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NOV | DEC 2016 | VOL 52 | NO 6 PRINT POST APPROVED PP100007333

WINNERS EDITION + DIGITAL DESIGN INDUSTRY SURVEY

| DESIGNING TO BAL-40 | THE BENEFITS OF STORMWATER HARVESTING


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The Squaire, Frankfurt, Germany Š Architects: JSK; Photographer: HG Esch Photography

161020DU_Image_The_Squaire_AUS_297x235_Infolink_Building_F39--GRA06.indd 1

13.10.16 09:22


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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O HERE WE ARE AT THE CLOSE OF 2016 AND I AM CHALLENGED TO CHOOSE A SINGLE THEME THAT SUMS UP WHAT WAS A TRULY EVENTFUL YEAR FOR THE AUSTRALIAN BUILDING DESIGN INDUSTRY. One that immediately springs to mind is timber construction, and you only have to look at the increased number and height of buildings created from engineered timber in 2016 to see that it’s certainly been a big year for wood. Prefabrication also garnered a lot of attention in 2016, proven by the immense growth of Australia’s two major prefab conferences hosted in Melbourne and Sydney, as well as the growing number of governmentfunded prefab research centres popping up around the country. Having said that, the scale of change in both of these probably can’t be considered profound enough to make 2016 ‘the year of timber construction’, or the ‘year of prefab’. Perhaps their time will come in 2017? Housing supply, affordability, and living standards certainly sparked the most debate within the industry in 2016, and in some senses could be called a hangover from years gone by. In Melbourne, for example, decades of poorly designed apartment buildings and a growing city population caused the Victorian government to step in and take control of the type, scale, and design of housing being built in the metropolitan. In December, it will release a set of apartment design standards, years in the making, specifically intended to improve the quality of apartments in the city.

Wales, which already has standards for multi-residential buildings above two-storeys, also recently announced that it will go further by creating a design guide for middledensity low-rise housing in a bid to generate a higher quality spread of housing options for the state. The major point to all of these policies is the facilitating of better housing outcomes through quality design that is measureable and assessable for planning authorities. And of course, through their considerable involvement in the consultation processes and unprecedented knowledge of what constitutes quality, the design sector and its industry bodies have been paramount in this. So while there were a few examples in 2016 where profit trumped quality in development–the loss of a public park to a skyscraper casino at Barangaroo in Sydney is one—it seems to me that the major theme for 2016 was the increasing influence of ‘design thinking’ on large-scale developments and government policy. All of that was probably just a long winded way to say that 2016 marked an important year for the building design industry in terms of the impact it had, and will continue to have, on the Australian built environment as a result of its influence on government planning policies. With an even higher amount of development expected next year, we can only hope that design thinking plays as much a part in 2017 as it did in 2016. I for one look forward to keeping you all informed on that when we return in the new year.

Western Australia is tipped to do the same next year, and New South

NATHAN JOHNSON

EDITOR NATHAN JOHNSON NATHAN.JOHNSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

DESIGNER JULIA GEE JULIA.GEE@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

CONTENT PRODUCERS NICHOLAS RIDER LUCY MARRETT

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 9018 2037 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 ADRIAN.WILSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

ON THE COVER: YARRAVILLE GARDEN HOUSE BY GUILD ARCHITECTS IS ONE OF THE WINNERS FROM THE 2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS ANNOUNCED ON 13 OCTOBER IN SYDNEY (MORE ON PAGE 41). PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER BENNETTS

NEWS

PUBLIC BUILDINGS & URBAN DESIGN

4 Commercial Connect event

reveals latest in workplace design

30 Croxon Ramsay Architects

5 2016 National Architecture Awards revealed

develop new community centre on Victorian wetlands site

ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN TOOLS

AIR CONDITIONING & VENTILATION

6 Results and recommendations from

38 Domestic air conditioners that

FIRE PROTECTION

SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

our digital design tools reader survey

11 WA house built to

BAL-40 reconciles biodiversity conservation and bushfire safety

are better for the environment

41

All 13 category winners and Best of the Best revealed

11

20 An interview with bushfire

41

responsive architecture specialist Dr Ian Weir

OUTDOOR LIVING & LANDSCAPE DESIGN

23 Utilising stormwater as a valuable resource

PRODUCT SHOWCASES

57 Information on new and

exciting building and architectural products. Introduced with a full directory and how to enquire

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Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,071 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION MARCH 2016

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

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NEWS

COMMERCIAL CONNECT WRAP UP: DATA, OCCUPANT WELLBEING AND FLEXIBILITY THE FUTURE OF WORKPLACE DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLAS RIDER

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EW MONITORING AND WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY WILL PLAY A SIGNIFICANT ROLE IN THE SHAPING OF FUTURE WORKPLACES, AS WILL POST-OCCUPANCY DATA AND BEHAVIOURAL STUDIES. These were just a few of the forecasts deriving from the Industry Q&A panel at Architecture & Design’s Commercial Connect event, held in Sydney on 13 October. The panel topped a jam-packed day of roundtable discussions, industry keynotes and a host of networking opportunities, and was a highlight for most delegates. On the panel was Valerie Mack, Interior Design Leader at Crone, Bureau Proberts Director, Terry Mcquillan, Warren and Mahoney’s Donna Wheatley, and Director of the Digital Design Institute Australia, Ben Coorey. The correlation between improved staff wellbeing and increased productivity was a major talking point for the panel and it lead to a whole host of smaller questions surrounding how to incorporate occupant wellbeing into design strategies and how to then prove the merit of these strategies. The answer seemed pretty obvious for the panel members—evidence. Whether it is from occupant-feedback or from new monitoring technologies that can track staff movement and working patterns, space and services use, and biological responses to different interior environments, the panel agreed that it will be big data that will be the big driver for future workplace strategy.

This data will help architects and designers map floor plans and layouts, choose fitout materials, and determine the number and variety of work stations needed for each business. It will also aid management in knowing how to get the best out of their space and workers.

WELL STANDARD

Historically, says Donna Wheatley, the data collected on patterns of use has been fairly rudimentary, and gathered by consultants who visit organisations on and off to make observations. But this is no longer the case, says Valerie Mack, who believes that the future will see even more technology able to track occupants and collect data to be used to improve working environments specific to the needs of different organisations.

The building standard can be applied to all typologies, but in particular for workplaces would focus on how greener and healthier spaces can have a positive impact on people, productivity and the bottom line.

For Terry McQuillan, evidence could prove a valuable tool for architects already advocating for these new types of workplaces. “It just provides evidence for what’s already intuitively obvious to the architect,” he explains. “It’s a really great tool in helping the client understand your vision for a space.”

REMAINING FLEXIBLE Key to the success of flexible workspaces will also be a built-in flexibility by the designer. Post-occupancy data will be able to track the performance of the space next to forecasts, but that space will need to be flexible in order to improve. If monitoring shows that a conference room is not being used for its intended purpose for example, the space could then be altered and re-equipped to serve another, say for relaxation or team collaboration.

The WELL Building Standard, an evidence-based system for measuring, certifying and monitoring the performance of building features that impact health and well-being, was also thrown out by the panel as a part of future workplace design.

Mack noted how her practice is already adopting the principles of healthy workplaces in its commercial building designs by focussing on things like air quality, increasing natural light and introducing greenery. It echoed an assertion by the panel that behavioural studies are making a triumphant return to architectural design after a 30 year hiatus from the profession. Wheatley, an environmental psychologist herself, says that studies tracking human response to different environments are gaining the attention of businesses looking to attract the right talent and bring positive measurable results to their businesses. As is the case for agile and flexible workplaces, key to the adoption and success of things like the WELL standard and behavioural studies in office environments will be the monitoring of their performance. So we guess only time will tell. Commercial Connect was proudly supported by HP, Innowood, Interpon, CSR Cemintel, Palram and Modular Walls Systems. n


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NEWS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GOLLINGS

2016 NATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AWARDS REVEALED

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HE WINNERS OF THE AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS’ 2016 NATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AWARDS WERE REVEALED AT A CEREMONY IN SYDNEY ON THURSDAY 3 NOVEMBER. Honours were bestowed upon 40 projects from all around Australia which were chosen from a highly competitive field of more than 890 entries, of which 79 were shortlisted. In total, 32 awards and 12 commendations were handed out across the 14 categories which included a fairly even spread of architecture practices and representation from different parts of the country.

School (NSW) by WMK Architecture and Project Zero (QLD) by BVN. The University of Queensland Oral Health Centre by Cox Rayner Architects with Hames Sharley and Conrad Gargett Riddel was the most awarded project of the night taking home the Daryl Jackson Award for Educational Architecture along with National Awards for Interior and Sustainable Architecture. See our comprehensive coverage of the 2016 National Architecture Awards online at Architectureanddesign.com.au. ■

ARM Architecture made it two in a row in the Public Architecture category, taking home its second Sir Zelman Cowen Award for Public Architecture in as many years for its Geelong Library and Heritage Centre. The Main Assembly Building and Pods at the Tonsley urban renewal precinct in South Australia received the named award for Sustainable Architecture, the Woods Bagot and Tridente Architects project pipping a number of high-quality green buildings, including Sustainability Awards finalists, the Northern Beaches Christian

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ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN TOOLS

DIGITAL DESIGN IN 2016: AN INDUSTRY SNAPSHOT [WORDS] DR BENJAMIN COOREY

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N OCTOBER 2016, THE INSTITUTE OF DIGITAL DESIGN AUSTRALIA (IDDA) CONDUCTED A SURVEY WITH ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN READERS WITH THE AIM OF SHARING THE KEY TRENDS, CHALLENGES AND FORECASTS ASSOCIATED WITH DIGITAL DESIGN TOOLS IN THE AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN INDUSTRY. Architects, engineers and construction companies were asked a series of questions about digital design. The key findings are below, followed by recommendations from IDDA Director Ben Coorey and further information on the state of digital design software.

TRAINING • The single biggest challenge for designers is finding the time to learn new software and keep up to date

CURRENT SKILL LEVEL

CURRENT TRAINING

• A frequent response from sole operators was that they had nobody to learn from • Most respondents learn new digital design software themselves, followed by private workshops and online training

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INFOLINK-BPN

ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN TOOLS

COLLABORATION

SOFTWARE ADOPTION

• Many respondents found “other people” the biggest challenge, whether it was other consultants who were not strong with BIM, or difficult client expectations

• The cost of software was a significant challenge for many respondents

• ArchiCAD, Sketchup, Rhino and 3DS Max were the three next highest adopted programs

• Respondents rated themselves highly for 2D documentation, 3D modelling and BIM, but lower for more advanced applications like rendering, parametric design, scripting and animation

• Respondents also found it slow and difficult to create high quality presentation models

CURRENT SOFTWARE

• When we asked on software plans for the next 12 months, the advanced applications were hardly to be seen. It appears that most companies are quite content with the status quo software programs and sticking with the core skills of 2D documentation, 3D modelling and BIM • Autodesk is the dominant software provider, with many firms currently using AutoCAD and Revit. AutoCAD and Revit were in the top three software programs to be implemented in the next 12 months as well

NEW SOFTWARE


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ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN TOOLS

ABOUT THE RESPONDENTS

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS:

3D MODELLING

COMPANY SIZE

• Many firms need upskilling but simply don’t have the time to do so. Firms should explore and evaluate faster ways of up skilling staff

3D modelling software focuses on geometry creation and rendering - allowing the design of 3D objects from the conceptual phase to detailed design most often with the ability to prepare your model for fabrication. They are used in multiple disciplines including product design, architecture, engineering and animation. 3D modellers offer maximum design flexibility with geometry being able to be constructed and manipulated with little constraint.

• Software vendors and resellers need to find creative ways to relieve the software pricing burden on small businesses. Businesses should also look at flexible and floating licenses to keep software costs manageable • Where possible, firms should look to work with clients and other consultants who are compatible with their digital design tools. Incompatibility is leading to large amounts of unproductive effort • Sole operators can join online communities or industry meetups to foster better connections

JOB TITLE

• Firms who only provide “standard offerings” should certainly consider widening their offerings to more advanced applications. Parametric design, rendering, scripting and animation are initially harder to learn, but provide improved workflows, designs and presentation models once mastered

“THE RATE OF CHANGE OF TECHNOLOGIES AND THEREFORE PACE AT WHICH WE HAVE TO REACT TO STAY AHEAD OF THE MARKET IN TERMS OF R&D, TRAINING, ETC. IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE WE FACE.”—DARREN TIMS, HDR RICE DAUBNEY TYPE OF FIRM

STATE OF DIGITAL DESIGN SOFTWARE The software that the AEC industry is using has evolved from standard 2D drafting that has been fundamental to the profession to fully integrated 3D modelling environments that contain building information, design analytics and programmable interfaces. This brings a plethora of new tools and processes as you can see from this snapshot into the industry. These tools are allowing more complex designs, performance driven design, rapid prototyping and the move to mass customisation and digital fabrication of building elements.

CAD CAD (Computer-aided design) software is used by architects, designers, engineers and more to create precision drawings and technical illustrations. It can be used to create both 2D and 3D models and is the standard documentation tool in the industry and design process. Key software products: AutoCAD, Microstation

Key software products: Rhino, 3DS Max, Maya, SketchUp

BIM Building information modelling (BIM) software allows the 3D modelling of buildings using tools that replicate real world elements. A building can be designed using floor slabs, walls, doors, windows and roofs. Most importantly, the 2D drawings are generated from the 3D model, allowing you to edit the model in Plan, Elevation, Section or 3D and all views update concurrently. 3D visualisation of a project has the capacity to minimise errors due to human error and can identify any potential design clashes. Key software products: Revit, ArchiCAD

PARAMETRIC MODELLING Parametric modelling offers a flexible, automated method to create complex design models. It permits a quick method to explore, iterate, change and test design models until an appropriate solution is found. Users can embed intelligence and constraints into their designs which can be both powerful and problematic. Geometry that is dependent on each other may reduce design errors further down the track but may also make editing difficult for those who did not create the model initially. Key software products: Grasshopper, Dynamo

RENDERING Architectural renders are useful for visualising a design concept, ranging from simple drawings to computer-generated images reflecting real-life situations. Video game engines are now available to designers and offer entirely new presentation possibilities. Whilst the visualisation process may be time consuming and often tricky to find the right settings to perform the job (colour, lighting, framing, composition, angles to convey moods and more), the final image is a persuasive and key communication tool between the designer and end user. Key software products: V-Ray, KeyShot, Lumion, Maxwell, Adobe Photoshop


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ARCHITECTURAL & DESIGN TOOLS

ANALYSIS It is now easier than ever to gather real-time analysis on the performance of a design with a range of analysis software emerging that plug directly into your design environment. These programs provide quick feedback for any current design. Key software products: Sefaira, Ladybug + Honeybee, Kangaroo, Karamba So, there you have it! How is your firm progressing with digital design? Leave a comment on our website at Architectureanddesign.com.au n

“MANY SMALLER FIRMS DO FIND IT DIFFICULT TO COORDINATE AND INTEGRATE WITH CONSULTANT TEAMS GIVEN THE TIME REQUIRED AND THE NECESSARY FEES TO COVER SUCH ADDITIONAL COSTS.”—ANONYMOUS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr Benjamin Coorey is a parametric design expert and architect, specialising in spatial analysis and the codification of design logic. He is the director of IDDA which provides a rapid learning platform for members to learn digital design. Coorey has also established a research hub that is pioneering a state of the art digital design analysis platform. His research aims to provide architects, designers, developers, planners and engineers better access to real-time feedback that will improve the quality of design and provide confidence in the designing and delivery of complex solutions.

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3-5 MAY 2017 DESIGNBUILDEXPO.COM.AU


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fire protection

Addressing a ‘national problem’:

Karri Fire House by Ian Weir and Kylie Feher Architect


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FIRE PROTECTION

[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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S THE NAME SUGGESTS, KARRI FIRE HOUSE IS DESIGNED PRIMARILY TO MITIGATE THE DANGER OF BUSHFIRE TO THE HOME’S OCCUPANTS. LESS OBVIOUS IS THE INTENTION OF THE ARCHITECTS TO POSITION THE BUILDING AS BOTH A MODEL FOR AFFORDABLE BUSHFIRE-RESPONSIVE ARCHITECTURE AND AS A MODEL FOR GOOD DESIGN IN LIEU OF INCESSANT VEGETATION CLEARING IN BUSHFIRE-PRONE AREAS. Designed for a professional firefighter and his family, and sited in a magnificent eucalyptus diversicolor forest in Denmark, WA, Karri Fire House is a collaborative project by research architect Ian Weir Architect from the University of Queensland and Kylie Feher Architect.

It is designed to achieve Bushfire Attack level (BAL)-40 construction according to AS3959 Construction of buildings in bushfire-prone areas, and on a budget of $2,900 per sqm. Incidentally, Weir notes that the major success of the project is the reconciling, through architecture, the otherwise opposing management goals of bushfire safety and biodiversity conservation. “Increasingly, bushfire regulators, authorities and local governments are encouraging – if not enforcing - vegetation clearing above building design as the principle means of bushfire risk mitigation,” he explains. “Design innovation is further hamstrung by misconceptions within society that building to the AS3959 bushfire standards is cost prohibitive. Of greater concern is that worldwide, biodiversity conservation is viewed as a management goal that is in direct opposition to bushfire safety.”

“The Karri Fire House purposefully challenges these misconceptions. It does so by presenting an inexpensive means of achieving BAL-40 construction, which in turn minimises its direct (and indirect) environmental footprint.” Had Weir and Feher built to the lower BAL levels they would have had to clear double the area of vegetation and put in place an active management of that area to maintain the lower bushfire exposure to a less resilient house. Regulators have anecdotally said this approach is problematic given that such large-scale vegetation management is difficult to police and often never maintained. Instead, with the BAL-40 Karri Fire House, risk mitigation is achieved through resilient design rather than an active response to bushfires, like a landscape management plan.


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FIRE PROTECTION

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1 The Galvabond and Heritage Galv walls and roof are cost effective bushfire resilient solutions that comply with AS3959 BAL-40. They also weather to a non-reflective texture (unlike Zincalume) and match the granite outcrops and Karri tree trunks 2 The 1,400sqm steeply sloping site is immediately adjacent a nature reserve on the Bibbulmun Track and is dominated by magnificent Karri’s amongst granite outcrops and features a vegetation conservation corridor on the downslope from the house 3 The aesthetic objective of ‘light resilience’ is expressed through contrast – with rock-anchored heavy masonry walls – from which spring the shop-fabricated structural steel cantilevered frame 4 Modwood BAL-40 ‘Flamesheild’ decking was used on the home’s veranda


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FIRE PROTECTION

THREE LINES OF DEFENCE 1. Spandek galvanised steel cladding 2. Firefly non-combustible sarking 3. Rockwool insulation batts


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FIRE PROTECTION

BAL 40

COASTAL

15O SLOPE

REACTIVE SOILS

BIODIVERSE


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FIRE PROTECTION

THE INTERIOR FITOUT WAS DONE ON A BUDGET OF LESS THAN $3,000 PER SQM

The architects adopted a multi-modal design approach that included landscape design, architecture, and industrial design to address what they call a “significant national problem that is beyond the scope of conventional modes of architectural practice.” “We believe that developing a particularly Australian response to habitation of our bushfire ecosystems is dependent as much upon good design as it is on good science,” says Weir. Much of Karri’s bushfire performance is owed to the industrial design of architectural components and the integration of technologies and materials from commercial construction and fire fighting apparel. The building products were chosen for their low-combustibility and fire resistance, however the product choice and passive design of the building also marries with the client’s cross-purposed goal for an energy efficient and bushfire resistant home.

As is the case with most extreme bushfire-prone areas around Australia, Karri’s site is typically cold in winter and hot in summer. In response, the architects integrated fireproof cavity masonry walls and a suspended concrete floor (with fireproof insulation) to provide the necessary thermal mass for the winter seasons, while summer heat and glare is moderated by external shutters, the verandah overhang, and, importantly, the [mostly untouched] Karri forest itself. The building’s heavy masonry walls are rockanchored and support a shop-fabricated structural steel cantilevered frame. The frame is wrapped by galvanised sheeting on its exterior sides and top which aesthetically reflects the texture of the granite outcrops and the Karri trees but also, more literally, the radiant heat of bushfire. This steel shield also overlays one of the most interesting building materials used in Australia - an envelope of fire-proof sarking adapted from fire-fighter’s tunics which provides a second line of fire defense. Karri’s bushfire shutters are a major component of the building and were designed by Perth

window-manufacturer Stephen Ripamonti. Weir notes that the entire spatial planning of the house links the daily pattern of life to the performance of the shutters which slide between full and half-width. With help from a site survey by Denmark Survey and Mapping and in collaboration with energy consultants (Architecture-Collective) and structural engineers (Westera Partners), Weir and Feher have created a bushfire responsive home which has been completed for less than $3,000 per sqm for the internal enclosed areas. While Karri has all the characteristics of the sustainable detached houses we see around Australia, like solar panel and heat pump systems, and no mechanical heating or cooling, Weir says the most important lesson from Karri in terms of sustainability is that it focusses on conserving biodiversity in the first place. Karri Fire House presents a model for how the otherwise opposing goals of biodiversity conservation and bushfire safety can be reconciled. It also addresses misconceptions that building to high bushfire standards is cost prohibitive. n


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FIRE PROTECTION

PEOPLE: ARCHITECTS KYLIE FEHER & IAN WEIR STRUCTURAL ENGINEER WESTERA PARTNERS ENERGY CONSULTANT ARCHITECTURE-COLLECTIVE INDUSTRIAL DESIGN (BUSHFIRE SHUTTER SYSTEM) STEPHEN RIPAMONTI PHOTOGRAPHY IAN WEIR & ANDREW HALSALL

PRODUCTS: ROOFING FIELDERS, ‘HERITAGE GALV’ SPANFORM PROFILE (0.48MM BMT) EXTERIOR WALLS FIELDERS, ‘HERITAGE GALV’ SPANFORM PROFILE (0.42MM BMT), BLUESCOPE ‘GALVABOND’ FLAT SHEET (0.8MM BMT), BORAL MASONRY CONCRETE BLOCK STRUCTURAL STEEL BLUESCOPE, HOT DIP GALVANISED STEEL BY M&A STEEL FLOOR BLUESCOPE BONDECK WITH 190MM SLAB INTERNAL WALL FRAMING PINE STUD FRAME SARKING FIREFLY PHEONIX EA INSULATION ROCKWOOL (ROOF AND WALLS) DECKING MODWOOD BAL-40 ‘FLAMESHEILD’ WATER HEATING HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIRE-FIGHTING WATER SUPPLY 45,000L TANK WITH 5HP HONDA WATER PUMP GLAZING SHELLEY GLASS, TOUGHENED GLASS, COMMERCIAL SLIDING DOOR SYSTEM EMBER/ RADIANT HEAT/FLYSCREENS DENMARK WINDOWS, ALUMINIUM SLIDING DOOR SYSTEM WITH STAINLESS STEEL MESH


ZEGO Fire-rated FireFORM Insulated Concrete Form • Structural Engineering and FRL to AS 3600 • Compliance with BCA performance requirement AS 1530.3 • Suitable for bushfire zones including BAL-FZ • Suitable for Type A, B or C Construction • Class 2, 3, 4, 5 , 6, 7, 8 and 9 Occupancies (Any height or rise) • Can cast solid concrete cores of variable widths • Fast to install and easy to erect

www.zego.com.au | 1300 13 9346


ADVERTISING FEATURE – ARCHITECTURAL WINDOW SYSTEMS

TESTED BAL-40 RANGE BY AWS

Photo: Mind The Gap Photography

A

WS DEVELOPED A WIDE RANGE OF BAL-40 TESTED WINDOWS AND DOORS TO HELP ADDRESS THE REBUILDING PROCESS AFTER THE DEVASTATION A BUSHFIRE CAN BRING.

windows are severe and result in a window which is not only difficult to use but costly to manufacture and in many cases aesthetically displeasing.

• Seals to stiles, head and sills shall be manufactured from materials with a flammability index no greater than 5 or made from silicone.

WINDOWS:

Changes to the Building Code of Australia (BCA) were implemented in 2011, with the hopes of increasing the protection of homes located in bushfire prone areas. These changes aim to increase the stringency around the selection of windows and doors along with other building materials for projects in bushfire prone areas, hopefully reducing the risk of loss of life and damage to property.

• Unprotected windows must be completely covered by shutters complying with AS3959-2009 clause 8.5.1.

Our products that have been successfully tested from our residential (Vantage), commercial (Elevate™) and thermally broken range (ThermalHEART™) are clearly marked with our BAL-40 certification symbol.

The AWS range of BAL-40 aluminium windows and doors meet and exceed BCA requirements for compliance under Australian Standard AS3959-2009 for windows and doors in a BAL-40 bushfire zone. These products are engineered, tested and certified to withstand the conditions likely to occur in a BAL-40 zone and are designed to help protect a home whilst still delivering unprecedented style, efficiency and functionality. The BCA offers a Deem-to-Satisfy approach for windows and doors in BAL-40 bushfire zones. What this means, you can choose a product that has been physically tested and certified for use in that application or you can satisfy the requirement by following a formula with a non-tested product. The Deem-to-Satisfy requirements for BAL-40 bushfire

OR • A tested window system must be used, compliant with AS1530.8.1 2007. The operable portion of the window must be screened internally or externally with an accredited BAL-40 rated metal screen that has a maximum aperture of 2mm made from corrosion resistant steel or bronze. OR the following Deem-to-Satisfy approach can be used: • Window frames and hardware shall be metal (includes aluminium).

The home pictured was designed by Luke Van Jour of Distinct Innovations. Located in the Blue Mountains in NSW, this home is in a prime BAL-40 region. Using products from the AWS ThermalHEART™ range, this home has ultimate energy efficiency and compliance. The products used include BAL-40 rated thermally broken sliding doors, hinged doors and awning windows all double glazed with 6mm toughened glass. Also included in the project was commercial grade fixed lights, also BAL-40 rated. For more information visit our website www.bal40windows.com.au or contact techsupport@awsaustralia.com.au

• Glazing must be a minimum of 6mm toughened glass. • Both the operable and fixed portions must be screened with mesh with a maximum aperture of 2mm, made from a corrosion resistant steel or bronze.

For more information, visit: http://bit.ly/2fDN6aV


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FIRE PROTECTION

AN INTERVIEW WITH DR IAN WEIR Nathan Johnson: So we’ll start by exploring the major misconceptions associated with designing affordable bushfire-responsive housing. What are they and where do you think they derive? Ian Weir: There are three main misconceptions that I have encountered while working in my practice and I can break them down for you. 1. Cost:

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AN WEIR IS A CONSULTING RESEARCH ARCHITECT WITH THE QUEENSLAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY AND DIRECTOR OF IAN WEIR ARCHITECT. IN BOTH ROLES HE RECEIVES COMMISSIONS FOR DESIGNING BUSHFIRE RESPONSIVE HOUSES WHICH OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS HAS INCLUDED THE WIDELY CIRCULATED KARRI FIRE HOUSE, WHICH HE DESIGNED IN COLLABORATION WITH KYLIE FEHER, AND H HOUSE, BOTH IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA. HE IS ALSO A MEMBER OF THE BUSHFIRE BUILDING COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA. The following conversation between Architecture & Design Editor Nathan Johnson and Weir discusses the major challenges and misconceptions associated with designing bushfire-responsive housing and explores design strategies for achieving compliant housing in high Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) areas without the need for incessant vegetation clearing.

• Landowners think it will be cheaper and more effective to clear vegetation rather than build a bushfire responsive house, not realising that the greatest threat to houses in bushfire is ember attack which can come from many kilometres away, and furthermore the vegetation has to be managed in perpetuity so there is a real cost in time and money in doing that • When rebuilding after bushfire, owners think that the greatest contribution to cost will be compliance with the bushfire regulations, but more often than not it is all the other requirements that have been introduced since their initial home was built such as: energy efficiency; structural adequacy; glazing standards etc. • The affordable home market and the Bushfire standard (AS3959) are not in opposition. For example, the typical first home-owner ‘project home’ in WA is already well prepared for bushfire, with double brick walls, slab on ground and metal clad roofs. This is the cheapest home to build in WA and for an extra $2-3,000 (less than 1%) that home could comply with BAL-40 - the second highest resilience level in AS3959. The cheapest wall system to build for one-off construction in Australia is a light timber of steel frame clad in steel sheet and that also complies with BAL-40 • The published costs on the premiums associated with building to the various Bushfire Attack Levels (BAL’s)—which we find on various websites—are based on the difference in cost to a conventional timber framed house. That house typology is not representative of what we typically build in Australia to satisfy the first home buyers’ market (as per immediately above point) 2. Belief that houses can’t survive bushfires: • Many people in the community, and even in the architectural fraternity, believe that no matter what you build it will not survive the intensity of a bushfire. I attribute this misconception to images of houses with molten glass and aluminium that have been subjected not to bushfires but rather to structural fires where heat intensities are much greater and more sustained than typical bushfire fronts

3. Resale value: • Land owners believe that it is better to build to a lower BAL rather than a higher BAL because they think it will affect the resale value of the home and/or attract higher insurance premiums. I have experienced this pressure from clients in my architecture practice NJ: You advocate for high quality integrated or ‘multi-modal’ designs for bushfire prone areas; designs that achieve meaningful and practical solutions for the raft of issues presented by these landscapes: heat/cold, fire protection and context. What do you mean by this and can you give us an example where you’ve used this? IW: Building in bushfire prone areas often attracts a premium anyway (regardless of the bushfire regulations) due to the difficulty of access, steep terrain, remote locations need for off-grid power and water systems. Furthermore, bushfire prone areas, by their nature, are both hot in summer and cold in winter, so achieving energy efficiency can be costly. The key to mitigating these high costs therefore is to ‘cross-purpose’ all these constraints so that building elements achieve more than one thing. By way of example the Karri Fire House has the following features, remembering that it was built by the owner not a registered builder (to save cost): • Steel structural frame manufactured off-site and assembled by an expert team does many things: saves cost and time for the owner builder; adds precision to the project; negotiates the steep terrain (15 degrees); galvanised against coastal corrosion; supports the cantilevered verandah and the suspended concrete floors and; is also BAL-40 compliant and non- combustible • Suspended concrete floor is cast in place to 190mm thick. It adds necessary thermal mass for 6 Star energy rating, and is of course fire proof • Concrete block cavity wall (south side) adds to thermal mass, owner built, and fire proof • Metal cladding (roof and walls) is ‘Galvabond’ galvanised sheet (thicker than normal) which provides first line of defence to heat and embers, is cheap and easy to install and BAL-40 compliant. Aesthetically it harmonises with the galvanised structural steel elements as well as the surrounding granite outcrops • Ember screens are insect screens - in this insect prone landscape such screens are required anyway, here they are stainless steel and slide in unison with sliding glass doors on the veranda elevation. They are retrofitting into commercial


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sliding door tracks to provide a very cost affordable solution to ember protection and insect screening (It is lightweight stainless steel —a heavier gauge would also provide security) NJ: What are the major impediments to this approach? IW: All the assumptions, prejudices, misconceptions mentioned before. • A tick-the-box approach to compliance by the architectural and building design industry • That the majority of homes in Australia are not designed by architects but by drafts people in building companies and often AS3959 considerations only appear in the specification (i.e “must be built to AS3959”) and not in the drawings, so AS3959 compliance mostly doesn’t get designed in at all. Instead it effectively gets retrofitted to the design by the builder • That AS3959 compliance discussions most commonly only occur at the building permit stage when it is too late to apply an integrated design approach. This should happen more at the pre-planning approval stage. For example, I always meet with the local government building surveyor and the town planner before lodging the planning application NJ: There is a tendency from authorities to prefer clearance of vegetation and the construction of homes with mid-range BAL level features. What troubles can this create? IW: Local governments want uniformity (e.g. everyone must have a 20 metre asset protection zone (APZ) around their house) and they want the least drain on their resources to inspect and administer variations and special cases. But principally, my view is that they want to be exonerated from liability. The problem is that the professed aim – from fire authorities and the risk assessment experts worldwide – is that people should understand their risk and mitigate against it – that we each take responsibility for our patch and not expect emergency services to save us. This makes sense. But by mandating 20 metre APZs through legislation—as is being done in WA—where if the clearing is not done, the land owner is fined and the local government does the work and sends the landowner the bill—that very aim for personal responsibility is completely undermined, it becomes a top-down authoritative relationship —it is completely contradictory to the aim. The bushfire prone landscape is a landscape which is highly variable in topography, subdivision patterns and vegetation types,

so a uniform approach just cannot be applied —especially to existing subdivided land. Meanwhile, there is considerable inconsistency across Australia and between authorities within states as to how vegetation should be managed in APZs and as to what the exact purpose of APZs are. AS3959 for example does not mention APZs —it is primarily concerned with fuel loads, while the CSIRO report that trees can be a very good thing close to houses because they reduce wind velocity and shield houses from ember attack. NJ: So do you think architects can play a reconciling role in these otherwise opposing management goals of bushfire safety and biodiversity conservation? IW: Well absolutely, and to do that that we (architects, designers and innovators) need to not just think of balancing vegetation clearing with more resilient house designs but to instead – here I borrow Noel Pearson’s term—find the ‘radical centre’. That is, develop new typologies of architecture that celebrate our inhabitation of this landscape which is at once highly biodiverse and bushfire prone. NJ: So what are the major challenges associated with actual designing BAL-40 and BAL-FZ houses, and how can we overcome them? IW: Strictly for BAL-FZ a big hindrance is the lack of competitively priced and alternative types of bushfire shutter systems. In general, it’s because AS3959 is considered the ceiling when it should be considered the floor. The NCC says that we don’t need to comply with AS3959—we need to comply with the performance requirements first, and AS3959 is just one of the ways of doing that (The NASH standard is another DTS method). So we architects and building designers need to work more closely with fire engineers and building certifiers to devise performance based-solutions, because ultimately AS3959 is just a base line which is devised to be acceptable and affordable to the broad community, it is in no way the best practice of what we could be doing to make homes and communities more resilient. NJ: Is the technology on the market to facilitate this? Is it difficult to come by? IW: The fire safety requirements in the commercial building industry have already triggered the development of building elements that surpass the requirements for bushfire resilience. Houses are pretty basic things, it is just the selection of materials and how they are put together, so new technology as such is not the solution. What we need is more lateral thinking and greater access to affordable fire testing facilities to demonstrate the performance compliance of new elements. n


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STORMWATER: UTILISING A VALUABLE RESOURCE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRAMED BY CHRIS


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“In conveying the water story through visible processes we can educate the community about the importance of urban water management, and the interdependent nature of our urban and natural environments.”—Adam Hunter, Director of Environmental Partnership [WORDS] Jasmine O’Donoghue

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ater is an integral part of urban life and a precious resource which needs to be conserved and managed. Australia’s cities generate enormous amounts of stormwater, causing significant environmental damage. As our urban development expands, increased utilisation of stormwater is necessary to create sustainable and harmonious spaces. Stormwater harvesting involves the collection, treatment, storage and reuse of stormwater run-off from urban areas. Stormwater is rainwater which runs off impervious or saturated surfaces such as roofs, roads, pavements and green spaces. Prior to urban development, natural vegetation and pervious areas would soak up rainwater, allowing for transpiration and evaporation, but urban development replaces these areas with impervious surfaces, resulting in an increased stormwater run-off. It is a relatively new form of water reuse, compared to rainwater tanks, but is increasingly being recognised as an option for meeting the water demands of many projects and is commonly used to irrigate public parks and golf courses. Most stormwater harvesting and reuse systems will include four elements. First, the stormwater is collected from a drain, creek or pond. It is then temporarily stored in dams or tanks to balance supply and demand. Storage is commonly either constructed on the creek or drain or some distance from the creek or drain. The water is then treated to reduce pathogen and pollution levels before being distributed to the area of use.

WHY HARVEST STORMWATER? As the landscape is transformed from urban development, the way water flows through a catchment changes, which can cause a range of adverse environmental impacts. Almost 90 per cent of Australia’s population lives in urban areas and produce an estimated 3,000 gigalitres of average annual run-off. Due to the large areas of impervious surfaces, it’s estimated at least two thirds of the run-off is more than what would have naturally occurred prior to settlement. Australian cities are producing more run off than the combined volume of water which they draw from catchments and groundwater sources (estimated to be 2,100 gigalitres annually). With the exception of Perth, less than three per cent of this rainwater and stormwater is used.

Increased urban stormwater run-off can result in poor water quality, due to the pollutants in the water. When this is disposed in rivers and creeks, it degrades the health of aquatic ecosystems. It’s estimated urbanised environments lead to a 90 per cent increase in the volume of water entering streams. This dramatic change in a pattern of flow in rivers and streams can impact the likelihood and severity of flooding. As more potable water is consumed than recovered, water availability can be reduced, impacting on a community’s quality of life. Stormwater harvesting helps urban communities overcome these issues.

BENEFITS OF STORMWATER HARVESTING A Senate Environment and Communications Committee Inquiry into Stormwater Management in Australia last year found stormwater is an underutilised resource. Stormwater differs to other environmental problems as although it is a significant problem, increasing its use can provide environmental, economic and social benefits. The inquiry found greater utilisation of stormwater can result in the following benefits: Environmental If stormwater is greater utilised, run-off volumes for most storms can be lowered to pre-development levels, helping to reduce baseflows, return natural soil moisture levels and maintain water quality. Capturing and storing stormwater for passive irrigation reduces run-off volumes and can improve the flow of rivers and creeks. Stormwater treatment can reduce pollutant loads to waterways, helping to protect ecosystems. Reduced costs Flooding-related costs - the need to build stormwater infrastructure due to increasing urban populations and the costs of replacing existing infrastructure - could be reduced by better stormwater management. It may alleviate the need to expand existing infrastructure or to identify other water management solutions. Professor Ana Deletic, Associate Dean, Research and Director of Monash University Infrastructure told the inquiry that to maintain the same level of flood protection in Melbourne, it’s estimated $8 billion will be needed to be invested in the next few decades to keep up with development and to address ageing infrastructure. Social Increased use of stormwater can improve the sustainability, resilience and liveability of cities by supporting their greening. Greening of cities can help improve thermal comfort by

mitigating heat and reducing the temperature. It can create productive vegetation and increased carbon sequestration, better air quality and improved landscape amenity. Improved water quality can limit blue-green algae growth and the odour it brings, creating more pleasant spaces and encouraging their use. Green infrastructure and proximity to natural systems has also been found to have a positive effect on property prices.

USES FOR STORMWATER Stormwater harvesting and water recycling has several uses, which can be tailored for each project. Harvesting of non-potable stormwater can be used to generate long term water storage for drought and emergency supplies or for agricultural uses. It can help control fires, for testing and maintenance of fire-control systems and for fire-training exercises. There are municipal uses such as roadmaking, dust control and street cleaning. In residential and commercial properties, stormwater may be used for toilets, gardens, car washing, water features and utility washing, while industrial and commercial buildings may use it for cooling water, process water and wash-down water. Currently most stormwater harvesting projects are for non-potable use, however there is potential for it to be used for potable supply.

CHANGE AFOOT On 10 October, the Senate received a response from the federal government on the five recommendations which rose from last year’s stormwater inquiry. The government committed to working with the states and territories to discuss reviewing the Australian Guidelines for Urban Stormwater Management and to see if the guidelines could form the basis of a national policy framework. The government said it will seek to incorporate audits as part of the approach to urban water management and agreed in principal with the recommendation that new funding models and financial incentives would facilitate improved stormwater management outcomes. The response agreed in part that funding be restored for stormwater research and that consideration be given to how co-investment can be attracted. Rather than waiting for the national stormwater initiative to be developed, several architects are already reaping the benefits of stormwater harvesting in their projects.


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SYDNEY PARK WATER RE-USE PROJECT BY TURF DESIGN STUDIO AND ENVIRONMENTAL PARTNERSHIP The Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project is the City of Sydney’s largest water harvesting project to date. Built in partnership with the Australian Government through the National Urban Water and Desalination Plan, the project has the capacity to capture and clean the equivalent of 240 Olympic-sized swimming pools of water per annum. It is a central element of Sustainable Sydney 2030, targeting 10 per cent of water demand be met through local water capture and re-use in the park. Mike Horne, Director of Turf Design Studio says the project’s success lies in its unique fusion of design, art, science and ecology. “Not only have we created an interwoven network of community infrastructures and ‘made’ systems, the City has taken another significant step in transforming this former brick pit and landfill site into a vibrant new urban parkland,” Horne says. The Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project has improved water quality, visual amenity and detention storage effectiveness by enhancing circulation of water through the ponds and wetlands. The ponds previously suffered poor water quality and from outbreaks of blue-green algae, Azolla and Duckweek, due to the stagnation of water during the warmer months and low rainfall. Prior to the project, all stormwater flowing through the Munni Channel continued to Alexandra Canal and beyond to Botany Bay untreated. The project now pumps up to 1000L/s of stormwater from Munni Channel into the Sydney Park water re-use scheme. This diverts an average of 840 ML/yr of stormwater for treatment and reuse. The treatment train includes a gross pollutant trap, 5,000sqm of bioretention system, wetlands and the existing ponds. Water re-used for irrigation is further treated by filtration and UV disinfection. Each year, 30 million litres of harvested water is now recycled for improved circulation of the ponds, irrigation of the Alan Davidson oval and the Village Green, and non-potable water supply for the nursery and truck washing at the City of Sydney Depot. Adam Hunter, Director of Environmental Partnership said the project strived to create “opportunities to immerse and engage with the landscape and to experience the landscape from different perspectives”. “In conveying the water story through its visible processes; the project is educating the community about the importance of urban water management, and the interdependent nature of our urban and natural environments,” he says.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ETHAN ROHLOFF

“The function and processes of water harvesting and cleansing is made legible through its visible ebbs and flows in the landscape.”


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON WOOD

“The design incorporates power generated by solar panels, dam water for toilet flushing, all grey water is reused for irrigation and recycled materials are used where possible.”

LIZARD LOG PARK BY MCGREGOR COXALL McGregor Coxall was brought on by the Western Sydney Parklands Trust to revitalise and extend the park facilities. This included an upgrade and extension to the existing toilet blocks, barbeque and picnic facilities, redevelopment of the children’s play area, the development of an events space and access bridge along with a new car park. Driven by an emphasis on sustainability, the design incorporates power generated by solar panels, dam water for toilet flushing, all grey water is reused for irrigation and recycled materials are used where possible. The area around Pimelea features waterways, ponds and water storage lakes. At Pimelea, a chain of ponds has been partially constructed near the main

entrance road and a naturalised channel leads into the pond. The Sydney Water channel also forms a key feature on the edge of each site, linking the sites to Sydney’s water supply network and offering further opportunities for water efficient fittings, rainwater tanks and grey water recycling at the site. The site car parks are based on a “no pipe” ecological filtering system. Ground water flow bypasses the traditional pit and pipe system and is navigated to an open wetland swale that captures and cleans the water before discharging into the site dam for reuse. The play area uses recycled water through a children’s play pump and water course system. Since completion of stages one and two, visitation numbers increased by over 40 per cent per annum from 198,000 (July 2011-June 2012) to 277,000 (July 2012-June 2013) per annum.


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ARANDA ADVENTURE GARDEN BY PAUL BARNETT DESIGN GROUP Once an unusable dustbowl, Paul Barnett Design Group (PBDG) converted the heart of Aranda Primary School into an adventure garden. “The water harvested adventure play space has transformed the centre of the school to become an oasis where before no children played as it was too hot,” Paul Barnett, Director of PBDG says. “They now fill the area with activities ranging from sitting, jumping over rocks and inhabiting the array of social and play space.” When Barnett first visited the site, he was taken by the desolation of the playground, which consisted of hard, compacted clay and had no chance of sustaining any plants. The team started by looking at the contours, the sun and wind microclimate and the potential for catchment for adjacent roofs and ground surfaces. They created spatial design that included pathways, sandpits, mud spaces, rock terracing and climbing places, tree logs, and meeting spaces. A water harvesting system was then developed by PBDG to create an underground trench system that mirrors the surface designs.

The trench and catchment system holds water and allows the water to permeate through the soil, creating plumes of moisture about one metre either side of the water harvesting trenches and enabling roots for trees and plants over time to enter the trenches. The dry creek beds were then created with rocks, sleepers and soil, sand, gravel, and geotextiles. Top soil was reused, improved, mulched and placed ready for planting. The five-stage masterplan covered the playground, sloped areas and ovals. Each area utilises roof water catchment, and existing ground levels were re-sloped to create water holding instead of run-off. Funding limited the amount of planting so PBDG are now revising the area under a next stage to finish the planting and consolidate the system to ensure that ground covers are connecting and providing a shading of the soil. In about five years time, the new adventure play area will create a forest of shade. As plants establish themselves and their roots seek out and enter the water harvesting trenches, there will be no maintenance other than weeding and fine tuning plant cover over the first few years. As the trees mature, the space will require lower amounts of water and will provide a shady summer play space and summer sheltered winter space. n

“The water harvested adventure play space has transformed the centre of the school to become an oasis where before no children played as it was too hot.” – Paul Barnett, PBDG Director


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2016-01-20T10:41:35+11:00

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TORMTECH WAS THE BRAND OF CHOICE FOR THE ARCHITECTS INVOLVED IN THE DESIGN OF BONDI’S NEWEST LUXURY DEVELOPMENT, PACIFIC BONDI. WHEN IT CAME TO SPECIFYING GRATED DRAINAGE SOLUTIONS FOR THE HIGH-END MIXED DEVELOPMENT PROJECT, PTW ARCHITECTS CHOSE STORMTECH FOR ITS ABILITY TO PROVIDE THE PERFECT BALANCE OF FORM, FUNCTION AND CUSTOMISATION.

drains with a narrow profile have also been integrated into the sub-sill of the sliding door frames, providing a level entrance with minimal impact on design, and enabling seamless flow between the indoor and outdoor spaces.

Located just minutes from the CBD in one of Sydney’s most popular neighbourhoods just across from the iconic Bondi beach, Pacific Bondi takes luxury living to an entirely new level, combining 112 designer residential apartments including 19 penthouses, a boutique hotel offering 69 apartments, and premium retail sites for stores, restaurants and bars, all positioned around a six-level atrium.

Stormtech’s threshold drains were also specified for the atrium of the Pacific Bondi to be installed around the entire perimeter. Surrounded entirely by glass and featuring a courtyard in the middle, the atrium also required drainage in the middle of the structure to drain water from the courtyard. For this application, Stormtech made changes to its manufacturing process to design and produce a drainage solution to fit the varying depths of the space.

Designed by Andrew Andersons of PTW Architects, Pacific Bondi also had three different designers working on the interiors of the project to create three bespoke design schemes that defined a high-end lifestyle destination for buyers. Stormtech was specified not only on the strength of its reputation as a manufacturer of high quality grated drains but also on the quality of service as well as its ability to adapt various products to meet specific project requirements. The harsh beachfront environment as well as the expected high traffic demanded grated drains made from 316 marine grade stainless steel to be installed throughout the project including the bathrooms and balconies of the apartments as well as the atrium area.

The project presented several challenges for Stormtech: Being a redevelopment of an existing structure, the installers not only had to deal with the old concrete slab but also the new floor zones where the grated drains had to be accommodated. Additionally, only shallow depth grates would suit the existing conditions. Stormtech’s grated drains were customised into a very narrow and shallow profile to meet the specific tolerances of the project. Stormtech’s Ti Tile Insert drains were specified for the bathrooms where the design called for linear drains to blend seamlessly with the tiled floor. These drains were required both for the shower as well as underneath the wall hung toilet and vanity basin running the full length of the bathroom. Given that there were multiple designers working across different segments of the project, the requirements were unique for many bathrooms. Stormtech assessed each bathroom before providing the Ti Tile Insert drains in three different styles, ensuring every bathroom had a perfectly matched grated drain. The linear drains from Stormtech’s TR range were installed in the balconies of all the residential and hotel apartments. Threshold

The technical support that could be provided by Stormtech personnel during the execution of the project was also one of the reasons the brand was a preferred choice for the architects. Stormtech staff were involved in the work from the beginning of the development all the way to completion, allowing the entire project to run smoothly and hassle-free.

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Croxon Ramsay develop SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY CENTRE

FROM WETLANDS SITE

WITH NO CONTEXT


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A 3KW CAPACITY PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ARRAY IS INSTALLED ON THE ROOF OF THE KINDERGARTEN, WHILE A 1KW CAPACITY WIND TURBINE IS INSTALLED ON A MAST 10 METRES ABOVE THE COMMUNITY PRODUCE GARDEN, HARNESSING ENERGY FROM THE RELENTLESS WINDS OF THIS COASTAL SITE

[WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA [PHOTOGRAPHY] DIANNA SNAPE

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N AUGUST, WYNDHAM CITY MARKED THE OFFICIAL OPENING OF ITS NEW COMMUNITY CENTRE IN POINT COOK, A $7.3 MILLION PROJECT THE COUNCIL DESCRIBES AS “ARTISTIC AND SUSTAINABLE”.

Taking home two awards at the 2016 Victorian Architecture Awards, as well as the 2016 Sustainability Award for Public Building, the Saltwater was a pilot community facility case study for the Wyndham City Council, supported by the State Government. “Council wanted the Centre to be a hub where residents can access health services, recreation and learning programs. We wanted this Centre to be a place for people of all ages to come together and enjoy,” Wyndham City Mayor Cr Adele Hegedich said. “It is an example of Wyndham City planning for the future and delivering

important infrastructure that meets the needs and interests of our local communities.” “In developing the plan for Saltwater Community Centre, Council also engaged with the local community to identify their preferences for activities and programs to be offered at the centre. The community told us arts activities that can reach out to the wider Wyndham community and that will make Saltwater a cultural destination was one of things they wanted.” Although a brief this specific makes design conceptualisation much easier – think: an exhibition hall for community art exhibitions – the design team at Croxon Ramsay wanted to flip the notion of fixed spaces for fixed activities on its head. Moving away from the narrative of many public spaces, the architects deliberately created a series of amorphous, unprogrammed public spaces with one goal: foster the idea of community through genuine interaction amongst community members, rather than just through a calendar

of events at specified meeting places. While the team had a lot to work with when it came to the intention of the new centre, the site didn’t offer much. In fact, the architects point out that because the building was one of the first to be completed in an unrelentingly flat and denuded wetlands site, the project in effect had no context. This provided a blank canvas for the team, who imagined the building as an abstracted tree, which reinstates a notional form of shelter to the site whilst signifying new life. “A green metal roof ‘grows’ strategically over and down the sides of the building in places, while in others, soffits are lined in a warm timber that speak of a tree’s under croft,” the design team describes. “The building is finished in a palette of honest, durable materials that speak to this context and with the change in season and ware of time slowly silver and soften.”


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1 Kindergarten and play area 2 Side entry 3 Sections 4 Isometric drawing 5 Floorplan


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80% OF ALL ROOFS ARE DRAINED TO 30,000LT RAINWATER COLLECTION TANKS IN THE COMMUNITY PRODUCE GARDEN, WITH THE COLLECTED WATER COLLECTED UTILISED FOR THE IRRIGATION OF THE COMMUNITY PRODUCE GARDEN AND SURROUNDING NATIVE LANDSCAPING.

Adopting a 5 Star Green Star rating equivalent as a starting point to the design was another guiding principle for the team. While most projects take the certified Green Star approach path, which often makes it easier for consulting teams to achieve sustainability benchmarks, Council chose to go without certification as they believed it would give them greater control and flexibility throughout the design process. However, this also meant that the team had to be creative with their sustainability approach. They quickly ruled out items that posed a cost, delivery or maintenance risk, so that efforts were concentrated on ensuring the vital ESD initiatives were not removed if cost-cutting was required. For example, when budget pressures came into play, the transpired wall, thermal labyrinth and displacement air were already built in and could not be “extracted”. Croxon Ramsay adds that while the wind turbine and PV array “required some convincing”, they were also retained due to their relatively short pay-back projections. This strategic planning allowed the project to soar on the sustainability front, and can be seen in the planning and extensive building envelope manipulation to maximise natural daylight penetration for all common gathering spaces. These community spaces are also serviced with displacement mechanical heating and cooling

local to gathering nodes, and feature windows that open to allow for automated night purging through the Building Management System. Other ESD highlights include: • C02 monitoring in all community gathering spaces to ensure maximum efficiencies are achieved in the operation of mechanical systems and the number of building users at any point in time • Separating carparking provisions into two smaller carparks to reduce the visual impact of this requirement and provide council with the opportunity to redevelop the carpark on the south of the site as public marketplace/green space once public transport links to this facility improve and demand on parking is reassessed in the future. The pedestrian and not the car is granted the privilege to the main entry at this centre

• All data concerning wind, solar and rain harvesting on site, plus all data regarding the facilities energy consumption, is managed and collated through the BMS and EMS, and communicated to the community via a dedicated LCD display promoting the performance of these ESD initiatives Understanding that the community centre today may not meet the needs of tomorrow, the design team also undertook significant future planning of areas within the facility that may need to support other functions. Areas such as the kindergarten and MC&H consulting rooms, for example, are designed for disassembly. The external metal cladding, external timber cladding and internal timber linings are also detailed with standard lengths and concealed/ clip fixing, which enable these components to be disassembled and reused elsewhere without damage or compromise to the salvaged material.

• Undercover bike parking and a shower are provided for patrons arriving on bicycle

Similarly all external structures adjacent to these spaces have adopted a standard length, mechanical fixing only approach to enable disassembly/reassembly in the future.

• A community produce garden promotes strategies for healthy communities and sustainable food practices, whilst encouraging the community to seed, cultivate and cook their own produce on site

The Saltwater Community Centre has been well used by the community since it opened its doors in February, and is expected to pave the way for a new facility that will provide for different activities for the community. n


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1 Brickwork pattern continues from facade to interior walls 2 Spill-out zones and multiple access points encourage serendipitous encounters 3 Timber features heavily throughout the project

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PEOPLE: ARCHITECT CROXON RAMSAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT XYLEM LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS SERVICES & ESD CONSULTANT SIMPSON KOTZMAN STRUCTURAL & CIVIL ENGINEER, QUANTITY SURVEYOR WILDE & WOOLARD BUILDER MELBCON PRODUCTS: ROOF LYSAGHT - KLIPLOK 700 HI-STRENGTH FAÇADE METAL CLADDING LYSAGHT CUSTOM FOLDED COLORBOND PAN CLADDING WITH STANDING SEAM BRICKWORK AUSTRAL LA PALOMA CLAY BRICK EXTERNAL TIMBER CLADDING WOODFORM SPOTTED GUM EXPRESSION CLADDING IN SORRENTO PROFILE GLASS VIRIDIAN THERMOTECH IGUS WINDOWS CAPRAL 100 FLUSHLINE DOUBLE GLAZED


THE NEXT

GENERATION  VRV IV-S SYSTEM FIRST LAUNCHED IN JAPAN IN 1982, THE DAIKIN VRV SYSTEM HAS BEEN EMBRACED BY WORLD MARKETS FOR OVER 30 YEARS.  The slim compact design offers improved energy savings, comfort and can be connected to a range of domestic indoor units, with outdoor units measuring as low as 990mm in height* for ease of installation. VRV IV-S capacity ranges from 9kW to 24kW to meet an even wider variety of needs.

Find out more today. Visit commercial.daikin.com.au or call us on 1300 368 300

*Applies to 9, 11.2 and 14kW models


ADVERTISING FEATURE – DAIKIN

AUSTRALIA’S HIGH RISERS DRIVE AIR CONDITIONING INNOVATION

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RENDS IN THE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY MARKET CONTINUE TO DRIVE INNOVATIONS IN THE AIR CONDITIONING INDUSTRY.

“Good quality is all about how the space is used,” he said, adding that the majority of apartments built over the last decade have, for the most part, been of high quality.

A prime example is increasing demand for more lightweight, compact and well-designed units that are better suited to high rise apartment living in Australia’s capital cities.

For suppliers this means ensuring products for this segment of the market are well designed.

Apartment living is a lifestyle choice for those who prefer the big-city vibe and proximity to work, social and entertainment activities, not to mention the benefits of communal on-site facilities such as gym, pool and concierge. Two thirds of Australians already live in capital cities, according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), and this ratio is set to trend much more urban as future generations flock to the main centres. ABS figures also show that by 2030 the most common dwelling units will be childless couples and single person households. This lifestyle shift has been accompanied by a preference for homes with high-end design that optimise limited space. “When it comes to apartments bigger doesn’t always mean better,” according to Asher Judah, Victorian acting executive director of the Property Council of Australia.

One company that has a distinct advantage over competitors when it comes to design for high-density living is Daikin. The leading air conditioning manufacturer is one of the few businesses that has managed to stay ahead of the pack by releasing products specifically to meet the new residential dynamics. Daikin’s national VRV manager Simon Langstaff said the company foresaw the growing preference for apartment living in Australia and created products to suit out of its $550 million per year global research and development program. Its newest VRV IV S series is compact, lightweight, aesthetically pleasing, yet powerful making it ideal for high-end apartments.

“They are compact enough to fit above the wardrobe and still allow for plenty of air flow behind the units.” Just last year Daikin released its entire VRV IV S series, offering an extended range of outdoor units from 9kW through to 24kW and the FXDQ compact bulkhead series specifically for high rise apartments offering a range from 2.2kW to 7.1kW. An advantage that Daikin has over competitors is that the company can design and manufacture its residential ducted range right here in Sydney. “One of the key differentiators that sets Daikin apart is that we can design each product range to meet the specific requirements of the market and we can do it locally,” he said. “Most VRV units can now be connected to our residential range so we can meet the demand for larger multi type product to be used in high end housing.”

In addition, the Daikin FXDQ compact series can actually fit in the bulkheads above built-in wardrobes and cupboards. “These bulkhead indoor units have a depth of just 450mm and height of only 200mm which is ideal for drop ceilings and wardrobes,” Langstaff said.

For more information on Daikin products visit. commercial.daikin.com.au


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Air Conditioning & Ventilation

Specifying the right energy efficient air conditioner

[words] Nicholas Rider

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reating a comfortable and thermally-stable interior environment for a home is a primary concern for the residential designer, and it can be achieved in a number of ways. On the one hand we have passive architectural design, which manipulates natural elements like sunlight and wind to achieve this stability and comfort, and on the other, there’s active, which relies on aid from mechanical space conditioning systems. And yet, despite a growing societal awareness about human-caused climate change, it appears that the uptake of mechanical space conditioning systems and active design in new homes and renovations appears to be increasing. According to a recent Federal government report, 40 per cent of Australian household energy usage comes from heating and cooling systems, making them the largest energy user in the average Australian home. New research from built environment expert Professor Mattheos Santamouris of the University of New South Wales, paints perhaps an even more troubling predicament. It finds that increased temperatures, population and economic growth, as well as the trend of smaller families living in larger homes could see worldwide cooling energy consumption rise by 750 per cent by 2050. This is all made more daunting when you consider that the vast majority of the world’s residential electricity use still comes from fossil fuel sources. At a local level, 86 per cent of Australia’s electricity is generated from fossil fuels, with 73 per cent from coal and 13 per cent from natural gas. So, what do we do? Other than offsetting your client’s energyuse through renewable sources, like solar energy, another potential solution is advocate a more energy efficient air conditioner—one that consumes less energy, but will keep them comfortable all year-round.

TYPES OF AIR CONDITIONERS There are two main types of air conditioners on the market – refrigerative and evaporative. It is important to consider which is suitable for your climate, be it a tropical or dry environment.

A refrigerative air conditioner cools the air via a method of heat extraction called refrigeration. This type of air conditioner is effective in tropical climates where high humidity is present.

Air conditioners can currently be rated up to 10 stars. If a product is rated at 6 stars or less, it will not show the extra star ‘super efficiency rating’ band.

On the other hand, evaporative air conditioners can drop the temperature of dry air significantly through the transition of water to vapour (evaporation), which can cool air using much less energy than refrigeration. This method of cooling is only effective in dry climates.

However, looking at the stars alone is not helpful, as the performance of a large appliance that is capable of heating and cooling a 200sqm house cannot be compared to a small product designed to condition a small bedroom. This means that the cooling and/or heating capacity required to heat or cool the room/house, which can be found on the power input label (measured in kilowatts (kW), needs to be determined before energy efficiency is considered.

Common products available include split system (non-ducted), window/wall units, ducted systems, multi-split system, double/ triple split system, and portable products.

THE E3 PROGRAM The Equipment Energy Efficiency (E3) Program is a collaboration between the Australian Government states and territories, and the New Zealand Government which aims to improve the energy efficiency of appliances used in Australia and New Zealand. Managed by the Greenhouse Energy Minimum Standards (GEMS) regulator in conjunction with the Energy Efficiency Advisory Team (EEAT), the E3 Program undertakes a range of activities including energy rating labelling, setting minimum energy performance standards (MEPS), and education and training.

ENERGY RATING LABELS The Energy Rating Label is the key initiative of the E3 Program. This label communicates the energy efficiency of an appliance through the use of stars, as well as displaying the annual energy consumption. Star ratings offer a simple and fair way of comparing the energy consumption of products that perform a similar task. The more stars a product has, the more energy efficient it is. An air conditioner’s efficiency is the amount of cooling (or heating) capacity (output) per unit of energy it consumes (input). Air conditioners have two different energy labels: one for air conditioners that provide cooling only, and another for air conditioners that provide heating as well as cooling. All domestic single phase, non-ducted air conditioners must carry an Energy Rating Label, but it is only voluntary for ducted systems.

SIZE DOES MATTER When purchasing a new air conditioner, it is important to ensure you’re selecting a suitably sized unit for your application. While air conditioners appear to look quite similar, they come with a diverse range of heating and/or cooling capacities. Sizing for air conditioners is provided as a kilowatt (kW) capacity output figure. Many elements within a home will impact the size of the air conditioner you require. These include whether you are looking to heat/cool a single room, a larger space or your entire home, size of the room/ home, external wall materials, insulation levels, and how many windows you have, their glazing, shading and orientation. Making sure you have selected an appropriate sized air conditioner will mean your clients are comfortable in their homes and using no more energy than is required.

RECENT INITIATIVES At a meeting in Kigali, Rwanda, on October 15, 197 parties agreed to an amendment in the Montreal Protocol, which would diminish the worldwide use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), a group of greenhouse gases used predominantly in air conditioning and refrigeration. The Montreal Protocol is an international agreement designed to protect the stratospheric ozone layer, which was originally signed in 1987. It sets out a mandatory timetable for the phase out of ozone depleting substances. The World Bank says that the new amendment could “reduce the rise in the global mean temperature by 0.5 degrees Celsius by the end of the century.” Here are seven energy efficient air conditioners available on the Australian market:


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AIR CONDITIONING & VENTILATION

MSZ-GL SERIES BY MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC Mitsubishi Electric Australia recently released the MSZ-GL series of domestic air conditioners, featuring R32 refrigerant technology. Energy ratings for all MSZ-GL models have improved compared to the R410A MSZ-GE Series. The 2.5 kW model, in particular, has a 5.5 Energy Rating making it the most energy efficient model in its class. Long-term efficiency and performance have been considered with an anti-corrosion treatment applied to the heat exchanger of the outdoor unit. The coating, which Mitsubishi Electric call the Blue Fin Condenser, prevents the corrosion of the aluminium fins caused by salt in the air, especially in coastal areas. The MSZ-GL series includes capacities from 2.5 kW through to 8.0 kW.

ESP PLATINUM SERIES BY ACTRON AIR Actron Air’s ducted ESP Platinum series features a Tru-Inverter compressor which reaches the desired temperature faster and smoother than conventional inverter technology, and maintains temperature to within +/- 0.3°C at the sensor location. Its variable fan technology delivers just the right amount of conditioned air to the zones you want, right down to 20 per cent of the total airflow volume. And, its energy smart zoning means you can condition only the areas you want, right down to a single room. Actron’s energy modelling shows that ESP Platinum is 75 per cent more efficient than conventional fixed speed air conditioners and can save up to $900 a year on energy bills.

US7 INVERTER SPLIT SYSTEM BY DAIKIN Daikin’s US7 inverter split system is the only split system in Australia to achieve a 7 Star ‘super efficiency rating’* using the refrigerant, R32. It provides premium air quality with its humidifying, dehumidifying, ventilating and air purification capabilities that have made it a Sensitive Choice approved product by the National Asthma Council of Australia. Other built-in energy efficient technologies include; 2-Area Intelligent Eye sensors which automatically enable energy saving operations when the room is unoccupied for 20 minutes. *applies only to 2.5kW unit


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DC HYBRID INVERTER BY TOSHIBA Toshiba has combined two technologies for its ducted air conditioners, creating the “DC Hybrid Inverter� that automatically chooses the better of the two control methods based on the actual conditions at the time. This solution provides high capacity only when it is necessary while also minimising running costs. On very cold winter days, or hot summer days the Toshiba DC Inverter uses PAM (pulse amplitude modulation). When conditions are less severe it will use PWM (pulse width modulation). As a result Toshiba air conditioners offer a great reduction in energy consumption without compromising the powerful operation.

REVERSE CYCLE AIR CONDITIONING BY FUJITSU Fujitsu claim that its reverse cycle air conditioning systems are one of the most cost effective and efficient ways of keeping the home cool all summer. It features a suite of technologies, like built-in human sensor control, inverter technology, DC fan motors and programmable weekly timers, with some models reaching a 5 Star energy rating.

360 CASSETTE BY SAMSUNG The Samsung 360 Cassette uses omnidirectional airflow discharge which provides fast and even temperature control by reducing minimal hot spots and cold spots. Samsung says its circular design cassette improves performance and energy efficiency.

REVERSE CYCLE SPLIT SYSTEM BY LG The LG Premium 2.5kW Reverse Cycle Split System is an LG P-series air conditioner. Equipped with Active Energy Control, the series allow users to cap energy consumption for improved power consumption at a reduced cooling output. Wi-Fi smart control lets users control energy usage. Additionally, the standby mode feature minimises standby electricity consumption when air conditioner is not in use.


Introducing the

Winners

Photography by Peter Bennetts


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS CELEBRATE PLAYFUL, SOCIALLY ENRICHING AND ENVIRONMENTALLY RESPONSIBLE DESIGN

[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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HE UNCOMPROMISING EFFORTS OF AUSTRALIA’S BEST ARCHITECTS, BUILDERS AND DESIGNERS TO CURB THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT OF THE NATION’S BUILT ENVIRONMENT WAS THE REAL CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION AT THE 2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS, HELD 13 OCTOBER IN SYDNEY. While it was the immensely sustainable 88 Angel Street multi-residential project in Sydney that took the program’s top gong, the Best of the Best Award, the biggest achievement was the number of people who turned out to celebrate and support what was once a fringe issue in Australia’s building industry – sustainability. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the Sustainability Awards and by taking the Best of the Best Award, 88 Angel Street by Steele Associates Architects continued a trend for the program set three years ago by being the third multi-residential project in as many years to win the top prize. In 2014 it was Breathe Architecture’s now well-known The Commons apartments that took the trophy, while in 2015 it was an Indigenous elders centre in Western Australia by Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects which shocked the community by winning the coveted honour. But according to the awards jury, the message from 88 Angel Street has the potential to be as significant, if not more significant, as the two Best of the Best projects that precede it.

“Never before has sustainable housing been more important to our cities as it is today,” said the jury. “We’re urbanising on an unprecedented scale and we need comfortable, playful, socially enriching and environmentally friendly housing options if we want to accommodate our population in a humane and sustainable manner.” “88 Angel Street, in all of its meticulous commitment to best practice sustainable building and material procurement, is certainly one of those options, and we hope that this award will encourage many more inner city developments just like it.” ‘Comfortable’, ‘playful’, ‘socially enriching’ and ‘environmentally friendly’ were common themes among all of the winning projects and products for 2016. From the near 10-Star Mildura Eco Living Centre in rural Victoria by EME Design (Small Commercial winner), to McGlashan Everist’s Building 56 Redevelopment at Monash University (Large Commercial), sustainability as the central and holistic concern in development was key driver for all the winning designers.

To mark the 10 year anniversary of the Sustainability Awards, a Best Newcomer and Lifetime Achievement award were also handed out. The Best Newcomer went to Alexander Symes of Alexander Symes Architect who was recognised for his recent design work for Dresden Optic as well as his recent launch of Big World Homes, a modular, flat-packed, off-grid tiny home design that will be used to create off-grid homeowner communities on unused land, like brownfields and open spaces, throughout Australia. Professor Ken Maher, Hassell fellow and current President of the Australian Institute of Architects, was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award, receiving a standing ovation from the audience for his undying and frankly excitable commitment to improving the built environment in Australia over the course of his career. A total of 14 awards were handed out on the evening in what was the program’s biggest year in terms of entries, categories, sponsors, judging panel and attendees at the gala event. Additional and project information on all finalists and winners are available here: www.architectureanddesign.com.au/2016-sustainability-awards Infolink|BPN is very proud to reveal the 2016 Sustainability Awards winners:


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BEST OF THE BEST: 88 ANGEL STREET BY STEELE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNA ZHU IMAGE: OLIVER STEELE (STEELE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS) AND RENEE MCGINTY (CSR GYPROCK)

“The more we read about this project, the more it just kept on giving and giving. From its Envirocrete slab and carpets made from recycled PET, to its green roof and huge solar array, the environmental footprint of this building has been deeply considered top to bottom. The building provides a sense of optimism to the industry by demonstrating that real sustainability can compete in the market with the status quo and be an integral part of commercially-successful developments.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Make an impression Acoustic performance with greater design freedom. New, expanded Perforated Plasterboard Range – eight pattern options available. gyprock.com.au/perforated

RIGITONE MATRIX 12mm SQUARE


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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT: KEN MAHER IMAGE: KEN MAHER (HASSELL) AND SCOTT EVANS (ZEGO)

“As a Life Fellow of the AIA, the AILA, the GBCA and Hassell, Ken’s allegiance to the industry is obviously unwavering. He is also a Professor at UNSW, and current President of the AIA and ASBEC. His recognition as a designer is reflected in the numerous awards received for projects he has led, including many that have won Sustainability Awards. He was an honorary guest and keynote speaker at the 2015 Sustainability Awards and in 2016 is the obvious and deserving choice for our first Lifetime Achievement Award.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

ZEGO INSULATED CONCRETE FORMS

A Sustainable Alternative To Conventional Building Systems • Multiple applications • Fast and precise construction • 6-9 times stronger than conventional brick and block • 100% recyclable • Reduces heating and cooling costs by 50-80%

www.zego.com.au | 1300 13 9346


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

BEST NEWCOMER: ALEXANDER SYMES ARCHITECT IMAGE: CRAIG HARDMAN OF HP (CATEGORY SPONSOR) AND ALEXANDER SYMES OF ALEXANDER SYMES ARCHITECT

“Alex joined Arup in 2010 to up-skill himself as a building physicist and facade engineer. Over the five years at Arup, Alex learnt the fundamentals of environmental quantification, sustainability governance frameworks and developed his capability to detail striking facades that were also responsible. Alex established Alexander Symes Architect in earnest in March 2014 and has since delivered a number of award winning projects including the Dresden Mobile (2016 Sustainability Awards finalist) and a modular, flat-packed, off-grid tiny home called Big World Homes.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Multi-function. Multi-user. Multi-benefit.

Boost your productivity with the HP DesignJet T2530 eMultifunction Printer

• Printing, copying and scanning capabilities in one device • Produce fast, high-quality results—get A1 size prints in 21 seconds • HP Mobile Printing¹ allows you to easily integrate with your other office devices Call us at 1800 816 042 for more details. 1 Local printing requires mobile device and printer to be on the same network (usually Wi-Fi access points bridge wireless to wired connections). Wireless performance is dependent on physical environment and distance from access point. Wireless operations are compatible with 2.4 GHz operations only. Remote printing requires an Internet connection to an HP web-connected printer. Wireless broadband use requires separately purchased service contract for mobile devices. Check with service provider for coverage and availability in your area. See www.hp.com/go/designjetmobility for more details.


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

PUBLIC BUILDING: SALTWATER COMMUNITY CENTRE BY CROXON RAMSAY ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIANNA SNAPE IMAGE: NICOLAJ DAHL OF CSR VIRIDIAN (CATEGORY SPONSOR) AND JEFF GABRIEL OF CROXON RAMSAY ARCHITECTS

“Croxon Ramsay’s comprehensive approach to sustainability is embedded throughout the design of the Saltwater Community Centre. From passive design elements to appropriate use of technology and active systems, the project’s energy performance and environmental message has been meticulously considered. Croxon Ramsay’s commitment to social sustainability and its efforts to bring its clients on the project’s journey is also to be commended.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Viridian Glass, beautiful buildings people love. Camberwell Public Library, Victoria

Visit us at ViridianGlass.com CSRViridian


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OFFICE AND RETAIL FITOUT: ST.GEORGE BARANGAROO BY RFA ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARBEL KHABBAZ IMAGE: WAYNE FOSTER OF QUATTRO SHADING (CATEGORY SPONSOR) ANDREW IP AND SARAH LENTHALL OF RFA ARCHITECTS, KATHRINA ESTELLA OF WESTPAC DESIGN

“This fitout project sets a new benchmark in the Australian market, driven hard by the holistic approach taken by developers Lendlease in their delivery of Barangaroo. It also goes beyond efficiency into lifecycle assessment of products and materials as well as social sustainability and education outcomes. An important part of this project is that the building is offered to charity organisations outside of work hours to benefit the community.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

LARGE COMMERCIAL: BUILDING 56 REDEVELOPMENT, MONASH UNIVERSITY BY MCGLASHAN EVERIST IMAGE: KENDALL WALLER OF PREMIUM FLOORS (CATEGORY SPONSOR), TOM SHARP AND JOHN LEE OF MCGLASHAN EVERIST

“This transformation of an asbestos clad warehouse into an energy-efficient and comfortable space is a benchmark example of adaptive reuse, something we should always consider before knocking down and building new. The architect’s aim for Passive House standard is commendable and its impressive 6 Star NABERS equivalent is fantastic considering the building was once a derelict underused facility leaking from every seam.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

SUSTAINABILITY AND RECYCLED CONTENT IS KEY The decimation of the world’s native forests is an issue that is important to all of us, as the degradation of the forest impacts the quality of all life immensely. A matter of particular importance at the moment is the illegal logging of Russian forests for European Oak, Ash and Elm. As identified in 2013, in a report on this issue by the WWF; “WWF analysis of Russian customs data revealed that in 2010, the volume of Mongolian oak logged for export exceeded the volume authorized for logging by 200 percent— meaning that at least half of the oak being exported across the border to China was stolen”. (source: https://www.worldwildlife.org/publications/illegal-logging-in-the-russian-far-east-global demand-and-taiga-destruction)

Most of our wood floor ranges are PEFC certified, while Premium Floors carries full Chain of Custody Certification (COC) for the PEFC program. (www.PEFC.org)

Contact us at commercial@premiumfloors.com.au Phone number 03 9798 0808 www.premiumfloors.com.au


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

SMALL COMMERCIAL: MILDURA ECO LIVING CENTRE BY EME DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUKE MIDDLETON IMAGE: MAREE MARSHALL OF SALT3 (CATEGORY SPONSOR), LUKE MIDLETON OF EME DESIGN AND BRAD PARKER OF SALT3

“This building embraces sustainable design and construction from start to finish. It is an inspiring example to all building types on what can be achieved in a fluctuating climate at an affordable cost. More importantly, MELC integrates ESD into a playful and interactive educational space, facilitating a new way of learning which has sustainability at its very core.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

WASTE ENGINEERING WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS GREEN STAR WASTE DESIGN TRAFFIC ENGINEERING ROAD SAFETY AUDITS Getting the balance right between design, environmental performance and usability.

visit salt3.com.au today Prefer a conversation over the phone? SYD +61 2 8415 9781 MEL +61 3 9633 1900 EAST GIPPSLAND AUCKLAND


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

MULTI-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL: 88 ANGEL STREET BY STEELE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNA ZHU IMAGE: PETER WOOD OF USG BORAL (CATEGORY SPONSOR) AND OLIVER STEELE OF STEELE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS

“Never before has sustainable housing been more important to our cities as it is today. We’re urbanising on an unprecedented scale and we need comfortable, playful, socially enriching and environmentally friendly housing options if we want to accommodate our population in a humane and sustainable manner. 88 Angel Street, in all of its meticulous commitment to best practice sustainable building and material procurement, is certainly one of those options, and we hope that this award will encourage many more inner city developments just like it.”– awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

USG BORAL CONGRATULATES MULTIRESIDENTIAL AWARD CATEGORY AND ‘BEST OF THE BEST’ WINNER STEELE ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS FOR 88 ANGEL STREET THANK YOU TO ALL THE OTHER FINALISTS OF THE MULTIRESIDENTIAL CATEGORY FOR YOUR OUTSTANDING ENTRIES At USG Boral, we strive for continuous improvement in our support and service of customers, business partners and stakeholders. USG Boral is a leading manufacturer and supplier of gypsum boardbased wall and ceiling lining systems, mineral fibre acoustical ceiling systems, metal framing, joint compounds, high-performance panels and accessories throughout Asia, Australasia and the Middle East.

SALES ENQUIRIES 1800 003 377 ARCHITECTURAL ENQUIRIES 1800 226 215 USGBoral.com Proud Sponsor of the Multi-Residential Sustainability Award © 2016 USG Boral. All rights reserved. USG BORAL and INNOVATION INSPIRED BY YOU are trademarks of USG Boral Building Products or one or more of its affiliates. UB1001


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

HERITAGE: BEYOND HOUSE BY BEN CALLERY ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER BENNETTS IMAGE: BEN CALLERY OF BEN CALLERY ARCHITECTS AND CHRISTOPHER SCHIAVELLO OF SCHIAVELLO (CATEGORY SPONSOR)

“This is a highly impressive project. It demonstrates that the heritage constraints of buildings need not limit sustainability outcomes. The architect has delivered an impressive residential project with the guidance of an ambitious brief from the owners. Attention has been paid to renewable energy, watersaving, passive design, material selection, windows and glazing lighting, and low VOC finishes. This project is an excellent entry in the category and for the awards program in general.” – awards jury

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Building our future. Schiavello is helping to shape the future of Australia’s great cities. With half a century of experience and a national construction presence, we continue to push the boundaries of innovation, precision, and technical excellence in everything we do.

@schiavellogroup | schiavello.com

MELBOURNE SYDNEY BRISBANE ADELAIDE PERTH

PROJECT_PRIMA TOWER, MELBOURNE


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SINGLE DWELLING: ALEXANDRIA RESIDENCE BY CPLUSC ARCHITECTURAL WORKSHOP PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID O’SULLIVAN IMAGE: CLINTON COLE OF CPLUSC ARCHITECTURAL WORKSHOP AND STEVE FRANETIC OF KNAUF INSULATION (CATEGORY SPONSOR)

“It’s alive! This kind of integration of building and edible landscape is what we need to see a lot more of. The shrinking of the new building’s GFA relative to the old is a brave move by the client and the floor plan does good things for layout in its terrace context with mixed north orientation. With all its permaculture, aquaponics, near carbon-neutrality and its distinctive street façade, this really is both a beautiful and sustainable response to such a constrained inner-city space.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Naturally brown. Certified green. Earthwool® insulation, the ONLY GreenTag Level A insulation available in Australia. Made using RECYCLED GLASS BOTTLES and with ECOSE® Technology. No added formaldehyde Non-combustible 50 year warranty


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

SINGLE DWELLING (ALTERATIONS & ADDITIONS): YARRAVILLE GARDEN HOUSE BY GUILD ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER BENNETTS IMAGE: PENNY GUILD OF GUILD ARCHITECTS AND GAIL COTTRILL OF OPEN SHUTTERS (CATEGORY SPONSOR)

“Whatever one makes of the Jekyll & Hyde approach to heritage design, and all the arch-speak attempts to make sense of it, this design actually kicks goals, and is backed by high quality data and information. Passive design is excellent, the mechanical systems are smart and well thought out, and the water use is good too. Beyond this, Yarraville Garden House is a beautiful piece of architecture with a very powerful roof.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Open Shutters represents the ultimate in window furnishing. With over 20 years’ experience in designing and manufacturing custom made shutters, our clients have the confidence that our bespoke solutions are able to satisfy the requirements of their projects.

If you can imagine it, we can create it.


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

GREEN BUILDING PRODUCT: JUNGLEFY BREATHING WALL BY JUNGLEFY IMAGE: KEVIN ALLEYNE OF VERTILUX (CATEGORY SPONSOR) AND JOCK AND HANNA GAMMON OF JUNGLEFY

“It’s great to see a manufacturer working with academia to substantiate the sustainability and performance claims of their products. The performance data derived from University of Technology Sydney testing will reassure building designers that choosing a Junglefy Breathing Wall is actually proven to accelerate the removal of air pollutants and thus help provide safer, more comfortable and productive working and living environments.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Providing Sustainable Window Coverings that Perform

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26/10/2016 3:19:52 PM


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

INNOVATION OF THE YEAR: GREEN BUILDING ONLINE COLLEGE BY GREEN BUILDING INSTITUTE IMAGE: ANTHONY SCOTT OF COVET (CATEGORY SPONSOR), DANIEL WURM AND RONNY MATZAT OF GREEN BUILDING INSTITUTE

“While there is no shortage of courses out there, online learning is set to become an essential part of moving the industry towards better quality and sustainable communities. The necessity is to now ensure people are taking these courses and utilising this type of learning in their organisations. Anything this awards program can do to support this initiative should be taken as it has serious potential to make an impact on the industry.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

PROUD SPONSOR OF

Ever Art Wood® series

Beautiful, Japanese made, timber alternative. Covet’s aluminium screens and cladding sets a new benchmark in natural-look timber alternatives. Designed with excellent weather resistance, and performs well to Australian fire standards. Available in a selection of profile sizes, cladding panels, textural surfaces, and unique installation options.

+61 3 9398 8128 wecovet.com.au


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2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS WINNERS

OUTDOOR STRUCTURE: SYDNEY PARK WATER RE-USE PROJECT BY TURF DESIGN STUDIO AND ENVIRONMENTAL PARTNERSHIP PHOTOGRAPHY BY ETHAN ROHLOFF

“An inspiring and innovative project that goes way beyond standard sustainability outcomes by capturing the hearts and minds of everyone who visits and reminds them about our most important resource, water. It is truly inspirational to see how Turf Design Studio and Environmental Partnership has transformed an urban stormwater management system (once a lifeless engineered solution) into a life-giving and nourishing place. It does its engineering job seamlessly with its perhaps even higher calling of engaging with people to play, get wet, perhaps fall over, but without a doubt - to love it.” – awards jury.

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION AND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS & WINNERS

Architecture & Design congratulates all of the winners, finalists and entrants from the 2016 Sustainability Awards. Special thanks goes to our judges – Alastair Coustock, Darryl Stuckey, Dick Clarke, Jeremy Spencer, Silvia Cupik, Suzie Barnett and Tony Arnel, and to all of our sponsors. We look forward to coming back bigger and better next year.

THANK YOU TO OUR 2016 SPONSORS:


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product showcases

Get the Information you need AustraliA’s leading source of new & exciting building and Architectural products

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showcase index

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ACOUSTICS Sound modelling apps for project design

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605AX

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606AX

Aluminium cladding & roofing

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607AX

Façade and roof systems

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608AX

Glazed clay bricks

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609AX

An innovative, highly versatile solid external wall system

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610AX

Aluminium linear façade system

60

611AX

High performance fitness flooring

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612AX

Slip resistant and hygienic safety flooring

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613AX

Pre-finished timber flooring

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614AX

Premium instant filtered boiling and chilled drinking water system

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628AX

Perspex sweet pastels range

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615AX

Natural clay pavers

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616AX

Interlocking plastic grass pavers

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617AX

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618AX

Multifunction printers

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619AX

Staff lockers

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620AX

Aluminium cladding & roofing

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607AX

Roof access hatches

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621AX

Mechanical opening and soft closing drawer hardware

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622AX

Double space carparking lifts

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623AX

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624AX

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CEILINGS & INTERNAL WALL MATERIALS Superior strength decorative plywood

EXTERIOR WALL MATERIALS

FLOORS & FLOORING ACCESSORIES

KITCHENS & KITCHEN EQUIPMENT

LANDSCAPING & OUTDOORS

LIGHTING Strip lighting and aluminum extrusions

OFFICE EQUIPMENT

ROOFING & FITTINGS

SHELVING & STORAGE

STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS Firm parallel chord trusses for flooring and roofing systems

WASTE MANAGEMENT New metallic colours for grates

WATER CONSERVATION A new name in water tanks

WINDOWS & GLAZING Aluminium window systems


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

NEW METALLIC COLOURS FOR STORMTECH GRATES Inspired by worldwide colour trends Stormtech has launched three new metallic colours – Sunlit Brass, Blazing Copper and Rustic Bronze – to offer more creative options to designers, specifiers and consumers. The colour finishes are available across the whole range of Stormtech’s designer grates and drains, from their standard 100, 65 or 38 Range through to fully customised options. These metallic finishes will add sparkle and give a sleek and luminous finish to any contemporary design, offering a luxurious and glamorous feel whether it be timeless brass or trendy copper. Stormtech has been providing inspiring architectural drainage solutions for home and commercial building projects for over a quarter of a century. Used in bathrooms, showers, thresholds, paved areas, driveways, pools and pool surrounds, Stormtech grates and drains are known for sleek design, innovation and practicality. All Stormtech products are Australian made and WaterMark certified. With a proud commitment to eco-friendly design, Stormtech offers the only linear drainage product in the world with Global GreenTag certification.

625AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

DOUBLE SPACER CAR PARKING LIFT LevantaPark’s Double Spacer vehicle lift offers you a truly independent parking solution for up to four cars. Thanks to its clever design, each car can easily be driven into and out of its parking space – without the need to move or disrupt any other vehicle. Its ingenious pit layout is just the start of Double Spacer’s technical innovations. The platform is fully galvanised above and below, offering increased strength, rigidity and durability. The smooth, flat platform design means no vehicle fluids can drip down onto the parked cars below. And the dual hydraulic cylinders provide easy-to-use, reliable operation. Double Spacer is an extremely versatile parking solution, allowing asymmetrical positioning of even just two cars on different sides of the platforms. It all adds up to one of the highest quality, safest parking platforms in the world – available now in Australia exclusively from LevantaPark. It’s the ideal parking design solution for residential apartment buildings. For full tech specs and product gallery visit levantapark.com.au 1300 993 548 levantapark.com.au enquiries@levantapark.com.au

623AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

KINGSPAN WATER – THE NEW NAME FOR TANKWORKS Since 1934, Tankworks Australia has manufactured quality, longlasting steel water tanks and accessories for the Australian market. In 2016, Tankworks joined the Kingspan Group, a global manufacturer of building products, including pre-insulated building panels and environmental and renewable energy technologies. Today, Kingspan Water continues as Australia’s market leader in water storage and rainwater harvesting. Continued innovation in manufacturing and technology around water storage and rainwater harvesting means Kingspan Water is the preferred supplier to many Australian businesses in the design and construction sector. Kingspan Water focuses on producing only the highest quality products out of its three Australian factories. The offering includes AQUAPLATE® made to measure steel tanks (500- 29,000 litres) for residential and commercial use and the iconic Galvanised Z450 steel tank (24,000- 542,000 litres), built on site, for commercial and rural use. Kingspan Water also designs stormwater detention and retention systems to suit almost any application. Kingspan Water steel tanks can supply a range of fire compliant static supply and domestic supply water tanks. Kingspan Water tanks are available for download as BIM files for ArchiCAD and Revit at kingspanwater.com.au. In addition, the Sizea-lator allows you to quickly design a tank and have it quoted, or alternatively you can upload plans and details to the website and a Kingspan Water expert will contact you. kingspanwater.com.au | 1300 736 562 | sales.au@kingspan.com

626AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

THE EVOLUTION OF MOTION Minimalist looks with expansive surfaces, clear cut designs and handle-less fronts put the spotlight on the functionality of the furniture. TIP-ON BLUMOTION for MOVENTO helps to discover the many different options you have to create handle-less furniture design. TIP-ON BLUMOTION is a 100% mechanical opening and soft closing support system that offers functional opening and closing support to handle-less furniture designs in living areas throughout the home. Handle-less drawers and pullouts open reliably by pressing on the front and close silently and effortlessly. TIP-ON BLUMOTION applications have a small front gap of only 2.5mm. Additionally the synchronisation feature enlarges the opening trigger for wide and high fronts. The latest MOVENTO brochure is available for complementary download from blum.com or email info.au@blum.com to receive a copy.

622AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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ACHIEVE MORE WITH ALUMINIUM CLADDING & ROOFING Aluminium is a top choice for architectural cladding and roofing providing superior quality, looks and durability compared to alternatives.

HIGH PERFORMANCE FITNESS FLOORING Neoflex™ High Performance Fitness Flooring has set the bench mark for flooring in the fitness industry since 1985. Rephouse manufactures and supplies a complete range of fitness flooring products for cardio & strength areas, agility & functional areas, free-weight areas, acoustic solutions and sprint tracks. Product can be supplied in rolls, square tiles and interlocking tiles with an optional Fresh Finish™ coating for easier cleaning. Logos and graphics can be easily incorporated to provide stunning effects. Don’t just settle for another boring black floor. Utilise our free design facility to see what can be achieved with Rephouse Fitness Flooring.

612AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

ZC Technical’s aluminium cladding and roofing solutions offer all the benefits of an organic, non-ferrous metal and more. For design and construction professionals, aluminium means design freedom, easy installation due to its lightweight, five stylish colour choices, and a neat finish and appearance. Greater functionality, flexibility and exceptional quality. It requires no maintenance and with a 40+ year lifespan, its incredible durability and corrosion resistance is further strengthened by PVDF paint. This allows it to be used in the toughest environments.

607AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

NO ORDINARY FIN SYSTEM Fintrax is the patented aluminium linear façade system specifically designed and engineered by Woodform Architectural for large-scale external facades. Typical Fintrax applications are vertical exterior fins to the façade of multistorey carparks or the first six levels of commercial or multiresidential buildings. Size, Shape and Space are the specific elements of Fintrax that enable designers to realise their creative vision. Fintrax profile size options are developed as stackable building blocks that can be combined into virtually any sequence, to allow Freedom of ExpressionTM. A total of 21 ‘building block’ profile extrusions gives you 61 size and shape options to choose from. Fintrax frees you from having to default back to conventional rectangular designs. For more information visit www.woodformarch.com or Freecall 1800 008 828

611AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

DESIGN BETTER-SOUNDING SPACES IN MINUTES • The world’s leading sound modelling app helps you easily design the sound of any room • Listen to any number of sounds inside and outside a virtual room • Simply change the room design and hear the difference immediately • Make perfect acoustic choices and showcase them to clients • An innovative app for your iPad – take it everywhere • Designed by acoustic experts • Very inexpensive – and there’s even a free version • Pro version includes heaps of extra features SoundSoup-Pro and SoundSoup-Free are on the Apple iPad App Store. Download them and try them out – hearing is believing! www.stirfrysoftware.com.au | +61 (0)407 461 100

605AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES HEBEL POWERPANELXL: AN INNOVATIVE, HIGHLY VERSATILE SOLID EXTERNAL WALL SYSTEM THAT GOES UP FAST Hebel PowerPanelXL external wall system provides design flexibility with thermal and acoustic insulation, making it an ideal choice for residential houses and low rise multiresidential projects.

610AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

FIRM PARALLEL CHORD TRUSSES FOR FLOORING AND ROOFING SYSTEMS FROM MITEK AUSTRALIA MiTek’s PosiStruts Open Web Truss System, the parallel chord truss, offer immediate access for plumbing, air conditioning, electrical and other services. PosiStruts Parallel Chord Trusses are quick and easy to install and have a lightweight design.

624AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

BURLESQUE™ GLAZED CLAY BRICKS BY AUSTRAL BRICKS Austral’s Burlesque™ are highly glazed, highly versatile and high gloss bricks for making bold statements, either mixed with conventional bricks or on their own as a feature wall. Glazed Bricks are enticing, lusciously bright and embrace a provocative style.

609AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

BENCHMARK FAÇADE AND ROOF SYSTEMS Designed using the innovative panel technology known from Kingspan, Benchmark is an architectural range of façade and roof systems. The range includes Benchmark Walls Liners, Benchmark Roofliners, Benchmark Kreate, Benchmark Karrier System, Benchmark Envolution range and Benchmark Envirodeck.

608AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

NATURAL CLAY PAVERS FROM PGH BRICKS & PAVERS PGH Pavers, are made from all natural Australian clay, sand and shale. A strong and safe paver, PGH Pavers are fired, producing long lasting colour and beauty. PGH Pavers are available in three different textural ranges; rustic, traditional or contemporary.

616AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

QUICK-STEP PREFINISHED TIMBER FLOORING FROM PREMIUM FLOORS Quick-Step Timber is Australia’s leader in pre-finished timber flooring. It is, unlike any other timber flooring options, pre-finished with six coats of hard wearing UV lacquer – SRT Nano, fast and easy to install and maintain.

614AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

TURFPAVE® XD INTERLOCKING PLASTIC GRASS PAVERS

SLIP RESISTANT AND HYGIENIC ALTRO SAFETY FLOORING

The TurfPave® XD light and durable interlocking plastic grass paver assists in creating grassed areas where pedestrian and vehicle traffic occur. They are used in the construction of emergency access, overflow parking, home driveways, golf buggy paths and slope stabilisation.

Altro are a leading UK, familyowned manufacturer and supplier of wall and floor coverings, founded in 1919. Altro’s success is due to determined innovation - matching evolving needs for surfaces that are both decorative and practical. Altro safety flooring is commonly used in healthcare, leisure and retail, food, drink and hospitality, and education.

617AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

613AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES PERSPEX® SWEET PASTELS RANGE The range of Perspex from Mitchell Group now offers a new colour set in sweet pastels. The Perspex range is compliant with EU food contact regulations and is easy to shape, form and fabricate. With a 3mm thickness as the standard size, each sheet has two sides with different finishes; the matt and the gloss surface.

615AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

STRIP LIGHTING AND ALUMINUM EXTRUSIONS

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

ARMOURPANEL - A SUPERIOR STRENGTH DECORATIVE PLYWOOD Big River Armourpanel offers superior strength decorative plywood that has been designed, tested and approved to tolerate extremes of heat and humidity, and to resist shrinkage. It’s strength and stability make it ideal as flooring, ceiling or wall linings in hard-wearing areas.

606AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

ROOF ACCESS HATCHES BY AMBOSS ACCESS LADDERS PTY LTD AM-BOSS Access Ladders Pty Ltd is the front-runner in Building Code of Australia (BCA) compliant pull-down access ladders. It currently offers the only pull-down access ladder on the Australian market that is CodeMark Certified.

621AX

Present your work in precise, detailed colour rendered with six original HP inks including grey and photo black. Produce professional CAD and GIS drawings with consistent colour accuracy, and crisp, sharp lines, up to 2400 dpi. Using the HP DesignJet T2530 Multifunction Printer, get A1-size prints in 21 seconds.

619AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

STAFF LOCKERS FROM AUSSIE LOCKERS

BoscoLighting’s range of aluminium extrusions has been enhanced to allow more choices with indirect lighting as well as task and decorative lighting. This allows architects and designers more flexibility and ways to realise their vision for their projects.

618AX

HP DESIGNJET T2530 MULTIFUNCTION PRINTER

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

Designed with state-of-the-art technology, Aussie Lockers range of Staff Lockers can be accessed with RFID wrist bands, RFID cards and also proximity and security cards. Once a locker has been assigned to the user, they simply have to touch their card/ wristband at the main frame and their locker will open.

620AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

BILLI ECO: PREMIUM INSTANT FILTERED BOILING AND CHILLED DRINKING WATER SYSTEM With a design focus on space saving, Billi’s Boiling and Chilled systems are often half the size of comparative underbench products, allowing you to make the most of the available area. The Eco sets a new standard for space saving at an amazing 180mm wide.

628AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

SCHUECO ALUMINIUM WINDOW SYSTEMS FOR RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL AND FOR INCLUSION IN STRUCTURAL FACADES AND CURTAIN-WALLING Schueco’s range of insulated aluminium windows encompasses systems designed for residential and commercial buildings.

627AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


NEXT GENERATION KEYLESS ACCESS CONTROL Next-generation locking solutions for world-class buildings. Control – Who can access what, where and when.

XS4 Platform.

Next-generation keyless access control.

Cost effective – Say goodbye to mechanical keys and key replacement expense.

— Electronic Locks

Audit trail – Door visited, time, access granted or rejected. — Mobile access

Stand- alone electronic locks – Long battery life. Smart building – Integrate all your users’ and staff’s security needs in a single card.

— Wall readers & door controllers

Lockdown – Essential function in emergency situations.

Electronic access made simple

• API Locksmiths can assist with product selection. • API Locksmiths can supply, install and maintain your selected system. • API Locksmiths specialise in both new building and upgrade projects.

Telephone 131539 www.131KEY.com.au

— Electronic Cylinders

— Management software


Be our region’s talent on the global stage. The INDE.Awards from Indesign Media is the new benchmark for design awards across the Asia Pacific region. This is a diverse and dynamic corner of the world. The INDE.Awards recognise the region’s best and most creative design on its own terms. Enter Now indeawards.com

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8/11/2016 1:37 PM

Infolink | Building Products News, November/December 2016  
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