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DEFINING THE URBAN SPACE INTELLIGENT BUILDINGS SUN CONTROL & SHADING PREVIEWING THE 2018 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS

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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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HE SECOND HALF OF 2018 IS UPON US AND NOW THE TONE OF THE YEAR, OR THE VIBE IF YOU LIKE HAS PERCEPTIVELY CHANGED. This is especially true for this publication, as soon, we will be opening FRONT, a boutique commercial design event for architects, designers, property facilitators and end users. FRONT, will be on all accounts, a unique event for the design industry, and one that is not to be missed. Launching on August 9 at Carriageworks in Sydney, FRONT flips the design exhibition experience on its head, turning the focus towards lasting engagement. In fact experts from various stakeholder positions will be collaborating on the FRONT FORUM: a 2-day investigation into the ideas, challenges and opportunities shaping the future of our combined industries. According to Indesign’s founder Raj Nandan, FRONT is targeted to the commercial and hospitality design sectors and is set to launch at Sydney’s Carriageworks this August. “For the first time in Australia, FRONT will bring together all the links in the design supply chain – architects, designers, real estate professionals and end users alike – for a far-reaching

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS BONNIE VAN DORP TIJANA TRIFUNOVICH PRUE MILLER

and formula-breaking event format,” says Nandan. After FRONT of course, will be the countdown to the 2018 Sustainability Awards, which this year will not only build on late year’s success with an enhanced panel / day event, but also promises to be a hugely successful night, with the venue this year being The Star in Sydney. To add to the momentus occasion, the MC for the night will be the one and only Tone Wheeler - a man who is not only larger-than-life when it comes to architecture and design, but also someone who captures the spirit of what the awards will mean to this industry moving forward.

ON THE COVER: THE INCREASING VERTICAL SPACE IS THE AREA IN WHICH DESIGN IS PERHAPS MOST ACTIVE. COMING TO MELBOURNE BY 2020 WILL BE A REMARKABLE SKYSCRAPER FROM FENDER KATSALIDIS. THE PROJECT, AUSTRALIA 108, WILL BE THE TALLEST BUILDING IN AUSTRALIA BY ROOF HEIGHT, AND IS SEEN AS A BIG BROTHER TO EUREKA TOWER, ALSO A FENDER KATSALIDIS DESIGN. IMAGE: FENDER KATSALIDIS

INDUSTRY

04 2018 Sustainability Awards snapshot

PEOPLE

12 Interview with Alec Tzannes 14 Interview with AIA presidentelect Prof. Helen Lochhead

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And there is still time to register for both awards. For FRONT its: front.design/visit/ while for the 2018 Sustainability Awards, the best way to register is to go to: sustainablebuildingawards.com.au

SPECIFY

34 Smart City design 40 Outdoor and landscape design trends

In this issue, we will be featuring urban design and transport as the overarching theme with separate features that include sun control, landscape design, smart cities, communication technology and intelligent buildings. All in all, the crescendo is slowly building up to 2018 being a huge year for the industry, and one set to bring many new idea and changes to what already is one of Australia’s most vibrant sectors.

45 Intelligent buildings 50 Electrical components and 14 16 Architectus principal Karl Traeger and trends in airport design

DETAIL

BRANKO MILETIC

20 An end-of-trip facility design 26 Ormond Station renewal

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54 Sun control and shading solutions Australia’s 57 Overcoming energy crisis through technology and design

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INDUSTRY

2018 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS: THE BACKGROUND STORIES WORDS: BRANKO MILETIC

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ith the 2018 Sustainability Awards gala night and the day panel event being held on October 11, the increased interest has impacted on the size of the awards, reaching such levels that a larger and more functional venue was required which is why it is being held at The Star in Sydney this year for the very first time. This year, for what is the 12th year of the awards, will see a total of 15 trophies presented on the gala night, all recognising and rewarding the work of those at the forefront of ecologicallysustainable building and design in Australia. There will also be some new awards reflecting both industry and outcome-based categories, in line with both industry trends as well as the feedback received from both the eminent judging panel and many of the entrants. In line with that, there are a range of stories that highlight the importance of some of the 2018 Sustainability Awards categories, as shown below.

IMAGE: ANNIE SPRATT


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COMMERCIAL How Google is changing the sustainable office game

makes CIS into one of the largest buildingintegrated solar power plants in Denmark. Each solar panel is used as cladding, and uniquely angled to create a sequin effect so the structure avoids looking too monolithic. In addition to elevating the school’s green credentials and reducing its carbon footprint and energy costs, the solar panels also play a part in classrooms. Data collected from energy production and use are incorporated into CIS’ curriculum.

At the end of 2017, Google announced that it had reached its goal of 100 percent renewable energy for its global operations. This milestone was achieved by purchasing 2.6Gw (2,600Mw) of energy in the form of renewable energy certificates (RECs), which are issued when one megawatt-hour of electricity is generated and delivered to the grid from a renewable energy source. In essence, Google is buying enough wind and solar electricity to account for all of the energy consumed by its data centres and commercial office spaces. Clive Wilkinson Architects designed the 16,700sqm Googleplex headquarters in Mountain View, California, over a decade ago. Working with the existing conditions of the original site, the team prioritised an energy-conserving environment, utilising either cradle-to-cradle building materials, or products with high-recycled content. Googleplex also uses over 9,000 solar panels— spanning about four acres across four main buildings at the campus—to generate 1.6Mw of electricity. This system powers up to 30 percent of the campus’ peak energy needs and was one of the largest solar power systems to be constructed on any corporate site globally.

EDUCATION & RESEARCH Copenhagen school is one of city’s largest building-integrated solar plants There are several noteworthy elements of the new Copenhagen International School (CIS) building. It’s the city’s largest school, located on a prominent site by the water in the new Nordhavn district, and looks more like a stack of mismatched shipping containers than a traditional campus. Covering the face of the new building are 12,000 solar panels, which together, supply more than half of the school’s annual electricity consumption. According to the architects, C. F. Møller, this is a feat that

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The highlight of the store is also its most obvious—an undulating cardboard wall accented by dark finishes. Made of exposed-edge cardboard sheets—the same used for shipping Aesop’s products—the wall is shaped to guide visitors through the space; its curbed form allowing for an interplay of light and shadow. The concept for this cardboard wall was inspired by the store’s previous design, which featured 3,000 folded boxes lining the length of one wall.

HEALTHCARE Royal Adelaide Hospital takes patients on a ‘journey to health’ The new Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH) is the first large-scale hospital complex in Australia to achieve a 4 Star Green Star—Healthcare as Built rating from the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). As the largest health and research precinct in the southern hemisphere, the 800-bed RAH was designed by Silver Thomas Hanley and DesignInc to bring patients on a “journey to health” through the use of biophilic design strategies.

THE USE OF NATURAL LIGHT AND GREENERY IS A KEY FOCUS. THE HOSPITAL’S ORIENTATION IS OPTIMISED TO INCREASE NATURAL LIGHT AND MINIMISE SOLAR THERMAL LOAD.

The use of natural light and greenery is a key focus. The hospital’s orientation is optimised to increase natural light and minimise solar thermal load. The hospital features tele-health facilities that reach remote rural areas, and information kiosks for visitor navigation. Robots deliver food and equipment to patients—a first for Australian public hospitals.

SINGLE DWELLING – NEW Troppo Architects’ prefab pods will revolutionise the market Three prefabricated pods in South Australia (SA) have won high praise from judges at the 2018 Australian Institute of Architects (AIA) South Australian Architecture Awards. Named trop_pods @ robe, the project by Troppo Architects took out the event’s top Sustainable Architecture prize, while setting new benchmarks for prefab. Each pod is carefully planned and founded to fit with site levels, oriented for solar control and views, and to establish privacy. To minimise site impact and construction waste, the team specified hardwearing local materials. The units are steel-framed and clad with timber, Colorbond and fibre cement sheeting. Their interiors feature strandboard linings, exposed steel framing and laser cut patterning in plywood paneling.

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE Aesop’s stores show sustainability can be found in simplicity Tucked away in a classic Melbourne alleyway, Aesop Flinders Lane was revitalised in 2015 by the brand’s in-house team of designers to reflect the constant cycles of regeneration “found in both nature and our urban environments”.

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SINGLE DWELLING ALTERATION OR ADDITION Building on good bones: Vasey House Vasey House in Canberra’s suburb of Campbell is proof that existing homes do not have to drastically change to improve. Designed by Light House Architecture & Science, the 1960s building was converted from being introverted and cold, into a warm and bright home with strong connections to the outdoors—all with just a 1sqm increase to the building footprint. The original home already had fundamentally “good bones” from a design and thermal perspective, as well as sufficient floor area, meaning they only had to make a few small but selective internal alterations to improve the residence’s energy efficiency, spatial relations, circulation and links to the outdoors.

environmental footprint while seamlessly integrating it with the existing local context.

THE FIRST RESIDENTIAL PROJECT TO ACHIEVE A GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA (GBCA) 6 STAR GREEN STAR RATING IN AUSTRALIA USES 50 PERCENT LESS ENERGY AND POTABLE WATER THAN A TYPICAL URBAN DWELLING.

The project design was informed early on by computer simulation and design analysis. According to the project’s sustainability consultant, dsquared Consultation, this allowed the team to test several scenarios, and choose a building form that was the most sustainable and beneficial for future occupants. Each of the eight terraces and four flats (built as mews behind the terraces) is orientated to maximise natural cross ventilation as well as the amount of natural daylight received throughout the year.

The library, distributed over two floors, occupies the majority of the floor plate. The first floor is divided between the Maternal Child Health facilities, including two playgroup rooms, and the library’s reading area. The second level features community facilities with large divisable spaces, a commercial kitchen and shared community office. An extensive rooftop garden serves as an extension of these spaces, providing an area for interaction and study. Here, an automatic irrigation system, equipped with moisture sensors, help minimise water usage. An under decking water catchment system collects rainwater for reuse throughout the building.

EMERGING ARCHITECT OF THE YEAR Aleph Zero named RIBA International Emerging Architect 2018 Gustavo Utrabo and Pedro Duschenes, founders of Brazilian practice Aleph Zero, have been named RIBA International Emerging Architect 2018 for their project, the Children Village.

Energy use is further reduced with help from a 1.5kW photovoltaic system installed on each roof.

PUBLIC & URBAN DESIGN Creating a tightly sealed envelope was a key priority for the team. On this end, high performance PVC double glazing replaced steel framed single glazing, while insulation was added to the double brick external walls, allowing internal mass to provide thermal benefits.

North Fitzroy Library and Community Hub Named ‘Bargoonga Nganjin’, which means ‘Gather Everybody’ in Woiwurrung, the language of the Wurundjeri people, the North Fitzroy Library and Community Hub is a three-storey, 2,040sqm, 6 Star Green Star facility. Encompassing a library, Maternal Child Health facilities, and a variety of community-focused facilities, it is also home to the City’s International House.

Meet Australia’s first 6 Star Green Star multi-residential project

Designed with Rosenbaum, the Children Village provides boarding accommodation for over 500 children at the Canuanã School in Formoso do Araguaia, Brazil. It is run and funded by the Bradesco Foundation, which offers similar accommodation spaces for farm workers and teachers in the local, remote Tocatins Region. At the same time, the school itself is one of 40 providing education for disadvantaged children.

The first residential project to achieve a Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA) 6 Star Green Star rating in Australia uses 50 percent less energy and potable water than a typical urban dwelling.

Seeking to merge knowledge, history, nature, culture and people, the architects set out to create a project that encourages local construction techniques, indigenous beauty and the notion of belonging.

Delivered by Defence Housing Australia (DHA), The Prince’s Trust Australia, and Renewal SA—The Prince’s Terrace Adelaide in Bowden, South Australia, was designed to respond to the local climate while providing comfortable living spaces for residents.

The Children Village comprises two identical structures—one for male students and one for female students—defined by a huge timber roof. This roof canopy is supported by glue laminated timber beams and columns, which is an uncommon material for the region.

It is expected that energy use for heating and cooling will reduce by 75 percent.

MULTIPLE DWELLING

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Central to the design strategy was the need to create a socially inclusive space, with a focus on minimising the building’s

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INDUSTRY

LANDSCAPE & BIOPHILIA Could Sydney’s North Shore get its own High Line park? Sydney’s Lavender Bay suburb is one step closer to getting its own New York-style High Line, pending approval of an Environmental Application by Sydney Trains and funding by the NSW government.

Known as Daramu House, which means “tree house” in the Aboriginal Sydney Language (also known as Dharug and Eora), the project will be Lendlease’s sixth timber building in Australia, and the third to come out of the company’s precision timber manufacturing centre in Western Sydney. The new building, featuring six floors of commercial floor space and approximately 680sqm of new retail, is expected to be completed in late 2019, and will be constructed from cross laminated timber (CLT) and glue laminated timber (glulam).

BEST OF THE BEST The 2018 Pritzker Prize winner B.V. Doshi touched lives and inspired with his designs Balkrishna Doshi, also known as B.V. Doshi, is the first Indian architect to receive the industry’s highest honor, the Pritzker Architecture Prize. Inspired by similar restorative initiatives in Paris and New York City, plans for new walking trails to be installed next to the rail road between the Lavender Bay and Waverton stations were first raised in a 2016 meeting attended by 200 local residents.

INNOVATION / APPLICATION Lendlease’s commitment to innovative green building solutions Lendlease recently announced that planning approval has been granted for a second engineered timber office building in Sydney’s Barangaroo South precinct.

LENDLEASE RECENTLY ANNOUNCED THAT PLANNING APPROVAL HAS BEEN GRANTED FOR A SECOND ENGINEERED TIMBER OFFICE BUILDING IN SYDNEY’S BARANGAROO SOUTH PRECINCT.

THE GREENEST SCHOOL IN NORWAY, THE POWERHOUSE DRØBAK MONTESSORI LOWER SECONDARY SCHOOL, WILL PRODUCE MORE ENERGY THAN IT CONSUMES WHEN IT OPENS ITS DOORS NEXT YEAR.

Solar panels will help the school to generate 30,500kWh of energy each year, with the body of the structure intersected by an angular, ‘solar plate’. According to Powerhouse, this plate uses the stack effect to draw in fresh air and is oriented directly to the south with a 33-degree incline. Similar to Powerhouse’s first energy-positive project, Powerhouse Kjørbo, the Drøbak school features two external ground wells that provide a renewable source of geothermal energy for heating, water and ventilation, as well as cooling in the summer. These energy wells have been drilled 300m into the ground.

The design concept includes a 3.3km linear park connecting several notable public spaces, including Ball’s Head Reserve, Wendy’s ‘Secret Garden’, Harry’s Park, Luna Park, the Olympic Pool and the Harbour Bridge. The pedestrian walkway will run through a 310m long tunnel, featuring a cathedral ceiling that offers opportunities for visual displays, similar in style and quality to the Argyle Cut at Vivid Sydney.

Delivered by Powerhouse, a coalition of sustainability-minded companies the Zero Emission Buildings Centre have likened to Tesla, the project has been designed with optimal solutions that allow for drastic cuts in energy use.

SMART BUILDING A designer, urban planner and educator, Doshi is known for his ethical and personal approach to architecture, which has touched the lives of various socioeconomic classes over the past 70 years. Born in Pune, India, Doshi first studied architecture at the Sir J. J. School of Architecture Bombay. He later moved to London and then Paris where, despite his inability to speak French, he worked under Le Corbusier. He returned to India in 1954 to oversee Le Corbusier’s projects in Chandigarh and Ahmedabad, and in 1956, founded his own practice, Vastushilpa.

GREEN BUILDING The ‘Tesla of construction industry’ delivers energy-positive school in Norway The greenest school in Norway, the Powerhouse Drøbak Montessori lower secondary school, will produce more energy than it consumes when it opens its doors next year.

Students assemble world’s smartest solar home in Dubai Students from Virginia Tech have begun assembling FutureHAUS, their new, net-zero smart home prototype, in Dubai in preparation for this year’s global solar decathlon competition. FutureHAUS combines digital technologies, cutting-edge products and smart building design to create homes of the future. The project centres around prefabrication methods, which are used to assemble medium and high-density homes that are pre-wired, pre-plumbed and pre-finished with integrated smart technologies and detailed interior elements. FutureHAUS was unveiled in four phases, starting with the kitchen in 2015 and culminating in the bedroom and home office in 2017. The prototype being installed in Dubai is the second of its kind, after the first was destroyed in an electrical fire in February 2017. For more information about the 12th Annual Architecture & Design Sustainability Awards, visit sustainablebuildingawards.com.au


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ALEC TZANNES RECEIVES AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE’S HIGHEST HONOUR

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YDNEY PRACTITIONER AND EMERITUS PROFESSOR ALEC TZANNES HAS BEEN AWARDED AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURE’S HIGHEST HONOUR, THE AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS’ GOLD MEDAL. Awarded since 1960, the Gold Medal recognises distinguished service by architects who have designed or executed buildings of high merit, produced work of great distinction resulting in the advancement of architecture or endowed the profession of architecture in a distinguished manner. Since founding his own practice in 1982, after working with the NSW Government Architect’s Office and Glenn Murcutt, Tzannes, who was also a former national president of the Institute (2007-2008), has given exemplary service and leadership within the profession, academia and related fields.

Some of Tzannes’ best known projects in Sydney include the Federation Pavilion at Centennial Park, Cathy Freeman Park at Homebush and the Brewery Yard at Central Park , while his most recent projects include International

SOME OF TZANNES’ BEST KNOWN PROJECTS IN SYDNEY INCLUDE THE FEDERATION PAVILION AT CENTENNIAL PARK, CATHY FREEMAN PARK AT HOMEBUSH AND THE BREWERY YARD AT CENTRAL PARK.

House Sydney in Barangaroo and Dangrove, a state-of-the-art museum storage, research, education and logistics facility in Alexandria. “Both of these projects embody innovative typologies for contemporary and responsive architecture,” the jury noted. Tzannes is the current chair of the Australian Institute of Architects Foundation, a member of the UNSW Foundation Board of Directors and served as the dean of the Faculty of the Built Environment at the University of New South Wales between 2008 and 2016. In recognition of his service, the UNSW Council conferred the degree of Doctor of the University, honoris causa on Tzannes in 2017. “The outstanding contribution Alec Tzannes has made to the architectural profession exemplifies the highest level of achievement within each of the criteria,” the jury stated. n


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PROFESSOR HELEN LOCHHEAD AND THE ‘LATTE LINE’ DIVIDING SYDNEY

it’s located, how it’s going to fit in, how it’s going to disrupt and what it will do to property values. It’s not a high rise vs low density housing issue; one needs to look at it as a kind of a gradient between low density family houses where they may be appropriate to high density high rises.

While women architects may see a steady increase in their responsibilities, there is a stalling point especially when they take time off to raise a family. This usually leads to their departure from the architecture profession as they seek to balance a career with a personal life.

How does politics influence development?

The construction industry is by far the worst with a high attrition rate among women. UNSW’s Built Environment faculty is working with industry to promote scholarships to get women into construction, and develop clear pathways for women through placements.

It’s a highly political process in Sydney. Development is big money and a big part of the economic engine that drives the city, but there have been instances when transparent processes get twisted towards a particular outcome, a case in point being Barangaroo for which there was an international design competition with legitimate winners.

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DENTIFYING SYDNEY AS ONE OF THE MOST INEQUITABLE CITIES IN AUSTRALIA, AIA PRESIDENT-ELECT PROFESSOR HELEN LOCHHEAD SAYS THE HOMOGENEOUS CITY OF HER CHILDHOOD, WHICH HAD A LARGE MIDDLE CLASS, A SMALL UPPER CLASS AND A ROBUST WORKING CLASS, NOW SHOWS A CLEAR DIVIDE BETWEEN THE HAVES AND THE HAVE-NOTS, OFTEN DESCRIBED GEOGRAPHICALLY AS THE ‘LATTE LINE’. Would you say that Sydney is a liveable city and can success ever make a city less liveable? The [latte line] description is quite unflattering since the divide makes it quite clear who has access to education, jobs, quality housing, community services and transport among others. In fact, the Three Cities Plan by the Greater Sydney Commission aims to address this inequity. Sydney is a victim of its own success; what it needs is a robust housing policy, which will ensure everyone has a good quality of life – this will make Sydney a liveable city. How does high rise development affect a city’s density issues? High-rise development is not a one-size-fits-all solution for any city to address its density issues; there are several considerations such as where

However, the plan was changed and a different design was eventually delivered by different architects and designers. There are many ways to get around the system in New South Wales, which may sometimes not lead to the best outcomes; one needs to be vigilant about making the process more transparent and equitable. This means politics should be kept out of planning as much as possible. For instance, developers are incentivised to provide affordable housing, which has a 10-year sunset; basically, the developer gets a windfall by providing 10 percent additional housing for a short timeframe. In such cases, the community doesn’t benefit long term. Affordable housing should be for the long haul and the portfolio should continue to be built so that people can live and work in the same place without having to commute up to two hours a day to get to their place of employment. What about women in architecture: are there issues around gender inequity and pay disparity in Australia? There are policies being implemented across the board in education, industry and government to address these inequities. For instance, at UNSW, the university council has established specific KPIs that have to be delivered to ensure parity not only among female and male academics within the faculty but also in promotions and retention. When it comes to architecture students, there is a good balance of males and females; however, the real gap is seen when they move into industry where they come in at lower salaries.

Another aspect that needs to be addressed is the high incidence of depression and marital breakdowns in the construction sector, due to the long working hours. Creating a more family-friendly environment will be good for both women and men, and will lead to gender equity in the industry. People-friendly urban planning will also go a long way in reducing current inequities – the idea is to have work, school, play and living within a reasonable distance, and that’s where affordable housing comes in play. Does the architectural degree risk becoming irrelevant? At UNSW, the focus is on ensuring every graduate has both depth and breadth in knowledge, which includes interdisciplinary education that would give them agility in their professional careers. Given the new types of buildings coming up with all their complexities that require high order thinking skills, architects do not risk irrelevance. But it’s important to educate architecture students to operate in that world. Students also need more skills development in terms of digital learning, data analysis, digital design, and social media communication among others. Tertiary education is different from professional training and this gap can be bridged through industry partnerships, internships, and eminent practitioners as professors, helping students get ready for a professional role. The full interview with Professor Helen Lochhead is available as a podcast on Soundcloud. n


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HOW AIRPORTS ARE CHANGING IN THE FACE OF NEW SECURITY THREATS

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HE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HAS ANNOUNCED IT WILL DEDICATE $293.6 MILLION TOWARDS AVIATION SECURITY IN THE 2018-19 BUDGET, IN AN EFFORT TO SAFEGUARD AUSTRALIA AGAINST EVOLVING THREATS IN THE CIVIL AVIATION, AIR CARGO AND INTERNATIONAL MAIL SECTORS.

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A&D: What are some of the threats we’re now seeing in aviation and how is this being addressed through airport design and technology? Would you say there are any major events that have caused designers to start thinking differently about airport design?

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LEFT: Government-owned airports like Changi Airport in Singapore benefit in spend on passenger experience beyond anything we see in Australia.

equipment, all adds to the perception that there is no way to get through with a concealed prohibited item. The space says in every way, ‘You are definitely going to get caught!’ The decentralisation of travel operations is developing as a key strategy to make airports less of a target because the facilities are spread out around the city. Hong Kong is a good example, having introduced external check-in and bag drop some time ago. Having passengers and visitors already screened prior to even setting foot in the airport may be some way off but this has great potential to help improve the passenger journey, allowing the experience to be human service focused. With your knowledge of airports in Australia and around the world, how would you characterise their differences? The identity of the airports in other countries tends to be more distinct than in Australia. It generally appears as though there is a better balance in the money allocated for passenger experience and operations. For example, all of Norway’s airports are controlled by one authority which helps their designs to be more consistent. Oslo Airport just finished its new renovation and expansion last year, with exquisitely crafted spaces fitted out with timber and natural light, integrating the surrounding environment of the location in a very literal way. The spaces communicate a high level of sophistication and operational efficiency, adding to the ‘theatre of security design’ and sense of safety. Germany on the other hand, appears to be focused on the communication of efficient transport infrastructure at the forefront. While

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Munich’s airport has plazas that are very much designed as a civic space, surrounded by infrastructure, it has one of the best plaza’s around with programmed entertainment activities like ice skating or a wave pool.

THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT HAS ANNOUNCED IT WILL DEDICATE $293.6 MILLION TOWARDS AVIATION SECURITY IN THE 2018-19 BUDGET, IN AN EFFORT TO SAFEGUARD AUSTRALIA AGAINST EVOLVING THREATS IN THE CIVIL AVIATION, AIR CARGO AND INTERNATIONAL MAIL SECTORS.

The government-owned airports in Asia, whether in Singapore, Hong Kong or Jakarta, benefit in spend on passenger experience beyond anything we see in Australia. These airports are seen as vehicles to showcase their country’s cultural identity and technological aspirations.

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Is there anything you think Australian airports should adopt from airports around the world? Australia’s privatised model doesn’t allow for much cohesion, and we struggle to find ways to design beautiful structures because of the need to focus on cost efficiencies. The arrival experience in each Australian airport is very different – we could benefit from a federal approach to design to make the experience more clearly culturally consistent, overlaid with regional variation. Security screening spaces at Australian airports need to take a holistic approach to a balance between the ‘theatre of security design’, implementation of the latest screening technology and high quality training for security personnel. This training should go beyond operations, and enable them to get the most out of the spaces we design and deliver. This means not only effective security but personable and thoughtful interactions with passengers, adding to a positive passenger journey experience. Designs that assist in creating better security staff cohesion and communications will help to make the overall experience for passengers better, not to mention more effective and efficient. In our experience, carefully considered overlay and coordination of lighting

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and finishes, more associated with hospitality projects, delivers spaces staff enjoy working in. How can the design of airports help to “humanise” the new security measures? In terms of security, we’re considering design less in terms of threats and more in terms of the solutions the result can offer. We’re conscious of designing spaces so that they’re genuinely intuitive for passenger wayfinding, so the first time you visit an airport you’ll instinctively know where you should be going. A passenger that is relaxed, knows where they are going and what the screening process is asking of them makes the process faster and more efficient.

farewellers to stand clear of the entry proper. There will also be automated boarding pass readers to further reinforce the threshold. Technology such as the boarding pass readers, designed to be integrated with biometrics into the future, is positioned where it can have the biggest benefit in freeing up staff for more meaningful human interactions. Finally, how did you get involved in airport design?

We collaborate closely with security stakeholders in the design process so that we’re addressing key concerns, such as ensuring the sightlines for exits are unobstructed and the flow of people through the screening space avoids aggregation points, where large groups of people could potentially gather together. This is always a big concern for airport security.

I find airport design to be the most challenging of the sectors I have worked in. The intensity of competition and collaboration between the complex web of stakeholders I think is unparalleled. Airports also bring together a lot of other sectors I have had experience in, including master planning and urban design, retail, hospitality, commercial and other transport projects. Most airport projects are a balance between these competing needs and I really enjoy the challenge in delivering cohesive, functional and innovative design work in the airport environment.

In our latest design for the entry to the security screening hall at Melbourne Airport’s International Terminal, there’s a space with a Melbourne themed wall for passengers to say their goodbyes and take photos in front of. This is clearly designed to signal to

I think there’s also a nostalgic element to airport design for me as well. I won a national student competition when I was at university for the design of an airport in Canberra, so it brings me back to what got me excited about architecture in the first place. n

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ONE URBAN END-OF-TRIP FACILITY BEGINS A NEW TREND ARCHITECT: GRAY PUKSAND WORDS: DALE O’BRIEN PHOTOGRAPHY: TATJANA PLITT

DESIGNED BY ARCHITECTS GRAY PUKSAND, ONE AT 101 COLLINS STREET SETS THE BENCHMARK FOR END-OF-TRIP FACILITIES IN AUSTRALIA. PROVIDING INDIVIDUALISED SOLUTIONS TO USERS’ DAILY COMMUTES, ONE ENDORSES THE FITNESS AND WELLBEING OF ITS PREMIUM TENANTS WHILE PROMOTING SUSTAINABLE COMMUTING OPTIONS.

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oused in the iconic 101 Collins Street, the architects say that ONE offers an unprecedented, resort-style spa and wellness experience designed to meet every need of the sophisticated professional. Designed to emulate the luxury of a highend, six-star hotel, the facility features 500 bicycle racks, 512 personal lockers, 45 deluxe shower rooms, ventilated drying rooms, GHD hair straighteners, Parlux hair dryers and curated hand soaps and toiletries from Australian label Leif. “With its elegant use of terrazzo, contrasting marble vanities, timber veneers and fabric wall panelling, the project offers unrivalled attention to detail, cementing its place as Australia’s premier end of trip facility,” says the architect. First developed in the early 1990s, 101 Collins Street holds a significant place in Melbourne’s commercial architecture history. Leading the way in innovative office environments, 101 Collins was among the first to break from the status quo of a bland workplace environment and develop a more luxurious, ‘hotel-like’ approach. With this legacy in mind, Gray Puksand was engaged to develop a modern end-of-trip

facility that remained respectful and relevant to the building in which it sat. An ode to the original development’s grand scale and high attention to detail, the project conveys an inspired design that accommodates the diverse needs of its daily users, say the architects. Taking cues from the existing luxury feel of 101 Collins Street, Gray Puksand sought to deliver a project that integrated harmoniously with the design language of the seminal office building. Being housed in the upper basement level of the building, access to natural light was restricted, making it a key goal of designers to inject a feeling of height and brightness into the space. As Gray Puksand senior associate Dale O’Brien says, “luxury isn’t just about what you touch and feel it’s also about the sense of space”.

End-of-trip facilities are often housed within a garage area of a workplace meaning users must take a tradesman’s entrance and are often unsafe and competing with vehicles. ONE differentiates itself through on-grade entry and ensuring its facilities unfold in a sequential manner. Users enter through either the runner’s corridor or the bike storage space, use the bench seat to take off their cleats and store in the lockers below, walk through to the luxurious showers and washroom facilities, continue for a five-minute respite at the lounge/hydration station and then exit to take the lift directly to their office lobby. Due to its hardiness and for the need to increase the light within the building, terrazzo was used in place of marble in some instances – both to reduce the structural load on the building and ensure longevity.

To execute a build that captured the opulent feel of the brief, the designers employed the use of high ceilings, wide corridors, marble-clad surfaces and ambient lighting.

In terms of the light, an array of lighting options has been implemented, with delicate LED strip lighting, subtle downlighting and feature pendants combining to produce a sense of ambience in this upper-basement level space.

A true point of difference for this project says O’Brien, “lies in the innovative and logical flow of the space, with designers recognising the need for an easy-access, ground-floor entry and carefully planning the user journey.

A key aim of the project, says O’Brien, is to enable “a shift towards lifestyle choices that enhance wellbeing. As a by-product of this sustainable transit options such as cycling, walking and running become more convenient and accessible.”


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“Given the location of the project on the upper basement level of the existing building, key challenges faced by the design team largely revolved around the structural load and limitations of the existing infrastructure,” he says. Overall, says O’Brien, “implementing a project featuring a significant amount of stone meant a deep understanding of structural load was required to ensure longevity and stability of the project. “ “We worked closely with the expert engineers at Arup to deliver a project that met both design and technical needs.” Presenting a further challenge, says O’Brien, “were the limitations of the existing infrastructure of the building, meaning all design concepts had to consider immovable objects and the flourishing ground-floor atmosphere housed only one level above the project site.” PREVIOUS & LEFT PAGE: ONE differentiates itself through on-grade entry and ensuring its facilities unfold in a sequential manner that captures the opulent feel of the brief. The designers employed the use of high ceilings, wide corridors, marble-clad surfaces and ambient lighting. THIS PAGE: Users enter through either the runner’s corridor or the bike storage space, use the bench seat to take off their cleats and store in the lockers below.

“This was overcome through the visionary use of design strategies to avoid the existing services infrastructure, delivering an aesthetically pleasing and highly functional end-product,” says O’Brien. n

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MELBOURNE INTEGRATED URBAN DESIGN CONSIDERS HOW PEOPLE INTERACT WITH TRANSPORT ARCHITECT: GRIMSHAW WORDS: REBECCA GAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY: MICHAEL KAI

THE AIM BEHIND THE ORMOND STATION AND NORTH ROAD LEVEL CROSSING REMOVAL WAS TO PROVIDE AN INTEGRATED URBAN DESIGN SOLUTION THAT ENCOMPASSES PUBLIC SPACE, BUILDINGS, LANDSCAPE AND THE CIVIL ENGINEERING SCOPE OF A MAJOR TRANSPORT PROJECT.


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rmond Station is located on the Frankston line in the south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Victoria. The station sits adjacent to North Road, which contains a mix of residential and mixed-use retail functions The precinct is typically surrounded by one and two storey houses.

THE BRIEF In 2015, the Level Crossing Removal Authority commissioned the KBR JHG alliance to design and construct a new grade separated train station. The brief called for the removal of the level crossing on North Road by providing a rail-under-road solution. This included: with access to platforms via entrances to both sides of North Road waiting area, toilet facilities, staff and protective services officers’ facilities, bike store facilities, and retail facilities platforms via lifts and stairs canopies over the concourse and platform waiting areas including new canopies

hard and soft landscaping.

THE DESIGN A key objective of the design is to soften the harsh road and rail environment through the creation of a series of smaller public places which benefit the rail users, community and potential future residents of the site. These spaces provide a sense of wellbeing and amenity that not only function well with regard to traffic, parking, servicing, pedestrian and cycle movement, but which are also distinctive and pleasing places to spend time in or transition through.

A legible and distinct character of design, form and material creates an identifiable gateway to the station, and defines the civic open space serves both station users and the wider community and works to define the edge of the adjacent retail strip. The new station is located to exploit its status as a premium station, offering optimal connections with existing pedestrian paths, the bus stops on North Road, bicycle paths and parking, kiss-and-ride, taxi ranks, car parking and other amenities such as residential, retail, and green spaces. The station forecourt faces directly on to North Road, connecting with the landscaped though the public open space to create a busy and activated public realm with clear sightlines to the station concourse and vertical transport. To further enhance the public realm, infrastructure elements are integrated into the urban design response. This includes the treatment of the rail cutting with expressed sheet pile walls lining the sides of the cutting, and the use of coloured perforated screens to define the station precinct and conceal major services. The under-croft area of the platforms includes coloured perforated panels with integrated lighting to conceal structural elements. Cameras and speakers are integrated into bespoke lighting poles to declutter the platform environment. Construction efficiencies were realised through the design and application of prefabricated kit-of-parts building components, reducing the overall programme while enhancing the quality – a key approach to navigating the tight timeframes and budget constraints imposed on the project with short rail occupation periods. The complex and live rail environment required a close and efficient working relationship to be established with the key stakeholders and consultants to ensure that a high-quality architectural outcome was delivered for the precinct and the benefit of the broader community now and in the future. The alignment of the rail and the positioning of the station was considered to maximise commercial opportunities to the north of the site. In addition, an expansive structural slab over the rail cutting behind the station provides future accommodation for a multilevel building which will integrate seamlessly with the transport hub to support government

initiatives to provide densification around key transport nodes. As such, the Ormond Station and North Road Level Crossing Removal seeks to promote economic, environmental and social benefits to the surrounding precinct.

CHALLENGES One of the key challenges the design team faced was the constraints of working within a live operating rail environment and how to minimise disruptions to commuters. The solution was to integrate pre-fabrication and modular construction into the design. The station buildings were designed to be constructed off site by a prefabrication contractor. Not only did this reduce the amount of activities on the construction site, it also provided excellent quality control of the station buildings. The platform canopies were also designed to be fabricated in parts and lifted into position and fixed with bolted connections.

SUSTAINABILITY Ormond Station is certified by the Green Building Council of Australia. The design achieves a 4 star As-Built Green Star rating using the Custom Rating Victorian Above-Ground Railway Stations, which was developed specifically for the Level Crossing Removal Authority.

INITIATIVES INCLUDE: station roof, providing over 17kwh of electricity to service the station and feed back into the main power grid including fly ash was used in some of the structural concrete throughout the project

which minimises material waste due to its manufacturing within a controlled factory environment Through major improvements to the precinct, enhanced intermodal connectivity and customer experience, this project seeks to promote public transport as a preferred sustainable mode of transport.


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MATERIALS USED The key materials used in this project were for the roofing and external walls of the station buildings. For the roofing, the following products used: 1000RW insulated roofing panels, 40mm thick composed of outer and inner steel cover sheets soffit colour – off white, roof colour - basalt 74mm thick triple skin polycarbonate clear roofing, colour – Opal Hi-strength profile roof deck, colour - Basalt was chosen because it provides long spans between purlins, which reduces the quantity of secondary framing members. The product bottom layer which negates the need for additional soffit treatment, and the panels are trafficable for maintenance access purposes. was also chosen because it provides long spans between purlins, and the panels are trafficable. The material also provides natural light onto the concourse area for improved amenity. The external walls of the station buildings used vitreous enamel coated steel wall cladding panels in the colour Zeus Black. Vitreous enamel metal panels were chosen for both aesthetic reasons and maintenance benefits. Vitreous enamel offers a smooth consistent paint finish that is hard-wearing and has a long-lasting resistance to graffiti. n


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ABOVE: A key objective of the design is to soften the harsh road and rail environment through the creation of a series of smaller public places which benefi t the rail users, community and potential future residents of the site.

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ABOVE: The station buildings were designed to be constructed off site by a prefabrication contractor.


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SMART CITIES ARE ON THE MOVE WORDS: PRUE MILLER

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THE SMART CITY CONSTRUCT BLURS THE LINES BETWEEN HUMAN ACTIVITY, DATA AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT. THE AIM IS TO CREATE URBAN LANDSCAPES THAT ARE MORE SUSTAINABLE, MORE ENJOYABLE PLACES TO LIVE AND WORK, INSTRUCTED BY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, AND FUELLED BY ALMOST UNIMAGINABLE DATA COLLECTION. TWENTYFOUR HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK, 365 DAYS A YEAR, INFORMATION IS INCOMING.

T

he Internet of Things (IoT), including our current gadgets from smart phones to smart light bulbs feed the cloud with the threads of our life story. By the end of this very decade it is estimated there will be 30 billion (some reports say 50 billion) IoT devices on this earth. However, that data is for the most part unlinked. The big picture, the patterns, remain largely unseen. However, change is afoot. “We have no idea what is going on in our cities. Not at all,” says Adam Beck, executive director of the Smart Cities Council for Australia and New Zealand. However, Beck says Australia is changing. “We’ve gone from sleepy to awake very quickly.” But why do we need cities to get smart? More people than ever are moving to cities, walking away from rural communities. To make this exodus workable, supportable, cities have to change. The poster boy for smart cities has been Milton Keynes in the UK, but competition is growing globally, and Australian cities are in the race, spurred on no doubt by the 2017 $50m Federal grant designed specifically for Smart City projects across Australia. According to Beck that was the push that kicked everything up a gear. What will it take? More data and more analysis. City planners have to find out more about our spatial use – who goes where, when, how often and for how long. It’s behavioural mapping that will inform the planners, the designers of our future. And how will it look? Indeed, will we see anything different at all?

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The unprecedented integration of analytics will alter everything in our lives from traffic management, such as holding a traffic walk sign longer for disabled (RFID card carrying) pedestrians, to adjusting city water flow for sewerage, parking locators and smart medicine bottles that alert doctors when a patient has failed to take their medication. Tesla is eager to link the road sensor data to their on-board computers – alerting drivers to the proximity of everything from Lycraclad cyclists to en-route traffic accidents by feeding data to the car dashboard. In Seattle, homeless people can wear data ‘beacons’ that alert passers-by phones (via an app) to their personal backstory, and via those same smartphones funds can be sent to the homeless persons’ store account with a screen tap. The Samaritan app, as it’s known, promotes social inclusion, though not every ‘unsheltered’ person is keen to wear their story around their necks for all to see. But, in many ways that is what Smart Cities promise. On a moment to moment basis our interactions will be watched. Take a simple city street. Fill it with sensors. Start storing. How many cars use a road, how many passengers in the car, is it the same car over and over again searching for a parking spot? Are the buses too full to stop? Are pedestrians crossing against the light to avoid a homeless person at the crossing? The sensors in this one intersection collect data that is useful to traffic management, parking lot planning, public transport, social services and the health and justice departments. Society itself is interdependent, so it follows that successful city-wide analytics means sharing data.

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Formerly this intersection data set would be locked up, accessed only by traffic management. A social resource lost. Smart Cities will take the data, analyse it, openly share it, act on it, in real time, and then store it in the cloud. Forever. It is the ‘real time’ response to data that was once collected via hard wired sensor banks that will help the most. New sensors won’t feed a node, new sensors will have their own IP address and communicate directly. George Verghese, business manager at Gerard Lighting explains the role sensors play in their new offering, which he says will make cities smarter and safer. “Our sensors will pick up air quality – sensing unsafe levels of gases such as carbon dioxide, this is reported back to the authority in the area.” As the rollout expands this may also encompass some alerts in bushfire prone areas. Parking information, which may sound trite but is an issue faced by most drivers, is also about

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to revamped by Gerard. Their data uptake will come via cameras which may cover 300-400 spots in, say, a rail station carpark. They detect vacant spaces and via a phone app will tell an approaching driver if there are free spaces, where they are, and in association with Google maps will direct them to the actual spot. The data management will be handled by Gerard, with only top line analytics taken on board by the client, in this case the rail authority. Electric cars are a hot topic, with sceptics suggesting their power needs will further overload strained city power grids. Christian Schiemann from the artificial technology and robotics firm ABB sees this as an opportunity for artificial intelligence to prove its value. He puts forward the scenario of everyone with electric cars pulling into their home garages at 6.00pm, ready to recharge. “An intelligent system,” says Schiemann “will look at the overall picture, and ask when is this car needed again? Tomorrow at 6am? Okay, we will schedule it for recharge at 3am or whatever works [for that city].” Equally, he puts forward the scenario that you park your fully-charged electric car at the airport, and you are leaving for a few days. You plug into the airport system. It asks the car when are you needed again? Five days? “If the airport system is in need of power, at a peak time, it can access your car’s charge.” And then when the demand is low, it will recharge the car in time for your return. It is a smart management of the power resource, perhaps allowing that resource to be cheaper and more available. Enter the Jevons Paradox. In environmental economics, the Jevons Paradox refers to fuel efficiency, and proposes that when progress increases efficiency, reducing the rate (and cost) at which a resource is used, consumption of that resource will increase in demand. It gives one pause for thought – can humans be trusted with good news? Participants in the Smart Cities Council are now numbering over 200, with networks in Australia and New Zealand, North Africa, Europe, India and of course, North America. Data, projects and opportunities

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are growing exponentially – as is the relatively new involvement of architects. According to Smart Cities’ Beck, until recently general city planning has been missing an important input. “Built environment professionals, professionals such as architects have not been at the table,” says Beck. “[City planning] has been a technically led agenda. Architecture has been more analogue.”

SMART CITIES WILL ALTER URBAN LIVEABILITY IN JUST ABOUT EVERY WAY – AND NOT JUST FOR THOSE LUCKY ENOUGH TO LIVE IN DESIGNATED HUBS.

“We should be procuring projects digitally,” says Beck clearly frustrated with systems, including BIM, which he compares to using a “Melways rather than Google Maps.” However, on a project basis at least, some cities and councils are very much linked into the digital design option. According to Karl Fender OAM, CEO and founder of Fender Katsalidis, architects frequently arrive at Council planning sessions armed with a drive containing their 3D model of a proposed project. The council plugs it into their cityscape 3D plan, and voila! Everyone can see the project in context, in the sun, in the rain and in the shadows of the existing city scape. As more councils adopt the technology, the landscape will see fewer miscommunications in the shape of unforgiveable Council approvals. Adam Beck is dialled into the Australian smart landscape. His excitement at what is possible globally and locally is palpable, and contagious. “Let’s look at Adelaide. Their ten gig city project – they will have a glass pipe in the ground – and, can you believe it? – it will have the fastest, the FASTEST internet in the world. On its own. No sharing with schoolkids playing computer games. High speed connecting in every city building. Imagine doing business in Adelaide?” Indeed, the economic advantage for cities offering such forward leaps in technology, with accessible IoT, will without doubt reap enormous rewards from business activity and investment. Adelaide is not alone on Beck’s honour roll - also present is Melbourne. “Michelle Fitzgerald (Melbourne City Council’s CIO) is doing world class stuff,” says Beck.

But perhaps more surprisingly is Beck’s last honouree. “The Sunshine Coast, it’s really punching above its weight.” On investigation, their website is filled with positive smart approaches including rubbish bins that sense when they are at capacity and need emptying, irrigation systems connected to weather updates and park lighting that dims or brightens depending on motion detectors. Smart Cities will alter urban liveability in just about every way – and not just for those lucky enough to live in designated hubs. Government, which intrudes into every dark corner of our lives, will also be swept up into the smart city interface, forced to move with the times, sensing our every move, saving the data of our lives for the greater good, and perpetual revision. If the names Zuckerberg or Cambridge Analytics send a shiver down your spine, consider the future. With all the progress we have made and continue to make in this exciting field, one aspect is still of global concern. The data. The lifeblood of the smart city. Who will store it, how much energy will be required to save it, and then who will crack the digital safe? The answer is rubbery. And what is at stake? From missed credit card payments to heart defects, our private lives, our private tale told by an artificially intelligent fool, all stored in 0s and 1s, will in the end signify something. Forever. n

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performance requirements and ever more stringent fire performance demands means that designers, engineers and builders are looking for standardized solutions which is where Acoustigard™ excels.

Fire is an ever-present risk and is at the forefront of consideration when specifying insulation materials whether for a boundary application or in a façade of high-rise apartments. The thermal and acoustic properties of insulating material are also key metrics to be considered and Acoustigard™ delivers the trifecta.

The inside insulation story presents similar fire risk, acoustic and thermal challenges. Acoustigard™ non-combustible insulation used within separating walls provides acoustic performance for occupier comfort and amenity, while reducing the spread of noxious gasses in the event of fire. Where internal walls are required to separate conditioned from non-conditioned spaces the thermal performance of Acoustigard™ come into play.

EXTERNAL WALLS Ongoing investigations prompted by recent tragedies have highlighted the critical need to use non- combustible components in high rise external facades; this also includes insulation. If combustible insulation is used fire could potentially spread within a façade cavity unnoticed. Noxious gasses from smouldering or burning combustible insulation is an additional risk. Acoustigard™ mitigates these risks while also addressing both acoustic and thermal insulation challenges. High density construction, increasingly near transport corridors places high demands on the acoustic performance of external walls. This, coupled with the NCC thermal

THE INSIDE STORY FRL INTERNAL WALLS

INSIDE AND OUT Bradford Acoustigard™ presents the ideal non-combustible insulation solution for external and internal walls, delivering enhanced fire, acoustics and thermal performance.

project requirements. Supplied in varying thicknesses up to 90mm and densities up to 32 kg/m3, it delivers up to R2.7 added insulation to the total wall thermal performance. Unlike some softer, more pliable insulation products, Acoustigard™ retains its form and won’t slump in the cavity, ensuring the risk of voids in walls are eliminated and maintaining the acoustic and thermal performance well beyond building handover to owners and tenants.

TECHNICAL PROJECT SUPPORT Bradford’s DesignSmart team has a wealth of construction experience and utilise industry-leading building science research for acoustic, thermal and fire performance. As the experts in building insulation the smart move is to call the DesignSmart team. Call the DesignSmart team on 1800 354 044 or visit BradfordDesignSmart.com.au

This non-combustible, glass wool fibre insulation is specifically engineered to reduce mid to high range acoustic transmission in walls and ceilings.

VERSATILITY Manufactured in varying densities the acoustic and thermal performance can be tuned to suit

For More info visit goo.gl/tZqryi


Am-Boss Access Ladders & Fall Protection Systems AM-BOSS Access Ladders are installed in all types of buildings: new and existing government buildings, factories, hospitals and residential properties. The AM-BOSS system is the ideal way to create safe access to the ceiling space for a storage facility, or to a plant room and rooftop access. AM-BOSS raised the standard of workplace safety by being the first pull-down access ladder to both comply with the Building Code of Australia (BCA) and receive CodeMark Certification. AM-BOSS offers pull-down access ladders with a Load Rating starting from 150kg (not spread weight) up to 400kg (not spread weight) depending on the Series chosen. AM-BOSS pioneered installations into suspended ceilings and manufacture, supply and install access ladders to suit each individual environment. AM-BOSS also manufactures a pull-down access ladder that is fire-rated to AS1530.42005, with a -/90/90 rating. AM-BOSS supplies and installs fall arrest systems, anchor points, walkways, guard railings, fixed access ladders and more.

Contact us: (03) 9310 9788 ambossaccessladder.com.au


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ARE OUR URBAN CENTRES DESIGNED TO ACCOMMODATE THE IMPENDING POPULATION BOOM? WORDS: BONNIE VAN DORP

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FROM 1971 TO 2000, IT TOOK SYDNEY ALMOST THREE DECADES TO EXPAND FROM THREE MILLION TO FOUR MILLION PEOPLE, BUT JUST HALF OF THAT TIME TO ADD ITS NEXT MILLION, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL POPULATION FIGURES BY THE AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS. AND NOW IT LOOKS AS IF THE CITY IS SET TO BALLOON AGAIN, WITH THREE MILLION MORE SET TO JOIN SYDNEY’S RANKS OVER THE NEXT FORTY YEARS.

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owever, the population boom isn’t just unique to our picturesque Harbour City. Not by a long shot. In fact, the official figures say it’s likely Melbourne will rival Sydney as the country’s largest metropolitan city by the mid-2050s. But by then, it’s likely more than eight million people will call both cities home.

on how to tackle the issue of the ballooning population, shone a light on the issue of congestion on our roads if new infrastructure and services aren’t accommodated.

Your line to get coffee in the morning before work is about to get longer – much longer.

“Australia’s metropolitan road networks and public transport networks are struggling to cope with this growing population, and while major infrastructure projects and new planned mass transit services will support continued urban growth, these are costly solutions to an efficiency problem,” he says.

So it raises the question: Are our cities ready to accommodate the population boom? US engineering firm AECOM Australia and New Zealand Cities leader James Rosenwax isn’t so sure. “Sydney is currently constrained by outdated governance and planning systems that were established during the first and second industrial revolutions,” says Rosenwax. “The pace and scale of population growth combined with the need for significant infrastructure demand a fresh approach to optimise the outcomes for the majority, not just for the few.” “We are confident that Sydney can be a truly brilliant city of 8 million people, but the current trajectory will not get us there. We need a new era of partnership between federal, state and local governments, the private sector and citizens, particularly with respect to planning. This isn’t just about more road or rail, it’s about how we embrace technology to plan, govern and deliver the right projects in the most equitable way,” he says. Rosenwax, who earlier in June released a new set of key recommendations dubbed ‘Manifesto for Sydney at 8 Million people’

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“Without new infrastructure and services, congestion is forecast to cost our economy more than $50 billion a year,” he says.

TRENDS IN URBAN REGENERATION Dr. Crystal Legacy, a senior lecturer in Urban Planning at the University of Melbourne, told Infolink | BPN magazine that Australian cities and their governments continue to show that they are underprepared to address the infrastructure demands that population growth places on cities. “This is because planning has not been conducted in a way that facilitates proper integration of transport and land uses, nor has there been a wide-scale and consistent commitment by all Parties in government to build public transport.” “Whose interests are being served by current decisions about infrastructure investment need to be brought into critical view,” Legacy says. When asked what the top trends in urban regeneration are, Legacy pointed to transport investment as one. “It’s not that transport investment in itself is disruptive, it’s more that it has a particular role to play in terms of renewing and changing land uses.”

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She points to the $76 million upgrade of Route 96 tram route operated by Yarra Trams between Blyth Street, Brunswick East and Acland Street in St Kilda Beach in Melbourne, as a prime example of this. “That whole route was updated to provide more access to trams themselves in those spaces, like on Acland Street where it’s pedestrianised.” “But that had a huge impact or perceived impact from the perspective of the traders on Acland Street who weren’t necessarily keen on that.” “We should design our transport systems to facilitate the movement of people, and accessibility. And one of the big issues that we have in a city like Melbourne is that we’ve got transport areas of the city that are really transport rich - like the inner city - and parts of the city that are really transport poor in terms of the infrastructure, and in terms of the spatial accessibility to jobs and services.” “If the tram stops are difficult to get to, or intimidating, or in the case for many women they don’t feel safe, then you know that’s a question of poor design.”

SHARING IS CARING Technological advancements surrounding autonomous cars and the proliferation of rideshare services such as Uber could also impact how we live and get around cities, says Legacy. “The issue around autonomous vehicles raises some interesting questions about the form of the city.” Legacy explained that if autonomous vehicles became the norm, it could see future car ownership go down meaning that spaces currently used for parking may soon be unlocked and pedestrianised. “It’d be wonderful if car parks in the future could be re-imagined for public purposes, such as parks, leisure spaces and cafe spaces.” “Or it could be wonderful if those three to five level carpark buildings could be turned into affordable or social housing.”

PREVIOUS: Jacek Dylag, Unsplash ABOVE: Laura Cros, Unsplash

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RIGHT: Light Culture recently partnered with Lighting Art and Science, George Floth & Associates and Sydney Olympic Park Authority in upgrading the ageing fittings at Sydney Olympic Park Train Station and replacing them with an energy-smart solution.

“There’s some real opportunity there.” A relatively new emerging transport model, carshare, has the potential to contribute significantly to helping manage congestion and change the way we think about car ownership in Australian cities, Rosenwax explained. “Carshare is an example of a suite of transport services deemed ‘transport on-demand’ or ‘Mobility as a Service’. These services are designed to be readily available to the user, through modern technology and mobile phone applications providing services on request at a given time and proximate to the users’ location. “The role of on-demand services helps fill the mobility gap between scheduled mass public transport services, such as trains and buses, and provides an alternative to private vehicle use or walking and cycling.”

SUPPLIER SOLUTIONS In outdoor recreational settings, strategically placed street furniture could also help create a feeling of community and togetherness, says Stoddart’s general manager for Infrastructure (AU and NZ) Matt Emerson. “If street furniture is not being effectively used, it is largely useless, and, while often passive, well designed and placed street furniture has an excellent level of capability in relation to activation of spaces.

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“It provides the user group opportunity to engage with both the furniture and the space in diverse ways,” he says.

also has the ability to store water in the base material thus acting as a retarding basin and reducing discharge and run-off significantly.

Innowood marketing and business support coordinator Isuru de Silva agreed with this sentiment, adding that he’d like to see the spaces furnished using recyclable materials that are sustainable and non-polluting, with the overall design reflecting the city’s identity, culture and history.

“Most urban flooding occurs after a sudden intense rainfall event that is due to the existing drainage infrastructure not being able to cope with the sudden amount of water.”

“The designers have to consider creating a space that both performs and functions well, responds and respects its surroundings, and has visual appeal for both its users and the community, all the while being sustainable and causing minimal environmental impact,” he says.

COMBATING RISING WATERS IN URBAN CENTRES In densely populated urban centres like Sydney, flooding and managing stormwater can be a real issue. The combination of steep flat terrain, highdensity residential, commercial and industrial areas, and a lack of natural open creeks and open surface water bodies have rendered parts of the city unable to accommodate excess stormwater. One such way to slow down and reduce water discharge and run-off is to install permeable paving, says a spokesperson from Premier Pavers and Stone.

“By introducing methods that slow the water down and have some storage capacity this can reduce and in some cases eliminate urban flooding,” he says.

CASE STUDY: LIGHTING UP SYDNEY OLYMPIC PARK TRAIN STATION Light Culture recently partnered with Lighting Art and Science, George Floth & Associates and Sydney Olympic Park Authority to lend a hand in upgrading the ageing fittings at Sydney Olympic Park Train Station and replacing them with an energy-smart solution. The challenge for Light Culture was that the brief asked for a solution which used existing infrastrucure. FLD-100 LEDs were chosen and the partnership resulted in 30 percent reduced energy consumption, all the while providing the same lighting levels. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS STODDART ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN. COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/STODDART-AUSTRALIA PREMIER PAVERS AND STONE ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ PREMIER-PAVERS-STONE INNOWOOD ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN. COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/INNOWOOD-AUSTRALIA-PTY-LTD

“The permeable paving absorbs water but

LIGHT CULTURE LIGHTCULTURE.COM.AU/

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ADVERTISING FEATURE – BAINES MASONRY

REVOLUTIONARY NEW TOOL FROM BAINES MASONRY TAKES THE HEADACHE OUT OF SPECIFICATION

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HE AUSTRALIAN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IS IN THE MIDST OF A PERIOD OF REMARKABLE GROWTH. TODAY’S DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS ARE FACING A RAFT OF COMPLICATIONS INCLUDING SHORTER PROJECT TIMELINES, ELEVATED PERFORMANCE DEMANDS, AND AN EMERGING CULTURE OF COMPLIANCE WITH STANDARDS AND OTHER REGULATIONS. IN RESPONSE, CONCRETE MASONRY SPECIALISTS BAINES MASONRY HAVE RELEASED A DIGITAL DESIGN TOOL THAT SIMPLIFIES THE SPECIFICATION OF FIRE PROTECTION, THERMAL, AND ACOUSTIC INSULATION.

summer and warm in winter. Concrete masonry excels in this regard, offering building occupants enhanced thermal comfort in addition to lower energy consumption levels thanks to reduced reliance on heating and cooling systems.

AN EMERGING CULTURE OF COMPLIANCE

With their new Fire & Acoustic Calculator, Baines Masonry channel their knowledge and expertise into one simple web-based tool that takes the headache out of specification. Designed to address concerns surrounding compliance, fire performance, and insulation, the Fire & Acoustic Calculator makes selection of the correct product and compliance with the BCA easier than ever. The simple tool takes the guesswork out of specification, and gives designers and specifiers the peace of mind that they are fully complying with industry requirements and significantly reducing their exposure to liability.

The Australian design and construction industry exists in the midst of a complex legal and regulatory landscape that comprises standards, regulations, certifications, and laws. In 2016, the National Construction Code (NCC) consolidated all Australian on-site construction requirements into a single code: volumes one and two of the Building Code of Australia (BCA), and volume three of the Plumbing Code of Australia (PCA). Combining the BCA and PCA in a single document has done much to dispel the confusion surrounding the responsibilities of built environment professionals, and has clearly set out the pathways to compliance.

FIRE PROTECTION In the wake of numerous high profile international and local fires, the construction industry is more concerned than ever with meeting the stringent fire safety requirements of the NCC and Australian Standards. In 2016, a Senate Inquiry into non-conforming building products identified

widespread industry confusion with respect to specifying appropriately fire safe cladding and construction products. Designers can significantly enhance the fire performance of their project simply by specifying concrete masonry; the material offers optimum fire protection as it contains flames, smoke, and deadly fumes for up to four hours to provide occupants with ample time to safely evacuate.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PROPER INSULATION Today’s designers and specifiers are also concerned with thermal and acoustic insulation. The increasing prevalence of high-density, multi-residential developments means that preventing noise spill between walls and floors is critical: insulating materials such as concrete masonry can contain sound and minimise its spread beyond the original source. Beyond this, changing climates and increasingly extreme temperatures have heightened the demand for thermal insulation. Designers and specifiers are seeking lightweight materials that trap heat effectively and keep spaces cool in

BAINES MASONRY FIRE & ACOUSTIC CALCULATOR

Use the revolutionary new Fire & Acoustic Calculator at the link below.

For more info visit bainesmasonry.com.au


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INTELLIGENT BUILDINGS: THREAT OR OPPORTUNITY? WORDS: PRUE MILLER

INTELLIGENCE IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT IS WITHOUT DOUBT AN EXCITING AND INSPIRING CONCEPT.

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echnical descriptions of wondrous objects rarely do them justice.

“The acquisition of knowledge, and responses to the information in real time” is a dull interpretation of the role intelligent buildings are taking in the management of not just building services, but also the lives of people who live and work within the envelope. Not quite sentient, but mighty close, intelligent buildings will gather a large amount of data about every aspect of these structures. Atmospherics, power consumption, population, parking, security, access, maintenance – well, the list grows exponentially. Through real time data analysis, building management systems react to emergencies without waiting for someone to throw the switch. In the event of fire (or potential fire) a building can automatically close off the gas, open the HVAC vents, drop fire curtains, and then keep track of who evacuates and who is left behind. But let us focus down to a more human level. In an economy of active work, where hot desks and meeting zones are in short supply, the building can tell you where a spare desk can be found and guide you there. Meeting spaces are equally easily found and booked. Can’t find your departure gate at the airport? Or the shop in the centre? You can be led by the hand – the hand that holds your phone that is. In healthcare, the potential is perhaps even more important. Air quality and management is vital throughout hospitals, from theatre needs to using air pressure to control the spread of bacteria. Patients’ ID bands will have more than just the barcode, but actual RFID chips that link to entire medical files, not just IDs. Lost patients (yes, it does happen) can be tracked and surgeries made more secure by theatres that read everybody and everything within its walls, from blood products to expensive equipment. From an economic and spatial use perspective, knowing if space is actually being used is important information. Working or non-viable space has previously been measured largely

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by word of mouth, and angry emails. Now the intelligent building is also the adjudicator. Data can and will be sourced from an array of devices; cameras, foot traffic, heat signatures, atmospheric sampling and of course feedback from mechanical components that give an alert even before a breakdown occurs, pre-emptively ordering new parts. Honeywell, a leader in smart buildings software has recently introduced a new product into the arena. Honeywell Vector Space Sense is designed to create a map of how space is used within a building. By collecting data from multiple sources such as smart lights, Bluetooth beacons, and mobile apps a clear picture can be created of actual space usage. From overcrowding to underutilised areas, commercial decisions can be made that can reduce company costs through reallocation of space and a revision of scheduling priorities. “Expenses associated with unused building spaces often go unnoticed, simply because it’s so difficult to get an accurate, moment-by-moment view into how building spaces are used, or if they’re being used at all,” says John Rajchert, president, Building Solutions, Honeywell. Building large scale developments such as shopping precincts and centres is complex, including the double consumers in the form of retail tenants and general consumer clientele. The promise of intelligent building systems is a tenant draw card, as it offers across the board cost reductions, says Justin Mills, executive general manager of Vicinity Centres which manages 80 centres across Australia including Chatswood Chase in Sydney, Chadstone in Victoria. “We know we need to be able to deliver cost savings to retailers wherever possible so if we can reduce the operating costs of a centre then our retail partners are going to get a better deal, which will help drive their business success. “We are focused on renewable energy, as part of an integrated energy strategy. Our solar program is in its first stage with a record investment across some of our centres in South Australia and Western Australia, with

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PREVIOUS: Fender Kastilidis LEFT: VICINITY Centres

obvious environmental benefits. The large-scale installations will reduce our reliance on the grid and help our retailers kerb rising energy costs.“ Vicinity, which has a staggering 2.8 million square metres of lettable space, has installed several intelligent systems, including a self-sufficient carpark lighting system. A first in their Oakleigh Central centre in Victoria, all the operational activities are now linked through the Vicinity network, which means they can be managed in a remote centre. “Our team can monitor entry doors, lighting, building management systems and CCTV through one system which means our in-centre teams can be deployed to other tasks,” says Mills. Vicinity also invested in intelligent waste services, which Mills says has added allowed further cost savings. “We’ve recently introduced robotic compacting waste bins which have seen our cleaning teams spend less time emptying bins and shifting rubbish to waste docks, so they can now look at other presentation-focused tasks. The next innovation is a waste bin that introduces artificial intelligence into the recycling process by analysing the rubbish that customers dispose of. The waste bin allocates rubbish into categories which are then processed for recycling or diverted to general waste. The technology helps reduce contamination in our recycling and create efficiencies that complement our current waste disposal systems. “Another great example of smart technology at work is what we are doing in robotics cleaning to help lift customer experience in centres. Using robotics to clean large-scale areas boosts efficiency and productivity,” says Mills. “We’re also looking to automate in-centre processes and systems covering the maintenance of equipment and planning for capital works. This will streamline activity with our service partners and provide us with a better understanding of customer and retailer feedback.


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The increasing vertical space is the area in which design is perhaps most active.

THE INCREASING VERTICAL SPACE IS THE AREA IN WHICH DESIGN IS PERHAPS MOST ACTIVE.

“Our data teams will also use the information we gather to provide “smart” insight into the operations of our portfolio of centres.“ A leader in this field is ABB. A pioneer in technology, robotics and industrial automation, ABB’s Channel Head for Australia and New Zealand is Christian Schiemann “We need to let buildings do things on their own,” says Schiemann. Albeit with some human assistance. Humans install the solar panel and technology will take that potential and run with it - though early on in this 4th Industrial Revolution, it has run in different directions and not all of them fruitful. The initial uptake of intelligent services and automation was massive, even urgent. The result of the initial ‘all aboard’ rush resulted in some systems incorrectly integrated and installed, resulting in many a wall being ripped out, and systems replaced. What was needed was adherence to a systems protocol, such as KNX, which has now been adopted in Australia. This internationally recognised system is an open protocol and is accepted as the world standard for intelligent building design. According to Schiemann this has resolved international and national problems – and allowed the systems to expand successfully even into the residential space. “Geofencing,” says Christian, is the electronic ‘virtual’ boundary that one can create around a property. “The home system is alerted when I am approaching home and puts on the lights.” Or opens the gates, turns on the heating and instigates any other number of actions connected to IoT devices in homes around the world. Such domestic projects are simply scaled up to commercial size. Hotel rooms for instance may sense the approach of a guest’s key. Before the door is opened, the curtains are opened, the air conditioning started, lights turned on. The payoff is a guest who feels welcomed and will return to the property. When the guest leaves, the suite closes down all services and returns to the suite to an energy efficient space.

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Coming to Melbourne by 2020 will be a remarkable skyscraper designed by Fender Katsalidis (FK). The project, Australia 108, will be the tallest building in Australia by roof height, and is seen as a big brother to Eureka Tower, also a Fender Katsalidis design. Founding partner and CEO of FK is Karl Fender, who says that despite his company’s commitment and take-up of building intelligence systems, the philosophy of the firm remains the same. “We build the best possible building, design the best possible building that we can. It is the beauty of the end product that consumes us,” says Fender. The path to that resolution is highly complex, including extensive use of both virtual 3D modelling and 3D printing of actual models. With this ability to physically hold a building model, a 200mm tall perfect representation of a project, the language of architecture is better understood by all concerned.

ABOVE: Vicinity Centres

“It is inclusive,” agrees Fender. With benefits extending to builders, quantity surveyors and of course clients. This digital option which once cost architectural firms huge amounts of money, is now commonplace. “We have a machine that just churns them out. 3D buildings. It works all night and all day, and never complains!” When asked to look at what new options excite him, Fender was quick to explain the importance of the new forms of vertical transportation. “The new designs are a quantum leap forward,” says Fender, responding to the new rope less, counter-weight free elevator systems that will move people both vertically and horizontally, using the power of magnetism. With many cabins able to move in a single shaft, capacity is increased, waiting time is slashed and the dynamic of moving between buildings, at height, becomes a very real option. The balance of robotics versus humanity is what concerns some, and an unnecessary distraction according to Christian Schliemann, who sees that along the same timeline that we have developed this technology, is the expanded opportunity for humans to study, innovate and live more fully.

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: ABB ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN. COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ABB-AUSTRALIA GERARD LIGHTING ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/GERARDLIGHTING VIRIDIAN ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.

“This is not a threat to humanity. We need artificial Intelligence, so that we can free our time for the overwhelming number of tasks that we have to do.” n

AU/SUPPLIERS/VIRIDIAN JOHN WARDELL ARCHITECTS JOHNWARDLEARCHITECTS.COM FENDER KATSALIDIS FKAUSTRALIA.COM/ HEALTHSCOPE HEALTHSCOPE.COM.AU/

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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT WORDS: PRUE MILLER


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THE CONVERSATION ABOUT RENEWABLE ENERGY IS NEVER FAR BEHIND THE CONVERSATION ABOUT SUSTAINABLE POPULATIONS. ONE IS DIRECTLY LINKED TO THE OTHER AND THE CONVERSATIONS AROUND BOTH ARE WITHOUT FAIL, HEATED.

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n planning architecture, for the growing population, power and energy consumables are a shifting paradigm. No sooner has one idea been considered than alternative consideration comes into play. Perhaps the biggest game changer has come about right here in Australia. ClearVue Technologies has presented a breakthrough product that has sent a buzz of excitement throughout the renewable energy field. Although a solar product, it is not a solar panel as we know it. ClearVue has created a glass product that is totally transparent, with no disturbance to the visual field at all, that gathers solar energy. The certification program, and manufacturing of the glass in China commenced in June of this year, with hopes the product will not be prohibitively expensive at the retail end, despite its cost savings. “It will be approachable,” says Victor Rossenberg, executive chairman of ClearVue. “Perhaps a little more than double glaze E glass – but I think perhaps within a year, it may even be a little cheaper [than double glaze E glass].” The possibilities for such a product are so extensive designers and engineers are re-thinking long help concepts. It is estimated that 5,500 million square metres of flat glass, used primarily in architecture and construction, is globally created each year. Consider the potential power that could be gathered from sky scrapers alone. Then add in awnings, skylights, residential and educational architecture. In agriculture, commercial greenhouses have been powered by adjacent solar panel fields, with Rossenberg’s glass, the glass walls will power the green house unit. A boon to agriculture not lost on the Federal Government,

which has promptly advanced ClearVue a $1.6m grant just for greenhouse application. It will have an immediate and positive impact on agriculture, and the ag economy. Simplistically, the glass is actually a sandwich which allows the natural, visible wavelength to pass through the structure, while trapping and converting the infrared and ultra violet wavelengths into electricity via the centrally located clear film which supports the nano technology. Measurement of output will vary as the product evolves but reports a generation of 30W per sqm are currently provided, with expectations of 50W in the near future. The nature of the product also produces a thermal shield, offering a potential 40 percent saving on heating and cooling costs, depending on square meterage of use. The ClearVue is manufactured for window frames and solar storage cells as a unit, they are now in the process of creating the glass, and allowing designers and engineers the freedom to design the storage as applicable to their architecture. “The move away from dependency upon any specific frame design to an industry standard IGU that can be supplied to innumerate framing companies and window fabricators will significantly increase ClearVue’s potential to reach a global market faster,” says Rossenberg. The end game is creating structures of all sorts that actually power themselves with renewable and totally green energy. “Collect, store, withdraw,” says Rossenberg, clearly excited by the creation of a disruptive technology which he says sees consumers of energy both on the demand side and supply side of the equation.

The greatest concern is of course massive withdrawals on the energy grid. Already plagued by breakdowns and blackouts, apprehension over the implementation of electric vehicles’ (EV) drawdown is very real. With that in mind, perhaps it is a good thing that take-up of the vehicles has been slow. The greatest barrier to potential buyers is the fear that they will be caught short, so to speak. How many charging stations will there be in the future, who will build them, and how much will a quick charge up cost? The general consensus is that charging stations will end up being a partnership between government and private companies. But will that be enough to get people on the EV road? In Los Angeles, the city authorities are encouraging private users by offering $500 rebates to home owners who charge up in their own garages, and some power companies offer rebates if you top-up during low demand periods. It may also boost mass interest in suburban micro grids, an option to isolate good energy consumers.

GRID LOCK Staying off the main power grids, remaining independent and financially more responsible is an ideal position in which to sustain a business. Logan City in South East Queensland recently committed to a project which allowed just that, seeing the benefits of a solar powered battery system for their massive water reservoir. The large water tank at Round Mountain required power to disinfect the contents, despite the location being remote and the potential cost of connecting to mains prohibitive. “We decided there was a need for a dedicated water chlorination station at the reservoir.


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LEFT: The end game is creating structures of all sorts that actually power themselves with renewable and totally green energy.

“The reservoir site is not connected to mains power or accessible via a sealed road so an innovative approach was required to maintain water quality from the reservoir,” says Logan City mayor Luke Smith. The council went ahead with a package put together by CSR Bradford Solar which included solar panels and Tesla Powerpacks. The size and location of the structure provided a few challenges, but in association with the council incremental adjustments were made until the solution was found.

STAYING OFF THE MAIN POWER GRIDS, REMAINING INDEPENDENT AND FINANCIALLY MORE RESPONSIBLE IS AN IDEAL POSITION IN WHICH TO SUSTAIN A BUSINESS.

“We were able to overcome all the challenges we faced during the installation process, particularly around the reservoir not having been originally designed to accommodate the size and weight of battery and solar technology,” says Bradford Energy project manager, Ashleigh O’Brien. “For us, this reiterates the enormous potential of this technology to be adapted

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to the needs of infrastructure and public assets across the country.” A quantum leap from water towers is the management, or containment of energy within a structure. Insulation was proved a simple-to-achieve method of conservation which will continue into the future of residential and commercial design. Thermal panels used in roof and ceiling spaces, walls, floors even ductwork conserve the savings achieved across the construction board. Kingspan Insulation Australia, a leader in thermal insulation products, believes in the value of collaboration being the lynchpin to positive energy outcomes. With an array of project specific products already on hand from flexible and rigid panels to Kooltherm Wall Boards Kingspan’s credo is to be innovative at every stage, creating new products where needed to give clients the forward thinking results they require in a rapidly changing product landscape. Stopping the heat from hitting the envelope is clearly a first step strategy, and one that supports insulated panels, as well as at least partially negating the energy loss through the most famous building weak spot, glazing. Dr Mark Tatam, building technology director, Kingspan Insulated Panels Australia says that whether in hot or cold climates, high levels of insulation and better air sealing are key factors to consider in reducing energy consumption in commercial buildings. “Better control of the thermal envelope (with additional ventilation control where appropriate) has been the subject of state-based

energy modelling of non-residential buildings by Kingspan Insulated Panels in the past. There are also spin-offs; health effects in avoiding temperature extremes for workers, less employee turnover, greater productivity, improved tenant-ability and greater property value retention for building owners.” “The types of buildings and the methods of construction can have significant effects on air leakage and building energy efficiency. Kingspan’s insulated panels provide both high levels of air tightness and industry leading R-values,” says Tatam. “The simple all-in-one method of construction and multiple functionality (fire performance, aesthetics, weather-tightness, speed of construction) are some of the reasons why there is now a wide and growing range of insulated panels in the market for use on commercial buildings,” he says. “With the sharp rises in energy costs in recent times, it is even more important to consider the choice of materials and be able to control / manage the quality of construction.” “A current market problem is that ‘as designed’ performance generally falls short of the ‘as built’ performance, and there are many reasons for this,” notes Tatam, adding that, “The building and construction market is conscious of the need to improve the quality of buildings in all respects of performance, and deliver those buildings faster. Insulated panels which have multicomponent performance fit the bill in most respects as a construction material.”

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Beyond the use of double glazed E products as seen from manufacturers such as Viridian, the design and wider availability of louvres expands on a month-to-month basis. As old as time itself, shading is the lowest drain on energy, while adding value to aesthetics of design and offering tenant and worker comfort. Open facades and canopy systems from Hunter Douglas Architectural are frequently seen on commercial and industrial structures, while residential applications are even more varied. Motorised solar control products, from external louvres and shades to internal blinds offer climate responsive solutions from a wide range of companies such as Louvretec Australia and market giant Vergola. The shade business continues to automate, ranging from remote control functions, to Helioscscreen Australia’s sun and wind sensor design where the awning automatically retracts if weather is threatening, and then once the sun returns, deploys again.

DATA POWER A newer element in the management of resources in the brave new world is data management. It is far too easy to solely consider cloud-based storage of private data and analytics as someone else’s problem. It’s believed that three percent of the worlds electricity consumption is being consumed by data storage farms, and with the explosion of data being created new and more selective ways of storage must be considered, with allowances being made for local storage as well as remote cloud storage. If companies were to bring some of that storage in-house, the actuality of the energy required will be brought home directly.

ABOVE: High levels of insulation and better air sealing are key factors to consider in reducing energy consumption in commercial buildings.

And why bring it in house? Ransom demands, breaches in security, and protection from physical and electronic destruction to nominate just a few justifications of further expense. Experts in data security believe that ultimately security of private information can best be achieved by air gapped systems. Indeed, some firms believe that data stored on magnetic tapes, a flash back to a bygone digital era, may be on the way back. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS VIRIDIAN ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ VIRIDIAN KINGSPAN ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM. AU/SUPPLIERS/KINGSPAN-INSULATION CSR BRADFORD ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/ CSR-BRADFORD CLEARVUE CLEARVUEPV.COM/ HELIOSCREEN .ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/ SUPPLIERS/HELIOSCREEN-AUSTRALIA-AND-NEW-ZEALAND HUNTER DOUGLAS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM. AU/SUPPLIERS/HUNTER-DOUGLAS-COMMERCIAL


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SUNSHADES: COMBINING UTILITY AND ARCHITECTURE WORDS: STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC

SUNSHADING IS A CRUCIAL ELEMENT OF URBAN DESIGN, ESPECIALLY IN SUNNY AUSTRALIA. WHILE SOME MIGHT VIEW SUNSHADES AS A BLAND UTILITY FEATURE, THIS IS NO LONGER THE CASE. INNOVATIVE ENGINEERS HAVE WORKED TO ENSURE THAT SUNSHADES ARE NOT ONLY MORE EFFECTIVE THAN EVER, BUT ALSO MORE AESTHETICALLY PLEASING THAN EVER.

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ONE CENTRAL PARK

STOKEHOUSE ST KILDA

When we think of sunshades, we typically imagine a solution that will completely (or almost completely) block out the light. However, in an urban design scenario that includes commercial spaces and outdoor green spaces, it can actually be more useful to have a solution that redirects and controls light.

Melbourne’s iconic Stokehouse restaurant is a sophisticated, contemporary example of sun control. After a severe fire in 2014, the owner sought a rebuild that would retain the character of the building, while also making it environmentally-friendly. As part of this, Tilt was asked to design, manufacture and install its operable architecture bi-folding screens on the restaurant’s exterior. The screens sit outside of the restaurant’s windows and provide protection from the sun, but can also be raised to highlight beautiful ocean views. This way, the character of the building remains unchanged while patrons’ comfort is much improved.

A good example of this is Sydney’s One Central Park development. Not only is it an example of pioneering sustainable architecture, but it also includes a stunning and highly functional shading solution using Tilt’s Heliostat Reflector Technology. The shade structure uses a combination of motorised and fixed mirror arrays to reflect sunlight throughout the site to offset the impact of overshadowing caused by the two towers. The reflections deliver substantial natural light into the retail space below, with the balance of light distributed to the shared spaces and parklands surrounding the site. No matter what time of day, as long as the sun is shining the system can deliver controlled amounts of sunlight to these key areas, improving liveability for residents and visitors to the site. One Central Park is the world’s largest installation of heliostats in an urban environment and the most significant use of this technology to ameliorate overshadowing of a public space by buildings.

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LEFT HAND PAGE: Sascha Berner, Unsplash THIS PAGE: Tilt’s Heliostat Reflector Technology was used in One Central Park to control light to the park below.

“Access to sunlight and fresh air are critical outcomes for realising successful developments, particularly in the public space,” says Tim Philips, managing director of Tilt Industrial Design. “The opportunities to increase access to these amenities are showcased at One Central Park and Stokehouse. Whether the [architect’s] designs are [trying] to overcome a development requirement or they are simply a value-add, the opportunities to utilise operable architectural features are only limited by the imagination of the architect.”

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THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SHADE AND HEALTH There’s no doubt that a lack of shade can have a negative impact on human health, especially in a country where temperatures can reach over 40 degrees Celsius in the summer. This can become a big problem for older people, who are more vulnerable to the heat. A retirement home in Narrabeen, NSW had this exact problem when one of their glass-lined lift shafts was found to have temperatures exceeding 50 degrees Celsius in the summer. The building’s original design had not accounted for the internal heating of the glass, which was an external feature around the lift lobby of the building.

THIS PAGE: Tilt’s operable architecture was used in the rebuild of Melbourne’s iconic Stokehouse restaurant following a severe fire in 2014.

Overheating of the lift shaft caused management to abandon use of the lift in summer due to the personal welfare of the tenants and mechanical operational issues due to the material heat mass. As a result, low mobility tenants were confined to the ground floor levels. In this case, the architect chose to use fixed horizontal shading louvres from Greene Fire. A sun study showed that the design of the 200mm-long louvres spaced 130mm apart would provide adequate shading after 11am during the hottest months of the year. The architect used Greene Fire’s Microlouvre, which is a versatile mesh product that can be used for a range of applications. Originally developed as a solar shading screen, it has also been used as a fire attenuation screen, bushfire screen, light diffuser, privacy screen, insect screen and has even been used in model-building for Star Wars tie fighters. The mesh is made from miniature woven bronze louvres which are only two times thicker than a human hair, and are angled for optimum sun control, glare and light. The product allows 35 percent shading as soon as the sun comes over the horizon. The material is also specifically designed to absorb solar radiation at up to 92 percent, making it a good heat sink when installed external to the building. At the retirement home, it resulted in up to an 86 percent reduction in solar heat gain through the glass windows, making the lift safe to operate year-round. n

SUPPLIERS: TILT: ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM. AU/SUPPLIERS/TILT-INDUSTRIAL-DESIGN GREENE FIRE: ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/SUPPLIERS/GREENE-FIRE

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HOW SMART BUILDINGS ARE OVERCOMING AUSTRALIA’S ENERGY CRISIS WORDS: TIJANA TRIFUNOVICH

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USTRALIA IS FACING ITS BIGGEST ENERGY CRISIS TO DATE. WITH FOUR OF THE COUNTRY’S COALFIRED POWER PLANTS CLOSED DUE TO AGEING INFRASTRUCTURE AND A WEALTH OF NATURAL GAS LOCKED INTO EXPORT CONTRACTS FOR YEARS TO COME, IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT THE WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM’S GLOBAL RISK REPORT 2018 IDENTIFIED ENERGY AS AUSTRALIA’S BIGGEST PROBLEM. If Australia is to be carbon neutral by 2020, the energy infrastructure will have to change, shifting to what economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin calls the Third Industrial Revolution. Like the first and second Industrial Revolutions, this third one will change the way our buildings use energy. However unlike the previous industrial revolutions, this energy won’t rely on a single source, but rather harvest the various renewable resources at their disposal to fuel activity. Melbourne’s streets proudly boast the facades of this future. Structures like the Pixel Building sparked the movement towards self-sustaining, carbon neutral commercial buildings. Cleverly designed, trendy modern structures are now competing to out-green each other; from indoor plants and green walls to high-tech energy and waste management systems and the use of pre-fabricated and recycled components. Pixel is one example of smart buildings embracing the sustainable revolution, and while its high-tech design is itself a statement of Melbourne’s forward-thinking culture, the

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real challenge lies in applying this mindset to the city’s residential housing crisis. The past few years have seen major growth in high and low rise apartment buildings in Melbourne’s inner suburbs. Mainly built for profit rather than sustainability, these buildings rarely consider environmental impact. There are a few exceptions, however. The award-winning The Commons is applying sustainable techniques, and tackling Melbourne’s housing crisis at the same time. Medium-rise apartments outfitted with rooftop solar panels and designed to minimise energy usage, The Commons’ self-sustaining community design is being replicated throughout Melbourne’s northern suburbs. Community solar panels like those at The Commons are increasingly appearing on apartment and residential rooftops. Their energy generation provides a potentially decentralised electricity supply that could inject much needed power into the existing infrastructure. Many sustainability-conscious home owners and architects are adding solar panels to their own rooftops to lower electricity bills and reduce their ecological footprint. By combining their solar supply with an innovative technological solution, their investment could go the extra mile, and help inject much needed electricity into the existing infrastructure. StarCluster, a Melbourne-based startup dedicated to optimising electricity supply for households has created a technology platform that addresses Australia’s high household electricity costs, and its potentially unstable energy supply.

The platform is working with communities to bring local energy supply from rooftops and larger sources to deliver sustainable electricity to conscientious consumers. It’s undeniable that technology will be an integral component within the buildings of tomorrow. Current trends may showcase new gadgetry, but in the long run, smart homes are heading towards a future that aims to sustain the environment for generations to come.

LIKE THE FIRST AND SECOND INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONS, THIS THIRD ONE WILL CHANGE THE WAY OUR BUILDINGS USE ENERGY.

These smart homes will be buildings that minimise their energy usage and maximise renewable energy generation as a connected system that is not only wired within each home, but within the infrastructure of the city it belongs to. Only then can we say that we have averted Australia’s energy crisis and joined the Third Industrial Revolution, a new era where technology and ecology entwine to form a truly sustainable world. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: STARCLUSTER STARCLUSTER.COM.AU

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TARKETT iQ ONE iQ One represents a new generation of resilient flooring. As a member of the iQ family, iQ One offers a perfect balance between aesthetics, flexibility and strength for specific demands. Its innovative, non-PVC formula provides the same unique benefits that have made iQ a recognised name for decades.

CSR: CEMINTEL BARESTONE - CEMINTEL Cemintel Barestone™ provides a raw, contemporary finish for an external and internal application. Barestone - External: Its biophilic impression enhances design aesthetics, as it weathers naturally and seamlessly blends into its environment. Barestone External can be used in many diverse ways and cut to different shapes and sizes for dramatic design effect. Barestone – Internal: The panels have a stain resistant coating applied and are simply installed internally by adhering to timber battens, or alternatively, and for a more industrial look, exposed fixing.

ELTON GROUP ALPI DESIGNER COLLECTIONS - ALPI Working with art director, Pierro Lissoni, ALPI has launched Designer Collections, unique wood veneers created in collaboration with some of the world’s leading designers, creating patterns that cannot be found in nature, with utterly original chromatic effects.


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AUTEX FRONTIER™ ACOUSTIC FINS Frontier™ revolutionises what it means to have beautifully designed acoustics. With modular fins that can be arranged and spaced in countless formations, Frontier is available in five styles and is designed for targeted sound absorption for the commercial, education and hospitality sectors. There are 16 colours to choose from which can be mixed and matched to bring the designs to life on walls and ceilings.

ZIP WATER ZIP HYDROTAP CLASSIC - ZIP WATER Offering the choice of instant filtered boiling, chilled or sparkling water or all three in any combination, the iconic design of the Classic HydroTap remains a much-loved and popular choice suited to any workplace.

CSR: PGH BRICKS

INBRICK - PGH BRICKS & PAVERS InBrick™ from PGH Bricks & Pavers™ brings the natural beauty of real brick to precast concrete panels, combining the choice and design flexibility of brick with the inherent qualities and construction benefits of precast concrete. The ability of precast concrete to take virtually any shape makes it a defining construction material of contemporary design.

www.front.design 9-10 AUGUST 2018 CARRIAGEWORKS, SYDNEY


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GRIMSHAW ARCHITECTS DESIGN MEDIA WALL-THEMED TOWER THAT FLOATS ABOVE A TRAIN STATION

ABOVE: Image supplied by Mirvac

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N JUNE, MIRVAC TOGETHER WITH ITS TENANTS PITCHER PARTNERS, AGL, EXXONMOBIL, NEXUS MUTUAL AND FUJITSU, CELEBRATED THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF ITS NEW OFFICE BUILDING AT 664 COLLINS STREET IN MELBOURNE’S DOCKLANDS. The completion of 664 Collins Street represents the final stage in the redevelopment of the Southern Cross Station precinct and builds on the success of 699 Bourke Street, which was officially opened in July 2015. Both buildings feature a unique design by Grimshaw Architects that sees the structures ‘float’ on concrete decks above the rail concourse and above the station. As an island site, the building’s pivotal location, rising above the station, provides incredible amenity and transport options for tenants. It also provides stunning light-filled workplaces with some of the most spectacular and uninterrupted views of the city. The project allows for the provision of innovative smart technology, allowing better understanding of the building’s

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utilisation, collecting real-time data to improve efficiency and effectiveness. With a heavy volume of commuter foot traffic set to travel past the building each day, Mirvac wanted to create a striking feature for the lobby, which would engage passers-by through the expansive glass façade on the ground floor.

THE PROJECT ALLOWS FOR THE PROVISION OF INNOVATIVE SMART TECHNOLOGY, ALLOWING BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE BUILDING’S UTILISATION, COLLECTING REAL-TIME DATA TO IMPROVE EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS.

Mirvac partnered with Grimshaw Architects and Swinburne University to develop an eight metre LED modular wall, which has over 255 screens weaved together to create a stunning platform that showcase digital artwork in the main lobby. Over 50 students studying for either a Bachelor of Design (Digital Media Design) or Masters of Design were offered the opportunity to craft pieces of digital storytelling to intrigue, entertain and relate to the local urban context. Each piece of selected content runs for five minutes and is then blended together in a continuous loop to ensure the artwork is ever changing. Public art plays an integral role in creating engaging spaces with a unique sense of place. As a company, Mirvac says that it has a “strong focus on collaborating with artists at their buildings to bring value and purpose to the urban landscape,” and as such, the large public facing lobby at 664 Collins Street “offered the perfect opportunity to support up-and-coming artists, showcasing their work in a prominent public space and contributing to the community.” n

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ANTHRACITE: BRINGING NATURAL BEAUTY INTO YOUR HOME Häfele now brings you the latest in home interior colour trends, the all new Anthracite powder coat finish for all Kesseböhmer products. Anthracite is a dark grey colour that pairs well with all other colours of your kitchen. It really makes natural tones and materials stand out. Across Europe, Anthracite is the colour of choice in furniture, home decor and interior design. It blends well with both traditional and contemporary kitchens to bring a refined finishing touch to your home. The Anthracite finish is now available across all major Kesseböhmer products to bring you another practical and attractive product. Contact Häfele 1300 659 728 hafele.com.au

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BALANCE INJECTS SUPERIOR SOUND ABSORPTION QUALITIES IN TO THE WOVEN IMAGE ACOUSTIC TILE PORTFOLIO Balance Acoustic Tiles are made of award-winning EchoPanel® in 24mm thickness and boast an outstanding 0.85 NRC value while radiating an elegant, designer surface-finish. Available in 3 proportionally-sized tile products and 9 colourways, Balance provides an endless stream of design options and configurations that can be created for a number of settings and spaces. Balance tiles are lightweight and use a pressure sensitive peel ‘n’ stick adhesive for quick and easy installation. Like all Woven Image acoustic products, Balance is made of 60% post-consumer waste sourced from recycled PET bottles. Each year Woven Image diverts over 13 million plastic bottles from oceans and landfill to convert into EchoPanel® – a product with a minimum 10-year life expectancy, which is still 100% recyclable and reusable. Now that’s a serious upcycle! Whether you’re looking to create privacy or to efficiently control noise in an open-plan office, café, lobby, classroom or restaurant, Woven Images Acoustic Tiles are an Architects and Designer’s key to achieving a quality bespoke design with acoustic function and first class environmental credentials. Visit our website to browse our extensive collection, or call to discuss your project needs. Contact Woven Image +61 2 9913 8668 www.wovenimage.com

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NATURAL CREATIONS XL RANGE

VENETIAN PLASTER COLLECTION

With the Natural Creations XL range from Armstrong Flooring, there is no need to sacrifice style or function. The large format resilient vinyl flooring combines underfloor comfort and timeless beauty with durability and exceptional acoustic properties, making it the perfect choice for commercial and residential projects.

The Venetian Plaster Collection blends traditional artisan craftsmanship with contemporary style to deliver truly distinctive and unique finishes suitable for both residential and commercial settings. Smooth and cool to the touch, the colours and finishes crafted by hand make every wall an individual work of art.

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QUICK-STEP’S TIMBER RANGE NOW WITH WATER RESISTANT TECHNOLOGY Quick-Step’s timber range comes with the protection of a water repellent coating along the most porous edge of the plank. The bevel technology is applied to the short end joints. This ensures the plank is sealed to withstand surface moisture, preventing absorption of dirt and water in the joints.

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LEDGE STONE NATURAL STONE IN 9 COLOURS WITH 2 CORNER SIZES Unique to DécoR Stone, the Ledge Stone range is manufactured using a combination of natural stone materials such as slate, granite, quartz and schist Individually crafted natural stone panels in a striking range of 9 fashionable colours with complementary corners in two convenient sizes.

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XPS EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE INSULATION BOARDS The XPS Extruded Polystyrene insulation boards from Foamex is resilient and robust, making it an ideal product for use across a range of construction and building applications. Suitable for both residential and commercial buildings, the material boasts both high compressive strength and a superior thermal performance.

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AIRMASTER® CLEARS THE AIR Desso AirMaster ® is a carpet tile which marries great innovation and performance with strong design to boost health and ellbeing in offices, schools, healthcare environments and other public buildings.

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SPECIFY SAVE SPACE AND MAXIMISE RETURNS ELECTRIC INSTANTANEOUS HOT WATER Stiebel Eltron’s range of electric instantaneous water heaters deliver hot water with precision. Specifying a Stiebel Eltron electric instantaneous hot water solution can unlock extra space, reduce energy use and the ongoing cost to residents.

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NATURAL FROM WEATHERTEX The Weathertex Natural range provides the look of organically textural timber showing all the knots, cracks and grooves. It can be installed without staining, oiling or coating, leaving the product to ‘silver off’ and lighten over time. Weathertex delivers natural, long lasting, ecofriendly cladding solutions around the world.

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SHINGLES RANGE FROM HERITAGE SLATE ROOFING

SURFACE MOUNTED LIGHTS FROM BOSCOLIGHTING

Heritage Slate Roofing’s Shingles range will enhance your next project and suit most roofing or wall cladding applications.The Shingles range is aesthetically pleasing, highly durable and complement the cross-section where quality and beauty intersect.

When track lighting and recessed installation is not an option, BoscoLighting offers a variety of surface mounted lights. These lights are very fashionable, modern and latest to our designs. Elegant yet its function and versatility are exceptional.

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INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL CURTAINS FROM LOCKER GROUP

ARENS ECW WINDOW ACTUATOR: REFURBISHMENT KIT

Sleek attractive design; wire mesh Architectural Curtains from engineered intelligence at Locker Group transforms interior and exterior spaces with a contemporary flourish. The comprehensive range of Architectural Curtains suit almost any application.

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OUTDURE QWICKBUILD MODULAR FRAMING & SUPPORT SYSTEM QwickBuild is an external flooring system that provides strong, durable, stable structures to support decking boards, tiles, turf or a combination of these. QwickBuild is a ‘mix and match’ system, making it easy to construct or assemble prefabricated frames.

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Many buildings are equipped with ARENS ECW window winders, these are a solid reliable unit, but time wears all. Arens now can provide refurbishment kits to repair these, offering many more years of reliable service at a considerable cost benefit over replacement units.

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FIRE-RATED ALUMINIUM ATTIC LADDERS FROM AM-BOSS The AM-BOSS “Inferno-Boss” offers the only Australian made fire-rated pull-down access ladder with a -/90/90 rating, which is CodeMark Certified. Inferno Boss has a load capacity of over 200kg at four key structural points and comply with AS1530.4-2005.

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SPECIFY AMBIENCE BY HIMMEL

MAFI LIGHT TIMBERS

Ambience by Himmel is an innovative product range that combines acoustic and aesthetic solutions. This decorative acoustic collection is available in 16 colours across six unique product ranges.

Mafi Timber Flooring has an extensive range of light coloured timbers. Species include European Oak, Larch, Maple, Ash and Douglas Fir, just to name a few. Finished with an all-natural oil, Mafi Timber is 100% free from chemicals and harmful substances such as VOC’s. Mafi are partnered with the National Asthma Council of Australia as a Sensitive Choice product.

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NATURE STONE™ BLOCK The Baines Masonry Block’s Nature Stone™ Block uses the “Henrick” patented system of adhering natural stone to structural masonry blocks. Insuring each unit’s structural integrity, the blocks are also ecologically sustainable, lightweight and AS3700 and BCA compliant.

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PREMIUM EXTERNAL WALL SYSTEMS FOR SUPERIOR ARCHITECTURAL STYLING From Covet International comes a range of stunning external wall systems – the ultimate in contemporary architectural styling. Takasho Ever Art Wood aluminium screens are a light-weight alternative to timber and steel.

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GARAGESAFE STORAGE SOLUTIONS

PROMAT PENETRATION SEALS

The GarageSafe unit is a modern and sleek innovation that helps to better utilise garage storage space.The space above your bonnet is transformed into a secure, compact garage solution that doesn’t reduce your car park size or restrict space.

All Promat Australia penetration seal products have been tested to AS1530.4 and AS4072.1 in line with the requirements of BCA Clause C3.15 and will achieve fire resistance levels (FRL) of up to -/240/240. Promat Australia has systems to protect metal pipes of various type and size, cables of various kinds.

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SUNPAL® MULTIWALL POLYCARBONATE STANDING-SEAM ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEM SUNPAL Multi is an advanced multiwall polycarbonate panel system that combines design, light transmission, thermal insulation and strength. It offers a lightweight, leak-proof design that can withstand very high loads and accommodate expansion and contraction.

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DOOR SEALS BY ALLEGION Allegion offers a range of high-performance door seal options. Easy to install and long lasting, the door seal options are robust and compact and come in a variety of styles and sizes. Suitable for commercial and multi-family residential use, the systems offer discreet installation for single, double, and sliding doors.

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SPECIFY MONIER INLINE SOLAR - THE POWER OF A GREAT LOOKING ROOF InLine SOLAR is compatible with any Monier roof tile product, and is recess-mounted within your roof line. It offers all the benefits of solar while still maximising the street appeal of your home. Available in standard black framed panels, InLine SOLAR can be upgraded to the industry-leading LG all-black panels.

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INNOSCREEN COMPOSITE TIMBER SCREENS FROM INNOWOOD AUSTRALIA

SLIMLINE WATER TANKS A Slimline water tank is a great choice for tight spaces, allowing you to maximise the water storage capacity of the area available. Tailor the length, width, and height to perfectly fit the space you have. Capacities range from 600 litres up to 8,700 litres.

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CRIMSAFE IQ™ - THE STRONGEST STAINLESS STEEL SECURITY DOOR IN AUSTRALIA

High quality InnoScreen composite timber screens is the perfect screening system for internal and external wall surfaces in commercial and residential applications for its protective and energy saving qualities.

Crimsafe iQ™ is the first of its kind in Australia. With the patented technology and smooth profile of Crimsafe Ultimate as its foundation, Crimsafe iQ™ adds antijemmy heavy duty hinges, a wider, stronger patented frame and electronic access options.

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KINGSPAN KOOLTHERM K17 INSULATED PLASTERBOARD

LYSAGHT YOURCOLOR™ CUSTOM COLOUR

Insulated dry-lining plasterboard for adhesive bonding. Kingspan Kooltherm K17 Insulated Plasterboard is a super high performance, fibre-free rigid thermoset phenolic insulation core. It is manufactured without the use of CFCs/HCFCs and has zero Ozone Depleting Potential (ODP) and low Global Warming Potential (GWP).

Through the YOURCOLOUR® custom colour offer, Lysaght can supply Australian-made COLORBOND® steel in the ideal colour for any project. Choose from 42 pre-matched colours or create something unique with the YOURCOLOR™ colour matching service.

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TROUGHS, FOR THE WIDEST RANGE OF STANDARD AND CUSTOM TROUGHS FROM BRITEX

INDIVO KITCHEN SYSTEM ALLOWS HEIGHT ADJUSTABILITY OF BENCHTOPS AND WALL CABINETS

The Wudu foot washing trough used during ritual washing/wudu in Islamic prayer amenities is hygienic and easy to clean. Optional tapware and stools available. Britex truly has a trough for any application.

Danish design and manufacture at its very best, Pressalit delivers an adaptable benchtop and wall cabinet system specifically designed for people with limited mobility.

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8402 AFS InfoLink, LW RW back page advert.qxp_Layout 1 20/6/17 4:06 pm Page 1

Innovation, efficiency and versatility for above and below ground application afs logicwall

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BASEMENTS, COLUMNS, PARTY WALLS, RETENTION TANKS LIFT & STAIR SHAFTS, RETAINING WALLS, SERVICE PITS

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Greater flexibility = superior design Our inhouse engineering experts can assist with any technical advice, along with concepts, structure comparisons, and even a CPD presentation. Talk to us now on 1300 727 237 or visit afsformwork.com.au

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