover colors and shapes, and learn math, reading, and more. Plus, they met kids from different backgrounds— even from other countries.” And that early education, Ford said, helped launch her children’s later successes. Today, Sarah is a laboratory technician at the Center for Genomic Advocacy and Colin studies computer science at Indiana State. They’re two of many outstanding alumni of the ECEC, a licensed and nationally accredited program with the highest rating in the Indiana Paths to Quality Program.

“We know the best way to help prepare children for kindergarten—and beyond—is by reading to and with them, encouraging early literacy, and providing varied learning materials,” said Gail Gottschling, director of the ECEC. “We believe in hands-on, developmentally appropriate learning opportunities and base experiences on children’s developmental needs, strengths, and interests.” Plus, the ECEC is an excellent resource for academic research and experiential learning. As assistants, volunteers, or visitors fulfilling a class requirement, students can observe, interact with, or develop learning activities for children. “These opportunities are practical, pre-professional experiences,” Gottschling said. “Students have a reallife, hands-on learning opportunities that give them a head start in building a well-rounded résumé.”

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BLUMBERG CENTER

At the Blumberg Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Special Education, every student matters. That’s what drives the Blumberg Center to ensure students with exceptionalities receive the education they need to succeed. And with all of the extraordinary work it does, it’s no wonder why the Blumberg Center is a leading resource for schools in Indiana. “Whether you teach special education, general education, physical education, music, or another subject at any grade level—you will be touched by what we do,” said Carol Wetherell, director of the Blumberg Center. “You will have a student with special educational needs—whether it’s an individual who is gifted and talented, has a vision or hearing impairment, or has a learning disability. And when you do, you’ll have us at the Blumberg Center.” The Blumberg Center—funded by an Indiana State endowment plus state and federal grants— has helped hundreds of educators, school administrators, paraprofessionals, and parents provide the best educational experience for students with exceptionalities.

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Since 1985, it has secured $43 million for projects, faculty research, scholarships for State’s students, community engagements, programs, and trainings. The Blumberg Center offers direct consultations with individual schools and students across Indiana and provides professional development events to keep professionals informed on effective teaching methods, best practices, and special education laws. “I’ve found the Blumberg Center’s professional development training to be outstanding,” said Robin Thoma, Blumberg Center project coordinator. “After attending the center’s Focus on Inclusion Conference, I walked away with new ideas and strategies to implement, along with a support system of fellow educators.”


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STUDY ABROAD

Study abroad makes us better servant leaders at home. Today, we serve ever more diverse populations. Our faculty and alumni must operate within a rich global context to be relevant at home. Taiwan (top) Learning from the Asian Experience: Under the direction of Dr. Karen Liu, elementary education students received an in-depth view of teaching strategies and pedagogies used in Chinese classrooms. Ireland and England (middle) An Elementary Education and Special Education: Expanding Horizons to Dublin and London trip explored Irish and English children’s literature combined with historic, cultural, geographic, and elementary school experiences. Dr. Pat Wheeler and Dr. Kathryn Bauserman led the study group. South Africa (bottom) Dr. Mary Howard-Hamilton, of the Higher Education Leadership faculty, has led study trips to South Africa. Students were immersed in South African culture while studying the country’s newly transitioned higher education system.

Germany Students traced the footsteps of Friedrich Froebal, the “Father of Kindergarten,” visiting historical sites and early childhood education centers in Germany, with Dr. Yong Joon Park, associate professor in early childhood education. Great Britain Future social studies teachers accompanied Dr. Kevin Bolinger on an 18-day sojourn across the United Kingdom, immersed in the history of “The Island that Ruled the World.” India Eight graduate students in clinical mental health counseling traveled to India for an international conference on art and play therapies organized by professors. They studied recent neuroscience discoveries about how people process trauma and used creative arts as a therapeutic tool.

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NOTED BAYH COLLEGE OF EDUCATION ALUMNI

Our graduates are making an impact. Bayh College graduates are enthused, connected, and ready to impact the lives of our children. Dr. Ena Shelley, ’81, knows her place is in the classroom as a university professor. She joined the faculty at Butler University as an assistant professor of early childhood education in 1982. Even after she assumed the duties of the dean of the university’s College of Education in 2005, Shelley has continued to work as a professor while building a better educational foundation for

all students in Indiana through her involvement in education policy and legislation on the state and national levels. Her commitment to education in Indiana has won her accolades as the recipient of the 2016 Edward C. Pomeroy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Teacher Education from the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education.

“For me it is an opportune time. If you want to make a difference in the lives of students and be part of change, where else would you want to be other than education?” —Scotia Brown, M.S. ’79 counseling; principal, Sarah Scott Middle School, Terre Haute

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“I AM PROUD TO SHARE THAT IN MY ROLE AS DEAN AND PROFESSOR, I WAS ABLE TO OPEN A LAB SCHOOL. MY PREPARATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION HELPED ME TO UNDERSTAND THAT YOUNG CHILDREN ARE FILLED WITH CURIOSITY AND HOPE. THIS PERSPECTIVE WAS WHAT I SAW AND FELT IN MY EXPERIENCES AT ISU—THE MORE YOU LEARN, THE MORE YOU REALIZE HOW MUCH MORE THERE IS TO LEARN.” —Dr. Ena Shelley, M.S. ’81

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PROGRAMS IN BAYH COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

MAJORS

DOCTORATES

Elementary Education B.S.

Special Education (Mild Intervention) B.S.

Speech-Language Pathology B.S. ■

MINORS

Counseling

Early Childhood

English Language Learners

Middle School Math

Reading

Special Education Elementary

Special Education Secondary

MASTER’S ■

Elementary Education M.Ed.

Special Education (Mild Intervention) M.S.

Curriculum and Instruction M.Ed.

Educational Technology M.S.

Clinical Mental Health Counseling M.S. Communication Disorders— Speech-Language Pathology M.S.

School Counseling M.Ed.

School Psychology M.Ed.

School Administration and Supervision M.Ed.

Student Affairs and Higher Education M.S.

EDUCATIONAL SPECIALISTS ■

School Psychology Ed.S.

School Administration Ed.S.

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 ducational Administration E (Higher Education Leadership) Ph.D. Educational Administration (K-12) Ph.D.  uidance and Psychological Services— G School Psychology Ph.D.

LICENSURES Gifted and Talented J unior High/Middle School Instructional License for Elementary Teachers

CERTIFICATES ■

Curriculum and Instruction Ph.D.

 urriculum, Instruction, and Media Technology C for Higher Education and Industry Instructional Design

NON-DEGREE ■

 irector of Career and Technical Education D Post-Master’s  irector of Curriculum and Instruction Initial D License Post-Master’s

Director of Exceptional Needs Post-Master’s

Mental Health Counselor Endorsement

 chool Administration and Supervision Initial S License Post-Master’s  isual Impairment License Program for V Exceptional Needs School Counselor Licensure Post-Master’s


Learn more about the Bayh College of Education and schedule a visit today. indstate.edu/education

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Bayh College of Education University Hall 401 North 7th Street Terre Haute, IN 47809 812-237-2888 indstate.edu/education

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Bayh College of Education showcase piece