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Gazette The CenTre CounTy

www.CentreCountyGazette.com

District champs!

The State College Area High School boys’ and girls’ basketball teams captured the District 6 Class AAAA championships with wins over Altoona. With their respective victories, the Little Lions and Little Lady Lions advanced to the PIAA playoffs./Pages 16, 17

March 3-9, 2016

Volume 8, Issue 9

FREE COPY

Area Catholic priests accused of abuse By StateCollege.com staff A statewide grand jury determined that at least 50 priests or religious leaders in the Roman Catholic Diocese of AltoonaJohnstown sexually abused hundreds of children over a period of 40 years, Pennsylvania District Attorney Kathleen Kane announced March 1. The 147-page grand jury report details evidence alleging abuse, as well as a history of superiors in the diocese taking action to conceal the child abuse as part of an effort to protect the institution’s image. Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown parishes are located within eight counties — Bedford, Blair, Cambria, Centre, Clinton, Fulton, Huntingdon and Somerset. There are more than 90,000 Catholics in the area the diocese cov-

ers, according to the grand jury. “The heinous crimes these children endured are absolutely unconscionable,” Kane said. “These predators desecrated a sacred trust and preyed upon their victims in the very places where they should have felt most safe. “Just as troubling is the coverup perpetrated by clergy leaders that allowed this abuse to continue for decades. They failed in our society’s most important task of protecting our children.” A search warrant executed by Kane’s office in August 2015 uncovered substantial evidence alleging former bishops James Hogan and Joseph Adamec — who, combined, led the diocese from 1966 through 2011 — took action to conceal the abuse. The grand jury report described a “secret archive” with documents

detailing children being sexually abused by members of the diocese. Among the documents uncovered were Hogan’s written notes, letters and documents sent to Adamec, several sexual abuse victim statements, correspondence with offending priests and internal correspondence. Hogan was bishop from 1966 to 1987 and died in 2005. Adamec was bishop from 1987 to 2011. The grand jury report states both bishops took steps to move priests to new locations, mandate treatment and otherwise avoid reporting numerous instances of abuse to law enforcement. Current bishop Mark Bartchak is not accused of wrongdoing. Kane commended Bartchak for removing alleged abusers from positions of power. The grand Abuse, Page 6

DARRELL SAPP/AP Photo

KANE SPEAKS: Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane addresses media on March 1 over allegations of criminal activity by dozens of Catholic priests.

House GOP launches initiative to cut costs in state government By ALEXA LEWIS news@centrecountygazette.com

HARRISBURG — State Rep. Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, and his House GOP colleagues are behind a new initiative called PennSAVE that will investigate state government spending and find ways to save taxpayer dollars. The initiative stands for savings, accountability, value and efficiency. It comes amid a more than seven-month budget stalemate in Harrisburg and Gov. Tom Wolf’s recent budget address of the upcoming fiscal year that received widespread GOP backlash. On Feb. 9 Wolf proposed a $33.3 billion budget with increased spending — a 10 percent bump from the proposed GOP budget this year. His plan requires $3.6 billion in broad-based tax increases to fix school funding disparities, meet the increasing costs of mandated services and confront the looming deficit. Wolf said the alternative is to face a $1.9 billion structural deficit, which has implications on tax rates, future interest rates, services offered to residents and debt loads. “Before taxpayers are asked to take a pay cut in order to send more money to Harrisburg, state government first needs to be accountable to taxpayers Initiative, Page 5

Submitted photo

BIG DAY: At last year’s Team Ream Day, Samantha Ream and friends of the late Brandon Ream presented Mount Nittany Health with a check for $20,000.

AP file photo

CLOSER LOOK: State Rep. Kerry Benninghoff, R-Centre, has proposed a program called PennSAVE, which will investigate state government spending. Benninghoff hopes the plan will save taxpayer dollars as well.

Brown to retire as health system CEO From Gazette staff reports STATE COLLEGE — Steven E. Brown, president and CEO of Mount Nittany Health since 2010, has announced plans to retire effective Tuesday, Nov. 1. “This has been a dream job for me,” said Brown. “My 40 years in health care, and especially the last six years here in State College, have been richly rewarding and deeply fulfilling on both a personal and Police ................................ 2 Opinion ............................ 7

professional level. “Working together, our board, employees, medical staff and volunteers have pursued a unique vision of what community health care can be when we focus on the patient, and have created a model organization, based on that, as a leading health care provider for our region.” Brown, Page 3

Health & Wellness ......... 8, 9 Education ....................... 10

Community ............... 11-15 Centre Spread ........... 16-18

Annual Team Ream Day set for Sunday By CHRIS MORELLI editor@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — Three years in, Team Ream Day is back and shows no signs of slowing down. Penn State will honor the life of Brandon Ream when the

IF YOU GO

What: Team Ream Day, Illinois vs. Penn State Where: Bryce Jordan Center When: March 6, noon More info: www.teamream.org

Sports ......................... 19-24 Around & In Town .... 25-27

Nittany Lion men’s basketball team takes on Illinois on Sunday, March 6, at the Bryce Jordan Center. The third of its kind, the game has been declared Team Ream Day. Tipoff is at noon. Ream, a Centre County native and former Penn State football player, passed away in November 2013 after a long battle with cancer. Friends of the Ream family have agreed to match, dollar for dollar, all funds raised for the event, up to $30,000. The Team Ream game will include a preTeam Ream, Page 5

What’s Happening ......... 27 Puzzles ............................ 28

Business ..................... 29, 30 Classified ........................ 31


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HEALTHY CHANGES: March is National Nutrition Month, which means it’s time to adjust your diet and way of thinking. Gazette intern Jane Mienkiewicz talked to some local experts to find out ways to improve your lifestyle. Page 11

TOURNAMENT TIME: The Penn State wrestling team will look to continue its winning ways when it travels to Iowa City, Iowa, for the Big Ten Tournament this weekend. Gazette correspondent Andy Elder previews the action. Page 19

BAND-ING TOGETHER: The Bellefonte Community Band will present a concert saluting the Golden Age of Bands at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 13, at the Esber Recital Hall on the campus of Penn State. Page 12

IT’S BACK: The College Town Film Festival returns to State College beginning on Wednesday, March 16, and runs through Saturday, March 19. The festival features five different types of events during the run. Page 25

CORRECTION POLICY

The Centre County Gazette corrects errors as soon as they are brought to our attention. Please contact us at editor@centrecountygazette.com to report a correction.

POLICE BLOTTER

STATE COLLEGE POLICE DEPARTMENT

Police are investigating a report that someone used a credit card to make unauthorized purchases at Uni-Mart on East College Avenue. According to police, at about 2:30 a.m. on Feb. 24, a man entered the store and purchased 11 packs of cigarettes with a reported stolen credit card. The man is described as being about 5 feet, 8 inches tall with pale skin and stubble facial hair. He was wearing a dark blue Penn State hooded sweatshirt. Anyone with information about the inciden can contact police at (814) 234-7150.

STATE POLICE ROCKVIEW Police reported a 17-year-old Milesburg boy punched a 17-year-old Clarence boy in the jaw at Bald Eagle Area High School at 1 p.m. on Jan. 26. No further information was provided. qqq Police are investigating an incident of criminal mischief that occurred sometime between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Feb. 8 at a residence on Flatt Street in Snow Shoe. Police said someone broke windows out of the building then fled the scene. qqq Authorities reported a 25-year-old inmate at the State Correctional Institution at Rockview was found to be in possession of suspected suboxone at 11 a.m. on Feb. 19. Charges will be filed after the lab results are received. qqq Forty-two-year-old Frank Stimer, of Sandy Ridge, was cited with harassment after police said he slapped a 46-year-old woman three times in the face along Jacksonville Road, Marion Township, at 7 p.m. on Feb. 20. No further information was provided. qqq A 23-year-old Snow Shoe woman reported to police someone stole her mail and a check from her Riggs Lane, Snow Shoe Township home sometime Feb. 24. qqq Police were called to Penns Valley Road at 3:53 p.m. on Feb. 24 to investigate a single-vehicle crash. Police said Robert Horner, of Centre Hall, was westbound. While approaching the intersection with Shook Hollow Road, he lost control of his 1995 Chevrolet Silverado. The truck struck the west roadside embankment with its front snow plow attachment and front bumper. The truck then spun 360 degrees and crossed into the eastbound lane, where it came to rest. Horner and his passenger, Matthew Weaver, also of Centre Hall, suffered serious injuries in the crash and were transported to Mount Nittany Medical Center via ambulance. Police said Horner will be cited for not driving his vehicle at a safe speed. qqq Police report charges of unauthorized use of a motor vehicle were filed against a 24-year-old Maryland man after he took a 24-year-old Centre Hall man’s vehicle on Feb. 25 without permission. The vehicle has since been recovered by the Baltimore Police Department.

qqq Police reported a Woodward man and a Loganton woman engaged in a verbal argument that turned physical at 2 a.m. on Feb. 25 at an East Mountain Avenue, Haines Township, residence. Police said the man pushed and shoved the woman, then grabbed her hands and bent her fingers backwards. Authorities said both parties have protection from abuse orders on each other. Charges were filed against both for PFA violations, and the man was also cited for simple assault and harassment. qqq Police reported a 27-year-old Coburn man was arrested for driving under the influence following a routine traffic stop along Coburn Road at 1:25 a.m. on Feb. 25. No further information was provided. qqq Police reported someone removed a stop sign and a tractor sign from along Marsh Creek Road in Curtain Township on Feb. 27. Police are continuing to investigate. qqq A 25-year-old Jersey Shore man was arrested on charges of DUI following a routine traffic stop along Axeman Road in Spring Township at 10:26 p.m. on Feb. 28, police said. No further information was provided. qqq Police reported a 17-year-old Bellefonte man was found to have drug paraphernalia in the bedroom of his Boggs Township home at 1:40 a.m. on Feb. 29. Authorities are continuing to investigate. qqq Staff at the Centre County Prison in Benner Township report the discovery of suspected drugs outside the main entrance at 9:42 a.m. on Feb. 29. The investigation is continuing. qqq Police reported an unidentified State College man was arrested on DUI charges following a routine traffic stop along Rock Road in Benner Township on March 1.

STATE POLICE PHILIPSBURG A 31-year-old Philipsburg man reported to police someone stole a cellphone, digital camera and three Skull power banks. Police believe the theft occurred sometime Feb. 7 and the investigation is continuing. qqq At about 1 p.m. on Feb. 9, a Port Matilda woman was approached by a man attempting to sell her a vacuum cleaner. Police said she declined the purchase of the vacuum cleaner, but did write a check for a Penn State scholarship fund, which does not exist. Police are continuing to seek information about this incident. qqq Police report someone damaged the windshield and headlights of a 1978 Chevrolet Silverado while it was parked at a Woomer Hill Road, Taylor Township, residence between 4 p.m. Feb. 20 and 7 a.m. Feb. 21. Anyone with information regarding this incident can call police at (814) 342-3370. — Compiled by G. Kerry Webster


March 3-9, 2016

The Centre County Gazette

Page 3

State budget battle updated at CBICC luncheon By HARRY ZIMBLER correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — As Yogi Berra once said, it was “deja vu all over again” at the legislative update luncheon sponsored by the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre County, held Feb. 25 at Toftrees Resort. An update presented by Gene Barr, president and CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, focused on the state budget stalemate between Gov. Tom Wolf and the state legislature. “There have been a lot of unfriendly words in Harrisburg,” said Barr. “On Feb. 9, the governor presented tax increases again, including an extraction tax on natural gas companies. We hear all the time that the industry gets a free pass. This is not true. The impact fees paid are substantial. The governor has proposed another tax just as the industry is cutting back. It makes no sense.” According to Barr, the governor is asking for an expansion of what is taxable, from digital downloads to movie tickets. “We should be asking, ‘What do we need

to do to move Pennsylvania forward?’ This will require everyone coming back to the center. We continue to have the highest corporate net income tax — the worst in the United States.” Barr said that the state has a structural deficit driven by the “pension problem.” “We owe $58 billion to two state retirement systems,” he said. “How we got to $58 billion is unfortunate. “The pension system no longer works demographically,” said Barr. One of the most contentious issues is the amount of money that should go to education. “You hear that Pennsylvania shortchanges education,” Barr said. “This is not true. This state ranks sixth in total spending for education. We are ninth in spending on each student. Both of these statistics are from the United States Census. “Let’s have the debate about education, but let’s use facts. And reforms need to be made to get the best teachers we can get.” Where does the state go now? “I wish I could figure that out,” said Barr. “We have to bring a sense of reality back to our system. The overwhelming

Submitted photo

GENE BARR, president and CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, spoke to a large group at a luncheon sponsored by the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre County. number of taxpayers will never see a benefit like the retirement system for teachers and state employees. That has to be addressed.”

Finally, Pennsylvania needs to make it easier to do business here, including eliminating red tape in the permitting process and dealing with labor costs.

Moody’s Investor Services upgrades Penn State credit rating By ZACH BERGER StateCollege.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — Moody’s Investor Services has recognized Penn State’s “excellent strategic position,” upgrading the university’s credit rating on Feb. 26. The credit rating firm gave Penn State a strong report, upgrading it to a Aa1 credit rating with a stable outlook, one step up from last year. This upgrade from Moody’s comes at an interesting time for the university, with Brown, from page 1 According to the health system’s board chair, Dr. James B. Thomas, Brown will work closely with the board and assist with the search for his successor. Thomas said that the board of directors has developed a formal succession plan, and an executive search firm will be hired to work with a search committee. “In Steve Brown, we have a great and trusted friend, but also a health care leader who has spearheaded Mount Nittany Health through a tremendous period of growth,” said Thomas. “His leadership has enabled us to accomplish what most hospitals and health systems have only

an eight-month budget impasse within the state legislature that could potentially leave Penn State with no state appropriation and a $300 million budget shortfall. The Moody’s report “recognizes Penn State’s exceptional liquidity enabling it to ably bridge the lack of Commonwealth of Pennsylvania appropriations due to the failure to enact its FY 2016 budget and strong operations from diverse and healthy revenue sources.” In its report, Moody’s cited Penn State’s “excellent strategic position” including the

fact that it’s one of the nation’s leading public universities, has sustained philanthropic support, modest financial leverage, and strong governance practices. Penn State’s senior vice president for business and finance, David Gray, lauded the credit rating upgrade, noting its gravity during a time of financial instability for the university and Pennsylvania as a whole. “In spite of numerous challenges and a turbulent environment, Moody’s action to upgrade the university’s credit rating rec-

ognizes Penn State’s considerable strength in student demand, philanthropy, research activity and financial management,” Gray said. Moody’s said that Penn State has expectations of growth in balance sheet reserves thanks to strong operations and good fundraising, success in research, high student demand, and manageable debt. “Penn State will continue to enjoy a strong market position with good national student demand as a leading national research university,” the firm said

dreamed about. At the same time, we are extremely pleased that Steve has agreed to assist the board with the national search for the next executive of the health system.” A native of Mechanicsburg, Brown is a Fellow of the STEVEN BROWN American College of Healthcare Executives, a graduate of Thiel College and received his Master of Public Administration degree in health services administration from Penn State. Prior to

joining Mount Nittany Health in 2010, Brown served as president and chief executive officer of Evergreen Health in Kirkland, Wash.

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Pedestrian killed in State College crash By ALEXA LEWIS correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — Josef Blunschi, 66, of State College, died after being struck by a car on East Park Avenue adjacent to Penn State campus on Feb. 24. Blunschi was crossing East Park Avenue at McKee Street at about 6:50 p.m. when a driver who police identified as Kay Shamalla, 68, of State College, hit him with her vehicle. Centre Life Link EMS transported Blunschi from the scene and took him to Mount Nittany Medical Center where he was later pronounced dead, according to a police press release. State College police have not filed any charges related the incident, but are continuing to investigate the crash. An autopsy is schedule for Friday, March 4, according to police. East Park Avenue was closed between Allen Street and Shortlidge Road while the scene was processed. Penn State University Police and the Alpha Fire Police also

assisted at the scene. State College Police have asked that anyone with information call the department at (814) 234-7150. Blunschi was a graduate student pursuing his doctorate in energy and mineral engineering in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. He also worked part time at Penn State. This was not the first fatal accident involving a pedestrian and vehicle that has occurred off or near campus. Three other pedestrians lost their lives within the last 20 months while crossing streets on the north side of campus, according to State College Police Chief Tom King. The first fatal accident occurred in July 2014 when Penn State freshman Eva O’Brian, 18, jogged across North Atherton Street against the signal on the northern side of the intersection where there is no crosswalk. She was hit by a Ford F-250 pickup traveling southbound. On June 22, Joel Reed, 39, of Port Matilda, was driving his motorized scooter northbound on Atherton when he collided

with a car turning left on North Atherton Street. Most recently Penn State student Michael Eiben, 23, of Wexford, Pa., was killed after a car struck him at the intersection of North Atherton and Curtin Road on Sept. 7. This is also the second pedestrian-vehicle crash in the last 30 days. On Feb. 13, Andrea Velarde, 20, of New Jersey, was visiting friends in the area when she was injured in a hit-and-run at the intersection of South Garner Street and East Prospect Avenue. Police have not yet found the driver or vehicle that hit Velarde. Residents, especially in the College Heights neighborhood, have vocalized their concerns for more than a year regarding the safety of the North Atherton and Park Avenue intersection and have met with local lawmakers to find solutions. In addition to traffic signal timings, borough leaders and community members have proposed pedestrian refuge islands, eliminating right turn lanes and a pedestrian tunnel or bridge to improve safety at

the North Atherton Street and Park Avenue intersection. PennDOT is also reconstructing Atherton Street, which is a state highway, in a multiphase construction project that could last for the next five or so years, Mark Whitefield, the borough’s public works director, previously said “The next section is from Aaron Drive to Park Avenue. We are obviously working with PennDOT in what physical changes may be made to the intersection to improve safety,” Whitfield said. State College Police have also collected data about the intersection using cameras that PennDOT installed and have analyzed the feasibility of the proposed options from community members. “The problem is there is no time for pedestrians,” said William Taylor, the chairman of State College’s Board of Health, to State College Borough Council members in regards to Atherton Street. “People are dashing across the street because there is no time ... 30 seconds every time the lights change would really help.”

Commissioners name March ‘American Red Cross Month’ By G. KERRY WEBSTER

correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

BELLEFONTE — The Centre County board of commissioners proclaimed March 2016 to be American Red Cross Month in Centre County during its regular monthly meeting on March 1. “The American Red Cross is an amazing organization here in Centre County,” said Chairman Commissioner Michael Pipe. “They have done so much good work here for us. This proclamation is important to recognize just how much the people at the American Red Cross do.” The official proclamation was read aloud by Kimberly Smeltzer. “I have a lot of friend and colleagues involved in the Red Cross and they all should

be commended for their hard work,” said Commissioner Mark Higgins. “Many people don’t understand all the trainings these people have to go through. It’s an important group that’s very valuable to the residents of Centre County.” Commissioner Steve Dershem said many people who think of the Red Cross think strictly of blood donation. He said the group is much more than that. “Blood donations are important, but the Red Cross also does a lot more, especially when natural or manmade disasters occur,” Dershem said. “I think we take those folks for granted. I’m glad we’re are making this proclamation. The Red Cross deserves it.” Also during the meeting, the commissioners heard a short update on the Tem-

ple Court courthouse annex renovation in Bellefonte from county administrator Denise Elbell. She said the renovations are “pretty much done,” noting the third and fourth floors were recently completed and the security and lighting system are set to go out to bid soon. “We don’t anticipate moving anyone in there until September,” she said. Elbell said the original cost of the project was $3.1 million. However, about $1 million was made in change orders, thus pushing the project costs to about $4.1 million. A brief discussion was held about the space, which will become available in the top floor of the courthouse when the Temple Court building is complete. Sugges-

tions for the space included holding cells, conference rooms or office space. In other business, the commissioners: ■ Adopted Resolution No. 5 of 2016 urging the general assembly and Gov. Tom Wolf to restore funding for human service programs and to put mechanisms in place to assure any future budget impasse or budget delay does not become a burden on Centre County and its constituents. ■ Corrected the original approval of a contract between the county and Schadler-Yesco to provide maintenance for the hardware and software for security computers. The contract was originally approved for a one-year period. The correction is to approve it for a fiveyear period at a total cost of $23,186.25 annually.

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March 3-9, 2016 Team Ream, from page 1 game autograph session featuring Penn State athletes and other athletes from various action sports. Brandon’s widow, Samantha, said that Team Ream Day gets a little more special every year. “Every year, I get more and more grateful,” she said. “The support we get is overwhelming. I’m not surprised, because I know how special the community is, but it’s a very special day for all of us. I know Brandon would be proud.” No doubt, it will be an emotional day for Samantha and the entire Ream family. “It always is. I don’t think it really hits you until you get inside the Jordan Center and you see all the Team Ream T-shirts. You think, ‘This is all for Brandon’ … so it does get emotional,” she said. Ream was born in State College on Jan. 23, 1984. A lifelong resident of Happy Valley and a Penn State graduate, he loved central Pennsylvania and could never imagine calling anywhere else home, according to the Team Ream Foundation. As a child and teen Ream was a standout football and basketball player. Through competition, he developed an unbreakable attitude for success and a dedication to team spirit. He continued his athletic career by playing football at Penn State University where he met Samantha, then a Penn State volleyball player. Initiative, from page 1 by ensuring it has explored every practical option for reducing costs,” Benninghoff said in a statement. “In a $30.3 billion budget, there are plenty of opportunities to find efficiencies and improve how government works.” Without more revenue, Wolf said that the state will face cuts in education and social services along with higher local taxes. And if the state were unable to make payments to human services, local municipalities and county governments would have to pick up the slack to fund these mandates services. Nonetheless, Benninghoff and 17 state representatives on the policy committee that he is chairman of will spend

The Centre County Gazette

Page 5

After graduation, Ream channeled his passion for success into his family’s business, Camp Woodward, an action sports and gymnastics camp. He worked his way up to become vice president of operations and guided the camp through both national and worldwide expansions, according to the Team Ream Foundation. In November 2011, Ream was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a rare form of bone cancer. Upon learning the diagnosis, he drew upon his competitive drive and immediately entered “battle mode.” He, along with his family and friends, confronted the crisis head on with a positive attitude and a gracious spirit. Through his life and his journey with cancer, Ream recognized the value and the importance of a solid support system, the love of family and friends and the availability of quality resources, the foundation states. According to Samanth, she’s extremely proud of the fact that the money raised through Team Ream events stays local. “(All the money) we’ve raised so far has stayed in the community. That’s extremely important and something we’re proud of,” she said. “Last year, we presented a check to Mount Nittany (Medical Center) for $20,000. Our goal is to beat that this year.” According to Ream, the past couple of Team Ream days have raised around $40,000. “We’re shooting for a similar goal this year,” she said.

Although Brandon didn’t play basketball at Penn State, Ream said she’s been impressed with the men’s basketball team and its efforts to help raise money for Team Ream. “One thing I’ve realized about Penn

State is that the athletes are all family,” she said. “Brandon and I were athletes and I feel like I never left. Brandon was raised a huge Penn State basketball fan and coach (Patrick) Chambers has really embraced this. It’s special.”

the next several weeks researching potential cost-saving measures including possible state agency and program consolidation, unaddressed audit finding, government procurement policies, “corporate welfare,” wage fraud and system abuse. “The state budget process should begin, not with conversations about higher taxes, but by first looking for ways to reduce government waste and cut unnecessary costs,” he said in a press release. “It is easy to argue higher taxes are the best solution for budget shortfalls and much more difficult to find real savings, but that is our job as lawmakers.” A House Majority Policy subcommittee, which launched PennSAVE, will mostly focus the research on the largest areas

of state government spending, which includes human services, education, corrections and state government in general. But Benninghoff added, “No idea is off limits.” The House Majority Policy Committee is encouraging the public to participate in the initiative by submitting ideas at www. pagoppolicy.com. “We have to look forward toward looking in a bipartisan manner to get good ideas accomplished for the commonwealth,” Benninghoff said in his Feb. 22 press conference where he announced the initiative. Benninghoff made it clear that it was neither a Democrat nor a Republican issue. He said he discussed his plan with Wolf and also hopes to work with other House

and Senate committees, executive agencies and Democrat Eugene DePasquale, the state auditor general. PennSAVE is similar to other efforts aimed at identifying areas where state government could save money including Wolf’s GO-TIME and a website that Sen. Scott Wagner, R-York, launched. “PennSAVE is another opportunity for the public to submit ideas on how to make government work better,” said state Rep. Mike Hanna, D-Lock Haven, via email. “We have seen similar efforts in years past. Most recently, we have seen how successful Governor Wolf’s GO-TIME initiative has been since its inception over one year ago. Finding government savings and efficiencies is a bipartisan effort that I am happy to support.”

Submitted photo

A BMX STUNT SHOW will take place following the Penn State-Illinois men’s basketball game on Sunday, March 6, at the Bryce Jordan Center. It’s all part of Team Ream Day.


Page 6

The Centre County Gazette

Abuse, from page 1 jury urged Bartchak to continue to report allegations and create a victim assistance program. Adamec, investigators found, created a “pay-out chart,” for levels of abuse, with suggested payments to victims from $10,000 to $175,000 based on the nature of abuse. “The Grand Jury notes the cold bureaucracy of this chart,” the report states. “The problem Bishop Adamec denied in public was a problem he secretly acknowledged to himself and the Diocesan insurance.” No indictment was issued by the grand jury. While Kane said the investigation is continuing, she said that none of the criminal acts alleged in the grand jury report can be prosecuted due to several factors including deaths of alleged abusers, traumatized victims being unable to testify in court and statute of limitations having expired. The grand jury credited George Foster, a businessman and Catholic in the diocese, who wrote a newspaper editorial after becoming concerned with allegations of sexual abuse by clergy within the diocese. Victims began to write to and visit Foster. He reviewed documents from a 1990s civil case against the diocese and a priest accused of molesting a boy, and received tips as others learned of his investigation. Foster provided his files to the attorney general’s office in 2014. Kane said victims and others with information concerning the Diocese of Altoona-Johnstown should contact the Office of Attorney General at (888) 538-8541, a toll-free, dedicated hotline established for the case. Among priests named in the report who served at one time in State College and Bellefonte churches are: ■ The Rev. Martin Cingle Cingle, now 69-years-old, is accused of having fondled

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a 16-year-old boy in 1979 while Cingle was assigned to Our Lady of Victory in State College. The victim had been a parish altar boy. The grand jury report said the victim, in 2002, approached Adamec, who in turn sent Cingle for counseling that concluded after a month, after which Cingle was returned to full-time ministry. Cingle, who served at Our Lady of Victory from 1978 to 1981, testified to the grand jury that he could have accidentally fondled the boy, and Adamec told investigators that Cingle previously told him the fondling may have been accidental. Following a letter from the attorney general’s office in 2015 urging Cingle’s removal from active ministry, current bishop Bartchak suspended Cingle. ■ The Rev. Paul Coleman Coleman, now deceased, was a priest at St. John the Evangelist in Bellefonte from 1975 to 1979. In 1979, the parents of a 10-year-old boy who was a student at St. John’s Elementary School told then-Bishop Hogan about changes in the child in which he seemed anxious during the previous months. The boy later told Hogan that Coleman “practiced ‘hypnosis’ and would invite little boys to spend the night in the rectory,” according to the grand jury report. While there, Coleman allegedly engaged in inappropriate touching and asked to take photos of boys in their underwear. Hogan told Coleman, who denied wrongdoing, to keep children out of the rectory and discuss the matter with the parents of the victim. Coleman returned to active ministry at St. John’s but was soon transferred to churches in Johnstown where he was again accused of sexual abuse. Coleman was sent for what was described as treatment at a convent in Cresson in 1987. According to documents presented to the grand jury, Coleman failed to comply with the treatment and was eventually suspended in 1988, never returning to the ministry. ■ The Rev. William Crouse Crouse, deceased, was assigned to St. John the Evangelist in Bellefonte from 1979 to 1980, but the grand jury report does not include any accusations during that time. Crouse is accused of rape and abuse of a 14-year-old boy while serving in New Jersey between 1968 and 1970. The victim reported the alleged abuse to Adamec in 2002, who then interviewed Crouse. According to the grand jury report, Crouse admitted to “what would be called ‘child molestation’ today.” A therapist told Adamec that Crouse was not a “pedophile” nor “a danger to anyone.” Crouse retired following his evaluation by a therapist. ■ The Rev. Robert Kelly Kelly, 68, was assigned to Our Lady of Victory from 1974 to 1978 and again from 1984 to 1985. He was accused of

sexually abusing a 12-to-13-year-old boy between 1975 and 1977. In 1993, the diocese acted on a complaint from a victim, and removed Kelly from ministry for a year, after which time he returned to being a parish priest at churches in Altoona and Phillipsburg and was told to avoid contact with young people. Documents from the diocese presented to the grand jury described Kelly as “pedophilic” and “sexual.” He was suspended in 2015. ■ The Rev. George Koharchik Koharchik, 67, was assigned to St. John the Evangelist from 1986 to 1987 and went on to serve at several other churches in the diocese until he resigned in 2012. The grand jury report does not specify when the accusations are alleged to have occurred, but that he groped children in his car and that he had abused children prior to 1994. According to grand jury testimony included in the report, Koharchik was asked if contact with certain victims’ intimate areas “was done with some sense of sexual gratification.” Koharchik replied, “Yes.” ■ The Rev. Martin McCamley McCamley, 79, had his final assignment in the diocese at Our Lady of Victory in 1995 and had served in the diocese since his ordination in 1962. Accusations of abuse in the grand jury report are alleged to have occurred prior to his time in State College. The first accusation came in 1981 when Hogan was told McCamley had fondled a 16-yearold boy in Johnstown. The report was dismissed and McCamley continued to serve as vice principal of Bishop McCort High School. McCamley is also alleged to have had a sexual relationship with another priest named in the report, the Rev. James Bunn, and in 2001 was accused of abusing a 13-year-old victim in 1977 who had previously been abused by Bunn. Another complaint of abuse was made in 2008 by a victim who said McCamley inappropriately touched him during his tenure at a Johnstown church in the 1960s. McCamley was evaluated in 2001 and 2003 and retired in 2004. ■ The Rev. Gerard Ream Ream, deceased, was assigned to Our Lady of Victory from 1954 to 1961. The allegation against him occurred when he developed a personal relationship with a female student while teaching at Bishop Carroll High School in the late 1960s. After the student went to college, he developed a sexual relationship with her during her visits home. When she entered a relationship with a male college student, she said Ream became possessive and harassed her via phone calls. The incident was reported in 2008, the same year Ream died.

Brown, from page 3

as well as the Mount Nittany Health Children’s Advocacy Center. In addition, under Brown’s leadership, the health system has partnered with Penn State Hershey on a joint venture for cancer care and with the Penn State College of Medicine to bring academic medicine to State College, including medical students and family medicine residents to ensure health care for the community for years to come. While maintaining strong financial health and philanthropic support, the health system has received numerous honors and awards, most significantly for quality, patient satisfaction, employee engagement and community leadership.

a hospital to a health system serving more than 500,000 people in a six-county region. Brown has been responsible for leading facility growth at the medical center — including a new and expanded emergency department, a shared services building, a cancer pavilion and a new main entrance — as well as significantly improving access to care in communities. The Blue Course Drive practice, Sieg Neuroscience Center, a new Penns Valley medical practice, and offices in Mifflin County, Lock Haven and Clearfield have been added,

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March 3-9, 2016

Gazette The Centre County

403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801 Phone: (814) 238-5051 Fax: (814) 238-3415 www.CentreCountyGazette.com

PUBLISHER Rob Schmidt

MANAGING EDITOR Chris Morelli

SALES MANAGER Amy Ansari

STAFF WRITER Alexa Lewis

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Bill Donley Vicki Gillette Katie Myers

COPY EDITOR Andrea Ebeling

BUSINESS MANAGER Aimee Aiello AD COORDINATOR Katie Myers

GRAPHIC DESIGN Laura Specht Beth Wood INTERNS Jennifer Fabiano Geena Goozdich Jane Mientkiewicz

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Media unfairly brands Wounded Warriors Patty Kleban treats the Wounded Warrior Project unfavorably in her recent column (February 4-10 edition) and, whether intentional or not, may dissuade some readers from donating to that charity. That’s shameful. The “digging” for additional information she evidently did on the Charity Navigator website for facts about the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals should have included a review of data for WWP and the two other veteran-related charities — Fisher House Foundation and Disabled American Veterans —with which WWP was unfavorably compared in the CBS News coverage she mentions. If she had exercised due diligence, she would have discovered that WWP spent 4 percent of its income on administration in 2014 (the most recent data available on the Charity Navigator site), compared to 5 percent for FH and 2 percent for DAV. So the insinuation that WWP is top heavy with administrators — the impression likely to be created by the incomplete CBS News report and subsequent almost identical coverage in The Washington Times, and by Ms. Kleban’s column — is not supported by available facts. Moreover, WWP spent $148.6 million on its veterans programs, significantly more than FH ($37.5 million) and DAV ($6.5 million) or the latter two combined. It’s true that WWP spent much more of its income for fundraising (25 percent) than FH or DAV spent for that purpose (2 percent and 1 percent, respectively). That disparity is reflected by the results: WWP had $312.5 million in contributions, FH had $56.1 million and DAV had $5.6 million. The old adage “it takes money to make money” seems to apply to charitable fundraising as well. WWP, FH and DAV all provide well-deserved benefits for American vets, many of whom have been severely damaged during their voluntary service to this country. But WWP is by far the most important of the three with respect to the value of services delivered. It’s unconscionable to risk leaving Gazette readers with a misconception about WWP, and that’s the likely upshot of Ms. Kleban’s column. Phil Edmunds Boalsburg

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Page 7

Timing is everything

With the budget impasse in Hartems to read PSU IDs, etc.) will cost risburg now hitting the eighth-month an estimated $200,000-plus per year milestone, the impact on programs to maintain. and services is very real and quite sigTiming, as they say, is everything. nificant. As my colleagues began canceling School districts, medical facilities, travel plans and department adminhuman service organizations and istrators met to figure out ways to other entities across the commoncut even closer to the bone and emwealth are being devastated ployees in the agricultureby the inability of our electrelated departments face ed officials to agree on how the fear of being without an much and where they will income, it is comforting to direct our tax dollars. know that we will be spendGov. Tom Wolf has been ing the money to keep high unable to bring the parties school kids out of Rec Hall. together to support a budDid anyone on the Board get based on compromise of Trustees think about and collaboration and, in the message that a vote to fact, has threatened line spend money in the same item vetoes for budget week that the university is proposals that did receive responding to a $300 milbipartisan support in the lion state money shortfall Pennsylvania Legislature. might send to its stakeholdThe budget impasse in ers? Harrisburg hit home again Patty Kleban, Student leader Kevin last week when employees who writes for Horne offered some amazat Penn State received an StateCollege.com, ing insight into the deciis an instructor email from Penn State ad- at Penn State, sion which came after input ministration asking all of us mother of three from students. In a trustee to implement bare bones and a community finance committee meetspending in our efforts to volunteer. She is a ing last November before do our jobs. Included in Penn State alumna the annual operating costs that was the mandate that who lives with her of the security upgrades travel, professional devel- family in Patton were cut in half, Horne said opment for employees and Township. Her “We’re at a place where we other non-essential spend- views and opinions can’t find a $100,000 in the do not necessarily ing are to be eliminated. budget to hire a CAPS counreflect those of Penn Later in the week, we State. selor so students’ mental learned that without the health needs are met, and financial support from Harrisburg, we’re about to spend $420,000 a year Penn State employees who provide just to say we’re keeping townies out and support agriculture programs of the gym.” such as the extension and 4-H proThe board’s decision is faulty in grams may be laid off in May if the both timing and rationale. According budget isn’t passed. It is estimated to the reports, the security system for that layoff will impact 1,100 members Penn State’s athletic facilities is one of the Penn State community. of the remaining recommendations And then it happened. Among left to check off the list from the Freeh the first items on the agenda for the Report that came after the Sandusky Board of Trustees meeting late in the scandal, a report that has been largely week included the approval of $151 panned in its process and content. million in numerous facility renovaThe reactive decisions and programs tions which includes a $7.5 million that have come in the wake of the upgrade to the security system for horrors of the Sandusky crimes, such Penn State’s athletic facilities. These as locking Rec Hall to outsiders and upgrades in security (turnstiles, sysmandating abuse training for all

PATTY KLEBAN

CONTACT US: To submit news: editor@centrecountygazette.com Advertising: sales@centrecountygazette.com The Gazette is a weekly newspaper serving Centre County and is published by Indiana Printing and Publishing Company. Reproduction of any portion of any issue is not permitted without written permission. The publisher reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement for any reason.

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Opinion

Penn State employees, would have done little to stop Sandusky. (The Lasch Building is already locked.) Instead, we put policies and expensive systems in place to make us all feel better. However, even if we agree that blocking the community from wellness facilities is a good idea, should that decision have been made this week? When the vote of “yea” to spend money on flawed reports and faulty problem solving is made when the rest of the university starts to buckle down on spending, it sends the wrong message. In this writer’s opinion, someone on Penn State’s Board of Trustees should have said: “Let’s table all spending decisions until Harrisburg gets their act together. Spending money while asking our staff and faculty to save money sends a bad message.” Inevitably someone will argue that the money for renovating East Halls and for putting in turnstiles at Rec Hall (and space for support staff to sit and check identification) comes from a separate pot of money than the funds for graduate student travel to professional conferences. That may be true. To the Ag Extension employee who may be worried about making his mortgage or paying her electric bill in the face of layoffs, I’m guessing that won’t matter. The message is one of using people to play politics and to pressure Harrisburg from a Board of Trustees that continues to be out of touch. Until Harrisburg passes the budget, I am happy to support the hardworking, committed folks who make decisions in my college and my department at Penn State to prioritize need, watch our spending, focus on our mission of teaching, research and service, and continue to support our students. We will do our jobs, unlike our elected officials in Harrisburg. The message and timing of our actions should be clear and consistent and should match what we say with our words.

NASA’s new explorers will be an elite group By Pittsburgh Post-Gazette This is the time of year when high school seniors eagerly await an acceptance letter from the college of their choice. While the nation’s most selective schools have acceptance rates in single-digits, NASA is sifting through a record pool of 18,300 applicants for a mere eight to 14 slots in its next astronaut candidates class. With odds like that, the chances of being picked for space training are more daunting than getting into an Ivy League school. Now that NASA’s Feb. 18 deadline

for applicants has passed, the agency’s 18-month winnowing process has begun. Caution to English majors: NASA insists that future astronauts have college degrees in mathematics, science or engineering. NASA staff will look at 400 to 600 applicants who survive the initial purge and identify those who pass reference and background checks. Then 120 will be invited to the Johnson Space Center for interviews. The final 14 will be announced in July 2017 and begin two years of extensive training on spacecraft systems, spacewalking skills, team build-

ing and Russian language. Those who complete the program will be assigned to NASA’s Orion deep space exploration ship, the International Space Station or one of two commercial vehicles in development. A manned trip to Mars is two decades in the future, but there is still plenty of work to be done on missions in Earth orbit. It is also good that a movie such as “The Martian” reminds Americans of the need to continue space exploration. Where the imagination goes first, the public support that makes it possible will follow.

Letter policy The Centre County Gazette welcomes letters to the editor and will endeavor to print readers’ letters in a timely manner. Letters should be signed and include the writer’s full address and telephone number so the authenticity of the letter can be confirmed. No letters

will be published anonymously. Letters must be factual and discuss issues rather than personalities. Writers should avoid name-calling. Form letters and automated “canned” email will not be accepted. Generally, letters should be limited to 350 words.

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The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

Health & Wellness

Kinesiology students address health problem areas By MARJORIE S. MILLER Special to the Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK — It’s good in theory: Eat right and exercise for a healthy life. But living in a way conducive to this lifestyle can be a challenge for many, due to limited resources where they live. While there is no single prescription to find a balance, kinesiology students at Penn State have placed action plans into the hands of community leaders throughout Pennsylvania to start bridging the gap.

WHY RESOURCES MATTER

Residents’ access to healthy resources — such as farmers markets and public parks — vary across the state. In turn, so do their health issues and concerns. “It’s important for students to understand that not everyone has the same resources to be active and healthy,” said Melissa Bopp, associate professor of kinesiology. Bopp introduced students to the American Fitness Index, which is managed by the American College of Sports Medicine. The AFI measures the 50 most populous metropolitan areas in the United States and provides scores and rankings reflecting a composite of preventive health behaviors, levels of chronic disease conditions, health care access, and community resources and policies that support physical activity. The report also includes benchmarks for each data indicator to highlight areas that need improvement. Rather than just study the AFI, Bopp challenged students to reach out to cities in Pennsylvania to explore how planning and goal setting can be used to improve the health of residents in their communities.

BRINGING NATIONAL PROJECTS TO THE CLASSROOM

In Bopp’s class, Physical Activity and Public Health, students applied the AFI to Allentown, Scranton, Erie, York, Lancaster, State College and Reading. First, students brainstormed what they wanted to know about the communities,

such as social norms and current health issues. They came up with a question guide and interviewed a “key informant,” a real community leader, in each of the cities. Input from community advocacy leaders added some interesting information to the project, Bopp said. “We had done the AFI project before, but never with the informants,” Bopp said. “I feel like the students had such a greater connection to the community because they talked with these key people.” In order to evaluate communities, students scored multiple variables in the community. They looked at health behaviors, including smoking or being physically active. They also reviewed chronic health problems, such as diabetes. In addition to the population, students evaluated the community, looking at access to facilities — playgrounds or swimming pools, for example — and people’s proximity to parks. They also examined a community’s access to primary care. Once the evaluation was completed, students scored each city, comparing it to the national targets. Then they wrote a letter to the community informant. The letters contained goals, areas of strength and weakness in the city, and a community action guide to be used as a planning tool to improve underachieving areas.

A LOOK AT YORK

In York, for example, students suggested more walking and bike paths to promote physical activity and a public media campaign to promote the benefits of fruits and vegetables. York performed worse than both the state and the nation in percentage of people meeting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s physical activity recommendations, percentage of people eating five or more servings of fruits and vegetables, percentage of people without health insurance and percentage of people classified as obese. York ranked in between the state and country in percentage of people currently smoking, those in poor physical and poor

KEVIN SLIMAN/Penn State University

PENN STATE kinesiology students applied the American Fitness Index guidelines and rankings to small cities in Pennsylvania, looking at health-related behaviors, problems and resources. mental health in the past 30 days, and people with diabetes, according to the project. Finally, York proved to rank higher than both the state and nation in percentage of people participating in no leisure time physical activity, median intake of vegetables and percentage of people in good or excellent health. “The students learned how the environment and surroundings can drive physical activity and behavior,” Bopp said.

A SURPRISING RESULT FOR READING

Katie Dutt, a senior kinesiology major, worked on the project for Reading. What she found surprised her: One of the city’s main goals wasn’t health and fitness, it was getting kids off the street. “I did a lot of collecting the data needed for the AFI, like demographics and number of fitness centers,” Dutt said. “Once our class collected the health markers for each of our cities, we did data comparisons and compared each health marker to two peer cities and determined if our city was better, worse or the same as our peer cities.”

With this, Dutt and her team took the numbers they had for Reading and compared them to the national and Pennsylvania averages. “I also interviewed our key informant, who was a local bike advocate,” Dutt said. “I got to ask him some more personal questions about how he felt the culture of Reading affected their health and wellness.” Dutt said the interview was where she learned the most about the lack of health care and education available for citizens. “I loved interviewing the key informant,” she said. “I was so surprised at what he told me about his goals in the community, which was to get kids off the street and out of trouble. This told me that health and fitness wasn’t the number one priority there; it was reducing crime and poverty. “This project is important because it gives students real case studies to analyze. I feel like what I learned in Melissa’s class about improving infrastructure, health programs and chronic disease, can be applied in other settings.”

Omega-3s may prevent breast cancer in overweight women HERSHEY — Omega-3 fatty acids may lower the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal obese women, according to researchers. The protection likely comes from the fatty acids’ anti-inflammatory effects, said Dr. Andrea Manni, professor and division chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism, Penn State College of Medicine. Obesity is a major breast cancer risk factor in postmenopausal women, and scientists believe increased inflammation is an important underlying cause in this population. “Omega-3 fatty acids have an antiinflammatory effect, so that’s one of the

reasons why we suspected it may be particularly effective in obese women,” Manni said. Some epidemiological data supports the idea that omega-3s protect against breast cancer, but the findings have been inconsistent. Manni suspected that data from normal-weight women obscured the results. Normal-weight women have less inflammation than heavier women, and are therefore less likely to benefit from antiinflammatory omega-3s, he said. To tease apart the effects, Manni’s team, working alongside researchers from Emory University and Colorado State Uni-

versity, looked at the influence of prescription omega-3 supplementation on breast density in different weight women. Breast density is a well-established biomarker for breast cancer risk, and may be an independent risk factor, as well. “The higher the breast density, the more likely the woman will develop breast cancer,” Manni said. The study included 266 healthy postmenopausal women with high breast density detected by routine mammograms. The women either received no treatment, the antiestrogen drug Raloxifene, the prescription omega-3 drug Lovaza or a combination of the two drugs.

At the conclusion of the two-year study, the researchers found that increasing levels of omega-3 in the blood were associated with reduced breast density — but only in women with a body mass index above 29, bordering on obesity. Although Lovaza contains both of the fatty acids DHA (375 milligrams) and EPA (465 milligrams), only DHA blood levels were associated with breast density reduction. The researchers plan to test the effect of DHA alone in obese subjects, potentially in combination with weight loss, in a future trial. Omega-3, Page 9

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The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

Tewksbury promoted to chief financial officer of Mount Nittany Health STATE COLLEGE — Mount Nittany Health recently announced the promotion of Randy Tewksbury as senior vice president and chief financial officer of the health system. Joining Mount Nittany Health in July 2015 as vice president of finance, Tewksbury previously served for 20 years in finance administration roles at Geisinger Lewistown Hospital, including controller and vice president for finance/chief financial officer. “We are truly fortunate to have someone of Randy’s caliber as an integral part of the Mount Nittany Health family,” said Steve Brown, president and CEO. “Randy brings more than 35 years of financial service in progressively responsible managerial positions, and has extensive experience in all aspects of health care financial management.” Tewksbury received a master’s degree in business administration with a concentration in health care ad-

Breast cancer support group to meet

RANDY TEWKSBURY

ministration from Marywood University in Scranton and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove. In addition, Tewksbury is certified as a Fellow of the Healthcare Financial Management Association, and is an active board member of the Lewistown Rotary Club. He and his wife, Lorraine, have two grown children, Ryan and Megan. In his free time, he enjoys travel, history, volunteering and spending time

with family. Tewksbury’s promotion comes following the retirement of Richard Wisniewski, who served Mount Nittany Health for 13 years.

STATE COLLEGE — A breast cancer support group will meet from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Monday, March 7, in the ground floor conference rooms at the Mount Nittany Medical Center, 1800 E. Park Ave., in State College.

The support group is for patients newly diagnosed with, recovering from or survivors of breast cancer. For more information, contact Angelique Cygan at angelique.cygan@ mountnittany.org or call (814) 2316870.

PaGe 9 Omega-3, from page 8 “The finding supports the idea that omega-3s, and specifically DHA, are preferentially protective in obese postmenopausal women,” Manni said. “This represents an example of a personalized approach to breast cancer prevention.” These findings may help to support future research looking at the direct effect of omega-3 supplementation on breast cancer incidence in obese women. Manni added that, with obesity-related cancers on the rise, the findings could have implications beyond breast cancer. The researchers also made a secondary discovery. Lovaza is an omega-3 drug FDA-approved for the treatment of severe high triglycerides at the dose of 4 milligrams daily. In the current study, the combination of Lovaza and a half recommended dose of Raloxifene at 30 milligrams, was superior to the individual treatments in reducing triglycerides and LDL — “bad” — cholesterol and increasing HDL — “good” — cholesterol. Other investigators on this project were Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center’s Narinder Sandhu and Carina Signori, Department of Medicine; Susann E. Schetter, Department of Radiology; Jason Liao and Ana Calcagnotto, Department of Public Health Sciences; John P. Richie, Bogdan Prokopczyk and Neil Trushin, Department of Pharmacology; Cynthia DuBrock, Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute; Christopher Hamilton and Laurence M. Demers, Department of Pathology; and Cesar Aliaga and Karam El-Bayoumy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; as well as Terryl J. Hartman of Emory University and John McGinley and Henry J. Thompson of Colorado State University. Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute funded this research. GlaxoSmith Kline and Eli Lilly supplied Lovaza and Raloxifene, respectively.

Bob: Former Penn State Defensive Tackle and passionate perennial gardener

Make sure to check out our Family Matters feature that runs the second week of every month in The Centre County Gazette!

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Education

Page 10

March 3-9, 2016

Group makes the magic of parks come to life By LAUREN BLUM Special to the Gazette

UNIVERSITY PARK — Penn State’s Theme Park Engineering Group, which focuses on industry-related engineering design projects and hands-on park visits, takes every opportunity for a good adrenaline rush. “Think about that feeling when your stomach is about to drop out, that flash when the stage lights come on, that moment of horror when you are about to get scared in the haunted house,” Manny Esteves, a senior in mechanical engineering, said. “We are the group of kids that live to make that happen.” Esteves, the club’s current president, leads the organization to provide students with theme-park industry networking opportunities, engineering and design projects, and discussions with people who share similar interests. Though the club is focused on engineering, more than 50 students from across a variety of majors come together for the weekly meetings, projects, discussions, tours and events that the group participates in throughout the year. They continue to grow as they accept new members year-round. Esteves said one of the most inspiring and exciting parts of being involved is touring theme parks and Broadway shows where they can see how the projects they are working on at Penn State translate into real-world operations. Over the past year, the group visited Busch Gardens, in Williamsburg, Va.,

where they completed a walking tour of the park and had a behind-the-scenes look at how the rides operate and create the “magic” for their customers. Last semester, the group met with Tait Towers, a stage technologies company based out of Los Angeles that designs sets for Disney and Universal Studios, as well as concert stages for artists such as Beyoncé, Katy Perry and Bruno Mars. During the spring 2015 semester, the club traveled to New York City to see Disney’s “Aladdin” on Broadway and get a behind-the-scenes look at how the production is put on multiple times a week for thousands of audience members. They toured the backstage area, received a brief history of the theater’s past performances, viewed special effects on the stage, and tried on props and costumes, including the trident from “The Little Mermaid.” “As a leader, it is so cool to take members to their first Broadway show and see how their faces light up for live theater,” Esteves said. “We get to share these new experiences, build a good community and make friends for a lifetime while we are at it.” While in New York, the group toured Coney Island in Brooklyn, where they explored the mechanics of one of the country’s most historic roller coasters, the Cyclone. When they are not touring parks and shows, the club works on various projects on campus, such as creating special effects for the Forensic Science Club’s haunted cottages during Halloween and designing

Submitted photo

PENN STATE’S Theme Park Engineering Group spends time researching lighting and other systems. a theme park model for teaching children science during Science-U summer camps at University Park. Esteves said he values the experiences, internships and connections he has had because of the group, and he is proud of the members for the passion they put into it.

“When you walk into a room and see every seat is taken at a meeting, it kind of lights you up a little,” he said. As of April 2014, the Penn State Theme Park Engineering Group has been recognized as an official university club of the Themed Entertainment Association.

St. Joe’s collects food for State College Food Bank STATE COLLEGE — The state’s budget stalemate has left food banks across the state short on funds. “Food banks throughout Pennsylvania are suffering,” said Carol Pioli, executive director of the State College Food Bank. “Some of us haven’t received the funding we rely on to help those in need in our communities.” Students at St. Joseph’s Catholic Academy in Boalsburg saw an opportunity to help. Led by the school’s Service Club, students, parents, faculty and staff worked together to collect enough items to help restock the shelves of the food bank following its busy holiday season. The donation drive brought in more than 500 items to

help local individuals and families in need. “The donation from St. Joe’s came at a critical time,” said Pioli. “Donations are important year-round, but especially after the holiday season. People are very generous in December, but that can make January tough. As the holiday spirit dwindles, so do donations.” “We knew that supplies at the food bank would be low after the holidays,” said SJCA student Jordan Wiser. “We rallied around ‘service’ — one of our four pillars — and thanks to tremendous generosity, we collected a lot of items on the ‘greatest need list’ we received from the food bank. It was a perfect opportunity to come together as a school to serve our community.”

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Submitted photo

STUDENTS IN the Service Club at St. Joseph’s Catholic Academy package their donations for the State College Food Bank.

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TEMPERATURES IN the teens didn’t stop Penn State senior Marie Passuello as she posed for some cap-and-gown photos outside Old Main recently. Passuello will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture in December, but took care of some photo necessities now because she is planning to spend the fall studying abroad in Germany.


March 3-9, 2016

Community

Page 11

Small changes can make a big difference By JANE MIENTKIEWICZ correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — Small changes can make all the difference when it comes to nutrition. “We’re each given this body to do the best we can with in the life that we’re given,” said Kym Burke, co-owner of One on One Fitness Consultants Inc. “If I want to go out every day and make a difference, I better make sure that I fuel my body properly to do so.” Burke, along with her husband, Bruce, runs One on One and co-founded the Nutrition Habit Challenge. March is National Nutrition Month, and in celebration, the challenge participants choose manageable nutritional behaviors to add or change for the month and track their progress. The focus of the challenge, and at Oneon-One, is the “less is more” approach. “Most people, they bite off more than they can chew when it comes to nutrition behavior change; they just try to do too much,” said Burke. “This isn’t an elimination diet. It’s not just about cutting things out of your diet, it’s more about focusing on doing all the right things and then you probably won’t have room for the wrong things.” Many challenge participants focus on consuming the proper amount of water or meeting fruit and vegetable requirements each day. Participants who are successful with their personalized goal for 25 days of the month of February are entered into a drawing for a trip for four to Disney World. The challenge is in its third year of being open to the public and has grown from 720 to almost 9,000 participants. The event raised $10,000 for charities in its first year.

“It is truly heartwarming to hear how this event is positively impacting individuals, their families and, ultimately, our community,” said Burke. The Burkes also give back to Centre Volunteers in Medicine and the Youth Service Bureau through donations in lieu of payments that have amounted to more than $247,000 since 2009. “Besides doing the right thing for the community — because it encourages people to lead healthier lives — it also benefits the clinic,” said Cheryl White, executive director at CVIM. White has had personal success with her involvement in the challenge, which began with her cutting out Diet Coke and led to her taking up running. “It worked really well for me, just to show me that I have the power to change myself and be better,” said White. Many of the employees of CVIM participate in the challenge and patients are also encouraged to become involved in the event. “I believe in the theory of taking small steps to making changes in your health,” said White. That personal responsibility of good nutrition is even available for those who rely on outside sources for their food. Food banks are required to provide a certain number of foods in each food group, said Nicole Summers, executive director at Faith Centre, a food bank in Bellefonte. Its stock can vary in size and content depending on the time of year and what is donated, but the food bank makes an effort to bring in fresh produce whenever possible. This focus usually occurs in summer because general donations decrease in the warmer months, said Summers. “Everybody thinks about food banks in November and December,” she said.

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ONE ON ONE FITNESS in State College is one of several workout facilities that offer group activities. The food bank relies on donations from the state food bank and the federal government, as well as independent donations and fundraising. Summers encouraged the donation of homegrown or abundant fresh produce to the food banks. “We’re constantly looking for ways to supplement,” she said. The Bellefonte food bank is one of seven in Centre County. Faith Centre has offered a variety of cooking classes in an attempt to teach the importance of good nutrition and ways to cook healthier. The food bank has partnered with the YMCA for a Dining With Diabetes class and with Penn State Nutri-

tion Links, a program where students went to Bellefonte to give out food samples and recipe cards. “I do understand that healthy foods are expensive,” Summers said. “The biggest piece of advice I would give to people is cook for yourself.” Summers also suggested conscious shopping to improve nutrition. “The best thing to do for yourself is to shop the outlining areas of the grocery shop where it’s not processed,” she said. “Then, take the time to actually cook. “I think it’s also a good family activity. Get people together. Couples cook together. Families cook together. Venture into the kitchen.”

Eating right: March is National Nutrition Month CONNIE COUSINS

Connie Cousins covers a wide variety of events in Centre County for the Centre County Gazette. Email her at ccous67@gmail. com.

With March as National Nutrition Month, I faced the dilemma of choosing a topic that would hold people’s interest. Nutrition does not have to be boring, however. This year’s National Nutrition Month theme is “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right.” I asked Tammy McCormick, with the Mount Nittany Physician Group, for some advice on nutrition. McCormick is a registered dietitian, a food and nutrition expert who has met all the academic and professional requirements to qualify for the credential. She also is a certified diabetes educator and a licensed dietitian/nutritionist. Her advice included the following tips: ■ Eat breakfast and make sure to include a lean source of protein. ■ Make half your plate fruits and vegetables. These add flavor, color, vitamins, minerals and fiber to your plate. You can include fresh, frozen or

canned. ■ Read your food labels. Know what to look for on the food label to help you make the best choices at the grocery store. (Check out www.eatright.org or www.kidseatright. org for more information.) Limit sodium and saturated fat. ■ Watch your portions, measuring to see how close you are to the actual portion sizes. Visit www.choosemyplate. gov for assistance with your choices. Half of your plate should be fruits and vegetables, a quarter should be a whole grain and a quarter should be a lean protein ■ Focus on moderation — anything can be eaten in moderation. ■ Avoid sugary drinks — they can pack on the pounds as they have a lot of empty calories. ■ Choose low-fat dairy products and added fats. ■ Be active. The recommended amount of exercise is 60 minutes daily for children and two and a half hours a week for adults. If you normally do not exercise and are able, start with a 10-minute walk after dinner. ■ Plan to eat a meal as a family a few times a week. (All electronic devices and the TV should be turned off at this time.) Get the kids involved in planning and cooking this meal and use it as a time to teach good eating habits. ■ If you eat out a lot, cut back and aim to make more meals at home. ■ Drink lots of water. Remember, our bodies are 55 to 60 percent water. A call to register dietitian Meagan Kronenwetter also was instructive regarding good nutrition. Kronenwetter

Jupiterimages

HAVING A variety of vegetables with every meal is a good way to keep your family’s diet healthy. has been a dietitian since 2014 and works at Penn State in Culinary Support Services, and also at Centre Volunteers in Medicine as a volunteer dietitian. A common misconceptions, Kronenwetter said, is that food that is good for you has to be boring. “You can do so much with the addition of spices to enhance flavors,” she said. “Healthy eating is all about eating in moderation and balancing your foods.” Asked about health problems and diets, Kronenwetter said that obesity is the biggest one and a sedentary lifestyle multiplies the harm. She urged the importance of exercise in improving overall health. Even small changes in diet and exercise can improve energy, sleep and mental attitude. Regarding her job at Penn State, Kronenwetter explained, “There are five dining rooms and we set up displays of what at balanced plate would look like, for example. As the students pass through, I am able to interact with them and do some nutrition teaching.” About halfway into writing this article, I spied The New York Times’ article “The Case for Breakfast” in the Feb. 24 Food section. Sam Sifton, a former restaurant critic for the newspa-

per, wrote the article, in which he argues his case for the beauty of breakfast. Because he worked nights and knew the importance of eating together as a family, he regretted not cooking dinner more often. So, he began to cook breakfast instead. For students, the data is clear: Eating a healthy breakfast leads to improved cognition and memory, helps reduce absenteeism and generally improves mood. According to Sifton’s article, a 2008 study in the journal Pediatrics found that “teenagers who ate breakfast regularly had a lower body-mass index than those who did not.” The same may be true of adults. There are other advantages to cooking breakfast, as opposed to dinner. One reason is that it is easier. Secondly, it is cheaper. According to Sifton, if you prepare a little ahead of time, or rise a few minutes earlier, you may feel the satisfaction of seeing a pile of toast and jam, bowls of yogurt with granola and fresh-cut fruit. “A skillet of scrambled eggs or a few toaster-ready pancakes take only a few minutes to prepare and your family, even if they can’t sit down together, will be receiving good nutrition and a start to their day.”


Page 12

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

Concert to feature ‘Golden Age of Bands’ music By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — The Bellefonte Community Band, a group of more than 50 volunteer musicians of all ages from Bellefonte and the surrounding communities, will present a concert saluting the “Golden Age of Bands” at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 13, in the Esber Recital Hall on the Penn State campus. The concert is free and the public is invited to attend. Band director Joshua Long is completing a master’s degree program in music conducting, which requires him to lead a recital in which his conducting abilities will be graded by a team of Penn State’s music department professors. Long said these recitals are typically performed by Penn State student musicians, but he chose to use the Bellefonte band instead. He also chose the “Golden Age” theme since it meshes well with research he is conducting on American community bands. Long holds a bachelor’s degree in music education from Penn State, where he played the euphonium in the Blue Band. He earned a performance degree in euphonium from the University of Hartford, and is currently also pursuing a doctorate degree at Penn State. The Golden Age of Bands in America extended from the postCivil War era into the early 20th century. It evolved from the numerous military bands that were popular during the war. “What

you had was mostly military bands in the beginning, and then the military guys came home, and they wanted to continue to play, so they created community bands,” said Long. From the late 1800s to the early 1900s, professional bands, such as the famed Patrick Gilmore and John Philip Sousa bands, toured all over the United States, and many towns across the country had their own amateur community bands. By the 1920s, as other attractions and entertainment developed, the popularity of the bands diminished and the “Golden Age” of professional bands came to a close. The Bellefonte Community Band concert program consists of music from that era, all composed more than 100 years ago. Among the compositions to be performed are the “Poet and Peasant Overture” by Franz Von Suppe; “Old Folks At Home,” with variations in the musical styles of five different countries; “Under the Polar Star,” a movement from Sousa’s suite “Looking Upward”; the triumphant “March From Tannhauser” by Richard Wagner; the “American Patrol” march by F. W. Meacham; and several others. A special feature of the concert is “Fantaisie Original,” a band-accompanied solo by band member and euphonium player Leigh Hurtz, who will perform the song on a vintage double-bell euphonium owned by Long. The double bell euphonium is an instrument based on the euphonium. The larger bell pro-

SAM STITZER/For the Gazette

JOSHUA LONG directs the Bellefonte Community Band in rehearsal for their upcoming “Golden Age of Bands” concert, set for March 13 at Esber Recital Hall. duces the mellow tone of a standard euphonium, and the second, smaller bell has a brighter tone similar to a trombone. The last valve on the horn (either the fourth or the fifth, depending upon the model) is used to switch the sound from the main bell to the secondary bell. Both bells cannot play at the same time because each bell has its own tuning slide loop. The double-bell euphonium

was mass produced starting in the 1880s, initially by the C.G. Conn Co. in the United States. Peak production of the instrument was from about the 1890s into the 1920s, although it was never one of the more popular brass instruments. Sousa’s and other bands all featured doublebell euphoniums in the early 1900s. By the 1940s, the instrument had disappeared from nearly all American bands.

Long found his 1936 vintage double-bell euphonium about four years ago intact, but needing cleaning and repair, and he restored it to playing condition. “Fantaisie Original” was written by Italian composer Giovanni Picchi nearly 400 years ago. It was virtually forgotten until it was revived and arranged by Simone Mantia, a soloist with the Sousa band, and published in 1908.

Used book sale planned Jersey Mike’s will donate to Four Diamonds Fund PHILIPSBURG — Friends of the Library will be holding a used book sale from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 5, in the basement of the Holt Memorial Library, 17 N. Front St. in Philipsburg. The sale will be held every month on the first Saturday of the month through May. Proceeds benefit the library.

Fire company hosting BBQs BELLEFONTE — Logan Fire Company No. 1, 120 E. Howard St. in Bellefonte, will host five chicken barbecues this year. Each will begin 10 a.m. on the following Saturdays: March 5, April 2, June 4, Aug. 6 and Sept. 3. A full meal is $8 and a half chicken is $6.

STATE COLLEGE — The Four Diamonds Fund is joining forces with three Jersey Mike’s Subs restaurants in State College and Lewisburg for the sixth annual “Month of Giving” fundraising campaign. During the month of March, customers can make a donation to Four Diamonds Fund at any of the three Jersey Mike’s restaurants. The campaign will culminate in Jersey Mike’s “Day of Giving” on Wednesday, March 30, when local Jersey Mike’s restaurants will donate 100 percent of the day’s sales — every single dollar that comes in — to Four Diamonds Fund. Throughout the country, on Day of Giving, Jersey Mike’s locations will donate 100 percent of sales to more than 180 different charities including hospitals, youth organizations, food banks and more.

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“I would like to extend a personal invitation to you and your family to visit Jersey Mike’s Subs throughout the month of March, and especially on Day of Giving when 100 percent of sales — every penny — goes to help a great local cause,” said Peter Cancro, Jersey Mike’s founder and CEO, who started the company when he was only 17 years old. Last year’s Month of Giving campaign raised more than $3 million for 150 different charities nationwide. Since 2010, Jersey Mike’s locations throughout the country have raised nearly $14 million for worthy local charities and distributed more than 1.5 million free sub sandwiches to help numerous causes. For more information, visit www.jerseymikes.com/ mog.

The 4th Annual Pot O’ Gold Online Auction to benefit St. John Catholic School opens Monday, March 7 at 8:00 a.m. and you don’t want to miss out! Art, Dining, Travel, Memorabilia, Tickets for events and activities across Pennsylvania and SO MUCH MORE! Log on, register and get ready to BID! Thank you to our Corporate Sponsors and Donors: Art Alliance of Central Pa Barnes & Noble Bellefonte Elks Lodge 1094 Bellefonte Lanes Bellefonte Sports Academy @ the Rink Bellefonte.com Best Western Plus University Park Carnegie Science Center Carnicella and Associates Clean Sweep Professional Cleaning Services Community Arts Center Williamsport Converge Solutions for Accounting, Payroll and Taxes Corner Cafe & Grill Country Inn & Suites By Carlson

Daniel Vaughn Designs DelGrosso’s Amusement Park Discovery Space Children’s Science Museum East Coast Health and Fitness Fullington Tours Fun Unleashed Gio’s Hair Design Grandville Hollow Pottery HappyValley.com Harrisburg Senators HealthSouth Hotel State College & Co. Jane’s Bed & Biscuit Kennedy Dance Centre Lake Tobias Wildlife Park Loaded Creative Lyons Kennels M&M Copy Service Manning Photography Memories by JT Photography Mike’s Video, TV & Appliance

Mount Nittany Vineyard and Winery Northland Bowl Northwest Savings Bank Penn Skates Pittsburgh Pirates Pittsburgh Superstars All Star Cheerleading Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium Pizza Mia Plaza Centre Antiques Plumb’s Drug Store Pollick Consulting, LLC Primanti Bros. Provan Enterprises Pure Imagination Ramada Conference & Golf Hotel Red Horse Tavern Red Line Speed Shine Car Wash Senator Jake Corman Seven Mountains Wine Cellars

Skyzone Trampoline Park Snap-on Tools Soothing Hands Massage and Day Spa Services State College Spikes State Farm Insurance (Cindy Evicic) Stella & Dot (Bethany Underwood) TC Transport, Inc. Texas Roadhouse The Queen Bed & Breakfast The State Theatre Triangle Building Supply Twisted Scissor DeZigns Velvet Salon Village Eatinghouse Whitetail Resort Wireless Made Simple YMCA of Centre County Younique (Stephanie Culley) St. John Families and Friends …And MORE!’

Auction Opens Monday, March 7 at 8:00 a.m. and ends on Monday, March 14 at 10:00 p.m. Income Restrictions Apply

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MarCh 3-9, 2016

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 13

Blacksmiths produced most Colonial era light fixtures By ROSE STEMLER Special to the Gazette

When you think of Colonial era lighting, it’s hard not to visualize creamy white candles in gleaming brass or silver candlesticks. While the image holds true for wealthy homes, most early settlers of our country had to make do with less expensive kinds of lighting. Instead of the silversmith, it was the village blacksmith who provided the craftsmanship. Many lighting devices in the 1700s were very simple and primitive in nature, usually constructed of hand-wrought iron with wooden bases or, in the case of hanging fixtures, fashioned of hand-wrought iron only. Adjustable floor candle stands were an important part of everyday living. Among the earliest were splint and rush holders. These devices held wood splints or rush, dried and coated with melted tallow, which burned best in a horizontal position or at a slight upward slope. At a later date, counterweighted jaws were added to hold the splints in a more secure manner. A variation was the rush and candle holder, which incorporated a candle socket with the rush holder so it could be used either way. Some blacksmiths embellished their ironwork with twisted stems and decorated counterweights. There were many forms of basic candleholders and quite a few were unique in their design, depending on the whims and workmanship of the blacksmith. Here’s an old custom based on the spiral, or courting candle: It was used by parents to set boundaries for their daughter when a suitor came to call. The father would light the candle in a sitting room where the couple were courting. When the candle burned down to the metal at the top of the holder, it was time for the suitor to leave promptly. If the father felt comfortable with the young man, he could change the height on the candle holder to allow them more time for their visit. On the other hand, he might immediately snuff out the candle if he deemed it necessary. The courting candle served as a quiet, yet firm, reminder when time was up. All economic levels used this method for courting. It taught children to respect their parents’ judgment.

Pendant or hanging candle holders were also popular and they varied in design and use. A basic type was the loom light. This was hung from a horizontal iron rod fastened to the front of the loom to provide the weaver with needed illumination. Sometimes, pendant candle holders were held by a hand-wrought spike that was merely hammered into the heavy beams of the ceiling. Another form of early lighting was the grease, fat or oil lamp, often called a Betty lamp. Heavy oils or grease would be heated and poured into the reservoir of the lamp. The wick was simply laid against the edge of the pan. Lighter oils would tend to overfeed and drip, becoming very messy. Numerous forms of saucers or drip catchers were located beneath the lamp to solve this problem. These lamps were usually canted to supply the proper amount of fuel, while a pivot or swivel suspension kept them level enough to guard against dripping and spillage. They came in single wick and multiple wick styles, depending on how much light was needed. Iron lighting ran the gamut. Some fixtures were very crude or plain in design and others were more ornate and fanciful. Take, for example, this two-candle light suspended on a twisted pendant. Behind each candle socket there is a stamped-out iron bird; they face each other, their original yellow paint still showing after 200 years. These early lights were just one phase of antique lighting. Not surprisingly, the handiwork used to create them has mostly disappeared. There are some talented blacksmiths who craft reproductions today, but in general this is a lost art. 18th century iron lighting devices are a rarity in today’s antique market; most examples are either in museums or in private collections. Do you own any of these wonderful pieces? If you do, you know that the workmanship is superb and you are helping to preserve history.

Submitted photo

EARLY AMERICAN lighting featured different types of candle stands and holders, which were made from a variety of materials.

Rose Stemler and her husband, Bob, have been collecting and selling antiques for more than 30 years. Their business, Stemlers’ Antique Shoppe, is part of Apple Hill Antiques in State College. During the month of March, pieces from their collection of early lighting devices will be featured in the exhibition case at Apple Hill Antiques.

Centre Gives registration deadline nears STATE COLLEGE — The deadline for local nonprofit organizations to register for Centre Gives is quickly approaching. “All 2016 applications to participate in Centre Gives are due by Friday, March 4,” said Molly Kunkel, Centre Foundation’s executive director. “We’ve already registered over 65 organizations and expect many more to register in the next few days.” Centre Foundation is encouraging qualified nonprofit organizations serving Centre County to register at www. centregives.org for its annual online giving program. This 36-hour community-wide giving event will begin at 6 a.m. Tuesday, May 3. Since Centre Gives began in 2012, the number of participating organizations has risen from 74 to more than 100. Organizations with missions in all interest areas, including education, environment, animals, the arts and health and social services, participate. Last year, nearly 5,000 gifts were made during the online event’s 36 hours.

CATA to adjust schedule STATE COLLEGE — During Penn State’s spring semester break, CATABUS and CATARIDE services will operate on a reduced service schedule, Saturday, March 5, through Saturday, March 12. The White Loop and Green Link will not operate during this time. Regular full service will resume Sunday, March 13. For more information, visit www.catabus.com or call (814) 238-CATA.

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“Over the lifetime of the program, community donations and Centre Foundation’s stretch pool dollars and prize money have invested a combined total of nearly $3 million back into the Centre County community,” said Kunkel. Participating organizations are also encouraged to attend the Centre Gives Success Series, which will be held this month. Sessions will cover storytelling, social media, fundraising strategies, engaging stakeholders, a four-week action plan and donor appreciation tactics. “These are skills that organizations can use during the 36 hours of Centre Gives, but also 365 days a year as best practices,” said Kunkel. More information about the sessions, dates and registration, visit www.centregives.org/resources. For more information about Centre Gives, contact Tracy Carey, grants and scholarship coordinator, at tracy@ centre-foundation.org or (814) 237-6229.

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Page 14

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

Author Karen Abbott to visit State College

Submitted photo

BB&T BANK recently presented a check to Economics Pennsylvania. Pictured, from left, are BB&T market president Michael Petrine, BB&T treasury management specialist Jami Tomczuk, Economics Pennsylvania president and CEO Fritz M. Heinemann and BB&T commerical lenders Tara Shaffer and Ryan Manotti.

Local bank branch donates to economics education group By SAM STITZER pennsvalley@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — Utilizing the benefits of the state Educational Improvement Tax Credit Act program, BB&T Bank made a $4,000 contribution to Economics Pennsylvania, a nonprofit economic education and financial literacy organization serving school districts, teachers and students in grades kindergarten through 12. Presentation of the donation was made by employees from the BB&T State College office. “We’re proud of our financial partnership with charitable organizations such as Economics Pennsylvania, and view our donation as another way in which we contribute to the vibrancy of our community,” said Michael Petrine,

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BB&T State College market president. Founded in 1950, the mission of Economics Pennsylvania is to ensure that every young person in the state understands essential economic and financial literacy concepts, benefits by using economic ways of thinking and problemsolving skills, and has a continuous understanding of the nature and structure of the global economy and its relationship to individual liberty and freedom. The organization also advocates for comprehensive school-based economic and personal finance education at all grade levels. Locally, Economics Pennsylvania sponsors the Entrepreneurship Challenge and Stock Market Game competitions, in which many high school students from Centre County and the surrounding area participate annually.

Welcome Club to meet STATE COLLEGE — The Women’s Welcome Club will hold a general meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 9, at the Oakwood Presbyterian Church, 1865 Waddle Road in State College. For more information, email wwcmembership@gmail. com.

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STATE COLLEGE — Centre County Reads will present “An Evening with Karen Abbott” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 16, in the John Bill Freeman Auditorium of Penn State’s HUBRobeson Center. The event is free and open to the public. It is the culmination of the 2016 Centre County Reads program, which brought the community together to read, discuss and explore Abbott’s book, “Liar, Temptress, SolKAREN ABBOTT dier, Spy: Four Women Undercover in the Civil War.” “An Evening with Karen Abbott” is ideal for readers interested in Civil War history, women’s stories and tales of espionage. Abbott’s visit, moderated by WPSU’s Patty Satalia, will include questions from the audience and will be followed by a book signing. Copies of Abbott’s books will be available for purchase. Abbott is the award-winning author of two other books: the New York Times bestseller “Sin in the Second City” and “American Rose.” “Liar, Temptress, Soldier, Spy” is her third book, and tells the true story of four American women who risked their lives to support the war effort during the Civil War. Copies are available at all Centre County libraries and the Bookmobile. Throughout March, Centre County Reads will continue to host book discussion groups, a Civil War round table and a secret writing contest. For more information, visit www.centrecountyreads. org.

Bellefonte church celebrates anniversary By JEN FABIANO correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

BELLEFONTE — The Watermarke Church in Bellefonte will celebrate its 10th anniversary during its 10 a.m. worship service on Sunday, April 3, at the Bellefonte Middle School’s auditorium. The church, started in 2006 as a small group led by Jeff Steppe, has grown to 200 members. Steppe relocated to another ministry in Maryland in 2012 and Pastor Tim Yates took over in 2013. Steppe and his family will visit the church during the anniversary celebration, and he will present a special sermon. Following the service, a lunch will take place in the school’s cafeteria. The church will provide the main meal and those attending are welcome to contribute to the lunch. According to the its website, Watermarke Church is a “simple approach to the Christian faith.” Yates emphasized that the main focus of the church is too provide a community to share one’s faith. The church invites those who have come and gone to return to the church and join the celebration. “We want people to come as they are and celebrate together,” said Yates. For more information, visit www.watermarkechurch. org.

Egg hunt scheduled CENTRE HALL — The Centre Hall Lions Club will host an egg hunt at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 19. The event is open to toddlers through sixth graders. Prizes and snacks will be provided.

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March 3-9, 2016

The Centre County Gazette

Page 15

State Day of Service connects students with projects PENN STATE students prepared meals for Stop Hunger Now on Feb. 27 as part of the State Day of Service in the HUB-Robeson Center. Students filled, weighed and packaged a mix of rice, soy powder, dried vegetables, vitamins and minerals that could make six meals per bag and will be shipped internationally when needs arise.

UNIVERSITY PARK — Penn State and State College got a boost Feb. 27 thanks to 449 students who volunteered as part of the State Day of Service. The Council of LionHearts mobilized students to give their time and talents at 21 locations during the event’s sixth year. Students lent a hand to nonprofits such as Stop Hunger Now, CentrePeace, Schlow Centre Region Library and Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania. Students from the Interfraternity and Panhellenic councils also cleaned up litter in downtown State College as part of State Sweep on Feb. 28. “State Day of Service is one of our most impactful day of service events,” said Matt Barone, assistant director for service and leadership in student activities. “The student volunteers who give their day to service are role models on our campus and understand the importance of giving back to their community. This year, the event featured projects that will have an immediate impact on our local community, and with the help of Stop Hunger Now, we are packaging meals that will go to people in need all over the world.” Established in 2004, the Council of LionHearts is comprised of student representatives from Penn State’s most active volunteer and community service student organizations. For State Day of Service, the Council of LionHearts partners with Student Activities, the Interfraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council and State College Borough to create service opportunities for students and community members.

BILL ZIMMERMAN/Penn State University

Elections the focus of NPR correspondent’s lecture UNIVERSITY PARK — An author and NPR contributor who has been called one of the 50 most influential people in American media will present a free lecture titled “The Elections, the Media and the Donald: How We Missed the Story” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 16, at Penn State’s University Park campus. David Folkenflik, the media correspondent for NPR News, will visit campus to present the Oweida Lecture in Journalism Ethics in Kern Auditorium. Based in New York City, Folkenflik’s stories and analyses are broadcast on the network’s newsmagazines, such as “All Things Considered,” “Morning Edition” and “Here & Now,” and are featured on NPR’s website and mobile platforms. Folkenflik’s reports cast light on timely stories, the figures who shape journalism and the tectonic shifts affecting the news industry. A four-time winner of the Arthur Rowse Award for Press

Criticism from the National Press Club, Folkenflik has received numerous other recognitions, including the inaugural Mongerson Award for Investigative Reporting on the News and top honors from the National Headliners Club and the Society of Professional Journalists. Business Insider has called Folkenflik one of the 50 most influential people in American media. Folkenflik is the author of “MurDAVID doch’s World: The Last of the Old FOLKENFLIK Media Empires.” He is also editor of “Page One: Inside The New York Times and the Future of Journalism.” His work has appeared in such publications as The Washington Post,

Politico, Newsweek International, the National Post of Canada and the Australian Financial Review. He often appears as a media analyst for television and radio programs in the U.S., the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and Ireland. Folkenflik joined NPR in 2004 after more than a decade at The Baltimore Sun, where he covered higher education, national politics and the media. He started his professional career at the Durham (N.C.) Herald-Sun. Folkenflik served as editor-in-chief at the Cornell Daily Sun and graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in history. He was the first Irik Sevin Visiting Fellow at Cornell and speaks frequently across the country. The Dr. N.N. Oweida Lecture in Journalism Ethics is supported by an endowment from Margaret L. Oweida in memory of her husband, the late Dr. N.N. Oweida, a surgeon from New Kensington.

Oasis Conference offers hope to survivors of sexual abuse STATE COLLEGE — On Saturday, April 23, State College Alliance Church, 1221 W. Whitehall Road, will host its third annual Oasis Conference. The event will bring sexual abuse and assault survivors, family members and local church leaders together to listen and learn from three nationally known experts in the areas of sexual abuse, abuse by clergy and sex trafficking. “If we’ve learned anything in these last few years, it’s that sexual abuse survivors suffer in silence, often for years,” says Susan Margolis, co-chair of the conference. “Oasis is designed to give survivors just that — an oasis of support, validation and healing.” The one-day conference will include talks and workshop sessions with three guests who each bring a unique perspective to the event:

Fueling station now open STATE COLLEGE — Clean Energy has opened a compressed natural gas fueling station at 100 Transfer Road in College Township. The fueling station is located on the south side of College Avenue, in between the Nittany Mall and SCI Rockview. For more information, visit www.cleanenergyfuels.com or call (412) 402-8830.

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PaGe 16

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

MarCh 3-9, 2016

Little Lions top Mountain Lions to capture D-6 title By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

CRESSON — Turn up the heat. That was the decision of the State College boys’ basketball team at halftime of its District 6 AAAA final game against Altoona on Feb. 27 at Mount Aloysius College. After splitting two games with the Mountain Lions this season, the Little Lions found themselves with a slim, one-point halftime lead. For State College it was decision time: to play it safe and have a down-to-the-wire finish, or take the risk and go all in. All in it was. The Little Lions unleashed an all-out, full-court press to begin the third quarter aimed at unnerving Altoona and getting it off its game. The press did more than that. It set State College off on a 15-6 run that propelled it to a 67-54 victory, the D-6 championship and a place in the 2016 PIAA Tournament. Ahead 24-23 as the third period began, the Lions made four quick steals, converting each one to easy baskets, and jumped out to a 32-23 lead before 90 seconds had ticked off the clock. Sophomore Drew Friberg scored three of the baskets and Brandon Clark the other, as SC seized the momentum in the game. As the quarter progressed, Tommy Sekunda and Cooper Gulley got into the action, and by the time Sekunda nailed a 3-pointer as time expired in the quarter, SC was ahead 45-32 and on its way. Backed against a wall, the Mountain Lions did put up 22 points in the fourth quarter, but Friberg, Sekunda and their teammates matched Altoona basket for basket to seal the victory. “Coach (Joe Walker) told us in the locker room to pick up the pressure,” Friberg said. “He said that’s where we were going to win the game, on the defensive end.

Submitted photo

THE STATE COLLEGE Area High School boys’ basketball team won the District 6 Class AAAA title with a 67-54 win over Altoona on Feb. 27. “We did get a lot of guys who were coming in and picking up the pressure, and that was great for us. That third quarter was really big for us.” The first very physical two quarters gave no indication that either team would be able to separate in this game. State College did break out 10-2, but Altoona evened things at 14-14 early in the second quarter. Altoona went ahead briefly in the latter stages of the half, but Friberg, who led all scorers in the game with 23 points, connected on a jump shot as the quarter ended to put SC up, 24-23. “We as a team, guys running in and out, played really hard,”

PHOTOS BY TIM WEIGHT

Walker said, “and that’s what happened in that third quarter with the run. We have the athletes to do it; sometimes we just go in spurts and that was huge. It put us over the double-digit mark, getting easy layups. “We wanted our defense to be our offense. We wanted to pressure them, in the third quarter especially. We wanted to get the pace a little higher, and we were able to do that.” State College’s run began with a steal and a basket by Clark. With bodies all over the floor from both teams going after loose balls, Friberg scored three time in a row to put SC ahead 32-23. Altoona baskets by Jayvion

Queen, Jacob Port and Daiquain Watson brought it back to 32-29, but Friberg, Gulley and Sekunda immediately set SC off on another 13-3 run to boost the Lions’ lead to 45-32 going into the fourth quarter. “You talk about basketball being a game of runs and momentum,” Walker said. “That was big for us to be able to get above the 10-point mark. We knew they were going to make runs, but we were able to keep it around that 10-12 point mark, which is confidence for you because you can make mistakes and play a little more loose.” State College was generally able to hold at least a 10-point

lead throughout the fourth quarter. The Mountain Lions did close to within 53-45 at the five-minute mark, but two scores by Friberg and another by Sekunda reestablished the State College margin. SC eventually took a 14-point lead, 61-47, with three minutes to go and played the game out from there. Besides Friberg’s 23, Sekunda scored 13 and Gulley added 10 for the Little Lions. State College will now take on Carlisle, a very familiar foe from the Mid-Penn Conference, in the first round of the PIAA tournament. The game is scheduled for 6 p.m. Saturday, March 5, at Bald Eagle Area High School.

THE STATE COLLEGE Area High School boys’ basketball team, shown here earlier this season, will take on Carlisle in the first round of the PIAA Tournament.

Congratulations Girls & Boys Basketball


MarCh 3-9, 2016

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 17

State High girls capture District crown By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

CRESSON — With possible big distractions floating all around the State College girls’ basketball team, it would have been easy for the Lions to lose focus in their District 6 Class AAAA final against Altoona on Feb. 27 at Mount Aloysius College. Fortunately, they didn’t. The team was playing in a double-header with the State High boys’ team, star forward Kyla Irwin was approaching her 2,000-career-point plateau, and the Lions had already beaten the Mountain Lions twice earlier in the season. Altoona was hoping to catch the Little Lions off guard with its intensity and determination, especially early, and especially against Irwin. But senior guard Abby Allen quickly fixed her team’s attention to the matters at hand. She drained four first-half 3-point goals that sparked a 12-point halftime lead, and then Irwin took over in the second half as the Little Lions pulled away for a 52-27 win. The victory avenged last year’s 46-45 loss to Altoona in the 2015 AAAA final and put State High into the first round of the PIAA State Tournament against District 7, No. 3 Penn Hills on Friday, March 4. It also saw Irwin drive for a fourth-quarter layup that put her over the 2,000-point milestone in her career. She became only the second Centre County player, boy or girl, to score more than 2,000 points. The other was Dana McDonald from Penns Valley, who scored 2,269 from 1986 to 1989 for the Rams. “I wanted to win,” Irwin said, “so I wasn’t worried about the 2,000 points. If we got the win, I had another game to get it. So I wasn’t worried at all, and we were really confident and had a lot of fun out on the court. Everyone played so hard, and it was just an all-around great game.”

Submitted photo

THE STATE COLLEGE Area High School girls’ basketball team captured the District 6 Class AAAA title with a 52-27 win over Altoona on Feb. 27. It was Allen, though, who got State College off the starting block. Altoona tightly clamped down on Irwin from the start — she scored just four points in the first half — which left the other Lions with open looks. Allen wasted no time taking advantage. She scored the first basket of the game from beyond the arc, added three more in the first half, and then put State College ahead early in the third quarter, 31-17, with her fifth and last rainbow of the game. “I knew they were going to double down on Kyla (Irwin),” Allen said, “so I had to do my work outside. Get the points in there, someone had to do it. I

usually am most comfortable at the 3-point line, that’s kind of where I feel most comfortable. I practiced all week and I knew I had to shoot there.” With Allen getting the damage done outside, Irwin finally began to find room to maneuver in the second half. She scored 15 of her 19 points after the break — including nine of 10 from the line — and it was her basket with two seconds left in the third quarter that put SC ahead 38-24. From there, the Lions turned deliberate, forcing Altoona to come to them and put them on the line. Down the stretch, SC converted 11 to 12 foul shots, stymieing any chance for a Moun-

tain Lions comeback. The game ended with Irwin’s 2,000th point followed with a jumper by Anika Mitika-Pone that set the final score at 52-27. “Abby Allen, gotta love those 3s,” State College coach Bethany Irwin said, “and I am so thankful that she kept shooting them. We knew they were going to put two, three bodies on Kyla (Irwin), and I wasn’t so much concerned about the milestone she was going to get — as long as we won. “We are going to have a little party in the locker room right now, and then we have four days of practice. I guess we play on Friday. I don’t know who or where, but we are going to enjoy

this and go out and celebrate with the boys and hope we can tag-team this year with them.” Irwin finished the game with 19 points, Allen had 15 and sophomore point-guard Kayla Hawbaker added eight. For Altoona, no one broke into double figures, but guard Sara Donley had eight and center Maddie Shetrom scored seven. Altoona finished its season at 14-8, while State College won its 20th game against just three losses. The Lady Little Lions now travel to Tyrone High School on Friday, March 4, for a first-round PIAA game against 22-3 Penn Hills at 6 p.m.

The Orndorff family congratulates our Girls Basketball team on a 20-win season and becoming District Champs!

Good luck in States!

Submitted photo

THE STATE COLLEGE Area High School girls’ basketball seniors pose with the District 6 trophy. From left, Allison Williams, Jess Orndorff, Abby Allen, Kyla Irwin and Casey Witter.

Congrats SC Boys & Girls Basketball 2016 District 6 Champions! It’s great to be #1 !


PaGe 18

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

MarCh 3-9, 2016

Area champs crowned at District 6 wrestling tourney By TODD IRWIN Special to the Gazette

ALTOONA — Bald Eagle Area had the fewest Northwest Regional Tournament qualifiers among the four Centre County wrestling teams, but the Eagles can boast having the most champions. Five BEA wrestlers qualified for the regional tournament, which returns Friday, March 4, to the Altoona Fieldhouse, but two of those captured titles Feb. 27 at the Fieldhouse: Seth Koleno at 132 and Josh Fye at 285. BEA also had a runner-up in Garrett Rigg, at 126. “We hope that they have a little bit more in them in the next two weeks,” BEA coach Steve Millward said, “but both of those kids are hard workers in the room. They’re pretty focused on wrestling season. That’s a big deal to them. It makes it enjoyable for them to go through the season and hopefully get up on that medals stand in Hershey.” Centre County teams had two other champions, seven runners-up and qualified 28 wrestlers who placed in the top four at their weights to the regional tournament, including eight apiece from Bellefonte and State College and seven from Philipsburg-Osceola. Bellefonte, which finished third in the team standings, with 155 points, behind Mifflin County (185) and Central Mountain (169.5), was led by three-time champion Brock Port, who breezed to the 145pound title. The Red Raiders also had three runners-up in Shafiq Blake (113), Aaron Witherite (132) and Chase Gardner (152). “Overall, I believe we had a pretty solid tournament,” Bellefonte coach Mike Maney said. “We moved eight onto regionals, which is the most we had in a few years, and we had the second most finalists. We brought 13 guys and 11 placed in the top five. Obviously, in a tournament like this, you always want to move more on, but overall I am pleased with our team effort.” State College, which finished fourth in the team standings with 142.5 points, had a champion in Adam Stover at 113 and two runners-up in Cole Urbas (160) and fourth-seeded Pete Haffner (220).

TIM WEIGHT/For the Gazette

BELLEFONTE AREA High School’s Brock Port captured another District 6 Class AAA title at Altoona on Feb. 27. Port breezed to the 145-pound title. P-O took sixth with 122 points and had two runners-up in Matt Johnson (120) and Dakota Weitoish (145). It was the second straight year Weitoish had to settle for second. Port (31-1) had two pins and an 11-1 win over Weitoish in the finals. He had four takedowns, two nearfall points and an escape in the finals. “Brock Port has earned all his accomplishments through a lot of hard work and dedication,” Maney said. “He is often doing two workouts a day and putting in a lot of time outside of the season. He had a solid tournament and capped it off with a major decision in the finals against a quality opponent. There are not too many three-time District 6 champions, so he is in rare company.” “Weitoish was just sort of dominated,” P-O coach Tim McCamley said. “Port is that good. He’s going to be a tough one to beat. There are always other things we can do to see if we can solve that problem.” Fye earned his second title and hiked

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his record to 25-0 with a fall in the semifinals and a 7-1 win over Hollidaysburg’s Hunter Gill in the finals. Fye notched three takedowns for the win. “We’d like to see him be more active,” Millward said. “He’s a big guy, and if he gets that momentum going in the right direction, we think he’s capable of scoring more points. I know the competition is going to get much better over the next two weeks. It’s a matter of being positive, being in good position and not giving up sloppy points here and there.” Stover, who reached the finals with a 4-1 decision over Altoona’s Curtis Dukes, beat Blake, 5-2, for the title. After a scoreless first period, Stover escaped and took Blake down. Leading 3-2 late in the bout, he got a takedown for the final points. The top-seeded Koleno (22-5), who had a technical fall in his only other bout of the day, was up 5-1 on Witherite when he pinned the second-seeded Red Raider in 5:09. Top-seeded Johnson dropped a 3-2

decision to Mifflin County’s third-seeded Noah Myers in the finals. Myers scored on an escape and takedown, while Johnson had an escape and penalty point. “I think Matt had problems solving (Myers’) defense,” McCamley said. “He had real good defense, and we knew that. I guess that’s what we need to work on.” Rigg (24-5) breezed to the finals with a pin and an 8-1 decision, but he ran into Altoona returning state runner-up Cole Manley, who picked up eight takedowns in a 21-9 win. It was Manley’s third title. Gardner also ran into a buzzsaw in the finals in Mifflin County’s Hayden Hidlay, who pinned him in 49 seconds for his fourth district title. Urbas knocked off P-O’s second-seeded Nick Patrick, 4-2, in the semis, but he was pinned by Mifflin County’s Trent Hidlay in 1:12 in the finals. It was Hidlay’s second title. Haffner knocked off Central Mountain’s top-seeded Hunter Weaver, 3-2, in the semis, but he was taken down by Hollidaysburg’s third-seeded Noah Worley in overtime to lose, 3-1. Worley reached the finals by beating P-O’s second-seeded Micah Sidorick, 2-1. The Little Lions had third-placers in Zachary Price (132), Dalton Barger (145), Ian Barr (152), Cory Dreibelbis (195) and Drew Linnes (285). The Red Raiders had third-placers in Cole Stewart (106) and Dillon Kephart (182) and fourth-placers in Lukas McClure (160) and Maximillian Mondy (195). The Mounties had third-placers in Bryce Bennett (126) and Patrick and fourth-placers in Levi Hughes (138), Ian Klinger (170) and Sidorick. BEA also qualified fourth-placers Garret Giedroc (106) and Clayton Giedroc (120). The District 6 wrestlers are joined this weekend at the regional by qualifiers from District 4-9, District 10 and District 8. To get to the PIAA championships, the wrestlers have to place in the top three at every weight. “Each match is important and exciting,” Maney said, “and I am excited for the opportunity for our wrestlers to compete and hopefully earn a trip to the state tournament.”


MarCh 3-9, 2016

SPorTS

PaGe 19

Penn State grapplers ready for Big Tens By ANDY ELDER For The Gazette

IOWA CITY, Iowa — Every weekend for nearly four months, the Penn State wrestling team has confronted whatever challenge it was presented with. Whether it was a tournament or a dual meet, the Nittany Lions found a way to win it. Penn State finished the season 16-0, the first undefeated season in coach Cael Sanderson’s seven seasons in Happy Valley. Sanderson said Feb. 29 he doesn’t expect that to stop this weekend at the 2016 Big Ten Wrestling Championships at Carver-Hawkeye Arena in Iowa City, Iowa. “This team continues to step up and wrestle well each week. We had 11 weeks in a row where we were wrestling and I can feel a little bit more energy and excitement right now … exactly what we need five days out,” he said. “We’ve cut back on our running and those types of things and just get ready to wrestle.” Based on the tournament pre-seeds that were released Feb. 29, Penn State is the favorite in the team race, with all 10 of its wrestlers earning a seed of No. 8 or higher. But with such a concentration of talent in one tournament, winning an individual or team title will be a challenge. “It’s always like that in the Big Ten, with only 14 teams. There’s gonna be big matchups and big matchups right away. Every match is very important and you have to be ready to go,” Sanderson said. “You also have to be ready to finish. It’s going to be one of those tournaments where you have to start strong and finish strong if you want to be a team that wins. We know what we have to do, just like everyone else knows what they have to do. There’s not a lot of room for error in a tournament with this few teams.” The Big Ten earned 71 automatic quali-

TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

PENN STATE’S Geno Morelli will wrestle at 165 for the Nittany Lions when they travel to Iowa City for the Big Ten Wrestling Championships. fiers to the NCAA championships, allocated as follows: seven at 125, nine at 133, seven at 141, six at 149, seven at 157, six at 165, nine at 174, seven at 184, six at 197 and seven at 285. Based on seeds alone, Penn State is predicted to advance seven wrestlers to the national tournament. The Nittany Lions’ 10-man contingent, with seeds in parentheses, includes: Nico Megaludis (3) at 125, Jordan Conaway (3) at 133, Jimmy Gulibon (8) at 141, Zain Retherford (1) at 149, Jason Nolf (1) at 157, Geno Morelli (7) at 165, Bo Nickal (1) at 174, Matt McCutcheon (2) at 184, Morgan McIntosh (1) at 197 and Nick Nevills (8) at 285.

Gulibon, Morelli and Nevills will have to finish above their seeds to assure an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament, scheduled for Thursday, March 17, through Saturday, March 19, at Madison Square Garden in New York. Sanderson said the decision to go with Morelli at 165 came down to Morelli’s competitiveness and Rasheed’s inability to adjust to the weight. “Geno is a guy that’s been competitive from the beginning. We just need his best effort and fighting spirit and we’ll be fine,” he said. “With Shakur we tried a few different things with his weight but he couldn’t really compete at 65. He couldn’t be himself;

he didn’t really adjust. We were hoping he’d adjust to the weight class eventually, but it just wasn’t happening. His body wasn’t functioning the way he needed to to be competitive.” Morelli and Gulibon could still earn wild card berths to the national tournament if either of them doesn’t finish high enough to earn an automatic berth. Nevills, on the other hand, didn’t wrestle enough matches to earn that privilege. “For Nevills, he has to go win matches. He has to earn that spot. He knows that; that was part of the discussion with him wrestling this year,” Sanderson said. As for the rest of the team, the coach sounded like he was confident his team is ready for the challenge. “We have a pretty good idea of what to expect. Consistency is one of the keys of being the best you can be. That’s nothing new, obviously, but that’s one thing that brings me confidence as a coach is that I know these guys are going to be consistent,” he said. “We’re excited and the team’s excited. Energy’s real high. We still have a few days; you don’t want to get too excited too early. It’s the Big Ten championship, you know; it’s what we train for.”

NEED TO KNOW What: 2016 Big Ten Wrestling Championships When: March 5 and 6 Where: Carver-Hawkeye Arena, Iowa City, Iowa Times: Saturday: Session 1, 11 a.m.; Session 2, 7 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. Radio: All sessions on 1390 AM. TV: Championship finals on Big Ten Network.

Penns Valley ready for Kane in first round of state playoffs By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

SPRING MILLS — There’s no denying that the Penns Valley Rams had their sights set on the District 6 Class AA basketball title. Going into the tournament, Penns Valley had lost just three games all season and was seeded No. 3 in the district. The Rams could see a path straight to the final game set for Feb. 26 at the Altoona High School Fieldhouse. But an off-balance, last-second 3-point shot by West Branch’s Kody Trude led to an overtime loss to the Warriors in the semifinal, and Penns Valley had to move on. Not that it was easy. PV squared off against Mountain League rival Tyrone in the consolation game on Feb. 25, and it was clear that the West Branch loss still hung over the team. For the first two quarters of that game, the Rams didn’t even score in double figures (nine points). They needed something to happen and got it when forward Logan Pearce suddenly got hot — very hot — and

sparked PV on an incredible 37-7 run that swamped Tyrone, 50-33. Now it’s on to the first round of the PIAA State Tournament and a matchup with the No. 1 team out of District 9, the Kane Wolves, on Saturday, March 5, at Clarion University. Kane has a story of its own. The Wolves won the District 9 title and the No. 1 seed with a 38-31 victory over Brockway on Feb. 27. The game, in almost every way, marked the end of a complete circle for the Wolves. In 2014-15, Kane finished with a record of 3-19 and somehow, in the span of just one year, turned it around enough to win a district championship. The Wolves did lose 10 games this season — they are now 14-10 — but when it counted, they were a very tough out. “These kids (Kane’s players) in the offseason worked very hard,” Kane coach Matt Gasbarre said. “Coming in at 7 a.m., coming in in the summer, they really dedicated themselves in the offseason and it got results. “We are super excited and we are blessed that this happened.” Along with an impressive work ethic,

the Wolves also have 6-foot-6 junior swingman Andrew Bucheit. Bucheit does it all for Kane — score, rebound, hand out assists and defend. In the D-9 championship game, even though he was hampered with fouls, Bucheit led a fourth-quarter surge that finally subdued Brockway and led to the title. Bucheit finished the game with 16 points and 10 rebounds. Yet when their star was on the bench in the third quarter with three fouls, the other Wolves stepped up and played Brockway better than even-up until Bucheit could return. The game was tied when Bucheit left, and when he returned, Kane was up by six. Those other players — Frank Truden, Davis Gardner, Tyler Rolick and Chris Udovich — did it by stepping up their defense. Brockway scored a game-low six points in the third quarter. The PIAA game, then, shapes up to be a struggle between two defensive-minded teams that have workman-like approaches. It will be played on the same floor where Kane beat Brockway — advantage Kane — but it will more likely turn on which player gets hot first, Pearce or Bucheit.

TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

PENNS VALLEY head coach Terry Glunt leads the Rams into PIAA playoffs. They will face Kane on March 5 at Clarion University.

Central Cambria knocks Penns Valley out of playoff picture By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

TYRONE — In the playoffs, it’s especially important to be able to put adversity and tough losses in the past. Nothing can be done about that last game and, in fact, the game coming up may be even more important anyway. All that is easier said than done, of course. There are countless high school basketball teams that have found those things out the hard way. The Penns Valley girls can be added to that list after their season ended with a 46-40 loss to Central Cambria in the District 6 Class AA consolation game at BEA on Feb. 25. The Lady Rams came into the D-6 tour-

nament as the No. 3 seed, 19-4, and looking to make some noise among the best teams in the district. After a first round bye, the Rams squashed Central by 30, 62-32, and seemed to catch a break when No. 7 Marion Center upset No. 2 Tyrone, setting up a semifinal matchup with the Lady Stingers. But Marion Center was a mirror-image of PV — tough defense, opportunistic offense and steely nerves. The entire game was a struggle for both sides, but some late errors by the Rams and a crucial miscommunication in the final seconds led to a crushing, 34-33 loss. Its district championship hopes were gone, but Penns Valley was not finished. Since three teams advance to the PIAA tournament, the consolation game on Feb.

25 against Central Cambria was a winnertake-all affair for that third spot. The Red Devils lost as well on Feb. 23 to No. 1 Bishop McCort, but it was quickly apparent that they had shaken off their loss more readily than Penns Valley. Led by the inside and outside play of forward Taylor Boring, along with solid guard play from Lauren Stevens and Michelle Hildebrand, Central Cambria broke out to a 14-8 first quarter lead. The Devils extended that to 29-17 by halftime after a jump shot by Boring in the final seconds of the second quarter. “I thought the first half, we were still reliving our last game,” Penns Valley coach Karen McCaffrey said. “It was so heartbreaking, I knew it was going to be a challenge for us to get back up.

“We were still hurting, and the first half we were struggling with energy.” Somehow, however, Penns Valley found some of that energy in the locker room at halftime. Two-guard Karli Ripka, who finished with 15 points and three 3-pointers started it for PV. The Rams went on a 15-7 run in the third quarter and crept back to within 36-32 as the fourth quarter began. Three minutes later, Kourtney Beamesderfer hit a jump shot that completed the Ram comeback and tied the game, 40-40. But Penns Valley could not hold on. The energy it expended in coming back was all it had, and Central Cambria clamped down and scored the final six points in the game to take the win. Playoff, Page 21


Page 20

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

Pittsburgh Pirates to focus on getting on base JASON ROLLISON

While spring training has officially begun for the Pittsburgh Pirates, their general manager acknowledges that the team is in the throes of forging a new identity. “We’re comfortable with an offense that is going to generate base runners,” Neal Huntington recently told assembled reporters. “The Cardinals found a way to be the best team in baseball Jason Rollison is a without hitting a lot of Pittsburgh Pirates home runs. The Roycommentator als have won a World who melds the Series — and lost a advanced analytic World Series — withaspect of baseball out hitting a lot of with old-school home runs.” thinking. Email him at jason@ Indeed, the offseapiratesbreakdown. son moves to replace com. the 43 combined home runs from Neil Walker and Pedro Alvarez has been focused not on replicating that power, but by attempting to mimic the approach of the 2015 World Series champions. From his view, manager Clint Hurdle feels the shift away from a pure power approach toward a “chain of hitters” approach is simple math. “The game is transitioning in a lot of different ways in a lot of different areas,” Hurdle said to reporters, as if bemused by

the question trying to ascertain the degree of difficulty to implement such an approach. “The nuts and bolts of it is, if you have more ‘on-base’ guys in your lineup, you’re going to have more guys on base, which can help create more runs, if we walk through the math together. “Every team talks about it. The elite teams were the ones who were able to do it late. No one did it better than the Royals, who ended up winning the last game of the season.” Last year, the Royals did not have a hitter launch more than 22 home runs. Their team batting average, however, was tied for third-best in the American League at .269. The leading team — the Detroit Tigers — was just one percentage point better at .270. For the Pirates, their emulation of the Royals is less about improving in statistical areas than it is focused on developing that solid hitting chain. When fully healthy and performing as they are capable, the Pirates batting order from first through eighth is uniquely capable of doing just that. Though Andrew McCutchen is rightfully locked into the third spot in the lineup, Hurdle will have myriad options in constructing his lineup. Hurdle also explained to the assembled media how he plans to impart the “get on base” mantra to his players. “We tell our guys that if we strike out nine times per game, that’s three innings of watching our opponents play catch.” The team’s strikeout rate — the Pirates had the fourth-most strikeouts in the National League with 1,322 — already has

CHRIS O’MEARA/AP Photo

PITTSBURGH PIRATES manager Clint Hurdle is faced with the daunting task of having to replace players like Neil Walker and Pedro Alvarez. gotten a boost from the departure of the free-swinging Alvarez. Though the departed Walker carried a steady-if-unspectacular strikeout rate of 20.3 percent in 2015, his replacement in Josh Harrison will still represent a 5.1 percent improvement. When considering newly acquired John JaYouth Fair

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to we’re happy a great project county. It’s be a part of.” to Woodhead, the decision By G. KERRY WEBSTER — where According untygazette.com its Fraser location — came correspondent@centreco 1986 to move from short situated since — Just a few it had been from visitors to the center in the STATE COLLEGE Region Senior after hearing the Centre Submitted photo traffic and congestion months ago, from its long time address to attend events who said the State made it hard Center moved Center in downtown will look like. downtown there. new senior center in the Nittathey could and in the Fraser and functions shows what the somewhere being used, current location is definitely College to its Now, it looks like the center An artist’s rendering “People wantedeasily,” said Woodhead. people now “The center of IN THE WORKS: that we’re seeing of the counny Valley Mall. room in feasible. We get in and out we can show in that just wasn’t commisus to use another from other parts is moving again. in,” said “Downtown, location and found a spot have allowed the meantime,” said Woodthe Centre County in the center, county a wouldn’t come in On Jan. 26, more voted to use time to renovate searched for the building to have a lot ty, that normally of the best things didn’t have a large vawe’re going sioners unanimously away, so we “I think one We need it.” the mall. We is moving head. “Soon, funds to renovate Woodhead. wanted to right area and use a lot more things. Woodhead’s contingency the mall, just a few doors with this programto be in the the area we space to do a smaller we’ve done in going support is currently cant space Now, we’re decided to renovate center until the larger 2014 and fall The numbers in.” to the mall. where the center between fall interim also approved wanted to be down from occupancy.” that as our claim. He said been an increase in attenproposal was space we really is renovated for has operating. The County Council of Governarea could be to Woodhead, the center 57 percent. He 2015, there center of aboutincreased by 22 by the Centre Page 4 According dance at the in about 3,200-square Senior Center, 25. moving service has Jan. is operating ments renovated meacurrently this project said noon meal direcspace to be “We’re excited feet. The new 7,000-square feet. percent. Ronald Woodhead, mall and Recreforward,” said sures just over the people at the Region Park a lot tor of the Centre“It’s going to open up “Graciously, the ation Authority. for seniors around Street home Irion more opportunities her in 21 on the found Jan. who were checking by friends, arin 2004. said Barry woman’s welfare. levels last seen police, authorities to the news,” the afterAccording to at Penn “Prices react woman’s home of economics By ALEXA LEWIStte.com rived at the 21 and found her dead. Ickes, a professor change, expectation Sayers news@centrecountygaze noon of Jan. are driving State. “If developments coroner Scott on changes but fundamentals Centre County death. An autopsy prices react, — Precipitous confirmed Tuggy’s Jan. 22 showed eviSTATE COLLEGE oil and slower growth Intermediate the price.” West Texas U.S. on of crude as contribthe body conducted in the price been two catalysts for the The price for cents to $30.51 a barrel force trauma 57 at the end dence of blunt her death. in China have turbulence, which sparked crude was up a to among Mercantile Exchange the case as uting factors stock market’s bear market territory the New York day Jan. 26, and international $31.14. Police are investigating fear of nearing was up to of the trading By G. KERRY WEBSTER watchers. Township Brent crude untygazette.com 26 with news homicide. many market benchmark the Ferguson updated did rally Jan. to correspondent@centreco On Jan. 25, While oil prices OPEC might be ready issued an enforcethat pro6 lived alone Police Department MILLS — Law the day before supply with non-OPEC Oil prices, Page stating Tuggy motive for PINE GROVE continue to investigate reached press release negotiate over month have was no known Pine Grove prices this ment authorities and there ducers, oil a 60-year-old the death of 4 Mills woman. to Ferguson Township Homicide, Page Tuggy was According body of Jean Police, the take off — in Centre County continues recycling The industry email about and then some. she never imagined. 800 people I ways “I have about to keep them updated has gone to change in just are Centre Countyeverything once a month recycling events that Recycling in By CHRIS MORELLI cans to tte.com on any new witnessed from just aluminum editor@centrecountygaze Schirf said. the and she has coming up,” she loves to get out in under the sun, has Schirf said changes. — Amy Schirf to the masses many of the here just over nine years. and speak STATE COLLEGE also loves to community “I’ve been (aluminum) recycling. She of recycling. from taking a passion for four about the positives We’ve gone 11 items curbside, education coor teach. her job as cans to taking any plastic bottle, jug And while County Recythe the Centre colors of glass, and we just added not be a ordinator for Authority may jar, metal cans things like Pringles and close. cling and Refuse — any pretty darn as spiral cans Of course, we’ll take dream job, it’s is to educate as much I can’t think peanut cans. resi“My main job that you have. schools “We teach the kind of paper paper that we don’t take her job is visiting groups county, I can,” she explained. of A big part of large anyone in the of any kind to educate said. dents, businesses, County Reand businesses to a large curbside,” Schirf one. makes the Centre tick. Schirf speaks is talking really.” is a daunting about what Whenever points Refuse Authority I’ll only talk Schirf’s position grow in Centre of her main recycle. Nearcycling and group, one continues to the out to speak, said. “We As recycling responsible for getting easy it is to “When I go be put into about how is minutes,” Schirf with she said, can County, she does so through a number for about 10 ly everything, about 40 minutes quesemails word out. She newsletters, usually spend has a million of ways — quarterly questions. Everyone Schirf, Page 6 mouth. I go somewhere.” things as and word of 29, 30 tions every time years, Schirf has watched tries to keep She said she when it comes to eduGazette 31 Business ..................... Through the ......... 26 CHRIS MORELLI/The green as possible Happening Classified ........................ 20-23 What’s ............................ 28 education coordinator cating the masses. Amy Schirf is the Refuse Authority. 25 Puzzles Sports ......................... GOING GREEN: and Town .... 24, ....... 16, 17 In & Recycling Corner Around 11 Women’s ................ 18, 19 for the Centre County Expo .................. 10, 7 Education ............... 12-15 Bridal Community Opinion ............................ ......... 8, 9 Health & Wellness

poses crude prices ry Steep drop in natural gas indust challenge to

passion for Schirf has a

recycling

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The CenTre CounTy

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2016

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CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

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MATT SLOCUM/AP

Photo

Jordan Penn State star The 61-yard High School and Santa Clara, Calif. State College Area 50 on Feb. 7 in MOMENT: Former during Super Bowl MEMORABLE a punt 61 yards Norwood returned punt return yardage. Bowl record for return set a Super

by Centre County ruled a homicide Sayers. board coroner Scott Centre County On Feb. 8, the offered an additionof commissioners money to anyone reward to al $4,000 in that leads the person supplying information conviction of the arrest and

CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

Book smart: Bellefonte senior is a standout

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impacted and families of children cancer. According by childhood the mission of the to THON.org, is “to conquer pedance marathonby providing emoto the diatric cancer back. nancial support and PARK — It’s tional and fi researchers UNIVERSITY neon knee socks, children, families, Diamonds Fund.” Break out the water guns — the staff of the Four the year, THON foand Dance fanny packs Throughout funds and awareIFC/Panhellenic Penn Penn State have cuses on raisingDiamonds, a fund will soon a cure — Marathon conquer dancing for ness for Four mission is to State students chilthat states its loby assisting for the kids. Jordan Center, Hershey childhood cancer The Bryce at Penn State corner of University dren treated through supewill host cated at the support Children’s Hospital Curtin Road, 46-hour Drive and and free care, comprehensive rior public research. the annual Dance Marathon, and innovative THON has raised families IFC/Panhellenic Since 1977, million for Four children and volunwhich brings $127 Fund, Hershey more than after of the Four Diamonds at Penn State others together Diamonds teers and all efforts. Children’s Hospital.begins at 6 p.m. fundraising of months THON weekend continues until largest student-run THON is the the world and is 19, and in Friday, Feb. Feb. 21. philanthropy enhancing the lives 4 p.m. Sunday, can use the Gate A to committed All spectators the Bryce Jordan access is needed entrance to identification Center. No to to gain entry. IFC/ entertainment What: THON 46-hour across To provide Marathon dancers from more than 700 thousands of volPanhellenic Dance Feb. 19, through famithe university, When: Friday, and Four Diamondsevents 21 unteers Feb. includes Sunday, Center lies, the weekend Centre County

untygazette.com correspondent@centreco

Valentine’secial Day Sp

February 18-24,

com ountyGazette. www.CentreC

2016

Volume 8, Issue

Medical

Pick up or Mall. (Dine in,

Delivery-$10 minimum)

Gazette

Jordan Where: Bryce Admission: Free More info: www.thon.org

Gazette file photo

will take over the Once again, THON the public. FOR THE KIDS: free and open to The event is again

for 46 hours beginning

Bryce Jordan Center

Wolf to Students lobby

THON, Page 4

on Friday, Feb.

19.

pass budget

the Gazette

along the side

of

countmonths and PARK — Seven the Pennsylvania’s UNIVERSITY with State, along has yet to see ing and Penn universities, state-related three other his budget rst announced Penn State its state appropriations. Tom Wolf fi When Gov. year, he said funding. But 2015-16 fiscal plans for the an extra $49 million in maup would pick and the Republican-led back-anddays into a Wolf’s administration more than 200 bottled up funding to has jority are now dispute that forth budget schools. concerned that state-related frustrated and could imThat has students budget stalemate Pennthrough the the state’s record-long receiving loans Agency and pact students Education Assistance Penn State’s sylvania Higher tuition rates, despite could increase

woman Police report dumped found dead was By ALEXA LEWIS

tte.com news@centrecountygaze

Budget, Page

to police, “There According that the to the are no indications on her own woman walked was found.”

5

By CHRIS MORELLI

— TOWNSHIP FERGUSON police think Ferguson Township woman Feb. 14 the still-unidentified was found on whose body block of Plainfield along the 500 out of a vePolice, Page 5 Road was dumped there. 1 hicle and abandoned 1 ....................... 9 Education Profile ........ 12 Community Opinion ............................ .......... 10 Health & Wellness

are changing. — The times CounJuniata Valley Good STATE COLLEGE 40 years, the the For more than America have presented of cil Boy Scouts a different name Scout, Page 7 Scout Award. Impact award will have This year, the Sue Paterno Community 33, 34 and & In Town .... — the Joseph 25-29 Around Happening .... 34, 35 What’s Sports ......................... Fair .. 30-32 ............... 13-16 Summer Youth Community ...... 17-24 Mature Lifestyles

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renovate

Graphic courtesy

however, there things shape and up-to-date; do to keep we have to still things “All these projects the said Brown. improving,” growth and the need in are based on drawing patients We’re now community.

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By ALEXA LEWIS

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HEATHER WEIKEL/For

raised nearly $10 Fasta, Page 4 28 on Feb. 21, THON tally was revealed from the event on Page 26. Puzzles ............................ 29, 30 When the final .... 24, 27 cancer. See photos PROUD MOMENT: Happening Business ..................... against pediatric 18-22 What’s photo page ......... 26 million for the fight ......................... THON ....... 14, 15 Women’s Corner ...... 16, 17 Wedding Planner

23 Sports Town ......... Around & In

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TEXT

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a Christmas GAP — After & Ravioli PLEASANT its doors, Fasta Eve fire closed its Pleasant Gap locaCo. is reopeningopening a new Harrisas tion, as well burg location. was no one inside Fasta after 2 While there broke out shortly when the fire 24, the damage left what be a.m. on Dec. predicted to the fire department of renovations. to three to six months a lot of damage “The fire caused but the larger imhouse, the front of the smoke damage,” Fasta the in plications is the Gazette Ricketts told in the owner Bob “Virtually everything December. in smoke.” store is covered phase of conremove With the abatement contractors struction, wherewrapping up, Ricketts a smoke particles, should stay closer to said renovations timeline. three-month celebrate the grand reFasta will store at 157 Pleasant Gap opening of its and its brand new store Street MarW. College Ave., in the Broad in Harrisburg 1233 N. Third St. on Friat day. ket located pasta free a with day, May 13, that Fasta participated loRicketts said Farmers Market in the Hershey’s Harrisburg and was in cated just outsidesaid opening a store He well received. logical progression from a is Harrisburg for our a growth standpoint. will be a conduit and “This shop Carlisle, Harrisburg wholesale in the Gazette

HAPPEN THIS CAN ONLY MIA! A DEAL LIKE YEARS AT PIZZA FOUR EVERY toppings additional. ONCE Pizza for $4, 38 Large Cheese 814-355-37 St., Bellefonte

9 Education ......................... ............... 10-13 Community

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4

Fasta to open two locations on May 13

tte.com editor@centrecountygaze

Battista, Page

delivery in

Center

more than 500,000 sions are important.”

ebrate the event. lack of sleep and the Despite the the enthusiasm was By JANE MIENTKIEWICZ of the 46 untygazette.com physical strain, past the end correspondent@centreco present even by, be— Bright colors, hours. I’m so inspired STATE COLLEGE squirt guns, laugh“Every dancer, a mental game,” said music, like crazy outfits, and tears — the final four majorcause it’s all — 21, a junior ter, dancing I knew that Christina Quaglia, all. “I think, like, hours had it ing in nursing. didn’t realize how much State IFC/Panhellenic 21 at 4 I The Penn ended Feb. going in, but to push through it and Dance Marathon46 hours on their feet doing it.” you just have after volunteer like, why you’re one of the p.m. when, remember, the cure, student Bryce Jorfor Apollo, dancing for Quaglia danced organizations particisat down. The 10 years, for dancers finally special interest home to THON every dan Center, pating in THON. students wearing and was filled with bandanas socks, tutus, color shirt, letters of their the THON, Page 6 holding even capes, dancing to celnames and organization

Batto miss Joe — It’s hard STATE COLLEGE faces in State tista. the most recognizable him around He’s one of you’ve seen if you think College. And chances are that you have. left for a State, he town recently, Sawith Penn After 26 years Terry Pegula and the Buffalo the Sawith of years with “dream job” after a couple of hockey bres. However, down as vice president bres, he stepped

Mount Nittany Medical

garage will look the renovated parking parking. rendering of what for employee This is an artist’s would be used we serve PLENTIFUL PARKING: Medical Center. The garage counties and Nittany from six different residents. These expanlike at the Mount are

By CHRIS MORELLI

the Gazette

County to the Centre award is given Award. The most embodies the service-oriented and its youthresident who of the organization ideals and values honoree. the first-ever ful charges. Paterno was Penn State In 1974, Joe is named for the late Now, the award football coach.

tte.com editor@centrecountygaze

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8

ng Battista pursuin a new passio

JEN HECKMAN/For

Gov. mail a letter to Members of UPUA Feb. 11 HE’S GOT MAIL: Legislature on the Pennsylvania impasse. Tom Wolf and with the budget expressing discontent

renam Scout award

she the place where they believe bePolice said was dumped woman’s body on Feb. 12 and tween 11 p.m. Feb. 14 when a 3:20 a.m. on

Submitted photo

returned to State Joe Battista has BACK HOME AGAIN: stint with the Buffalo Sabres a short his own business, College following Battista has started and Terry Pegula. LLC. PRAGMATIC Passion,

By ALEXA LEWIS

tte.com news@centrecountygaze

G. KERRY WEBSTER/For

was found unidentified woman The body of an eld Road. CRIME SCENE: 500 block of Plainfi the road near the

Volume 8, Issue

raises THON 2016 on nearly $10 milli

CENTRE COUNTY SPOTLIGHT

IF YOU GO

February 25-March

boilof boilers. Four and, facility, ■ The replacement used at the hospital is the ers are currently Wisniewski, originally inBy G. KERRY WEBSTER untygazette.com according to that were correspondent@centreco was constructed using two boilers Medithe facility the boilers have stalled when — Mount Nittany old said although BELLEFONTE serving the health care in 1972. He replacing the been since cal Center has been well-maintained, a more sufficient Region residents of the give MNMC meeting needs of Centre and the water boilers will this week’s the buildings 1972, and at Board of Commissioners, way of heating in Centre County announced $20 million used within. of a linear accelerator meet hospital brass ■ The purchase to even better of cancer patients. campus renovations for treatment of the cardiovascular and those needs. ■ The expansion originally constructed in many facets was “We are growing to keep up with eva drastic insuite. The suite be able since has seencardiovascular the hospital,” we want to in 2000, and going on at seeking and erything that’s crease in patients MNMC’s president floor. be paid through said Steve Brown, services. to the ground needs projects will there will be CEO. “These ■ Improvements attention Authority, and has said particular the Hospital charge to the county. These Wisniewski the kitchen area, which is now and to additional since the plan no to be paid or improved our five-year kitchproject are in them taken care of.” not been updated He said the serve bethe time to getto Rich Wisniewski, former building’s construction. designed to however, MNMC, five According day; en was originally president of 90 meals per 190 CFO and vice the agenda, including: tween 60 and show between 160 and on parkday. counts projects are of a two-story each recent and served good ■ The construction current parking meals prepared our facilities are in of the side of a ing garage on will increase the number “I think all lot. The project by 300. parking spaces

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CHAVANIC By SAMANTHA and CHRIS MORELLI

2, 2016

s plans to center announce

com ountyGazette. www.CentreC

Gaz ettereadies for THON

By entte.com By ALEXA LEWIS MILLS — Law editor@centrecountygaze untygazette.com PINE GROVE in Centre Councorrespondent@centreco day came and the death of — As signing forcement authorities — The Ferguson to investigate BELLEFONTE high school athletes across six TOWNSHIP whose body ty continue of to play FERGUSON of Supervisors will interview left Jean Tuggy, went, dozens signed letters of intent 5 was Grove Mills 60-year-old Homicide, Page Township Boarda spot in Ward 3 that in her Pine deCentre County has been for was found next level. Colleen Unroe 21. Her death candidates a sport at the supervisor-elect Area home on Jan. 4. vacant when At Bellefonte Jess Unroe oath on Jan. senior clined to take reorganization meetingcommitHigh School, time on to play During the Book signed against and professional and basketcited personal as two lawsuits brought both soccer City Colof the township’s ments, as well a provision ball at Grove Raider is her for not meeting lege. The Red Green and Charter. star — she Home Rule solicitor Joseph a three-sport — and is in the Both township separate complaints also runs track students filed Unroe because Drew Clemson Pleas against The one of the top 2016 at of Court of CommonSection 2.05 of the charter. of in the Class meet for the office she did not BAHS. registhat a candidate playresident and least JESS BOOK section states Book said that and have been a for at supervisor must Ferguson Township three sports ing of election. academics tered elector to the date of his or her balancing last year’s its share of challenges. it’s one year prior a write-in candidate in definitely presents time-wise, but I think in Unroe ran as the question of her qualificahave a lull “It’s very busy, but said the because I never primary. She prior to the general election actually easier Book said shortly before up up in time to remove tions came my schedule,” basketball team wrapped was not filed think girls’ the paperwork the ballot. Raider active, but I Red six ap“It keeps me shape her name from supervisors will interview m their season. because it keeps me in Thursday, The current Feb. 10, and appointZACH BERGER/StateCollege.co it’s really great Wednesday, holds a photo of plicants on will consider making an regular Stacy Parks Miller for at the board’s Feb. 11, and District Attorney Book, Page 7 Jan. 21. A reward the vacancy Centre County 36 Mills home on ment to fill ............................ REWARD INCREASED:found dead in her Pine Grove Feb. 16. before the Feb. 37, 38 meeting on was 32-34 Puzzles who applied Rita raised to $5,000. Jean Tuggy, who & In Town .... 34, 35 Business ..................... The six applicants Balkey, Drew Clemson, .... 24-29 Around the crime has been Steven information on ......................... 30, 31 What’s Happening 1 deadline are 18, 19 Sports Day ......... Matters .......... Valentine’s 5 12 Family Youth Fair .. 20-23 Ward 3, Page ....................... 9 Education ............... 13-17 Summer Community Shaped Pizza Opinion ............................ ..... 10, 11 ❤ Any Heart Health & Wellness (up to 3 toppings)

An With tine! Be Mine Valen Edible 00

Gaz ette

Mature Lifestyles includes a special section The Gazette’s for Centre County little bit of everythinglook at technology, a seniors, including dementia, finances travel, heart health, 17-24 and overall wellness./Pages

The CenTre COunTy

to Police continueicide investigate hom

Battle Area High School The Penns Valley team lost to West boys’ basketball in a classic District Branch in overtime game. The Rams 6 Class AA playoff the could not find battled, but simply 21 net in OT./Page

The CenTre CounTy

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Centre County

as if replay, it appearedspecial On instant of the Carolina called had several members that Norwood By CHRIS MORELLI tte.com teams thought editor@centrecountygaze what for a fair catch. Norwood said. “That’s High to “Probably,” — From State in that situation.” that STATE COLLEGE usually happens Norwood explained he and the Super Bowl. Area High School The 5-foot-11 a fair catch because a for Norwood State College was there for he didn’t call graduate Jordan 7 in opportunity Penn State Bowl history on Feb. believed the made Super Santa Clara, Calif. punt maybe big play. 50 with the short didn’t,” he and special Super Bowl “I thought they wide receiver 61-yard run past, but The Denver guys would made a spectacular the the Nittany teams player the second quarter to set said. a wideout for in 14-yard line. punt return Norwood was alongside former NFL at the Carolinain Super Bowl played Williams. Broncos up Lions and of 45 was the longest Butler and Derrick The return of his career previous record players Deon return the punt history, breaking held by San Francisco’s professional. It was the longest was college and yards, which Super Bowl XXIII. — high school, return punts in college,” in the bigJohn Taylor “I didn’t even was, quite simply, field The return the game. Norwood said. set up a Denver teams play of lot of times gest special The punt return The Broncos went on punt, and a told short a 13-7. it was “It Norwood goal to make run past it,” but guys will just Press. “And they didn’t, to win, 24-10. the Associated roll with it.” to I just decided

vement Downtown Impro for a safe, District works College prosperous State

ial $19 SpecBread!

2016

State High grad es Norwood mak ry histo Super Bowl

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Officials still concerned with se budget impas

budget ongoing state PARK — The wondering UNIVERSITY county commissioners left lay ahead. impasse has issues could vetoed the $30.3 what other financial it pushed Tom Wolf line-item When Gov. after Christmas, funding to budget just emergency billion GOP $24 billion in forward nearly and school districts. social services have still By G. KERRY WEBSTER But countiestheir children untygazette.com fund correspondent@centreco struggled to beginning and youth services, a hat to be worn changed how — If there is when the stateappropriated in BELLEFONTE Dainty has almost certainly is Vana a newspathe child welfare in Bellefonte, initiative in been a salesperson, a “rebalancing” tried it on. She’s and a councilwoman. budget. Essential-a accountant Keystone the 2015-16 shift per editor, an acting as Bellefonte’s and is allowed to ly, the state coordinator, she Now, she’s of reimbursements Development town full quarter Community be working in and for a fiscal year. to following to the she’s happy meant is that Centre What this has loves so much. it here,” Dainty told The the state never GOV. TOM WOLF community counties acrossreimbursements “I just love “It’s a wonderful here and received CYS quarter of the County Gazette. The people are good from April to there is for the fourth fiscal year, which runs to live and work. so much. I don’t think care state’s 2014-15 that’s why I I’d like to live.” more in 1989. viewpoint, it’s June. another place commissioners state government is to Centre County Florida “From the Dainty came lived in the where the payment in family had a quarter’s drug trade unfunded mandate She and her going to skip of the rising to said commissioner saying we are they decided Keys, but because the budget,” United States, Bellefonte area, so we can balance the southern to the and if they would move north, Mark Higgins. pack up and and colleagues. left asking when Michael had friends Counties were in accounting,” said Chairman from the where Dainty a background Gazette offered spokesperson receive reimbursement, “I came with AMY ANSARI/The said I arrived, I was eventuon Feb. 2 a “As soon as I D-Lock Haven, a significant Pipe. However, said Dainty. Sheet where Rep. Mike Hanna, for the fourth quarCollege will have the Bargain office of state a position at in downtown State Improvement District. reimburse counties general manager.” for about Feb. 12. The Fraser Centre the state will ally became to the Downtown TAKING SHAPE: around Sunday, county administrator, with the publication publiter sometime on the area, according She worked moving on to another about the acting Ceneconomic impact Denise Elbell, was just notified is befour years before Pennsylvania Businesstook a the county planning confirmed that cation — Central stint with CPBC, she But long-term for the county’s short the reimbursement. in the computer tral. After a to be of a messy situation and purchasing is turning out coming more funding job in sales state sure did skip staff, as irregular field. at it now, I was for a 12-month the norm. “Looking back said. “But, I think that be able to budgetgimmicks,” Pipe she of peoany “We need to to meet a lot around a lot,” CYS without well after the because I got period for our this impasse occurred for me.” good for me had to draw several doors said. “Because taxes last April, we’ve ple that opened business county property cash reserves.” those doing to imour ment paid by 20 state bills borders. down a lot on Dainty, Page 5 of more than passed the Legislawithin the district closes, the By HARRY ZIMBLER Plus, a series recaseloads untygazette.com When a business protection recently is a constant increased CYS counties, prove child correspondent@centreco resulted in empty storefront development ture and have 20 percent or more in somea bit for a that economic launched to — It takes conminder quite than COLLEGE be costs more with to by STATE hikes up the to keep up provide and efforts will needquickly as possible. required to Pipe said. That as stant monitoring and flow of retail counties are on time. ebb fill the space in with the property service that the constant organizations is not funding has an unasThe DID works the best fit. that the state for Centre County, it and professional College, and that said. owners to assure observers may State million, Elbell into Fortunately Downdowntown of about $6 Many casual with a constant mission of the reserve fund the county likes dipping signed area an is part of the why District. payments. mean wonder traffic and visitors That does not front money to cover CYS typically town Improvementdirector George to flow of student one empty storethat cushion into perspective, the countyCYS, Pipe DID executive of a muleven for would have the forefront the To put things $2 million every quarter Arnold is at to enhance observer front. receives about in the a casual tifaceted initiative be a the However, environment guarding was going to not understand said. economic Pipe learned there jealously would probablyis occurring in retail “When we first were in a better position,”living downtown while for the many busiwe we are life revolution that fierce competition budget impasse in the position where allocation.” the quality of services losales, including wide varisaid. “Now we’re check until we get state the counstores and a nesses and professional pay from big box district. expay check to sent out emergency funds, cated in the Anof the DID ety online retailers. by the spirit Tax and Revenue Before Wolf The boundaries Street to Sowers of cutting “I am encouraged the different out a $10 million instead Atherton took also from Highty among tend Avenue to to cover expenses of cooperation for Downtown ticipation Note Street and College that area there “We groups responsible Within 75 the Gazette said Arnold. land Alley. and eateries, TIM WEIGHT/For 3 State College,” 29, 30 Budget, Page are 75 restaurants 250 professional Bellefonte’s and Vana Dainty is 31 Business ..................... retail stores .... 26, 27 HOMETOWN PROUD:Development coordinator. “I DID, Page 3 Happening Classified ........................ entities. assess28 What’s service an by 18-23 Keystone Communitygreat potential in Bellefonte,” The DID is funded Puzzles ............................ Sports ......................... lot of .... 24, 25 ............... 12-15 Around & In Town think there’s a 8-10 Community ........... 16, 17 Pizza Dainty said. & Wellness ....... 11 Centre Spread • Lg. 1 Topping .. 2 Health ....................... Police .............................. 7 Education $8 3 Topping $6 Lg. ............................ • Wings Opinion

Pizza,

February 11-17,

com ountyGazette. www.CentreC

on the hardwood

Summer Summer Youth The 11th annual on Saturday, Feb. Fair will be held Nittany Middle 20, at the Mount previews the School. The Gazette a one-stop shop event, which is on local summer for information 20-23 camps and activities./Pages

scoring

Balanced Area High School The State College from team got points rout girls’ basketball lineup in a 64-45 everyone in the Lions The Lady Little of Mifflin County. game for the their are fine-tuning e 20 postseason./Pag

The CenTre CounTy

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Pick up your copy every Thursday. 814-238-5051 www.centrecountygazette.com


MarCh 3-9, 2016

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 21

TAKING DOWN CANCER

MICHAEL CZAP/For the Gazette

DURING A February wrestling match between Clearfield and Philipsburg-Osceola high schools, the teams got together for a special “Take Down Cancer” fundraiser. The schools raised $20,000 for the Emily Whitehead Foundation.

Awards dinner slated

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STATE COLLEGE — The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame Central Pennsylvania Chapter will hold its 19th annual Scholar-Athlete Awards Dinner from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 20, at the Penn Stater Hotel and Convention Center, 215 Innovation Blvd. in State College. The NFF will be honoring 52 high school football players from across central Pennsylvania for their outstanding performances on the field, in the classroom and in their communities. Several of the honorees will be awarded $1,000 scholarships to be used toward higher education. The event is open to the public. Tickets are $25 each and can be purchased by calling (814) 466-7244.

Find us on Facebook. Search “Centre County Gazette.” TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

PENNS VALLEY’S Maci Ilgen tries to get a shot off during a playoff game with Marion Center in February. Expert Certified Hand Washing of Oriental & Area Rugs

Boring scored four of those points, sandwiched around a basket by Hildebrand. “It takes a lot of energy to come back from a 12-point deficit,” McCaffery said. “I though Karli Ripka really came out in the second half. “We kinda challenged her in the locker room at halftime. She has one of the best outside shots we have, and I asked her how many shots she’d taken. She said, ‘Zero.’ Exactly. We are not going to get back into this by pounding it into the lane.” Except for two second-quarter free throws, all of Ripka’s 15 points came in the second half. Beamesderfer and Maci Ilgen added seven points each for the Rams, and MacKenzie Ironside added five. Penns Valley finished the season at 19-6 and as Mountain League champions with a league record of 14-1. The Rams will lose two four-year starters to graduation — Ripka and Ironside — but McCaffrey is still optimistic about PV’s future. “We made big gains over two years,” she said. “We lose two starters, four-year starters, and they will be hard to replace. But we played a lot of kids all year. Our freshmen have played a lot, so of the 12 we have in there, with the two that we are losing, we still played 10 of them. So we have a nice core coming back.”

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PaGe 22

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

MarCh 3-9, 2016

Penns Valley defeats Tyrone in consolation game By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

WINGATE — “Consolation” is the wrong name for the District 6 Class AA clash between Penns Valley and Tyrone on Feb. 25 at BEA. It should have been called a “reclamation game.” It is true that both teams were deeply disappointed in losses on Feb. 23 in the district semifinals, and this was just a necessary step to determine where and who both teams will play when the PIAA tournament begins on Friday, March 4. Don’t tell that to the players and coaches from either Penns Valley or Tyrone. This was, after all, the Rams against the Eagles, two contentious Mountain League rivals and perennial championship contenders. And even though PV won the first game this season going away, a win in the second matchup would still loudly proclaim a sign of improvement for Tyrone or a reaffirmation of its dominance by Penns Valley. In the end, both teams had something to say. Penns Valley emerged with its second win over the Eagles, 50-33, but Tyrone gave the Rams all they could handle through three tight, closely played quarters. The Golden Eagles in fact led at one point in the third quarter by 13 points, 2411, before PV guard Logan Pearce almost

single handedly turned things around for the Rams. Pearce nailed five second-half 3-pointers and loosened what had been a very tight and tentative Penns Valley offense. The Rams subsequently went on a 13-0 tear after the first of Pearce’s threes, tying the game at 24 just as the third quarter ended. Tyrone center Anthony Politza broke the spell, but the Rams were not finished. Another three by Pierce sparked another PV run — this one 18-5 — and before the Eagles could take a breath, the score was 42-31 with only 2:11 left to play. “It was like a different team came out of the locker room in the second half,” Tyrone coach George Gripp said. “We had everything going our way. They (Penns Valley) didn’t do anything that we didn’t expect or weren’t ready for. But for whatever reason, we started to turn the ball over, making careless mistakes, bad decisions, and that just started to feed their fast break. “But hats off to those guys. They came out and pressured us and didn’t quit.” There were times in the first half where Tyrone looked immune to Penns Valley’s pressure. Playing a controlled offense, waiting for good shots, and forcing the Rams into numerous mistakes, the Eagles took a 9-2 first quarter lead. By halftime, Penns Valley had still not broken into double figures and Tyrone ex-

tended its lead to 10 points, 19-9. “The first half was the worst half of basketball that we’ve played,” Penns Valley coach Terry Glunt said. “Our defense was OK, but our offense was without any kind of tempo. We were indecisive and we just called an offense and went to Plan F, and it worked. And then we stayed with it. Once we started and we broke that seal, it led to a 41-14 second half.” After PV got to 42-31, a 3-pointer by forward Ben Alexander and five free throws by the team put the game on ice for the Rams. Pearce led Penns Valley with 19 points on the night, and he was closely followed by Alexander with 17. For Tyrone, Politza scored 16 and guard Alex Weaver chipped in with 10. “The first half he (Pearce) was off balance,” Glunt said, “and we had to do something for him. We couldn’t dwell on the fact that he was missing shots, and he was the solution to the problem we had. We needed to score some points, and he’s one of our best offensive players. “We went from one of the worst losses I’ve ever experienced (to West Branch) to one of the best wins. I am really happy for my kids more than anything.” Both teams will now advance into the PIAA playoffs. Penns Valley will match up with the No. 1 seed from District 9, Kane. Kane beat Brockway in the district

TIM WEIGHT/Gazette file photo

PENNS VALLEY’S Chase Collison puts up a shot during a playoff game with West Branch in February. The Rams won their consolation game with Tyrone to earn a spot in the PIAA playoffs.

final on Feb 27. Tyrone will see Aliquippa, the No. 1 seed from District 7.

State College High faces a familiar foe in state playoffs By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — If an opponent takes the State College Little Lions’ 14-10

record as representative of how the Lions are playing, that team will be in for a rude awakening. The Carlisle Thundering Herd, State College’s opponent in the first round of

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the PIAA State Tournament beginning on Saturday, March 5, will be under no such illusions. Back on Jan. 20, the then middle-ofthe-road Little Lions beat the first-place Herd, 61-54, in a Mid-Penn matchup on Carlisle’s floor. And it was no upset. At that point, SC was just beginning to get its footing and since then has been noticeably improving almost game by game. It all culminated for State College on

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PaGe 23

Nittany Lions narrowly defeats Cornhuskers at BJC By DANIEL CORREA

correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

UNIVERSITY PARK — On Feb. 25, Penn State narrowly escaped with a nail-biting 56-55 victory over the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Penn State notched its second consecutive win at home and the Nittany Lions improved to 10-3 inside the Bryce Jordan Center. Starting point guard Shep Garner had a team-leading 22 points in 37 minutes played. Garner shot 50 percent from the field and made five of his 10 3-pointers, scoring 16 of his 22 points in the second half. Garner’s presence was felt during the entire game, as he scored field goal after field goal and hit timely 3-pointers. With seven seconds left in the second half of the game, he made a game-changing trip to the free-throw line after being fouled by Nebraska guard Tai Webster. Garner made the first of his two attempts, but following the missed second attempt, Nebraska guard Andrew White III hauled in the defensive rebound. Nebraska forward Shavon Shields missed a costly jumper as time expired, though, and that is how the game ended, as Penn State held on by the slimmest of margins. “I focus on doing well and working hard in practice, and it translates over,” Garner said. “You have to have a great mentality, get better each day, play hard and defend the rebound.” Penn State head coach Patrick Chambers was pleased with his team’s overall performance and resolve. “We did a really good job in the first half; we have to continue to work harder, set screens and we have to learn how to put teams away,” Chambers said. Chambers also praised his sophomore guard. “I was really proud of Shep Garner tonight.” Nebraska head coach Tim Miles credited Garner and Brandon Taylor’s (19 points) performances as the culprit for his team’s defeat. “We were getting beat by two guys — Garner and Taylor — which translated into turnovers, and once we got into transition we didn’t have enough at the end,” Miles said. Commenting on Nebraska’s losing effort, Miles blamed

AL GOLDIS/AP Photo

PENN STATE head basketball coach Patrick Chambers had to be restrained during the Nittany Lions’ 88-57 loss at Michigan State on Feb. 28.

his defense for not stopping Penn State’s 3-point shooting parade, led by Taylor and Garner. “We can’t give up 11 3-pointers and expect to win.” Penn State stumbled in its next outing at Michigan State in an 88-57 loss.

State High, from page 22 the Lions evened things with the win in January. In the District 3 playoffs, Carlisle (19-6) entered as the No. 7 seed. The Herd beat William Penn in the first round, 69-54, but they then ran into No. 1 seed and state power Reading. That game went into overtime. Carlisle had its chances, but Reading prevailed, 78-73, and the Herd found itself in the loser’s bracket. Two wins later — over Lebanon and Hempfield — Carlisle qualified for the state tournament in the fifth spot, and the game with State College was finalized. Carlisle is led by three outside players and 6-foot-6 center Ethan Huston. Guard and 1,000-point scorer DeShawn Millington leads the Herd in scoring, and he consistently scored over the 20-point mark per game, especially late in the season. Swingmen Jordan Purcell and Tyler Green also score in double figures and give Carlisle a balanced and dangerous attack. State College counters with sophomore Drew Friberg and Tommy Sekunda, but Cooper Gulley, Keaton Ellis, Tommy Friberg and Brandon Clark also contribute for the Lions. “We’ll have Carlisle,” State College coach Joe Walker said after the Altoona game, “and we split with them. We lost at home with not all of our guys and we actually won down there in a good — no great — team effort game. “They are playing really well. They lost to Reading, and Reading is a top-notch state team. It seems that they’re peaking right now, so we go back to practice this week and start laying in for Carlisle. “We did some things in the last game that we learned in the first game that helped us be successful.” The D-6 title game against Altoona turned on the play of the State College defense. Walker and his team will no doubt be concentrating in that area again — hopefully with the same results against Carlisle as well.

Send sports information, schedules and photos to ... editor@ centrecountygazette.com

Lady Little Lions to face WPIAL powerhouse By PAT ROTHDEUTSCH sports@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — The State College girls’ basketball team came away with it all after a Feb. 27 victory over District 6 Class AAAA rival Altoona. The Little Lady Lions completed an extraordinary year with a 20-3 record, and they won the D-6 championship going away from the Mountain Lions by a score of 52-27. In addition, State College high scorer and UConn recruit Kyla Irwin passed not only the 600-point mark for the season, but the 2,000-point milestone for her career at State College as well. She became only the second player, boy or girl, to pass 2,000 points in Centre County history. It’s not surprising and completely understandable that head coach Bethany Irwin said her team was going to take some time to sit back and enjoy their successes. “I don’t know who we play next or when,” she said after the Altoona game. She has no doubt found all of that out by now. The Lady Little Lions are matched up in Round 1 of the PIAA tournament against one of the big powers out of the WPIAL — the Penn Hills Indians. Penn Hills finished this season with a 22-3 record and comes into the state tournament as the No. 4 seed out of

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District 7. The Indians were a finalist last season and came into the District 7 tournament this year riding an eightgame winning streak. Interestingly, their last loss in the regular season came at the hands of Altoona, 56-55, on Jan. 19 in Altoona. In the first two rounds, Penn Hills took out Latrobe and Canon-McMillan by double-digit margins, but it ran into No. 2 seed North Allegheny in the semifinals. In that game, the Indians started slowly and never recovered in a 68-40 loss. Penn Hills is a guard-dominated team led by two Division I prospects — senior Jade Ely and junior Disiree Oliver. Ely has already committed to play in 2016-17 for Cleveland State, while Oliver is sifting through at least 10 offers from D-1 schools including Rhode Island, Cleveland State and Kent State. Both girls average close to 15 points per game, and according to head coach John Tate, they have seen just about every kind of man-to-man, zone and combination defense imaginable this season and have still performed. The trouble for opponents is that the Indians play nine deep. Along with Ely and Oliver, Penn Hills also has senior guard Ionie Banner and three promising freshmen who have seen lots of playing time — Diamond-Jay Whittington, Ariana Dunson and Tayanna Robertson. State College also comes into this game playing ex-

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tremely well, and the Lions have also shown overall team balance as well. When opponents gang up on Irwin, like Altoona did in the D-6 final, other players such as Abby Allen and Kayla Hawbaker have stepped up and relieved the pressure on Irwin. Allen, for example, nailed five 3-pointers against Altoona while the Mountain Lions were concentrating on stopping Irwin. Irwin could be the wild card in this game. If Penn Hills can’t match up with her inside and keep her relatively under control, State High could very well be doing some more celebrating.

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Page 24

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016


MarCh 3-9, 2016

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

PaGe 25

College Town Film Festival coming to State College By JEN FABIANO correspondent@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — College Town Film Festival presents its fourth annual movie festival Wednesday, March 16, through Saturday, March 19, in venues throughout State College. The films being screened were submitted through an Internet portal and then selected by the festival’s board. Eric Zudak, executive director of College Town Film Festival, said the festival’s host cities have a large impact on it. State College, and Penn State, has become influential in their search for important movies. “This year’s rich and wide-ranging slate of films is the result of the widespread support we receive from the university, the borough and the community,” said Zudak. The College Town Film Festival has also produced two film festivals at Ohio University, and is hoping to expand the program in coming years. “We are growing the festival every year,” said Matt Jordan, president of College Town Film Festival. Five types of events will be presented during the festival, including features, documentaries, the Café Series, programs and workshops. The features category includes longer films that vary in topic, ranging from the life of an African-American kid in Los Angeles to a story about a couple surviving in the real world. The documentaries also are focused on a wide range of topics, including the situation that Palestinian people currently live in and the life of a man who has suffered from a

Submitted photo

THE COLLEGE TOWN Film Festival’s screenings of features and documentaries will run through Saturday, March 19 in various State College locations. stroke. The Café Series is a collection of 11 short films that will be presented at Café 210 West in downtown State College at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16. The programs are events featuring various films that are related by topic or directors. There also will be two workshops held during the festival. “Everyone’s a Filmmaker” will focus on how film is reshaping the world. “Original Script Reading” will offer and overview of an original screenplay. “The Key,” will premier at 10 p.m. on the opening day of

the festival at the State Theater. The film, a story about horror and revenge, features actor Gedeon Burkhard. Burkhard, who is most well known for his role as Corp. Wilhelm Wicki in “Inglorious Bastards,” will participate in a question-and-answer session after the screening with ilmmaker and moderator Kevin Guzowski. Each film screening is free to Penn State students with student ID cards. Tickets for all others are $4. For more information, visit www.collegetownfilm festival.com.

Nittany Theatre announces award winners BOALSBURG — Nittany Theatre recently announced the winners of its first-ever “Tony Awards” for achievement and service at Nittany Theatre at the Barn. Winners of these “off-off-Broadway Tonys” were selected by popular vote drawn from nominations of the 108 participants who worked in and on the group’s six summer stock productions. The “Tony Awards” are named in honor of one of Nittany Theatre at the Barn’s founding patrons, Tony Bonaduce. A plaque acknowledging these achievements will be permanently displayed at the theater and winners will be recognized on opening night of the 2016 summer stock season, scheduled for Tuesday, May 10. The winners are: Best production — “The Addams Family” Best musical — “1776” Best play — “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll” Best director — Courtney Young, “The Addams Fam-

ily,” and Richard Roland — “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll” Best choreography — Courtney Young, “The Addams Family” Best light fesign — Andrew Saxe, “Always, Patsy Cline” Best sound design — Michael Tony Cooper, “The Addams Family” Best costumes — Julie Snyder, “The Addams Family” Best set — William Snyder, “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll,” Best technical contribution — Katie Carriero, stage manager, “Forever Plaid” Funniest moment — “Louise Drives Sexy Dude,” Laura Ann Saxe, “Always, Patsy Cline” Most unforgettable moment — “Baby Pick Up,” Steve Raybuck, Mercer Bristow, Frank Wilson, John Koch, Rod Egan, “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll” Most unforgettable song — “You Belong to Me,” Kristi Branstetter, “Always, Patsy Cline”

Best actor — Dave Saxe, Gomez, “The Addams Family” Best supporting actor — Jerrod Miller, Fester, “The Addams Family” Best actress — Christina Kidd, Joy, “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll” and Laura Saxe, John Adams, “1776” Best supporting actress — Hannah Richardson, Bonnie Sue, “Betty Crocker, Kinsey, and Rock ‘n’ Roll” Best ensemble — “1776” Best performance number (individual) — “Molasses to Rum,” Deb Saxe, “1776” Best performance number (ensemble) — “Death Is Right Around the Corner,” C.J. Greer/ensemble, “The Addams Family,” and “Travelogue Medley,” Katrina Diehm, Carrie Brandon, Kaye Saxe and Julia Hemp, “The Taffetas” Local auditions for Nittany Theatre at the Barn’s 2016 summer stock season will take place from Thursday, Feb. 25, through Sunday, Feb. 28. Information and details can be found at www.nittany theatre.org.


PaGe 26

The CenTre CounTy GazeTTe

MarCh 3-9, 2016

AROUND & IN TOWN

New Bellefonte Art Museum show opens on March 4 BELLEFONTE — The Bellefonte Art Museum presents “Who, What, Why, When and Where,” featuring the photos of retired journalism professor R. Thomas Berner, beginning Friday, March 4. Berner, who has taken pictures on six of the seven continents, will exhibit photos from as close as Mingoville and as far away as China. His most recent international photography venture was in Peru, and next up on his agenda is Portugal, Spain and a third visit to Wales. Berner and his wife, Paulette, have jointly self-published books — featuring his photographs and her paintings — about their travels under the name Pixels and Bristles. Their last commercial book resulted from a trip to Cuba. A second exhibit by Berner, “Off the Wall,” will feature photos that once hung in his home, removed from their frames to make way for photos for this exhibit. Berner will also exhibit several photo books he has published, including “Pennsylvania Barn Stories” and “Wales Married to the Eye.” He is now working on a book about quilt barns. For more information on Berner’s work, visit www.rthomas-berner.artistwebsites. com. In addition to Berner’s show, the popular exhibit “Dinor Bleu: The Vanishing American Diner,” with photos by Chuck Fong, will be in its last month. Fong’s show explores the unique American tradition of diner eateries through photographs, historical information and nonfiction narratives. Also on display will be art by Monika Malewska, Sue Lacy, Peg Klinger, Janice Kramer-Heverly, Alison Borkowscy, Jeff Mathison, Mary Shay McGuire and Barb

Submitted photo

“PENNS VALLEY CLOUD” is one of the many works by R. Thomas Berner that will be featured at the Bellefonte Art Museum beginning March 4. Pennypacker and jewelry by Janise Crow, who is featuring a new show this month. The museum kicks the month off with its First Sunday event at 1 p.m. Sunday,

March 6. Visitors can enjoy food and meet the artists, and children are invited to participate in an art activity. Two other museum events in March are Jazz Night with the Ronnie Burrage Duo from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 11, and

Out Loud at the Bellefonte Art Museum, featuring local students reading their own writings, at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 18. For more information, visit www. bellefontemuseum.org.

Local author releases new novel PHILIPSBURG — Romance novelist Bethany M. Sefchick, of State College, has recently released “From the Viscount With Love,” the seventh novel in her “Tales From Seldon Park” Regency-era romance series. “I never imagined that this series would become so popular,” Sefchick said. “When I wrote the first novel several years ago, it was more of a test to see if I could do it and do it well, more than anything else. When people responded so positively to that first novel, I wrote a second book, and then a third. After that, the series seemed to just take

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on a life of its own and I couldn’t be happier. “Somehow, I seem to have created characters that people really connect with, even though they’re from a previous century and another continent.” Sefchick, a former Emmy Award-winning television producer, published her first novel in 2011. She is the author of more than 20 novels, novellas and short stories and her works are available at Thieves Market in Philipsburg, Amazon. com, BarnesandNoble.com and other online locations.

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March 3-9, 2016

The Centre County Gazette

Page 27

AROUND & IN TOWN

Ouwehands fund PSU classical music endowment

UNIVERSITY PARK — Pieter and Lida Ouwehand, of Ferguson Township, have used an IRA qualified charitable distribution to immediately support the Pieter and Lida Ouwehand Endowment for the Center for the Performing Arts at Penn State. “Pieter and Lida are passionate about the performing arts and classical music in particular,” said George Trudeau, director of the Center for the Performing Arts. “Not only are they faithful audience members

but, through their philanthropy, they are providing funds to ensure that the center will continue to flourish now and far into the future.” The Ouwehands created the planned future endowment in 2013 as an estate gift that will be used to support classical music programs and activities. This new gift adds funds immediately, rather than waiting for an estate distribution, so the Center for the Performing Arts can benefit in the near

term and the donors are able to witness the impact of their support during their lifetimes. The Ouwehands have been involved with the arts in Centre County since they moved to State College in 1994. They are Director’s Circle-level members of the Center for the Performing Arts, and in June Pieter Ouwehand will complete his second three-year term on the community advisory council. He also is a member of the

Music at Penn’s Woods advisory council. Before retiring in 1993, Pieter Ouwehand was a chemical engineer with Merck & Co. Inc. in Rahway, N.J. He and his wife regularly attend performances presented by the Center for the Performing Arts, Music at Penn’s Woods and the Penn State School of Music. For more information on the Center for the Performing Arts, visit www.facebook. com/pscpa.

WHAT’S HAPPENING To be included in What’s Happening, submit your events by Wednesday one week prior to publication to community@centrecountygazette.com or mail information to The Centre County Gazette, Attn: What’s Happening, 403 S. Allen St., State College, PA 16801.

ONGOING

Bookmobile — Centre County Library Bookmobile is a fully accessible library on wheels. Look for it in your community and join Miss Laura for story times, songs and fun. Visit the website at www.centrecountylibrary.org for days and times. Meeting — Calvary Church hosts a Christian Recovery meeting every Monday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 1250 University Drive, State College. Visit www.liferecovery statecollege.com. Club — The Schlow Knitting Club meets at 5:30 p.m. every first and third Monday. Knitters of all skill levels are welcome. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Club — The Centre Region Model Investment Club meets the second Monday of every month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Mazza Room at the South Hills Business School, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. Call (814) 2348775 or contact cr20mic@aol.com. Performance — The Nittany Knights perform at 7:15 every Monday night at South Hills School of Business and Technology, 480 Waupelani Drive, State College. Visit www.nittanyknights.org Safety checks — Mount Nittany Health sponsors free car seat safety checks from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at its Boalsburg location, 3901 S. Atherton St., State College. Certified car seat safety educators will check to make sure car seats are installed correctly. Call (814) 466-7921. Meeting — The Nittany Valley Model Railroad Club meets every Tuesday from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Old Gregg School, 106 School St., Spring Mills. Call (814) 422-7667. Meeting — The Centre County Advisory Council to the Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission holds a meeting the second Tuesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. in the State College Municipal Building, 243 S. Allen St., State College. Meetings can also be broadcast to laptops and iOS or Android devices, or participants can join by phone. Call (814) 689-9081. Meeting — The State College Sunrise Rotary Club meets every Wednesday at 7:15 a.m. at the Hotel State College, 100 W. College Ave., State College. Visit www.statecollege sunriserotary.org. Support group — The Home Nursing Agency hosts a free grief support group from 2 to 3:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesday of every month at its Centre County office, 450 Windmere Drive, Suite 100, State College. Call (800) 445-6262. Club — The Nittany Valley Writers Network meets from 7 to 8 a.m. every third Wednesday of the month at the Waffle Shop, 1610 W. College Ave., State College. Email nvwn@ yahoogroups.com. Community meal — A free hot meal is from 5 to 7 p.m. every Thursday at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church Community Cafe. Meeting — The State College Alliance Church hosts a Christian Recovery meeting every Friday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at 1221 W. White Road, State College. Visit www. liferecoverystatecollege.com.

LIMITED-TIME EVENTS

Children’s activity — There will be a preschool story time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Mondays throughout March at the Centre Hall Area Branch Library, 109 W. Beryl St., Centre Hall. Visit www.centrecountylibrary.org. Children’s activity — A variety of story time groups will be held throughout March at the Centre County Library

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and Historical Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Toddler story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Mondays. Family story time will be held from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays. Book Babies will be held from 9:30 to 10 a.m. Wednesdays. And, a preschool story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays. Visit www.centrecounty library.org. Children’s activity — A variety of story time groups will be held throughout March at Holt Memorial Library, 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. “Mother Goose on the Loose,” a baby story time group, will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays. Preschool story time will be held from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays. There will also be elementary-level activities from 6 to 7 p.m. Thursdays. Visit www. centrecountylibrary.org. Exhibit — “Coded Language” will be on display through Thursday, March 3, at the HUB-Robeson Galleries, HUBRobeson Center, University Park. Call (814) 865-2563. Performance — The Penns Valley Thespians present “Mary Poppins: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 4, and Saturday, March 5, at Penns Valley Area High School, 4528 Penns Valley Road, Spring Mills. Visit www. showtix4u.com. Performance — State College Community Theatre presents a Mystery Dinner Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 4, through Sunday, March 6, at Duffy’s Tavern, 113 E. Main St., Boalsburg. Visit www.scctonline.org. Exhibit — “Art is EVERYWHERE, Art is EVERYONE” will be on display from Friday, March 4, through Monday, March 22, at the Huntingdon County Arts Council Building, 212 Fourth St., Huntingdon. Visit www.huntingdon countyarts.com. Children’s activity — “Plantpalooza” plant experiments and workshops will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, March 7, and Tuesday, March 8, at Discovery Space, 112 W. Foster Ave., State College. Recommended for children ages 6 through 10. Visit www.mydiscoveryspace.org. Exhibit — “Consciously Surreal: Photography, the Uncanny, and the Body” will be on display through Sunday, May 8, during operating hours at the Palmer Museum of Art, Curtin Road, University Park. Call (814) 8657672. Exhibit — “From Dada to Dali: Surrealist Works on Paper” will be on display through Sunday, May 8, during operating hours at the Palmer Museum of Art, Curtin Road, University Park. Call (814) 865-7672.

UPCOMING THURSDAY, MARCH 3

Open house — An open house for volunteers will be held from noon to 2 p.m. and from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at St. Vincent de Paul Thrift Store, 526 Westerly Parkway, State College. Call (814) 867-3131 Concert — Folk band Low Lily will perform at 4:30 p.m. at State College Presbyterian Church, 132 W. Beaver Ave., State College. Music workshops will be held after the concert at 5:30 p.m. Visit www.lowlily.com. Concert — The Russian National Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. at Eisenhower Auditorium, Eisenhower Road, University Park. Visit www.cpa.psu.edu/events. Concert — Local musician Van Wagner will perform at 7:30 p.m. at Elk Creek Café, 100 W. Main St., Millheim. Call (814) 349-8850 or visit www.elkcreekcafe.net.

SATURDAY, MARCH 5

Workshop — State College Community Theatre Audition Workshop will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at SCCT Backstage, 171 Technology Drive, Boalsburg. Visit www. scctonline.org. Community meal — A chicken dinner will be served starting at 10 a.m. at Logan Fire Company No. 1, 120 E. Howard St., Bellefonte. Call (814) 355-3100. Fundraiser — The Friends of the Library will be holding a used book sale from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the basement of Holt Memorial Library, 17 N. Front St., Philipsburg. Performance — Giacomo Puccini’s “Manon Lescaut” will be presented live from The Metropolitan Opera from 12:55 to 1:55 p.m. at The State Theatre, 130 W. College Ave., State College. Visit www.thestatetheatre.org. Children’s activity — Block Party will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. at Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Concert — Still Hand String Band will perform bluegrass at 8 p.m. at Elk Creek Café, 100 W. Main St., Millheim. Call (814) 349-8850 or visit www.elkcreekcafe.net.

SUNDAY, MARCH 6

Community meal — A pancake breakfast will be served from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Good Shepherd Catholic Church, 867 Gray’s Wood Blvd., Port Matilda. Visit www.good shepherd-sc.org. Community meal — A spaghetti dinner will be served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Port Matilda Sportsmen’s Club, South Eagle Valley Road, Port Matilda. Call (814) 691-1016. Children’s activity — A National Pig Day celebration will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. at Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org.

MONDAY, MARCH 7

Children’s activity — Discovery Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org.

TUESDAY, MARCH 8

Workshop — “Tax and Bookkeeping Considerations for Small Business” will be held from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Technology Center, 200 Innovation Blvd., State College. Visit www.sbdc.psu.edu/seminars. Children’s activity — Discovery Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Workshop — The Nittany Valley Writer’s Network will meet from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Workshop — Happy Valley Sip and Paint will hold an open workshop from 7 to 9 p.m. at Garfield’s Restaurant Pub, 2901 E. College Ave., State College. Visit www. happyvalleysipandpaint.com.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9

Children’s activity — Discovery Day will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Schlow Library, 211 S. Allen St., State College. Visit www.schlowlibrary.org. Concert — The Klezmatics will perform from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Weis Center for the Performing Arts, 1 Dent Drive, Lewisburg. Visit www.bucknell.edu/weiscenter. — Compiled by Gazette staff

FRIDAY, MARCH 4

Concert — Northwestern University piano professor James Giles will perform from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Esber Recital Hall, University Park. Visit www.music.psu.edu. Movie — “The Martian” will be shown at 1 p.m. at the Centre County Library and Historical Museum, 200 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte. Visit www.centrecountylibrary. org.

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Page 28

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

PUZZLES CLUES ACROSS

32. Purplish red

2. Delicacy

28. Bo __, “10”

1. Sold at a higher price

33. Towards the mouth or oral region

3. Punish with an arbitrary penalty

29. Unfledged or nestling hawk

8. Instill fear

34 Portuguese musical genre

4. Household god (Roman)

30. Surrenders

35. Steals

5. Public television station

34. Planted with trees

6. __ Lilly, drug company

35. Washington town

13. Can be domesticated 14. Oohed and ___

38. Acts insincerely

15. Make too simple

39. City in Belarus

19. Plutonium

40. Anticipates

20. Necessary for breathing

43. Paris airport

21. Make happy

45. No (Scottish)

22. Mythological bird

47. Opens lock

23. A baglike structure in a plant or animal

48. Central parts

10. Exclamation of surprise

49. Sheep disease

11. Lies down in rest

50. Indicates position

12. Give an education to

44. Deal with

24. Put on __ 26. Blushed 30. Celestial object 31. Point __ National Seashore

Sudoku #2

8. Free from danger 9. Low bank or reef of coral

37. Inwardly 38. Chinese province 40. Garrison 41. Converts thermal energy to mechanical work 42. Holy people

16. Provides

55. Khoikhoin peoples

17. Fat from a pig

57. Informal alliance between countries

46. Boundaries

18. Belonging to a thing

48. Utter obscenities

58. Long poems Fun By The Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

36. Listen in

7. Degraded

44. Lowest point between two peaks

51. Doing many things at once

25. Type of dough

Sudoku #1

32. Type of dessert

51. ___ and cheese

22. Branches of a bone

59. The state of being poorly illuminated

25. Having a cheerless aspect or disposition

CLUES DOWN

27. Edema (archaic)

1. Portico

52. Member of the cuckoo family 53. Type of microscope 54. ___ and Barbie 56. Michigan PUZZLE #1 SOLUTION PUZZLE #2 SOLUTION

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March 3-9, 2016

Business

Page 29

Dunham’s to open soon, assist Nittany Mall revival By ALEXA LEWIS news@centrecountygazette.com

STATE COLLEGE — The Nittany Mall has spent the last year reinventing itself and a Dunham’s Sports store, set to open at 9 a.m. Friday, March 11, is a key component of the makeover. “We would like to revive the Nittany Mall to what it used to be, which was a community atmosphere,” said Polly Welch, the Nittany Mall’s general manager. “Dunham’s is going to help us achieve that.” Since the recession that hit in 2007 and did not officially end until 2009, the future of American shopping malls has become apparent. In 2006, just before spending decreased for the first time in about 20 years, 94 percent of the country’s 1,200 malls were considered healthy, with vacancy rates of 10 percent or less. But today, that percentage has dropped to about 80 percent, according to CoStar Group, a real estate data provider. As the earnings gap has widened since the recession, with wealthy households continuing to accrue a larger share of the nation’s collective income, working- and middle-class malls have suffered the most. These malls are disappearing as their anchor stores, such as Macy’s, Sears, Kmart and J.C. Penney, continue to close. When the J.C. Penney in the Nittany Mall shut its doors last April, after announcing it would close about 40 locations nationwide, it left one of the mall’s larger spaces — a 63,000-square-foot space — vacant. Once anchor stores close it puts pressure on the mall’s other retail entities, Business Insider reported. And, with the recent boom in retail space across the country, it can be hard for mall administration to find tenants to fill these large spaces. Fortunately for the Nittany Mall, it signed a contract with Dunham’s just a few weeks after J.C. Penney closed. Welch said it is hard to lease a space that size and said she was surprised with how quickly they were able to finalize negotiations with Dunham’s. While construction delays pushed back the opening from the end of 2015 to now, renovations are now complete and the store is in the process of stocking its shelves, which can take between four to six weeks. Construction started in October 2015. “The whole process to get zoning and code through can be somewhat long,” Welch said. Welch said the Nittany Mall is working hard to change the public’s perception of the mall by offering community programs and providing a space to showcase the area’s tal-

HEATHER WEIKEL/For the Gazette

DUNHAM’S SPORTS will open soon at the Nittany Mall. It will take over space once occupied by J.C. Penney. ent. For example, the mall will host the 27th annual Senior Health and Lifestyle Expo scheduled for Thursday, May 19. Dunham’s fits well into that revival scheme, as it plans on offering money-saving programs for local sports teams and companies, Welch said. Welch also said that the Dick’s Sporting Goods located in the shopping area off of Colonnade Boulevard should not impact sales at the Dunham’s store. “Dick’s is a little on the higher end,” she said. “This is a store everyone can shop at.” The Nittany Mall has also recently welcomed other tenants, including the Centre Region Senior Center,

which will occupy a 7,075-square-foot space once renovations are complete. The Senior Center moved out of its 4,728-square-foot location below the Fraser Street Garage in September to a temporary location in the Nittany Mall. The Senior Center’s move has brought more traffic to both the mall and the center. The number of participants at the center has doubled since its move, according to Welch. Niki Tourscher, the program manager at the agency that oversees the Senior Center, said, “We see a lot more people just stopping in to check us out and a lot of those people who have stopped in are now participants.”

Centre County Bar Association wins PBA recognition UNIVERSITY PARK — The Pennsylvania Bar Association presented a County Bar Recognition Award to the Centre County Bar Association during a Conference of County Bar Leaders seminar held Feb. 25 through 27 at the Nittany Lion Inn. Recognized for its Law Day activities, the Centre County Bar Association is one of 24 local bar associations in Pennsylvania honored this year for sponsoring projects that improve the legal profession, justice system or community. The awards are presented annually by the PBA. “Numerous projects and programs aimed at improving communities and the legal profession are successfully completed each year thanks to the voluntary efforts of lawyers involved in local bar associations,” said William H. Pugh V, PBA president. “We are proud to highlight their

New facility to open TYRONE — American Eagle Paper Mills recently announced the opening of a new 50,000-square-foot building in Tyrone. This new building will provide American Eagle with a world-class warehouse facility and new corporate sales and logistics offices to support American Eagle’s growing business. The new warehouse also will provide for operational efficiencies, including new inbound and outbound truck and rail facilities, and ample storage space for company’s full line of fine paper products. The facility has been integrated with American Eagle’s state-of-the-art converting operation, increasing productivity at the mill.

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good works and hope this recognition inspires more legal professionals to participate in future efforts.” The Centre County association planned and coordinated the Law Day program at the county courthouse. Four different programs developed for approximately 400 high school seniors included presentations from local lawyers and representatives from county and state correctional facilities, law enforcement agencies, the district attorney’s office and the public defender’s offices. The Conference of County Bar Leaders, whose membership includes leaders from county bar associations throughout the state and from the PBA, organizes a yearly educational conference focusing on the exchange of innovative bar association projects and ideas and on the development of mutually beneficial relationships among

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Page 30

The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

Galliker Dairy Co. finalist for marketing awards JOHNSTOWN — Quality Chekd Dairies announced today the selection of Galliker Dairy Co. as one of three finalists for both the 2016 Outstanding Marketing Achievement Award’s Best Single Product Campaign and Best Integrated Marketing Campaign categories. These awards recognize a company’s clearly defined marketing objectives and strategies, creative execution and measurable results. “Our marketing group works hard to develop campaigns that help us stand out from the competition,” said Lou Galliker, chairman of the board of Galliker Dairy Co.

“Being named as a finalist for the Best Single Product Campaign category and the Best Integrated Marketing Campaign category is a tribute to their efforts and the success of the campaigns they created.” Entries for the two categories are judged by an independent panel that reviews each dairy’s marketing plan, goals, strategy, promotional materials, merchandising programs and ability to enhance brand awareness and generate positive sales results. Quality Chekd, a memberowned organization of independent dairy processors, will announce the winners at its 2016 QCS Leadership Confer-

ence, scheduled for Sunday, April 24, through Tuesday, April 26, Indianapolis. “This award for marketing excellence challenges member dairies to create and implement unique, exciting campaigns,” said Peter Horvath, president of Quality Chekd. “We are always pleased and amazed by the marketing campaigns our members execute each year.” Galliker serves the State College and Bellefonte Area school districts and the company’s products can be found locally at Wal-Mart, Giant, Weis Markets, McLanahan’s, Sheetz, Minit Mart, Snappy’s and Burkholder’s.

DEED TRANSFERS The following property transactions were compiled from information provided by the Centre County recorder of deeds, Joseph Davidson. The Gazette is not responsible for typographical errors. The published information is believed to be accurate; however, the Gazette neither warrants nor accepts any liability or responsibility for inaccurate information.

Jonathan K. Nelson and Patricia A. Sanford, 113 E. Aaron Drive, State College, $200,000.

HALFMOON TOWNSHIP

RECORDED FEB. 8-12, 2016

Glen D. Adams to Lawrence G. Adams, 100 Hillcrest St., Philipsburg, $1. Frank Boyer Scott IV and Karen Beth Scott to HSBC Mortgage Services Inc., 11 Hemlock Drive, Port Matilda, $1.

BENNER TOWNSHIP

MARION TOWNSHIP

Jerilynn R. Yeisley estate and Wendy Y. Blumenthal to Bretton L. Beard and Jamie M. Beard, 1375 Seibert Road, Bellefonte, $349,900.

Christine L. Woodruff and Neal Woodruff to Christine L. Woodruff, Neal Woodruff and David Woodruff, 296 Oakley Drive, Lewisburg, $1. White Lion LLC to Jerry L. Bierly and Tammy L. Bierly, 140 Whisper Ridge Drive, Port Matilda, $56,000.

Gazette

POTTER TOWNSHIP

Northwest Savings Bank to Elevation 1809 LP, 559 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Centre Hall, $623,000.

RUSH TOWNSHIP

WORTH TOWNSHIP

Ronnie L. Phillips Jr. and Lynette Phillips to Teresa E. Putillion, 312 Walker St., Osceola Mills, $30,000. Larry M. McCloskey and Victoria L. McCloskey to Sondra Sprock and Paul G. McCloskey, 320 Walnut St., Philipsburg, $1.

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boilof boilers. Four and, facility, ■ The replacement used at the hospital is the ers are currently Wisniewski, originally inBy G. KERRY WEBSTER untygazette.com according to that were correspondent@centreco was constructed using two boilers Medithe facility the boilers have stalled when — Mount Nittany old said although BELLEFONTE serving the health care in 1972. He replacing the been since cal Center has been well-maintained, a more sufficient Region residents of the give MNMC meeting needs of Centre and the water boilers will this week’s the buildings 1972, and at Board of Commissioners, way of heating in Centre County announced $20 million used within. of a linear accelerator meet hospital brass ■ The purchase to even better of cancer patients. campus renovations for treatment of the cardiovascular and those needs. ■ The expansion originally constructed in many facets was “We are growing to keep up with eva drastic insuite. The suite be able since has seencardiovascular the hospital,” we want to in 2000, and going on at seeking and erything that’s crease in patients MNMC’s president floor. be paid through said Steve Brown, services. to the ground needs projects will there will be CEO. “These ■ Improvements attention Authority, and said particular area, which has the Hospital charge to the county. These Wisniewski the kitchen is since the plan and now no additional to be paid to or improved our five-year kitchproject are in them taken care of.” not been updated He said the serve bethe time to getto Rich Wisniewski, former building’s construction. designed to however, MNMC, five According day; en was originally president of 90 meals per 190 CFO and vice the agenda, including: tween 60 and show between 160 and on parkprojects are of a two-story recent counts and served each day. good ■ The construction current parking meals prepared our facilities are in of the side of a ing garage on will increase the number “I think all lot. The project by 300. parking spaces

Gazette file photo

Jordan Center

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on Friday, Feb.

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returned to State Joe Battista has BACK HOME AGAIN: stint with the Buffalo Sabres a short his own business, College following Battista has started and Terry Pegula. LLC. PRAGMATIC Passion,

By ALEXA LEWIS

tte.com news@centrecountygaze

G. KERRY WEBSTER/For

the Gazette

along the side

Graphic courtesy

however, there things shape and up-to-date; do to keep we have to still things “All these projects the said Brown. improving,” growth and the need in are based on drawing patients We’re now community.

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woman Police report dumped found dead was

countmonths and PARK — Seven the Pennsylvania’s UNIVERSITY with State, along has yet to see ing and Penn universities, state-related three other his budget rst announced Penn State its state appropriations. Tom Wolf fi When Gov. year, he said funding. But 2015-16 fiscal plans for the an extra $49 million in maup would pick and the Republican-led back-anddays into a Wolf’s administration more than 200 bottled up funding to has jority are now dispute that forth budget schools. concerned that state-related frustrated and could imThat has students budget stalemate Pennthrough the the state’s record-long receiving loans Agency and pact students Education Assistance Penn State’s sylvania Higher tuition rates, despite increase could

Renovate, Page

Budget, Page

renamed for

5

Scout award

Paternos

County to the Centre award is given Award. The most embodies the service-oriented and its youthresident who of the organization By CHRIS MORELLI tte.com ideals and values to police, “There honoree. According editor@centrecountygaze that the the first-ever ful charges. Paterno was Penn State to the are no indications By ALEXA LEWIStte.com are changing. In 1974, Joe is named for the late on her own — The times Counwoman walked was found.” Juniata Valley Good Now, the award news@centrecountygaze STATE COLLEGE she 40 years, the the the place where — football coach. For more than America have presented they believe beTOWNSHIP Police said of FERGUSON was dumped cil Boy Scouts police think woman’s body on Feb. 12 and a different name 36 Scout, Page 7 Ferguson Township woman Scout Award. Impact award will have ............................ tween 11 p.m. Feb. 14 when a This year, the Sue Paterno Community Feb. 14 the still-unidentified 33, 34 Puzzles ..................... 37, 38 and was found on 3:20 a.m. on & In Town .... Business whose body block of Plainfield — the Joseph 25-29 Around Happening .... 34, 35 along the 500 out of a veSports ......................... 30-32 What’s Police, Page 5 Youth Fair .. Road was dumped there. ............... 13-16 17-24 Summer 1 Community hicle and abandoned Lifestyles ...... 1 ....................... 9 Education Profile ........ 12 Mature 10 Community Opinion ............................ .......... Health & Wellness

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Batto miss Joe — It’s hard STATE COLLEGE faces in State tista. the most recognizable him around He’s one of you’ve seen if you think College. And chances are that you have. left for a State, he town recently, Sawith Penn After 26 years Terry Pegula and the Buffalo the Sawith of years with “dream job” after a couple of hockey bres. However, down as vice president bres, he stepped Battista, Page

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a Christmas GAP — After & Ravioli PLEASANT its doors, Fasta Eve fire closed its Pleasant Gap locaCo. is reopeningopening a new Harrisas tion, as well burg location. was no one inside Fasta after 2 While there broke out shortly when the fire 24, the damage left what be a.m. on Dec. predicted to the fire department of renovations. to three to six months a lot of damage “The fire caused but the larger imhouse, the front of the smoke damage,” Fasta the in plications is the Gazette Ricketts told in the owner Bob “Virtually everything December. in smoke.” store is covered phase of conremove With the abatement contractors struction, wherewrapping up, Ricketts a smoke particles, should stay closer to said renovations timeline. three-month celebrate the grand reFasta will store at 157 Pleasant Gap opening of its and its brand new store Street MarW. College Ave., in the Broad in Harrisburg 1233 N. Third St. on Friat day. ket located with a free pasta day, May 13, that Fasta participated loRicketts said Farmers Market in the Hershey’s Harrisburg and was in cated just outsidesaid opening a store He well received. logical progression from a Harrisburg is for our a growth standpoint. will be a conduit and “This shop Carlisle, Harrisburg wholesale in the Gazette

raised nearly $10 Fasta, Page 4 28 on Feb. 21, THON tally was revealed from the event on Page 26. Puzzles ............................ 29, 30 When the final .... 24, 27 cancer. See photos PROUD MOMENT: Happening Business ..................... against pediatric 18-22 What’s photo page ......... 26 million for the fight ......................... THON ....... 14, 15 Women’s Corner ...... 16, 17 Wedding Planner

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Mount Nittany Medical

more than 500,000 sions are important.”

ebrate the event. lack of sleep and the Despite the the enthusiasm was of the 46 physical strain, past the end present even by, be— Bright colors, hours. I’m so inspired STATE COLLEGE squirt guns, laugh“Every dancer, a mental game,” said music, like crazy outfits, and tears — the final four majorcause it’s all — 21, a junior ter, dancing I knew that Christina Quaglia, all. “I think, like, hours had it ing in nursing. didn’t realize how much State IFC/Panhellenic 21 at 4 I The Penn ended Feb. going in, but to push through it and Dance Marathon46 hours on their feet doing it.” you just have after volunteer like, why you’re one of the p.m. when, remember, the cure, student Bryce Jorfor Apollo, dancing for Quaglia danced organizations particisat down. The 10 years, for dancers finally special interest home to THON every dan Center, pating in THON. students wearing and was filled with bandanas socks, tutus, color shirt, letters of their THON, Page 6 holding the even capes, dancing to celnames and organization

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Bryce will take over the Once again, THON the public. FOR THE KIDS: free and open to The event is again

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untygazette.com correspondent@centreco

THON, Page 4

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impacted and families of children cancer. According by childhood the mission of the to THON.org, is “to conquer pedance marathonby providing emoto the diatric cancer back. nancial support and PARK — It’s tional and fi researchers UNIVERSITY neon knee socks, children, families, Diamonds Fund.” Break out the water guns — the staff of the Four the year, THON foand Dance fanny packs Throughout funds and awareIFC/Panhellenic Penn Penn State have cuses on raisingDiamonds, a fund will soon a cure — Marathon conquer dancing for ness for Four mission is to State students chilthat states its loby assisting for the kids. Jordan Center, Hershey childhood cancer The Bryce at Penn State corner of University dren treated through supewill host cated at the support Children’s Hospital Curtin Road, 46-hour Drive and and free rior care, comprehensive research. the annual publicDance Marathon, and innovative THON has raised families IFC/Panhellenic Since 1977, million for Four children and volunwhich brings $127 Fund, Hershey more than after of the Four Diamonds at Penn State others together Diamonds teers and all Hospital. efforts. Children’s begins at 6 p.m. months of fundraising THON weekend continues until largest student-run THON is the the world and is 19, and in Friday, Feb. Feb. 21. philanthropy enhancing the lives 4 p.m. Sunday, can use the Gate A to committed All spectators the Bryce Jordan access is needed entrance to identification Center. No to to gain entry. IFC/ entertainment What: THON 46-hour across To provide Marathon dancers from more than 700 thousands of volPanhellenic Dance Feb. 19, through famithe university, When: Friday, Diamonds Four unteers and includes events Sunday, Feb. 21 Center lies, the weekend Centre County

untygazette.com correspondent@centreco

Valentine’secial Day Sp

Volume 8, Issue

2016

CHAVANIC By SAMANTHA and CHRIS MORELLI

By entte.com By ALEXA LEWIS MILLS — Law editor@centrecountygaze untygazette.com PINE GROVE in Centre Councorrespondent@centreco day came and the death of — As signing forcement authorities — The Ferguson to investigate BELLEFONTE high school athletes across six TOWNSHIP whose body ty continue of to play FERGUSON of Supervisors will interview left Jean Tuggy, went, dozens signed letters of intent 5 was Grove Mills 60-year-old Homicide, Page Township Boarda spot in Ward 3 that in her Pine deCentre County has been for was found next level. Colleen Unroe 21. Her death candidates a sport at the supervisor-elect Area home on Jan. 4. vacant when At Bellefonte Jess Unroe oath on Jan. senior clined to take reorganization meetingcommitHigh School, time on to play During the Book signed against and professional and basketcited personal as two lawsuits brought both soccer City Colof the township’s ments, as well a provision ball at Grove Raider is her for not meeting lege. The Red Green and Charter. star — she Home Rule solicitor Joseph a three-sport — and is in the Both township separate complaints also runs track students filed Unroe because Drew Clemson Pleas against The one of the top 2016 at of Court of CommonSection 2.05 of the charter. of in the Class meet for the office she did not BAHS. registhat a candidate playresident and least JESS BOOK section states Book said that and have been a at for must sports Township supervisor ing three of Ferguson election. academics tered elector to the date of his or her balancing last year’s its share of challenges. it’s one year prior a write-in candidate in definitely presents time-wise, but I think in Unroe ran as the question of her qualificahave a lull “It’s very busy, but said the because I never primary. She prior to the general election actually easier Book said shortly before up up in time to remove wrapped tions came filed schedule,” team not my was basketball I think the paperwork the ballot. Red Raider girls’ keeps me active, but six ap“It shape her name from supervisors will interview m their season. because it keeps me in Thursday, The current Feb. 10, and appointZACH BERGER/StateCollege.co it’s really great Wednesday, holds a photo of plicants on will consider making an regular Stacy Parks Miller for at the board’s Feb. 11, and District Attorney Book, Page 7 Jan. 21. A reward the vacancy Centre County 36 Mills home on ment to fill ............................ REWARD INCREASED:found dead in her Pine Grove Feb. 16. before the Feb. 37, 38 meeting on was 32-34 Puzzles who applied Rita raised to $5,000. Jean Tuggy, who & In Town .... 34, 35 Business ..................... The six applicants Balkey, Drew Clemson, .... 24-29 Around the crime has been Steven information on ......................... 30, 31 What’s Happening 1 deadline are 18, 19 Sports Day ......... Matters .......... Valentine’s 5 12 Family Youth Fair .. 20-23 Ward 3, Page ....................... 9 Education ............... 13-17 Summer Community Shaped Pizza Opinion ............................ ..... 10, 11 ❤ Any Heart Health & Wellness (up to 3 toppings)

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Centre County

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Battle Area High School The Penns Valley team lost to West boys’ basketball in a classic District Branch in overtime game. The Rams 6 Class AA playoff the could not find battled, but simply 21 net in OT./Page 2, 2016

plans to reno r announces February 25-March

com ountyGazette. www.CentreC

Gaz ettereadies for THON

as if replay, it appearedspecial On instant of the Carolina called had several members that Norwood teams thought what for a fair catch. Norwood said. “That’s “Probably,” — From in that situation.” that STATE COLLEGE usually happens Norwood explained he and the Super Bowl. Area High School The 5-foot-11 a fair catch because a for Norwood State College was there for he didn’t call graduate Jordan 7 in opportunity Penn State Bowl history on Feb. believed the made Super Santa Clara, Calif. punt maybe big play. 50 with the short didn’t,” he and special Super Bowl “I thought they wide receiver 61-yard run past, but The Denver guys would made a spectacular the the Nittany teams player the second quarter to set said. a wideout for in 14-yard line. punt return Norwood was alongside former NFL at the Carolinain Super Bowl played Williams. Broncos up Lions and was the longest Butler and Derrick record of 45 The return of his career players Deon the previous punt return history, breaking held by San Francisco’s professional. It was the longest was college and yards, which Super Bowl XXIII. — high school, return punts in college,” in the bigJohn Taylor “I didn’t even was, quite simply, field The return the game. Norwood said. set up a Denver on teams play of return lot of times a punt gest special and The Broncos went punt, it 13-7. The “It was a short past it,” Norwood told goal to make run but guys will just Press. “And they didn’t, to win, 24-10. the Associated roll with it.” to I just decided

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Mature Lifestyles includes a special section The Gazette’s for Centre County little bit of everythinglook at technology, a seniors, including dementia, finances travel, heart health, 17-24 and overall wellness./Pages

The CenTre COunTy

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State High grad es Norwood mak ry histo Super Bowl

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Officials still concerned with se budget impas tte.com news@centrecountygaze

ial $19 SpecBread!

February 11-17,

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budget ongoing state PARK — The wondering UNIVERSITY county commissioners left lay ahead. impasse has issues could vetoed the $30.3 what other financial it pushed Tom Wolf line-item When Gov. after Christmas, funding to budget just emergency billion GOP $24 billion in forward nearly and school districts. social services have still By G. KERRY WEBSTER But countiestheir children untygazette.com fund correspondent@centreco struggled to beginning and youth services, a hat to be worn changed how — If there is when the stateappropriated in BELLEFONTE Dainty has almost certainly is Vana a newspathe child welfare in Bellefonte, initiative in been a salesperson, a “rebalancing” tried it on. She’s and a councilwoman. budget. Essential-a accountant Keystone the 2015-16 shift per editor, an acting as Bellefonte’s and is allowed to ly, the state coordinator, Now, she’s of reimbursements Development and for a town she quarter full Community be working in fiscal year. to to the following meant is that she’s happy Centre What this has loves so much. it here,” Dainty told The the state never GOV. TOM WOLF community counties acrossreimbursements “I just love “It’s a wonderful here and received CYS quarter of the County Gazette. The people are good from April to there is for the fourth fiscal year, which runs to live and work. so much. I don’t think care state’s 2014-15 that’s why I I’d like to live.” more in 1989. viewpoint, it’s June. another place commissioners state government is to Centre County Florida “From the Dainty came lived in the where the payment in family had a quarter’s drug trade unfunded mandate She and her going to skip of the rising to said commissioner saying we are they decided Keys, but because the budget,” United States, Bellefonte area, so we can balance the southern to the and if they would move north, Mark Higgins. pack up and and colleagues. left asking when Michael had friends Counties were in accounting,” said Chairman from the where Dainty a background Gazette offered spokesperson receive reimbursement, “I came with AMY ANSARI/The said I arrived, I was eventuon Feb. 2 a “As soon as I D-Lock Haven, a significant Pipe. However, said Dainty. Sheet where Rep. Mike Hanna, for the fourth quarCollege will have the Bargain office of state a position at in downtown State Improvement District. reimburse counties general manager.” for about Feb. 12. The Fraser Centre the state will ally became to the Downtown TAKING SHAPE: around Sunday, county administrator, with the publication publiter sometime on the area, according She worked moving on to another about the acting Ceneconomic impact Denise Elbell, was just notified is befour years before Pennsylvania Businesstook a the county planning confirmed that cation — Central stint with CPBC, she But long-term for the county’s short situation the reimbursement. in the computer tral. After a to be messy a of purchasing and is turning out coming more job in sales state funding sure did skip staff, as irregular field. at it now, I was for a 12-month the norm. “Looking back said. “But, I think that be able to budgetgimmicks,” Pipe she of peoany “We need to to meet a lot around a lot,” CYS without well after the because I got period for our this impasse occurred good for me doors for me.” to draw had several we’ve “Because said. ple that opened taxes last April, business county property cash reserves.” those doing to imour ment paid by 20 state bills borders. down a lot on Dainty, Page 5 of more than passed the Legislawithin the district closes, the By HARRY ZIMBLER Plus, a series reuntygazette.com When a business protection recently CYS caseloads is a constant prove child in increased correspondent@centreco empty storefront have resulted or more in some counties,a development and conture takes economic to — It a bit for 20 percent minder that with to be launched by more than hikes up the costs quite STATE COLLEGE to keep up provide and efforts will needquickly as possible. required to Pipe said. That as stant monitoring and flow of retail counties are on time. ebb fill the space in with the property service that the constant organizations is not funding has an unasThe DID works the best fit. that the state for Centre County, it and professional College, and that Elbell said. owners to assure observers may State Fortunately Downabout $6 million,dipping into downtown the casual of of fund Many mission a constant signed reserve mean the county likes an area with is part of the District. payments. wonder why traffic and visitors That does not front money to cover CYS typically town Improvementdirector George to flow of student one empty storethat cushion into perspective, the countyCYS, Pipe DID executive of a muleven for would have the forefront the To put things $2 million every quarter Arnold is at to enhance observer front. receives about in the a casual tifaceted initiative be a the However, environment guarding was going to not understand said. economic Pipe learned there jealously would probablyis occurring in retail “When we first were in a better position,”living downtown while for the many busiwe we are life revolution that fierce competition budget impasse in the position where allocation.” the quality of services losales, including wide varisaid. “Now we’re check until we get state the counstores and a nesses and professional pay from big box district. expay check to sent out emergency funds, cated in the Anof the DID ety online retailers. by the spirit Tax and Revenue Before Wolf The boundaries Street to Sowers million encouraged “I am out a $10 instead of cutting ty also took among the different tend from AthertonAvenue to Highto cover expenses of cooperation for Downtown ticipation Note Street and College that area there “We groups responsible Within 75 the Gazette said Arnold. land Alley. and eateries, TIM WEIGHT/For 3 State College,” 29, 30 Budget, Page are 75 restaurants 250 professional Bellefonte’s and Vana Dainty is 31 Business ..................... retail stores .... 26, 27 HOMETOWN PROUD:Development coordinator. “I DID, Page 3 Happening Classified ........................ service entities.funded by an assess18-23 What’s ............................ 28 Keystone Communitygreat potential in Bellefonte,” The DID is Puzzles Sports ......................... lot of .... 24, 25 ............... 12-15 Around & In Town think there’s a 8-10 Community ........... 16, 17 Pizza Dainty said. & Wellness ....... 11 Centre Spread • Lg. 1 Topping .. 2 Health ....................... Police .............................. 7 Education $8 • Lg. 3 Topping Wings $6 Opinion ............................

Pizza,

A. Capp

Diana L. Cox-Foster to Brock L. Weiss and Sylvia D. Shank, 447 Ardery Hollow Road, Port Matilda, $403,000.

Youth Fair

Summer Summer Youth The 11th annual on Saturday, Feb. Fair will be held Nittany Middle 20, at the Mount previews the School. The Gazette a one-stop shop event, which is on local summer for information 20-23 camps and activities./Pages

The CenTre CounTy

Gaz ette

is in the air

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to we’re happy a great project county. It’s be a part of.” to Woodhead, the decision By G. KERRY WEBSTER — where According untygazette.com its Fraser location — came correspondent@centreco 1986 to move from short situated since — Just a few it had been from visitors to the center in the STATE COLLEGE Region Senior after hearing the Centre Submitted photo traffic and congestion months ago, from its long time address to attend events who said the State made it hard Center moved Center in downtown will look like. downtown there. new senior center in the Nittathey could and in the Fraser and functions shows what the somewhere being used, current location is definitely College to its Now, it looks like the center An artist’s rendering “People wantedeasily,” said Woodhead. people now “The center of IN THE WORKS: that we’re seeing of the counny Valley Mall. room in feasible. We get in and out we can show in that just wasn’t commisus to use another from other parts is moving again. in,” said “Downtown, location and found a spot have allowed the meantime,” said Woodthe Centre County in the center, county a wouldn’t come in On Jan. 26, more voted to use time to renovate searched for the building to have a lot ty, that normally of the best things didn’t have a large vawe’re going sioners unanimously away, so we “I think one We need it.” the mall. We is moving head. “Soon, funds to renovate Woodhead. wanted to right area and use a lot more things. Woodhead’s contingency the mall, just a few doors with this programto be in the the area we space to do a smaller we’ve done in going support is currently cant space Now, we’re decided to renovate center until the larger 2014 and fall The numbers in.” to the mall. where the center between fall interim also approved wanted to be down from occupancy.” that as our claim. He said been an increase in attenproposal was space we really is renovated for has operating. The County Council of Governarea could be to Woodhead, the center 57 percent. He 2015, there center of aboutincreased by 22 by the Centre Page 4 3,200-square According dance at the in about Senior Center, service has is moving ments Jan. 25. renovated meacurrently operating this project said noon meal direcspace to be “We’re excited feet. The new 7,000-square feet. percent. Ronald Woodhead, mall and Recreforward,” said sures just over the people at the Region Park a lot tor of the Centre“It’s going to open up “Graciously, the ation Authority. for seniors around home Street more opportunities 21 in her Irion on the found Jan. who were checking by friends, arin 2004. said Barry woman’s welfare. levels last seen police, authorities to the news,” the afterAccording to at Penn “Prices react woman’s home of economics By ALEXA LEWIStte.com professor rived at the 21 and found her dead. expectation a Ickes, change, Sayers news@centrecountygaze noon of Jan. are driving State. “If developments coroner Scott on changes but fundamentals Centre County death. An autopsy prices react, — Precipitous confirmed Tuggy’s Jan. 22 showed eviSTATE COLLEGE oil and slower growth Intermediate the price.” West Texas U.S. on of crude as contribthe body conducted in the price been two catalysts for the The price for cents to $30.51 a barrel force trauma 57 at the end dence of blunt her death. in China have turbulence, which sparked crude was up a to among Mercantile Exchange the case as uting factors stock market’s bear market territory the New York day Jan. 26, and international $31.14. Police are investigating fear of nearing was up to of the trading By G. KERRY WEBSTER watchers. Township Brent crude untygazette.com 26 with news homicide. many market benchmark the Ferguson updated did rally Jan. to correspondent@centreco On Jan. 25, While oil prices OPEC might be ready issued an enforcethat pro6 lived alone Police Department MILLS — Law the day before supply with non-OPEC Oil prices, Page stating Tuggy motive for PINE GROVE continue to investigate reached press release negotiate over month have was no known Pine Grove prices this ment authorities and there ducers, oil a 60-year-old the death of 4 Mills woman. to Ferguson Township Homicide, Page Tuggy was According body of Jean Police, the take off — Centre County continues recycling in The industry email about and then some. she never imagined. 800 people I ways “I have about to keep them updated has gone to change in just are Centre Countyeverything once a month recycling events that Recycling in By CHRIS MORELLI cans to tte.com on any new from just aluminum she has witnessed editor@centrecountygaze Schirf said. the and in up,” sun, out coming under the has loves to get changes. — Amy Schirf to Schirf said she speak to the masses many of the here just over nine years. and STATE COLLEGE also loves community “I’ve been (aluminum) recycling. She of recycling. from taking a passion for four about the positives We’ve gone 11 items curbside, education coor teach. her job as cans to taking any plastic bottle, jug And while County Recythe the Centre colors of glass, and we just added not be a ordinator for Authority may jar, metal cans things like Pringles and close. cling and Refuse — any pretty darn as spiral cans Of course, we’ll take dream job, it’s is to educate as much I can’t think peanut cans. resi“My main job that you have. schools “We teach the kind of paper paper that we don’t take her job is visiting groups county, I can,” she explained. of A big part of large anyone in the of any kind to educate said. dents, businesses, County Reand businesses to a large curbside,” Schirf one. makes the Centre tick. Schirf speaks is talking really.” is a daunting about what Whenever points Refuse Authority I’ll only talk Schirf’s position grow in Centre of her main recycle. Nearcycling and group, one continues to the out to speak, said. “We As recycling responsible for getting easy it is to “When I go be put into about how is minutes,” Schirf with she said, can County, she does so through a number for about 10 ly everything, about 40 minutes quesemails word out. She newsletters, usually spend has a million of ways — quarterly questions. Everyone Schirf, Page 6 mouth. I go somewhere.” things as and word of 29, 30 tions every time years, Schirf has watched tries to keep She said she when it comes to eduGazette 31 Business ..................... Through the ......... 26 CHRIS MORELLI/The ........................ green as possible Happening 28 Classified 20-23 What’s education coordinator cating the masses. ......................... 24, 25 Puzzles ............................ Amy Schirf is the Refuse Authority. Sports GREEN: 16, 17 GOING Town .... Recycling and Corner ....... Around & In 11 Women’s ................ 18, 19 for the Centre County Expo .................. 10, 7 Education ............... 12-15 Bridal Community Opinion ............................ ......... 8, 9 Health & Wellness

BUY ONE, FREE GET ONE

WALKER TOWNSHIP

Matthew E. Nixdorf to Justin A. Witherite and Melanie M. Witherite, Sycamore Lane, Howard, $150,000. Bretton L. Beard, Jamie M. Johns, Jamie M. Beard, Rodney A. Beard and Rhonda J. Beard to Eben L. Sundquist and Helen R. Sundquist, 1162 Zion Ridge Ave., Bellefonte, $195,500.

plans Senior center n to move — agai

Police investigating homicide

Matthew James Adams, Carina Josephine Adams and Carina Josephine Struble to Matthew James Adams, 324 Baney Road, Julian, $1.

Matthew H. Kizina and Anna Renea Kizina to Michael R. Willis and Lauren E. Willis, 204 Berkley St., Philipsburg, $105,000. Samuel T. Kelley and Kenneth J. Kelley to Terry L. Fleck, Water Street, Philipsburg, $1.

scoring

The CenTre CounTy

UNION TOWNSHIP

PHILIPSBURG BOROUGH

Balanced Area High School The State College from team got points rout girls’ basketball lineup in a 64-45 everyone in the Lions The Lady Little of Mifflin County. game for the their are fine-tuning e 20 postseason./Pag 4

Windsor Franklin Cousins estate, Windsor Franklin Cousins Jr. estate, Richard G. Cousins, executor, Windsor Franklin Cousins II estate and Windsor F. Cousins to Robert R. Littman, 234 E. Hamilton Ave., State College, $249,900. Lucilee P. Mansell by agent to Charles L. Andrew, 932 Hart Circle, State College, $172,900. Thomas A. Hale and Barbara Ann Hale to Susan M. ConsoloKetchel and Michael L. Ketchel, 521 W. Fairmount Ave., State College, $415,000.

PATTON TOWNSHIP

Siddhartha Srivastavia by agent and Sangeeta Saigal Srivastava to Cartus Financial Corporation, 361 McBath St., State College, $334,750. Gerald I. Susman and Elizabeth J. Susman to Bret M. Stevens, 772 Beaver Branch Road, Pennsylvania Furnace, $420,000. Ronald F. Tiberio, Dolores H. Tiberio and Delores H. Tiberio to Ronald F. Tiberio, Delores H. Tiberio, George J. Keister and Susan L. Keister, 670 Hawknest Court, State College, $1. Timothy W. Lucas and Samantha A. Lucas to Artam Vahmani and Azadeh Shahravan, 2531 Park Center Blvd., State College, $233,000. S&A Homes Inc. to Christopher J. Kaminski and Kelly A. ReillyKaminski, 160 Red Willow Road, State College, $336,878. Loren A. Honaas and Susan G. Krosunger to Mary Ellen Fisher and Donald M. Fisher, 2111 W. College Ave., State College, $196,000. Helen Rachwal Coll estate and Celine Rachwal, executrix, to

Volume 8, Issue

STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH

Douglas A. Treaster and Heather G. Treaster to Heather G. Treaster, 115 Rockville Road, Rebersburg, $1.

FERGUSON TOWNSHIP

3, 2016

Mark S. Grey, Jacqueline S. Grey and Jacquelyn S. Grey to Mark S. Grey, 118 Grant Circle, Bellefonte, $1. Grace Hazel Hockenberry estate, Grace H. Hockenberry estate and Constance L. Subalusky, administratix, to David Shirk and Lori Shirk, 739 N. Allegheny St., Bellefonte, $85,000.

MILES TOWNSHIP

Richard J. Burkett and Sepideh Kashani to Trevor W. Calabro and Christa J. Calabro, 430 Norle St., State College, $469,900. Lillian D. Peterson to Lillian D. Peterson and Lynn E. Drafall, 130 Winchester Court, State College, $1. Philip M. Lucas and Shirley W. Lucas to Leon R. Zook and Mary O. Zook, 126 Watson Road, State College, $242,000.

January 28-February

SPRING TOWNSHIP

Donna Doherty to Brian K. Rhoades, 101 View St., Bellefonte, $197,000.

COLLEGE TOWNSHIP

com ountyGazette. www.CentreC

Patricia Cantolina, Leroy M. Cantolina, Deborah Patishnock Auman, Deborah Patischnock and Scott J. Auman to Samantha Murnyack, 257 Hickory Road, Clarence, $55,000.

MILESBURG BOROUGH

Brian S. Focht to Brian S. Focht and Rachael N. Focht, 122 Patricia Ave., Centre Hall, $1.

The CenTre CounTy

SNOW SHOE TOWNSHIP

James R. Ensor Sr., Karla L. Musser, Karla L. Musser-Ensor, Shane K. Ensor and Megan M. Querns to Shane K. Ensor and Megan M. Querns, Weights Lane, Bellefonte, $1.

CENTRE HALL BOROUGH

Gaz ette

Frederick M. Neidrick, Fredrick Michael Neidrick and Deborah E. Neidrick to Freserick M. Neidrick, Deborah E. Neidrick, Marie D. Kephart and Frederick Michael Neidrick, 218 One Mile Run Road, Philipsburg, $1.

delivery in Bellefonte,

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Milesburg,

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March 3-9, 2016

The Centre County Gazette

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REAL ESTATE PACKAGE

One local call. One low cost.

Total value of all items for sale must be under $2,000 • Must have price of item for sale in ad • Run up to 6 lines for 3 weeks • One ad per person • PRIVATE PARTY ONLY

OVER 37 MILLION JOB SEEKERS! Go to www.MyJobConneXion.com or call 814-238-5051.

Real Estate, Rentals, Auctions, Financial, Services/Repairs. Garage Sales, Pets, Bulk (firewood, hay, etc.) not eligible. No other discounts or coupons apply.

Houses For Sale

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AMBLESIDE 2 Story house on 1.72 ac, 5 bdr, 2.5 ba, close to I99 & 7‑mi to PSU Campus, asking $540,350 negotiable. See details at ForSaleByOwner.com or Call 1‑800‑843‑6963 ID# 24056115 for vm

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Furnished Apartments

SUMMER SUBLET 1BR / 1BA Minutes from PSU $900.00 Looking for some to sublease a 1BR, 1BA private apartment within 2 miles of Penn State University Park campus. Quiet apart‑ ment complex that is student friendly. Updated kitchen equipped with dishwasher, oven, microwave and fridge. Apartment comes furnished with queen sized bed and mattress, couch, and kitchen table and chairs. Available from May 25th‑July 29th. Lease ends July 31st so sublet must be out of apartment by 12pm on July 29th. Rent is $900/month and includes all utilities except cable and internet. $100 deposit required. Please contact with any questions or inquiries. Free parking and coin‑operated laundry within the building. (210) 254‑5942

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Unfurnished Apartments

1 BEDROOM Apt. Available Now. $700.00 Within walking distance to campus and downtown located on West College Ave. 1 bedroom with lots of storage available now. Rent includes all utilities except electric. (814) 234‑1707

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Snow removal, Painting, Electrical, Carpentry, Plumbing, Flooring, Driveway sealing, Mulching, Brush removal, Leaf blowing

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061

Special Services

Antiques

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Full-Time/ Part-Time Substitute Custodial opening at the Central PA Institute of Science and Technology available immediately.

Substitute Instructors needed at the Central PA Institute of Science and Technology.

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ANTIQUE COLLECTIBLE TINS Large collectible tins. MFB tin, about 16� high, $12; Bachman pretzel tin, about 12� high, $5; Johnson’s candy tins, about 7� high, $5 each. 814‑237‑2024. CALLS ONLY, NO EMAIL!

061

Help Wanted

only

COMPUTER REPAIRS I have over 15 years of experience in repairing desktops, laptops and servers. I can easily remove viruses, spyware, and malware and get your PC back to top form. Please email Mike at mnap11@hotmail. com or Call 814‑883‑4855.

090

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for more information.

for more information.

EOE

EOE

PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT: ProStat Healthcare is seeking a Personal Care Attendant to assist 20-40 hours per week on local home care cases.

Please contact Chelsey at (814) 548-7819 today!

Townhouses For Rent

SPRING SEMESTER RENTAL $478/ Person Spring Semester rental now available. Rent entire townhome or roommate matching available. Rates starting at $478/person. Newly renovated furnished 3 bdrm units include washer/dryer, cable or internet, and a CATA bus pass. Call or come by today! (814) 235‑1377

is now hiring in Centre County So many Seniors want to stay in their homes, but can’t ... without your help. EOE

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HOUSES FOR SALE

You can have a rewarding and gratifying career as a care giver.

095

COUNTRY 5 min. from town. This 3 bdrn home sits on 1/2 acre with open living room, dining room, and kitchen. Three car garage. Bellefonte area. Asking $250,000 firm. Ph. 814.222.3331.

Clothing

SIZE 18 WEDDING DRESS $200.00 Bought from Diamonds and Lace for $1400. It was a discontinued dress so there’s not more like it. Wore once and needs dry cleaned. Very little alterations done to it. Asking $200. Please email me for more information and pictures. (814) 404‑9710 NECK TIES: dozens of men’s silk neck ties. like new. $1.00 ea. Call (814) 466‑7235 DON’T miss out on the latest news and local happenings. Read The Centre County Gazette every week.

097

Fuel & Firewood

100

Walks Firewood & Lawn Care Seasoned, Barkless, Oak Firewood. Cut to your length, Split, & Delivered. We sell our firewood year round. Dont hesitate to call. Call Now: Matthew R. Walk (814)937‑3206 FIREWOOD $175.00 BARKLESS OAK FOR SALE $175.00 for approximately 1 cord $325.00 for full trailer load (approx. 2 cords) CUT TO 18 inch standard size CAN BE CUT TO ANY SIZE ADDITIONAL FEE MAY APPLY FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 15 MILES OF CENTRE HALL (814) 364‑2007

100

Household Goods

OAK N GLASS TABLES $100 Very nice beveled smoked glass tops solid oak frames. Coffee table 42�x42�x16.5� $50.00. End table 30x 30x 20.5 $35.00. End table 30x25.5x20.5 $30.00. All three $100.00. Spring Mills pick up. (814) 558‑2200

Some ads featured on statecollege.com Part time Medical Front Desk Position open for a fast growing medical clinic in Snow Shoe. u Previous medical office experience preferred. u No weekends or holidays. u Must have excellent verbal and written communication skills. u Computer experience. Please send resume to: Kristie Bennardi, CEO at kriben@keystoneruralhealth.com Or fax to 814-486-0404 You can also mail to: 90 East 2nd Street, Emporium, Pa. 15834

Household Goods

109

Miscellaneous For Sale

109

Miscellaneous For Sale

CRAFTSMANS 42�, 21hp, Briggs Straton rid‑ ing mowing. $615.00. Call (814) 364‑9440 OLD OAK FRAMED MIRROR & PENN STATE CHAIR Mirror has plain oak wooden frame $60; Penn State Chair; new conditon; cherry colored finish $100 For more info: call 814‑777‑0155 Location of items is the Howard / Snydertown area.

FLORAL Arrangements: All shapes, sizes & col‑ ors. Price $5.00 ‑ $10.00. Call (814) 321‑8598

WICKER BASKETS: all shapes & sizes. Priced $5.00 ‑ $10.00. Call (814) 321‑8598

101

Appliances For Sale

WASHER & DRYER: good condition. $99.00 for both. (814) 321‑8598

105

Pets & Supplies For Sale

TRIPLETS MARMOSET MONKEYS FOR ADOPTION $600.00 Tiny Male / Female Marmoset Monkeys Available ASAP! These lovely puppies are teacup size, they are extraordinarily gor‑ geous. No tear stains, little button noses, and baby doll faces.They need lots of love and affection, and are ready to go to a good home today.They are six weeks old and very tame and friendly and affectionate. Serious buyers text (770) 203‑1986

FITBIT SURGE BUNDLE SIZE LARGE $350.00 I am selling 2 Fitbit Surge smart watches as a bundle. Normally they are $250.00 a piece. But my girlfriend and myself don’t use them anymore. no scratches. only 1 box comes with it. The other one got thrown away by mistake. (814) 414‑8272

HARRY POTTER DVD’S $25.00 Four Harry Potter DVDs. (Six DVDs in all, two are doubles.) Three are still factory sealed, one viewed once. Prisoner of Azkaban, Chamber of Secrets, Sorcerer’s Stone, Goblet of Fire. All for $25. Phone calls only. NO EMAIL. (814) 237‑2024

USED MASSAGE EQUIPMENT. Priced To Sell 2‑ MASSAGE TABLES WITH HEATING PADS & Carrying case & MASSAGE CHAIR. (814) 761‑9358

JOEPA COCA COLA TRAY and PENN STATER TRIBUTE MAG Limited Edition metal 13x18 serving tray. Released 1977 & numbered, #65665. Also, a Richie Lucas autograph. $125. CALLS ONLY 814‑237‑2024

USED SALON EQUIPMENT. Priced To Sell Tanning Bed, Facial Steamer, 8 in 1 Facial Machine, Sterilizer, Towel Warmer, Equipment Trolley, Facial Table, 8 waiting rm chsirs, barbicide bottles, Chair mat. For prices please call 814‑761‑9358 PENN STATE 2016 Sea‑ son Football Tickets. Section NL Row 38, Seats 14 & 16. $770.00 Call (814) 769‑3154 or email: isnor@comcast. net

131

Autos For Sale

1994 CADILLAC Eldo‑ rado, pearl white touring coupe. New tires & brake lines, runs good. $1,995. (814) 553‑5599

137

Snowmobiles For Sale

2001 POLARIS 600 Edge $2,200. (814) 933‑8709

OPPORTUNITY TO OWN • RENT TO OWN

We can arrange “Rent To Ownâ€? on any property for sale by any broker, owner, bank or others. NEW HORIZONS REAL ESTATE CO. JOHN PETUCK • 814-355-8500

ASST. MANAGER FAITHCENTRE THRIFT STORE Part-time person needed to work some evenings, Fridays, and most Saturdays in the FaithCentre store. Responsibilities include helping customers, running the cash register, organizing displays, and other duties. A background in retail preferred but not necessary. High School diploma or higher education, basic math, and computer skills required. Excellent communication skills a must.

Please send resume to Nicole Summers, FaithCentre 110 W. High St., Bellefonte, PA 16823 or email nsummers@faithcentreinfo for more information.

NURSING OPPORTUNITIES AT CENTRE CREST Centre Crest is currently seeking individuals to join our growing Nursing team. We currently have openings available for Full time and Part time Licensed Practical Nurses and Nursing Assistants. We have limited openings on all shifts for both Full and Part time needs. We have recently increased our Shift Differentials for 2nd and 3rd shift. If you are committed, compassionate, out-going and have a desire to help others, we would like to meet you. We offer paid time off, 403B, and an opportunity to make a difference. Please stop in at 502 East Howard St., Bellefonte, PA 16823 or visit www.centrecrest.org to complete an application.

1-855-861-0465 or apply online at:

www.helpmatesinc.com

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E/O/E

       

Registered Nurses We are currently recruiting to fill Full-time and Per Diem Registered Nurse positions. Our Nurses love nursing, display compassion and empathy towards patients, and work with other nurses and clinical professionals as a team. We offer: • Excellent pay rates and benefits • Low staff-to-patient ratios • Four to Six-week orientation with preceptor program

Rehabilitation Nursing Techs Our Rehabilitation Nursing Technicians are responsible for assisting our RN’s and LPN’s by providing compassionate care and assistance to our patients. Per Diem positions available. Previous Nursing Assistant experience is preferred but not required. High school diploma/GED required. To be successful, the RNT must possess a sincere interest in helping people, display compassion, and have a solid work ethic.

To apply, visit www.nittanyvalleyrehab.com. Click on “Careers� and then “All Hospital Jobs�. Questions? Call 814-359-3421 We are an Equal Opportunity Employer


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The Centre County Gazette

March 3-9, 2016

THIRDANNUAL TEAMREAMDAY The mission of the Team Ream Foundation is to assist the everyday lives of financially disadvantaged individuals in State College and surrounding areas who have been affected by cancer and serious medical conditions.

PENN STATE MEN’S BASKETBALL VS

ILLINOIS

BRYCE JORDAN CENTER

SUNDAY, MARCH 6 12 PM

ONLY TICKETS PURCHASED DIRECTLY THROUGH THE WWW.TEAMREAM.ORG WEBSITE WILL BENEFIT TEAM REAM. PLEASE MAKE SURE TO PURCHASE GAME TICKETS THROUGH:

WWW.TEAMREAM.ORG EMAIL | TRF@TEAMREAM.ORG TWITTER | @GOTEAMREAM INSTAGRAM | @GOTEAMREAM FACEBOOK | TEAM REAM FOUNDATION

Centre County Gazette, March 3, 2016  
Centre County Gazette, March 3, 2016  
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