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jan | mar 2019 | Vol 55 | No 1 Print Post Approved PP100007333

the changing face of residential design 2018 Trusted Brands Winners Kitchens Doors & Windows


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Elastic bearing of building service installations

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Elastic ceiling hangers

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Elastic suspension of pipes

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Elastic bearing of stairs and landings

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Separation of adjacent components (flanking sound)

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Elastic bearing of swimming pools

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Elastic shielding of building side wall decoupling

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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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VER THE COURSE OF 2018, THERE HAVE BEEN MANY THINGS IN AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE THAT HAVE BOTH EXCITED AS WELL AS SURPRISED ME, NOT LEAST OF WHICH IS THE INDUSTRY’S NEAR-UNIVERSAL ADOPTION OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN AND BUILDING TECHNIQUES. Whilst this is still a work in progress and will be for many firms, a lifelong journey, the fact remains that it is industry (along with the general public) that has embraced the concept of living and working within our ecological means much more so than our current political elite. This is both an inspiration to the nation as well as a sad indictment of the moral vacuum this country’s leaders have put themselves in. As was written in the Sydney Morning Herald last September: ‘The Coalition has shown it cannot deliver on its claims to address the three main objectives of reducing prices, improving reliability and reducing emissions. It delivers a leadership crisis instead. That means the Coalition’s policy on emissions is a question mark and the reliability challenge in limbo, awaiting decisions by the states on what used to be called the National Energy Guarantee. For now, the government policy is lost in space. A royal commission is not enough to fill the vacuum.’ While carbon emissions are just one component of the sustainability

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS PRUE MILLER NATHALIE CRAIG

debate, this lack of government will that is being translated into a lack of official action could have found itself easily replicated in the architecture, building, construction and design sectors, were it not for the forwardthinkers in this industry. One only has to look at what is happening with concepts such as Nightingale, or the designs of new and upcoming firms along with the sustainability push by the various built environment industry bodies like ASBEC, marque projects such as the EY Centre at Barangaroo or the massive uptake in solar to see it’s the industry that is filling the leadership vacuum which has been created by Australia’s political class. What will this year, 2019 bring? Well, while punditry is a science that is closest to astrology in its unscientific quackery, I think that I am on safe ground if I predict that sustainable design will now become the rule rather than the exception.

ON THE COVER: THE FINERY’S 223 APARTMENTS AND TERRACE HOMES, ARE LOCATED IN WHAT WAS ONCE A BLACK STACK INDUSTRIAL PRECINCT, NOW TRANSFORMED INTO THE ‘IT’ PART OF THE HARBOUR CITY. IN THIS NEW BEATING HEART OF INNER-CITY WATERLOO, SITS A COLLECTION OF SIX ARTICULATED BUILDINGS AND A DENSELY PLANTED COURTYARD GARDEN WITH A TALL CANOPY OF TREES AND LUSH UNDERPLANTING.

INDUSTRY

SPECIFY

04 Fox Johnston award-

30 Kitchen couture and the

winning rockpool-inspired apartment building

emerging new designs of modern residential kitchens

PEOPLE

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06 Exclusive interviews with

Tone Wheeler, Sandra Furtado and Koichi Takada

DETAIL

15 The stunning beauty of the Clifftop House

38 Opening a portal into new

22 The Finery, Mirvac’s latest

materials for windows and doors

inner-city apartment offering

26 Tiger Prawn – the crustaceanthemed house

I know this will hold true because not only is the industry acting like adults, but also the financial numbers are starting to turn very much in favour of sustainablydesigned houses, buildings and other facilities.

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44 The apex of modern residential roofing ideas

50 Bathrooms and laundries that change the home

54 An insight into the latest laminates, veneers and hard surfaces

58 The 2018 Trusted Brands Review 72 New age townhouses 74 Designing for a stay-at-home

So when the ‘invisible hand’ of the market, as Scottish philosopher Adam Smith put it, starts to influence the outcome, the recalcitrant laggards in the ruling class will surely follow.

ageing population

77 Book review 81 Product showcases

BRANKO MILETIC

DESIGNERS JULIA GEE TRACEY YEE LOUIS WAYMENT

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FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 02 9018 2029 ISSN 1039-9704

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine.

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

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news

Fox Johnston wins design competition with rockpool-inspired apartment

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thoughtful scheme by Sydneybased architecture and interiors practice Fox Johnston, evoking the calm refuge offered by rock pools along Sydney’s coastline, has won a Design Excellence Competition for a new apartment building in the Sydney southern bayside suburb of Brighton-le-Sands.

The jury, comprising Bob Nation (Chair), Tony Caro, Brian Zuhlaika, John Choi and Ron Keir, unanimously selected the Fox Johnston scheme, having considered submissions from three architecture practices – Carter Williamson Architects, Fox Johnston, and Olsson & Associates Architects.

Fox Johnston’s building takes the form of a carefully sculpted and eroded organic volume, twisting and turning in its intuitive response. It responds to the unique character of its site, providing 34 modern apartments nested behind a set of five historic Victorian-era terraces.

“We conceived the apartments in this building almost as a series of rockpools: a calm, sunny and protected environment where you can live comfortably on the wild edge of the ocean. Warmed by the sun, out of the wind, but still feeling part of the beautiful coastline experience that is unique to Botany Bay and the surrounding coastline,” says Fox Johnston director, Conrad Johnston.

The jury praised Fox Johnston’s winning scheme, noting that it ‘steps outside cookie cutter solutions and achieves a distinct character for each apartment’. Jurors commented favourably on FJ’s ‘use of house design principles in designing the apartment layouts’ and appreciated the high level of landscape integration in the proposal, achieved through wintergardens, courtyards and landscaped terraces, and a shared garden between the old and new buildings.

The site for the new apartment building lies 10km south of Sydney’s CBD, on the western shore of the Captain James Cook-made famous Botany Bay.

The site provides expansive views over the water, but also presents significant challenges: solar access is at odds with the view, and its south-west aspect opens it up to wind exposure.


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LEFT: The site provides expansive views over the water, but also presents significant challenges. RIGHT: A variety of thoughtfully planned one, two and three bedroom apartments sit within this modulated form offering differing site experiences and flexibility in floor plates.

Fox Johnston’s building takes the form of a carefully sculpted and eroded organic volume, twisting and turning in its intuitive response. It responds to the unique character of its site.

A major road — the Grand Parade — runs adjacent to the site, requiring careful attention to noise mitigation and ventilation. It sits amid larger apartment buildings with a row of Victorian terraces in front, requiring careful consideration of views, privacy and shadowing. The new building’s organic volume is designed to address the site’s proximity to The Grand Parade,

its predominant exposure east overlooking Botany Bay and its proximity to neighbours to the north and west. In response, the form extrudes to the south-east to increase its northerly aperture and further embrace views to Botany Bay and beyond. This adaptive form is then eroded to open and close in response to its site placement and provide places of calm and shelter within – winter gardens protected from noise and wind, solid walling and sun fins to control privacy and heat load, expansive double glazed apertures to embrace panoramic city and bay views. A variety of thoughtfully planned one, two and three bedroom apartments sit within this modulated form, offering differing site experiences and offering flexibility in floor plates. Upper floor penthouse apartments are recessed from the northern and eastern face creating a further articulated form that embraces its expansive aspect. Fox Johnston’s design achieves 82 percent solar access for apartments, including direct sunlight in winter for all units. 100 percent of the apartments are naturally ventilated, with 74 percent cross ventilation across the whole building.

Some 23 percent of the building is communal space that receives 100 percent natural light and ventilation. The ground plane is envisaged as a permeable and interconnected series of spaces linking Princess Lane to the historic terraces, and reinventing the laneway to the rear as a ‘garden mews’, providing a revitalised and activated public domain addition. Entry to the new building will be from this ‘garden mews’, providing strong visual links to the proposed central garden hub beyond. This lush garden space is pivotal to the design – inserted between new and old, this space allows the historic terraces to breathe and offers a place of refuge for residents and visitors alike. The existing historic terraces, part of the original New Brighton Estate, will continue to house commercial spaces and will be repaired and restored. Their rear wings will be re-imagined as the lush garden hub and a continuation of the permeable ground plane offering a quiet sanctuary for the occupants. A ground level retail space within the building — imagined as a new cafe / wine bar — will open onto this central garden hub as well as the reinvented ‘garden mews’. n


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PEOPLE


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The Tone of AUSTRALIAN Architecture

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n this edition, WE speak exclusively with Tone Wheeler, the principal and director of Environa Studio and a passionate advocate for environmental architecture. wheeler has taught at universities for over 40 years and IS a chronicler of the changing mood of Australian architecture and its many iterations over the years.

Three years ago, you wrote an obituary to the late Australian architect Ken Woolley, where you said we have lost a great architect. What makes a great architect in your opinion? I said that because I think Ken Woolley was very broad in his interests and in his abilities, and he was also incredibly thorough in what he pursued. He designed a whole range of buildings from the ABC headquarters in Sydney to several really iconic houses, none of which look like anything else. And that’s one of the most interesting things about Ken Woolley – that he didn’t have a signature style, and we’ve been obsessed with style for 55 years so that’s an interesting thing about somebody who designs and doesn’t stylise things. He was one of a number of architects including Peter Johnson and Bill Lucas; there were a number of people who were looking at Sydney as being a particular place so if you were designing a building on a steeper hillside, which is often the case in those houses in the 50s and 60s, whether it was Bill Lucas in Castlecrag, Peter Johnson in Chatswood or Ken Woolley in Mosman, they tried to make the buildings fit the landscape of that place, without taking out too many trees or disturbing it too much. For instance, Ken used clinker brick in the house in Mosman. Clinker bricks are basically bricks

rejected by the brickworks because they are damaged, misshapen and rough, all of which appeal to architects, but they are also cheap. So he fitted the sandstone outcrops off it, he used timber structures for the roof that very evidently weren’t made from the eucalyptus around, but it was sympathetic to the site. The house in Paddington was all white brickwork, curves and round windows – it was in the middle of a period of postmodernism and the house had some of that flavour but it was also an urban house. His house in Palm Beach is up on stilts sitting above a creek that runs down onto the roadway. A river runs underneath it and it has some sort of giant lattice underneath and timber framing – it’s a tree house! So he’s done a cave house in Mosman, an urban retreat in Paddington and a tree house at Palm Beach. This is what I admire about Ken Woolley and to a certain extent we want to do that in our own work – take the project from its fundamentals. There are two things that you begin with in architecture – a purpose and a place. A client comes to you to design a building – it usually has some purpose. It could be a home, housing, a school, or a civic building and it has a brief to it. But more than the briefing, it has a purpose – the brief might say what the building is on the inside but the purpose of the building may also be to add something to the city that might not be in your client’s brief. The building needs to have both an inward looking special arrangement and an outward looking place.


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The thing about architectural design is that it occurs in a particular space and a particular place. There are a number of people who claim that modern design should be taught across multiple disciplines – graphics, textiles, products, food, white goods and so on – that you should be able to design anything and everything. But when you design something for someone’s kitchen, you don’t know what the kitchen is going to be like; it could be going into thousands of different kitchens from a country style to a modernist concrete benched design. The graphics could go anywhere, the textiles could be worn by any shape or size of person in any place, but buildings are located in a place, not a site – they are much more than a site. In the same way that the purpose of the building is bigger than the brief, the idea of a place for the building is bigger than the site – it includes things like the environs, the surroundings, the climate, the attitude around that particular space.

which had a kind of universality to it. We are building the cities in the 21st century and we are building them with a whole range of different people, so I can’t have an ambition to do the city or even do the same building twice. You’re going to do something different but I have a vision to make the rest of my contemporaries be a little bit more open minded, a little bit more, perhaps, conciliatory towards the diversity of things that are being built in our cities. One of the things that I tried to do when I was teaching was to only show buildings that met these criteria: First, you had to like and admire, and find something worthy in the building. The second thing is you had to have been to the building. You can’t talk about a building if you haven’t been there and experienced the space, the texture of the building, the qualities of the acoustics of the building, and the sense of the environs.

The Italians have a lovely word for it – they call it ‘situazione’, which is basically the situation but it sounds so much better in Italian! What would be your favourite thing to design and what would be the least favourite thing to design and why? As a younger architect quite some time ago, I was interested in housing. Now I am really interested in the city as a whole; that may sound incredibly pretentious but as you get older and live in many cities around the world, it really does pressure you to think about your particular building in the context of the wider city and so I’d really want to change the way cities are done, the way we have been working building by building, brick by brick. I try to tell every student: Every building has a purpose, every building has a place; therefore develop your own unique way, or find your own voice to interpret those things to come up with a unique building as we are looking for diversity. One of the few irritating things about Australian architecture is the idea of Australia is a homogenous ‘thing.’ It’s the most polycultural nation on earth. It’s a highly multi-national, multi-religious, polychromatic society and yet we have a very singular kind of architecture. You do Brisbane architecture in Brisbane, or you do Melbourne architecture in Melbourne. I think the regional areas are much more homogeneous still, but the cities are very polycultural and you’d expect the cities to be very diverse. We go to cities that somehow have a kind of consistency about them, not a uniformity by any means but in places like Paris and London or even parts of New York, you get a consistency of those buildings and how they work. They did arise from a particular society at a particular time,

One of the few irritating things about Australian architecture is that the idea of Australia is a homogenous ‘thing’.

The third thing is you have to show the plan in section at the same time you show the building. One of the things that you always want is the section. It’s very hard to convince students that they should draw a section; at some stage you have to say to them well, amateurs draw plans, professionals draw sections. How a section works is the key to how architects use the space. You can’t talk about sustainability in buildings, or how it works environmentally without a section. The more remarkable architects to visit are always the architects who are in command of the section. You recently hosted the Sustainability Live panel event where a range of issues were discussed and a range of ideas thrown around. What are your views? What was really interesting about the curatorial effort was that it was really moving towards the idea of passive solar housing and passive house versus the idea of a highly Green Star rated building and so on. I think you moved away from the object or the product to the process

and everything that was talked about there was process-driven from the very first one when Elizabeth Watson Brown and James Grose started talking about how the thought processes of growing up in Brisbane — where you are alive to the humidity and the heat and the breeze and the sounds — left a lasting impact on how they practised architecture. You start to talk about chain of custody in materials and the idea of what makes a sustainable material, not in terms of its end product but in terms of the process by which it’s devolved, and then you link that to modern slavery because slavery is a process by which those in power dominate and subjugate people in order to manufacture products in a price system over which they have very little power or control. Then you start talking about the mental health of people working in architecture generally... there’s a huge issue with the ideas that can make people happier, and therefore, more fulfilling and enjoyable for them to be working in an industry that’s very hard. It’s the second most dangerous industry to work in, in terms of deaths onsite; it’s variously described as being 8-12 percent of the GDP; it’s the single largest sector, bigger than mining, and employs five times the number of people than the mining industry ever did at its height. As an architect, engineer or planner sitting in the office, your biggest joy is when you go out onsite and start to see your special drawings becoming a building – it’s a huge thrill. But you’re working in the extreme cold conditions, you’re working in extreme heat, you’re working outside, it’s not easy and yet people are a slave to the time pressures, the money pressures, the drawing pressures – does this work, do I keep building, do I question it? I think that’s all process. It culminated in the debate that you were talking about as to whether population is a good thing or a bad thing. My main comment about that is that it depends how you handle the process. In 1950, Sydney had 1.6 million people. Twenty five years later, 1975, it had grown to just over 3.3 million – the number of people living in the city doubled in 25 years. If you look at the city in 1950, the tallest building was the AWA Tower sitting on top of a 10-storey brick and stone building and then you look at it in 1975 and the city is there, you know the big towers, the waterfront, the Cahill Expressway, and the Opera House – the city that we know as Sydney is formed in 25 years by that huge influx of population. I don’t think it’s anything to be scared about – of doubling the population, of adding one percent or two percent per annum; in order to double the


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ILLUSTRATION BY TONE WHEELER

population we were talking about having to add five, six, seven percent in some of those years. So was that sustainable then, looking back? No, they were building suburbs, the city they built was modernist and pretty and personable but they did some stupid things like the Liberal Party pulling out all the trams – the third biggest system of transit services and second biggest system from Brisbane and Melbourne. That was rank stupidity. However, a lot of very good things happened such as the social housing programs when we were trying to help people after a terrible war, we were taking in people from mostly southern Europe and then towards the end of that period, we were taking in people from Asia because we were fighting in south-east Asia. You can repopulate those suburbs, you can take the main lines of transport, and double, triple, quadruple the population in those areas, but you can leave the suburbs as they are. Your house is not threatened, 90 percent of the houses in the suburbs are not threatened. Maybe you could do something like make your house more

sustainable, grow some vegetables, put in some solar panels, put in some better insulation but the real sustainability is that you increase those traffic routes now. Rob Adams, the former city architect for the Melbourne city council calculated that you really only have to work on a very small percentage, about six percent of the building stock to double, triple, quadruple the amount of housing along the transport routes in order to be able to double the population. That’s what we want to do in Sydney – you just need to target certain areas and you build something so if you look at the way in which some of the urban centres of Sydney are being revitalised, you don’t hear the negativity of medium density houses and people living in flats. Actually quite a lot of people like living here without a car, having direct access to the services, and don’t want a big kitchen as they would rather go down and have a meal at a restaurant. Will the so-called ‘invisible hand of the market’ increase sustainability in our capital cities? One of the talks I gave at the Sustainability Live event was how in my woods the green karma runs over the brown dogma. What I’m talking

about is that green is no longer on the margins; it’s become mainstream and brown dogma is really the kind of pushback against it. Taken as a whole, Australia has got some of the most interesting innovations in sustainability, the highest uptake of photovoltaic panels on private houses in the world, maybe due to the fact that we have so much suburbia, or maybe because of the incentives that we have. Australia has a huge number of self-made electric cars – the Australian Electric Vehicle Association listed about 400 homemade electric cars. The thing is they’re coming and they’re coming in such a way because it’s so much easier to charge off the photovoltaics than indulge in fossil fuels. That aside, there’s a whole revolution in what people are eating, and how you eat and how you travel, where you go, how things get made and what goods are at one level. It’s not all bright sky because there’s a brown dogma; I think Australia has world class brown dogma. Any country where the Prime Minister, the premier politician, walks into Parliament carrying a lump of black coal saying this is the future, don’t be scared of it; not to put too fine a word on it – it’s idiotic. n


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sandra furtado talking vernacular design, women and mental health in Architecture

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n this edition, WE speak with Sandra Furtado, the principal and director of Sydney-based architecture studio Furtado Sullivan, on a range of topics from environmental efficiency in design, vernacular design, architecture across different continents, carbon neutrality, women in architecture, leaving a legacy and more.

In an interview to this magazine a couple of years ago, you said: “There is a cost-effective way to achieve environmental efficiency even if the client doesn’t want to”. What exactly do you mean by that and is that still applicable today? One of the things I discovered as I studied sustainable development was that there is this market expectation that a green building is a sustainable building, which the market uses to potentially get the revenue they want from the commercial perspective. But sustainability is something that can be achieved through clever design and that comes through the proportion of the spaces, the sizes and placement of windows in certain directions to create airflow, by understanding the environmental constraints of the site and then designing towards that end. Those are things that are inherent to the practice of architecture if you use the principles of vernacular design. Your experience tends to go across many continents. What are the more obvious differences between the way architecture is approached in Australia and Europe, the Middle East or Africa? There are two key things here – the scale of the project, the technology that is specific to

a country and how the industry delivers that product; and the other is about the type of client that you work with, how visionary they are and how willing they are to create a product. I think there is also a difference when you work with a client who’s creating an asset for themselves versus a client who’s developing something that’s going to be taken over by a third party; for example, when you develop a multi-residential building and the developed product is then transferred to an end user or group of people who will then become the owners of that asset and will be carrying on costs of maintaining that asset over time. When you build a building for the owner, you’re thinking about building something that is going to last, has reduced maintenance costs, and is energy efficient because those things eventually become meaningful in terms of the running and operational costs. You decide at the beginning that you want to design for all these environmental efficiencies. However, if you are building something that will be passed on to someone else, the discussion will be focussed on making it as cost-effective as possible even if it’s going to be expensive on the operational side. On the subject of procurement in Australia, especially in large projects, the architect develops a design up to a certain level of documentation, about 70 percent, and then the client goes to


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the market and asks for the market to give them a price, following which the client will choose a builder and a tender from that group. The architect is then introduced to the builder. This was something new to me when I came to Australia because never in the past had I seen the architect working for the builder and the builder dictating what needed to be done. This is usually a collaborative process with the architect and the builder trying to achieve the most cost-efficient way to address issues. I think procurement makes a huge difference in the quality of the built environment overall; however, it’s unfortunate that it’s become the mainstream mode of construction in Australia. What are the main issues when it comes to mental health in architecture, building and construction? There are times when you are taken to almost extremes where you do question your role in the profession and whether it is relevant. You know this happens because of external pressures that not only come from tough deadlines but also how much support you get from the people around you to solve complex problems. At the workplace, you realise that it’s mostly about managing relationships, it’s about teamwork, it’s about communication and it’s about being in a continuous negotiation process that involves design, creativity and problem-solving. There are so many different levels of relationships that architects deal with on a day-to-day basis. Within the office you’ve got to bring over your consultants together and sometimes you’ve got meetings where you have 30 people in the room who are all working on multiple projects but you need to get them to focus on the pressing issues. So, on one hand, you are working through the design of a building, and on the other, you are delivering that design. When you go onsite, you have to go through a process where you are solving problems with a group of disparate people. In Australia, I’ve heard so many different languages being spoken onsite and sometimes there is a communication gap between the foreman and the people or between the different trades. As an architect employed by the builder, you’ve got to try and keep everybody’s interest in line but at the end of the day you also want to deliver a building that is beautiful. I have heard stories of colleagues who were broken by tough experiences onsite and had to take time off and get psychological support; they

didn’t have a lot of help from the practice when all they were doing was trying to protect the interests of the project and therefore, the practice too. When these things happen, you do question what’s right and you hope that you are never in that position. But if you are in a position where you can make changes and influence, then you’ve got to try to help them or try to protect them. In 2011, you wrote a paper called: ‘Entering the ecological age: Carbon neutrality: myth or reality?’ It’s almost 2019, so tell me, is carbon neutrality from a built environment perspective, more myth than reality? Or is carbon positive the way forward? Some people would look at carbon neutrality purely from an energy perspective – their energy consumption over time and whether it can be offset through carbon credits. Or do you go deeper and think about the impact of the assets you are designing and developing, the carbon intensity of all the materials that you know you need to use to build that building, and whether you are designing the building for the next fifty or hundred years or even ten years? Some buildings are designed for fifty years but then there is an expectation that every ten years everything that happens inside them is going to evolve and change. So when you think about the carbon intensity there, then the calculations become so complicated because you have to think about the impact now as well as the recurring impact of maintenance; and the fact that the building may not be recyclable or whether you can count the carbon credit for utilising some of the materials by repurposing them elsewhere. There are all these different nuances when people talk about carbon neutrality, which can be actually really complex. Even if you were to look at this from purely an energy perspective, a sustainable built environment is only sustainable for as long as its users have sustainable behaviour. For instance, you can have a super efficient building but if you leave all the lights on when you’re not there, your energy consumption will go up regardless. Another aspect that comes into play is the footprint of the building: a high rise building has a lot of stacked levels and a small roof whereas a warehouse has maybe one or two levels and a larger extent of roof area. So if you are thinking about harnessing energy from the sun, of course the one that has the largest extent of roof area is the one that is going to be able to collect more energy but you might not be able to have as many

users inside to utilise the energy as you would in a high rise building. So, you also have to think about energy efficiencies not on a building level per se but how the building connects and plugs into its immediate network and how the play of synergies between users can actually create efficiencies. At the end of the day, by connecting different buildings with different types of users, you can create efficiencies because the peak energy for offices happens at a time where there is lower energy for residential and then it kind of balances out at night.

I never thought of me as being a woman when I began my architectural journey – I always thought that I was one of many people in the team.

Let’s talk about women in architecture. Nearly half of architecture graduates are women but less than one in four are practicing architects. In your opinion, what can be done about this? I never thought of me as being a woman when I began my architectural journey – I always thought that I was one of many people in the team. There’s a group called the Architects Male Champions of Change Group, which has been kind of developed by the Institute of Architects. They have done wonderful work championing the cause of women in the profession. I used to question the value of having a group of very influential and talented individuals (but all males) discussing problems related to women architects. If the Institute is championing diversity, then it should be a diverse group. Coming back to the mental health conversation, some women may get to a point in their life when they think this type of pressure is not worth it and they just move on because they have other priorities in life that make their career less meaningful for them to feel accomplished. n


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Koichi Takada – the non-conformist dreamer Words: Prue Miller

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t may have been 20 years ago, but Koichi Takada remembers well the day judges awarded him first prize in an architectural competition – not because he won, but because the judges were arguing about his win. “So I asked Kuma-san (Kengo Kuma) — he was one of the judges — what was happening. I was so confused, and he told me that some of the judges were arguing if I should have won, saying ‘We could not see any architecture in your scheme”. Today the quietly spoken, internationally acclaimed architect reflects on the mayhem of that day and says, “The question was more powerful than the answer”. The excitement and enchantment surrounding Takada’s current body of work echoes the judges of old – his work is not about buildings; it is about relationships in space, relationships that connect people, nature and design. With nary

a straight line to be seen, Takada’s designs have movement; they wave and curl through space. A&D asked Takada if this was a learnt obsession. “I think you know my background. In my Japanese heritage, we write kunji [adopted Logographic Chinese characters] when we write the language, the Japanese language, to communicate with people. I think a lot of these characters have a lot of curvature in them and also characters to show different parts of languages.” By extension, he sees rounded character in the language of his adopted city. “The nature and the typography, you know the landscape of Sydney is very much curvilinear and organic by nature. It’s never straight, nature is never straight, and I was asking myself that question, which nature does very straight lines? And its only humankind.” In the heart of Sydney’s CBD the curves of Takada are gently reaching out to the clouds,

with the unique and quite massive rooftop design of his Arc building for Crown Group almost complete. Fifty-nine steel arches form the crown of the 25-level building that will include 220 apartments and 45 serviced apartments. While the ‘wave pool’ reception area is breathtaking, it is the rooftop that demands the accolades. A pool, vast decking, and fragrant frangipani trees, all under the rather sensuous steel arches suspended in the rarefied atmosphere of Sydney’s conservative skyline. “There’s a lot of provision to express the building rooftop, or architectural feature as they call it, but not many architects do it. How shameful. Because the landscape of the skyline of Sydney, or any city, it just looks the same. You know New York, LA, London, they are all the same, glass curtain walls, they all look the same so why don’t we create something with a point of difference, something that celebrates the great organic nature of Sydney. It’s a wonderful place to be. So we chose to celebrate the rooftop, not ignore it.”


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LEFT: Crown Infinity in Green Square. BELOW: The Arc building for Crown Group has fifty-nine steel arches forming the crown of the 25-level building that will include 220 apartments and 45 serviced apartments.


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ABOVE: The Crown Infinty’s ‘wave pool’ reception area is breathtaking.

An even more immense project is nearing completion, once again for Crown, in the Sydney suburb of Botany. On completion, the 20-storey building will have 325 apartments and a range of commercial outlets. Officially named ‘Infinity’, it has already been nicknamed the ‘landscape tower’, referencing the sweeping, staggered profile that allows each level to have green space – and brings light and air to the centre of the precinct hub. A massive endeavour, and unique in almost every sense, Takada is finally seeing his vision in actuality, as the scaffolding and any doubts are torn away. Yes, even the great ones have second thoughts. “You are always doubtful, you are always questioning, was that the right decision that we made? Can we improve it and so on and so forth.” “It is a constant balancing act,” says Takada of the process. “It is not juggling; it is a matter of finding the right balance.” A balance that Takada embraces, is Crown Group’s belief in making buildings that are healthy places to live. Rather than curse the tightly regulated building codes and selfimposed standards, the Takada team thrive.

“We love it, we are always trying to get more daylight in, more natural ventilation.” With a growing list of award winning and internationally recognised projects in Australia, the impact of this man’s vision for Sydney will be considerable, and may shape the face of our country in the eyes of the global market. But when A&D tries to pin Takada down to discuss his legacy, he humbly ducks and weaves around the suggestion. “A good example, a controversial example is the Sydney Opera House. The Opera House created an incredible iconic image of the city; without the Opera House image, you cannot talk about the city.” Takada goes on to explain how this iconoclasm had a negative effect on building design in Sydney. He suggests many did not try to compete with the Utzon vision. “Everybody started to conform rather than create a contrast and I think that is what we are contributing to, changing the face of Sydney in some way.” With that change comes the ongoing search for new materials that will answer both the call for innovation, as well as the need for carbon

accounting. He sees exciting potential in hybrid materials, and searches for solutions to noise cancellation, thermal boundaries and pollution. Despite the gravity of the responsibility to design with a conscience, the young architect almost giggles with excitement at the potential of Tesla products and photovoltaic glass. Would he swap places then, with the less regulated, less complicated life of an architect 100, or even 500 years ago? His response references the baroque work of the 17th century Italian designer, Borromini. “He designed pretty much from the human eye level as I call it, as opposed to other architects in the Renaissance period who were designing as if they were God, from a god’s eye view, which was the aerial looking down. Borromini designed from looking up from the street level. So, his architecture was never perfect.” “I prefer of course to be in today’s context. This is a very exciting time. Through architecture we are discovering cultural differences and what human kind can do best.” And perhaps, if one were able to achieve a God’s point of view, looking down onto Sydney’s Takada designs, unlike Borromini, perfection may indeed be found. n


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The dramatic clifftop home perched on the edge of a rock face ARCHITECT: Joe Adsett Architects Words: Joe adsett PHOTOGRAPHY: Scott Burrows


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A three-storey extension on a sliver of land on the edge of a cliff, this project could hardly be bigger or more dramatic.


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HOUSE SECTION 1. Entertaining

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2. Hall 3. Ensuite

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5. Pool 6. Macquarie Street 7. Bed 4 8. Hall

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THE CONCEPT 1 2

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1 : 50 @ A0 1 : 100 @ A2 1 : 143 @ A3 1 : 200 @ A4

Originally, the site presented as a triangular parcel of land apologetically wedged between grand, sweeping residences in a leafy suburban street in Teneriffe. A poorly constructed “character house” sat awkwardly on the site, accessed from the smallest frontage. Beyond the house was a dramatic, sheer cliff with views over the river to the North East. The client’s brief was to restore the house and accommodate a family of seven; however the existing house was in poor condition and could not be raised or lifted. An unorthodox solution lay in utilising the sliver of land between the existing house and clifftop. Thankfully, the question “Would you like to build a three-storey extension to the boundary on a crumbling clifftop?” captured the client’s sense of imagination and Clifftop House emerged on pieces of yellow trace.

THE DESIGN As the first sketches were presented a landslide occurred, destroying an enormous historic porphyry wall bounding the property along Walker Avenue. The main approach to the site is from a low vantage point ascending the hill;

thus the monolithic stone wall would serve as a dramatic podium for the new structure. The floorplan of the existing house was divided into quadrants. The architects selected the largest rear quadrant, which was not visible from the street, to dissolve and connect to an extension of 5m with a 27m long elevation to the clifftop. The extension is raised up 1.5m from the existing house to capture river views and breezes and also to the upper storeys to float above the clifftop and tree canopy when viewed from the base of the cliffs. A weathered and natural material palette has been inspired by the texture of the cliff face. Concrete was utilised as the structure and main fabric of the building, deliberately exposed and finished in a worn and weathered manner. Timber window frames and cladding were introduced to soften the architecture from a Brutalist statement to an expression of a finely-detailed interior tailored to the complex dynamic of a family of seven. Bedrooms are split between the original house and extension, with the family brought together in living areas on the ground floor or the third

storey which was designed as a “man cave” (or family room according to the five females) and roof garden. Central voids funnel a stream of light into the house while allowing cross ventilation. The voids provide visual and acoustic separation between rooms, while still affording a vertical connection. In order to balance the shared spaces with the need for solitary, private spaces, the architects convinced the client to extend the brief to incorporate a series of small “interludes”. Clifftop House was built for a budget appropriate for the complexity of the site and constraints of the existing house. Restraint was employed with the sizes of rooms and the joinery design, enabling spaces to be flexible. The building’s main material is concrete and expense was saved in working with the engineer to design the most efficient suspended concrete structure. The slab itself is impossibly thin and was only achieved by working collaboratively with 3D software. The architects also collaborated with an interior designer who brought a wealth of knowledge to the resolution of detailed cabinetry items. On site, a close relationship with the contractor allowed further improvement to the design intent and details.


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PREVIOUS: The floorplan of the existing house was divided into quadrants. ABOVE: Timber window frames and cladding were introduced to soften the architecture. RIGHT: The building’s main material is concrete and expense was saved in working with the engineer to design the most efficient suspended concrete structure.


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RIGHT: Originally, the site presented as a triangular parcel of land apologetically wedged between grand, sweeping residences in a leafy suburban street in Teneriffe. BELOW: Glazing is shaded by large concrete eaves and cast in external blind recesses that house automated canvas roller blinds.

SUSTAINABILITY FEATURES “Clifftop House” makes a meaningful contribution to innovation and excellence in environmental sustainability through the concrete structure being used in a manner similar to “reverse brick veneer construction”. Concrete walls and ceilings are deliberately exposed where thermal mass is relied upon internally. External heat gain through the concrete walls is minimised by isolating the cladding from the walls with timber battens, and a layer of sisalation wrap. The external cladding systems act as a rainscreen to the concrete frame, and heat gain is minimised to the openings by using plantation timber frames glazed with low-e glass and solid timber louvres. Glazing is shaded by large concrete eaves and cast in external blind recesses that house automated canvas roller blinds. The long thin building envelope encourages natural light and ventilation and a 22m-long swimming pool extends along the cliff edge to provide cooling breezes to living spaces. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Designer Panel Systems architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/DesignerPanel-Systems Cedar Sales architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/cedar-sales Warwick Brick Works warwickbrickworks.com.au/ Boral architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/usg-boral Bluescope Steel architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ bluescope-steel Artedomus architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/artedomus National Tiles architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/national-tiles Northern Suburbs Timber Floors nstimberflooring. com.au/ Aussie Woodworks aussiewoodworks. com.au/ Alex Earl Made alexearl.com.au/about/


FORMRITE®

PLYFLOOR®


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The 223 apartments and terrace homes are located in what was once a black stack industrial precinct, now transformed into the ‘it’ part of the Harbour City. In this new beating heart of inner-city Waterloo, sits a collection of six articulated buildings and a courtyard garden with a tall canopy of trees and lush underplanting known as The Finery.


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Sydney’s inner-east gets some architectural finery ARCHITECT: MIRVAC DESIGN WORDS: BRANKO MILETIC PHOTOGRAPHY: MURRAY FREDERICKS

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he Finery has a detailed façade inspired by the buildings from Waterloo’s industrial past, combined with the delicate framing of balconies with decorative white brise soleil screens.

Then, there is what the developer euphemistically calls ‘the bump factor’ - in other words, stairways deliberately designed as a device to make it easier for residents to meet and get to know each other.

The exterior finishes are primarily face brick and concrete, in keeping with the area’s industrial past, while deep-toned electro bronze screens, present a contrast in colour and texture that emphasises the evolving sculptural symphony of the area of today.

The idea was to not just build apartments but to design a community and as such, The Finery’s diverse offering meets the demands of an equally diverse range of people seeking to make the inner-city their home.

The primarily brick and concrete exterior is complemented by lobbies incorporating large format vitrified tiles with pressed metal pattern and pavers laid in The Finery’s signature herringbone motif, that tells visitors where once people toiled, they now relax in a citadel of serene elegance. As mentioned, The Finery owes this design to the gritty industrial heritage of Waterloo, although in this case, reimagined as a graceful collection of six low-rise buildings from four to eight storeys, to create a city village on a human scale while still celebrating its historical significance. Through its design, “The Finery explores different ways for a new community to build connections and develop a sense of belonging,” says the developer, Mirvac.

And as with many similar buildings in this growing part of town, at street level, boutique retail spaces will form a new dining precinct, extending Waterloo’s growing reputation as one of the city’s most popular gastronomic destinations. Mirvac says that it acquired the site from electrical switch makers HPM Legrand in 2014, and it was “an ageing inner-city warehouse that no longer met their requirements and the company wanted to move closer to main arterial routes”. The site, within the Lachlan Precinct of the Green Square urban renewal area, “lies within the prized Waterloo-Danks Street locality, is close to Moore Park and Centennial Park and established shopping at East Village Shopping Centre in Zetland,” notes the developer.


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PREVIOUS PAGE: Through its design, “The Finery explores different ways for a new community to build connections and develop a sense of belonging,” says the developer, Mirvac. THIS PAGE: The Finery’s diverse offering meets the demands of an equally diverse range of people seeking to make the inner-city their home.

The vision for the project says Mirvac, was to “reinterpret the industrial heritage of Waterloo to create a more human-scale villagelike development that also addressed a lack of green space in the immediate vicinity”. Clustering buildings around a central courtyard allows light to penetrate deep into the development, while the tall canopy of trees also provide an additional layer of screening and privacy to the ground-level apartments. This, says Mirvac, has been designed to counter the urban heat island effect of buildings, streets and footpaths while offering residents a calm and contemplative stroll garden. The landscape design was by Aspect Studio director Sacha Coles and was developed to ensure a harmonious integration of the built and natural environment. The dense planting of the courtyard, with its native and non-native species, has been designed to counter the urban heat island effect of the

inner-city, and creates a welcome ecosystem that promises to be several degrees cooler than the surrounding streets. This landscaping, says Mirvac, goes well beyond design and planning guidelines and adds a green heart that will not only benefit residents but avoid creation of another temperature hot spot. Native species that once proliferated in what was a wetland area that thrived well before European settlement have been planted provide a mixed height canopy, combined with ferns and palms. The hard landscaping has been combined with blocks of sandstone and sawn timber to be used as seating, as once again, a place where residents can meet and greet each other. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Aspect Studio aspectstudios.com/au Mirvac architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/mirvac-group


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THIS PAGE: The primarily brick and concrete exterior is complemented by lobbies incorporating large format vitrified tiles with pressed metal pattern and pavers laid in The Finery’s signature herringbone motif.


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LIKE A Tiger Prawn: A playful take on the Australian home Architect: WOWOWA Architecture Words: WOWOWA Architecture Photography: Shannon McGrath

the humble tiger prawn becomes a two-pronged deity for this Fitzroy North renovation. The existing double storey Victorian Terrace’s zig-zag (almost scalloping) brown and gold brick façade was translated and embellished to form the scalloped extension to the rear, whimsically drawing a fortified silhouette in the sky.


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THE BRIEF In 2014, WOWOWA produced a series of renovation tip YouTube videos celebrating some of Melbourne’s Featurist houses Robin Boyd famously identified in The Australian Ugliness. Often, colloquial vernacular nicknames were given to distinct housing styles; early Victorian pattern brick façades as seen in this project were referred to as “Tiger Prawn”. These clients came to WOWOWA proclaiming they have a Tiger Prawn house and were eager to honour the glory of their Victorian terrace frontage with a new addition out back. Another key feature of the distinct Fitzroy North site was the carpark and laneway adjoining the back of the property. The back was publicly visible, so from the outset the architects treated the back not only as a back but also a front. This was reminiscent of ‘Janus’ the Roman god of beginnings, transitions, time and duality - depicted with two faces, so he could look to the future and to the past. WOWOWA thought this duality of past and present, front and back was an excellent driver for a narrative rich project.

PROJECT INNOVATION The brief called for a mirroring of the robustness, craft and ornament of the front in the back. This mirroring of Janus’ faces started in the plan – quite simply by mirroring the terrace frontage to the back, setting up a similar duality. From there, the form was eroded to allow for maximum light, flexibility and amenity into the densely programmed spaces. A commitment to the Tiger Prawn thematic ran deep. The crustacean’s shell inspired the fluted geometry but also the colour scheme – the grey

and green hues of the raw prawn favoured by one of the clients. Furthering the sea vibe is the pearl earring ball light on the brick, cuttlefish bone ribbed pendants and upstairs screening shadow play (likened to little scampering prawn legs) that dance over the highly decorative concrete floors, which tie together the semicompartmentalised kitchen living and dining areas of the downstairs. The Dichondra hanging from the balconies dances in the wind like seaweed floating.

CHALLENGES The back façade dramatically turns the corner a metre off the boundary, allowing it to also dance along the northern edge. As well as providing a handsome vista for the neighbours, it allows for large north facing windows that facilitate an impressive amount of borrowed landscape for such a tight 5m-wide site. The fire regulated setback windows dually create substantial storage below and a high-level pocket garden. Like all Victorian terraces, the house was dark, depressing and everyone was living on top of each other. The brief was for breathing space – together but apart. The whole family can now be in any kitchen, living or dining nook, divided by courtyard and spatial play, but feel a sense of retreat. A “V” lightwell with a special curved glass corner to the southern boundary breaks up the mass and fills the space with light and ventilation.

SUSTAINABILITY Tiger Prawn packs an environmentally sustainable punch with insulated double brick cavity walls, double glazing with low-e, cross ventilation, thermal floor mass and a tidy footprint.


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PREVIOUS: A commitment to the Tiger Prawn thematic ran deep. The crustacean’s shell inspired the fluted geometry but also the colour scheme. ABOVE: The fire regulated setback windows dually create substantial storage below and a high-level pocket garden. LEFT: The back façade dramatically turns the corner a metre off the boundary, allowing it to also dance along the northern edge.

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it’s back to black for Kitchen design Words: Prue Miller


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Many remember the mid-century modernisation of the Australian kitchen; when Sunbeam made Magic Frying pans, the Mixmaster whipped up cakes, Pyrex bowls were the ant’s pants, Aga cookers were sneered at and ‘guess whose mum’s got a Whirlpool?’ was every kid’s phrase of praise and familial pride.

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he kitchen was an actual room, all on its own. It was a place mums disappeared into and out of which food appeared. Cooking was a chore, unglamorous, and certainly not a spectator sport. In 2019, we see kitchens that talk to you, that you can control from the office, that blend seamlessly into the open architectural spaces of contemporary family life The most remarkable thing about this year’s designs is that they are, well, understated. While kitchens as recently as the noughties were spectacular showcases of money, with benchtops crammed with every juicer, blender, mixer and bread maker, as a society we seem to now blush at the suggestion that we spent $6,000 on a fridge. So coy are we about our culinary largesse that we hide it away, spending loads of money to create walls of superb cabinetry camouflage.

The space issue is equally well dealt with in the company’s drawer systems, which boast practical improvements such as draws which you can internally configure yourself. It sounds simple, yet to be able to lead an unjumbled life – to not have to dumpster dive through drawers in order to find the corkscrew/ fondue forks/biro/school excursion permission slip is not to be underestimated. However, even more impressive is the Blum electrical servo drive system that can be used on drawers, cupboards and cabinets – meaning just a tap or a touch and the device will open, requiring no additional effort on your part no matter the size of the opening. And no handles – not one. And if the permission slip is nowhere to be seen, even the angriest eight year old can’t slam a soft close drawer.

It seems so old fashioned to use the expression cabinet maker – so very 18th century – yet the craft and craftspeople are still at the centre of innovative design.

Another major player in the kitchen field, Hettich offers a very interesting range of handle furniture for their units – and it supplies a rather genteel French folding door pantry cupboard that once again offers great access and sightlines while not blocking the through traffic in what is most often a space challenged area.

Blum Kitchens has succeeded in taking even the most humble elements, the drawer and the cupboard, and allowed as cabinet makers to elevate the concept to feature status.

If you have a small cavity space, just looking for a reason to exist, consider the SlideLine M sliding door system – of course this and Blum furniture can be adapted to rooms beyond ‘la cucina’.

The Aventos over bench cabinet doors that lift (or even bifold lift) rather than swing open allow complete access (visual and physical) so that no corner of valuable kitchen cupboard space is left unused.

You can see the theme minimalism as we move along; no obvious doors, no handles, few accoutrements – but what of the most basic elements – such as stoves and sinks?

Combined with the famed Blum smooth-as-silk hinges, hunting for Mum’s martini shaker has never been more fun.

For those who despair at the sight of gas cooktops scarred by an unforgiving and long forgotten boeuf bourguignon, the soon to be released Smeg Dolce Stil Novo will surely appeal.


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Designed by Italian architect Guido Canali, titanium coated pan stands rise above a black ceramic deck, and the flame is a continuous ring of vertical flame offering a 20 percent increase in efficiency over standard burners. If, however the stands are a tad too Brutalist, one can locate a rather whimsical alternate “ring of birds” trivet with a little online detective work. And the sink? No longer the shiny stainless steel single bowl with dish drain attached – now the sink is a statement piece, and a matte one at that. A most bizarre concept even five years ago, black taps and black sinks are very much ‘on trend’. Oliveri, a name synonymous with the stainless steel range, has produced an impressive range of granite or granite, quartz acrylic composite units in its Santorini range. If black is your thing, don’t forget to check out the Blanko range and the slightly more upmarket Franke version which comes with some great black taps as a set. Black, black, black – it is the look these days. Matte, chilled, minimalist black – with just the odd accent of character. It is a comfortable, easy on the eye concept that finds itself well suited to space-short apartment design, as much as the big entertainer’s kitchen.

PREVIOUS: Dekton by Cosentino ‘Radium’ – each is still dark and mysterious but has veins, shades and flecks to add depth to the mysterious palette of beguiling black. ABOVE: The sink is a statement piece, and a matte one at that.


Impressive kitchen design deserves quality hardware @blumaustralia


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OPPOSITE PAGE: Black, black, black – it is the look these days. Matte, chilled, minimalist black – with just the odd accent of character. THIS PAGE: Cosentino designers suggest looking at something as subtle and sleek as the Silestone bench top material called ‘Indian Black’.

The challenge is adding something to lift it, to add that extra dimension – lighting is big here, but don’t forget that subtle depths of noir – Cosentino designers suggest looking at something as subtle and sleek as the Silestone bench top material called ‘Indian Black’, or even Dekton by Cosentino ‘Radium’ – each is still dark and mysterious but has veins, shades and flecks to add depth. But back to taps. Now freestanding and multifunctional, the Billi bench-mounted, chilled, filtered water tap is just one of those chic add ons that can lift a kitchen from good to memorable.

or go for the full bling and have it become the main feature of the monochrome cooking arena.

Snaidero is the newest kid on the kitchen block, opening a flagship store in Sydney.

While the sleek Liebherr, and the two door AEG had their admirers, it was indeed the all singing, all dancing Samsung Family Hub fridge that had the most attention. It was playing music while offering, on a large touch screen-come-fridge door access to your emails, messages, calendar, photos – while apparently also keeping food cold.

It offers Italian made kitchens with a notably different point of view that has been distilled over its 72-year history. Kitchen designer, Greg Natale created the showroom space, filling it with a very lux vibe and rather fabulous colours.

If we are to believe the American YouTube clip, you can even order takeaway food – from the fridge door touch pad. Imagine watching the cricket on the actual door behind which lies an icy cold beer?

This year we will see Billi’s newest incarnation, the Eva Pro tap with boiling, chilled or sparkling water – all from the one outlet – with a “touch user interface” for easy operation. Yes, there is a chance you will want to read an instruction manual to use a tap, but hey, it’s still very cool. It comes in black.

Let’s face it, food is pretty much central to our lives, so it is no wonder we have strong feelings about its realm within our fiefdom. We want to keep the love affair alive, and we seek out new ways to enjoy our relationship with food and nutrition – and the work involved in preparing it – even after long days at our workplaces.

On that same thread – there does seem to be some disagreement regarding whether to hide the humble fridge behind elegant, LED lit panelling,

So it was with great delight that a fresh face has recently appeared on the design scene, a new player with a very long international history.

Sort of the antithesis of the black phenomenon, and encouraging the trend that is gathering traction, is that of mixed textures. This is an inspiring space, filled with curated pieces and add-ons that will excite those who feel the need for a designer shot in the arm, while their hand fishes out their credit cards. Many on trend items of today, such as Aga stoves or lime-coloured toasters were seen in our mothers’, or grandmothers’ kitchens. In fact, hidden in my pantry is my mother’s 1950 Sunbeam Mixmaster; a metal work horse that weighs a ton, in slightly chipped black and cream whose lovely curves look so vintage it’s finally back in vogue, and will make a fine statement piece in a matte black kitchen.


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THIS PAGE: The most remarkable thing about this year’s designs is that they are understated.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: BLUM architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/blum-australia BILLI architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/billi-pty-ltd HETTICH architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ hettich-australia OLIVERI architectureanddesign. com.au/news/oliveri-delivers-minimalist-design LIEBHERR architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ liebherr-australia SAMSUNG architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/samsung-electronics-australia ARTEDOMUS architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/ Artedomus AEG aegaustralia.com.au SNAIDERO snaidero.com COSEnTINO cosentino.com/en-au SMEG architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/smeg-australia

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The evolution of windows and doors WORDS: Prue Miller


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while oversharing pictures of our lives on social media, we are ALSO keen to have the chance to retreat to our personal planets of solitude when the chance arrives.

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et our solitude is far from cavernous; we crave and pay dearly for great expanses of glass, for doors and windows that fold, slide and lift away to let the world take part in our reverie, day and night, good weather and poor, all year around. The barrier between outside and in, the threshold if you will, has never been more visually vacant. The pivot door, seen most often as amazing statement pieces at the front of private residences as well as rather flash commercial developments are here to stay – and getting bigger by the day. The year 2019 will see doors that would rival anything you might find in Winterfell or Versailles.

This century we did away with walls, and with it went the chance to decorate with purpose.

to Viridian, such as New South Wales and Queensland are reluctant to embrace it.

However, glass itself has evolved to become such a versatile building element that we may forgive or forget the loss of sandblasted flamingos on a sunroom door.

But again, with energy prices on the rise, and challenging weather conditions continuing across the continent, more designers and buyers will be seeking out the best options in glazing products.

Now architects can specify toughened, laminated, tinted and insulated fenestration options that according to Australian Glass Group (so called because it consists of three companies: Moen Glass located in Melbourne and Canberra, Bevelite Glass located in Sydney and CL Glass located Brisbane) can reduce heat transfer by over 50 percent, alleviating at least some of the excesses in heating and cooling.

Without doubt the pivot door has elevated the experience of egress to something extraordinary.

They can toughen glass, create insulated glass, make sky glass and well, the list is lengthy and goes to prove that glass is a highly technical and developing field.

The very action of opening a door of immense proportion, and we’re talking about some as imposing as 5m X 5m, is exciting and dramatic.

According to Viridian we are going to progressively see high performance glass and double glazing as a standard in building design.

Mid-century is now being held up so often as the epitome of style, and while it was not always so, back then they did have rather marvellous internal glass doors, some framed in timber, some etched with wild things, but they were effective at allowing light to travel and climate to be somewhat compartmentalised.

When you think about double glazing you usually associate it with colder climates like North America and Europe. This is why states like Victoria and Tasmania are leading the uptake of this transformative building material in Australia, and why states, according

Bi-fold windows, specifically used as serveries between kitchens and terraces were perhaps the buzz product of 2018, but Breezway has another that should attract some attention in 2019. Breezway has expanded its range to include a very smart new product that won “Most Innovative Window System” at the 2018 Fenestration Awards some months ago. The Secondary Glazed Altair Dualair Louvre System answers concerns of older models by placing two Altair Louvre Galleries in the one 150cm commercial frame which results in a number of benefits. The new system is much improved in water penetration resistance (which is perhaps most important to tropical zones) from 450Pa to 620Pa. The virtual double glazing effect offers energy efficiency and enhanced acoustic performance– while still allowing for the rather exhilarating air movement that only louvre windows offer.


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OPPOSITE PAGE: Evolution Window Systems offers the Aneeta Sashless, as well as a full range of aluminium and timber framed windows and doors for clientele who value the bespoke possibilities of using either or both media. THIS PAGE: The Secondary Glazed Altair Dualair Louvre System answers concerns of older models by placing two Altair Louvre Galleries in the one 150cm commercial frame which results in a number of benefits.

Also gaining popularity is the frameless window – adding to the allusion that there is no barrier between in here and out there.

become the defining point? Not if one were to then counter with the Breezway louvres that can be controlled remotely, and just as well.

The ‘sashless window’ is a chic idea. Best described as a vertical slider, the panels – from two to even four, can be slid into a variety of positions that allow optimum air flow, reacting to changing needs of every season.

Some glass doors can have window inserts, some windows have doors (for the paw families), really the concepts are only restricted by imagination, and budget.

Evolution Window Systems offer the Aneeta Sashless, as well as a full range of aluminium and timber framed windows and doors for clientele who value the bespoke possibilities of using either or both media.

How do you compare experiences? The excitement of an architecturally well-placed floor to ceiling glass door, paired with a glass balustrade, is the only way to really enjoy a coastal vignette.

A spokesman for the company speculated that its current customers are becoming enchanted by very thick glass, not just glass that is technically impactful, but also glass in windows and doors that has a bit of heft to it.

Equally, when a garden becomes part of the interior courtesy of the supernatural effect of floor to ceiling glass doors that seemingly fold away leaving nothing but a gleaming minty green slash left by the profile of neatly stacked glass blades, more than one’s green thumbs burst with delight.

All this does lead to the question, when does a window become a door? And vice versa. We know that doors have become Wi-Fi enabled, and can be answered and opened remotely – will that

And finally, what we haven’t addressed here is the pure and delightful aesthetics of the timber framed windows and doors, versus those entirely fabricated by man.

Wood has some rather wonderful qualities; some tactile, some thermal, some romantic. The fear of maintenance has turned many away from timber products, despite the fact that a little maintenance goes a long way. Some metal frames, not the ‘top of the line’ products mind you, absorb heat and add to the thermal load of a room, unlike timber. But then again with powder coating options and slim line profiles (or indeed no frame profile at all) aluminium products can be attractive. In any event, people are certainly coming to grips with the fact that investing in quality windows and doors can in the long term be a money saver, while adding immeasurably to quality and transparency of life. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Breezeway breezway.com.au Evolution Window Systems architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/evolution-window-systems Viridian architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/Viridian Australian Glass Group architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/australian-glass-group


RETURNING TO CARRIAGEWORKS, SYDNEY 29-30 AUGUST 2019 Apply to exhibit now www.front.design

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USING A ROOF TO SavE energy & ADD BEAUTY WORDS: NATHALIE CRAIG

F

irstly, energy costs have skyrocketed in recent years, with homeowners searching for ways to save on bills. Secondly, Australians are becoming more eco-conscious, and in turn, are wanting to build more sustainable homes. Energy costs, whether they be gas or electricity, are at an all-time high. In fact, power prices alone have more than doubled over the last five years, becoming a huge expense for many homeowners. A recent study by independent consumer advocacy group Choice revealed that electricity prices, health and food are the top three concerns for householders. Coupled with this, media coverage about power prices, and blackouts has kept this topic front of mind for many people. Monier Roofing, which has been putting roofs on Australian homes for 100 years, says choosing energy saving roofing is a no brainer these days; especially when considering the fact that the cost of solar is falling by an average of 19 percent per annum. “It’s no wonder most homeowners are considering adding solar to their roof,” Monier’s product manager Meena Somi says. “People are slowly realising that you wouldn’t build a home without insulation, so why build a home and not have solar?” Arcpanel’s director of sales and marketing Christian Webb agrees that energy saving roofing is one of the best ways to cut down on bills while simultaneously supporting the environment. This is because one of biggest influences on the energy efficiency of a home is the type of roof that it has over it. “A substantial amount of heat loss and heat gain is through the roof,” Webb says. “In particular there is heat gain with our Australian climate which drives the need to insulate the roof to protect against the harshAustralian sun and reduce the cooling demands of the building.” So while energy saving roofing sounds like a good idea, can it be aesthetically pleasing also?

Monier’s Somi says getting solar roofing to look good was certainly a challenge in the past, with standard solar panels often detracting from the look of the home. “Until recently, homeowners have traditionally invested heavily into designing and building their dream homes, but only had one option when it came to choosing solar for their homes.” Today the focus has shifted towards improving aesthetics. To meet this emerging need, Monier teamed up with Bradford, a supplier of energy-saving products for homes and commercial buildings. The partnership has allowed Monier to combine its roofing expertise with Bradford’s experience as energy experts. Backed by CSR, Monier has a new range of high-performance roofing solutions that don’t compromise on style. Unlike traditional solar panels, Monier’s InlineSOLAR and SOLARTiles are embedded within the roofline, integrating seamlessly with the rest of the tiles. Both products are available for reroofing existing homes or building an entirely new home. “Monier InlineSOLAR was the first fully integrated, modular flat solar panel system on the Australian market,” Somi says. “The slimline system is recess-mounted within the roofline, meaning that it sits flush with the roof to provide all the benefits of solar whilst maximising the street appeal of a home.” She says its “elegant low profile” also means it is less prone to damage and wear than conventional systems. InlineSOLAR is compatible with the full range of Monier roof tiles, which are available in classic terracotta or contemporary concrete finishes. Monier SOLARtile, on the other hand, is a concrete tile-based modular system that

integrates with existing roof tiles and is built to withstand a beating from the elements. “The system can be used in conjunction with sarking to prevent condensation and mould build-up, thus minimising the risk of structural damage to the roof surface and the supporting structure,” adds Somi. The modular nature of Monier SOLARtile means it can be installed in virtually any configuration.

CAMBRIDGE WITH A HIGH PITCH This ‘American lux’ style home design by Architect Tom Potter is set on a 1.6ha block in Sydney’s Oxford Falls. The roof needed to be high pitched, sleek and streamlined across the different planes of the roofline. The homeowners wanted a dark, grey to black colour. They chose the Monier Cambridge roof tile because it had the look, the fire rating (the house is situated in a bush fire prone area) and the colour they wanted, as well as the thermal mass advantages of roof tiles when it comes to energy efficiency. Luckily, the Monier SOLARtile integrates seamlessly with a Cambridge roof tile. The owners were adamant that they wanted solar power. The house has a lot of roof area and faces north-east, and with electricity prices continually on the rise, they wanted to be as independent as they could be. They looked at solar panels, but didn’t really like them appearance of them, classing them as ‘”plain ugly”. They didn’t want to ruin the lines and aesthetics of their roof and home. Now they have a solar efficient solution that fully integrates with the roof line.

InlineSOLAR in action The roof on this newly-built Brisbane coastalinspired house is fitted out with Monier Cambridge Concrete Colour roof tiles in Soho Night, along with InlineSOLAR.


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Energy-saving residential roofing is becoming more and more sought after and the reasons are two-fold.


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The end result is a coastal look using a slateinspired roof tile topped off with A-line ridging. InlineSOLAR allowed the solar panels to integrate flawlessly into the roofline, giving a streamlined look while enabling the owners to save hundreds of dollars on their electricity costs. The difference in the family’s bills since moving into the new house in September 2017 has been remarkable with their regular electricity bills dropping from $900 down to $350. The family is resoundingly pleased with their solar roofing, saying they’d much rather be paying off a solar unit than giving that money away to their energy provider. Arcpanel Roof Systems, on the other hand, uses sustainable insulated panel systems in order to create more energy efficient roofing and focus on creating the right building design to suit the local climate and environment. Arcpanel’s philosophy is that the future of the building industry is in sustainable and efficient products and systems. The roof panels consist of a top sheet and bottom sheet of Colorbond steel bonded to an insulated core. “It’s designed not only to provide a significant thermal performance but is also a fantastic spanning panel and cantilevering panel,” Webb says. “This not only insulates the internal space of the building, but can provide outstanding cantilevering which can provide shade solutions over windows for the summer sun.”

Camp Mountain Farmhouse Designed by architect Paolo Denti and his team from PentArchi, this farmhouse at Camp Mountain in Queensland was built for the future with sustainability at its core. Denti says the brief from the owner-builder was to have an energy efficient, modern rural residence. He and his team met the challenge of creating a home that fits the “green and clean” brief.

ABOVE: Tractile’s CEO Jason Perkins says a great example of the Eclipse Solar PV tile in use is on a beautiful new family home in Strathmore, Victoria, designed by award winning architect Michael Ong.


THE LATEST INNOVATION IN SOLAR ROOFING THAT MAINTAINS YOUR STREET APPEAL InlineSOLAR™

SOLARtile™

DESPITE THE BENEFITS OF SOLAR, 30% OF HOME OWNERS WON’T PUT SOLAR ON THEIR HOME! Research of over 1000 Australians* showed 35% of new build homes end up with solar installed on them. Yet despite Australia being one of the biggest adopters of solar, 30% won’t put it on their home if you can see it from the street. Monier offers a total roof solution to ensure you get all the savings of solar without affecting your street appeal. Monier’s InlineSOLAR™ and SOLARtile™ are the first of its kind. It is installed as your roof goes on, so there is no cutting and grinding and comes with a 25 year output performance guarantee.

INTEGRATED DESIGN STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY CSR MONIER WARRANTY COMPATIBLE WITH BATTERY

* Australian Solar Survey. Research conducted by third party – The Online Research Unit, N = 1025, conducted between 04 May 2018 to 09 May 2018

Visit monier.com.au for more information or call 1800 666 437

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For the boomerang-shaped roof, the Arcpanel 140mm Custom Panel was used to create the floating form above the steel-framed home. The roof can also be used to harvest rainwater, while the wide eaves keep the sun off the windows and enhance the floating effect of the roof.

EFFICIENCY IN East KurrajonG Arcpanel points to this East Kurrajong project in NSW as great example of its energy efficient roofing in action. For this project, the homeowners chose the Arcpanel Firetek product. Firetek was developed off the back of the Victorian bushfires and is used in areas where design for a Bal 40 bushfire rating is required. The product is a pre-fabricated insulated panel that consists of two Colorbond sheets, bonded to a fire-retardant PIR core. Because of the home’s rural setting, the heating and cooling demands are quite high so the client was keen to use the Arcpanel for thermal qualities, fire resistance and to harvest rainwater. They also added solar to generate power and go off-grid. The Firetek panel itself plays a key part in reducing the energy load of the building, while providing “significant cantilevers” for passive shade control and heat control.

ABOVE: The owners chose the Monier Cambridge roof tile because it had the look, the fire rating (the house is situated in a bush fire prone area) and the colour they wanted, as well as the thermal mass advantages of roof tiles when it comes to energy efficiency.

The roof also helps to provide a comfortable environment and peace of mind while living in a Bal 40 zone.

PHOTOVOLTAIC + AESTHETICS Another top energy-saving roofing solution is the Eclipse solar PV tile by Tractile. These large format tiles not only generate electricity but also preheat water to 30 or 35°C through water channels in the back of the tile. Designed with a focus on aesthetics, these tiles form part of an interlocking system of high performance composite materials and solar. This delivers a 4-in-1 solution for roofing, insulation, electricity, and heated water.

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Tractile’s CEO Jason Perkins says a great example of the Eclipse Solar PV tile in use is on a new family home in Strathmore, Victoria, designed by award winning architect Michael Ong. “The client wanted the very best. He really likes the integrated features which give a seamless look between the solar and non-solar tiles.” The home has a fascinating roof design with four different roof planes. “It was beautiful project to be associated with, great attention to detail, a great quality build,” Perkins adds. He says the Eclipse solar PV tile was able to fulfill the client’s brief of wanting “a beautiful looking roof that gave them energy independence”.

NO MORE TRUSSES

THE FUTURE IS SOLAR Arcpanel’s Webb says he expected that people’s interest in energy efficient roofing would only continue to grow. “There has been an increased awareness of energy usage and sustainability that has driven the need for there to be changes through the building code of Australia,” he says. “This puts the impetus back on the architect or designer of the building and its stakeholders to ensure that buildings can run efficiently.” “The days of buildings being built with absolutely no regard to insulation of the building envelope are gone.” Now rather than pumping air conditioning through an uninsulated building to regulate the temperature, it has to be built to minimise the energy usage in the first place.

Roofing company Bondor offers eco-friendly insulated roofing systems through its InsulRoof, SolarSpan and MetecnoSpan products. These all-in-one roofing solutions include an external steel roof, ceiling, insulation and structure.

Webb says he was proud to be part of a business that supports a greener way of doing things.

The heat blocking high performance insulation supports energy-efficiency in the home by reducing reliance on heating and cooling systems.

“From adding beauty and value to your property to lowering energy bills, cutting pollution and bringing you more independence from the grid, our solar roofing gives back to you in ways that other power sources cannot.” n

Bondor SolarSpan was the roofing of choice for a new Stafford Heights home in Queensland designed by architect Matt Riley of Tonic Design.

As for Monier’s Somi, she says that eco-friendly roofing is definitely the way of the future.

From a design perspective alone, SolarSpan eliminated the need for traditional trusses, meaning the home owners could enjoy higher ceilings to provide more open and spacious living areas. Suppliers & Contractors: Monier Roofing

The homeowner wanted sustainability to be a “fundamental” part of the build and said the high performance insulated core found in SolarSpan roofing panels means they very rarely find the need for continuous air conditioning or heating in their new home.

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architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/MonierRoofing Arcpanel architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/arcpanel Tractile architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/tractile Bondor architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/bondor Bradford architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/csr-bradford

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Australian residential buildings have seen significant changes over the past few decades, with the move from detached homes on large blocks to detached and semi-detached homes on smaller blocks, and growing numbers of apartments being developed across the board. This shrinking of our residential spaces has required a significant reimagination of utility spaces such as the bathroom and laundry.


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Bathrooms and laundries: Two spaces undergoing rapid change WORDS: Stephanie Stefanovic

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hile utility once reigned supreme, bathrooms have since become much more aesthetically pleasing and even inviting. And with advents in bathroom technology, designers are needing to become increasingly savvy with the items they choose for interior bathroom fitouts. “Nowadays, bathrooms are more about functionality, embracing new product technology and a focus toward the type of environment and feeling that is created,” says Darshan Nagarsekar, national marketing manager at Geberit. “It is also about personalisation and consumers are taking this up like they do with their bedrooms and living rooms. [At the same time] it is about being pragmatic, so consumers are looking at a bathroom with more space and less clutter, as well as ease to access things around the space and stress-free maintenance.” In terms of aesthetics, the traditional materials are changing. “There is a trend about fusion of different materials, surfaces and elements being elegantly blended together in the bathroom furniture,” says Nagarsekar. “Taking cues from what we saw [last] year, bathrooms are embracing matte textures, warm colour palettes, practical products and an aim to maximise the use of available space as much as possible.”

Saving space Toilets represent an opportunity to save space and improve a home’s sustainability at the same time. Saniflo’s Sanicompact, for example, uses water and space efficiently. According to Saniflo marketing executive Tarika Shetty, it’s the first all-in-one macerating toilet suite, and features a water-saving cistern-less flush and the ability to add a basin. It was designed to be added where space is limited, making it a good solution for a small ensuite or laundry addition. Geberit also offers a cisternless toilet suited for the modern bathroom.

“The trend nowadays is, if you don’t need to access it every day you can hide it in your walls and just have the actuator on your bathroom wall to access your flush tank,” says Nagarsekar. “This product is also hygienic as back to wall pan installations means one can clean the floor underneath the pan.” Another drawcard is the product’s Sigma80 buttons, which use sensors for a hygienic touchless flush.

Aesthetic yet functional Speaking of concealing utility items, drainage is another area that has undergone significant change. Most people don’t give much thought to drains unless they aren’t working properly, and many architects don’t consider drainage solutions until after the bathroom or laundry has already been constructed, which is a mistake. According to drainage specialist Stormtech, this approach can have serious complications, and typically results in ineffective drains that will inevitably require a change of specification. Unfortunately, changing the drainage specification can also impact the selection of flooring materials, requiring quite significant redesign and potentially requiring repairs or replacement down the track. There are two main drainage styles: traditional drains with a single, centralised drainage point, and linear drains. Linear drains can be placed anywhere in the wet area and only require two-way floor grading toward the drainage channel, as opposed to the four-way grading required by traditional grates. With their discrete appearance, linear drains are a good option for bathrooms where aesthetics are a primary concern.

Bathrooms are changing Not only have bathrooms needed to change with building and design trends, but also with the population itself. As Australia’s population becomes increasingly older, accessible design is becoming a concern.


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PREVIOUS: Bathrooms have become much more aesthetically pleasing and even inviting, rather than being a utility space. THIS PAGE: The Electrolux 10kg Washing Machine and 9kg Heat Pump Condenser were stacked using the Electrolux Stacking Kit in a project by Three Birds Renovations. Image: Three Birds Renovations

“As the Baby Boomer generation is entering retirement, the focus needs to turn towards bathroom accessibility,” says Dave Sayers, founder of Availcare. “Builders will need to prepare bathrooms for future modification, which includes strengthening walls to allow for future grab rails and shower seats. Innovations like adjustable height toilets, electronic temperature control tapware, ergonomic bidet controls, sensor lighting and weight bearing bathroom accessories will allow retirees to continue living at home comfortably for years to come.” In doing so however, designers need to ensure these products don’t look ‘clinical’. This is a primary concern for many people retrofitting their homes for accessibility. Sayers recounts a recent project where the client had this exact concern: “Sharon’s mother had been coming to stay with her quite often so she contacted an occupational therapist to find out how she could improve access in their bathroom. Based on the occupational therapist’s recommendation, we installed four rails from Cabrini Health. We were able to add a 300x300mm angled rail by the toilet, making it much easier to sit and stand. We also added a toilet roll holder to the rail, making sure the toilet paper was within easy reach. “For the shower we installed a vertical rail to hold onto as they walk into the shower and an angled rail on the main wall to help Sharon’s mum get in and out of her shower seat. Sharon since wrote to us and said she has been using the rails herself and was surprised how often she uses them and was so pleased they didn’t look clinical.”

DISAPPEARING Laundry rooms These days, buying a new home with a dedicated laundry room is a luxury. And in the case of apartments, a rarity. There has been a growing trend of ‘European laundries’ in Australia. This is where the washer and/or dryer is incorporated into other rooms such as bathrooms or kitchens. Some traditionalists may find it strange, but considering the functional requirements of a washer/dryer, it makes perfect sense. According to Electrolux this is indeed the case, but not to fear – laundry machines can easily be concealed in a cupboard for a seamless look. This is exactly what the company achieved in a recent project, House 9 by Three Birds Renovations. As space was a challenge, Three Birds opted for a hidden European laundry, tucking the appliances away in a kitchen cupboard. The Electrolux 10kg Washing Machine and 9kg Heat Pump Condenser were stacked using the Electrolux Stacking Kit, creating a stylish and seamless flow between the two machines. n

Suppliers & Contractors: Electrolux architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/ElectroluxHome-Products Stormtech architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/stormtech Availcare availcare.com.au Saniflo architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/saniflo Geberit architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/Geberit


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Scratching beneath the surface of veneers WORDS: Prue Miller

The word ‘veneer’ has managed to traverse various meanings. Once a decorative layer applied to anything at all, it was then said a ‘veneer’ was a thin layer of good wood bonded to woods of lesser notoriety.


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N

owadays if one Googles veneer, they are beset with unwanted hits from dentists offering flawless veneers and perfect smiles at low, low prices.

Clearly then the creativity in veneers has never been at a standstill. The recent past has seen exciting and frankly mind blowing examples of what can be achieved with very minimal material, but great engineering. Veneers are certainly a major design element, but the substrate must be positioned, moulded and engineered to make the most of a valuable resource. Laminates and veneers have shaken off their image of being cheap off cuts of the timber industry. Marketing manager of Elton Group, Karen Griffin agrees. “In our experience the laminate market has shifted and growth these days is found in products offering innovative, high quality finishes and designs.” The Elton Group creates its laminates using real timber, and stands firmly for responsible renewable resource practices. It is this ethos that has allowed the company to expand its range of products as technology progresses. “The runaway success of our range has been the Evaneer Prefinished range of real timber laminates – ready polished with high quality polyurethane and a brushed 3D texture that can be applied the same way as an HPL laminate and protected with a peel-off film,” says Griffin.

Early non visual concepts were things such as buzzing Nintendo controllers, and future haptic science will not involve actual touch at all, but rely more on ultrasonic transducers for the no-touch touch experience. Indeed, the haptic experience will soon transform into what some will call the virtual reality experience in design.

Laminex too is leading the new year with matte finishes, and adding to them palettes of what the company calls Nostalgia. One palette consists of muted Green Slate with Winter Sky and Natural Teak – while another comes back to a vibrant earth with Brushed Bronze and and Essastone Marmo Bianco that is a remarkable marble stone lookalike.

A different take on the physical veneer industry is found in the world recognised Wilsonart company, famous for creative designs and options for residential and commercial applications.

Perhaps a leap of concept here, but on the subject of stone and bench surface finishes, or splashbacks, the new range from Caesarstone is entirely the opposite of matte and quiet in design.

The laminates are created using 70 percent paper, (actually is it resin impregnated Kraft paper) and part of the extensive range includes wood grain laminate designs, however for those looking for a more industrial or urban design Wilsonart’s VDL range includes a recycled timber look will appeal to those adverse to clinical perfection.

The Concetto collection is comprised of slices of agate, quartz and amethyst that are hand crafted to create dramatic surfaces – in a range of individual colour palettes (including Red Tiger Eye, Amethyst, Petrified Wood and White Quartz), some of which are so thin they are perfect for backlit panels in any room of the home that deserve a little semi-precious luxury.

A specialist in high pressure laminates, Wilsonart’s AEON range delivers a robust anti scuff and scratch product that is partly comprised of aluminium particles that aid in the ‘sliding off’ effect of abrasive wear.

It’s irresistible to not go from sealing to ceiling – and from residential sized veneers to truly massive installations.

Laminates and veneers have shaken off their image of being cheap off cuts of the timber industry.

“From a technical point of view the strength of Eveneer Prefinished is in the brushed 3D texture and quality of the polishing which is factory applied utilising the highest quality, oven cured, acrylic modified polyurethane; offering a finish that is hard to achieve.” What lies ahead in 2019 is the evolution of Eveneer Touch, which is strongly focused on enhancing the haptics of the product. Perhaps this is one of the greatest distinctions of the timber veneers of this century; more than the look, these finishes have to stand up to the touch test, to how people respond to the tactile qualities of surfaces. It’s the art of the feedback loop that tells our brains if we are enjoying an experience.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that precious means fragile, these panels are heat and scratch resistant and according to Caesarstone never require sealing.

The Wilsonart range offers desirable traits for hard wearing locations such as kitchens and bathrooms – but has additional veneers that work well throughout both residential and commercial design, all of which suffer the slings and arrows and fingerprints of adversary. One solution is a new product called Traceless which is a highly durable laminate, combined with anti-fingerprint technology.

Matilda Veneer, a leading Australian timber veneer manufacturer, has taken on and created some of the most inspiring commercial buildings in the country – and it’s all about veneer and plywood. For those of a certain age, plywood brings back memories of chipped schoolroom chairs that snagged and laddered pantyhose every single day of winter term. The cursed chairs revealed the laminated layers, and certainly left a negative impression on the female designers of the future. But all that has now changed. The product has lined magnificent halls such as those of Dr Chau Chak Wing Building in Sydney, the Trinity College at the University of Melbourne, and the vast and dramatic Robina Town Centre retail outlet in Queensland. One cannot call these halls of architectural distinction ‘shopping centres’ because this design is elevated beyond that through the use of warm, golden toned veneers that wave across the ceilings of the vast market hall, and wrap around walkways.


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Each project is unique, as is every tree ever grown. It is the seeking out of perfect timbers that sets Matilda apart, and guarantees its clients bespoke designs that will never fall out of some sort of faddish style. The sliced veneers created by Matilda are typically 0.6mm thin, allowing for the maximum output from each log, and an almost countless number of designs from the same source. One cubic metre, according to company notes, can produce 1000sqm of veneer. The artistry lies in what it does with the strips, and how it responsibly sources the material. The company’s rotary veneer, for example, is peeled on a lathe and can be seen in many applications but is perhaps most often seen in residential applications in high-quality hoop pine ceilings – where the veneer is applied to a plywood substrate. Appearing front and centre for Matilda this year will be its new tactile product; rough cut. In appearance, this veneer will approach that of freshly sawn wood, a far cry from the silken appearance of other materials in the range. This newcomer will appeal to those who seek the benefits of veneer, while craving the more rustic or even industrial aesthetic.

PREVIOUS: The Trinity College at the University of Melbourne. THIS PAGE: The new range from Caesarstone is entirely the opposite of matte and quiet in design.

The icing (or veneer) on the cake for 2019 will be the arrival of Rough Cut Blackbutt, which will be joined by Spotted Gum. This Australian input to the existing range will surely excite those who seek a veneer finish with Australian depth. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Elton Group architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/Elton-Group Wilsonart architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ wilsonart Laminex architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/laminex Matilda Veneer matildaveneer. com.au caesarstone architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/caesarstone


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

WINNERS 1. Weathertex 2. Dulux 3. Blum 4. Architectural Window Systems (AWS) 5. Colorbond Steel

6. James Hardie Australia 7. Kingspan Insulation 8. Laminex 9. USG Boral 10. Assa Abloy


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

And the winner is….the Top 100 Trusted Brands survey winners revealed

After an exhaustive and some would say, intensive online survey process, INFOLINK | BPN in conjunction with Architecture & Design has finalised the results of its Trusted Brands 2018 survey and revealed Australia’s best brands in the architecture, building, construction, and design industries. With some 6,000 votes counted, Weathertex beat over 600 other participating brands to come up on top for the second consecutive survey. Specialists in a range of exterior wall panels, Weathertex ticks all the boxes when it comes to Trust. This win is by all measures, a true validation of Weathertex, its products, and also its philosophy as a company. With a history dating back to 1939, this is also probably why Weathertex is the preferred cladding manufacturer by many builders, architects and designers all over the world.

database initiative and receiving a GreenTag Platinum certification with a GreenRate Level A for their products actually does make a discernible difference to the market.” “Customers in our industry are quite savvy and well-informed and they tend to respond very positively to companies that try and do the right thing in regards to the environment and wider society.” This was also reflected in the Trusted Brands Survey, which set out to uncover the drivers behind trustworthiness while also helping to define trust as something based on three key pillars: Quality, Consciousness, and Candour. The results indicate that of these three pillars, Consciousness – how a brand demonstrates social, safety, and environmental responsibility – is a particular area in which brands can gain a competitive advantage.

The runner up in the Top 100 Trusted Brands survey was Dulux, a company that is also wellknown to many in the architecture, building, construction and design space.

Reflecting the importance of building trust over time, the top 10 positions in the 2018 survey were dominated by iconic brands like Dulux, Colorbond Steel, James Hardie, Laminex, and USG Boral.

According to its website, Dulux helps consumers to imagine and create better places and spaces in which to live and work – an ethos that was instrumental in getting the company such a high ranking in the survey.

Other brands that came out on top include Kingspan Insulation, which took out top honours in the Insulation category for the 5th consecutive survey and finished at number 7th overall.

Rounding out the top three was Austrian cabinet company Blum, which says it has a “motivation to perfect motion,” and whose “goal is to be a trusted and future-oriented partner”.

The results came after the online audiences of Architecture & Design and Indesign cast votes for their favourite brands by allocating a maximum of 10 votes to 10 different nominated brands between 26 September and 2 November 2018.

According to Architecture & Design editor Branko Miletic, “The number 1 spot once again was taken up by Weathertex, which shows that applying initiatives such as third party certification, participating in the Declare Label

Companies offering products or services were nominated for recognition of their innovation, application, or quality in one of 30 categories.


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2018 RESULTS

The winning Brands in their own words Following are responses FROM some of the Top Trusted Brands top 10 companies as to why they think they were rated so highly.

Weathertex “We are extremely proud to have been voted number one Most Trusted Brand and to have won the External Wall Materials Category twice in a row,” says Vanda Correia, national marketing manager.

us apart. Our product is natural, containing no glues, resins or binders and is made from 97 percent Australian hardwood timber, the ultimate renewable resource, and that really differentiates us from our competitors.”

“We believe these wins are thanks to our continuous commitment to providing our customers with great service, high quality sustainable products and technical support at affordable pricing.”

“When people buy Weathertex they buy it knowing it’s safe to install and use on their home and around their family.”

“Weathertex is Australian-owned and has manufactured cladding that has been around since 1964, so we have a long history and engagement with the community around us. Weathertex is family run and the importance of our staff, community and environment has shaped the company’s values.” “All our products are 100 percent natural and customers today are savvier than ever and are seeking safer alternative sustainable building materials.” “We have a totally unique manufacturing process that can’t be replicated.” “The properties of Australian timber and our manufacturing process means our product can only be made in NSW. That alone sets

As to what the customers say about the brand, Correia says, “We had over 500 customer testimonials during the Trusted Brand voting process in 2016 and 2018. We found our customers share the same values as us.” “We’ve had a lot of feedback about our quality of service, the safety of using our product on site, plus a lot of positivity around being able to support an Australian company and a ‘Green’ product.” “However, if we were able to somehow change the nature of timber, we’d love to be able to make the product totally flame retardant. As it stands we have a BAL 19 level and Weathertex can be used in Class 2 – 9 commercial constructions, making it suitable for townhouses, residential areas, schools and hospitals.”

“Making our product totally flame retardant would mean adding extra chemicals into our manufacturing process and these chemicals can be a huge concern for other reasons.” “We’ve chosen to instead remain a natural product but we’re hoping with continuous development and innovation we can one day achieve a higher fire retardant rating without impacting the environment and the health of our customers.” “The Weathertex Brand is very important to our success because it clearly marks who we are and what we stand for.” “Weathertex is a small company compared to our large iconic competitors, and in an industry that’s always changing and evolving, our focus is to remain trustworthy, grounded and a ‘true’ brand while educating the uniqueness and benefits of our products.” “We want to continue to be a trusted brand in the building industry, delivering on three main drivers: Quality, Consciousness and Candour.” “We’d love to become a trusted household name, known for being the safer natural alternative to cladding without impacting the durability and performance of a product.”


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TOP TRUSTED BRANDS

BLUM With 600 brands competing for the accolade, Blum Australia has been awarded the winner of the Trusted Brand for the Kitchens & Kitchen Equipment category and placed third as the overall Trusted Brand winner. Operating for over 65 years in countries around the world, Blum is a third-generation, familyowned company with quality and service at the heart at everything it does. As for how the brand’s identity influences its success, “We continually focus on dialogue with our customers and their experiences with Blum so we can understand their everyday requirements. This feedback is a key element in our efforts to develop products and services that support our efforts to become a valuable business partner. Receiving this award is a nice recognition of this translating to our customers and we are very humbled to win the most trusted brand in the kitchen and kitchen equipment category”, says David Noakes, director – sales and marketing, Blum Australia.


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2018 Winner The Social Space Barangaroo House, Collins and Turner indeawards.com


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

Architectural Window Systems (AWS) According to AWS marketing manager Sam Moorhouse, the reasons why the company was so highly rated include AWS’s objective to “innovate and design quality aluminium windows and doors which meet the needs of architectural specification around the country”. “We design, engineer and test our product to ensure it delivers on the objectives of the design. I believe the A&D community recognise this and value our comprehensive R&D processes and specification support, which gives them confidence in using our product,” adds Moorhouse. “We design, engineer and test products specific to the demands of the Australian market and the unique needs of our customers. We listen to market trends and specification requirements via our national specification team and consistently feed that back into our product development programs.” “I would like to think we are recognised as a company that is committed to the architectural profession and invests in activities which

support and promote Australian architects and their architecture.” As to one thing about the company’s product that it would change, Moorhouse says, “I would like to find a way to disseminate more specification detail of our products into architects’ knowledge base to help them overcome daily design challenges easier. We have an amazing resource in our national specification team and www.specifyaws.com but there is nothing like knowing it off the top of your head.” “Investing in a national specification team allows us to consult with architects and building designers on design challenges first hand while at the same time, listening to the ever changing demands of the market.” “Although we might have a large profile in the A&D community, we are still a small player in the aluminium windows and doors segment,” says Moorhouse, adding that, “We want to continue our growth and continue to be recognised as the leaders in architectural specification in the windows and doors segment.”


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

James Hardie “We help people achieve their look. From vision through to planning and building, James Hardie provides innovative products that enable people to build for their lifestyle,” says Cathleya Buchanan, James Hardie marketing director. “We invest heavily in our research and development teams looking for ways to innovate and enable increased living space and faster home construction. Not only have our products been proven to be durable, they meet the aesthetic requirements of the contemporary design and are constantly evolving to meet the lifestyle needs of our customers.” Asked what customers say about the brand, Buchanan says, “They trust our expert advice and share our passion. We are the guiding hand and the trusted advisor they turn to when they begin the journey of building their dream home”. “Design professionals trust our products as they offer versatility, innovation and a complete solution to help bring their creative visions to life.”

If there is one thing about the product that the company would change, Buchanan says, “As a business, we are in constant flux to bridge the gap between dreams and reality with products that look fantastic, that reduce risk when it counts and deliver on promise. Change is constant to be able to continue and be successful.” “James Hardie has become a leader by balancing what appeals to people’s heads and hearts: innovative products that stack up on looks, quality and environmental sensibility. James Hardie has been proudly helping people build homes in Australia for 125 years.” “In the future, James Hardie will continue to enhance lives as we transform the Australian way to build. We want to continue to have a meaningful role to play in the home. We want to help people build houses they love and open up the possibilities for the way Australians live.”


ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU Combining the best in new projects, industry news and expert commentary with the country’s most comprehensive archive of new products, suppliers and their educational resources. Go online today and discover what’s new.


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TOP TRUSTED BRANDS

Kingspan Insulation “Kingspan Insulation has strived from the beginning to improve the built environment through consistently improving their business, products and service,” says Alyssa Robertson, Kingspan Insulation marketing coordinator. “We’re committed to providing high-quality, innovative products supported by technical expertise and customer service which is unsurpassed in the industry. We also have a strong focus on manufacturing excellence, first class customer service and unrivalled expertise in meeting the needs of the market. Our full service and product range sets us apart.” As to what customers say about the brand, Robertson says, “They comment on the service and support that comes with purchasing and using our product. We have become known for our technical and customer support services that help our customers from start to finish with any questions or concerns they may have.” “Our customers recognise this as a competitive advantage and value the support we can offer them.”

The one thing about the product that could be changed, says Robertson is the product’s aesthetic appearance. “We wish we could change the appearance of our boards to make them prettier and more exciting. As an insulation company, our product is applied inside walls, roofs, and floors. It is rarely seen from the outside which makes things very hard for our marketing team who have the job of making our product look enticing and look as good as it performs.” As for how the brand’s identity influences its success, Robertson says, “Our success on a global scale, across a number of divisions, shows our products are trusted and perform to a high standard”. In terms of the future, Robertson says, “With a global commitment to have our manufacturing facilities net zero energy by 2020, we champion excellence in energy through clean air and water conservation initiatives and low-energy smart lighting systems.”


We are proud to be voted by customers as the category winner for Internal Wall Materials & Partitions and No.9 overall in this year’s A&D Top Trusted Brands Survey

© 2018 USG Boral. All rights reserved. USG BORAL and INNOVATION INSPIRED BY YOU are trademarks or registered trademarks of USG Boral Building Products or one or more of its affiliates. SHEETROCK is a registered trademark owned by United States Gypsum Company and used under license. *Lightweight claims abased on comparison of USG Boral 10mm and 13mm SHEETROCK plasterboard with competitive 10mm and 13mm plasterboard produced in Australia as at 1 April 2016. USG Boral Building Products Pty Limited – ABN 84 004 231 976 – 251 Salmon Street, Port Melbourne, VIC. 3207. UB1305 12/18


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

Laminex According to Laminex marketing manager Rachel Oakley, “Laminex has been a part of the voter’s design tool box for many years. Our extensive range of decors, quality products, commitment to product innovation and industry support over many years has cemented Laminex’s place as a trusted brand.” “A key point of difference,” she says, “is our ongoing commitment to local production. Laminex has been a proud Australian manufacturer for over 80 years.” As to what customers would say about the brand, Oakley says, “Laminex is an Australian icon with a reliable and trustworthy brand”. “Laminex, is synonymous with the laminates category. Our brand’s history, longevity and ongoing industry support has connected our brand’s identity as part of our success.” “In 10 years from now, we would like Laminex to be known as a design-led business with an innovative, curated palette of decors and finishes.” “Also, by that time, we’d like our brand to have established laminate as a non-compromising design choice.”


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2018 TRUSTED BRANDS

USG Boral As to why the company won this category, Anastasia Narkiewicz, integrated communications manager says, “It’s recognition of our company and products and our successful introduction of new and innovative wall and ceiling products and systems such as SHEETROCK and Ensemble – products that positively contribute to the design aesthetic and help improve the way buildings are built and perform.” Innovation is the one thing that separates the company’s product from its competitors, she says. “[Our] products not only perform above expectations with regard to acoustics, fire and structural design requirements, but also meet

the needs of our customers in ease of use, installation and efficiency,” says Narkiewicz. “USG Boral is a strong, reliable brand with a long legacy in the manufacture of Australian building products established through parent brands BORAL and United States Gypsum (USG). [We are] a trusted company with a wide range of new and innovative products who works with their customers to enable and support their success.” “USG and BORAL are two well recognised brands known worldwide for innovative technology driven manufacture and supply of gypsum based building products. Both have a legacy dating back over 70 years.” n


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SPECIFY

Australia’s first “new age” townhouses in western Sydney WORDS: STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC

Construction has begun on Australia’s first “new age” residential development in north-western Sydney, where more than 74 townhouses will be connected to a solar battery storage solution.


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SPECIFY

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ach home will be powered by a 5.13kWp solar system, with a 10kWh sonnenBatterie to store excess day time solar production, allowing customers to fully maximise the power produced. Homeowners will also have the ability to charge their battery on off-peak power purchased from the grid, and utilise the power directly from the battery at times when it would normally be more expensive. Each household will no longer have to pay for power in the traditional sense. SonnenFlat is distributing the Energy Retailing market through its capped monthly fee model, which limits a homeowner’s electricity bill to $30 per month. “Commentary on ‘the home of the future’ has been rife, but it’s clear to see the concept of the future is already here in Australia,” says Chris Williams, CEO and founder of Natural Solar. “A relatively new technology to the market has been transformational, with home battery storage solutions no longer a ‘dumb’ battery or storage device, but fast becoming a central hub within a smart home ecosystem. Not only will the Essentia Townhomes be guaranteed free electricity consumption with no daily supply charges on their electricity bills, these townhomes will have the ability to add state-of-the-art home automation, giving residents the ability to communicate with the sonnenBatterie direct.” Each battery has a smart learning algorithm, learning from household consumption patterns and able to predict and adjust how and when the battery discharges its power. The sonnenBatterie will also be able to modify its behaviour based on

the weather forecast, anticipating which time of day and the precise appliances the residents will utilise in order to best maximise savings and offer return-on-investment. “While homeowners will have the ability to access and remotely turn appliances on and off using the sonnen app, the capabilities of the sonnenBatterie extend far further than this. Each sonnenBatterie will have the intelligence to decide when to turn appliances on and off in order to maximise self-consumption and savings. Essentially, your home will be able to make the tough decisions — when it comes to power usage — for you,” says Williams. “In an increasingly competitive housing market, we are seeing consumers gravitate toward more energy efficient homes with properties that have a higher energy rating fetching a considerable premium. The energy savings are a vital component, while at the same time households with intelligent devices and home automation are key drivers in the decision making process when purchasing a property.” According to Natural Solar, the shift towards battery power has been significant, with a 2,500 percent increase in the rise of residential battery enquiries in the past 36 months, and a 1,100 percent increase in commercial battery power storage solution enquiries across Australia in the past 18 months. However, Essentia is the first large-scale development to move completely to technology-led solar and battery storage solutions for residents, and is a key milestone for both renewable energy and alternative energy solutions. n


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Ageing in place - and in style WORDS: Stephanie Stefanovic

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he term “ageing in place” has been coined to describe the use of design techniques to allow older people to continue living comfortably in their homes as they age. Anthony Windust, director of Windust Architects x Interiors, discusses his research and philosophies on the topic. “Our interest in ageing in place first started in 2013 when a repeat client asked us to fit out the lower level/basement area of their existing 1850s bluestone terrace house in west Melbourne,” says Windust. “The client, a couple in their 80s, were intent on continuing to live in their house and in their community. Part of the arrangement was that the couple’s son and his family would move into the two levels above, housing an extended family over three levels without the cost of buying an additional property, or going into a nursing home.” “We are finding that a number of our clients and property owners are wanting to remain living in their neighbourhoods. They have grown up or raised families in their preferred locations. They have a circle of acquaintances and friends, and these are the lifeblood of a good community. There are also clear economic reasons for ageing in place.” Windust’s research is both “poetic” and “pragmatic”. “The poetic is an extension of our main design philosophy to provide spaces that are ‘a joy to inhabit’,” explains Windust. “What is it about a space that provides such an experience? In answering this question, we look at the human needs for social connection, community, privacy, natural light and visual interest.” “The pragmatic research includes establishing guidelines on how to manoeuvre within spaces as we grow older: eliminating steps and tripping hazards, providing enough space in bedrooms and bathrooms to allow free movement, having things that are bold and easy to read/easy to

touch, and of course handrails, larger type handles and automation.” A perfect example of these theories put into practice is one of the firm’s most recent projects, Grand Pavilion. Grand Pavilion is a built solution; a “shed” in the rear yard to serve as a resort of privacy and independence. Meanwhile, a series of intermediate spaces were created between the existing house and the shed where the clients could come together and spend time with family and friends. It’s a small but flexible space. Fully glazed walls create a connection with the outside world, while a curved plan, flying eave and concrete breeze block wall combine to create spaces with a good flow of circulation and different levels of privacy and/or interaction. “The actual spaces required for ageing in place are key to having a functioning building in the future, and this is best addressed early on in sketch design, and reviewed throughout the design and documentation process,” says Windust. “For our Grand Pavilion project, while we addressed the functional requirements of present and future mobility, the key to the longevity of the project was more to do with the couple’s relationship and how they wished to live together and independently into the future.” Of course, the way ageing in place takes shape will vary from project to project, influenced by factors such as the quality of the existing spaces and how they might be used over time. According to Windust, a space designed for ageing in place will integrate the pragmatic elements into the overall design so they blend in seamlessly, rather than looking like they’ve been tacked on after-the-fact. “Research suggests that our senior people not only prefer spaces that enable independence, but that also appear enlivening,” adds Windust. n


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As the population continues to age, providing housing for older Australians is becoming increasingly important.


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book review

Book review: By the Sea by Barry Stone WORDS: Stephanie Stefanovic

SUMMARY Featuring 48 unique coastal properties from around the world, Barry Stone’s By the Sea makes for an impressive coffee table book. The book begins with a short recount of the history of beaches as spaces of recreation, which according to Stone, largely began during the Renaissance period, when we finally started to move away from myths around sea monsters, tempests and precipitous horizons. And as the author (accurately) states, we’ve pretty much been obsessed with the ocean ever since. The 336-page book is split into three sections: Hotels, Residences and Restaurants. For each residence, Stone outlines the history of the site and the architecture that sits upon it. There’s a lot of impressive architecture in this book (too much to mention here), but I was particularly struck by two outstanding (and very different) houses.

WHAT I LIKED The first building that caught my eye was 566-567 Driftwood Walk (p.223). Designed by Horace Gifford in 1972, this home is located on Fire Island in New York. It’s one of an array of modernist, sustainable timber beach houses designed by the likes of Gifford, Harry Bates and Earl Combs.

Virtually all timber and glass with panoramic ocean views, not only is this house architecturally stunning but also riddled with history.

often used on sloping sites to prevent erosion). The base of the house is clad in these walls, filled with pebbles sourced from a nearby channel. The visual effect really is striking.

“Fire Island Pines was a seminal social experiment, an enclave for America’s gay community who first began to live there in large numbers in the 1930s,” writes Stone.

“Attempts at camouflage are everywhere,” writes Stone.

“Calvin Klein lived there; Truman Capote holidayed on Fire Island where he wrote Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” “The houses turned Fire Island into a modernist laboratory. Bathrooms suddenly had windows because privacy was no longer viewed as necessary. Small spaces had soaring ceilings. Mirrored walls reflected ocean views. Outside there were winding boardwalks and cascading decks, but interestingly no lawns, fences or painted exteriors – the very antithesis of suburban conformity.” Another interesting project is the cleverly camouflaged Shoreham Beach House (p.285), which effortlessly blends into its coastal surrounds. A recent project, this house was designed by ABIR Architects and completed in 2015. Pictures speak louder than words with this house, which is defined by the concept of the gabion wall (rock or pebble-filled mesh cages

“It’s silvered chestnut cladding echoes the look and feel of driftwood. When looking at the house from the beach, the sky is reflected in its glazed surfaces. The caged pebbles were dredged up from a nearby channel so as to blend in with the pebble-strewn beach around it. The cladding, the walls and the reflective power of the glass all combine to produce an uncommon level of concealment, and a sense that this building really belongs.”

THE VERDICT Overall, I was impressed with this book, which I consider a hybrid between a travel guide and straight-up architecture appreciation. What I appreciated was the author’s careful curation of projects that have architectural and historical merit, as well as a strong connection to their coastal setting. This book goes to show that buildings are really be worth more than their sum of parts, and every project has a story behind it. If you’re a fan of coastal architecture, I think By the Sea would be a worthy addition to your book collection. n


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advertising feature??????????? – Light·Space·Design 2019

The Integration of lighting into architecture

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esigning lighting that positively impacts the human spirit requires drawing together various elements, some tangible and some not so much. Architectural lighting design is at its best when balance is reached between human comfort and aesthetic appeal, and achieving this result is in large part possible when the lighting is well-integrated into the architecture of a space.

Local and international lighting experts, many of whom have a number of prolific awards under their belt, will be hitting Melbourne next March 27th for the Light·Space·Design 2019 summit to impart their knowledge on efficient human-centric lighting design and its connection to architecture. The Melbourne Airport’s Forecourt Enhancement was treated to the development of a dynamic lighting installation by Mint Lighting Design, led by director Adele Locke. In an effort to provide both ambience and entertainment for the area while welcoming newcomers to the city, Mint created a ‘sense of arrival’ through the visual impact of light, while injecting the forecourt with a ‘beating heart’. Of Mint’s work, Locke says that because you “cannot light a tree in the same manner in which you light a bridge, my creative design had to work around the existing structures and lighting, and not impinge on the safety of travellers.”


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advertising feature??????????? – Light·Space·Design 2019

Locke adds that key design elements of the project were indeed well-integrated and visually pleasing - including the airport’s landmark 14-metre ‘Melbourne’ sign, the projections of programmed colour changing light underneath the elevated roadway and the canopies placed within pedestrian walkways – the critical key was to ensure the presence of these coloured lights did not overwhelm weary travellers. Traditionally, airports need to provide as much spatial and visual enjoyment and comfort as possible – not only for exhausted travellers passing through, but for, as emphasised by Locke, “those who work tirelessly in the forecourt providing information and support to travellers,” who also require more useful cues to provide travellers with directions. Locke will draw from her multi-varied career at Light·Space·Design 2019 to zero in on how broader lighting design industry shifts can be applied when lighting residential settings. Architecture strongly informs even the way lighting is designed for houses of worship. More traditional churches are often likened to theatres by lighting designers, in that the church is a large room with a stage and an audience where the priest is performing, with surrounding scenery. The architecture was conceived to command awe, respect and even fear, with light drawing attention to elements that heightened such emotions. Highlighting the altar would often be a way of drawing these emotions out of visiting churchgoers. Lighting a traditional church is much like lighting a heritage building. Martin Klaasen, principal and founder of the award-winning Klaasen Lighting Design says that “the overall feeling is not about the lighting itself but how it brings out the totality of the building, validating its architecture and heritage”. Klaasen will present at the event on the various intricacies of lighting heritage buildings. Bergamo’s Church of St. Maximilian Kolbe, dating back to its 2008 inauguration, exemplifies lighting design’s role in newer churches. Church rituals now err towards being more participatory, with the role of audience and priest becoming more collaborative. St. Maximilian Kolbe reflects this shift, with its layout more compact and circular, its altar smaller and less pronounced; the architectural proportions shrinking to favour the human scale. Nicolò Brambilla, senior lighting designer of Schuler Shook led his team on this project. He accommodated the collaborative shift occurring in modern churches by ensuring that natural and natural-like light was primarily utilised, in order to create a softer, more diffuse feeling rather than one imbued by drama. ‘Spreading out’ the light rather than containing it to a sole player (the priest),

encourages participation by audience members, instead of confining them to the background Brambilla, who will be participating in a panel discussion centred on effective collaboration between lighting designers and architects, says that having everyone on a project team understand the importance of lighting within the architecture can be a challenge. “In Australia the lighting design profession, despite the many fantastic designers active all around the country, is not yet as well recognised as elsewhere in the world.” Brambilla adds that “many projects — also of a major size — do not have a lighting designer involved at all; lighting projects are still being developed by non-lighting specialists, and many architects and clients still have a hard time understanding what we do.” When utilised efficiently, as Light·Space·Design 2019 participants have demonstrated, light can live up to its potential to enhance wellbeing for tenants. Arup global lighting design leader Florence Lam sums up the relationship between lighting and architecture well when she states that “we know experiencing architecture is multisensory: it is as much about ‘feeling’ as it is about ‘seeing’ – light plays a key role in connecting people and space as it breathes life into a building and gives it character”. Achieving this result is possible, as stated by Brambilla, “when a working relationship between architect and lighting designer is solid”.

Mutually-beneficial dialogue between each design professional ensures that “there’s also an increased creative potential: by this I mean that where the lighting designer understands better the architectural intention, is able to come up with stronger and more meaningful lighting concepts, and on the other hand the architect who understands the role of lighting design — and trusts the lighting designer — may be more open to the lighting designer‘s recommendations even of an architectural nature where they’re aimed at achieving a better visual appearance of the architecture”. The key to well-integrated lighting, then, is realising that much like a modern church, collaboration is key. When a well-informed lighting designer understands the context, architecturally and societally, and they are backed up by an architect who is willing to utilise them, a truly efficient balance between aesthetics and human comfort can be reached. Significant lighting design projects will be discussed in depth at Light·Space·Design 2019 in order to underpin lighting’s potential, when contextually appropriate, to transform human-occupied spaces for the better.

For more info visit: lightingdesignsummit.com.au


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SPECIFY imPortant Watermark technical sPecification uPdate the australian Building codes Board has released an update to the Wmts-040:2016 waste pipe connection outlet and gratings, separate or integral specification. The objective of this Technical Specification is to enable product certification in accordance with the requirements of the Plumbing code of australia (Pca). The revision specifies suitable materials for waste pipe connection outlets and gratings. The WMTAC found WMTS-040 had no materials specified, leaving it open to interpretation. inclusion of a materials section now avoids confusion which has allowed unsuitable materials including aluminium to be used as waste pipe connection outlets and gratings, either separate or integral. Aluminium, while generally durable and reliable, is unsuited to specific applications due to corrosion susceptibility in stagnant, oxygen deprived environments. While tolerant to ph values between 4 and 8.5, Products such as mortar, cement, concrete, tile glue, grout and bricks can generate highly alkaline solutions up to ph 13. When this solution contacts the aluminium, particularly corners or surface scratches, corrosion can occur. the Wmtac concludes that the use of aluminium should be restricted in its use under Wmts-040, particularly where exposed to wet environments, such as bathroom floors. Stortmech welcomes this update to the Watermark specification, and all Stormtech grates and drainage products are 100 percent compliant with Wmts-040:2018. contact stormtech 1300 653 403 stormtech.com.au

265AY 000AX

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Performatech - toP tier Performance double glazing reducing energy consumption in every aspect of our lives is becoming an increasing priority. in response to this concern, building compliance changes have focused on increasing commercial building efficiency, which can often sacrifice valuable visible light needed for a healthy living and working environment. PerformaTech™ products provide the balance between exceptional light transmission, solar control and thermal insulation, enabling developers, architects, designers and engineers alike, the opportunity to create inspirational, economically viable and environmentally sustainable buildings. PerformaTech™ uses a high-performance Low-E coating that restricts UV and infrared radiation, allowing the maximum use of glass for light and views while simultaneously insulating against heat loss and selectively shielding unwanted heat gain. It is ideal for use in commercial glazing where light and clear views are important, as well as the need to keep solar heat out in summer and retain it during winter. PerformaTech™ is only available as part of an insulating glass unit and, when combined with other Viridian glass, a vast range of performance possibilities and aesthetic options can be achieved including additional privacy, security, noise and other benefits. Viridian engineers and architectural managers are available to discuss requirements and assist further regarding custom configurations, thermal assessments and building compliance. Contact Viridian Glass 1800 810 403 viridianglass.com.au

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SPECIFY

acoustigard non-combustible acoustic & thermal insulation Beyond structural performance, fire, acoustics and thermal – are perhaps the key elements of wall system performance and specification. Whether on a boundary or in a facade of high-rise apartments, external walls require non-combustible insulation to reduce fire risk, while delivering peaceful acoustics and thermal performance for occupant comfort. Similarly, many internal walls in commercial and multi-residential buildings require enhanced acoustic and fire separation, while some also require a thermal rating. Bradford Acoustigard™ presents the ideal non-combustible insulation solution for external and internal walls, delivering enhanced fire, acoustics and thermal performance. Acoustigard™ is a non-combustible, glasswool fibre insulation specifically engineered to reduce mid to high range acoustic transmission in walls (and ceilings). Manufactured in varying densities the acoustic and thermal performance can be tuned to suit project requirements. Acoustigard™ can be supplied in varying thicknesses up to 90mm and densities up to 32 kg/m3, delivering up to R2.7 added insulation to the total wall thermal performance. Unlike some other products, Acoustigard™ retains its form and won’t slump in the cavity, ensuring the risk of voids in walls are eliminated and maintaining the acoustic and thermal performance well beyond building handover to owners and tenants. contact csr bradford 1800 354 044 bradfordinsulation.com.au

267AY 000AX

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insPired by euroPe. designed for australia. LF550 FrameLess gLass Louvre system by ebsa Introducing the LF550 frameless glass louvre system......for when size does matter. • large frameless blades up to 600mm high • continuous glass spans of up to 3300mm • end pivoting with concealed mechanisms (in closed position) • performance glazing with blades from 12mm up to 21.52mm thick • manual or automated versions with option to integrate with BMS and Fire this is not your average louvre!

these include the contemporary colorbond® steel colour range, the superb colorbond® metallic steel colour range, and the striking colorbond® steel matt colour range. the Zenith™ range offers you the peace of mine only genuine 100% australian made colorbond® steel can offer – supported by the technical expertise of lysaght. contact lysaght 1800 641 417 www.lysaght.com

Contact ebsa 1300 327 200 ebsa.com.au

268AY 000AX

The LYSAGHT ZENITH™ range provides a stylish suite of profiles for your design palette, offering valuable design versatility which is made even greater when you consider the wide variety of finishes you can specify.

architectureanddesign.com.au/PRODUCTS

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SPECIFY 2 Way fire rated: 1 hour, 90 minute & 2 hour FYREPANEL The 1 hour, 90 minute & 2 hour FP - FYREPANELS are screw fixed fire rated access panels with a laminated MDF or ACP face designed to meet the requirements of the BCA with FRLs of - /60/60, -/90/90 & -/120/120 fire from both directions.

270AY

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Lopi Linear Gas Fireplaces The Lopi Linear Gas Fireplaces are available in two ranges: Lopi Premium Linear Range and ProBuilder Range. They are available in three sizes and bring the very best in-home heating with sleek and linear appeal.

272AY

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KingFlor® composite steel formwork range KingFlor® steel decking provides the designer the ability to tailor a flooring solution while accessing the inherent benefits of steel decking over labour and material intensive ply timber and lost formwork alternatives. KingFlor® is manufactured from DECKFORM® steel by BlueScope Steel.

274AY

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The GreenBook™ Take the time and confusion out of selecting the right materials and assemblies for your low carbon footprint design. Gain easy access to the authoritative source of embodied carbon inventory for construction assemblies and materials. Gain the jump on your peers and deliver eco-design excellence for your clients with The GreenBook™ from The Footprint Company.

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Centor S5 screen and blind for timber windows Designed for openings up to 1800mm high by 2400mm wide, the Centor S5 Screen is a vertically retractable, chain-operated screen or blind system for timber windows. Simply rolled away when not needed, S5 is perfect for use on a window with a servery between the kitchen and an outdoor entertaining area.

273AY

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Polytec ULTRAGLAZE range Inspired by top design houses, polytec’s ULTRAGLAZE doors & panels offer interior designers and architects a new dimension in creating kitchens and rooms of breathtaking beauty. ULTRAGLAZE provides contemporary lines that are enhanced when combined with the sleek Shadowline door or matching edge finish.

275AY

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ZEGO ReFORM System

Polkky Oy Timber

ZEGO ReFORM System is a reusable formwork solution made from recycled plastic which does not require the foam insulation. ReFORM is fire rated to AS3600 and AS3959-2009 and is suitable for residential applications requiring a full fire rating from BAL-LOW to BAL-FZ area construction and on or within 900mm of a boundary.

The largest private wood processing company in Northern Finland, Polkky Oy use slow grown, fine grain timber. Specially kiln dried to suit the Australian Market, Polkky Oy use high technology processing capabilities including optical grading to ensure every piece of timber meets the intended grade specifications.

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SPECIFY Inclose unitised rainscreen facades CSR Inclose™ designs, engineers and installs precision fabricated, unitised rainscreen façade systems that meet or exceed building codes for fire, thermal, acoustic and weather performance. For the first time, a prefabricated façade system can deliver high performance with excellent buildability and durability that delivers real benefits during construction.

278AY

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Dyson Airblade™ Wash & Dry Now up to 39 per cent Quieter The new Dyson Airblade™ Wash+Dry hand dryer is available in Short, Tall and Wall variants. All Dyson Airblade™ hand dryers have HEPA filters that capture 99.95 percent of particles the size of bacteria (0.3 microns) from the washroom air.

279AY

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Grip Guard AntiSlip treatment for tiled and stonebased floors

noraplan quality rubber sheet commercial industry flooring

Grip Guard anti-slip treatment increases the wet slip resistance of tiled and stone-based floors. The treatment microscopically modifies the internal pore structure of the tiles to reduce the risk of aquaplaning - the cause of slip accidents.

The noraplan® floor covering collection from Nora Flooring is available in rolls or tiles and offers unlimited design options thanks to the varied patterns with smooth surfaces and harmonised colour range. Its functional properties make noraplan® floorings suitable for a wide range of needs.

280AY

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EasyVJ decorative panel wall EasyVJ from Easycraft is a decorative wall panel that can suit traditional designs wanting to match the older VJ panelling style, but also those wanting a modern clean feature that adds texture and dimension to their design.

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Flexible InnoCeil modular ceiling system from Innowood Australia InnoCeil’s composite timber modular ceiling system is designed to enhance indoor and outdoor applications in commercial and residential settings. Flexible panels achieve a perfectly flat finish or shaped into curves that traditional building materials are unable to achieve.

283AY

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UV-Resistant Coloured Concrete Pigments by Ability Building Colours

Pour On Gravel Binder - the solution to bind and stabilise loose gravel

The Abilox coloured concrete paving range is designed to permanently colour concrete, asphalt, mortar, applied finishes, caulks and sealants, surface coatings, adhesives and other composite products and materials used by both the construction and building industries.

StoneSet Pour On Gravel Binder is the ideal solution to create a finished surface with a natural loose gravel look, or a smooth off for a pathway that is suitable for pushchairs and wheel chairs. Quick and easy to install, Pour On Gravel Binder provides a cost effective way to bind and stabilise loose gravel.

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SPECIFY Peel away 1 to remove oil, enamel and lead paint Peel away 1 is a standout product with its ability remove up to 30 layers of oil, enamel and paint in just one application. Peel away is a patented concept in a paint removal system and is specifically formulated to remove multiple layers of paint in one clean and fast application.

286AY

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Ritek® XL Wall®: For all internal and external walls Ritek XL Wall can be used for all internal and external walls. The sanded surface is ready for direct setting by your finishing trades to a level four finish, this removes the cost and time to batten out and plaster line internal walls, speeding project completion. Without battening out the Ritek XL Wall there’s an opportunity for increased floor space.

288AY

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Textile Façade The latest innovation in tensile membrane is the MakMax Architectural Façade; an alternative to traditional building façade with the added flexibility that fabric brings to architectural design. Create interesting shapes, colours and textures all with the added functionality of all climate weather protection or simple solar control.

290AY

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Aliwood: A non-combustible timber finish aluminium system AliWood are the experts in Aluminium Wood look products with over 13 years’ experience. They have created many innovative aluminium systems finished in a durable woodgrain look or powder coat finish and are created for easy installation, minimal maintenance and amazing aesthetics!

287AY

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Decidamp® SP Range: Water based vibration damping compound Decidamp® SP80 is a fast drying, water based viscoelastic vibration damping compound. Optimised to suit building applications the advanced formula was developed for acoustic improvement of structures that are exposed to vibrations and noise impact.

289AY

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LYSAGHT ZENITH™ architectural cladding The LYSAGHT ZENITH™ range consists of stylish architectural steel cladding profiles that combine classic, European elegance with trusted, high-quality Australian steel. The profiles are striking, and are sure to add visual texture to your project whether used as roofing or wall cladding.

291AY

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Solar Star Roof Ventilation System

AirMaster® clears the air

Roof ventilation is important to drive heat and moisture out of your roof cavity all year round. A Solar Star Roof Ventilation System removes excess heat from your home, giving you a more comfortable interior and lower energy bills.

Desso AirMaster® is a carpet tile which marries great innovation, performance & strong design to boost health and wellbeing in offices, schools, healthcare centres and other public buildings. Its patented technology has been proven to reduce the concentration of fine dust in the air 4 times more effectively than regular carpets.

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A NEW BRAND. A NEW VISION. PARAGON is the consolidation of three market leading successful businesses now operating under one new brand; formerly DMS Perth, SolarX Melbourne and Sunscreen in Sydney. Regardless of your needs, you can be assured PARAGON will recommend the best product for your space. The PARAGON team are proud licensed installers for 3M™ Window Films Australia with a wealth of knowledge and expertise across all window film, signage and graphic installations. What Makes us Unique: • Window Film Solutions • Commercial & Residential Specialists

• Innovative Graphic Services • Creative Corporate Signage Solutions

• Experts in Corporate Fit-outs • National footprint

THE PARAGON STRATEGY IS SIMPLY BEING THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE WINDOW FILM, DESIGN AND PRINT PARTNER FOR THE DIGITAL AGE. WE DELIVER HEAD-TURNING RESULTS WITH INSPIRING AND INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS.

1800 720 876 | info@paragonfilms.com.au Adelaide • Brisbane • Melbourne • Perth • Sydney


SETTING THE NEW STANDARD

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE SYDNEY

14–16 MAY 2019

ARCHITECTURE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DESIGN

DesignBUILD brings Australia’s most enterprising Architects, Developers and Construction professionals together. Not only to connect in the most efficient way possible, but to raise industry standards as a whole. An invaluable opportunity to connect with peers, source quality materials, hear about legislation updates, and get insights into property trends, DesignBUILD is the cornerstone of the industry.

Supported by:

REGISTER AT

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Profile for Indesign Media Asia Pacific

INFOLINK | BPN JANUARY / MARCH 2019  

The Changing Face of Residential Design

INFOLINK | BPN JANUARY / MARCH 2019  

The Changing Face of Residential Design