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GAZETTE THE CENTRE COUNTY

www.CentreCountyGazette.com

Let the festivals begin!

It’s that time of year as both the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts and the People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts get underway. Inside, there are features on both events, which take place in State College and Boalsburg, respectively./Pages 14-19

July 9-15, 2015

Volume 7, Issue 27

FREE COPY

CHAMPIONS!

Borough council paves way for 11-story building

CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

Carroll takes pride in Kepler Pool

By ZACH BERGER StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — It took a year to make its way from a local developer’s dream to an amendment passed by the borough council. On June 6, borough council members voted 6-1 in favor of the Collegiate Housing Overlay. The overlay district will allow for buildings up to 11 stories tall in the 500 block of East College Avenue, as originally proposed by Jeff Haas, the owner of Kildare’s Irish Pub. In order to reach those heights, which soar above the current maximum of seven stories, developers will need to include sustainable building features, commercial space on the first floor and two floors of graduate/professional housing. The proposal came with plenty of controversy as it made its way through borough government, and the June 6 vote was no exception. A number of residents came to the meeting to speak about the amendment, bringing mixed reviews ahead of council’s big decision. David Stone, who recently attempted a council run before losing in the primary, said he wishes the overlay covered more ground and looked more extensively at zoning in the downtown area. “I think there’s a lost opportunity to bring the community together around a more positive vision of how we can develop the town,” he said. “Unfortunately, that didn’t happen and we’re just considering one block here.” Peg Hambrick, who lives in the Highlands area of town, has no problem with development, but wants to see it come from community members, not developers such as Haas. “I am not anti-development and I am not antideveloper,” she said. “I think we have to start asking developers and incentivizing them to come forward with plans that we have made in our community. We need public partnerships with private entities and we need to ask them to fulfill our vision.” Susan Venegoni spoke on behalf of the Highlands Civic Association, which has largely been opposed to the Collegiate Housing Overlay. She took issue with the inclusion of graduate students in the incentives for extra floors. “I’ve followed this plan very closely,” she said. “I think this sets a very bad precedent, particularly in that graduate students are considered professionals. I think that’s a slippery slope.” On the other side of the debate, student representative Shawn Bengali spoke on behalf of the undergraduate student government, which reviewed the overlay proposal and supports the concept. “After studying the overlay, myself and the executive branch have come to the decision that we support it because it’s beneficial to both the students and the member of the community,” he said. “The Council, Page 4

By MATTHEW FELDMAN correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

Photo courtesy gopsusports.com

FORMER PENN STATERS Alyssa Naeher and Ali Krieger celebrate the United States’ 5-2 victory over Japan in the World Cup Final on July 5. The United States women captured their first World Cup title since 1999. For more on Krieger, see Page 3.

Bellefonte dedicates bridge in grand style By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

BELLEFONTE — Bellefonte residents turned out in force for a recent bridge dedication ceremony, which took place downtown following the Logan Fire Company Parade. A large crowd watched as the High Street Bridge officially became Veterans Bridge. Debra Burger, the driving force behind the name change, said that it was a picture-perfect evening in Bellefonte for the ceremony. “It turned out so wonderful,” Burger said. “The veterans were so appreciative. There were a lot of teary-eyed veterans. A lot of them said they weren’t sure that they wanted to participate in it … that it would bring back memories. But they were so glad that they did. They really felt honored by it.” Approximately 70 veterans acted as grand marshals in the parade. At the ceremony, there were emotional speeches by Army veterans Carol Clark-Baney and Pastor Calvin Miller. State Rep. Kerry Benninghoff, R-

Bellefonte, and U.S. Rep. Glenn “GT” Thompson, R-Howard Township, were also on hand for the ceremony. “Today, we rededicate this bridge as hallowed ground,” Thompson told the crowd. “Today, we commemorate this bridge to all who have answered the call to service. “What a fitting tribute, given that so many from our communities first answered this call to service crossing over this bridge as they boarded trains for training and deployment. For most, crossing this bridge a second time marked a return to loved ones and families following their service. For a few, they’ve yet to return.” As the parade snaked its way through Bellefonte, there was red, white and blue everywhere. The Bellefonte Area High School football team handed out small U.S. flags to spectators along the route prior to the parade. “Everyone went out of their way to make this a very nice parade,” Burger said. “The streets were lined with Bridge, Page 4

BELLEFONTE — The family atmosphere and child-friendly environment were two things that drew Raymond Carroll to the Centre County YMCA, and it began with a pair of shoes. Seventeen years ago, Carroll moved to central Pennsylvania from Yeadon, a suburb of Philadelphia. As the manager of a retail business, he interacted with children a lot, but one such interaction was particularly meaningful. Carroll was waiting on a mother and her son, and the mother refused to buy the son the shoes he wanted for school because he didn’t know how to tie them. Naturally, Carroll knelt down and began to teach the boy. Little by little, the boy learned. A month later, that same boy came running in the store to tell him that he still knew how to tie his own shoes. “That was when I knew that, after 13 years in retail management, I had to find something that would give me that same feeling of pride in what I do,” Carroll said. Carroll, Page 5

TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette

TAKING PRIDE: Raymond Carroll oversees the Kepler Pool for the Centre County YMCA.

‘We Are’ sculpture installed at Penn State By ALEXA LEWIS

correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — A new sculpture at University Park has brought Penn State’s “We Are” chant to three-dimensional life. The sculpture — which is the gift of the Class of 2013 — was unveiled on June 30 at the northwest corner of Curtin Road and University Drive beside the Intramural building, according to the Associated Press. The artwork, which spells out “We Are” in letters made of steel and sits on a concrete base, stands at 12 feet. “There is a lot of pride and history and lore behind the ‘We Are’ chant, and it conveys that sense of unity among all Penn Staters,” Geoff Hallet, the university’s director of student and recent graduate giving, told the Associated Press. The words to the alma mater in Fred Lewis Police ................................ 2 Opinion ............................ 7

Pattee’s original handwriting are also inscribed across the steel letters. Pattee, who was a professor of American literature at Penn State, wrote the words to the alma mater in 1901, according to Penn State’s website. In addition to the words “We Are,” the 2013 Senior Class Gift Committee also wanted to include the alma mater’s lyrics into the design of the sculpture, said Morgan Delaware, who was the committee’s overall chair for the class of 2013. “It was one year after the (Sandusky) scandal broke, so we wanted a reminder of who we were and what we stood for,” said Delaware, who now works at Penn State Hershey as the assistant director of the annual campaign. After an application process, the 2013 Senior Class Gift Committee selected Penn State alumnus and Brooklyn-based artist Jonathan Cramer to design the statue. “We loved the way his design was not like

Health & Wellness ......... 8, 9 Education ....................... 10

Community ............... 11-13 Arts Festivals ............. 14-19

anything else that was on campus,” said Delaware, who was referring to many aspects of the sculpture, including the reflective material that Cramer chose for the body of the sculpture. That material allows people to see their reflections in the “We Are” letters, serving as a visual reminder of “who we are” and what Penn State stands for, Delaware said. While Delaware explained that the sculpture sends a unique message, it is not the first monument on campus given to the university as a class gift. Starting with the Class of 1861, graduating classes have given gifts to the university. TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette These gifts include the Lion Shrine, given SIGN OF THE TIMES: A new sculpture by the Class of 1940, and the Allen Street appeared on the University Park Gates, which were presented by the Class of campus at the end of June. The “We 1916. Sculpture, Page 5

Sports ......................... 20-24 Arts & Entertainment 25, 26

Are” piece is a gift from the Class of 2013.

What’s Happening .... 26, 27 Puzzles ............................ 28

Business ..................... 29, 30 Classified ........................ 31


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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Front and Centre WELCOME WAGON: On July 1, Penn State students, faculty and alumni gathered to welcome Gregory Drane, who was recently appointed as the new director for the Penn State Blue Band. Page 11

TITLE TIME: The Nittany Valley 11- and 12-year-old softball All-Stars battled back through the loser’s bracket to defeat State College twice and capture the District 5 championship. Page 20

COMING TO LIFE: The Centre Hall branch of the Centre County Library recently held its summer reading program, “Every Hero Has a Story.” A pair of military re-enactment groups paid a visit to the library. Page 12

GROWTH IS GOOD: The C. Barton McCann School of Art will soon be expanding its arts programs. The school really comes to life during the summer months. Gazette staff writer Alexa Lewis takes a closer look at the unique school. Page 25

CORRECTION POLICY

The Centre County Gazette corrects errors as soon as they are brought to our attention. Please contact us at editor@centrecountygazette.com to report a correction.

State College man accused of assaulting daughter By MICHAEL MARTIN GARRETT StateCollege.com

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STATE COLLEGE — A State College man faces assault charges for allegedly giving his 9-year-old daughter a concussion and refusing to take her to the hospital. Sisay Shimelis, 46, was arrested on July 7 after police received a tip from a Children and Youth Services employee. According to court documents, police went to the Mount Nittany Medical Center emergency room, where officers met with the girl’s mother. Police said the mother told officers that her two daughters were playing when the playing turned into roughhousing. Shimelis, the father of the girls, separated them and placed the younger daughter in a timeout in the older daughter’s room. According to court documents, the 9-year-old daughter, the older of the two, tried to intervene and Shimelis “pushed the victim against the wall with such force that she struck her head and fell to the floor.” Police said Shimelis then gave the daughter a spanking. The mother reportedly told police that her daughter complained of head pains and dizziness after the incident, saying

SISAY SHIMELIS

her head hurt on the opposite side from where it hit the wall. Shimelis reportedly responded that she was not really hurt and was inventing her symptoms. When the mother decided to take the girl to the emergency room, Shimelis reportedly became angry and left the

house. The victim was treated for a concussion by a Mount Nittany Medical Center doctor, who reportedly wanted to keep the victim and family at the hospital until he was informed that Shimelis was in police custody. The victim also reportedly told police that similar incidents had happened “numerous times” in the past. Shimelis faces misdemeanor charges of simple assault, endangering the welfare of children, reckless endangerment and a minor harassment charge. He was arraigned before Magisterial District Judge Steven Lachman on $5,000 bail, and currently awaits a July 15 preliminary hearing.

Police seek help finding credit card fraud suspects STATE COLLEGE — State College police are investigating a case of suspected credit card fraud, and they need your help to figure out who is responsible. Police said they are on the hunt for two people they suspect of using cloned credit cards to purchase more than $1,000 worth of gift cards last month. Officers said one of the suspects is a black man in his mid-20s with “long bushy black hair” and some facial hair. When he was caught on camera, he was dressed in all black with a baseball cap and a golden cross necklace. He was with a black woman with long hair in blue jeans and a black sweater worn over a

white shirt, police said. The couple were in a full-size red or maroon SUV with a sunroof, which police suspect may be a GMC or Cadillac model. Police have been looking for the two suspects since June 24, when the man went to the Giant grocery store on East College Avenue in College Township around 9 p.m. Officers said they suspect he paid with credit cards encoded with stolen information, totaling more than $1,000 of allegedly fraudulent purchases. Those with any knowledge of the crime are asked to call State College Police at (814) 234-7150.

Centre County legal bill reaches more than $50,000 By ALEXA LEWIS correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

2675 Carolean Industrial Dr. • State College, PA 16801 814-238-6332 • www.spectrawood.com

BELLEFONTE — Centre County taxpayers will have to cover the county’s legal bill, which is climbing because of Right-toKnow court suits that it is involved in. WJAC-TV reported on June 30 that the county’s legal bill is more than $50,000. Centre County Administrator Tim Boyde confirmed in an interview on July 7 that the bill currently stands at $54,490. Boyde added that this includes fees going back to November when allegations of the first Right-to-Know request were made.

“I think the whole situation is unusual in the county,” Boyde said, referring to the legal bill that includes fees from all three lawsuits brought against the county. Centre County judges Jonathan Grine and Kelly Gillette-Walker, as well as District Attorney Stacy Parks Miller, filed lawsuits against the county saying that their cell phone records were wrongly released in response to Right-to-Know requests. The county’s legal bills are often covered under its insurance policy, Boyde said. He added that the county needed additional expertise to handle these lawsuits and that expertise was not covered under the county’s policy.

Find us online at centrecountygazette.com


JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 3

ELAINE THOMPSON/AP Photo

FORMER PENN STATE standout Ali Krieger contributed mightily during the U.S. women’s soccer team’s run to its first World Cup since 1999. Gazette file photo

HUNDREDS OF volunteer workers helped put together the Central PA 4th Fest, which enjoyed another successful year.

4th Fest delights with food, fireworks and fun By MICHAEL MARTIN GARRETT StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — Fire danced in the sky above State College on Saturday night as the sound of explosions, like distant thunderclaps, rolled across the hills. The Central Pennsylvania 4thFest fireworks show lived up to its reputation once again, bringing blooms of light bursting open in time to music. The score featured everything from a classic patriotic medley to intricate instrumental pieces to Disney and pop songs, all

synced with the booming bursts of nearly 12,000 fireworks shells over 45 minutes. “I’ve watched it from afar, but I’ve never been this close before,� said State College resident James Brennan, who looked on from the VIP section where you could see the rockets lighting in the field. “It was amazing. You really feel like you’re in the fireworks.� Katie Brennan agrees with her husband and said she felt awestruck as she watched the fading streams of golden beams fall 4th Fest, Page 5

Pair of Penn Staters victorious in U.S. World Cup rout By ZACH BERGER StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — There’s no doubt that Penn State is an athletic powerhouse, boasting successful players in just about every professional sport. And now, for the first time ever, two Nittany Lions are World Cup champions. The drama happening on one of the world’s biggest stages wasn’t lost on area soccer fans. As the match was going on, State College was abuzz with people enjoying the action and rooting on Team USA. A crowd gathered at Kildare’s restaurant on East College Avenue, which has become a popular spot for soccer followers. “I’m not usually a big soccer guy. I really only watch the World Cup when its going on,� said Marc Buchanan, enjoying a plate of chicken wings during the match. “With the Penn State girls in the game, I figured

I’d come down and watch.� On July 5, the United States women’s national team trounced Japan, 5-2, behind an early barrage of goals. Carli Lloyd struck twice in the game’s first five minutes. Lauren Holiday added a goal at the 14-minute mark and Lloyd earned a hat trick just two minutes later. Ali Krieger is the lone Penn Stater to take the field in the World Cup, as backup goalie Alyssa Naeher sat behind starter Hope Solo for the entire tournament. Krieger had just one shot attempt during the final match, but her staunch defense helped propel the national team to victory. The Penn State women’s soccer family was enthralled by the win, for both Krieger and the country. “It was a fun one,� said Alex Portelli, who also enjoyed the game at Kildare’s. “It was sort of anticlimactic, but a win is a win. I wish the men’s team would get one.�

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Bridge, from page 1

Council, from page 1

people. We had about 5,000 flags that were handed out. There was red, white and blue flying everywhere.” The ceremony coincided with the 43rd annual Logan Fire Company Parade — and certainly the parade is one of the most meaningful in its history. “Everything worked,” Burger said matter-of-factly. “When you’re thinking about this and putting it down on paper, you’re thinking, ‘Is this really going to work?’ “I’ll tell you … it really did.” And when the ceremony went off without a hitch, Burger said it was more emotional than she envisioned. “I lost it,” she said. “I just totally lost it.” Burger’s brother, Air Force Maj. Lewis P. Smith II, was shot down over Laos on Memorial Day, May 30, 1968, when he was 25 years old. He’s was declared killed in action, though his remains were never located. During the ceremony itself, a plaque was revealed, as were the signs with the new Veterans Bridge name on them. Bellefonte mayor Tom Wilson pulled off a covering to reveal the new street signs. For Burger, it was a culmination of her hard work to get the bridge dedicated. “That’s why I got so emotional,” Burger said. “Seeing everything come together. Having all the veterans there ... the climax was just unbelievable.”

first floor commercial space helps the economy, and the mixed use benefits everyone and enables diversity and a stronger community feel.” Council president Peter Rosenberger spoke very favorably of the proposal. He recognizes the concerns many residents have brought forward, but said that adjusting with the amendment endlessly does no good. “I think perfect is the enemy of the good,” he said. “We could tinker for another year, but I hand it to the planning commission. They did pretty hard work and came up with a good proposal. I think that if council votes ‘no,’ we would regret it four years from now.” Councilwoman Sarah Klinetob was the lone dissenter in the 6-1 vote. Among a few issues with the amendment, she said there are areas of town better suited for professional housing.

TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette

BELLEFONTE MAYOR Tom Wilson unveils a new street sign during the dedication ceremony. The High Street Bridge was renamed Veterans Bridge.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 5 4th Fest, from page 3

Gazette file photo

THE KEPLER POOL is a popular destination for Bellefonte residents during the summer months. Carroll, from page 1 He found that feeling of pride at the the Centre County YMCA. Carroll’s wife was working parttime as a fitness instructor at the Bellefonte YMCA, and he had a feeling it was something he wanted to get involved with as well. He talked to executive director Howard Long many times about possible jobs and, in March 2007, an opening came up for the position of Kepler Pool’s manager. For Long, Carroll was the obvious choice for the position, so he made him an offer. “The one thing that stuck out to me during the interview process was his ability to manage numbers, and that was what I need at that point for Bellefonte Y. Learning the aquatic piece was the least of my worries,� Long said. Carroll jumped at the opportunity and accepted the job. As the pool manager, he is in charge of everything from menial cleaning tasks to processing payroll and maintaining all state and local records and bather code regulations. Carroll is quick to point out that he can’t manage the entire facility by himself, which is why he employs around 20 staff members per summer. From lifeguards to desk attendants, every job is covered, and each contributes to the well-being of the pool. Kepler Pool has served as a recreational landmark of the Bellefonte community for years, and Carroll insists that it is still one of the best forms of entertainment a family can get during the summer. “(Kepler Pool) provides a place for families to come together and spend idle summer hours outdoors. For less than the cost of a movie, a person can swim all day in a safe, supervised facility,� Carroll said. The pool serves more than 10,000 patrons per summer, and with deals such as $3 community days on Wednesdays and Sundays, those numbers have stayed consistent for

the past few years. Unfortunately, Kepler Pool is in quite the predicament right now. The pool was built for 25 to 30 years of use, but it has now been operating for more than 40 years. The pool’s maintenance has become very cumbersome for Carroll and his staff, and it is evident that a new facility is needed. However, this new facility will not come cheaply, costing local taxpayers if a policy were to be passed. The Nittany Valley Joint Recreation Authority proposed a tax to local townships in order to fund this massive project, but it was voted down. “Unfortunately, the question of whether to properly repair the pool has become a political issue,� Carroll said. Swimming pool politics are not only confusing, but also are a hot topic around the area. A Facebook group, Friends of Kepler Pool, has been created, and currently has more than 100 members. Township meetings have been swamped by people lobbying both on behalf and against the renovation of Kepler Pool. Thankfully for pool users, Long was able to secure enough funding to keep the pool open one more year, but where the pool will go from here is just speculation. Even Carroll, the modern day father of Kepler Pool, is not sure what to expect in the future, but if he had his way, he would do more than just repair the pool. “I think that if the community thought bigger — for instance, a nice-sized waterpark — and built something that would attract not only Bellefonte area people but State College, Lewistown, Lock Haven, Clearfield, etc., the pool could pay for itself without being a long-term drain on the local taxpayers,� he said. It has been said that wrinkles indicate where smiles have been. Carroll is trying to restore the smiles of Kepler Pool, and he’s been doing it one wrinkle at a time.

from the sky above her. Kim Heller and her son Hunter drove all the way from Toledo, Ohio — a nearly six hour trip — to be in State College to take in the fireworks show with their family. After coming to the show last year, Kim Heller said she was so impressed by the fireworks that the trip immediately became an annual tradition. “The fireworks were amazing,� Heller said. “It was just such a big, big show.� But perhaps the best thing about 4thFest is its variety. A wealth of activities, performances and musical acts make sure there’s something for everyone — even if you’ve never celebrated the Fourth of July before. State College residents Chris and Jenn Stubbs have been coming to 4thFest for years, but Saturday was the first time their little son Mason got to experience Independence Day — so where else would the Stubbs have gone? “We love that we have this kind of celebration to bring him out to,� Jenn Stubbs said, looking down at little Mason, all tuckered out in his stroller from a day of firsts. Excited crowds cheered for death-defying flips and tricks from Boalsburg’s Dialed Action Sports Team — which was Hunter Heller’s favorite part of the festival. “The stunts seemed so dangerous,� he said, his face painted with a blue mustache. “I’ve never seen anything like that.� In addition to arts and crafts, robotic demonstrations and more, three stages of constant entertainment provided endless opportunities to take in some tunes. The Tir na Nog river dancing troop twirled in front of one stage, while local roots rock duo the Tommy Roberts wailed and serenaded just down the street. As the roughly 80,000 visitors headed to watch the fireworks, a lively bunch danced and grooved with Jackie Brown and the Gill Street Band. Philipsburg country singer Joe Quick was also in town to play 4thFest, which he looks forward to each year. He jokes that the people setting up to watch fireworks near his stage guarantee him “a captive audience� — but that might also have something to do with his earnest showmanship. But Quick said that 4thFest is much more than just a chance for him to perform; it’s an annual family tradition. He even found himself in the audience for a change, watching Nashville country star Craig Morgan perform as 4thFest’s first nationally-touring artist.

Sculpture, from page 1 Students, faculty and others affiliated with Penn State are eligible to submit ideas to the Senior Class Gift Committee when it is considering gift options. The committee narrows down the list of ideas, and the senior class votes for the gift. The senior class also funds the gift. This year’s graduating class voted in October 2014 to create a solar panel array, but the committee has not yet chosen a design or location for the array. According to Penn State’s website, a competition is now being held for the design of the 2015 class gift. Teams who submit a design should include a proposed location for the panels and a written statement of how their submission impacts Penn State, the Class Gift Campaign program and solar energy, according to the website.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Hate the fire, love the fighting: Reflections of a firefighter By MICHAEL MARTIN GARRETT StateCollege.com

STATE COLLEGE — “You have to hate the fire. You have to hate it!” This year marks veteran firefighter Bill Markle’s 50th year with Alpha Fire Company. When he first joined the company half a century ago, the assistant chief gave him a critical piece of advice: If you want to be a firefighter, then you have to hate the fire. And Markle, though he deeply loves his role in the company, has more reasons than most to hate the fire. “As a little kid, I was scared to death of fire,” Markle said, his brow furrowed. “I would have nightmares every now and then about our home burning down.” But despite his fear, fire was in Markle’s blood. His grandfather and brother were both members of Alpha Fire Company, which may have contributed to his fascination with fire and its beautifully destructive nature. “If you know Bill’s mom and dad, then you know why Bill’s Bill,” said Alpha Fire Company president Marvin Robinson. “They’re very hardworking people, and Bill learned that way from his parents.” As a student at Penn State in the ’60s, Markle would always find himself distracted from his studies when he heard the fire whistles blaring. During a break between classes, he once followed the fire engines to the scene of a major house fire in Stormstown, where he was unsettled by how quickly a home filled with memories could be reduced to

smoldering ash. Markle said that fear, that fascination, that hatred of the fire, is what drove him to his 50-year tenure with State College’s dedicated volunteers. “You’re getting out there to help someone in need, and you’re doing a service for the public,” Markle said. “It can be dangerous, but it gives you a good feeling to get out there.” The lifelong State College resident first joined the company in 1965, signing up during the last recruiting meeting of the year. He said this decision was the beginning of a new phase of his life, one that he was excited and nervous to start. Back then, the force was a little bit different than it is today. Alpha Fire members wore big rubber overcoats and boots that were “like fishermen’s boots.” They used a fire engine from 1949 and wore charcoal filter masks. “Our coats and everything was actually stored on the apparatus back then,” Markle said. “You’d be lucky if, right after we’d arrived somewhere, you could find a pair boots. Sometimes you’d end up with two right boots, or a coat that was too big.” But little annoyances like ill-fitting boots never much bothered Markle. They are not why he hates the fire. After he had been with the company for two years, Markle had seen a little bit of almost everything. On one of his first calls, he saved a farmer’s field with some quick thinking, surrounding a spreading fire with a moat of dirt. On another occasion, in 1966, Markle

crawled into the third-story window of the Sigma Nu fraternity house as it was engulfed in flames. Although the crew put the fire out, Markle got his first taste of death after the frat’s housemother perished from smoke inhalation and severe burns. “The first time you come upon death, it bothers you, but it’s part of the job,” Robinson said reflectively. “Some people can handle it and some can’t. There’s no shame if you can’t.” Markle, remembering the housemother’s death all those years ago, seems as though he handled it pretty well. But, when Markle talks about another fire that same year, he grows more reserved and quiet. It was 3 a.m. when Markle’s phone rang. Even before he answered, he could see the reddish glow haunting the sky outside his bedroom. Only 2 miles away, a farmhouse was burning to the ground with his neighbors trapped inside. He was there within minutes, but the house was consumed. It was too late. “I knew there was nothing I could have done,” Markle said, his shoulders stooped and his voice heavy. “The Thursday before the fire, my wife and I went to church and we sat two rows behind them at the service.” Perhaps that experience, more than anything else, helped Markle realize what the assistant chief had meant when he told him to hate the fire. “It really bothered me for months afterwards,” Markle said. “I can’t say that it made things easier or harder, but it made

Photo courtesy StateCollege.com

BILL MARKLE has been a firefighter with Alpha Fire Company for 50 years. me more dedicated to try to prevent anything like that from happening again.” If you ask him if he followed the assistant chief’s advice, Markle does not hesitate. He hates the fire. He hates the destruction. He hates the death. But those memories of death and destruction are few and far between. When Markle looks back on half a century with the Alpha Fire Company, he thinks about the camaraderie. The dinners in the company kitchen. The jokes and the laughter. The brotherhood. You have to hate the fire, but you come to love the fighting.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

GAZETTE THE CENTRE COUNTY

403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801 Phone: (814) 238-5051 Fax: (814) 238-3415 www.CentreCountyGazette.com

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CONTACT US: To submit news: editor@centrecountygazette.com Advertising: sales@centrecountygazette.com The Gazette is a weekly newspaper serving Centre County and is published by Indiana Printing and Publishing Company. Reproduction of any portion of any issue is not permitted without written permission. The publisher reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement for any reason.

World Cup win shows a battle far from over By Newsday The World Cup victory by the U.S. women’s soccer team was the latest feel-good moment in the evolution of women’s sports. Interest, whether measured by live attendance or TV viewership, has never been higher. The U.S. team’s 5-2 win over Japan unleashed a celebration by the players in Vancouver, and in myriad places across the country where viewing parties were the rage. While showcasing the players’ athleticism, skill, teamwork and determination, the World Cup also put a spotlight on a larger point: The battle for respect and equity is far from over. Consider that while the U.S. women’s team earned a record $2 million for its victory, Germany’s men’s team won $35 million for winning its World Cup last year. Overall, the women’s teams shared a prize pool of $15 million; the men divvied up $358 million. The women were forced to play on artificial turf, which is harder on one’s legs, bakes in the sun and produces different bounces from grass. A group of women headed by America’s Abby Wambach last year filed a gender discrimination lawsuit, later withdrawn, because men have played on nothing but natural grass. This year’s World Cup women should have received hazardous-duty pay. And those stirring commercials by Nationwide Insurance and Nike — will they air on telecasts of men’s games? Still, progress is undeniable. Today’s American women athletes are the children of the first generation of mothers who grew up with Title IX, the federal law banning gender discrimination in education. Girls’ participation in high school sports has risen for 25 straight years. Strong role models abound — from the UConn women’s basketball team to Little League Baseball player Mo’ne Davis; from Olympic skiers and swimmers to tennis player Serena Williams. These are times and people to celebrate. So rejoice in the U.S. victory. Call for a parade. Marvel at Carli Lloyd, her finale hat trick and that audacious 55-yard goal. But keep pushing, too, for fairness — in all sports — for your daughters, sisters and mothers. That would be the biggest win by far.

OPINION

Is religious liberty now in peril? By JOEL MATHIS and BEN BOYCHUK McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges may have established same-sex marriage as a constitutional right, but it opened a whole host of controversies. Among the most contentious: Can same-sex marriage and religious liberty coexist? Justice Anthony Kennedy, writing for the court, offered some assurance that religious freedom is safe and churches are free to continue advocating and teaching their beliefs. But Chief Justice John Roberts in his dissenting opinion pointed out that the First Amendment guarantees free exercise of religion, not simply advocacy. Will churches be forced to perform weddings that run counter to their doctrines? Could the federal government go after religious organizations’ tax-exempt status if they refuse to comply? Columnists Ben Boychuk and Joel Mathis weigh in.

JOEL MATHIS

No, folks, the gay sky is not falling. Yes, civil marriage equality was just sanctioned by the Supreme Court — but for reasons that had zilch to do with the First Amendment. (Your religious freedom generally is never affected in any way by my marriage.) And here’s the thing: When the First Amendment does come into play, it almost always wins before the court. Consider this: The exact same court that just approved gay marriage also, not long ago, decided in the Hobby Lobby case that the First Amendment religious rights of business owners were sacrosanct enough that they could refuse to purchase insurance plans for their employees that include contraceptive coverage. It’s the exact same court that not long before that protected Fred Phelps’ right to conduct ugly homophobic protests at the funerals of dead soldiers — again, because of the First

By The San Jose Mercury News The Greek government on Tuesday managed, yet again, to disappoint the ministers of the eurozone. Nearly everything Greece does disappoints those leaders, but this time — oh, perhaps “disappoint” is too mild a word. Greek officials were scheduled to present an alternative plan for paying down the nation’s massive debt, since voters overwhelmingly rejected the austerity plan demanded by the European Union. But when Alexis Tsipras, Greece’s prime minister, met Tuesday in Brussels with his 18 eurozone counterparts, he had nothing. He promised to have a proposal this week. Imagine the collective eye-rolling in the room. If history is any teacher, the details of the Greek plan won’t matter much. The European ministers are almost certain not to like it, insisting that it

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Blithe assurances from Justice Kennedy and Joel Mathis notwithstanding, the Supreme Court’s Obergefell decision will almost certainly lead to conflicts between the First and 14th Amendments of the Constitution. The survival of religious liberty in the United States is far from certain. How could that be? Yes, the First Amendment’s language is fairly unambiguous: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.”

does not go nearly far enough. The ministers hold the upper hand right now. Greek banks are closed and about to run out of money unless there is further cash liquidity from the European Central Bank or, perhaps, Santa Claus. Then, next week, Greece has to pay salaries and pensions, and in two weeks it must redeem a $3.9 billion bond, which it cannot do on its own. Tsipras’ calling of last Sunday’s referendum was a play for political leverage to demonstrate to the other nations — and possibly even himself — that he has a mandate from the Greek people. Point taken, but taxpayers in other European nations are getting grumpy about continuing to fund Greece’s excesses. If those representatives listen to their own people, they might not blink in the face of Greece’s posturing. What will that mean to the rest of the world? The most obvious possibility is for Greece to leave or be ejected from the

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But the Supreme Court’s First Amendment jurisprudence often is not. It’s amazing how quickly first principles can be eviscerated as soon as the lawyers get involved. For every high-profile case such as last year’s Hobby Lobby decision — which drove many of the same people celebrating the Obergefell outcome completely bananas — there is a case like Martinez v. Christian Legal Foundation, a 2010 decision in which the court held 5-4 that taxpayer-funded colleges and universities could deny religious groups use of school facilities because of their opposition to same-sex marriage. And let’s not forget the court’s 1983 decision in Bob Jones University v. United States. The court said it couldn’t outlaw a church’s practices — free exercise and all that. But stripping its tax-exempt status? No problem, as long as the church runs afoul of “fundamental national policy,” such as racial equality. How long until this court extends the logic of Bob Jones to same-sex marriage? Joel says in an aside, “Your religious freedom generally is never affected in any way by my marriage.” That’s true — because Joel is married to a great woman. No mainstream religious institution in the United States would have thought twice about wedding them. Now, churches will be forced to decide between doctrine and civil law. Given precedent and current trends, it isn’t far-fetched to imagine future court decisions that limit “free exercise” of religion to the inside of a church, synagogue or mosque. Or maybe not! It wouldn’t require much to erode the foundations of the First Amendment. A few lawsuits targeting small churches that lack the wherewithal to fight a protracted legal battle would be enough to get the ball rolling. Don’t be surprised if in a few years we’re left with religious liberty in name only.

European Union. The danger in that has always been that other debtor nations such as Spain, Italy, Portugal and Ireland — which received 2011 bailouts — might follow. That could bring down the entire confederation. That is less likely today because most of Greek debt is held by the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund rather than by individual European banks, as in the 2011 bailouts. Also, while the bailouts haven’t improved Greece’s situation greatly, the economies in those other nations have seen improvement. The greatest danger, particularly to Americans, is that it creates uncertainty and makes conditions right for stampedes. That means investors and the world’s markets should buckle up and expect to see some substantial volatility in the next few months. Unless, of course, Tsipras presents a workable plan. OK, never mind, seat belt it is.

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Amendment’s protections on freedom of expression just couldn’t be curtailed. That’s the court that’s going to force priests to ignore their own theology and conduct marriage ceremonies for gay people? Uh, no. Even if the court took leave of its senses, though, getting to that point would also require that Congress — or a majority of legislators in some state — suddenly decided they were hostile to their religious constituents. That’s what it would take to pass such a law. Even in a nation increasingly supportive of gay marriage, that’s not going to happen. Period. Are the tax exemptions of churches and church colleges in danger? Possibly. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli said as much during oral arguments in April. Then again: Politicians would have to disregard their religious constituents to do so. So: Unlikely. Listen: These scenarios are almost entirely fiction, so close are they to political and legal impossibility. They’re invented by people who don’t have a reason to be plausibly victimized by gay marriage, and so they dream up nightmare scenarios in order to claim martyrdom in the matter. Let the would-be martyrs have their nightmare fantasies. Reality — that gay marriage is here, and here to stay — is rightly, joyously celebrated by the rest of us.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Poison ivy affects some people more than others HERSHEY — Dr. David Adams, a dermatologist at Penn State Hershey, doesn’t buy recent news reports that poison ivy has become stronger and more prevalent. As a lifelong outdoorsman who enjoys fishing, hunting and hiking, Adams said he hasn’t seen significant changes in the location or prevalence of poison ivy, nor the size of the leaves: “I think people are just out more and so they’re coming into contact with it more.” Three-quarters of the population will get an itchy red rash if exposed to the urushiol oil inside the plant’s leaves, stem and roots, while the other one quarter will not have any reaction to exposure. Contrary to popular belief, Adams said you can’t get poison ivy simply by brushing against its leaves. “You have to actually break the leaves, stem or root to get the urushiol oil on you.” Although most people who contract poison ivy see a family doctor for treatment, Adams sees some of the more serious cases each summer, but the number or severity hasn’t changed much in the past 15 years. He does see a few patients who get poison ivy during the winter holidays. “What happens is that people buy a live Christmas tree, and there are dead vines on it that they rip off, not knowing what they are,” Adams said. “The urushiol oil inside is still viable.” The oil can remain on inanimate objects for long periods of time, so Adams recommends laundering clothing and cleaning garden tools after use. Now and then, he’ll run across someone who has been exposed to poison ivy after using a chainsaw to cut down trees that have decades-old mature vines of the plant roping up the trunk. In other cases, people burning yard waste and debris make the oil become airborne, and exposure to the smoke can cause the whole face and any exposed skin to swell and itch. “The most common method, though, is that someone is pulling out weeds and then they rub an eyelid or something,” Adams said. Irritation and rash don’t appear immediately, but take some time to incubate, depending on whether it is the person’s first exposure. Initial exposure usually produces symptoms seven to 10 days later, while those who have had it in the past typically react a day or two after coming into contact with the plant’s oil.

Submitted photo

POISON IVY is very easy to spot. Treatment to contact with poison ivy depends on the location and severity of the reaction. Poison ivy is not normally passed from one person to another, nor by scratching areas that itch. Treatment depends on the location and severity of the reaction. For mild, localized cases, a topical treatment such as an over-the-counter cortisone cream or calamine lotion often works. When the itching is unbearable, it’s time to see a doctor. More serious cases may require prescription creams or a two-to-three-week round of predni-

sone or other oral steroid. “The biggest mistake that primary care doctors make is prescribing a Medrol Dosepak for six days,” he said. “It always seems to rebound after that, so it seems that isn’t long enough.” He added the best way to prevent a reaction is to steer clear of the plant and its oil by adhering to the old saying: “Leaves of three, let it be.”

PinnacleHealth affiliate J.C. Blair receives federal grant HUNTINGDON — J.C. Blair Health System, a PinnacleHealth affiliate, announced that the Health Resources Ser-

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vices Administration, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, has awarded a federal grant in the amount of $200,000 to J.C. Blair Memorial Hospital. “J.C. Blair is the only hospital in rural Huntingdon County where a health professional shortage area exists for primary care, mental health and dental health care services,” said Adam Dimm, chief operating officer at the hospital. “The primary goal of this grant project is to provide comprehensive, patient-centered care that will integrate an evidence-based behavioral health and physical health component into the physician office setting.” The project will provide a level of coordinated patient engagement that offers the most benefit to patients in Huntingdon County. Programs like this have proven to be successful in enhancing patient relationships with health care providers, which improves their success rate in achieving health goals. The program enhances access to mental health support in a care environment with reduced stigma. “Patients appreciate having a designated mental health provider available in the practice,” said Shelly Rivello, director of J.C. Blair Behavioral Health Services, who will serve as the grant’s project director. “They like the added support that it brings to their treatment and helps them achieve their goals.”

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The grant was awarded by HRSA through the Health Center Expanded Services supplemental funding opportunity, which supports community-based organizations that serve populations with limited access to health care. The funded program will take place in various primary and specialty-care practices within J.C. Blair Medical Services to better serve both the physical and mental health needs of patients. A behavioral health consultant will meet with patients to evaluate their needs and provide support as part of the practice care team. “This integrated approach benefits mental health, primary care and specialty care practitioners, as they share the responsibility of managing patients with multiple health issues,” said Rivello. “More than half of mental health care is provided within primary care settings, with a majority of visits involving management of psychosocial issues. Integrating mental health services into primary and specialty care settings offers a promising, viable and efficient way to provide access to care while minimizing stigma and discrimination.” The project will bring together a collaboration of medical and mental health groups: J.C. Blair Memorial Hospital and Medical Services, Juniata Valley Behavioral and Developmental Services, Juniata Valley Tri-County Drug and Alcohol Abuse Commission and PinnacleHealth System.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 9

Autism and rare childhood speech disorder often coincide HERSHEY — Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand in hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Over the course of a three-year study, 64 percent of children initially diagnosed with autism were found to also have apraxia. The study also showed that the commonly used Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder accurately diagnoses autism in children with apraxia. “Children with apraxia have difficulty coordinating the use of their tongue, lips, mouth and jaw to accurately produce speech sounds, so that each time they say the same word, it comes out differently, and even their parents have difficulty understanding them,” said Dr. Cheryl Tierney, associate professor of pediatrics. It’s estimated that one in 68 children in the United States has autism and one to two in 1,000 have apraxia. With increased recognition and improved evaluation measures, more children are being identified with autism and apraxia. Developmental experts have long noted autism and apraxia seem to frequently coincide. The researchers studied 30 children between the ages of 15 months and 5 years old who were referred to the Penn State Hershey Pediatric Developmental Communication Assessment Clinic for concerns regarding speech, language or autism. After an initial diagnostic screening, follow-up testing showed that 63.6 percent of children initially diagnosed with autism also had apraxia and 36.8 percent of children initially diagnosed with apraxia also had autism. The researchers determined that about a quarter of children — 23.3 percent —

studied had both autism and apraxia at the initial diagnosis, and the same amount had neither condition. Researchers report their results in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Outcomes for both autism and apraxia can be improved with early intervention, so the findings point to the importance of ongoing apraxia assessment for some children with autism, and vice versa. Based on the study, Tierney believes that children with autism or apraxia who are non-verbal should be screened for the other condition until they start talking. The new study also verified that the CASD, a commonly used autism tool, does not over-diagnose autism in children with apraxia. Penn State College of Medicine psychologist Susan Mayes developed the CASD. It was standardized on children with language disorders — trouble in using language for expression — but not for speech disorders — trouble producing the sound — so clinicians have wondered if it could accurately be used in children with apraxia. “We were concerned that children with childhood apraxia of speech were being mislabeled as having autism when they were being evaluated for it, but we found that this was not the case,” Tierney said. To test the accuracy of the CASD in children with apraxia, the researchers used four other tools, which included two assessments for autism and two assessments for apraxia. Overall, the CASD was 97 percent sensitive, and it accurately diagnosed autism in 95 percent of children with apraxia. “We found that in our diagnostic center, we were not over-diagnosing autism

Photodisc

PENN STATE College of Medicine researchers say that children diagnosed with autism should undergo screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder. in a cohort of children that had a concern for childhood apraxia of speech,” Tierney said. Autism and apraxia have very different interventions, so making a correct diagnosis is important for preventing long-term problems. “CASD is used to diagnose autism, but it can also be used to rule out autism,” Tierney said. “We wanted to make sure this tool came out negative in a child that just had apraxia and we found that it really does help us distinguish kids accurately. Children who had apraxia without autism,

children who had autism but not apraxia, or those who had both or neither were picked up accurately. The tool was very sensitive in picking up all those different combinations. And that’s good news because we want the right treatment for the right child for the right diagnosis.” Also on this study are Susan Mayes, professor of psychiatry; Sally Lobs and Amanda Black, Penn State College of Medicine Class of 2015; Eugenia Gisin, Penn State College of Medicine Class of 2017; and Megan Veglia, Penn State College of Medicine Class of 2018.

During summer months, be sure to practice lightning safety KEN KEPHART

STATE COLLEGE — Summer weather can mean increased storms that bring dangerous lightning. Protecting you and your family means understanding what lightning is, planning ahead for unpredictable weather, and understanding what to do if you find yourself in the midst of a storm. Lightning is a giant Ken Kephart is a full-time paramedic spark of static electricity generated from at Mount Nittany clouds that are elecMedical Center. trically charged. You He previously was a PSU professor of often see lightning animal science. moving across the sky, which is common. But, you also see lightning moving

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between the ground and a cloud, and this is when lightning is the most dangerous. While lightning can be a fascinating thing to watch, it is incredibly hot, produces shockwaves in all directions and, of course, carries an enormous amount of electricity. For most of us, the first warning that a bad storm is on the way is usually the sound of thunder. When you hear thunder, you know there is lightning in the area. That is the time to start planning how you will get to a safe area and where that area is. The National Weather Service also broadcasts warnings of severe thunderstorms. Sometimes you will hear these before you hear the storm coming, and sometimes it will be after you’ve gone for cover. In any case, these warnings provide vital information about the location and severity of the storm. It’s also important to remember that if you hear thunder, lightning is nearby and close enough to strike you. Lightning Your 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE STAMP OF APPROVAL: the American Members of local Philatelic Society’s made recently Stamp Club Steamtown a visit to the Site in National Historic 11 Scranton. Page Rows DAYS GONE BY: were of antique tractorsthe on display duringMachinery Nittany Antique annual spring Association’s was held at show, which Page 14 Penns Cave. The SUMMER RITUAL: Summer’s Ninth annual comes to Best Music Fest College on downtown State6. Country Saturday, June Dee Messina music star Jo play on the to is scheduled Pages 16, Garner Lot Stage.

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on break ground excited front Project. is extremely assistant “I think everyone Bellefonte Borough talked about it,” said Holderman. “We’ve some for quite manager Don groundbreakingthe framework to about the grant gave us But it was a long time. A small we are today. get to where in 2006. process.” burned down it once where The Bush House the property Since that time, vacant. hopeful stood has remained officials are Bellefonte Borough in the near future. that will change Bellefonte Borough manager of According to valuable piece the land is a Ralph Stewart, borough. the new developproperty in help anticipating “We are tax base and add will help the ment, which financially and the borough businesses strengthen to help the other more foot traffic said. in town,” Stewart

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2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY

CELEBRATION: ANNIVERSARY Italian Pizza The Original celebrate will in Millheim The 20 years in business. by owned restaurant is and his wife, Vinnie Castiglia 14 Nadia. Page With the SUMMER FUN: it’s kids out of school,summer your time to plan Gazette’s schedule. The fun will tell guide to summerand what to go you where to County. Pages do in Centre 16-18 With SEASONS IN REVIEW:for over the postseason baseball and high school in Centre softball teams writer Pat County, sports takes a look Rothdeutsch that was. back at the season Page 22

INC. BELLEFONTE,

June Annual ~T C C HISTORIC

27th

June 11-17, 2015

A special

publication ENTRE

19-21,

HE

FREE COPY

23

By CHRIS MORELLI

TURNING THE

PAGE

TIM WEIGHT/For

project to New county firefighters benefit area

staffs. and train their a bid to their equipment accepted pit at the The commissioners called a drafting build somethingEmergency Services TrainCentre County a pit will be ing Facility. the drafting with Essentially, water reservoir massive underground of storage capacity. 30,000 gallons

GARRETT

StateCollege.com

life is — Pretty soon, BELLEFONTE a bit easier for Centre quite going to get firefighters. County’s dedicated9 meeting, the Centre step At their June took a major project, giving County commissioners a long-awaitedresource to test forward on a new area fire companies

Firefighters, Page

6

TRAINING DAY: During their weekly meeting, Centre County commissioners a voted to approve new facility where test firefighters can and their equipment train staff.

company Manufacturing facility moves into new

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the Gazette

the in the shotput during Wolf of took home a gold Rachel of Centre County over the weekend. GIRL: Lena Purdum which were held at Penn State GOLD MEDAL Summer Games, Special Olympics earned the silver. Centre County

By MICHAEL MARTIN

By CHRIS MORELLI

editor@centrecountygazette.com

sun set — Once the BELLEFONTE Governor’s darkened over and the skies turned solemn. the Gazette were HARRY ZIMBLER/For Park, the mood lights that walkers The portable Services recently turned off, and Homeland Manufacturing from left, are brought in wereheld Bellefonte Relay for DOWN TO BUSINESS: in State College. Pictured, at the recently candles. As Wiz Khalifa’s Bonislawski and location backpresident John opened in a new Life picked up played in the trek Allen Sherman, the “See You Again” operations manager began to makethose who Bonislawsk. ground, they for controller Jennifer walking path around the cancer. was were lost to of Bellefonte, Kerry O’Hara,for Life lead. He talkcome to the this year’s Relay feelings that ed about the the event. speak, it forefront throughout hear a caretaker “There By HARRY ZIMBLER .com “When you said O’Hara. goes correspondent@centrecountygazette really hits home,” Services Inc. emotions someone Manufacturing specifically are so many survivor or a caregiver. — Homeland a designed have this through as STATE COLLEGE facility in State College around and aca new Then you turn needs. on the service. I could has moved to manufacturing cut the ribbon beautiful luminaria Bonislawski right now. for the company’s founder John tually start crying emotional event. Owner and “It’s an extremely here and seen it, the Gazette TIM WEIGHT/For never been 4 you’ve If for 29, 30 Facility, Page the Bellefonte Relay 31 Business ..................... helped kick off were down .... 26, 27 ........................ Relay, Page 6 Happening A CAUSE: ParticipantsBellefonte. Although numbers 28 Classified WALKING FOR in ....... 24 What’s Viewpoints .... 25 Puzzles ............................ at Governor’s Park a huge success. Lic # 687 Life on May 29 16-17 Medical was still seen as Spread ........... 18-23 Arts & Entertainment 10 Centre this year, the event ......................... ....................... 7 Education ............... 11-15 Sports Community Opinion ............................ ......... 8, 9 Wellness & Health

The senior CLASS ACTS: at Bellefonte institute class recently Area High School $11,000 raised nearly Brandon for 11-year-old Pleasant Gap. Conaway of from many Conaway suffers 10 Page health issues. The SPIRITUAL SINGING: held recently Covalt Family Gospel Sing their 20th annual Fairgrounds at the Grange More than a in Centre Hall. the dozen acts entertained 11 crowd. Page DAD: Before CELEBRATING summer they left for in Paula break, studentsthird-grade Hendershot’s essays and class penned to celebrate drew pictures Be sure to Father’s Day. handiwork. check out their Page 14

TIM WEIGHT/For

the Gazette

June boards during the 11. on their mortar and moved the tassels area graduates, see pages 4 Area High School For more on 16-18 SENIORS AT Bellefonte at the BAHS gymnasium. Fun ............. 19 9 Summer 8 graduation ceremony Matters ............... ......................... 7 Opinion ............................ ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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21-24 Sports ......................... 25, 26 Arts & Entertainment

29, 30 31 Business ..................... Classified ........................ Lic # 687

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CHAMPS CROWNED: put on an The Yankees display impressive offensive crowned as they were the Nittany of champions a League with Valley Little win over the lopsided 13-3 25 Red Sox. Page

12

Volume 7, Issue

24

FREE COPY

ter United Way Paceset Centre County more personal approach Campaign takes

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

Front and Centre

editor@centrecountygazette.com

Special 46th annual PARK — The at Penn State June 4, UNIVERSITY Games, held 2,500 athapproximately convergOlympics Summer a big hit, with counties 5 and 6, were 52 Pennsylvania letes representingPark for the event. on severing on University Games put the wraps And, while The Summer competitions. training and the attention, the event of al weeks of garner most the many volunteers who the athletes place without State to make sure the couldn’t take at Penn spend the weekend a hitch. are local, without the volunteers Mifflin games go off majority of drove in from And while the Rose Belante some are not. at the games. event,” County to help just a wonderful, wonderful they do, “I think it’s see these athletes do whatany other of “To I can’t think Belante said. to my face. it brings a smilebe this weekend.” at the place I’d rather that she’s been volunteering that time, Belante said for several years. During athletes and some of the Summer Games friends with she’s become year after year. their families. lot of the same people — a huge event “You see a a big event the you. Sure, it’s to stop and talk with is They know which always time — but there’s just about the competition, not athletes. It’s said. nice,” Belante Page 5 Special Olympics,

A celebration Happy Valley The third annual begins on Monday, Culinary week through Sunday, June 22, and runs you need to out all June 28. Find kicks off./Page know as the week

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE

2015

of

OUNTY

GAZETTE

Volume 7, Issue

es state’s Area again welcom Games ics Summer Special Olymp

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

Aaronsburg MUSIC MAN: recently native Jay Vonadajazz fifth released his To celebrate, trombone CD.CD release a Vonada had Green Drake party at the Page 13 Gallery in Millheim.

again!

Let’s cruiseBellefonte Cruise Historic next The 27th annual downtown Bellefonte to the takes place in guide for our annual weekend. Look with a map, schedule cruise — complete stories, inside. of events and feature

Historic H.B.I.

GAZETTE Front and Centre

June 18-24, 2015

has decided The organizationannual Pacethe against hosting Campaign this com setter Kick-Off which Evans decorrespondent@centrecountygazette. atyear, an event a pep rally — Centre scribed as having the 35 partner STATE COLLEGE Way’s Pacesetmosphere where once County United pacesetter compais under way year new agencies and ter Campaign announce any but this nies meet to companies and to difagain this summer, is taking a participating their camthe organization give the companies ferent approach. things have paign materials.this year is much “We’ve noticed said Megan The process CCUW asked for the been stagnant,” more personal. partner agency are so Evans, a spokesperson companies representatives CCUW. “The to serve as camused to runpaign stewards ning their camSubmitted photo we who will guide paigns that accepted Medical Center the pacesetneeded some Mount Nittany campaign. ter companies LOOKING AHEAD: kind of change in the United Way United LOOKING BACK, through their — something 2014 for its participationMount Nittany CEO; Scott Lamb, a plaque in May Brown, to make it more director; and Jerry right, are Steve internal campaigns. July, the exciting.” Pictured, left to United Way executiveNittany. organization Mostly throughout Tammy Gentzel, The nonprofit year for local meet with company resources at Mount Way board chair; in each agencies will and employees to and deductions president of human raises funds Dittmann, vice provide health the representatives tions and payroll the campaign agencies that the opporthroughout stostories personally deliver the past. that hearing By giving agencies human services to the CCUW and share the have how their pro“We thought the people who materials, clients who county, according tunity to explainthe community, of the agency’s the funded prories and meeting might have an website. negawork grams benefit campaign, might change benefited from are doing the Aug. Before the general Evans said it on Monday, some employees grams. will hear 6 which starts runs the Pacesettive views that when their the “The companies United Way, Page mouth how 17, the CCUW where designatmay have developedfor contribuasked from the horse’s the commuter Campaign that support the bosses have money is affecting emed companies said. hold internal nity,” Evans United Way campaigns. ployee

By ALEXA LEWIS

full life has come For Tice, SPOTLIGHT

circle

CENTRE COUNTY

ner County commissio system demands court act’ ‘clean up its By MICHAEL MARTIN

GARRETT

StateCollege.com

By CHRIS MORELLI County’s commissioners its act.” editor@centrecountygazette.com — One of Centre to “clean up June life has BELLEFONTE judicial system needs meeting on Kristina Tice, had thinks the county’s At a commissioners — For Bellefonte’s Chris Exarchos BELLEFONTE Caththe current 16, Commissioner the Evangelist words about system and come full circle. a student at St. John big office as some heated she sits in the She was once criminal justice District Atstate of the Bellefonte. Now, lawsuit between the county olic School in John for the past five years. the doors the ongoing and St. Tice unlocked Parks Miller stuprincipal of torney Stacy Monday morning, that a former For On a recent It’s not often configovernment. on the lights. the school they attended. that we restore and turned “Its imperative system of our counprincipal of to St. John. judicial dent becomes easy decision to return Tice said. dence in the operate in this an back to St. John,” continue to said. “We’ve Tice, it was to be a teachty; we can’t right to come Exarchos “It just felt made me want vested of the entire Gazette environment,” John was what there and I was very laughing stock CHRIS MORELLI/The “Going to St. my kids were become the the er. Coming back, suing the serves Centre front of St. John state.” of the school.” is currently Tice stands in in the success Evangelist Catholic School level from a CHRIS EXARCHOS to defense Parks Miller Tice attended the IN CHARGE: Kristina St. John the children ranging in grade cellphone recordsthe county. School in Bellefonte. some of her has Evangelist Catholic is now the principal. requests with policy by County and to fifth grade. for nearly 125 years. county for releasing and filed Right-to-Know and county school as a child pre-K for 3-year-olds attorneys who county violated state law been in Bellefonte who have gone to St. ages. The school has of families a lot,” Tice said. for many different school. presidShe claims the of the think that says requests. asked the judge of “There are generations an educator it’s a great community level because filling those the size that attorney recently County in contempt Tice has been said. “I think elementary grow beyond that time. never John,” Tice more Centre Parks Miller’s prefers the so we can’t request for grade, so it’s in children during they’re little She said she lawsuit to hold We’re landlocked,one classroom per small schools. It’s changes seen ing over that defender’s to a Right-to-Know kids from when have growth and in the public that hapand I like we are. We able to watch court for responding from an employee “I like to be grade. There’s a lot of growth a really big school grade,” the going to be fifth through fifth cell phone records it’s family.” it. This year, up through a community, says family, she means have been at the child from kindergarten who pens with a Page 3 When Tice 37, 38 Commissioner, a pair of teachers Tice said. 39 Business ..................... school celebrated the school .... 34, 35 has been at years. Happening Classified ........................ school for decades. for 30 Tice, Carol Fisher 25-31 What’s ............................ 36 Tice, Page 4 According to has been there ......................... here. I Puzzles Lic # 687 Michelle Davis go here. My kids went 11-16 Sports Entertainment 32, 33 ............... for 25 years. & grandkids 17-24 Arts 8, 9 Community “Mrs. Fisher’s Cruise ...... Wellness ......... 2 Health & ....................... 10 Bellefonte .................... 7 Education Police Report Opinion ............................

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can travel up to 10 miles. Many of us will remember from childhood that you can estimate your distance from the storm — when you see a flash of lightning, count the seconds until you hear the thunder. Five seconds will equal 1 mile. If you are outside and a storm approaches, look for a safe place nearby. The best place is an enclosed building or a vehicle. Picnic shelters, dugouts and small buildings don’t offer much protection from lightning. Try to avoid open fields, ridgelines, water and metal objects. If you’re inside during a bad storm, stay off corded phones, and instead use a cordless phone or a cell phone. Refrain from touching electrical equipment such as TVs and computers. Avoid plumbing, including washing your hands, washing dishes or taking a shower. Stay away from windows and doors and stay off porches. Also, remember to protect your pets. An outdoor doghouse is not safe. In the event that someone near you ball

Summer but don’t tell season, It’s not football County contingent that to the Centre Lezzer Lumber the that took part in in which was held Football Classic, 19. State College Clearfield on June John Weakland Area High School’s 18 had a stellar game./Page

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE azette.com www.CentreCountyG

School board, union reach contract accord

June 25-July 1,

2015

Volume 7, Issue

25

By ZACH BERGER

By ALEXA LEWIS

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

.com

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Volume 7, Issue

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By CHRIS MORELLI

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Bellefonte Cruise

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July 2-8, 2015

Bellefonte bridg

correspondent@centrecountygazette times StateCollege.com about three equivalent to that cuts College Each day driversportion of Pike Street — The State LEMONT — nally use the STATE COLLEGEboard of directors fi Lemont’s population the Gazette using the road District village. TIM WEIGHT/For the State College cars and truckslocal businesses Area School at through the agreement with 6,000 to 8,000 and Association of getting public reached an That’s betweenmany of Lemont’s stores Support Personnel are in the process with months of negotiaEducational STREET: Officials that is lined traffic speed meeting after in Lemont. WORD ON THE concerns with its June 22 Brumthe traffic situation on a given day. there have been said Adam said College freeze for the input on improving tions. “For many years,go through the village,” becomes available, includes a salary with an that The contract when a grant Projand volumes forum that just concluded, Township manager. and Streetscape is shovel-ready member Carla Stilson. the remaining academic year houses for public have traffic in each of baugh, the CollegeStreet Traffic-Calming care ago to slow Township councilhas hosted three open members increase occurring are significant health the in the than three years After the Pike The township Stilson said because council have seen little in There proposed more pedestrian friendly more three years. but drawings medical insurance ect was first commaking Lemont more since 2012, the past few years the concerns that and staff are changes involving and make downtown many of the changed over from July Township Council the project forward. pornew contract. have not addressed runs retroactively process, College public input and push disbumped-out change and gather The agreement and affects 360 school crosswalks, advances to paraparallel parking 2018 has considered 6 2014 to June sidewalks and The township including secretaries, perPike Street, Page street, improved other support trict employees, so that it tions of the clerks and in the design. the project professionals, designs for along Pike Street to finalize the 7-1 vote. Board sonnel. The goal is passed by a the lone dissentThe contract Pawelczyk was member Jim of many ing vote. the culmination and will “It represents By CHRIS MORELLI respectful discussions, months of editor@centrecountygazette.com and the association’s in the there’s the district serve both members well Conenthusiasts, County car Amber dedicated, hard-working — For Centre board president BELLEFONTE the Bellefonte Cruise. place over coming years,” Cruise took than “voted nothing better Historic Bellefonte cepcion said. once again. personnel association consaid Pat success The 27th annual huge The support to accept the proposed a fairly smoothly,” “There and was the weekend went very well and it ran overwhelmingly”month, according to co-presiCruise committee.happy.” this “Everything were very of the Bellefonte Trish Storch. tract earlier Smeltzer and a fair contract and McCool, chairman no issues. The participants visited Bellefonte dents Shelbi that it is car enthusiasts 19 with the open were no problems, “We recognized change was inevitable,” 7,000 to 9,000 June care stateAn estimated The event kicked off on on the diamond. in a prepared that the health hop of Storch said process over the weekend. followed by the sock lined the streets Smeltzer and grateful to conclude the was like several and motorcycles cruise, which ment. “We are of negotiating and would colfor awards in classic cars competed Saturday, new On months their owners 18 as for after district’s team downtown Bellefonte bit from preto thank the of negotiating.” was down a an update different classes.McCool, the car count laborative way the board heard the high According to weather,” McIn other news, schedule for because of the but everyvious years. first phase runs on the construction was to be expectedand a few showers, project. The of eight “I think that skies school renovationto August, and a total had overcast BelleCool said. “We just like clockwork.” from this month in July 2018. This summer’s boon to downtown and thing went down an economic local businesses and eat phases conclude building a bus driveway the The cruise provides often shop at work will involve pathway that leads from at who attend disfonte. Those to a crossing coupons for a paved student faces South Building the North Buildat local restaurants. give show participants back of the to bring new linking to that tends Many restaurants Westerly Parkway McCool said expressed of the coucounted meals. ing. to 80 percent Penni Fishbaine door. days. through the that anywhere from 60 said. “With those kinds Board member noise during school Tim the “I’ve heard store,” McCoola few faces that they norrepresentative durconcern over back to the management occur are getting pons come Construction will need to you know they demolition schedule. help the numbers, of with the Jones says entities that see.” of order to keep mally wouldn’tthere are many different ing the day in eliminating noise,” director said that Bellefonte manOf course, machine. McCool a success. “It won’t be Poprik said. “It will be a well-oiled cruise living Ed borcruise run like a vital role in making the physical plant the help of the the reality we’re That will be Borough plays wouldn’t be possible without and accommodate ... (The demolition) aging noise. to help three years. down as “The cruise of their way set up. It’s one for the next of peeling the building go way out the streets and ball.” for the ough. They come out on just trying to do more should be kind old-fashioned wrecking begin in us. The merchants opposed to the construction work will of the year. We’re days bedbest said. of their McCool be blasting The heavier as a whole,” as crews will Building site community the near future, at the South to six total of five rock for excavation the Gazette Bellefonte one to an end. A Cruise, Page 5 TIM WEIGHT/For at annual Historic as June comes occur, with no more than will Cars “lap the block” to go around detonations a day. The crew will coordinate INSIDE: Classic disof shiny chrome in 11. happening in Community Pool to avoid There was plenty which took place 29, 30 Cruise. See Page in lieu TIME TO SHINE: Bellefonte Cruise, with the Welch staggered blasts come 31 Business ..................... annual Historic the .... 26, 27 20. during the 27th ruptions, and use of jackhammers. Happening Classified ........................ on June 19 and and 18-23 What’s ............................ 28 of the constant downtown Bellefonte for the neighborhood Lic # 687 Sports ......................... 24, 25 Puzzles “It will be better Poprik said. ............... 11-15 Arts & Entertainment pool,” 16, 17 9 Community people in the Corner ....... Spotlight ..... 10 Women’s 7 Penns Valley Education ....................... Opinion ............................ ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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Boalsburg Choice Festival of People’s The 23rd annual be held next and Crafts will Pennsylvania Arts The official guide has week in Boalsburg. to know about the event, need everything you more./Inside food vendors and from artists to

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE e to be renamed

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c Pike Street traffi focus of study through Lemont

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that Frialready knows — Debra Burger for her. will BELLEFONTE an emotional evening be in Bellefonte to day, July 3, will the High Street Bridge slated during a ceremony That night, tradiclose out the p.m. Veterans Bridge be renamed p.m. The ceremony will begins at 4 Parade, whichlong process. begin at 7:30 Fire Company has been a tional Logan about the of the bridge back in 2014 The renaming the borough on in FebruIt was voted “I had approached of the bridge. possible renaming Bridge is Burger said. High Street ary of this year,” that simple. Since the approve the name to But it wasn’t the state had a state road, Rconsidered Benninghoff, Rep. Kerry change. through Burger, state made its way According to the bill, which the House of Repreby Tom Bellefonte, proposed It was first passed in June. Gov. the Legislature. and then by the Senate May sentatives in last week. was a project the bill just bridge renamed Wolf signed getting the For Burger, her heart. accolades, and dear to any type of don’t that is very near veterans deserve them. They “I feel that our yous that we can give I feel, as a (United thank any type of shape or form.them. This is just a in any way, thank ask for this our duty to is it said. said States) citizen, doing it,” Burgera park, or a street? Burger small way of Why not decision. So why a bridge? a relatively easy a bridge was that choosing Bridge, Page

6

that soldier’s remains holds out hope INSIDE: Family Page 4 United States. returned to the

will be

TIM WEIGHT/For

REMEMBRANCE:

The High Street

Bridge in Bellefonte

will be renamed

After 12 years, 4th Fest director exits with bang

Veterans Bridge

at a dedication

ceremony scheduled

the Gazette

for July 3.

Judge: County has acted improperly By MICHAEL MARTIN

GARRETT

StateCollege.com

County — Huntingdon down back BELLEFONTE Kurtz will not GARRETT Judge Stewart against Centre County. By MICHAEL MARTIN lawsuits from his rulings StateCollege.com but similar Jonathan In three separate ago, County judges Dis— Twelve years filed by Centre Gillette-Walker and a successful STATE COLLEGE Miller, Kurtz retired from Grine and Kelley Stacy Parks come to State has Bernie Keisling trict Attorney ruled that the county IBM, only to career with several full time. preliminarily reover the past College to work alumnus, Keisling acted improperly A Penn StateValley after 35 years with of months. say the county turned to Happygiant to take the reigns phone reAll three plaintiffs ansome of their to the technology 4th Fest. Now, after wrongly released attorneys in response PA the immensely the Central cords to defenserequests. years running 26, other dozen Day celebration, Right-to-Know documents filed June time. popular Independence for real this against the In new court once again, why he ruled he’s retiring Gazette filing an order I reKurtz explained ALEXA LEWIS/The “I thought three suits by ago, his crew county in the county from responding the room that he and tired 12 years Keispreventing bins in the break requests. and I didn’t,” there of a nonpoint to the recycling to any similar that the specter out upon Al Matyasovsky ling said. “Now “We add only want to LASTING LEGACY: campus. employee giving are things I I judicial phone judicial county manage throughout without notice see and grandkids wrong,” time request and us as manifestly want to spend jokrecords strikes with.” Despite“aged was a response Kurtz wrote. ing that he appeal” filed Kurtz’s memorandum role runof issues on Lou out” of his to a “statement massive, attorney Mary the ning the argued that by Centre County’s Fourth BERNIE KEISLING OPP last week. She all-volunteer are actually building in an Maierhofer in questions to his office of July operation, as a Penn State he pulled up phone records records that the county retains there 30, his last day Keisling still charm. Perhaps eyes, van on June public financial release because his retirement. By ALEXA LEWIS crews obligated to phones — and com a distinct boyish baby blue employee before and his tight-knit was legally around his the result the wrinkles be to provided are correspondent@centrecountygazette. Matyasovsky and composting programs more likely the county to the Commonage. her position but they seem laughter instead of his Matyasovsky handle recycling for the entire campus. she’s taking PARK — Al of Pennsylvania. reaof his frequent running 4th Fest has worn they have UNIVERSITY farewell to the 3:30 a.m. wealth Court But, together with Maierhofer’s his dozen It’s not that much isn’t only bidding Kurtz disagreed from a similar In fact, he called he accomplished job deworkday at extensively Keisling down. “a labor of love” that their start to his soning, citing helm Office of County. more than proyears at the Penn State’s where he case in Lackawanna that any record possibly regret. when I scriptions. in we could never Physical Plant,since 1984 “It is axiomatic employee is a record any nervousness “When Al came “I didn’t feel didn’t know any better judicial campus. has worked duced by a force for the I just the last labor spent into basic a has first started. and were just said, laughing. us into individuals, as the proSupport 5 yet,” Keisling had run marketing three years But he has molded Lawsuits, Page of OPP’s Central After all, Keisling — surely he could 28-30 gram manager Games the said for six Olympic 12,000 fireworks into 31 Business ..................... Services. Retire, Page 5 ......... 26 get my boys,” Matyasovsky team as Happening while he’s been manage to Classified ........................ “These are a year. And Support Services 19-23 What’s ............................ 27 air one night about his Central Sports ......................... 24, 25 Puzzles ............... 11-14 & Entertainment 6 ... 15-18 Arts 8, 9 Community Director, Page PA 4th Fest Wellness ......... 2 Health & ....................... 10 Central Police ................................ 7 Education Opinion ............................

t Services Central Suppor r retires program manage CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

has been struck by lightning, call 911 and report the accident. If the person is unresponsive and not breathing or has abnormal breathing, begin CPR, as those are signs of cardiac arrest. People struck by lightning do not carry a charge, and it is safe to touch them. Most people actually can survive an encounter with lightning, especially with timely medical treatment. Remember, any outdoor activity carries a high risk for being struck by lightning. The highest fatality rates from lightning strikes include fishing, camping, swimming, boating and golfing. It is recommended that you and your family be prepared for bad weather. Websites such as www.stormsurge.noaa.gov/ preparedness-plan.html can help you and your family put together your own disaster preparedness plan and kit. By staying vigilant and having a plan in place, you and your family can avoid the dangers of these types of storms.

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EDUCATION

PAGE 10

JULY 9-15, 2015

PSU helps blaze trails on Pittsburgh’s North Side UNIVERSITY PARK — Penn State students are collaborating with students from Carnegie Mellon University and Chatham University to map trails that will connect community assets in 18 neighborhoods on Pittsburgh’s North Side. The Penn State Center: Engaging Pittsburgh received a $25,000 grant from The Buhl Foundation for two Penn State summer interns to participate in the One Northside Asset Inventory Mapping project. They are working with nine other students from CMU and Chatham to map out a potential trail system that will connect community assets and historic locations in Allegheny Center, Allegheny West, Brighton Heights, California-Kirkbride, Central Northside, Chateau, East Allegheny, Fineview, Manchester, Marshall-Shadeland, North Shore, Northview Heights, Perry North, Perry South, Spring Garden, Spring Hill-City View, Summer Hill and Troy Hill. Emily Paskewicz graduated from Penn State in May with a degree in landscape architecture. She applied to be a part of this project to gain experience working with students from different schools and disciplines. “We all bring something a little different to the table from sustainability and landscape architecture to urban design, food studies and public policy,” Paskewicz said. “Our ability to bounce ideas off of each other will really help the project in the long

run.” Frederick Thieman, president of The Buhl Foundation, said the foundation backed this project to not only support student engagement but to develop quality of place for the individual North Side neighborhoods. “It is a win-win for both the students and the community,” said Thieman. “The team-building approach to this project creates a cross-pollination of skills and combines it with the opportunity for students to be entrenched in neighborhoods to develop space that will appeal to future generations.” One Northside AIM is being managed by GTECH Strategies — a nonprofit dedicated to improving the social, economic and environmental health of communities — and will be completed in three phases through Friday, Aug. 21: research, community survey and data analysis. Jeffrey Holzer, a fifth-year senior in landscape architecture at Penn State, said he will then use the data this fall in a design studio course to further develop themes for the trails. “People who are coming to visit Pittsburgh, as well as locals, will be able to see all the amazing landmarks, a taste of the local culture and plan to see some really spectacular stuff,” said Holzer. For more information about the project, visit One Northside AIM or The Penn State Center: Engaging Pittsburgh online.

Submitted photo

PENN STATE students are helping to revitalize Pittsburgh’s North Side, including the Mexican War Streets.

South Hills School holds graduation ceremony STATE COLLEGE — Jubilation filled the room at the Penn Stater Conference Center as South Hills School of Business and Technology graduated 73 students from their State College and Altoona campuses. Maralyn Mazza, president and co-founder of South Hills School, said that starting South Hills was the best thing that she and her husband, the late Paul Mazza II, ever did. “It has been the joy of our lives watching you head into your new lives and careers,” Mazza said. The night was filled with bursts of applause and cheering from family and friends as the graduates walked across the stage to officially receive their specialized associate degrees, diplomas and the accompanying hug from Mazza. Two South Hills graduates returned to be a part of this year’s ceremony. The commencement ceremony vocalist was Coreen Watson, a 2012 business administrationaccounting graduate who drove from Everett to be a part of the event. Keynote speaker was Lori Watson, a Class of 2000 diagnostic medical sonography graduate who recently became executive administrator for Surgical Specialist of Lancaster PC. Watson commented on how thrilling it was for her to return to State College to see how South Hills School and her medical sonography program has expanded since graduating 15 years ago. She encouraged the graduates to aim high, set good goals, challenge themselves and be confident in their ability to achieve. Numerous academic honors and awards were given throughout the night. Accounting graduate Dominique Hook, of Aaronsburg, was the honorary recipient of the Joann Bonfatto Memorial Award. This special award is given to a graduate who exhibits the attributes of enthusiasm, friendliness, dependability and willingness to help others while a student at the State College campus. South Hills has schools located in State College, Altoona and Lewistown and has graduated more than 6,000 students during its 45-year history.

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Submitted photo

SOUTH HILLS graduates celebrate as school director Mark Maggs formally conferred their specialized associate degrees and diplomas. Seventy-three graduates participated in the June 25 commencement ceremony held at the Penn Stater Conference Center.

LEARNING LESSONS

STATE COLLEGE Area School District’s Park Forest Middle School sixth-grade technology and engineering students recently downloaded NASA highresolution photo mosaic scans of the dwarf planet 1Ceres as part of their STEM Newton’s Laws Motion class work. They then utilized computer-aided drafting software to construct and print a 3-D high-definition scale model for use in class.

Submitted photo


JULY 9-15, 2015

COMMUNITY

PAGE 11

Village of Colyer celebrates Independence Day By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

POTTER TOWNSHIP — Other towns in the county have parades, usually put on in conjunction with carnivals as fundraisers for volunteer fire companies, but the tiny village of Colyer’s Fourth of July parade is just for fun — a pure celebration of American independence. The parade traces out a winding circuit beginning and ending at the farm of Doug and Janie Mothersbaugh on Lake Road, near Colyer Lake. Following the parade, a community picnic is held on the farm, where canopycovered tables are filled with food brought by residents and hot dogs, pork barbecue and drinks supplied by the parade committee. The parade had its origin in the 1990s, when five local men who owned antique tractors decided to drive their tractors, adorned with American flags, around the Colyer area to show them off. A tradition was born. John Weaver was one of those men, along with Bob Sprankle, Ralph Rimmey, Bob Mothersbaugh and Gil Ralston. He credits Sprankle for organizing the first parade. “I got a call the night before the Fourth: ‘This is Bob. Parade. Tomorrow. Ten a.m. See you there,’” said Weaver. “Shortest phone call I ever got in my life. We went to Wal-Mart because they were open late, and bought some American flags and ribbons to put on the tractor.”

The first parade is said to have had just seven spectators, but over the years the parade has grown in size and popularity, acquiring many more antique tractors, floats, antique cars, hundreds of American flags waving in the breeze and several hundred spectators. This year’s parade was hampered by rainy weather, but still came off without a hitch. There might have been fewer than normal participants and spectators, but the light-hearted spirit of the event overcame the showers. The parade was led by Tom Kistler, the parade commitee’s chairman, and his wife, riding in a 1976 Triumph TR-6 convertible with the top down, defying the constant drizzle. Parade floats displayed great creativity in their design and construction. Two floats were adorned with banners reading “Lake of Dreams — If You Fill It, They Will Come,” referring to nearby Colyer Lake, which was drained last fall for repairs to its earthen dam. One family rode on their bass boat, which was on its trailer, decorated with flags and hay bales. Several antique tractors drove the parade route, and were joined by golf carts, ATVs and even a gokart. At the community picnic, Kistler thanked everyone who helped organize the event. Following an invocation by Colyer resident Bill Arnold, the approximately 70 people present at the picnic enjoyed a good meal and plenty of good oldfashioned socializing.

SAM STITZER/For the Gazette

THE VILLAGE OF COLYER annual Fourth of July parade begins on Lake Road.

Luncheon welcomes new Blue Band director By SAM STITZER

pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — On July 1, about 100 Penn State University students, faculty and alumni gathered in the Blue Band building on the Penn State campus for a luncheon to welcome Gregory Drane, the newly appointed director of the band. Drane took on his new role following the retirement of Dr. O. Richard Bundy. A native of Miami, Drane earned bachelor’s degrees in music education and music performance at Bethune-Cookman College in Daytona Beach, Fla. Upon completion of a master’s degree in music education at Penn State, Drane joined the School of Music faculty as instructor and assistant director of athletic bands in 2005. During his tenure at Penn State, he has also served as the director of the Pride of the Lions basketball pep bands, and has worked extensively on drill design and arrangements for the Blue Band. Drane is only the sixth director in the band’s 116-year history. His appointment honors a tradition of assistant directors moving up to the director’s position following the previous director’s retirement. “This provides a link to the past,” said Annemarie Mountz, director of communications in the College of Education at Penn State. “That’s why the band is what it is today.” Drane plans to continue Bundy’s leadership style. “I never saw Dr. Bundy as a strict disciplinarian,” said Drane. “I was always

amazed at how he was able to maintain discipline without the authoritative type of leadership that we often associate with drill sergeants. “The times have changed, and that type of leadership is not accepted in society any more, especially in our situation, with a group of students who are volunteers,” he added. Drane noted there is a trend that finds many students who were in high school bands not continuing in college bands. “I can only equate that to the type of experience they’re receiving in those schools — those who had great experiences in high school are the ones that see the value of continuing to participate in bands,” he said. “As a result, we work very hard to make sure that our students are having a valuable, meaningful experience while here.” Drane said that many people assume that the majority of Blue Band members are music majors, but they actually make up only 30 percent of the band’s membership. He noted that band members must audition each year to remain in the band, and that the band loses roughly a third of its 315 members every year due to graduation or scheduling conflicts. He praised the band members for their ability to learn new halftime shows from start to finish in just four rehearsals per week. Drane plans to enhance some areas of the band’s performances, but not make any major changes. “This program is entering its 116th year of existence, so there’s an established tradition that we want to

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SAM STITZER/For the Gazette

GREGORY DRANE is the newly appointed director of the Penn State Blue Band. maintain. There are some areas where we can be more creative, and we are exploring those areas.

“The flow of the show is the same for the past 50 years,” he said. “We’re not touching that. That’s our bread and butter.”


PAGE 12

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Military history comes alive at Centre Hall library By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

CENTRE HALL — The Centre Hall branch of the Centre County Library has begun its children’s summer reading program, “Every Hero Has a Story.” And, during the program’s July 2 meeting, military heroes were featured, with two military reenactment groups paying a visit to the library. Roy Stewart represented the 82nd Airborne Parachute Infantry Regiment, based in Blairsville. Stewart brought a display of World War II soldiers’ equipment, uniforms, helmets and non-functional weapons and ammunition to show to the children. During his presentation, which held the attention of children and parents, Stewart explained the role of paratroopers in the war and fielded questions from the children. He let the kids try on a helmet and hold some of the weapons, and explained how they work.

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Stewart, who teaches a protective services course at the Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and Technology in Pleasant Gap, has participated in many World War II living history events in the area. He has acquired many of his display items from estate sales, flea markets and online auctions. “I probably have three times more than what you see here,” he said. Stewart also owns a 1942 Dodge WC56 command car, similar to one ridden in by Gen. George S. Patton. Quartermaster Sgt. Bob Barry and Pvt. Dylan Carter, of the Battery B, Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 152nd Regiment Civil War living history unit based in Boalsburg, brought a Civil War-era cannon to the event, explaining in detail the process of loading and firing the weapon. The cannon is technically called a Parrott rifle, which has spiraled grooves in its bore and fires a bullet-shaped projectile, rather than round cannon balls. “Those guns were rifled — they had grooves down the barrel,” said Barry. “When the shells were fired, they would spin, which gave them more accuracy and more distance.” Barry said the shells would explode on impact, which allowed the artillery men to see where the shells landed and helped to re-aim the gun for the next shot. Barry and Carter walked the audience through the steps required to clean, load and fire the cannon. Barry also shared the history of the original 152nd Regiment and its role in the war. The regiment was involved in many critical battles, including the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863. The Centre Hall Library summer reading program,

Chicken barbecue planned SNOW SHOE —The 13th annual Best Line Powersports/Snow Shoe Rails to Trails chicken barbecue will be held Saturday, July 18, at the Gillentown Trailhead. Meals include a half chicken, potato and macaroni salad, baked beans, dinner roll and a beverage. Cost is $9. Meals will be served beginning at 11:30 a.m., until they are gone. The fundraiser is open to the public. For more information, visit www.ssrt.org.

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ROY STEWART shows World War II equipment to participants in Centre Hall Library’s summer reading program.

which takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. on Thursdays, is open to children ages 4 and older. The library is located at 109 W. Beryl St. For more information, call (814) 364-2580.

Fest Zero targets recycling STATE COLLEGE — Last year, the group Fest Zero assisted State College Borough and the Centre County Recycling and Refuse Authority by increasing recycling efforts throughout the grounds at Arts Fest. This year, Arts Fest will again feature recycling bins for plastic bottles and metal cans located next to each trash can. In addition, there will be 26 locations to recycle lemonade cups. Compost bins to collect organic waste also will be located throughout the area. Fest Zero has been working with local food vendors to decrease the amount of polystyrene containers and cutlery available, as well. Arts Fest attendees are urged to recycle and compost anything and everything, as Arts Fest moves toward becoming a zero-waste event.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 13

PEN PAL PROGRAM

Submitted photo

KEN SMITH will show his unique works of art in Milesburg on July 18.

Tinsmith brings historic craft to Milesburg MILESBURG — The Milesburg Museum and Historical Society will host Ken Smith for a demonstration of the historic craft of tinsmithing from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, July 18. The event will be held on the front lawn of the museum, which is located at 205 Market St. in Milesburg. There will be popsicles for the kids and fun for everyone. Smith will exhibit historic tinsmithing tools and demonstrate techniques for the crafting of kitchenware and small household items that were in common use the early 1800s. In Colonial times, tinsmiths provided everyday kitchenware such as cups, plates and pots, and household items such as

candle holders and lanterns. Tin was an affordable alternative for the working class to the expensive silver, pewter and ceramics items owned by the wealthy. By the late 1800s, the craft of tinsmithing began to fade as it was replaced by the mass production of the Industrial Revolution. Smith comes from a line of tin workers, and he, his father and grandfather have all been tin roofers. He learned his skills from his father and began working in the family trade in 1973. In 2012, Smith decided to put his father’s collection of historic tinsmithing tools to work and has been studying and promoting tinsmithing ever since. The rain date for the event is Saturday, July 25.

Rhoneymeade open in July CENTRE HALL — Rhoneymeade Arboretum and Historic Rhone House, located along Rimmey Road in Centre Hall, will be open to the public Sunday

afternoons in July. Donations will be accepted. For more information, visit www.rhoneymeade-usa. org.

Submitted photo

THE STATE COLLEGE Elks Lodge recently donated funds to support Centre County’s Retired Senior Volunteer Program’s pen pal program. The Pen Pal program enhances the writing and reading skills of elementary school children as they write letters back and forth with RSVP volunteers. Adults shown here with student pen pals are, from left, Brenda Reeve and Andrea Puzycki, of RSVP; Centre County Judge Brad Lunsford and Bob Kidder, of the Elks; and Bindy Bracken, of Port Matilda Elementary School.

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PAGE 14

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Celebrate Festival Week! Central PA Festival Of The Arts & People’s Choice Festival What: 49th annual Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts When: July 9-11, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; July 12, noon to 5 p.m. Where: Downtown State College and University Park Highlights: Sidewalk sale, Italian street painting, silent auction, exhibitions, BookFest PA, live performances, Sue Crowe Memorial races and festival food.

What: 23rd annual People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts When: July 9-11, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; July 12, noon to 5 p.m. Where: Pennsylvania Military Museum, 51 Boal Ave., Boalsburg Highlights: Artisan sale, young artisan sale, live performances, festival food, specialty food tent, and children’s activities.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 15

People’s Choice Festival is a tradition unlike any other BOALSBURG — The 23rd annual People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts will be held Thursday, July 9, through Sunday, July 12 on the grounds of the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg.

flat, no traffic to bother with, and parking doesn’t seem to be a problem. If you are tired, there are always the tents to sit under or benches all around the grounds and usually some type of entertainment going on.”

The four-day festival is a very well-attended and muchappreciated summer institution. More than 200 artists will bring their arts and crafts to amaze and entice. Forty groups are already signed up to entertain throughout the four days and 23 food booths promise delicious snacks, meals and treats.

The entertainment is varied and plentiful at People’s Choice. Do you prefer rock ‘n’ roll? It will be there. Do you feel like some toe-tapping bluegrass? They’ve got you covered. Jigsaw, Thunderbolts Production Unit, Harrisburg Mandolin Ensemble, Make Mine Country and The Strayers are all new acts this year. Bands featuring Dixieland, barbershop and big band sounds are all planning to perform. You can watch Elvis, or check out some belly dancing.

CONNIE COUSINS

The atmosphere is family friendly and open. There are all sorts of activities for kids at the festival, from face painting to the petting zoo. Your children will not be bored. Want to bring your dog? The People’s Choice Committee is fine with that. They do however, remind you to watch the animal as you would a child, and look out for its welfare and the safety of others. A new vendor this year is Wisker Biscuits, from Stroudsburg. You may want to visit there early before the biscuits have all gone to the dogs.

Connie Cousins covers a wide variety of events in Centre County for the Centre County Gazette. Email her at ccous67@gmail. com.

CHRIS MORELLI/Gazette file photo

There will be something for every taste at the 23rd annual People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts. “This will be my fifth year at the festival. I love that the festival focuses solely on Pennsylvania artists,” said Krause. “It’s always wonderful to buy handmade, but I think the reason People’s Choice has such loyal patrons is because they know they are supporting local artists and small businesses which supports the local economy,” she said.

Festivalgoer Barb Foley said: “I like the People’s Choice. It is a lot cheaper in their prices and I love the convenience of parking. And, I can find art stuff I like.”

That seemed to be a common theme among those who were questioned regarding their festival experiences. Several people said that the Boalsburg site was so easy to get to and since there was abundant parking close to the grounds, it was a favorite of older people. Dee Vonada said that she has gone to People’s Choice many times. “I find it to be a more relaxed atmosphere there. It is easy to walk the grounds and there are great arts and crafts there,” she said. Karen Eklund said, “I like both the Arts Fest and the People’s Choice Festivals, but for different reasons. I like the idea that there are more local vendors at the People’s Choice and prices are more reasonable if I’m looking for arts and crafts. People’s Choice is easier to get to for me.” Nellie Natalie responded to questions about People’s Choice and reported, “People’s Choice Festival seems more like a friendly backyard festival. It’s all in one place,

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Betsy Wiser described the People’s Choice: “It’s very open; feels cooler than downtown. There are some artists that we enjoy visiting every year. Great food. Even a tea stand — decaf, too,” she said. The Community Service Tent will be staffed with members of local nonprofit organizations who will be present each day to welcome you to the festival and share their information with you. Vendors also had positive comments about People’s Choice. Sierra Krause is from Allentown.

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PAGE 16

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts returns UNIVERSITY PARK — The 49th annual Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts takes place through Sunday, July 12, on the streets of downtown State College and the adjacent Penn State campus. Founded by the State College Chamber of Commerce and Penn State’s College of Arts and Architecture, the festival attracts about 125,000 visitors each summer. The festival features the nationally recognized Sidewalk Sale and Exhibition, a juried gallery exhibition, Children and Youth Day, the Downtown State College Italian Street Painting Festival, educational opportunities, music, dance and theatrical performances in a variety of outdoor and indoor venues. At 10 a.m. Thursday, July 9, the awardwinning Sidewalk Sale and Exhibition will open. Sidewalk Sale hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, July 11, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 12. The works of more than 300 exhibitors comprise one of the nation’s best juried fine art and craft shows. A panel of five jurors will award more than $17,500 in prize money to winning exhibitors during a ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday, July 11, at the Allen Street Stage. Six Pennsylvania artisanal food producers will be selling their products at Foster Avenue and South Allen Street during the Sidewalk Sale and Exhibition. Participating food merchants include Gemelli Bakers, Tait Farm Foods, Razz’s Shagbark Hickory Syrup, Red Hawk Premium Peppers, Bevvy’s Gourmet and Village Eatinghouse. The 2015 Silent Auction will be in its traditional spot on the 100 block of South Allen Street. The Silent Auction

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opens at noon Thursday, July 9, and will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday, July 10, and Saturday, July 11, and from noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 12. Proceeds from the auction help to defray the costs of the festival. Images 2015, an exhibition of drawings, paintings, mixed media, photography, hand-pulled prints, watercolors, fiber and paper, will hang in Schlow Centre Region Library and in the Woskob Family Gallery of the Penn State Downtown Theatre Center during July. Both galleries are located on South Allen Street in downtown State College. Images 2015 is open to artists whose primary residences are in the state.

CHRIS MORELLI/Gazette file photo

Vendors will return to the streets of State College this week for the 49th annual Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts.

Artists enter the show by submitting digital images of work created within the last three years. The works in the exhibit have been selected by juror Scott Dimond, curator for visual arts at Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art in Loretto.

The 2015 Downtown State College Italian Street Painting Festival honors the 16th-century Italian tradition of using special chalks to paint on the street. Look for the Italian Street Painting Festival on the 100 block of Hiester Street. A variety of local visual artists will create 6-foot by 4-foot paintings. For a $5 fee, Young Artists Alley gives children the opportunity to create a square street painting. Painting ends at 8 p.m., Thursday, July 9, through Saturday, July 11, and at 5 p.m. on Sunday, July 12, weather permitting. The Italian Street Painting Festival is sponsored by the Downtown State College Improvement District. The sixth annual BookFestPa will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 11, in the Schlow Centre Region Library and the BookFest tent in the library’s parking lot. The event focuses on comics this year, and featured authors include Collin Colsher, Jay Hosler and Joel Priddy. There will be an additional 10 authors in the BookFest tent. For more information, visit www.bookfestpa.org. This year, Festival of the Arts presents folk music by Hughes, Kidder and Rounds. Since playing their last show with the band Cartoon in July 2012, Randy Hughes, Glenn

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Kidder and Jon Rounds have worked on new original songs via email and play music whenever they’re in the same room. They will perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, July 11, in the State College Presbyterian Church. A CPFA button is required for admission. Not So Silent Cinema will present the silent film “The Mark of Zorro” at 8 p.m. Saturday, July 11, at the State Theatre. Not So Silent Cinema is the project of New York composer Brendan Cooney, who pulls together different groups for each of his film projects, creating diverse mashups of musical personalities from different music scenes to create lively new platforms for interaction and creativity. A CPFA button is required to attend. Entrain, the eclectic Martha’s Vineyard-based six-piece band will perform at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 11, at the Festival Shell Stage. Their performance is sponsored by the Penn State Alumni Association. While most performances are free, some require a festival button. They are good for the entire festival and grant admission on a space available basis to all indoor events. For more information, visit www. arts-festival.com. The Nittany Valley Running Club’s 40th annual 10K, 5K and 10-mile runs will take place at 8:15 a.m. Sunday, July 12. The Kids’ Fun Run, quarter- to half-mile races for children 12 and younger, will start at 11 a.m. For registration and additional race information, visit www.nvrun.com. Parking will be available for a fee at Jordan East parking lot, next to the Bryce Jordan Center and Beaver Stadium. Visitors may park and take a free bus operated by the Centre Area Transportation Authority. Bus service will stop in the festival zone at the Downtown State College Italian Street Painting Festival at the corner of College Avenue and Hiester Street, and at College Avenue and South Allen Street. For more information, visit www.arts-festival.com.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 17

People’s Choice Festival is more than just a home for local artists By ALEXA LEWIS correspondent@centrecountygazette.com BOALSBURG — The 23rd annual People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts will again celebrate the homegrown talents of Pennsylvania artists while also offering a variety of activities for families. On the grassy grounds of the Pennsylvania Military Museum in historic Boalsburg, the four-day festival starts on Thursday, July 9, and ends on Sunday, July 12, simultaneously as the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts takes place in State College. People’s Choice began in 1993 by local artisans who were cut from the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts’ lineup. To this day, the festival still features only instate artisans, and it has reached its maximum capacity for artists this year with nearly 200 set to participate. But beyond showcasing art from home-based artists, the festival harnesses a different atmosphere than that found at Arts Fest. “I think people come to our festival for family time and — to be perfectly honest — for affordable art and the open atmosphere,” said Cindy Rockey, one of the festival’s co-directors. “You’re walking on grass instead of down streets.” More than 100,000 people are expected to attend the festival this year to enjoy the art, but also the 22 food concessions, six wineries, 12 specialty food vendors and more than 40 entertaining groups. And Rockey really wanted to emphasize that kids’ events are scheduled throughout all four days of the festival. Every day is a kids’ day, she said, with activities that range from face painting and a petting zoo to an interactive science museum. A designated children’s circle will host most of the activities that are intended for kids, which also include a BMX stunt team, tie-dying and the Little Smilin’ Choo Choo. “I call it a safer atmosphere because all the children’s things are in the circle. It’s smaller than running up and down streets,” Rockey said. The specialty food tent features local food producers serving some of Pennsylvania’s best treats including maple sugar candy, chutneys, coffee beans and salsa, according to the event’s website.

Gazette file photo

The 23rd annual People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts will be held on the grounds of the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg.

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Arts Fest will transform downtown State College By MICHAEL MARTIN GARRETT

mug made with care with a story behind it instead of something that came from a factory somewhere.”

STATE COLLEGE — Although State College is quiet for most of the summer, downtown streets will undergo their annual transformation into a bustling museum of artwork and entertainment when the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts returns for its 49th consecutive year. The event, which kicks off on July 9, continues through Sunday, July 12.

So, if you’re looking for artisan goods with a practical purpose, Arts Fest will have something for you, from carefully crafted leather accessories or handmade jewelry to a vast array of paintings, drawings, prints and sketches.

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“We’re going to have 300 artists here who all make and sell their own work,” said Arts Fest Executive Director Rick Bryant. “Call me old-fashioned, but I’d rather drink out of a

The event’s famous sidewalk sale begins Thursday, July 9, when artists from all over the country will have the chance to talk to the roughly 125,000 visitors that come to town throughout the week. That day, the bulk of Arts Fest’s many concerts and performances begin, too. Those range from all

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kinds of music to theater to dance and more. Although it’s completely free to walk around the festival and take in many of the performances, Bryant recommends buying a festival button to get the full Arts Fest experience. The button is only $10 and gets you access to every single indoor event throughout the weekend, including extra bands, silent cinema played to live music and theater performances. In between all the street vendors and great performances, don’t forget to check out such Arts Fest staples as the Street Painting Fair on Hesiter Street, the sand sculptor in Sidney Friedman Park, or Schlow Library’s BookFest on Saturday, July 11, which features talks and book signings from a number of established comic book artists. Additional events during the five-day party include a juried art show in the Schlow Library, the banner exhibition and competition and the Sue Crowe memorial races. Bryant and the rest of the Arts Fest team have to put in numerous hours of hard work each year, but he said it’s always worth it. By putting on the festival, he’s playing a small part in helping people connect with art and connect with the incredible State College community. “When you come to Arts Fest, you don’t just come for a leather purse or a pair of earrings or a painting; you come for the experience,” Bryant said. “In houses all over the Centre region, and beyond, you can walk in and say ‘Wow, I really like this picture,’ and you’ll hear, ‘I got it at Arts Fest.’”

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 19

People’s Choice Festival has grown through the years From Gazette staff reports BOALSBURG — It’s been 22 years since a handful of volunteers got together to create a homegrown arts festival. In 1993, there were 50 vendors, a couple food stands and a few live bands. Now it’s one of the largest and most family-friendly arts festivals in central Pennsylvania — attracting more than 110,000 visitors over a four-day period. This year, the People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts & Crafts features nearly 200 artists, about two dozen food vendors and more than 40 acts on the two stages. The event started when George Marion, a local artist, wanted to start a brand new arts festival to be held on a grassy lawn in Boalsburg. It seemed that there were far more local artists than could possibly be accommodated at State College’s Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. Marion and his compatriots wanted a venue to share their creations at the same time. Marion and his wife, Nancy, both energetic artisans, were up to the challenge of organizing the first event. Marion placed an ad in the paper and there was a write-up, as well. Cindy Rockey, who had already organized a few such events, suggested the Pennsylvania Military Museum grounds as a good location — and it remains an exceptional venue to this day. Rockey recommended a few artists and also signed

up as an artist, showcasing her handmade stuffed animals, household decorations and specialty Christmas items. John Madison, who was new to the area in 1993, had been helping his wife, Georgia, as she sewed her handmade welder’s hats. “We were just getting into the hat-making business,” Madison said, “and I saw the article in the paper. We went to George and Nancy’s house and took our hats with us.” The Madisons were accepted into the first show. Rockey and Madison, are now the codirectors of the People’s Choice Festival. They took over a few years ago when the Marions retired and moved south. With all the work they do to present each festival, neither one exhibits at the show anymore. Their artistic labor of love has become the show itself. “I think there were about 60 artists that first year,” Madison said. “They were all along the military museum entrance road, with about four food vendors over by the monuments. We had one little stage. It was a hay wagon. Someone made us a yellow, red and blue canvas backdrop and a little roof. That was it, a hay wagon.” The festival now has two huge entertainment tents that seat hundreds. Chris Kepler, the event’s entertainment director, remembers one particular year quite vividly. “One that stands out was, I believe in 1995, when the storm blew the

entertainment tent down at night and the firemen took the gear to the fire hall for safekeeping. We got things up and running in time to open the next morning.” Diana Stapleford, a broadcast executive with Magnum Broadcasting, has been with the festival for 18 years as marketing and sponsorship director. She’s responsible for publicity and raising funds for the festival. People’s Choice runs on donations and sponsorships. “The more donations and sponsors we get, the more we can improve the show year after year. We appreciate this support more than you know,” Stapleford said. The People’s Choice grounds are so spacious, no matter how large the crowd, visitors feel free and unfettered. Some festivalgoers bring babies in strollers or their pets.

George and Nancy, it’s become ‘the local show’ in my opinion. Many local folks come every year, every day. The people have really supported the People’s Choice Festival, and we appreciate it.”

One of the things that makes People’s Choice a little different from most arts festivals is that all the artists, entertainers and food vendors are from Pennsylvania. The selection of arts and food are also chosen to suit the budgets of growing families.

The festival exists because of the Marions’ energy, enthusiasm and perseverance. Sadly, Nancy passed away last year; George now lives in Florida. They’d be proud of their legacy, and, 22 shows later, how the “second generation” of volunteers is taking it to the next level, while preserving the original goals — exclusively Pennsylvania vendors and entertainers, affordable crafts and a wholesome family experience.

“At first, this was a ‘silly little arts festival’ that nobody thought would come to much of anything,” Madison said. “Thanks to

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JULY 9-15, 2015

All the way back

Nittany Valley softball All-Stars fight their way through loser’s bracket By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

BELLEFONTE — The Nittany Valley 11and 12-year-old Little League Softball AllStars made it all the way back. After dropping the very first game of the tournament, a 5-4 extra-inning defeat at the hands of Bald Eagle Area, Nittany Valley strung together five consecutive wins to capture the District 5 title. Nittany Valley knocked off State College twice to capture the championship — 8-2 on July 1, and 4-1 on July 2 at Panik Field. In the tournament finale on July 2, Nittany Valley pitcher Lexi Rogers fired a gem, limiting high-powered State College to four hits and a meaningless run in the top of the sixth. “She was wonderful,” said Nittany Valley assistant coach Chris Lauck. “She got ahead of almost every batter. She didn’t let up and we made some defensive plays behind her. She was just great.” Rogers scattered four hits and struck out three in the victory, which propelled Nittany Valley to sectionals, which take place this week in Indiana, Pa. The tournament ended in heartbreaking fashion for State College, which was outscored 12-3 over the final two games. “The team didn’t quit at all,” said State College manager Shawn Hernacane. “We just didn’t hit the ball the way we’re capable of hitting the ball. I thought we played well defensively and our pitcher pitched well enough to win the game. It just didn’t happen for us.” After a scoreless first inning, Nittany Valley broke through for the first runs of the game.

In the bottom of the second, Lily Gardner was hit by a pitch and Jaelyn Smith walked. McKenna Port was then hit by a pitch, loading the bases. Addyson Manning walked, forcing in the first run of the game. No. 9 hitter Maddie Morelli connected for an RBI infield single to make it 2-0. Taylor Kerr’s sacrifice fly gave Nittany Valley a 3-0 lead. “We gave (State College) their first loss (July 1). We thought if we could get up on them early, that would hopefully keep them down. We didn’t want to let them get any momentum and I think it worked,” Lauck said. In the bottom of the fifth, Nittany Valley added an insurance run. With one out, Rogers singled to center field. Hanna Lauck followed by ripping an RBI double to left field. That gave Nittany Valley a 4-0 cushion. State College finally got to Rogers in the top of the sixth. Caitlyn Brannon reached on an infield single. After a pair of ground outs, Maggie Mangene crushed a double to left field, which plated Brannon for State College’s first run. But it was too little, too late for State College. “Our kids definitely learned a lot,” Hernacane said. “I think those lessons will continue to help them as they get into junior high or play travel ball.” As for Nittany Valley? The show goes on. “It was a great win. This is a great group of girls. They listen, they hustle and they want to work hard. It makes our job a lot easier. They come to the game ready to play,” Lauck said. Nittany Valley did it the hard way, los-

TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette

NITTANY VALLEY’S Lexi Rogers delivers a pitch during a July 2 game with State College for the District 5 Little League Softball title. Rogers scattered four hits in a 4-1 victory that propelled Nittany Valley to Sectionals. ing the first game of the tournament and then fighting its way back through the loser’s bracket. “It’s the hardest way, the toughest way. But I think you could see them each game, building character,” Lauck said. “The pitching got better, the hitting got better, the defense got better. But they definitely did it the hard way.” When Nittany Valley heads to Section-

als this week, Lauck hopes that his squad will start winning right away. “Hopefully, they won’t want to do it the hard way,” he said. “I’d like to see us get on the winner’s side of the bracket — and stay there.” Editor’s note: Maddie Morelli is the daughter of Chris Morelli, managing editor of The Centre County Gazette.

Softball All-Star Games highlight the county’s best By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — How can a taut, 1-0 victory in a big game over a very good team be both an exhilarating experience and a sad one at the same time? It can if it happened in one of the Pennsylvania Softball Coach’s Association AllStar softball games that sent the best players from District 6 and District 4 against each other in what would be, for every senior player, the final games of their high school softball careers. The All-Star games, held on July 1 at Penn State’s Beard Field, were sponsored by the PSBCA and were the culmination of a night celebrating the quality and popularity of high school softball in central Pennsylvania. There were special presentations, introductions of the latest inductees into the PSBCA Hall of Fame, and the games, of course, which annually have the best players from each district show off their talents in two seven-inning games. The first game featured predominantly the players from AAAA and AA schools, while the second consisted of players from AAA and A schools. For the record, State College pitcher Jess Henderson pitched three perfect innings and took the win in District 6’s tight, 1-0 victory in the first game. In the second game, District 4 emphatically bounced back, batting around and scoring four runs in the fifth inning, in an 8-1 victory that evened the slate for the night. But for the players, the game scores were, frankly, secondary to the excitement of capping their careers by playing with so many top-echelon players in a quality venue such as Beard Field. “This is so exciting,” Henderson said. “I’ve never played on this field before and

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this is an incredible atmosphere to be playing in. And, I got to meet a bunch of new people today — people that I knew from other teams but who I’ve never actually gotten to play with. So, it was just very exciting.” Henderson was joined on the D6 team in Game One by area players Kenzie Burge and Abby Showers, from Philipsburg-Osceola, Marissa Tobias and Haley Giedroc, from Bald Eagle Area, and Karli Nolan, from State College. Burge had the only RBI in the game when she drove in Mandy Glass, of Glendale, in the fifth inning for the run that three D-6 pitchers made stand up. Cori James (CH) and Taylor Yuhas (Ferndale) followed Henderson on the mound and completed the one-hitter. D-4’s Mikayla Bower (Williamsport) went the distance and gave up just six hits in the loss. “It’s was nice coming back and being able to play out here (Beard Field) one more time,” Burge said. “We haven’t seen, and I haven’t seen, a pitcher like Mikayla Bower in a long time. So there was an adjustment to make because she was really good. “It was a good game. District 4 is obviously a strong district, and they’ve always been tough, so I knew it would be a good game coming into it.” The second game featured Bellefonte players Liz Linn, Jessica Fishburn, Sarah Menna and Stevie Confer, but the outcome of the game was a one-sided D-4 win. Led by Whitney Cross’s (Milton) tworun double, D-4 scored four fifth-inning runs to take a commanding 7-0 lead that eventually became an 8-1 victory. Fishburn had a big hit in D-6’s only rally of the night, with Hollidaysburg’s Kirsta Shay driving in the team’s only run, but the game belonged to the hitters from D-4. The end of the games had many players, Your 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE STAMP OF APPROVAL: the American Members of local Philatelic Society’s made recently Stamp Club Steamtown a visit to the Site in National Historic 11 Scranton. Page Rows DAYS GONE BY: were of antique tractorsthe on display duringMachinery Nittany Antique annual spring Association’s was held at show, which Page 14 Penns Cave. The SUMMER RITUAL: Summer’s Ninth annual comes to Best Music Fest College on downtown State6. Country Saturday, June Dee Messina music star Jo play on the to is scheduled Pages 16, Garner Lot Stage.

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By CHRIS MORELLI

editor@centrecountygazette.com

sun set — Once the BELLEFONTE Governor’s darkened over and the skies turned solemn. the Gazette were HARRY ZIMBLER/For Park, the mood lights that walkers The portable Services recently turned off, and Homeland Manufacturing from left, are brought in wereheld Bellefonte Relay for DOWN TO BUSINESS: in State College. Pictured, at the recently candles. As Wiz Khalifa’s Bonislawski and location backpresident John opened in a new Life picked up played in the trek Allen Sherman, the “See You Again” operations manager began to makethose who Bonislawsk. ground, they for controller Jennifer walking path around the cancer. was were lost to of Bellefonte, Kerry O’Hara,for Life lead. He talkcome to the this year’s Relay feelings that ed about the the event. speak, it forefront throughout hear a caretaker “There By HARRY ZIMBLER .com “When you said O’Hara. goes correspondent@centrecountygazette really hits home,” Services Inc. emotions someone Manufacturing specifically are so many survivor or a caregiver. — Homeland a designed have this through as STATE COLLEGE facility in State College around and aca new Then you turn needs. on the service. I could has moved to manufacturing cut the ribbon beautiful luminaria Bonislawski right now. for the company’s founder John tually start crying emotional event. Owner and “It’s an extremely here and seen it, the Gazette been TIM WEIGHT/For 4 If you’ve never for 29, 30 Facility, Page the Bellefonte Relay 31 Business ..................... helped kick off were down .... 26, 27 Relay, Page 6 Happening A CAUSE: ParticipantsBellefonte. Although numbers Classified ........................ WALKING FOR in ....... 24 What’s ............................ 28 Park Governor’s Viewpoints at Lic # 687 .... 25 Puzzles a huge success. Life on May 29 16-17 Medical was still seen as Spread ........... 18-23 Arts & Entertainment 10 Centre this year, the event ......................... ....................... 7 Education ............... 11-15 Sports Community Opinion ............................ ......... 8, 9 Health & Wellness

The senior CLASS ACTS: at Bellefonte institute class recently Area High School $11,000 raised nearly Brandon for 11-year-old Pleasant Gap. Conaway of from many Conaway suffers 10 Page health issues. The SPIRITUAL SINGING: held recently Covalt Family Gospel Sing their 20th annual Fairgrounds at the Grange More than a in Centre Hall. the dozen acts entertained 11 crowd. Page DAD: Before CELEBRATING summer they left for in Paula break, studentsthird-grade Hendershot’s essays and class penned to celebrate drew pictures Be sure to Father’s Day. handiwork. check out their Page 14

TIM WEIGHT/For

the Gazette

June boards during the 11. on their mortar and moved the tassels area graduates, see pages 4 Area High School For more on 16-18 SENIORS AT Bellefonte at the BAHS gymnasium. Fun ............. 19 9 Summer 8 graduation ceremony Matters ............... ......................... 7 Opinion ............................ ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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PATRICK MANSELL/Penn

21-24 Sports ......................... 25, 26 Arts & Entertainment

State University

.... 26, 27 28 What’s Happening Puzzles ............................

ng Mıd-State Awnı

Education ............... 10-14 Community

29, 30 31 Business ..................... Classified ........................ Lic # 687

CHAMPS CROWNED: put on an The Yankees display impressive offensive crowned as they were the Nittany of champions a League with Valley Little win over the lopsided 13-3 25 Red Sox. Page

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June 18-24, 2015

24

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has decided The organizationannual Pacethe against hosting Campaign this setter Kick-Off which Evans deatyear, an event a pep rally scribed as having the 35 partner mosphere where pacesetter companew agencies and announce any nies meet to companies and to participating their camgive the companies ferent approach. things have paign materials.this year is much “We’ve noticed said Megan The process CCUW asked for the been stagnant,” more personal. partner agency are so Evans, a spokesperson companies representatives CCUW. “The to serve as camused to runpaign stewards ning their camSubmitted photo we who will guide paigns that accepted Medical Center the pacesetneeded some Mount Nittany campaign. ter companies LOOKING AHEAD: kind of change in the United Way United LOOKING BACK, through their — something 2014 for its participationMount Nittany CEO; Scott Lamb, a plaque in May Brown, to make it more director; and Jerry right, are Steve internal campaigns. July, the exciting.” Pictured, left to United Way executiveNittany. organization Mostly throughout Tammy Gentzel, The nonprofit year for local meet with company resources at Mount Way board chair; in each agencies will and employees to and deductions president of human raises funds Dittmann, vice provide health the representatives tions and payroll the campaign agencies that the opporthroughout stopersonally deliver the past. share the stories that hearing By giving agencies human services to the CCUW how their pro“We thought the people who materials, and clients who have county, according tunity to explainthe community, of the agency’s the funded prories and meeting might have an website. negawork grams benefit campaign, might change benefited from are doing the Aug. Before the general Evans said it on Monday, hear some employees grams. will starts 6 which tive views that when their the runs the Paceset“The companies United Way, Page mouth how 17, the CCUW where designatmay have developedfor contribuasked from the horse’s the commuter Campaign that support the bosses have money is affecting emed companies said. hold internal nity,” Evans United Way ployee campaigns.

LEWIS

By ALEXA com correspondent@centrecountygazette.

— Centre STATE COLLEGE Way’s Pacesetonce County United is under way year ter Campaign but this difagain this summer, is taking a the organization

circle has come full

life For Tice, SPOTLIGHT CENTRE COUNTY

ner County commissio system demands court act’ ‘clean up its By MICHAEL MARTIN

GARRETT

StateCollege.com

By CHRIS MORELLI County’s commissioners its act.” editor@centrecountygazette.com — One of Centre to “clean up June life has BELLEFONTE judicial system needs meeting on Kristina Tice, had thinks the county’s At a commissioners — For Bellefonte’s Chris Exarchos BELLEFONTE Caththe current 16, Commissioner the Evangelist words about system and come full circle. a student at St. John big office as some heated she sits in the She was once criminal justice District Atstate of the Bellefonte. Now, lawsuit between the county olic School in John for the past five years. the doors the ongoing and St. Tice unlocked Parks Miller stuprincipal of torney Stacy Monday morning, that a former For On a recent It’s not often configovernment. on the lights. the school they attended. that we restore and turned “Its imperative system of our counprincipal of to St. John. judicial dent becomes easy decision to return Tice said. dence in the operate in this an back to St. John,” continue to said. “We’ve Tice, it was to be a teachty; we can’t right to come Exarchos “It just felt made me want vested of the entire Gazette environment,” John was what there and I was very laughing stock CHRIS MORELLI/The “Going to St. my kids were become the the er. Coming back, suing the serves Centre front of St. John state.” of the school.” is currently Tice stands in in the success Evangelist Catholic School level from a CHRIS EXARCHOS to defense Parks Miller Tice attended the IN CHARGE: Kristina St. John the children ranging in grade cellphone recordsthe county. School in Bellefonte. some of her has Evangelist Catholic is now the principal. requests with policy by County and to fifth grade. for nearly 125 years. county for releasing and filed Right-to-Know and county school as a child pre-K for 3-year-olds attorneys who county violated state law been in Bellefonte who have gone to St. ages. The school has of families a lot,” Tice said. for many different school. presidShe claims the of the think that says requests. asked the judge of “There are generations an educator it’s a great community level because filling those the size that attorney recently County in contempt Tice has been said. “I think elementary grow beyond that time. never John,” Tice more Centre Parks Miller’s prefers the so we can’t request for grade, so it’s in children during they’re little She said she lawsuit to hold We’re landlocked,one classroom per small schools. It’s changes seen ing over that defender’s to a Right-to-Know kids from when have growth and in the public that hapand I like we are. We able to watch court for responding from an employee “I like to be grade. There’s a lot of growth a really big school grade,” the going to be fifth through fifth cell phone records it’s family.” it. This year, up through kindergarten from a community, says family, she means have been at the child who pens with a Page 3 When Tice 37, 38 Commissioner, a pair of teachers Tice said. 39 Business ..................... school celebrated the school .... 34, 35 has been at years. Happening Classified ........................ school for decades. for 30 Tice, Carol Fisher 25-31 What’s ............................ 36 Tice, Page 4 According to has been there here. I Lic # 687 Sports ......................... 32, 33 Puzzles Michelle Davis go here. My kids went ............... 11-16 for 25 years. & Entertainment grandkids 17-24 Arts 8, 9 Community “Mrs. Fisher’s Cruise ...... Wellness ......... 2 Health & ....................... 10 Bellefonte .................... 7 Education Police Report Opinion ............................

ng

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Family

Bellefonte, PA

12

Volume 7, Issue

ter United Way Paceset Centre County more personal approach Campaign takes

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

Front and Centre

editor@centrecountygazette.com

Special 46th annual PARK — The at Penn State June 4, UNIVERSITY Games, held 2,500 athapproximately convergOlympics Summer a big hit, with counties 5 and 6, were 52 Pennsylvania letes representingPark for the event. on severing on University Games put the wraps And, while The Summer competitions. training and the attention, the event of al weeks of garner most the many volunteers who the athletes place without State to make sure the couldn’t take at Penn spend the weekend a hitch. are local, without the volunteers Mifflin games go off majority of drove in from And while the Rose Belante some are not. at the games. event,” County to help just a wonderful, wonderful they do, “I think it’s see these athletes do whatany other of “To I can’t think Belante said. to my face. it brings a smilebe this weekend.” at the place I’d rather that she’s been volunteering that time, Belante said for several years. During athletes and some of the Summer Games friends with she’s become year after year. their families. lot of the same people — a huge event “You see a a big event the you. Sure, it’s to stop and talk with is They know which always time — but there’s just about the competition, not athletes. It’s said. nice,” Belante Page 5 Special Olympics,

A celebration Happy Valley The third annual begins on Monday, Culinary week through Sunday, June 22, and runs you need to out all June 28. Find kicks off./Page know as the week

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE

2015

of

OUNTY

GAZETTE

Volume 7, Issue

es state’s Area again welcom Games ics Summer Special Olymp

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

Aaronsburg MUSIC MAN: recently native Jay Vonadajazz fifth released his To celebrate, trombone CD.CD release a Vonada had Green Drake party at the Page 13 Gallery in Millheim.

again!

Let’s cruiseBellefonte Cruise Historic next The 27th annual downtown Bellefonte to the takes place in guide for our annual weekend. Look with a map, schedule cruise — complete stories, inside. of events and feature

Historic H.B.I.

GAZETTE Front and Centre

Commercial Residential • Free Estimates Awnings Custom Canvas

Bellefonte, PA

79

TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette

BALD EAGLE AREA’S Marissa Tobias slides safely into second base during the District 6-District 4 All-Star Game at Penn State’s Beard Field. such as BEA’s Giedroc, reflecting on their seasons, as well as looking ahead. “I think it’s sad,” Giedroc said. “It’s the end of a really great thing for me, but then again, it’s a new beginning. ... I have another four years of college where I can play four more years of great ball and make some more friends.” “It’s kind of shocking,” SC’s Nolan said, “but in the same way exciting. It’s exciting to look back at my high school season and be really pleased with how my season went. I don’t really have any regrets. It was good for me and good for my family, and I had a great time socially and with the game.” Before the first game, this year’s inball

Summer but don’t tell season, It’s not football County contingent that to the Centre Lezzer Lumber the that took part in in which was held Football Classic, 19. State College Clearfield on June John Weakland Area High School’s 18 had a stellar game./Page

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE azette.com www.CentreCountyG

School board,

union reach contract accord

June 25-July 1,

2015

Volume 7, Issue

25

azette.com www.CentreCountyG

nds

draws thousa

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Bellefonte, PA

Volume 7, Issue

26

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By CHRIS MORELLI

editor@centrecountygazette.com

Bellefonte Cruise

• 814-355-89

July 2-8, 2015

Bellefonte bridg

LEWIS

By ALEXA .com correspondent@centrecountygazette

times StateCollege.com about three equivalent to that cuts College Each day driversportion of Pike Street — The State LEMONT — nally use the STATE COLLEGEboard of directors fi Lemont’s population the Gazette using the road District village. TIM WEIGHT/For the State College cars and truckslocal businesses Area School at through the agreement with 6,000 to 8,000 and Association of getting public reached an That’s betweenmany of Lemont’s stores Support Personnel are in the process with months of negotiaEducational STREET: Officials that is lined traffic speed meeting after in Lemont. WORD ON THE concerns with its June 22 Brumthe traffic situation on a given day. there have been said Adam said College freeze for the input on improving tions. “For many years,go through the village,” becomes available, includes a salary with an that The contract when a grant Projand volumes forum that just concluded, Township manager. and Streetscape is shovel-ready member Carla Stilson. the remaining academic year houses for public have traffic in each of baugh, the CollegeStreet Traffic-Calming care ago to slow Township councilhas hosted three open members increase occurring are significant health the in the than three years After the Pike The township Stilson said because council have seen little in There proposed more pedestrian friendly more three years. but drawings medical insurance ect was first commaking Lemont more since 2012, the past few years the concerns that and staff are changes involving and make downtown many of the changed over from July Township Council the project forward. pornew contract. have not addressed runs retroactively process, College public input and push disbumped-out change and gather The agreement and affects 360 school crosswalks, advances to paraparallel parking 2018 has considered 6 2014 to June sidewalks and The township including secretaries, perPike Street, Page street, improved other support trict employees, so that it tions of the clerks and in the design. the project professionals, designs for along Pike Street to finalize the 7-1 vote. Board sonnel. The goal is passed by a the lone dissentThe contract Pawelczyk was member Jim of many ing vote. the culmination and will “It represents By CHRIS MORELLI respectful discussions, the association’s months of editor@centrecountygazette.com and in the there’s the district serve both members well Conenthusiasts, County car Amber dedicated, hard-working — For Centre board president BELLEFONTE the Bellefonte Cruise. place over coming years,” Cruise took than “voted nothing better Historic Bellefonte cepcion said. again. personnel association consuccess once smoothly,” said Pat The 27th annual The support to accept the proposed fairly and was a huge “There the weekend went very well and it ran overwhelmingly”month, according to co-presiCruise committee.happy.” this “Everything the Bellefonte were very Trish Storch. tract earlier chairman of Smeltzer and a fair contract and The participants visited Bellefonte McCool, issues. dents Shelbi is no that it car enthusiasts 19 with the open were no problems, “We recognized change was inevitable,” 7,000 to 9,000 June care stateAn estimated The event kicked off on on the diamond. in a prepared that the health hop of Storch said process over the weekend. followed by the sock lined the streets Smeltzer and grateful to conclude the was like several and motorcycles cruise, which ment. “We are of negotiating and would colfor awards in classic cars On Saturday, as owners competed for their new after 18 months district’s team downtown Bellefonte bit from preto thank the of negotiating.” was down a an update different classes.McCool, the car count laborative way the board heard Mcthe high According to for weather,” In other news, schedule because of the but everyvious years. first phase runs on the construction was to be expectedand a few showers, project. The of eight “I think that skies school renovationto August, and a total had overcast BelleCool said. “We just like clockwork.” from this month in July 2018. This summer’s boon to downtown and thing went down an economic local businesses and eat phases conclude building a bus driveway the The cruise provides often shop at work will involve pathway that leads from at who attend disfonte. Those to a crossing coupons for a paved student faces South Building the North Buildat local restaurants. give show participants back of the to bring new linking to that tends Many restaurants Westerly Parkway McCool said expressed of the coucounted meals. ing. to 80 percent Penni Fishbaine door. days. through the that anywhere from 60 said. “With those kinds Board member noise during school Tim the “I’ve heard store,” McCoola few faces that they norrepresentative durconcern over back to the management occur are getting pons come Construction will need to you know they help the of numbers, with the schedule. Jones says demolition entities that see.” of order to keep mally wouldn’tthere are many different ing the day in eliminating noise,” director said that Bellefonte manOf course, machine. McCool “It won’t be Poprik said. “It will be like a well-oiledin making the cruise a success. living Ed borrun we’re plant cruise physical the help of the the reality a vital role That will be Borough plays wouldn’t be possible without and accommodate ... (The demolition) aging noise. to help three years. down as “The cruise of their way set up. It’s one for the next of peeling the building go way out the streets and ball.” for the ough. They come out on just trying to do more should be kind old-fashioned wrecking begin in We’re us. The merchants opposed to the construction work will days of the year. bedof their best a whole,” McCool said. be blasting The heavier as as crews will Building site community the near future, at the South to six total of five rock for excavation the Gazette 5 Bellefonte one to an end. A Page than Historic WEIGHT/For comes Cruise, TIM no more at annual as June will occur, with Cars “lap the block” to go around detonations a day. The crew will coordinate INSIDE: Classic disof shiny chrome in 11. happening in Community Pool to avoid There was plenty which took place 29, 30 Cruise. See Page in lieu TIME TO SHINE: Bellefonte Cruise, with the Welch staggered blasts come 31 Business ..................... annual Historic the .... 26, 27 20. during the 27th ruptions, and use of jackhammers. Happening Classified ........................ on June 19 and and 18-23 What’s ............................ 28 of the constant downtown Bellefonte for the neighborhood Lic # 687 Sports ......................... 24, 25 Puzzles “It will be better Poprik said. ............... 11-15 Arts & Entertainment pool,” people in the ....... 16, 17 ..... 9 Community Corner Spotlight 10 Women’s 7 Penns Valley Education ....................... Opinion ............................ ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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Boalsburg Choice Festival of People’s The 23rd annual be held next and Crafts will Pennsylvania Arts The official guide has week in Boalsburg. to know about the event, need everything you more./Inside food vendors and from artists to

THE CENTRE COUNTY

GAZETTE e to be renamed

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c Pike Street traffi focus of study through Lemont

By ZACH BERGER

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that Frialready knows — Debra Burger for her. will BELLEFONTE an emotional evening be in Bellefonte to day, July 3, will the High Street Bridge slated during a ceremony That night, tradiclose out the p.m. Veterans Bridge be renamed p.m. The ceremony will begins at 4 Parade, whichlong process. begin at 7:30 Fire Company has been a tional Logan about the of the bridge back in 2014 The renaming the borough on in FebruIt was voted “I had approached of the bridge. possible renaming Bridge is Burger said. High Street ary of this year,” that simple. Since the approve the name to But it wasn’t the state had a state road, Rconsidered Benninghoff, Rep. Kerry change. through Burger, state made its way According to the bill, which the House of Repreby Tom Bellefonte, proposed It was first passed in June. Gov. the Legislature. and then by the Senate May sentatives in last week. was a project the bill just bridge renamed Wolf signed getting the For Burger, her heart. accolades, and dear to any type of don’t that is very near veterans deserve them. They “I feel that our yous that we can give I feel, as a (United thank any type of shape or form.them. This is just a in any way, to thank ask for this it is our duty said. said States) citizen, doing it,” Burgera park, or a street? Burger small way of Why not easy decision. So why a bridge? was a relatively bridge a that choosing Bridge, Page

6

that soldier’s remains holds out hope INSIDE: Family Page 4 United States. returned to the

will be

TIM WEIGHT/For

REMEMBRANCE:

The High Street

Bridge in Bellefonte

will be renamed

After 12 years, 4th Fest director exits with bang

Veterans Bridge

at a dedication

ceremony scheduled

the Gazette

for July 3.

Judge: County has acted improperly By MICHAEL MARTIN

GARRETT

StateCollege.com

County — Huntingdon down back BELLEFONTE Kurtz will not GARRETT Judge Stewart against Centre County. By MICHAEL MARTIN lawsuits from his rulings StateCollege.com but similar Jonathan In three separate ago, County judges Dis— Twelve years filed by Centre Gillette-Walker and a successful STATE COLLEGE Miller, Kurtz retired from Grine and Kelley Stacy Parks come to State has Bernie Keisling trict Attorney ruled that the county IBM, only to career with several full time. preliminarily reover the past College to work alumnus, Keisling acted improperly A Penn StateValley after 35 years with months. of say the county turned to Happygiant to take the reigns phone reAll three plaintiffs ansome of their to the technology 4th Fest. Now, after wrongly released attorneys in response PA the immensely the Central cords to defenserequests. years running 26, other dozen Day celebration, Right-to-Know documents filed June time. popular Independence for real this against the In new court once again, why he ruled he’s retiring Gazette filing an order I reKurtz explained ALEXA LEWIS/The “I thought three suits by ago, his crew county in the county from responding the room that he and tired 12 years Keispreventing bins in the break requests. and I didn’t,” there of a nonpoint to the recycling to any similar that the specter out upon Al Matyasovsky ling said. “Now “We add only want to LASTING LEGACY: campus. employee giving are things I I judicial phone judicial county manage throughout without notice see and grandkids wrong,” time request and us as manifestly want to spend jokrecords strikes with.” Despite“aged was a response Kurtz wrote. ing that he appeal” filed Kurtz’s memorandum role runof issues on out” of his Mary Lou to a “statement massive, attorney the the ning argued that by Centre County’s Fourth BERNIE KEISLING OPP last week. She all-volunteer are actually building in an Maierhofer in questions to his office of July operation, as a Penn State he pulled up phone records records that the county retains there 30, his last day Keisling still charm. Perhaps eyes, van on June public financial release because his retirement. By ALEXA LEWIS crews obligated to phones — and com a distinct boyish baby blue employee before and his tight-knit was legally around his provided the the Commonare wrinkles more likely to be the result correspondent@centrecountygazette. Matyasovsky and composting programs the county to age. her position but they seem laughter instead of his Matyasovsky handle recycling for the entire campus. she’s taking PARK — Al of Pennsylvania. reaof his frequent running 4th Fest has worn they have UNIVERSITY farewell to the 3:30 a.m. wealth Court Maierhofer’s dozen But, together with his bidding It’s not that much called only isn’t Kurtz disagreed from a similar In fact, he he accomplished job deworkday at extensively Keisling down. “a labor of love” that their start to his soning, citing helm Office of County. more than proyears at the Penn State’s where he case in Lackawanna that any record possibly regret. when I scriptions. in we could never Physical Plant,since 1984 “It is axiomatic employee is a record any nervousness “When Al came “I didn’t feel didn’t know any better judicial the campus. has worked duced by a I just the last labor force for into first started. and has spent the prowere just a basic said, laughing. us into individuals, as Support 5 yet,” Keisling had run marketing three years But he has molded Lawsuits, Page of OPP’s Central After all, Keisling — surely he could 28-30 gram manager Games the said ..................... 5 for six Olympic 12,000 fireworks into 31 Business Page Matyasovsky Services. Retire, ......... 26 get my boys,” team as Happening while he’s been manage to Classified ........................ “These are a year. And Support Services 19-23 What’s ............................ 27 air one night about his Central Sports ......................... 24, 25 Puzzles ............... 11-14 & Entertainment 6 ... 15-18 Arts 8, 9 Community Director, Page PA 4th Fest Wellness ......... 2 Health & ....................... 10 Central Police ................................ 7 Education Opinion ............................

t Services Central Suppor r retires program manage CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

ductees into the PSBCA Hall of Fame were introduced. The new members were Taylor Harpster, Kelsey Gonder and Chasity Myers, from Philipsburg-Osceola; Megan Shaw and Brooke Kleinfelter, from Bald Eagle Area; and Brittany Smith, from Bellefonte. Showers, who played shortstop in the first game and will join Giedroc at Penn State Altoona next year, voiced what was the consensus of all the players involved. “It was pretty awesome,” she said, “coming back and playing with all the competitive people in our area. It just shows how good our area is. “Just coming here and playing with all these people was my favorite thing to do.”

814-238-5051 www.centrecountygazette.com


JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 21

Golf professionals’ series reaches season’s midway point PHILIPSBURG — Centre County golf professionals compete in a six-event series that meets once a month at different golf courses, using different formats and a points championship. This year’s series has reached the halfway point, with Dustin Starer, of Centre Hills Country Club, the mid-season point leader with 77 points. The series’ 2014 champion, Josh Swires, formerly of Iron Masters Country Club, moved to Florida, guaranteeing there will be a new champion crowned at the end of this season. The first event was held at Penn State Golf Course in May with a better ball of partners and individual formats. Judd Caruso, of Belles Springs, was low pro, shooting a round of 74, followed by J.D. Coccia, of Toftrees, and Brant Reilly, of Penn State, posting 76s. Steve Wager and Brian Soule, both of Penn State, shot a better ball score of 68 to win the team event. Paul Fischer, of Philipsburg Elks County John Dixon covers golf for The Centre Club, and Coccia posted a round of 70 County Gazette. for second. Caruso and Tom Koehle, of Email him at Iron Masters, along with Brian Short sports@centre and Reilly, both of Penn State, tied for countygazette.com. third, carding rounds of 71. The second event of the season was a rain-shortened eight holes contested at Tyrone’s Sinking Valley Country Club in June. The format was individual, with four players tying for first with 31 points: Troy Monahon, of Sinking Valley, Penn State’s Wager and Short,

JOHN DIXON

Centre Hills’ Starer. The third event was held at Mountain View County Club in Boalsburg on July 1, with a best ball of three format, along with individual play. Starer, Monahan and Koehle took first place with a score of 60. Short, Reilly and Eric Handley, of Penn State, took second with 68. Starer shot a 69 for low individual honors, followed by Koehle with 72 and Jack Brennan, of Mountain View, with 75. The Top 10 standing to date is: Starer, 77; Caruso, 60; Short, 56; Wager, 56; Monahan, 55; Reilly, 45; Koehle, 44; Coccia, 36; Soule, 25; and Brennan, 21.

CENTRE HILLS REPORTS FLAG TOURNEY RESULTS

It was a flag tournament, using a nine-hole and 18-hole format, during the recent Women’s Day at Centre Hills County Club. Winning the nine-hole portion of the day was Mary Lovette, with Susie Friedman and Linda Kilareski finishing second and third, respectively. Jan Condon won the 18-hole group over Sandy Herniman, while Mary Nicholson placed third.

NITTANY HOLDS FOURTH OF JULY EVENT

The dynamic duo of Dave Myers and Denny Taylor claimed the title of the Nittany Country Club’s Fourth of July Better Ball of Partners event. The team of Brad Fritchman and Kenny Lannan placed second, while the Beaten 4 winners were Mike Hoy and Chuck Colyer and the consolation match winners were Scott Gray and Matt McCartney. Taking home the first flight title was the twosome of Dave Smith and Rick Knepp over runners-up Gary Struble and Jim Berkey. The Beaten 4 winners were Ken Bean and

John Kowalchuk and the consolation match winners were Ryan Mattern and Irv Witonsky. The second flight had Randy Moyer and Drew Curtin winning over runners-up John Wallace and Mike Taylor. The Women’s Division championship flight had Barb Roberts and Cathy Gray claiming the title over runners-up Donna Lannan and Sally Fletcher. The first flight winner belonged to the twosome of Karen Workman and Ann Roselle.

FLAG TOURNAMENT HELD AT PHILIPSBURG

The Philipsburg Elks Country Club held its flag tournament over the Fourth of July holiday, with Larry Potter placing his flag 15 inches from the second hole, beating runner-up Doug Wetwiler’s 11 yards, also on No. 2. Scott Nelson was third at 29 yards on No. 2. Nick Wasilko took fourth at 81 yards on No. 2, while Dan Nelson and Doug Goss tied for fifth with in-the-hole on No. 1. Other results: Randy Way, seventh with 2 feet on the first hole; Gif Weller, eighth with 3 feet on the first hole; Michael Czap, ninth at 6 feet on the first; M. Gary Helsel, 10th at 9 feet on the first; and Jack Vesnesky, 11th at 18 feet on the first. On the women’s side of the event, Gabi Barnett won with 55 yards on No.1, while runner-up Cathy Jo Miller and third-place finisher Jody Czap placed their flags in hole on No. 17. A flag tournament is a competition format in which golfers begin the round of golf with an allotment of strokes, and then play the golf course until their strokes run out. The game gets its name from the fact that little flags are usually given to competitors to stick in the ground at the point from which their final shot is played. The golfer who stakes his flag the farthest around the course is the winner.

Big Valley tops Philipsburg in winner’s bracket final By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

PHILIPSBURG — Not only did Big Valley’s Brycen Hassinger give his Little League team a big early lead against Philipsburg on July 5, he was also given the job to protect it. Hassingers first-inning, three-run home run in the District 5 11-12 Winner’s Bracket Final jump started his team into an early command of the game. Then later in the third inning, Hassinger relieved BV starting pitcher Ethan Eichorn, squelched a potential big P-O rally and finished out the game on the mound for Big Valley. Hassinger’s efforts lit the way to a 5-2 Big Valley win over a Philipsburg team that just could not come up with the big hit. Three times in the game — in the third, fifth and sixth innings — P-O put runners on third base without scoring

them as Hassinger and the Big Valley defense were up to the challenge. Big Valley will now face the July 9 winner of the Loser’s Bracket Final on Saturday, July 11, with a chance to take home the District 5 trophy. If Big Valley loses that game, however, the two teams will meet again Sunday, July 12, to determine the district’s champion. “Very good Little League game,” Philipsburg-Osceola coach Greg Whitehead said. “We have been battling with them (Big Valley) every year in All-Stars, and this was a good game.” As effective as Hassinger was, Philipsburg did have its opportunities. After Hassinger’s homer put BV ahead 3-0,

P-O pitcher Anthony Merryman brought his team back to within 3-2 with a two-run home run in the top of the third inning. P-O went on to put runners on second and third later in that inning, threatening to tie or even go ahead, but Hassinger relieved Eichorn and struck out two batters to end the threat. BV chipped out another run against Merryman in the bottom of the third to make it 4-2, but P-O knocked again in the fifth after a one-out double by Nathan Gustkey. Gustkey moved to third on a wild pitch, but that’s where he remained after Hassinger ended the inning with two pop-outs. Big Valley, Page 23

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PAGE 22

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

State High’s Olivett attracts national attention in lacrosse By JOSH SONG correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK— Aside from the university, the Nittany Lions, Joe Paterno and, possibly, the Berkey Creamery, names attached to the Centre Region don’t often ring a bell with a nationwide audience. But, Renee Olivett, a State College Area High School athlete, has brought a focus on lacrosse to State College this year, with dual National All-American Honorable Mention Awards in sports and academics. Scheduled to begin her freshman year at LaSalle University in the fall, Olivett explained that she is excited to put Centre County on the map, as far as lacrosse is concerned. “It’s really great for the program. The selection board includes a lot of coaches from established, competitive teams, so earning that recognition means a lot,” she said. Lacrosse has been growing and gaining popularity in the area, and much of its success is attributed to the talent that has been groomed over the years. Nine central Pennsylvanian female athletes were recognized as U.S. Lacrosse All-Americans this year, including Olivett. She said she is encouraged by the rise in female athletes participating in the sport. “Lacrosse is certainly growing in our area, and it’s awesome to see that happening,” said Olivett. “This year, we had around 20 freshmen on the high school team, which is huge growth from previous years.” Olivett’s rapid success is a true representation of her work ethic and attitude. Lacrosse wasn’t even her preferred sport entering high school, and four years later, she’s already got an All-American award under her belt.

SPORTS BULLETIN BOARD BEA to host basketball camp Bald Area High School will host Camp Havoc, Monday, July 13, through Thursday, July 16, for boys and girls in second through eighth grades. Camp will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, focusing on fundamental skills on offense and defense. The camp will include daily games, skill competitions, prizes and guest speakers. The cost is $85, with discounts for multiple family members. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/camphavoc or email havoccamp@gmail.com.

Youth flag rugby offered Registration is now open for the Nittany Lion Rugby Association’s summer program. The non-contact league is for grade school, middle school and high school students. Play is on Monday and Wednesday evenings at Tudek Park at 6 p.m. Register at www. nittanylionrugby.org. No prior experience is required, and coaches will teach players the game.

Hunting licenses available Hunting licenses for 2015-16 are now on sale at the Centre County Treasurer’s Office in Bellefonte, as well as at other outlets around the county. Antlerless deer license applications for Pennsylvania residents will be accepted at the treasurer’s office beginning Monday, July 13. The cost is $6.70 and must be submitted in a qualifying pink Game Commission envelope. Of the county’s two Wildlife Management Units, Unit 2G has an allocation of 22,000 licenses and 4D has been allotted 33,000.

“I wasn’t sure I was going to pursue lacrosse in high school because I had run track since I was little and always thought I would continue to run in high school. My freshman year came around and I decided to give lacrosse a shot, as I really liked the team aspect of the game,” she said. “I missed track and still wish lacrosse was a fall sport so I could do both. I’m happy that I made that decision, though, because it’s definitely opened a lot of doors for me, plus it’s such a fun sport to play.” What separates Olivett from most of her peers is her fulfillment as a complete student-athlete. She brings the same determination and attitude to the classroom as she does to the turf. She uses one activity to push herself in the other, demanding the same effort in every task she faces. Her performance in lacrosse is indicative of her performance in school. She is held back from operating at 100 percent on the field if she isn’t satisfied with her performance in school. Olivett stressed that this is what’s expected of her from not only herself, but her family as well. “It’s definitely important that I’m doing well in school in order to be the best lacrosse player I can be. Knowing that I’m excelling in the classroom gives me the ability to focus on lacrosse at practice,” she said. “I don’t think I would be able to give it my all on the field if I was worried about my grades in school. So, I suppose receiving All-Academic is what I expect of myself, while receiving All-American is like the icing on the cake.” The recruitment process has been hectic for Olivett the past few years, especially as she began to gain notice around the area. Most Division 1 recruits are followed since a young age and are committed by the beginning of their junior year. Olivett only joined a club team after her sophomore year, and wasn’t even sure if she was going to play Division 3, let alone Division 1. The process has been much speedier than most recruits, as everything’s happened in just a matter of a couple years. Olivett explained that during the recruiting process, athletes are often required to reach out to college coaches. She knew it meant something special when La Salle’s head coach, Candace Taglianetti, noticed her and reached out to her that day. “We’re told to constantly email coaches, attend camps and clinics and fill out forms about ourselves. It’s very rare for an athlete to be randomly recognized, so I was ex-

Sports Bulletin Board is a weekly feature of The Centre County Gazette. To have your sports event listed here, email editor@centrecountygazette.com.

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into the three-hole of manager Johnny Rodriguez’s lineup, and he hasn’t skipped a beat. In the first two games of the series against West Virginia, Bader tallied two hits and scored a run. In the third game, he matched those numbers and set up three RBIs for Grayson. “Outstanding,” Rodriguez said of Bader’s bat. “It makes a huge difference in the lineup. He can run, he can throw, he’s strong and he’s smart. He plays the game the Cardinal way.” Bader also scored the Spikes’ fourth run of the game, after he took two bases on a Jerry Mulderig past ball. “You always like to get to the next base,” he said. “I saw the slider was down in the dirt, so I vaulted. On those plays, you’ve got to make the ball stop you. He didn’t know where it was, so I was just kind of reading it.” Bader called the wild pitch “a hustle play” that made up for a mistake in the third inning where he got picked off rounding third base. But even with a blunder, the Spikes scored two runs

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Spikes take home series from West Virginia

Tennis camp to be held Registration for the State College Tennis Camps is now open for players ages 5 through 17 of all levels and abilities. Camp will be held Monday, July 13, through Friday, July 17, and Monday, Aug. 3, through Thursday, Aug. 6, and will run from 8 a.m. to noon. For more information, email sctenniscamp@gmail. com.

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 23

Bellefonte native makes a name for himself with Spikes By CONNOR GREELEY correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — There are two outcomes when you grow up in a small town. The first is that the same faces and same places of the community drive you away in a quest to find and discover bigger and better things. The second is that you become so engrained in that close-knit environment that you can’t find any reason to leave the comfortable confines of the town. Scott Walker chose the latter, and he couldn’t be happier. Walker is the new general manager for the State College Spikes, after being promoted at the end of last season. He likes to tell people he grew up “six ridges down” in Pleasant Gap. (The ridges he is referencing are the ones that adorn the view from Medlar Field out in the outfield, working from center field down the line to left.) Walker attended Bellefonte Area High School in 2002 and then graduated from Lock Haven University with a degree in sports management. One requirement of receiving his degree was to hold an internship before he graduated. Walker became an intern with the Altoona Curve, the Pittsburgh Pirates’ AA minor league team. “That was really just a foot in the door to work here (State College),” he said. The Curve just so happened to be owned by Chuck Greenberg, the managing owner of the Spikes. After Greenberg sold the Curve, Walker began working for the Spikes in December 2008. Walker often tells the story of how he saw Medlar Field being built as he used to drive to work on campus up Curtain Road. “I was watching this place being built,” he said. “And I knew I wanted to work here then and there.”

Now, seven years later, after being groomed by and learning under Greenberg and former general manager Jason Dambach, Walker now runs the team and its business. What exactly does a minor league general manager do? “Everything between the lines and the dugout is the Cardinals,” Walker explained. “We run the business of minor league baseball.” This involves food vending, organizing groups and events for game day, making sure the field is ready and establishing promotions and advertisements. During game days, Walker is “sprinting from one end of the stadium to another” making sure everything is running smoothly for the game, meeting people from the community and helping out wherever he can. Walker loves the game of baseball, but that is not where he really sees his calling. “I’m a baseball guy at heart, but I’m a salesman by trade.” Minor League baseball teams thrive in small markets. The games have become a staple in summer nights around the country. State College, a town which buzzes during the Penn State football season, used to lack the all-year passion and excitement that comes from a sports team. But since the introduction of the Spikes 10 years ago, the town has embraced the team. Community involvement, according to Walker, is the biggest thing for the Spikes and the reason the team averages around 3,000 fans a night. “We try to give back as much as we can,” he said. The goal of a minor league ball player is to make it up to the big leagues. Walker cannot express that same goal. “I’m the GM of the minor league team in the town I grew up in. How cool is that?” Walker adjusts the 2014 New York-Penn League Championship ring on his finger. “I like where I’m at. I don’t see myself ever leaving the industry. I feel like I was built for it, wired for it.”

Newbill continues working toward NBA dream By BEN JONES StateCollege.com

LOS ANGELES — Former Nittany Lion and NBA hopeful D.J. Newbill has put in a lot of work to get to this point. In many ways you could argue that his career at Penn State created a harder journey than most to reach the doors of the NBA. So, to finally be so close to reaping the rewards of that effort is an even more special moment than perhaps for a player who was surrounded by players of equal skill for so many years. Whatever emotions are attached to getting this far for Newbill, after months of extra practices and working out Spikes, from page 22 on the play and “won the inning” according to Rodriguez. That was the theme of the series for the first-year Spikes manager: Win the inning, win the series. Rodriguez said he’s not thinking about a season-opening sweep at the hands of Williamsport and he’s not thinking about the upcoming road series with Auburn. He’s always thinking about winning the current inning and then, hopefully, winning the game. Starting pitcher Dailyn Martinez “won” five of his six innings on the mound July 3, giving up just one run and striking out two Black Bears. “He didn’t have his best stuff,” Rodriguez said. “I didn’t like his stuff, but what I did like was his damage control. We made a couple errors, but he settled down and made his pitches. He gave us six innings, which was huge.” Martinez moved to 2-1 on the season and has now bounced back from his first loss with two strong outings. Previously, against Mahoning Valley, he tossed seven scoreless innings. His July 3 win came after teammate Jorge Rodriguez struggled in game two, giving up five hits and five walks in just slightly more than three innings of work. The Black

with 14 NBA teams, he finally gets a chance to play again. This time in a different jersey — that of the Los Angeles Clippers during Summer League play in Orlando, Fla. The Clippers opened play on July 4 against the Orlando Magic’s blue squad, falling by a single point. Unfortunately for Penn State fans, Newbill was one of three players to sit the bench for the entire game. In all likelihood, this was a predetermined rotation and not the result of Newbill getting passed over for four straight quarters. Newbill will be a part of at least three more Summer League games up to Friday, July 10. What happens after that is a question mark. But, it’s safe to assume Newbill will be playing basketball again sooner rather than later. Bears quickly rebounded from a one-run deficit and surged for five runs in the fourth inning, all with two outs. State College scored only one run on West Virginia’s Stephen Meyer and fell 7-1, which evened up a series they started strongly. After dropping two of three in Staten Island, the Spikes came home and earned a convincing 5-2 win over West Virginia in game one. Second baseman Josh Swirchak stood out at the plate, going 2-4 and driving home four runs. Ian McKinney threw six innings, giving up just one run with four strikeouts. Tyler Bray earned his first save of the season after taking over for McKinney, giving up one run and three hits in three innings of work. The two wins brought the Spikes to 6-8 on the season. Over the course of the series, they out-hit the Black Bears 31-24 and have now won five of seven with a lineup that hasn’t moved much.

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STATE COLLEGE SPIKES general manager Scott Walker shows off his ring from last year’s New York-Penn League Championship. Big Valley, from page 21 Finally, P-O mounted its biggest threat in the last inning. Down now 5-2 after a Colby Bodtorf home run, Philipsburg loaded the bases with none out after two walks and a hit batter, bringing the potential winning run to the plate three times. But Hassinger forced a pop-up and then got a big strikeout, bringing up Merryman with two outs. Merryman fought off two pitches and then hit a sharp grounder to third baseman Kaden Milliron. Milliron fielded it cleanly, stepped on third base, and ended the game. “We couldn’t come up with the big hit,” Whitehead said. “We left too many men on base. I think three different innings we left runners on third. We’ve been coming up clutch all tournament, but it just didn’t happen for us today. I hope we get another chance at them.”

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THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Family Matters

People’s Choice Festival caters to families, kids By ALEXA LEWIS correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

BOALSBURG — While the People’s Choice Festival of Pennsylvania Arts & Crafts was created to feature the work of Pennsylvania artists, the festival has since grown into an experience that your kids will not forget. Activities for children kick off at 10 a.m. Thursday, July 9, and continue through to the end of the festival, which wraps up on Sunday, July 12. “After providing a venue for Pennsylvania artists, then comes providing a safe and affordable and really nice vacation day for families,” said Cindy Rockey, the festival’s co-director. The line-up for each day features the same activities, although additional special events are scheduled on select days. Saturday is Kids’ Character Day and the Young Artisans Sale is hosted only Thursday through Saturday. Here’s a look at what to expect each day:

THURSDAY, JULY 9

■ From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the State College Senior High Thespians will be hosting face painting. During this time, children can also display and sell their works of art at the Young Artisans Sale. ■ From 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. the HandsOn Kids’ Science Museum will be open to

guests, along with the Dominion Science Center, Quant Corner Children’s Museum, PSU Altoona Mobile Science Lab and Ashburn’s Animals on a Mission. Children can also enjoy a petting zoo and pony rides, T-shirt tie-dying, the Little Smilin’ Choo Choo and bouncy houses.

FRIDAY, JULY 10

■ Friday’s kids schedule is the same as Thursday’s, with an additional three special events. These events include the Tumblebus from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and a performance by Dialed Action Sports Team BMX Stunt Team at 11 a.m. and again at 3 p.m.

SATURDAY, JULY 11

■ Saturday is Kids’ Character Day. This day also will feature another two performances by the BMX stunt team at noon and 4 p.m. The same activities offered Thursday will also be available, including the science museum, petting zoo and bouncy houses.

TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

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SUNDAY, JULY 12

■ The kids’ weekend concludes with an abbreviated schedule on Sunday. The Hands-On Kids’ Science Museum, Dominion Science Center, Quant Corner Children’s Museum and PSU Altoona Mobile Science Lab will be open from noon to 5 p.m. Also open between those times are the

THE LITTLE SMILIN’ CHOO CHOO will transport children around the event. petting zoo and pony rides, T-shirt tie dying, the Little Smilin’ Choo Choo and bouncy houses. ■ New this year is a community tent

TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

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JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

PAGE 25

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Local art school set to expand its programs By ALEXA LEWIS correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

PETERSBURG — The C. Barton McCann School of Art has a sculpture garden, an all-glass studio overlooking a pond and many other spaces on its 250-acre grounds in the woods of Rothrock State Forest. Administration at the school, which is located at 4144 Miller Road in Petersburg, just a few minutes away from Whipple Dam State Park, is now ready to put these spaces to more consistent use. “We have beautiful grounds and forests, and we want to use everything here to its maximum,” said the school’s assistant director, Sarah Wharton. “We have a blank slate of what we can accomplish here.” Local business owner David Corneal and his wife, Sandy Corneal, founded the private nonprofit organization in 2006 with the purpose of providing art classes for kids. Every year, a few weeks after school lets out, the school offers one- and twoweek summer art classes for elementary, middle and high school students. These classes are similar to basic art classes, Wharton said, where students have the opportunity to work in a variety of mediums including drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture and clay. “We are really hoping to expand to the point where we are hosting classes for kids and students all year,” said Kenn Davis, the school’s director. Davis also said the goal is to also start the classes as soon as school lets out and run them from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays. Some of these changes could come in the next year. Davis added that he would like to provide art classes as a part of local charter and private school curriculums, and for students who are home-schooled. “Long term, we’d like to entertain the

idea of being an accredited school instead of a summer day camp,” Davis said. “It’s challenging to operate as just a summer camp. We have a lot facilities that require a lot of upkeep.” For many years during the summer, the school has also offered week-long applied art theory classes for adults, during which participants have the opportunity to work with watercolor and do photography and silkscreen printing, among other things. This year, on June 25, the school hosted its first evening art and wine class for adults where participants received two complementary glasses of wine while painting under the instruction of an art professional. The school now has another art and wine night scheduled for Thursday, July 30, and Davis said the goal is to continue this event on the last Thursday of every month. The school will likely also expand the classes available to adults, including having a ceramics class in the pottery studio. Wharton said the staff at the school has also discussed offering outdoor yoga classes and art therapy, and Davis added that live music and art workshop evenings, acting and dancing events, and holiday celebrations are also being considered. “We have the facility to handle it, now it’s just about putting it in place,” Davis said. The school already rents out parts of the facility for weddings in the sculpture garden and receptions in the pavilion, as well as for business meetings in either the art education building or one- and twobedroom cabins with open decks. “We try to work art into everything. If people have business meetings out here, or a wedding, we’ll work in an art workshop during it,” Wharton said. “It’s a unique ex-

Submitted photo

THE C. BARTON MCCANN School of Art in Petersburg offers several classes for budding artists.

Author to hold book signing PHILIPSBURG — Local romance novelist Bethany M. Sefchick, a native of Houtzdale, will hold a book signing from 4 to 6 p.m. on Friday, July 10, outside of Thieves Market on Front Street. Thieves Market and the Country Peddlers will be hosting the event. Sefchick will be promoting her most recent release, the Regency-era romance novel “A Marquess Is Forever,” which is the fifth novel in the popular Tales From Seldon Park series. She will also be signing copies of previous releases, including “Christmas in Philipsburg,” “A Midsummer Night’s Delusion,” and “And We Danced,” which is part of the Ghosts Inc. series and is set inside a fictionalized version of Thieves Market. “It’s a huge thrill to be able to hold a book signing during Heritage Days,” Sefchick said. “So much of my business, including my books sales, is conducted online these days that I don’t always feel as if I have that personal connection with my readers. I have active social media pages, but it’s not the same as meeting my readers in person. Nothing can replace that personal connection you get when you meet people at book signings.” Sefchick, a former Emmy-award winning television producer, has been writing romance novels for the last several years. She is the author of more than 20 novels, novellas and short stories. Her works are available on Amazon.com, BarnesandNo-

WPSU productions, reporters win awards

Submitted photo

ble.com, Kobo, AllRomance.com, Google Play, Lulu.com and iBooks in Apple’s iTunes Store. Print versions are available at Thieves Market, Philipsburg, as well as Amazon.com and BarnesandNoble.com. Sefchick also has a handcrafted jewelry company, Easily Distracted Designs.

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STAMP OF APPROVAL: the American Members of local Philatelic Society’s made recently Stamp Club Steamtown a visit to the Site in National Historic 11 Scranton. Page Rows DAYS GONE BY: were of antique tractorsthe on display duringMachinery Nittany Antique s annual spring Association’ held at was show, which Page 14 Penns Cave. The SUMMER RITUAL: Summer’s Ninth annual comes to Best Music Fest College on downtown State6. Country Saturday, June Dee Messina music star Jo play on the to is scheduled Pages 16, Garner Lot Stage.

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Bellefon project for waterfront

By CHRIS MORELLI

ntygazette.com editor@centrecou

17

The PIAA PLAYOFFS: High School Bellefonte Areasaw its season baseball team tournament. end in the state College Area However, State continues its High School Pages 18, 19 magical run.

TIM WEIGHT/For

aerial view computer-generated THE VISION: A upon completion.

shows what the

Bellefonte Waterfront

plan is finalE — Bellefonte’s BELLEFONT helped ly coming together. a host of dignitaries On May 29, the long-anticipated Wateron break ground excited front Project. is extremely assistant “I think everyone Bellefonte Borough talked about it,” said Holderman. “We’ve some manager Don king for quite to groundbrea the framework about the grant gave us But it was a long time. A small we are today. get to where in 2006. process.” burned down it once House where The Bush the property Since that time, vacant. hopeful stood has remained officials are Bellefonte Borough future. near in the that will change Bellefonte Borough manager of According to valuable piece the land is a Ralph Stewart, borough. the developin g new property help anticipatin “We are tax base and add will help the ment, which borough financially and the businesses strengthen to help the other more foot traffic said. town,” Stewart the Gazette in

Project will look

like

Waterfront, Page

5

rflow at Emotions ove for Life lay Bellefonte Re

2015

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project to New county fighters fire benefit area GARRETT

soon, life is E — Pretty BELLEFONT easier for Centre quite a bit going to get firefighters. County’s dedicated9 meeting, the Centre step At their June ers took a majorgiving d project, County commission a long-awaite resource to test forward on a new area fire companies

staffs. and train their a bid to their equipment ers accepted pit at the The commission called a drafting build somethingEmergency Services TrainCentre County a pit will be ing Facility. the drafting with Essentially, d water reservoir massive undergroun of storage capacity. 30,000 gallons Firefighters, Page

6

TRAINING DAY: During their weekly meeting, Centre County commissioners a voted to approve new facility where test firefighters can and their equipment train staff.

company Manufacturing facility moves into new

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the in the shotput during Wolf of took home a gold Rachel of Centre County over the weekend. GIRL: Lena Purdum which were held at Penn State GOLD MEDAL Summer Games, Special Olympics earned the silver. Centre County

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The senior CLASS ACTS: at Bellefonte institute class recently Area High School $11,000 raised nearly Brandon for 11-year-old Pleasant Gap. Conaway of from many Conaway suffers 10 Page health issues. The SPIRITUAL SINGING: held recently Covalt Family Gospel Sing their 20th annual Fairgrounds at the Grange More than a in Centre Hall. the dozen acts entertained 11 Page crowd. DAD: Before CELEBRATING summer they left for in Paula break, studentsthird-grade ’s Hendershot essays and class penned to celebrate drew pictures sure to Be Father’s Day. handiwork. check out their Page 14

TIM WEIGHT/For

the Gazette

June boards during the 11. on their mortar and moved the tassels area graduates, see pages 4 Area High School For more on 16-18 SENIORS AT Bellefonte at the BAHS gymnasium. Fun ............. ..... 9 SummerMatters ............... 19 8 graduation ceremony .................... ........ 7 Opinion .................... ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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CHAMPS CROWNED: put on an The Yankees display impressive offensive crowned as they were the Nittany of champions a League with Valley Little win over the lopsided 13-3 25 Red Sox. Page

For

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has decided The organizationannual Pacethe against hosting Campaign this setter Kick-Off which Evans deatyear, an event a pep rally — Centre scribed as having the 35 partner STATE COLLEGE Way’s Pacesetmosphere where County Unitedis under way once pacesetter companew agencies and ter Campaign announce any but this year nies meet to companies and to difagain this summer, g is taking a participatin their camthe organization give the companies ferent approach. things have paign materials.this year is much “We’ve noticed said Megan The process CCUW asked been stagnant,” n for the more personal. partner agency are so Evans, a spokesperso ives companies representat CCUW. “The to serve as camused to runpaign stewards ning their camSubmitted photo we who will guide paigns that accepted Medical Center the pacesetneeded some Mount Nittany campaign. ter companies LOOKING AHEAD: kind of change in the United Way United LOOKING BACK, through their — something 2014 for its participationMount Nittany CEO; Scott Lamb, a plaque in May Brown, to make it more director; and Jerry right, are Steve internal campaigns. July, the n exciting.” Pictured, left to United Way executiveNittany. organizatio Mostly throughout Tammy Gentzel, The nonprofit year for local meet with company resources at Mount Way board chair; in each agencies will and employees to deductions president of human raises funds ves health and Dittmann, vice provide representati tions and payroll the campaign the agencies that the opporthroughout stopersonally deliver the past. share the stories that hearing By giving agencies human services to the CCUW how their pro“We thought the people who materials, and clients who have county, according tunity to explainthe community, of the agency’s the funded prories and meeting might have an benefit website. negawork grams campaign, from the might change benefited are doing Aug. Before the general Evans said it on Monday, some employees grams. will hear 6 which starts runs the Pacesettive views that when their the “The companies United Way, Page mouth how 17, the CCUW where designatmay have developedfor contributhe horse’s asked from commuthe have the Campaign ter bosses that support money is affecting emed companies said. hold internal nity,” Evans United Way ployee campaigns.

By ALEXA LEWIS

te.com entrecountygazet correspondent@c

come full Tice, life has

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esetter United Way Pac Centre County more personal approach s Campaign take

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By CHRIS MORELLI

By MICHAEL MARTIN

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GAZ ETTE

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Special The 46th annual June 4, Y PARK — at Penn State UNIVERSIT Games, held ely 2,500 athapproximat Olympics Summer a big hit, with a counties converg5 and 6, were 52 Pennsylvani letes representingPark for the event. on severing on University Games put the wraps s. And, while The Summer competition training and the attention, the event of al weeks of garner most the many volunteers who the athletes place without State to make sure the couldn’t take at Penn spend the weekend a hitch. are local, without the volunteers Mifflin games go off majority of drove in from And while the Rose Belante With the some are not. at the games. event,” SUMMER FUN: it’s County to help just a wonderful, wonderful they do, kids out of school,summer “I think it’s see these athletes do whatany other your of “To time to plan Gazette’s I can’t think Belante said. to my face. schedule. The fun will tell it brings a smilebe this weekend.” g at the guide to summerand what to place I’d rather that she’s been volunteerin go that time, you where to Belante said for several years. During County. Pages athletes and do in Centre some of the Summer Games friends with 16-18 she’s become year after year. With their families. lot of the same people a huge event SEASONS IN REVIEW:for — “You see a a big event over the you. Sure, it’s to stop and talk with is the postseason They know baseball and , which always time high school in Centre there’s competition the — but not just about softball teams writer Pat athletes. It’s said. County, sports nice,” Belante takes a look Rothdeutsch that was. Page 5 back at the season Special Olympics, Page 22

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: CELEBRATION ANNIVERSARY Italian Pizza The Original celebrate will in Millheim The 20 years in business. by owned restaurant is and his wife, Vinnie Castiglia 14 Nadia. Page

By CHRIS MORELLI

Pick up your copy every Thursday.

27th

June 11-17, 2015

Annual ~

lcomes state’s Area again we Summer Games ics Special Olymp

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Aaronsburg MUSIC MAN: recently native Jay Vonadajazz fifth released his To celebrate, trombone CD.CD release a Vonada had Green Drake party at the Page 13 Gallery in Millheim.

INC. HISTORIC

A celebra Happy Valley The third annual begins on Monday, Culinary week through Sunday, June 22, and runs you need to out all June 28. Find kicks off./Page know as the week

again!

Let’s cruiseBellefonte Cruise Historic next The 27th annual downtown Bellefonte to the takes place in guide for our annual weekend. Look with a map, schedule cruise — complete stories, inside. feature of events and

ic

Histor

H.B.I.

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TURNING THE

the sun set E — Once BELLEFONT Governor’s darkened over and the skies turned solemn. the Gazette were HARRY ZIMBLER/For Park, the mood lights that walkers The portable g Services recently turned off, and Homeland Manufacturin brought in wereheld Bellefonte Relay for from left, are DOWN TO BUSINESS: in State College. Pictured, at the recently candles. As Wiz Khalifa’s Bonislawski and location backpresident John opened in a new Life picked up played in the trek Allen Sherman, the “See You Again” operations manager began to makethose who Bonislawsk. ground, they for controller Jennifer walking path around the cancer. was were lost to of Bellefonte, Kerry O’Hara,for Life lead. He talkcome to the this year’s Relay feelings that ed about the the event. speak, it forefront throughout hear a caretaker “There By HARRY ZIMBLER tte.com “When you O’Hara. said centrecountygaze goes correspondent@ Inc. really hits home,” emotions someone ing Services Manufactur are so many survivor or a caregiver. — Homeland a designed specifically have this through as STATE COLLEGE facility in State College around and aca new Then you turn on the ing needs. service. I could has moved to manufactur cut the ribbon beautiful luminaria Bonislawski right now. for the company’s founder John tually start crying emotional event. Owner and “It’s an extremely here and seen it, the Gazette been TIM WEIGHT/For 4 If you’ve never for Facility, Page . 29, 30 the Bellefonte Relay Business .................... .... 31 helped kick off were down .... 26, 27 .................... Relay, Page 6 Happening A CAUSE: ParticipantsBellefonte. Although numbers ........ 28 Classified WALKING FOR in ....... 24 What’s Viewpoints .... 25 Puzzles .................... at Governor’s Park a huge success. Lic # 687 nt Life on May 29 16-17 Medical was still seen as Spread ........... Arts & Entertainme this year, the event ... 10 Centre ......................... 18-23 .................... Sports ........ 7 Education ............... 11-15 Community Opinion .................... ......... 8, 9 Health & Wellness

“We Regret to Inform You” (James Espy, director; Kevin Conaway, producer; Mark Stitzer, director of photography) earned both a bronze Telly and silver People’s Telly in non-broadcast production. The remaining bronze Telly recipients included producer Claire Gysegem and director of photography and editor Tyler Henderson for “Huck Institute” in the educational category; producer Mindy McMahon, director and writer Kristian Berg and editor Coe Cullen for “Connected for Life” in the institutional/corporate image category; and producer and director Carley Greiner and editor Romeal Hogan for “Military Appreciation” in the non-broadcast production–motivational category. On the radio side, the PAPBA recognized Keystone Crossroads reporter Kate Lao Shaffner and news director and producer Emily Reddy. Lao Shaffner, who recently won a regional Edward R. Murrow Award, earned third place in the enterprise/individual reporting category for “Electric Bill Spikes — Was It Really Just That Cold?” Reddy placed second in features for “A Daughter Lost to Heroin: One Family’s Story.” For more information, visit www.wpsu. org.

UNIVERSITY PARK — Five WPSU Penn State productions and a pair of WPSU-FM reporters were recently lauded with industry awards as a trio of media organizations announced their award recipients. WPSU Penn State earned a total of 11 Telly and Communicator awards, both of which recognize outstanding video and film productions, while the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcasters Association praised a pair of WPSU-FM reporters for their broadcast journalism efforts. “The Phosphorous Paradox” (Diane Espy, producer and director; Gabriel Ibias, graphic artist and animator; Mark Stitzer, director of photography) led the station’s impressive haul with six honors. The video earned bronze awards in both the social responsibility and education and online video categories, and a pair People’s Telly awards, which are voted on by the public, for use of animation (bronze) and online video (silver). The video, which tells the story of the first element isolated and discovered by modern science, also earned silver Communicator awards for distinction in both the online video animation and online video science categories. Produced as a training collaboration between WPSU Penn State and the FBI,

LOCAL AUTHOR Bethany M. Sefchick will be signing her latest novel on Friday, July 10, outside of Thieves Market in Philipsburg.

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2538 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to schedule a tour. For more information on the school’s programs and class registration, visit www.mccannart.org.

perience because we have the space and we just like to propagate art.” Those interested in a tour of the grounds can call the school at (814) 667-

GHT COUNTY SPOTLI

circle

issioner County comm t system demands cour act’ ‘clean up its GARRETT By MICHAEL MARTIN StateCollege.com

ers By CHRIS MORELLI commission ntygazette.com Centre County’s“clean up its act.” editor@centrecou E — One of needs to life has BELLEFONT on June judicial system Kristina Tice, ers meeting thinks the county’s At a commission Chris Exarchos had E — For Bellefonte’s er BELLEFONT Caththe current 16, Commission the Evangelist words about system and come full circle. a student at St. John big office as some heated she sits in the She was once criminal justice District Atstate of the Bellefonte. Now, lawsuit between the county olic School in John for the past five years. the doors the ongoing and St. Tice unlocked Parks Miller stuprincipal of torney Stacy Monday morning, that a former For On a recent . It’s not often configovernment on the lights. the school they attended. that we restore and turned “Its imperative system of our counprincipal of to St. John. judicial dent becomes easy decision to return John,” Tice said. dence in the operate in this an back to St. continue to said. “We’ve Tice, it was be a teachty; we can’t right to come me want to Exarchos t,” “It just felt made vested of the entire Gazette environmen John was what there and I was very laughing stock CHRIS MORELLI/The “Going to St. my kids were become the the er. Coming back, suing the serves Centre front of St. John state.” of the school.” is currently Tice stands in in the success Evangelist Catholic School level from a CHRIS EXARCHOS to defense Parks Miller Tice attended the IN CHARGE: Kristina St. John the children ranging in grade cellphone recordsthe county. School in Bellefonte. some of her with has Evangelist Catholic is now the principal. ow requests County and policy by to fifth grade. for nearly 125 years. county for releasing and filed Right-to-Kn and county school as a child pre-K for 3-year-olds attorneys who county violated state law been in Bellefonte who have gone to St. ages. The school has of families a lot,” Tice said. for many different school. presidShe claims the of the think that says requests. asked the judge of “There are generations an educator it’s a great community level because filling those the size that attorney recently County in contempt Tice has been said. “I think elementary grow beyond that time. never John,” Tice Centre Parks Miller’s prefers the for more so we can’t grade, so it’s in children during they’re little She said she ow request lawsuit to hold We’re landlocked,one classroom per small schools. It’s when changes seen ing over that defender’s to a Right-to-Kn have growth and I like in the public watch kids fromof growth that hapresponding and to for we are. We able school employee be court from an “I like to a really big grade,” There’s a lot the going to be fifth grade. cell phone records through fifth it’s family.” it. This year, up through a community, says family, she means have been at the child from kindergarten who pens with a , Page 3 When Tice 37, 38 Commissioner a pair of teachers said. ..................... ... 39 Tice celebrated Business school the school .... 34, 35 ..................... has been at years. school for decades. What’s Happening ....... 36 Classified for 30 Tice, Carol Fisher .... 25-31 Tice, Page 4 ..................... According to has been there here. I Lic # 687 Sports .....................nt 32, 33 Puzzles Michelle Davis go here. My kids went ............... 11-16 Arts & Entertainme for 25 years. grandkids Community 17-24 8, 9 “Mrs. Fisher’s Cruise ...... Wellness ......... 2 Health & ....................... 10 Bellefonte .................... Police Report ....... 7 Education Opinion .....................

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Summe but don’t tell season, It’s not football County contingent that to the Centre Lezzer Lumber the that took part in in which was held Football Classic, 19. State College Clearfield on June John Weakland Area High School’s e 18 had a stellar game./Pag

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School board, union reach rd contract acco

June 25-July 1,

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July 2-8, 2015

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Friknows that Burger already

By ALEXA LEWIS tte.com centrecountygaze

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correspondent@ times StateCollege.com about three equivalent to that cuts College Each day driversportion of Pike Street — The State finally LEMONT — use the STATE COLLEGEboard of directors the Gazette Lemont’s population using the road College District TIM WEIGHT/For village. cars and truckslocal businesses Area School with the State through the at 6,000 to 8,000 agreement and Association of getting public reached an That’s betweenmany of Lemont’s stores are in the process Support Personnel with months of negotiaEducational STREET: Officials that is lined with traffic speed in Lemont. meeting after WORD ON THE its June 22 the traffic situation on a given day.years, there have been concernssaid Adam Brumsaid College freeze for the input on improving the village,” tions. “For many becomes available, includes a salary with an that go through The contract y when a grant Stilson. Projforum and volumes that just concluded, is shovel-read Township manager. and Streetscape the remaining member Carla c houses for public academic year in each of baugh, the CollegeStreet Traffic-Calmingyears ago to slow traffi care Township councilhas hosted three open council members have health occurring Pike cant the increase than three After the friendly in seen little The township Stilson said because There are signifiinsurance in the proposed more pedestrian more drawings have but three years. medical ect was first Lemont more since 2012, the past few years the the concerns that comstaff are making changes involving Council and forward. many of and make downtown changed over from July College Townshipinput and push the project t pornew contract. have not addressed retroactively and process, runs disbumped-ou change gather public The agreement and affects 360 school crosswalks, advances to parallel parking para2018 has considered 6 2014 to June sidewalks and The township including secretaries, perPike Street, Page street, improved other support trict employees, so that it tions of the ls, clerks and in the design. the project professiona designs for along Pike Street to finalize the 7-1 vote. Board sonnel. The goal is passed by a the lone dissentThe contract Pawelczyk was member Jim many of ing vote. the culmination, and will By CHRIS MORELLI “It represents s ntygazette.com respectful discussions editor@centrecou months of and the association’ there’s the district well in the enthusiasts, serve both g members County car Amber Condedicated, hard-workin E — For Centre Cruise. board president BELLEFONT place over coming years,” Cruise took than the Bellefonte “voted nothing better Historic Bellefonte cepcion said. again. personnel association consuccess once smoothly,” said Pat The 27th annual The support to accept the proposed fairly and was a huge “There ngly” co-presithe weekend went very well and it ran overwhelmi according to Cruise committee.happy.” this month, Trish Storch. “Everything were very of the Bellefonte tract earlier Smeltzer and a fair contract and McCool, chairman no issues. The participants visited Bellefonte dents Shelbi that it is car enthusiasts 19 with the open were no problems, “We recognized change was inevitable,” June 7,000 to 9,000 care stateAn estimated The event kicked off on on the diamond. in a prepared that the health hop of Storch said process over the weekend. followed by the sock lined the streets Smeltzer and grateful to conclude the was like cruise, which cars and motorcycles awards in several for ment. “We are of negotiating and would colclassic On Saturday, as owners competed for their new after 18 months district’s team bit from predowntown Bellefonte to thank the of negotiating.” was down a an update different classes.McCool, the car count laborative way the board heard high According to weather,” McIn other news, n schedule for the because of the but everyvious years. first phase runs on the constructio was to be expectedand a few showers, project. The of eight skies “I think that school renovationto August, and a total had overcast BelleCool said. “We just like clockwork.” to downtown from this month in July 2018. This summer’s boon down eat and went thing an economic local businesses and phases conclude building a bus driveway the from The cruise provides often shop at work will involve pathway that leads who attend at disfonte. Those to a crossing coupons for a paved student South Building the North Buildnew faces at local restaurants. give show participants bring to to back of the linking that tends Many restaurants McCool said Westerly Parkway expressed of the coucounted meals. ing. to 80 percent door. Penni Fishbaine days. through the that anywhere from 60 said. “With those kinds Board member noise during school the ve Tim “I’ve heard store,” McCoola few faces that they nort representati concern over back to the n managemen need to occur durare getting pons come Constructio will you know they help the of numbers, with the schedule. Jones says demolition entities that see.” of order to keep mally wouldn’tthere are many different said that Bellefonte ing the day in eliminating noise,” director McCool manOf course, machine. “It won’t be Poprik said. “It will be a well-oiled cruise a success.the borliving Ed cruise run like a vital role in making the the help of physical plant the reality we’re te That will be Borough plays wouldn’t be possible without accommoda ... (The demolition) aging noise. to help and three years. down as “The cruise of their way set up. It’s one for the next of peeling the building ball.” go way out the streets and do more for the ough. They come out on should be kind old-fashioned wrecking trying to in the us. The merchantsof the year. We’re just work will begin opposed to days construction be blasting bedof their best a whole,” McCool said. The heavier as as crews will community Building site the near future, at the South to six total of five rock for excavation Bellefonte the Gazette to an end. A than one Cruise, Page 5 TIM WEIGHT/For at annual Historic as June comes occur, with no more will Cars “lap the block” to go around detonations a day. The crew will coordinate INSIDE: Classic disof shiny chrome in in 11. Pool to avoid lieu There was plenty happening which took place . 29, 30 Cruise. See Page Community in TIME TO SHINE: Bellefonte Cruise, with the Welch staggered blasts come Business .................... .... 31 annual Historic the .... 26, 27 20. ed .................... during the 27th ruptions, and use of jackhammers. on June 19 and What’s Happening ........ 28 Classifi od and 18-23 Bellefonte ..... constant the .................... neighborho of downtown for the Lic # 687 Sports .................... nt 24, 25 Puzzles “It will be better Poprik said. ............... 11-15 Arts & Entertainme pool,” ....... 16, 17 people in the ..... 9 Community Valley Spotlight ... 10 Women’s Corner ........ 7 Penns Education .................... Opinion .................... ............ 8 Health & Wellness

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fic Pike Street trafy focus of stud ont through Lem

beckons

Boalsburg Choice Festival of People’s The 23rd annual be held next and Crafts will Pennsylvania Arts The official guide has week in Boalsburg. to know about the event, need everything you more./Inside food vendors and from artists to

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E — Debra for her. will BELLEFONT an emotional evening be in Bellefonte to day, July 3, will the High Street Bridge slated during a ceremony That night, the tradiVeterans Bridge will close out 4 p.m. be renamed p.m. The ceremony which begins at Parade, begin at 7:30 process. Fire Company has been a long about the tional Logan of the bridge back in 2014 The renaming the borough on in FebruIt was voted “I had approached of the bridge. possible renaming Bridge is Burger said. High Street ary of this year,” that simple. Since the approve the name But it wasn’t road, the state had to a state f, Rconsidered Benninghof Rep. Kerry change. through Burger, state made its way According to the bill, which the House of Repreby Tom Bellefonte, proposed It was first passed in June. Gov. the Legislature. and then by the Senate May sentatives in last week. was a project the bill just bridge renamed Wolf signed getting the For Burger, her heart. accolades, and dear to any type of don’t that is very near veterans deserve them. They “I feel that our yous that we can give I feel, as a (United thank any type of shape or form.them. This is just a in any way, to thank ask for this duty our it is said. said States) citizen, doing it,” Burgera park, or a street? Burger small way of Why not decision. So why a bridge? a relatively easy a bridge was choosing that Bridge, Page

6

that soldier’s remains holds out hope INSIDE: Family Page 4 United States. returned to the

will be

TIM WEIGHT/For

CE: The High Street REMEMBRAN

Bridge in Bellefonte

will be renamed

, After 12 years tor 4th Fest direc exits with bang

Veterans Bridge

at a dedication

ceremony scheduled

the Gazette

for July 3.

ty Judge: Coun has acted improperly By MICHAEL

MARTIN GARRETT

StateCollege.com

County E — Huntingdon back down BELLEFONT Kurtz will not GARRETT Judge Stewart against Centre County. By MICHAEL MARTIN lawsuits from his rulings StateCollege.com but similar Jonathan In three separate ago, County judges Dis— Twelve years filed by Centre Gillette-Walker and a successful STATE COLLEGE Miller, Kurtz retired from Grine and Kelley Stacy Parks has Bernie Keisling only to come to State trict Attorney ruled that the county IBM, y career with several full time. preliminaril reover the past College to work alumnus, Keisling acted improperly A Penn StateValley after 35 years with months. of say the county turned to Happygiant to take the reigns phone reAll three plaintiffs ansome of their to the technology 4th Fest. Now, after released response wrongly PA attorneys in the immensely the Central cords to defenserequests. years running ow other dozen ce Day celebration, filed June 26, Right-to-Kn time. documents against the popular Independen for real this In new court ruled once again, he why retiring he’s Gazette filing an order I reKurtz explained ALEXA LEWIS/The “I thought three suits by crew ago, county in the county from responding that he and his the tired 12 years Keisin the break room preventing requests. and I didn’t,” there the recycling bins a nonto of similar point any to specter that the Al Matyasovsky ling said. “Now out upon “We add only want to LASTING LEGACY: campus. employee giving are things I I judicial phone judicial county manage throughout without notice see and grandkids wrong,” time request and us as manifestly want to spend jokstrikes records with.” Despite“aged Kurtz wrote. m was a response ing that he runappeal” filed Kurtz’s memorandu role of issues on Mary Lou out” of his to a “statement massive, attorney the ning the argued that by Centre County’s r Fourth BERNIE KEISLING OPP last week. She all-voluntee are actually building in an Maierhofer in questions to his office of July operation, as a Penn State he pulled up phone records records that the county retains there 30, his last day Keisling still charm. Perhaps eyes, van on June public financial release because his retirement. By ALEXA LEWIS te.com obligated to phones — and a distinct boyish baby blue tight-knit crews employee before was legally around his entrecountygazet y and his provided the the Commonare wrinkles more likely to be the result correspondent@c Matyasovsk and composting programs the county to age. y her position but they seem laughter instead of his Al Matyasovsk a. handle recycling for the entire campus. she’s taking Y PARK — of Pennsylvani of his frequent running 4th Fest has worn the 3:30 a.m. s reathey have UNIVERSIT wealth Court farewell to But, together with Maierhofer’ It’s not that fact, he called his dozen much ed isn’t only bidding Kurtz disagreed from a similar In he accomplish workday at extensively Keisling down. “a labor of love” that their job destart to his soning, citing helm Office of County. more than years at the Penn State’s where he in Lackawanna that any record proI case possibly regret. when scriptions. never we Plant, in could Physical “It is axiomatic employee is a record any nervousness “When Al came since 1984 “I didn’t feel didn’t know any better judicial the campus. has worked duced by a I just the last labor force for into first started. and has spent the proindividuals, were just a basic said, laughing. marketing Support molded us into 5 years as run yet,” Keisling has Page had Central he three But OPP’s Lawsuits, of After all, Keisling — surely he could gram manager . 28-30 Games the y said for six Olympic 12,000 fireworks into Business .................... .... 31 Services. Retire, Page 5 ......... 26 get .................... my boys,” Matyasovsk team as while he’s been manage to “These are What’s Happening ........ 27 Classified a year. And Support Services ..... 19-23 .................... air one night about his Central Sports .................... nt 24, 25 Puzzles ............... 11-14 Entertainme 6 Community Fest ... 15-18 Arts & Director, Page ......... 8, 9 PA 4th Health & Wellness ... 10 Central ............ 2 .................... Police .................... ........ 7 Education Opinion ....................

t Services Central Suppor ager retires program man Y

CENTRE COUNT SPOTLIGHT


PAGE 26

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

Local artists featured Foxdale art show runs through Aug. 17 in juried art exhibition STATE COLLEGE — The Mind’s Eye show at Foxdale Village’s second-floor gallery, 500 E. Marylyn St. in State College, will feature 16 artists exhibiting 48 paintings, drawings, photographs, prints and collages. This large contemporary art exhibit focuses on interior abstract spaces as the artists create their own structures and worlds with color and forms. The exhibit runs through Monday, Aug. 17.

The gallery is open weekdays from 9 a.m to 5 p.m. and weekends from noon to 5 p.m. The artists in the show are: Joe Beddall, Charleen Casbourne, Pasquale Cortese, Melinda Curley, Mike Demi, Mary Deutsch, Dorothy Durrenberger, Susan Graham, Cynthia Hassler, Sue Lacy, Barbara Metzner, Susan Parsonage, Robert Placky, Gary Schubert, Will Wadlington and Adrienne Waterston.

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present

azz@thePalmer Thursday, July 23

JazzPA presents Teri Roiger

in the Palmer Lipcon Auditorium Doors open at 7:00 p.m. Performance begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are FREE and limited to four per address. Reserve your seats:

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Sponsored in part by Tire Town Auto Service Center, Fred and Judy Sears, and the Friends of the Palmer Museum of Art.

STATE COLLEGE — The Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts presents Images 2015, a juried exhibition that will hang in Schlow Centre Region Library and in the Woskob Family Gallery of the Penn State Downtown Theatre Centre during the month of July. The exhibit features drawings, paintings, mixed media, photography, handpulled prints, watercolors, fiber and paper, all by Pennsylvania artists, including 23 from the Centre Region. The 47 works were selected by juror Scott Dimond, the curator for visual arts at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art. The Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, founded in 1976, is a community art museum that operates the nation’s longest-running museum sat-

ellite system, with four museum facilities in the southwestern Pennsylvania cities of Altoona, Johnstown, Ligonier and Loretto. The museum maintains a permanent collection of more than 4,000 works of local, regional, national and international artists. Dimond calls the predominant mood of Images 2015 “poetic and contemplative,” with a delicate balance of “imagination and technical excellence.” Dimond will select award winners in six different categories. Along with a Viewer’s Choice award, prizes for Images 2015 will total $1,500. The public is invited to an opening reception for the Images 2015 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at Schlow Centre Region Library, 211 S. Allen St. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

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WHAT’S HAPPENING To be included in What’s Happening, submit your events by Wednesday one week prior to publication to community@ centrecountygazette.com or mail information to The Centre County Gazette, Attn: What’s Happening, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801.

ONGOING

Bookmobile — Centre County Library Bookmobile is a fully accessible library on wheels. Look for it in your community and join Miss Laura for story times, songs and fun. Visit the website at www. centrecountylibrary.org for days and times. Club — The Centre Region Model Investment Club meets the second Monday of every month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Mazza Room at the South Hills Business School, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. Call (814) 234-8775 or contact cr20mic@aol.com. Meeting — Calvary Church hosts a Christian Recovery meeting every Monday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 1250 University Drive, State College. Visit www.life recoverystatecollege.com. Community Meal — A free hot meal will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. every Thursday at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church Community Cafe. Meeting — The State College Alliance Church hosts a Christian Recovery meeting every Friday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at 1221 W. White Road, State College. Visit www.

liferecoverystatecollege.com. Safety Checks — Mount Nittany Health sponsors free car seat safety checks from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at its Boalsburg location, 3901 S. Atherton St., State College. Certified car seat safety educators will check to make sure car seats are installed correctly. Call (814) 466-7921.

LIMITED ENGAGEMENTS

Music Festival — The Remington Ryde Bluegrass Festival will be held Thursday, July 9, through Sunday, July 12, at the Centre County Grange Fairgrounds, 169 Homan Lane, Centre Hall. Visit www. remingtonryde.com. Performance — “Guys and Dolls” will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 9, through Sunday, July 19, at the Millbrook Playhouse, 258 Country Club Lane, Mill Hall. Visit www.millbrookplayhouse. org. Performance — “1776: The Musical” will be presented at 7:30 p.m., Wednesdays through Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Saturday, July 25, at the Nittany Theatre At The Barn, 197 Old Boalsburg Road, Boalsburg. There also will be a 2 p.m. performance on Saturday, July 4. Exhibit — An exhibit of paintings by Brienne Brown will be on display through Sunday, July 26, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays or by What’s Happening, Page 27


JULY 9-15, 2015 What’s Happening, from page 26 appointment, at the Bellefonte Art Museum, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Exhibit — An exhibit of jewelry by Staci Egan will be on display through Sunday, July 26, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays or by appointment, at the Bellefonte Art Museum, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-4280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Exhibit — “Healing Transformations,” an exhibit of watercolors by Michele Rivera, will be on display through Thursday, July 30, at the Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Call Rivera at (814) 234-3441. Exhibit — The exhibit “Images 2015” will be open every day throughout July during normal operating hours at the Schlow Library, 221 S. Allen St., State College. The exhibit is free and open to the public. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Historic Site — The Rhoneymeade Arboretum and Historic Rhone House will be open to the public on Sunday afternoons throughout July. Visit www.rhoneymeadeusa.org. Children’s Activity — A variety of story time groups will be held throughout July at the Centre County Library and Historical Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Toddler story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Mondays. Family story time will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m. on Tuesdays. Book Babies will be held from 9:30 to 10 a.m. on Wednesdays. And, a preschool story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. on Wednesdays. Visit www.centre countylibrary.org. Children’s Activity — A preschool story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. every Monday in July at the Centre Hall Area Branch Library, 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. Visit www.centrecountylibrary. org/library/centre-hall-area-branchlibrary. Summer Reading Club — Special summer reading activities will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. every Thursday in July at the Centre Hall Area Branch Library, 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. The club is designed for elementary students, but all family mem-

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE bers are welcome. Special events include visits from the Seeing Eye Puppy Club and professional football player Josh Hull. For more information, visit www.centrecountylibrary.org/library/centre-hall-areabranch-library. Adult Program — The Centre County Library and Historical Museum is hosting its Adult Summer Reading Program through Saturday, Aug. 8, at 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Each book read earns a ticket to enter into a biweekly prize drawing. For each reading log filled, participants receive a free three-day video rental coupon. Call (814) 355-1516 or visit www. centrecountylibrary.org. Performance — The Friday Concerts on the Lemont Village Green series will be held at 7:30 p.m. every Friday through Aug. 28. All concerts are free. Exhibit — A print gallery featuring artists Steve Getz, Gary Schubert, May Vollero and ZheKa will be on display through Sunday, Aug. 30, from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays or by appointment, at Bellefonte Art Museusm, 133 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 3554280 or visit www.bellefontemuseum.org. Event — Monday night kickball will be held at 6 p.m. on Mondays throughout the summer at the State College Evangelical Free Church, 1243 Blue Course Drive, State College. All family members and ages are welcome. Visit www.scefc.org/kickball. Farmers Market — The Lemont Farmers Market will take place from 3 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays through Oct. 21, in the Coal Sheds, 133 Mount Nittany Road, Lemont. Contact Anna Kochersperger at kochrose@gmail.com Exhibit — “Everyday Iron” will be on display every Saturday through November from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Boalsburg Heritage Museum, 304 E. Main St., Boalsburg. Visit www.boalsburgheritagemuseum.org.

THURSDAY, JULY 9

Support Group — A diabetes support group will be held from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., State College. Contact Amy Leffard at aleffard@mountnittany.org or (814) 231-7095. Exhibit Opening — The opening reception for “Images 2015” will take place from

PAGE 27

6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Schlow Library, 221 S. Allen St. The reception is free and open to the public. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Class — A free “Parents-To-Be” class will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. at Mount Nittany Health, 3901 S. Atherton St., State College. Call (814) 466-7921.

FRIDAY, JULY 10

Movie — The film “Jaws” will be shown and discussed from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Centre County Library. Visit www.centre countylibrary.org.

SATURDAY, JULY 11

Fundraiser — The Tyrone Area High School Class of 1984 will be holding a “CanA-Thon” from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the SaveA-Lot Food Store, 111 W. 13th St., Tyrone. The fundraiser will benefit homeless members of the community. Visit www.tahs84. weebly.com/can-a-thon-2015.html. Event — The Bellefonte Kiwanis Club will be hosting a shredding event from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Northwest Savings Bank, 1127 Zion Road. Each participant is limited to three boxes of paperwork. Kids Day — The State College Spikes and Ike the Spike will be hosting Kids Day from noon to 2 p.m. at Medlar Field at Lubrano Park, State College. This event is free, as are all refreshments. Local and state representatives for family-oriented programs and benefits be on hand.

SUNDAY, JULY 12

Performance — There will be an open mic jam session for musicians of all skill levels starting at 1 p.m. at the 100F Club, 756 Axman Road, Pleasant Gap. Call (814) 571-5576 or (814) 357-6954. Performance — The Bellefonte Community Band will be performing at 1:30 p.m. at the Sidney Friedman Park Stage, 243 S. Allen St., State College.

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MONDAY, JULY 13

Meeting — The garden club will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Holt Memorial Library, 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Anyone interested in gardening is welcome. The group will share gardening tips and ideas, and work on the landscaping at the library’s front entrance. Visit www.centrecountylibrary.org.

TUESDAY, JULY 14

Luncheon — The Women’s Mid-Day Connection Luncheon will be held at 11:45 a.m. at the Mountian View Country Club, 100 Elks Club Road, Boalsburg. Speaker Norma Dinkelmeyer will be presenting “Winning Over Worry.” Call (814) 404-3704 to make a reservation. Event — The Penn State School of Hospitality Management will be hosting a dinner devoted to traditional Chinese cuisine at 5:30 p.m. in the Mateer Building, 200 W. Park Ave., State College. Call (814) 516-1287 or visit www.cafelaura.psu.edu/ cafelaura/theme-dinners.cfm. Performance — The Nittany Knights barbershop quartet will be performing at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 14, at Foxdale Village, 500 E. Marylyn Ave., State College. The event is free, and free parking will be available. Visit www.nittanyknights.org.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 15

Movie — The film “James and the Giant Peach” will be shown for free at the State Theatre at noon. Visit www.thestate theatre.org. Fundraiser — Five Guys Burgers and Fries, 226 W. College Ave., State College, will be donating 15 percent of all purchases made from 5 to 8 p.m. to the Community Help Centre. Visit www.community helpcentre.com. — Compiled by Gazette staff

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PAGE 28

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

PUZZLES CLUES ACROSS 1. Swedish rock group

35. Computer code for letters & numbers

5. Founder of Babism 8. 2 stripe Army rank (abbr.)

38. Initials of Watson’s detective

11. Of Salian Franks 13. Indicates near

39. Spanish be

14. Swiss river

41. Jauntier

15. Golden pothos 16. Runs PCs

43. Cormoran Strike’s 2nd novel

17. E. Tunisian seaport

46. Wasted material

18. Cyprinid fishes

48. Bleat sound

20. Genus Ulmus

49. Excess body weight

21. Stitched garment border

50. Oral polio vaccine

63. Animal nest

28. Duo indicates

64. Abba __, Israeli politician

29. Regarding this point 32. Stand for coffin

CLUES DOWN

33. Not yielding

2. Spoken in the Dali region of Yunnan

36. Point midway between S and SW

3. Worthless drivel

37. Data executive

4. Aboriginal race of Japan

40. Changed gears

1. Signing

5. Adorn

41. ___ Sauer: Weapons co.

6. Greek god of light

42. Brews

7. Atomic #83

44. __ May, actress

8. Eating houses

45. Shiny cotton textile

9. Baby buggy

22. Takes in as a part

55. Rigs

25. Pierre is the capital

56. Drawstring

30. Brush upward 31. Moby’s author’s initials

57. Baltic flatbottomed boat (alt. sp.)

32. Belgian franc

59. Double curve

19. Flank

60. Point midway between NE and E

23. Sleep

51. “Puppy Bowl” network listing

24. Richly patterned weave

52. Hillside

61. Mackerel shark genus

25. Hoagies

62. Used to be United __

27. University of Santo Tomas

Fun By The Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Sudoku #1

34. Mongolian capital Ulan ___

Sudoku #2

10. Supervillain Luthor 12. Hansom 14. Tennis champion Arthur

46. Cavalry-sword 47. Bullfighting maneuver 48. Shopping containers

53. Metrical foot 54. Dog in Peter Pan

26. Moonfish

55. Romaine lettuce 58. Irish Sea Isle PUZZLE #1 SOLUTION PUZZLE #2 SOLUTION

WOULD YOU LIKE A MAILED SUBSCRIPTION TO CLIP OUT THE FORM AND MAIL IT WITH YOUR PAYMENT TO THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE AIR BASEMENT BUSINESS CENTRAL COIL COMFORT COMPRESSOR CONDENSATION CONDITIONING COOLANT COOLING CYCLE

DAMPER DISCHARGE DUALZONE DUCTWORK EFFICIENCY EVAPORATOR EXCHANGER FAN FLOW FORCED HOUSE HUMIDIFIER

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GAZETTE? THE CENTRE COUNTY

q 1 year ...... $144 q 6 mos. ........ $72

PLEASE PRINT NEATLY Name:________________________________________________________________________ Address:______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ Phone #: (

)_______________________

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Credit Card Type:_________________ Credit Card #:_________________________________ Credit Card Expiration Date: ______________Security Code #:_________________________ Signature: _____________________________________________________________________ PAPERS WILL BE MAILED OUT NO LATER THAN THE FRIDAY AFTER THE ISSUE DATE.

CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE • 403 S. ALLEN ST. • STATE COLLEGE, PA 16801 www.centrecountygazette.com


BUSINESS

JULY 9-15, 2015

PAGE 29

Workshop proves popular to industry professionals WILLIAMSPORT — Summer is anything but vacation time for the Plastics Innovation & Resource Center at Pennsylvania College of Technology. The PIRC recently hosted 34 industry professionals from 10 states and Canada for its sixth annual National Hands-On Thin-Gauge/ Roll-Fed Thermoforming Workshop. The three-day course featured presentations from industry experts and hands-on sessions focusing on materials testing and operating, and troubleshooting thermoforming equipment. “It’s rewarding that this annual workshop attracts a variety of top experts and professionals from the plastics industry,” said Christopher J. Gagliano, PIRC program and technical service manager. “The interest in the workshop is a testament to our talented staff and the excellent facilities we enjoy at Penn College.” Eighteen companies were represented by the attendees, who came from Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Wisconsin and Ontario, Canada. The students left Penn College very impressed. “This workshop is an awesome share of information, knowledge and expertise that greatly reduces your learning curve,” said Ed Lengen, of Multi-Plastics Extrusions in Hazleton. Thomas Weikel, of Brentwood Industries in Reading, referred to the course as “the most worthwhile workshop” that he has attended. “I have come away from this workshop with some very valuable information that I can directly apply to the tooling and machinery that we design and manufacture in-house,” he said. Weikel’s co-worker Kevin Brinton agreed. “I learned tons of new information every day and solidified any previous understanding of the process from start to finish,” he said. The workshop featured several speakers: keynoter Mark Strachan, senior technology director for First Quality Packing Solutions in West Palm Beach, Fla.; Matthew Banach, director of sales for Processing Technologies International in Aurora, Ill.; Conor Carlin, sales and marketing manager for CMT Materials in Attleboro, Mass.; Vijay Kudchadkar, engineering manager at Compuplast Canada in Mississauga, Ontario; and Julie Griswold, sales/customer service at W.R. Sharples Co. in North Attleboro, Mass. Penn College faculty members Kirk M. Cantor, assistant professor of plastics and polymer technology, and Joseph E. LeBlanc, instructor of physics, also presented.

Submitted photo

CHRISTOPHER J. GAGLIANO, left, program manager for the Thermoforming Center of Excellence at Penn College, watches lab assistant Jacob W. Fry evaluate the wall thickness of a container produced in the thermoforming lab. Several PIRC staff members shared their expertise in the workshops, including Gagliano; Gary E. McQuay, PIRC engineering manager; and PIRC lab assistants Jacob W. Fry, Ian Killian, Noah L. Martin and Madison T. Powell. Penn College is one of just five colleges in the nation offering plastics degree programs accredited by the Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET. For information on the plastics degrees and other majors offered by the School of Industrial, Computing & Engi-

Association presents business awards BELLEFONTE — The Bellefonte Keystone Community Development Association recently presented its first Golden Broom Awards to The Blonde Bistro, located at 135 S. Allegheny St., and Woodrings Floral, located at 125 S. Allegheny St. The Golden Broom Awards will be presented quarterly to two businesses in the Central and Waterfront Business districts. Each winner will come from one of two different business categories. Businesses will be judged using a set of five criteria: cleanliness, inviting, creative, showing community support and clutter free. This quarter’s judging was done by two Bellefonte Area School District employees. Upcoming awards will be determined by previous winners.

Job search class set BELLEFONTE — PA Career Link presents a free class, Job Search Techniques, from 9 to 11 a.m. on Friday, July 10, at 240 Match Factory Place in Bellefonte. Registration is required. Call (814) 548-7587.

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Submitted photo

DAVID WOODRING, owner of Woodrings Floral, receives his Golden Broom Award from Rodney Beard, president of Bellefonte Keystone Community Development Association. Also pictured is Sue Dove, a longtime Woodrings employee.

RECORDED JUNE 8 TO JUNE 12, 2015 BELLEFONTE BOROUGH

Jane Sonnenday to Billie Jo North, 156 E. Curtin St., Bellefonte, $230,000. Anthony J. Ceppulio and Eric J. Porterfield to Daniel J. Gill, 238 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte, $199,900.

BENNER TOWNSHIP

Kimberly A. Homan and Stephen P. Homan to Melissa K. Tea-

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DEED TRANSFERS

The following property transactions were compiled from information provided by the Centre County recorder of deeds, Joseph Davidson. The Gazette is not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate; however, the Gazette neither warrants nor accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information.

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neering Technologies, call (570) 327-4520 or visit www.pct. edu/icet. The PIRC is one of the top plastics technology centers in the nation for research, development and education related to injection molding, extrusion, blow molding, rotational molding and thermoforming. Its Thermoforming Center of Excellence is a technical resource offering independent, hands-on applied research and development to the thermoforming community.

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man, 97 Spring Creek Road, Bellefonte, $225,000. Mark C. Sherburne and Susan A. Sherburne to Judy S. Haranin, 1761 Jacksonville Road, Bellefonte, $279,900.

BOGGS TOWNSHIP

George W. Newman and Twila M. Newman to Toby C. Newman and Christie L. Newman, 1715 Egypt Hollow Road, Bellefonte, $1.

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CENTRE HALL BOROUGH

Thomas M. Weaver and Chantelle L. Weaver to Rebecca Appler, 136 E. Allison St., Centre Hall, $113, 700. Melissa K. Teaman to Jessica L. Aikey and Jason A. Aikey, P.O. Box 447, Centre Hall, $212,000. Deed Transfers, Page

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PAGE 30

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

Deed Transfers, from page 1

COLLEGE TOWNSHIP

S & A Homes Inc. to Stacey L. Blazina and Andrew Michael Smalley, 175 McCann Drive, State College, $413,436. Mark D. Dwyer and Sarah M. Dwyer to Robert L. Steingrabe and Melissa Steingrabe, 2479 Buchenhorst Road, State College, $165,000. Carl R. Kline Estate and Edith Bilger, executrix, to Edith Bilger, 532 Decibel Road, State College, $1. W. Scott Flipse to Nicholas Kotch and Renee Kotch, 116 Faith Circle, Boalsburg, $75,000. Richard L. Crowley and Barbara A. Crowley to Penny A. Garban Family Trust and Steve A. Garban, trustee, P.O. Box 233, State College, $280,000. Matthew R. Henry and Kara L. Henry to Lauren N. Randolph, David A. Randolph and Susan R. Randolph, 728 Tussey Lane, State College, $217,000.

CURTIN TOWNSHIP

Anthony J. Cingle and Judy W. Cingle to Wilbur E. Stocker Jr., 1864 Walnut Grove Road, State College, $100,000.

FERGUSON TOWNSHIP

Shirley Ann Woodside to Michael S. McAfee, 3084 Sheffield Drive, State College, $219,900. Alice I. Matis to Donna L. Quadri and Pasquale Felitti, 1701 Princeton Drive, State College, $300,000. Phyllis Hertzog to Phyllis Hertzog and Ronald W. Hertzog, 208 Corl St., State College, $1. Carl R. Temple Estate and Traci Temple, executrix, to Traci Temple, 123 Cambridge Drive, Savannah, Ga., $1. Traci Temple to John Carl Jenkins, 2110 W. College Ave., State College, $1. D. Michael Taylor and Susan C. Taylor to Ebsa LLC, P.O. Box 92, State College, $1,600.000. Mary E. Adams and Robert A. Adams Jr. to Mark Kline, Eileen C. Kline, Norris Zachary Muth and Barbara Allyson Muth, 1107 W. Pine Grove

Road, Pine Grove Mills, $11,000. Circleville Road Partners C LP to Berks Homes LLC, 335 Morgantown Road, Mohnton, $29,700. J. Allen Witherite and Tara R. Witherite to Sarah Rocker and Erik Hagan, 135 W. Chestnut St., Pine Grove Mills, $174,000. Bruce R. Shorey and Linda S. Shorey to Brett Hollern and Christine Hollern, 709 15th St., State College, $300,000.

GREGG TOWNSHIP

Esther G. Zettle Estate, Fawn L. Houtz, co-executor, and Keith D. Zettle, co-executor, to Devon J. Hegarty and Randy L. Hegarty, 765 Upper Georges Valley Road, Spring Mills, $17,137.50.

HAINES TOWNSHIP

Shirley L. Weaver Estate and Terry L. Weaver, executor, to Andrew D. Markle, 154 Penn St., Millheim, $18,000.

HARRIS TOWNSHIP

David A. Watkins and Pamela J. Watkins to Gregory A. Lingo and Jean L. Harrison, 1225 Earlystown Road, Boalsburg, $267,500. Edith L. Plummer Estate, Edith L. Dickey Estate and S. Elizabeth Dickey, executrix, to Jeremy D. Moeller and Cristin M. Hall, 1442 Willowbrook Drive, Boalsburg, $279,000. TOA PA IV LP to Marjorie Delozier, 225 Plymouth Circle, Boalsburg, $370,290.18.

HUSTON TOWNSHIP

Michael J. Angellotti and Kristina R. Angellotti to Michael J. Angellotti, 550 Ulrich Road, Julian, $1. SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority to Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, 70 Penndot Drive, Clearfield, $1. Neal F. Proctor and Joan Proctor to Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, 70 Penndot Drive, Clearfield, $1.

MILES TOWNSHIP

Lester G. McWilliams and Barbara McWil-

GAZETTE IT DONE! G Jack’s

AUTO REPAIR

PA. STATE & EMISSIONS INSPECTIONS 116 N. THOMAS ST. • BELLEFONTE, PA 16823

814.357.2305 PA CUSTOM COATINGS • Painting • Wallpaper Removal • Drywall Repairs • Wallpaper Hanging • Commercial and Residential

814-762-1230

A. Capp

• Single, Double & Triple Ground

Dyed & Natural Premium Bark Mulch FREE DELIVERY

• Brown $26/yd., Dark Brown $26/yd. All Dyed Mulch $30/yd.

(4 yard minimum)

• Certified Playground $28/yd., Pet Bedding $32/yd.

814-355-8462 leave message Alan Capparelle, Owner-Operator

S A SPRAY FOAM A N D

ALL YOUR INSULATION NEEDS BLOWING INSULATION AND FIBERGLASS

SAMUEL L. DETWEILER 814.644.8474 FLAT OR LOW SLOPE ROOF COATING

Moshannon, $9,000. Joseph W. Martin and Filomena M. Martin to Michael D. Brown and Kristy L. Brown, 1213 Fox Meadow Circle, Bellefonte, $85,000.

PATTON TOWNSHIP

Vincent Romanini and Brenda J. Moore to Christopher J. Krum, 125 Elm St., Pleasant Gap, $154,900. John Douglas and Sarah Douglas to Christopher J. Harris and Jodi O. Harris, 129 Rosehill Drive, Bellefonte, $265,000. Robert Caverly to Jeremy M. Honzell and Jennifer A. Honzell, 732 Willowbank St., Bellefonte, $105,000. Matthew L. Jones to Jacob C. Smith, Amanda J. Smith and Glenn A. Shirey, 116 Gwenedd Court, Pleasant Gap, $229,900. Bobbie L. Benner and Bobbie L. Deibler to Timothy S. Deibler and Bobbie L. Deibler, 2345 Valley View Road, Bellefonte, $1.

Mark A. Newman, DC 814 Willowbank St. Bellefonte, PA 16823 814-355-4889

SPRING TOWNSHIP

Cristin M. Hall and Jeremy D. Moeller to Kate M. Lesciotto, 227 Oakwood Ave., State College, $161,000. Ralph E. Chronister to Charles Rock Rosamilia III and Lorraine Larsen Rosamilia, 4829 Buffalo Run Road, Port Matilda, $8,000. Charles Rock Rosamilia III and Lorraine Larsen Rosamilia to Charles Rock Rosamilia III and Lorraine Larsen Rosamilia, 4829 Buffalo Run Road, Port Matilda, $1. Ralph E. Chronister to Ralph E. Chronister, 4805 Buffalo Run Road, Port Matilda, $1. Matthew D. Hurteau and Sarah R. Hurteau to Jeffrey G. Wong and Lisa H. Preis, 1033 Wharf Indigo Place, Mount Pleasant, S.C., $347,000. Justin D. Clark and Shao-Ling Ma to Ryan D. Kirkwood, 660 Stoneledge Drive, State College, $304,000.

STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH

Michael Jonathan Clark and Heather Joy Kuhns-Clark to Frances Elizabeth Miller, 1040 Greenfield Circle, State College, $379,000. Dunbar McManus Partners to Mark S. Freeark and Sharon B. Freeark, 754 S. Madison Ave., Pasadena, Calif., $329,000. Esther V. Cramer Estate and Joann C. Thompson, executrix, to Joann C. Thompson, 1128 S. Allen St., State College, $1. Angelina Natale and Donald J. Natale Jr. to LMR Holdings LLC, 61 Oak Bottom Road, Quarryville, $152,900. Kuang-Hu Hsieh and Feng Cheng to Michael P. Lenze and Yvonne Lenze, 2916 Southgate Drive, Unit No. 6, State College, $146,000.

PENN TOWNSHIP

Clara L. Robison Estate and Clearfield Bank and Trust Company to Terry L. and John F. Robison LLC, 1020 Haymaker Road, State College, $275,000.

PORT MATILDA BOROUGH

Amanda Richards and Joshua Richards to Jonathan R. Hodgins and Ara A. Hodgins, 204 N. High St., Port Matilda, $180,000.

POTTER TOWNSHIP

Larry A. Brown Estate and Connie B. Mell, administratix, to Priscilla B. Bruce Estate, Beverly B. Hoatling and Brenda B. McNeil, 40 Oyster River Road, Durham, N.H., $1.

UNION TOWNSHIP

Scott L. Horner and Jennifer L. Horner to Phillip Hrenko and Frances A. Hrenko, 1776 Sand Hill Road, Hershey, $259,900.

SNOW SHOE TOWNSHIP

Wells Fargo Bank to Randall E. Viehdorfer and Cheryl Ann Viehdorfer, 294 Askey Road,

AZETTE

— Compiled by Gazette staff

GAZETTE IT DONE!

Susan Carnevale, MS, CCC-SLP

Jason McCaslin Home Improvements

Helping people communicate at their best Acquired Neurogenic Disorders/ Stuttering Specialist Speech Language Pathologist

scarnevale52@gmail.com www.susancarnevaleslp.com Lemont Physical Therapy, Ste. 300, 2766 W. College Ave., State College, PA 16801 c 276-782-2824 ph 814-861-6608

LYONS SALVAGE LLC. 814-355-3974

1826 Zion Road • Bellefonte, PA 10 Minutes from State College

814-355-3974

OVER 55 YEARS IN BUSINESS!

We have over 25 Premium, Grain Free and Holistic Pet Foods! Boarding and Pet Grooming Available WE SELL 2015 DOG LICENSES! www.lyonskennels.com

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

Our Live-In Caregivers Can Help You Stay At Home

Call Care For People

• Handyman Services • Power Washing • Deck Restoration • Windows & Siding • Painting • Woodworking PA 2663

www.McCaslinsHomeRestoration.com

1401 Benner Pike Bellefonte, PA 16823

Market & Greenhouse

Fair Pricing Fully Insured Free Estimates

814-353-3323

SHUEY’S (814) 237-4578 We buy junk cars, trucks & scrap metals 1806 Zion Rd. Bellefonte

PA #080570

liams to Timothy A. McWilliams, 115 Beaver Run Road, Danville, $1. Larry R. Breon, by attorney, and Fay L. Breon to Dustin N. Auman, 108 S. Alley, Rebersburg, $21,200.

THE CENTRE COUNTY

Newman Chiropractic Clinic

JULY 9-15, 2015

Cable • Internet • Digital Phone

HOURS: Monday-Saturday 8-6; Sunday Noon-5pm

Hanging Baskets, Flowers, Vegetable Plants, Bedding Plants

www.tele-media.com

1-800-704-4254 or 814-353-2025 Triple Play service $99.95/mo. for 1 year

PRESTON’S

Bellefonte Farmers’ Market

COMPLETE HOME REMODELING

PA 050607

• Kitchens • Baths • Doors • Windows • Siding • Decks • Wiring, Plumbing • Exterior Power Washing

PA Wine Seasonal Veggies Bison and Eggs Fresh Pasta and Ravioli Baked & Canned Goods

FIND A

JOB

Post your resume. Get matched instantly.

814.353.3432

WEST LAMB ST.

Saturday 8am-Noon

814.592.9562

the

GAMBLE MILL PARKING LOT

FREE for job seekers to use! Scan to download the FREE mobile app!

.com 814-238-5051 Powered by The Centre County Gazette & RealMatch


JULY 9-15, 2015

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

FREE

REAL ESTATE PACKAGE Powered by RealMatch

ACTION ADS

Total value of all items for sale must be under $2,000 • Must have price of item for sale in ad • Run up to 6 lines for 3 weeks • One ad per person • PRIVATE PARTY ONLY Real Estate, Rentals, Auctions, Financial, Services/Repairs. Garage Sales, Pets, Bulk (firewood, hay, etc.) not eligible. No other discounts or coupons apply.

Free MCAT practice test by Gold Standard MCAT Prep plus free videos will help you understand practice test explanations http://www.mcatprep.com/free-mcatpractice-test

RENT TO OWN We can arrange “Rent To Own” on any property for sale by any broker, owner, bank or others. NEW HORIZONS REAL ESTATE CO. 814-355-8500

THE CENTRE COUNTY

Phone 814-238-5051 classifieds@centrecountygazette.com

Call by Noon Monday to run Thursday. All ads must be pre-paid.

GAZETTE

Placing a Classified Ad?

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OVER 37 MILLION JOB SEEKERS! Go to www.MyJobConneXion.com or call 814-238-5051.

2 BEDROOM DUPLEX Lovely Scenic Location $727.00 This quaint two bedroom duplex is located 10 minutes from downtown State College in the middle of a quiet, wooded, nature lovers paradise. You would have your own private drive and entrance. Large yard surrounded by woods and nature. Available 8/6 814-278-7700

4 Weeks 8 Lines + Photo only

76

$

1/2 Security Deposit 3 Bdr Near Campus Newly upgraded townhomes available for rent. We have furnished and unfurnished options. Washer/Dryer in each unit Parking included CATA bus pas included Some utilities paid Roommate matching available *3 person maximum if not related $550/person (814) 235-1377

Full-time (temporary) opportunity for a licensed physical therapy assistant to provide treatment to patients of all ages in the comfort of their residence. Responsibilities include knowledge of physical therapy modalities and performing care evaluations under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. One-year experience preferred and a current PA driver’s license is required. VNA Health System offers competitive compensation. Send resume to: Centre HomeCare, Inc. Attn: Vice President-Western Division, 2437 Commercial Blvd., Suite 6, State College, PA 16801, or email sprobert@vnahs.com. EOE/F/M/V/H

Spacious 4 bedroom 2 bath home Located minutes from downtown State College. It features a large living room, dining room, large partially finished basement. The home will feature many new upgrades for fall. Stove and refrigerator are included. Sit an relax on your large front porch or rear patio area. 1 Car garage and off street parking included. Sorry no pets. Due to borough regulation, only 3 non-related persons can reside in this home. Tenant pays all utilities. (814) 278-7700

COME JOIN OUR TEAM! Calling all CNAs, LPNs to experience our culture at Juniper Village. We have openings for full-time, part-time and a special rate for Per Diem.

Come in to complete an application. We look forward to meeting you soon!

“Come join me and help make a difference!”

COUNTRY 5 min. from town. This 3 bdrn home sits on 1/2 acre with open living room, dining room, and kitchen. Three car garage. Bellefonte area. Asking $250,000 firm. Ph. 814.222.3331.

CORPORATE SHORT TERM RENTALS 3 month minimum. Fully furnished 3 bedroom townhomes available immediately. All utilities are paid, including cable TV, and a CATA bus pass. Great for football season or for short-term stays in State College. Call or stop in to reserve a townhome! (814) 235-1377

Career Guidance Counselor

Centre HomeCare, Inc., a VNA Health System agency and leading provider of home health, hospice and rehabilitative care, is looking for professional and clinical staff to join our growing team.

PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSISTANT

HOUSES FOR SALE

1950 Cliffside Drive, State College, 16801

Grant funded, part-time position. Candidate must have a PA teaching certification in counseling. Exp. working with high school students preferred. Acts 34, 114, and 151 clearances required. Send letter of interest, resume, PA Standard Teaching application, and copy of PDE certification to the Exec. Sec., Central PA Institute of Science and Technology, 540 N. Harrison Rd., Pleasant Gap, PA 16823. Application deadline: July 31, 2015.

HELP WANTED Bald Eagle Area School District is accepting applications for a full-time maintenance person. Qualified applicants should possess a strong HVAC/ Refrigeration/ Electrical background. See District website www.beasd.org for more information. EOE

Computer Services

PAGE 31

TRUE HANDYMAN SERVICES No job too small!

LAWN SERVICES For New or Routine Lawn Care give me a Call for a Free Estimate 814-360-9402 Cheap rates! Reliable and Dependable! Commercial and Residential! Fully Insured! Serving State College, Boalsburg, Bellefonte and the Surrounding Areas. CLASSIFIED helpline: More details equal faster reader response and better results for you. We can help you write a “bestseller” advertisement. Call us today.

Spring Cleanup, Landscape, Lawnmowing, Mulch, Brush Remocal, Driveway Sealing, Deck Staining, Painting, Electrical, Carpentry, Plumbing, Flooring

814-360-6860 PA104644

Odd Jobs / Handyman Services. Repair and cleaning of gutters to lawn care & more. What you got? Centre Hall Area. (207) 667-2443

COUNTER / bar stool: solid wood, swivels, 23”. $8. Call (814) 574-6387

DELIVERY DRIVER The Centre County Gazette is looking for a weekly delivery driver. Every Thursday from 6am-2pm, 52 weeks per year rain or shine. Proper vehicle and ability to speak with location managers and owners. Fair compensation based on # stops, time, and mileage. 1099 position

Contact: Bill Donley 814-251-3668 or bdonley@ centrecountygazette.com

Some ads featured on statecollege.com

CARE GIVER OPPORTUNITIES

UPMC Home Nursing Agency Do you enjoy working with people? Are you looking for a position where you can make a difference in the lives of others? Our Private Duty Home Care department has several openings for compassionate candidates to join our team as Care Givers! In this role, you’ll provide personal care and basic daily living assistance to clients in their homes. • Full-time and casual positions available • No experience required • Excellent benefits package!

Learn more and apply today at homenursingagency.com/ careers EOE. Minorities/Females/Veterans/ Individuals with Disabilities

END TABLE: oak with 1 drawer. $25 Call (814) 360-7360 HONEYWELL air purifier, Hepa air filtration system. $25. Call (814) 574-6387 LAZY BOY RECLINER brown tweed $50, Large wooden desk $50, Glass top dining table w/ wrought iron base $100, Call (814) 470-0712 LOVE SEAT: excellent condition, beige in color. $250 Call (814) 360-7360 WHIRLPOOL air conditioner, 1200 btu’s $79.00 Call (814) 574-6387

1926 National Cash Register. bought in Lassman Hardware in Bellefonte, $500 negotiable. Call (814) 342-0488

16MM SOUND projector with slices machine, $100 negotiable. Call (814) 342-0488 GRANDFATHER clock: Ridgeway. 1 owner. beautiful cherry case. brass works/fittings. recently serviced. $700.00 (814) 571-9342 TRANSPORT wheelchair $75, potty chair $25, walker $20, tub chair $15, adult diaper $2.00 per pack, elevated toilet seat $5. Call (814) 470-0712 WHITE MOWER: 18hp, 48” cut, inc. 48” snow blower, wheel weights, 3 pt hitch, automatic drive. $800.00 (814) 349-5576

FOR SALE BY OWNER: 2005 Buick LaSarbe, in very good condition, 33,000K, newer tires, 4-door, automatic, single cd player, white in color. $7,300. (814) 234-7495

DAYCARE DIRECTOR A Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood Education Preferred, with minimum Associates/AAS with 18 ECE credits. Love for God and His precious children.

Send résumés: 227 Washington Avenue, Lewistown PA 17044 Call: (717) 248-4579 gracecovenantlewistown@gmail.com

Comfort Keepers ... a Career in Caregiving Caregivers needed in the State College area

v Pay rates ranging from $10.25 to $12.51/hr. based on availability v Full-Time Major Medical, Dental and Vision Benefits v Company matched 401-k plan v No limitation on hours

For more information on Job Opportunities, contact Michelle at: 814-861-1628 Or apply online at: ck551.ersp.biz/employment EOE

Centre HomeCare, Inc., a VNA Health System agency and leading provider of home health, hospice and rehabilitative care, is looking for professional and clinical staff to join our growing team. Physical Therapist Part-time opportunity for a licensed Physical Therapist to provide care and treatment for patients in the comfort of their residence. Responsibilities include care evaluations, preparing individualized treatment plans, knowledge of physical therapy modalities and use of high-tech clinical equipment. Position offers scheduling flexibility. One-year experience preferred and a current PA driver’s license is required. VNA Health System offers competitive compensation. Contact or send resume to:

COMPUTER REPAIRS Over 14 years of experience in repairing desktops, servers and laptops. I can easily remove viruses, spyware, and malware and get your PC back to top form. Please email Mike at mnap11@hotmail.com or Call 814-883-4855

DROP LEAF table with 4 chairs, like new. $175. Call (814) 360-7360

Centre HomeCare, Inc. Attn: Vice President-Western Division 2437 Commercial Blvd., Suite 6 State College, PA 16801 Email: sprobert@ vnahs.com Phone: 814.237.7400 EOE/F/M/V/H


PAGE 32

THE CENTRE COUNTY GAZETTE

JULY 9-15, 2015

7 9 15 centre county gazette  
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