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FINALISTS REVEALED + A GOOD LOOK AT SMART METERING | NEW PERMEABLE PAVING TECH | CARPET TILES LEADING THE WAYFINDING


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

I

N JULY, I HAD GOOD REASON TO BE EXCITED ABOUT A SUSTAINABILITY TRADESHOW COMING TO SYDNEY THAT LOOKED TO BE RIGHT UP MY ALLEY.

The event was billed as the nation’s leading showcase of green building products, one that would provide suppliers and manufacturers a platform to pitch their latest offerings to an audience truly interested in sustainable building. But while it was refreshing to hear exhibitors voicing the sustainability story of their products, I have to admit that numbers were low on the day and I was left wondering why. My question was soon answered when an industry Q & A panel chaired by Sustainability Awards judge, Alistair Coulstock got underway a bit later. The panel addressed four or five key obstacles they felt were hindering the progress of green building in Australia but in doing so seemed to continually return to one core issue—our culture. The consensus around the panel was that Australia is performing well below its potential in terms of sustainable building because, quite simply, the majority of us don’t care for it. (Maybe this was why attendance at the event was low!) So how then do we change this culture? How do we make people care about the sustainability of their buildings? The panel offered a number of solutions, most of which are too

sophisticated to summarise here, however there was a general consensus that change needed to come on a few fronts and from a variety of stakeholders, not least the design sector who hold a significant position of influence in society. After the panel I talked with Sophie Solomon, an architect and long-time supporter of Architecture & Design, and her take was that the media could do more to celebrate and encourage those within the industry making conscious efforts to not just design, manufacture, and build green but also those who continually hold the line against compromise to do so. This was the founding premise of the Sustainability Awards, one (I hope) it still hasn’t lost sight of after 10 years. The Sustainability Awards are as much about discovering new buildings, products and designers as they are about commercialising and propagating their success to the public as real and valuable alternatives to the status quo. It’s a testament to you, the designer and reader, that in its tenth year, The Sustainability Awards received a record number of entrants and more publicity than ever before. But we can still do better! Nevertheless we’re very proud to present the 2016 Sustainability Awards shortlist on page 38 and welcome you to visit Architecture & Design to view full summaries and additional images of all the products and projects at the forefront of sustainable building in Australia.

ON THE COVER: BVN’S PROJECT ZERO IN ALDERLEY QUEENSLAND IS A FINALIST FOR THE 2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS IN THE RESIDENTIAL (ALTERATIONS & ADDITIONS) CATEGORY. SEE ALL THE FINALISTS FROM PAGE 38. PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER FREDERICK JONES

NEWS

4 Major asbestos scare sparks

DESIGNER JULIA GEE JULIA.GEE@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

JOURNALIST NICHOLAS RIDER

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0612 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 ADRIAN.WILSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

CONTRIBUTORS GERALDINE CHUA LUCY MARRETT JASMINE O’DONAGHUE

26

A quick look at what’s next for skylights in Australia

national investigation and calls for senate inquiry

HEALTH & AGED CARE

5 Tests highlight benefits of CLT/

30 Group GSA play with colour

concrete hybrid construction

and geometry for Victorian health services project

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

7 A technology snapshot of new smart energy metering

10 Two case studies demonstrate efficiency of smart metering

FLOORS & FLOORING ACCESSORIES

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14 See why carpet tiles are

Aged care following high-rise trends

15 The latest carpet tile product

Architecture & Design’s Care Connect event a resounding success

BRICKS & PAVERS

2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS

suitable for wayfinding strategies

offerings from Australian suppliers

19 The latest updates on

36

38 All 64 finalists revealed

permeable paving technology and products in Australia

in 10th anniversary special

PRODUCT SHOWCASES

53 Information on new and 19

NATHAN JOHNSON

DEPUTY EDITOR NATHAN JOHNSON NATHAN.JOHNSON@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

NATURAL LIGHTING

exciting building and architectural products. Introduced with a full directory and how to enquire

CLIENT SUCCESS MANAGER SHEREE BRYANT PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0958 SHEREE.BRYANT@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1300 360 126 ISSN 1039-9704

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN LEVEL 1, 50 MARSHALL STREET, SURRY HILLS NSW 2010 PHONE: +61 (0)2 9368 0150 WWW.ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,303 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION SEPTEMBER 2015

© Copyright Architecture & Design 2016. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

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NEWS

ASBESTOS SCARE SPARKS SHIPMENT TESTING AND NATIONAL INVESTIGATION YOU SAID IT

“As they say ‘the horse has bolted’. I became aware of this issue in 2009 (that’s not an error- yes, 2009). My approaches to a number of stakeholders since that time have been basically been ignored. The recent aborted Senate Enquiry on compliance was not even interested.” – RICHARD SHERIDAN, RICHARD SHERIDAN CONSULTING

A SHIPMENT SEIZED BY THE AUSTRALIAN BORDER FORCE AT PORT BRISBANE IN SEPTEMBER CONTAINED ASBESTOS-TAINTED BUILDING PRODUCTS FROM CHINESE COMPANY, YUANDA. IMAGE: PORTBRIS

Concerns that contaminated building products are making their way into Australia have resurfaced after asbestos-tainted materials from China were found at Perth’s new children’s hospital and a new government tower in Brisbane.

suspected asbestos contamination from China.

The discoveries prompted the Australian Border Force to independently test boat shipments and airfreights from Chinese company, Yuanda Australia, the façade component manufacturer linked to both the contaminations.

But as Erin Dale, Australian Border Force (ABF) Commander, explains, in China, “asbestos free” doesn’t actually mean asbestos free.

It also impelled independent testing at 28 of the 68 Australian construction sites (so far) at which Yuanda had supplied building products to in recent years. These include the Queensland Children’s Hospital in Brisbane, the Gold Coast University Hospital, Fiona Stanley Hospital in Perth, the Perth Stadium, the Royal Adelaide Hospital, ANZ Bank’s headquarters in Melbourne, Lend Lease’s Barangaroo development in Sydney and James Packer’s new Crown Towers. Independent testing at construction sites has so far yielded no asbestos discoveries, however asbestos-tainted material was found in a Yuanda shipping container at Port Brisbane. Yuanda has already dumped a third party supplier which it said had supplied the asbestostainted material discovered at Brisbane and Perth, and had also supplied a fraudulent test certificate.

ASBESTOS FREE NOT ASBESTOS FREE In February 2015 Asbestos Safety and Eradication Agency CEO Peter Tighe told the ABC that he was aware of 64 sites across the nation that had

He said the deadly substance is slipping into the country illegally from places like China, in products often certified as “asbestos free”.

“In China… a product can be asbestos-free even if it contains five per cent asbestos material,” she told the ABC. Asbestos is also not illegal in China.

CALL FOR ANOTHER SENATE INQUIRY South Australian senator Nick Xenophon wants to set up another Senate inquiry, just months after the year-long senate inquiry into non-conforming building products was shut down before it made its final report due to the double dissolution federal election. He questioned the targeted regime tactic currently used by the Australian Border Force when it comes to assessing the risk of shipments, suggesting that the selection process for whether or not products were tested for asbestos was not good enough. “When Border Force talks about having a targeted regime of enforcement, I’m pretty sceptical,” he says. “It seems that their target is an increasingly shrinking one and that’s not good enough.”

“Until we have systems in place to ensure that any product that comes in from overseas is asbestos-free then we really need to consider what we are importing, and if that means not importing similar products until that can be resolved then that’s what we should do.” – CFMEU WA-STATE SECRETARY, MICK BUCHAN CALLS FOR TEMPORARY BAN ON CHINESE BUILDING MATERIALS

” FOR DAILY NEWS AND TO COMMENT

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NEWS

TESTS HIGHLIGHT MASSIVE BENEFITS OF CLT/CONCRETE HYBRID CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM A joint research project by American architects, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, and Oregon State University concludes that there is strong evidence that a timber-concrete composite construction system can satisfy code requirements and compete in terms of structural performance with traditional construction methods. The team have been considering the possibility of using a hybrid concrete timber structure for skyscrapers since 2013 when they launched their Timber Tower Research project. The project was launched to develop a new structural system for skyscrapers that uses timber as its primary material because of its environmental benefits. Now, three years on, the team have proposed a solution called the Concrete Jointed Timber Frame, which utilises mass timber for the main structural element but reinforces weak points at connections with reinforced concrete. An 11m by 2.5m model was constructed out of a Cross-Laminate Timber (CLT) deck topped with a thin layer of reinforced concrete and tested by Oregon State Uni under load pressure from an hydraulic actuator. The system was tested for two hours under 48 different sensors and the pressure was increased until the system failed at an ultimate load of nearly 40,000kgs which is about eight times higher than required by code in the US.

THE PROPOSED SOLUTION, CALLED THE CONCRETE JOINTED TIMBER FRAME, UTILISES MASS TIMBER AS THE MAIN STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS AND STRENGTHENS WEAK POINTS (CONNECTIONS) WITH REINFORCED CONCRETE. IMAGE: SOM

According to the study, the topping slab effectively creates a rigid connection between the decks which allows floors to span between beams with a minimal cross-section.

DESIGN YOUR FUTURE AT THE MELBOURNE SCHOOL OF DESIGN study.msd.unimelb.edu.au/programs

The use of concrete, says SOM, also enhances the acoustic and fire performance of the material, two commonly heard arguments against using CLT for tall buildings. n

The University of Melbourne has a proud history of educating built environment professionals, offering accredited programs and drawing on its research excellence to deliver an innovative curriculum. We are a vibrant community of staff and students engaging in a set of professionally-relevant and industry-focused courses: • • • • • • • •

Master of Architecture Master of Architectural Engineering Master of Construction Management Master of Landscape Architecture Master of Property Master of Urban and Cultural Heritage Master of Urban Design Master of Urban Planning

Studying at the University of Melbourne, you will learn from eminent scholars and practising industry leaders. Your studies will be enriched by our thriving design culture, which offers a busy and vigorous program of exhibitions, visiting international speakers and conferences. In our award-winning building, the Melbourne School of Design supports all students to connect with their peers and industry practitioners to evolve in their chosen field. Apply now to take your place at Australia’s number one university* and build your career with the Melbourne School of Design. * Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2015-2016 CRICOS 00116K


Hot Water re-invented by Bosch The new Bosch OptiFlow

Connectivity, patented technology, and stunning industrial design

Patented OptiFlow combustion management system Bluetooth enabled appliance 6 star efficiency Solar compatible appliance

The OptiFlow is set apart from conventional continuous flow hot water systems by its connectivity. The Installer and Service App allows plumbers to measure performance and get diagnostic codes in real time via near-field Bluetooth communication. It enables trouble-shooting during set-up or servicing, and suggests solutions for easy adjustments. This ultimately means less installation and servicing time. The separate App for consumers lets the user adjust the temperature, track energy and water usage, and keep an eye on costs. So the end user’s smartphone can function as a substitute controller. Bosch’s OptiFlow is full of innovative efficient technology such as its combustion management system which utilizes a patented algorithm to modulate the appliance gas valve and fan speed to ensure optimum combustion. This process is ongoing over the lifetime of the appliance, allowing it to intelligently and continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions, ensuring optimum efficiency in all conditions. A new patented Bosch technology known as “Easy Minimum” allows the OptiFlow hot

Bosch Water App

water system to operate at very low minimum power output, while maintaining a stable output temperature for more comfortable showers. This technology is beneficial in situations where the incoming water temperature is high and only a small temperate rise is needed. This feature extends the operating range of continuous flow water heater technology. The design influence utilized for the OptiFlow takes its lead from sophisticated, uncluttered and sleek consumer appliances, and has more visual similarity to an iPhone than a conventional hot water system. The OptiFlow raises the possibility of converting a traditional “back of wall” category to an architectural feature. For more information contact Bosch on 1300 30 70 37 or visit www.boschoptiflow.com.au

Bosch ProWater App


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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

TECHNOLOGY SNAPSHOT:

NEW SMART METERING TECHNOLOGY IMPROVING BUILDING EFFICIENCY


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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

[WORDS] JASMINE O’DONOGHUE

W

E’VE GOT SMART PHONES, SMART TVS AND NOW, SMART METERS.

Smart meters have the potential to change the way consumers look at, and use their energy, allowing them to be conscious of their usage patterns. They are meters with data logging and communications which record and transmit a building’s energy usage. Typically, a smart meter will read and store energy usage every 30 minutes and then send this information to energy distributers, or users. Smart meters have come a long way. Traditional meters, or accumulation meters would simply record the amount of electricity which passed through it since it was first installed, or was last reset. The shortcomings of this style of meter was users would only find out their energy usage when they received their bill and a large amount of labour was required by the provider to send a reader from house to house in intervals to read the meters. Accumulation meters progressed to interval meters, which measure energy electronically. They can record usage in intervals, usually have a digital display and the data can be downloaded by a reader using an electronic or optical interface. They enable a customer to pay different rates for different time periods in which they use their electricity. However, they are not considered smart meters.

SMART METERS SAVE SPACE A smart meter is “smart” due to its ability to record more accurate and detailed data and facilitate a twoway flow of information. They eliminate the need for meter readers to visit each meter. Smart meters can receive commands from the supplier and carry out tasks such as disconnecting and reconnecting the power supply when a customer moves out or in. It continuously monitors the supply and can automatically notify the provider if there is a fault. They can also act as a gateway to the home for information. The space-to-design ratio performance of smart meters has improved as technology advances. Less panel space and electrical installations are required and advanced smart metering designs can use up to 90 per cent less space when compared with typical ‘bottom up connect’ utility meters. This is particularly valuable in high-density, high-rise buildings.

HOW ARE THEY USED? With any data-driven technology, it’s not the data which drives innovation, but the way in which it is used. “Smart meters can create structures internally that allows a consumer to understand their usage patterns,” explains Dean Davis, Director of Satec. “This is done by recording information, and having a clock on-board the meter. Thus, now the information logged to memory can detail what time energy is consumed.” Timing of energy consumption is used by retailers to offer Time of Use (TOU)

tariffs, which reward people for using electricity outside of ‘peak’ periods. Furthermore, consumers can use this data to identify what time they use more energy. They can be programmed to provide feedback on their consumption and automatically send messages based on instructions. For example, a user can opt to be notified if their energy usage is unusually or undesirably high. Smart meters make it easier to identify sources of high energy use and can prompt users to modify their behaviour. This may lead to energy-saving decisions such as taking shorter showers, or opting for more energy efficient appliances.

“WITH ANY DATA-DRIVEN TECHNOLOGY, IT’S NOT THE DATA WHICH DRIVES INNOVATION, BUT THE WAY IN WHICH IT IS USED”

This can be communicated to the user via an In Home Display (IHD). A simple IHD indicates which price-period (according to the TOU tariff) a user is in, while a more complex IHD displays the total power the house is using. This allows a user to watch their usage change depending on which appliances they are using and identify which appliances to avoid during peak periods. A more advanced IHD may show the cost of the energy used at low, medium and high price periods over a time frame and allow comparison on prior corresponding periods. Customers may also choose to be notified if there is a high availability of green power, so they can use energy when the greenhouse gas intensity of the supply is low. When integrated into a smart grid - which combines advanced communication, sensing and metering infrastructure with the existing electricity network - smart meters have significantly more benefits. Smart meters can help create a system which automatically uses power in an eco-friendly and cost effective way. Smart meters can facilitate smart appliances, which are capable of adjusting their operations to information it receives, in a way that is helpful to the user or the grid. This may involve turning off for a brief period or operating in low periods instead of high. It may opt to use green energy when there is high supply of it, or discharge stored energy to the grid when it is needed. This functionality is a step beyond what a IHD can provide in that the user does not have to be home to manually react to an event when it happens. The appliance will respond automatically to pre-programmed events, unless instructed otherwise, so the user can simply “set and forget”. This can contribute to a green rating.

WHERE ARE WE NOW? The usage of smart meters varies throughout Australia and different states and electricity suppliers have different policies. Some have committed to replacing old meters over a predetermined time frame, some are installing smart meters only in new buildings or when the old meters need replacing and others are continuing to install interval meters. Not everyone has warmed up to smart meters. In 2006 the Victorian government mandated the roll out of smart meters. Every Victorian household was required to pay for a meter and all needed to have the same type, whether it suited their needs or not. Take up of TOU tariffs was low, meaning the largest benefactor of the rollout was the supplier, as they no longer had to send an energy reader.

CONCERNS: BIG BROTHER, MICROWAVES & ACCURACY Resistance to smart meters revolves around three concerns: privacy, safety, accuracy. Similar to the “big brother” argument, Davis says some people believe “privacy could be compromised by learning one’s habits as a smart-meter can tell what times during the day you use resources.” Davis says this can be resolved by using encryption and improving policies governing the use of modern communication techniques. Some have expressed safety concerns regarding smart meters use of radio frequency. Emissions from radio frequency is a widely debated issue, which stretches into the use of microwaves, mobile phones and Wi-Fi. Smart meters use technology commonly used in other areas and all are required to comply with Australian safety standards. They use communications such as Zigbee (similar to Bluetooth), 3/4G using cellular SIM cards and metropolitan based RF communication systems in ranges of 900MHZ and more. The debate is not exclusive to smart meters, but Davis says one way to fix the issue is to use hard wired cables such as CAT-6 cabling, like the NBN uses. There are some concerns regarding the accuracy of some smart meters. The accuracy of a meter is dependent on factors such as the load of the network and the power factor of the system. Some low-cost solutions have issued with electronics such as ‘harmonics’ caused by many small transformers used for phone chargers, air-conditioning inverters, etc. Due to improvements in electronics, smart meters are more accurate than before. IEC/AS have developed standards known as “Accuracy Class” to define accuracy under different load conditions. Check the accuracy class complies with the desired functionality.

WHERE TO GET THEM Architects can have a discussion with electrical contractors or engage directly with suppliers to evaluate the technology and discuss ways in which a smart meter can improve the design of the building.


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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

1 Targeted at the commercial sector, Ozgreen Energy offer wireless energy management systems which read and track a building’s energy, water, gas and carbon (via smart meters) in real time, and display them on an easy-to-use web portal system.

1

2 Frako units like this EM-MC 2200 are marketed to small to medium-sized industrial and commercial operations, office buildings and hotels. Frako says the product is an investment with a short payback time even in the deregulated energy market, since exceeding the specified power peak limit still results in extra costs that can be avoided. 3 Satec’s Branch Feeder Monitor BFM136 automatically provides metering, demand and energy readings, logging and multi-tariff (TOU) data. It monitors up to 12 three phase circuits or 36 single phase circuits, or any combination of single or three phase circuits, making it suitable for multi-tenant facilities such as residential projects, office buildings and shopping malls. 2

4 Since their rollout, there has been concerns that domestic smart meters can contribute to electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EMH), a proposed pathological sensitivity to electromagnetic fields in the environment caused by things like smart meters. In response, companies like Smart Block have begun manufacturing cages which they claim will remove 98-99% electromagnetic radiation from the surrounding environment. 5 New smart meters can accommodate hard wired cables such as CAT-6 cabling which eliminate Radio Frequency issues and concerns about electromagnetic radiation. 6 Energy gateways like the Eagle from Rainforest Automation transfer meter data to a cloud server to be then accessed on a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other mobile device for domestic users.

3

6

NMI

APPROVED

4 5


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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

ONE CENTRAL PARK BY ATELIERS JEAN NOUVEL AND PTW ARCHITECTS. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROB DEUTSCHER/WIKIPEDIA

CASE STUDY: ONE CENTRAL PARK, SYDNEY One Central Park is not easily missed on the Sydney landscape. But there’s a lot more than meets the eye to this building. It was developed with the hefty goal of building Australia’s greenest and most self-sufficient mixed-use urban development. Built around more than 6,400sqm of parks and public spaces, the two towers redefine green living – both inside and out. One Central Park has a billing grade Energy Management System (EMS) supplied by Siemens in over 1,400 apartments. The system created is rather complicated, but also brilliant. The building and energy management system includes 1,663 smart meters which monitor the apartments, retail shops, bulk water meters and the electrical switchboards. There are 3,000 hot/ cold and bulk water meters, 1,428 touch screens in the apartments, 42 M-bus thermal energy meters and 70 BACnet/IP programmable controllers integrated to the smart meters, touch screens and thermal meters. In addition, there are 26 Virtual Local Area Networks, 26 BACnet Broadcast Management Devices, a layer 3 switch on a third party network and a server with remote access. This system generates 148 daily energy reports. “It means we can email daily energy and water consumption reports for all services to the customer for billing purposes,” says Siemens Executive General Manager Building Technologies, Stefan Schwab. “At the touch of a screen located in each apartment, residents can monitor apartment total energy, and hot and cold water consumption.” Using these touch screens, residents can see their energy and water consumption in real time, along with the indicative cost and greenhouse gas emissions. “This means tenants can monitor their instantaneous energy consumption, cost and CO2 emissions and compare with previous days, weeks or even months, allowing them to track and alter their usage prior to receiving a bill,” Schwab says. In addition, Schwab says the EMS can scrutinise chilled water, hot water, domestic hot water and spa thermal energy meters, monitor main switch board electrical meters and inspect bulk potable and non-potable water meters. All of the EMS functions use fibre-optic infrastructure. Schwab says the main risk of the project was to provide a robust and reliable billing grade EMS that met all standards and requirements. “Our team worked closely with the developers to produce an energy meter customised specifically to the requirements of One Central Park,” he says.


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ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

CASE STUDY: ALDI DISTRIBUTION CENTRE, JANDAKOT

explains Elliot Alfirevich Electrical Project Engineer, Wood & Grieve Engineers.

ALDI’s first step in establishing a Western Australian presence was to commission the construction of a $60 million, 45,000sqm facility located within the Jandakot Airport industrial precinct. Wood & Grieve Engineers (WGE) were engaged by Georgiou Group to provide full electrical, hydraulic and sustainability design services, as well as peer review roles for fire, civil and mechanical services.

Alfirevich says the system is “quite clever” as it included a “maximum demand optimisation computer”, which calculates the power demand at the site and shuts down mechanical services or the refrigeration plant at key times to reduce the electrical demand.

The ALDI Distribution Centre utilised a Frako power monitoring and maximum demand controller system, which included a network of 37 smart meters. The system consisted of a headend computer, modems for connection to the Frako network, a RS232 communication network linking all devices, expansion modules for load shedding, a Frako maximum demand controller and connections to the site wide metering system. “ALDI are a quite advanced in their distribution centre design - they’ve built these all over the world, so they are quite aware of smart metering and smart grid technology,”

“This can be configured to save energy during peak billing periods, but in our case it’s used when the site runs on generator. Controlling the start-up of the mechanical/refrigeration plant while the site is on generator reduces the demand on the generator and avoids generator overloads,” Alfirevich says. Six levels of load shedding were configured to ensure that loads are switched in a staged manner and the operational impacts of each load shedding level has been considered by the client. For example, management procedures exist to manage staff expectations when the lunch room air conditioning may be unavailable and to manage the limitations on the building during a load shedding sequence. n

DESIGNED BY OAKFIELD, THE JANDAKOT WA ALDI FOODS DISTRIBUTION CENTRE RECENTLY RECEIVED A 4 STAR GREEN STAR RATING INDUSTRIAL DESIGN V1 FROM THE GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA. IMAGE: GEORGIOU GROUP


TENANT SMART-METERING THERE IS A DIFFERENCE NMI/PATTERN APPROVED ONE DEVICE, UP TO 36 TENANTS UP TO 90% SPACE SAVING COST EFFECTIVE INSTALLATION REDUCED CARBON FOOTPRINT *ELECTRICITY/WATER/GAS USAGE

*DAILY READINGS *WEEKLY READINGS

CAN YOUR BILLING SMART-METER DO THIS?

*MONTHLY READINGS T +61 2 4774 2959 sales@satec-global.com.au www.satec-global.com.au

*QUARTERLY READINGS


ADVERTISING FEATURE – INNOWOOD

AN INTRODUCTION TO VENTILATED FAÇADE SYSTEMS IN MODERN DESIGN

V

ENTILATED FAÇADE SYSTEMS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF A BUILDING BY IMPROVING THERMAL COMFORT AND REDUCING THE RELIANCE OF HVAC SYSTEMS, WHILST IMPROVING THE ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE OF THE FACADE.

Also known as double-skin façades or rain-screens, ventilated façade systems can also assist in protecting buildings against the combined action of wind and rain by counterbalancing the effects of water beating on walls and keeping the building dry.

HOW DO VENTILATED FAÇADE SYSTEMS WORK? At its most basic, a ventilated façade system consists two layers of different facades which are separated by an air cavity. This cavity prevents rainwater from penetrating and diffuses water vapour from the inside to the outside. While the external cladding serves to provide the majority of rain and wind protection, the air corridor between the support structure and the external cladding plays a major role in the ventilated façade system. A naturally ventilated façade results in a temperature difference between the face of the cladding panel and the air cavity behind. This is turn creates a variation in air density and causes air to flow upwards within the cavity according to the stack effect. The airflow transports heat from the cavity out through high level exhausts, aiding convection drying of any residual amounts of moisture that have accumulated within the air cavity.

BENEFITS OF VENTILATED FAÇADE SYSTEMS

VENTILATED FAÇADE SOLUTIONS FROM INNOWOOD

The system provides three main benefits for buildings:

INNOWOOD Australia in partnership with recognised market leaders in the international façade industry Allface Smart Fixing Systems provide complete ventilated façade solutions to the Australian market.

THERMAL Significant reductions in HVAC reliance through: • A reduction in the amount of heat that buildings absorb in hot weather conditions from the partial reflection of solar radiation by the outside façade, and the naturally ventilated air cavity. • In cold weather conditions ventilated walls retain heat, resulting in a lower reliance on heating.

With the fixing system and cladding type making up the two most important elements in an effective ventilated façade solution, the benefits of having two of the world’s leading companies in their respective fields coming together offers an unprecedented level of expertise and insight into ventilated façade systems for Australian conditions.

HVAC electricity consumption typically accounts for around 40% of total building consumption. Research has shown ventilated facades systems can easily achieve savings of about 30% on energy consumption.

INNOWOOD’s innovative industry leading composite timber cladding in conjunction with Allface Smart Fixing Systems provide the complete ventilated façade solution.

ACOUSTIC Ventilated façade systems provide an increase in the reflection of external noise, with a recent Australian project realising an average reduction of up to 8dB. With the primary external noise sources affecting buildings being road traffic noise, a reduction of this level can greatly improve occupant comfort.

STRUCTURAL In addition a secondary façade provides protection against wind and rain. The natural bottom-to-top airflow through the cavity assists in eliminating moisture accumulation on the facades, preventing mould and water ingress, helping to prolong the structural integrity and ultimately the lifespan of a building.

Download the full whitepaper here: http://buff.ly/2cUVxeK


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FLOORS, FLOORING & ACCESSORIES

1

FINDING THE WAY WITH

CARPET TILES [WORDS] NICHOLAS RIDER

I

NCORPORATING THE PRINCIPLES OF WAYFINDING INTO YOUR BUILDING CAN OFFER A PLETHORA OF BENEFITS TO END USERS, INCLUDING INCREASED SATISFACTION, REDUCED STIGMA AND ISOLATION OF DISABLED USERS, AND IMPROVED ORIENTATION AND EXPERIENCE FOR NEW VISITORS. It can also boost productivity and health, says a 2010 Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental report, and given the studies detailing the impact wayfinding has on human psychology, occupant satisfaction, health, long-term performance, and the financial bottom line, ignoring it altogether is effectively reducing the inclusiveness of your building. Due to their modularity, and the fact they’re offered in an excess of sizes, colours, patterns and pile types, carpet tiles are considered to be one of the most effective materials among the many used to facilitate wayfinding. Carpet tiles are generally considered durable, and are easy to install, clean and replace. They also offer better acoustics than some other popular floor coverings, which is one of the reasons Graphite Architects chose carpet tiles for their Mingara Leisure Group Corporate Offices project in Newcastle.

the Australian market, other points for distinction include their backing type and sustainability. In recent years especially we’ve seen carpet tile manufacturers making efforts to improve the environmental footprint of their carpet tiles to create a sellable point of difference among their competitors, and a lot of these improvements have been in the material makeup of the tile backing. Most manufacturers now offer bitumen-, PVCand fiberglass-free products and some like Above Left, Shaw Contract Group and Interface (among others) go to great lengths to certify their products with key green building product certifiers like GECA, Green Star, Green Tag and more.

A PROVEN COMBINATION Carpet tiles can provide colour coding to define different working zones or departments, as well as edging for corridors to direct pedestrian flow. In spaces such as schools, offices, libraries and airports, where different sections offer different types of activities and facilities, demarcations in carpet tile colour and patterns can prompt a person to change their experience of that space and act accordingly. Often a designer may choose to use neutral colours in the central or general part of a space and then introduce splashes of colour and pattern into the other areas for difference.

“They offered acoustic absorption [and] softness underfoot… [while still being] firm enough to feel like a commercial environment,” says Principal Design Architect, Sandy Strazds.

Site Architecture Studio did just this with its Mercedes College St. Joseph’s Year 12 Learning Centre project in Perth. While the main tile, a neutral colour with some movement, was used throughout the classrooms and corridors, the breakout feature had large circles or contrasting carpet tiles under the selected furniture.

“The randomness of the pattern [also] really suited the awkward angular geometry of the existing space.”

“This helped slow the space down and encourage the girls to stop and linger,” says Site Architecture Studio Associate, Laura Adams.

Besides the obvious style, colour and size differences among the surfeit of carpet tiles available in

Retaining the existing building fabric of the heritage building, Site Architecture Studio’s

implementation of carpet tiles provided an opportunity to introduce some colour. This contrasted with the existing wall colours and white plasterboard, timber and corrugated iron ceilings. “The selection of carpet tiles was great, as our circular designs to the breakouts, and the thin strips to indicate existing walls were easily and affordably able to be integrated,” says Adams. Similarly, Harrison & White in collaboration with Paul Coffey Architects used carpet tiles for their St. Bernard’s Primary School, Year 5&6 Learning Hub project in Victoria. Through visual variation in floor finishes, the architects aimed to integrate, yet differentiate internal and external spaces. Harrison & White Associate Hannah Rowe explains that the green of the artificial grass outside continues throughout the building with matching green carpet tiles, while breakout spaces were created by the clustering of blue carpet tiles.

DISADVANTAGES Carpet tiles do come with their disadvantages though. Firstly, they don’t always appear to be a cohesive singular carpet, and this disjointed look may not be suitable for certain spaces. They also create seams every 12, 18 or 24 inches, which will always be visible, no matter how carefully the carpet is installed. While replacing a carpet tile removes visible stains from spills and accidents, it won’t necessarily get rid of odours that have soaked into the floor beneath. Unlike wall-to-wall carpet where a backing material can be made waterproof to provide protection, due to carpet tiles having many seams, they can’t provide the same protection. Although carpet tiles are made for high traffic areas, this lack of waterproof protection means they’re not ideal for places that are exposed to moisture, such as the kitchen, laundry, bathroom and entrance of a building.


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1 Through visual variation in floor finishes, Harrison & White and Paul Coffey Architects aimed to integrate, yet differentiate internal and external spaces at St. Bernard’s Primary School, Year 5&6 Learning Hub, Victoria. Photography by Ben Hosking 2 Carpet tiles were used by Graphite Architects at Mingara Leisure Group Corporate Offices, Newcastle. “[They] offered acoustic absorption [and] softness underfoot… [while still being] firm enough to feel like a commercial environment,” says Principal Design Architect, Sandy Strazds. 3 Retaining the existing building fabric of Mercedes College St. Joseph’s Year 12 Learning Centre, Site Architecture Studio’s implementation of carpet tiles provided an opportunity to introduce some colour.

PRODUCTS AVAILABLE IN AUSTRALIA

TAVOLA PLANK CARPET TILE BY ABOVE LEFT The Tavola collection offers a textural design in a stunning range of colours. Tavola was inspired by the memory of scribbling on paper and seeing the texture of the surface beneath the paper create an unexpected pattern. The collection comes with Ecosoft backing, delivering superior acoustic benefits, thermal efficiency, underfoot comfort and dimensional stability.

EARTH ROCK BY BELGOTEX The Earth Rock range, inspired by the folds and fissures of rocks, is a Stainproof SDX (Solution Dyed Nylon) product. It is available with the dimensionally stable backing system, EOS BAC, which offers sound absorption and sound reduction properties, and is also environmentally friendly. The collection is available in multiple colourways.

MOTARCLAY BY NOLAN UDA Modern designers often believe that everything old, is new again. The Mortarclay carpet tile range was developed to embrace the ageing process of concrete. Available in four unique colours, Mortarclay compliments the hard surfaces often associated with a minimalistic design. Nolan UDA are national distributors of commercial and industrial textiles.


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THE HANDCRAFT COLLECTION BY GIBBON GROUP The Handcraft Collection brings together scraps and stitches of nature’s tale. Invite the outside in with the collection’s organic patterns and hues. A green inspiration for a tranquil atmosphere. Get away from the hustle and bustle of your busy workspace and enjoy the peace and quiet of the outdoor experience. Discover the fragmented designs of Moss, Leaf, Willow and Grind.

THE COMMON THREAD COLLECTION BY ONTERA Common Thread’s unique patterning was inspired by the distinctive skin of a tree. The natural shedding and renewal of its layers reveals individual scales and textures of bark patterns. This collection is a family of patterns that seamlessly and organically shift into each other. A common thread of bright accents further illuminates this dynamic shifting, providing designers with boundless opportunities to define space.

CONFIGURE BY SHAW CONTRACT Configure is an extension on Shaw Contract’s award winning Hexagon carpet tile collection. Designed to promote impromptu interaction, Configure assists with wayfinding and provides alluring, visual interest. Deconstructed, rhythmic patterns and bold colour encourage a more imaginative, playful approach with installation. Configure comes in four carpet styles, and is constructed with premium Eco Solution Q nylon and EcoWorx backing.

NET-EFFECT BY INTERFACE Net-Effect from Interface recruits discarded fishing nets from poor fishing villages to create a 100 per cent recycled yarn modular carpet tile. It was a winner at the 2014 Good Design Awards and was a finalist for the 2014 Sustainability Awards. n


ADVERTISING FEATURE – CEMINTEL

THE REAL COSTS OF INSTALLING NON-CONFORMING AND NON-COMPLIANT BUILDING PRODUCTS

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HE RISE OF NON-CONFORMING AND NON-COMPLIANT BUILDING PRODUCTS INFILTRATING AUSTRALIAN BUILDING PROJECTS IS ONE OF THE GREATEST CHALLENGES FACED BY THE INDUSTRY TODAY.

As some recent events in Australia have shown, the specification and use of non-conforming building products can significantly increase the chance of fire, contribute to building compliance failure and require replacement well before time which must be funded by the owner. Just as dangerous as non-conforming building products are non-compliant building products – products that are conforming but used incorrectly and do not meet regulatory obligation such as those found in the NCC. With an increasing number of products being manufactured offshore and increased access to these products through online and direct B2B purchasing, the use of non-conforming products is a growing problem for the industry. Adding to the concern, the National BCA requirements for building products, including the suitability of materials, are inconsistently applied and poorly understood. There is a lack of knowledge and resources from various industry participants to ensure imported products used are ‘fit for purpose’. They enter the supply chain, provenance is lost and seeking a remedy when a problem arises becomes very difficult.

Following these revelations, the Victorian Building Authority (VBA) initiated the External Wall Cladding Audit, designed to identify the extent of non-compliant use of external wall cladding materials in residential high rise buildings and public buildings. Of the 170 high rise residential apartments, hotels, hospitals and aged-care homes that were inspected and audited, 51% of them were assessed by the VBA as non-compliant. Around the same time, a briefing from the NSW Department of Planning and Environment revealed that preliminary data estimated that around 1800, and as high as 2500 buildings in metropolitan Sydney could contain similar non-compliant cladding materials as the Lacrosse Tower. In July of this year, controlled tests found fragments of asbestos in roof panels at the new Perth Children’s Hospital, with the CFMEU warning hundreds of workers on the project may have been exposed to the white asbestos.

There have been a number of incidents in recent years which have highlighted the seriousness of the issue.

In the same month asbestos was also found in the metal skirting of the Queensland Government’s new Executive Building. Both projects had sourced materials from the same Chinese manufacturer, and with the manufacturer having supplied building materials for nearly 70 major buildings and constructions across the country there are fears the incidence of asbestos in Australian building projects will be far-reaching.

When a smouldering cigarette on the eighth floor of the Lacrosse Apartments in Melbourne’s Docklands precinct sparked a fire that raced up 16 floors of the building in just 15 minutes, it caused up to $40 million worth of damages. The Metropolitan Fire Brigade (MFB) analysis of the incident identified it was the non-compliant use of the building’s external cladding material that fuelled the fire.

While the wheels are certainly in motion for tighter regulation across the industry to provide better protection against the use of non-compliant and non-conforming building products, there is no quick fix and with the Government of the day lacking courage to swiftly address the issue, the flood of non-conforming and non-compliant products entering the Australian market looks set to continue for the foreseeable future.

For the time being, a great deal of the responsibility for ensuring compliant and conforming products falls to the architects, designers, specifiers, project managers and builders entrusted with producing safe and sustainable projects. However, the ultimate cost may fall to the property owners. Being well informed on both a product’s background as well as its intended applications is crucial to making the right decision. Dealing with trusted manufacturers and suppliers who have a systematic, in-country testing process and effective record management can advise on their products compliance can help ensure a successful project and allay concerns for all parties involved.

CEMINTEL® Cemintel is an Australian owned company, supplying cement panels and building systems used for external facades, internal linings, ceilings and flooring in commercial and residential applications. With a strong focus on design, Cemintel’s product range looks beyond now. Taking a holistic view of global and local issues that Influence our lives, Cemintel interpret these factors to produce products that inspire architects, designers and specifiers to use when designing beautiful buildings, and that builders use because they are known, tested and trusted. To find out more download this new white paper ‘The real costs of installing non-conforming and non-compliant building products’

Download the full whitepaper here.: http://buff.ly/2d0Q0lQ


LONG & LEAN THE NEW LINEAR BRICK

Available in Dry Pressed & Glazed Collections. For more information visit pghbricks.com.au or call 13 15 79. Product Specifications: 290x90x50mm


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Bricks & Pavers

Permeable

Pavers:

Why it’s not a thing yet (and why it really should be)


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BRICKS & PAVERS

AQUAROC BY BELGARD. PHOTO COURTESY OF BELGARD HARDSCAPES.

[WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA

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E’RE ON THE PHONE WITH THE SALES DIRECTOR OF AN AUSTRALIAN SUSTAINABLE PAVING MANUFACTURER, AND SHE’S TELLING US THAT THERE IS NOTHING SPECIFICALLY ABOUT PERMEABLE PAVERS IN THE NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION CODE (NCC) OR AUSTRALIAN STANDARDS. This piece of information only highlights what Tori Newton from Stoneset mentioned earlier in our conversation – that despite the advances in permeable paving products, there remains a lack of awareness within the Australian AEC industry about what is available in a relatively small market. “[Permeable pavers] have been well-designed and well-tested for 20 years,” Newton explains, “but building confidence in this paving method is taking a bit of time.” Understandable, we think, considering the lack of set testing and the fact that permeable paving is not a legal requirement in the Building Code of Australia (BCA). Add to this the diversity of permeable paving products on offer, which range from fully permeable concrete and ceramic pavers, to solid paver products that rely on structural gaps for infiltration and various resin based products, and the task of developing a national standard becomes even more complicated.

SO WHAT? WE DON’T NEED PERMEABLE PAVERS Unlike countries such as Germany, the UK and the United States, where “confidence in utilising this sort of design is very high” and therefore “specified in much vaster areas”, the use of permeable pavers is not as widespread in Australia, even though pavers themselves make up a large part of our landscape. According to John Wells from Hydrocon, the reasons stopping architects and designers from specifying permeable pavers include a lack of awareness of the benefits of permeable paving; a lack of concern by authorities over the rapid increase of impervious surfaces; and an aversion to risk and liability issues in the specification of unfamiliar and new systems. He compares the existing industry mindset in Australia to the US, where the National Ready Mix Concrete Association highly encourages the use of poured in situ ‘pervious paving’, and the UK, where permeable pavers are part of the Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) toolbox heavily promoted by the Precast Concrete Paving & Kerb Association. “Germany is arguably the country most advanced in its adoption and support for permeable pavers (PP) through certification of product; state and local regulations favouring the use of PP for stormwater management; and incentives for property owners to install PP as a means of reducing off site discharge and improving ground water quality,” Wells adds.

Referring to systems that allow air and liquids to pass through, the use of permeable pavers dates back to 1800s Europe, with the technology growing in popularity after World War II because of cement shortages. However, the Green Building Alliance notes that specific implementation of porous pavements only really occurred in the late 1960s to “promote percolation, reduce storm sewer loads, reduce floods, raise water tables and replenish aquifiers”. It is these quoted phrases that set permeable pavers a part from their standard concrete or asphalt counterparts. As concrete, brick, tile, steel and other hard surfaces take over soil and dirt in our cities and suburbs, the chances of flooding, polluted surface runoff and erosion occurring increase. The traditional way to mitigate these problems is by ensuring the design of good surfacewater disposal and drainage systems, as is set out in the NCC – Damp and Weatherproofing section (Part F1). But permeable pavers also get the job done. By absorbing and retaining rainfall and stormwater runoff, permeable pavers allow water to be infiltrated into the ground or directed to the nearest storm drain. Boral’s Hydrapave Permeable Paving solution, for instance, directs infiltrated water through small channels formed on the ends and sides of its concrete pavers, passing into a prepared sub-base. “The water is then detained, filter treated and dispersed, discharged or redirected for re-use,” Mark Dell, National Sales and Marketing Manager of Boral Roofing and


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1 Boral’s Hydrapave system allows water to infiltrate through 4mm deep vertical channels at each end of the 80mm thick concrete pavers, and into a prepared 50mm bedding course where pollutants are naturally filter treated 2 In the US, permeable pavers have spilled over from the commercial market into residential areas. Pictured: Belgard’s Subterra PICPs

Masonry, says. Compare this to hard surface paving, which instead speeds up the flow of water, often carrying with it pollutants like debris, to creeks and streams when flash flooding takes place. Another similar paving system that slows the effects of local flooding, lowers the chance of erosion and acts as a filtration system, is Belgard’s Permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP). Installed with layers of stone or variously sized aggregate underneath, Belgard’s PICP mimics the way natural land absorbs water, effectively doubling up as a water management system. These systems furthermore help reduce water demands, for example when installed over grassed areas. This means porous pavers can assist the growth and improve the health of mature trees near to the paved areas – important generally for the community, and for architects who have to respect preservation orders. “Traditional residential and commercial paving systems do not allow for water to infiltrate the paved surface and therefore can shut off necessary water supply to tree roots,” Dell explains. “When used in a suitable application, the benefits of permeable pavers are numerous, including channeling roof water run off to the sub-base to maximise water catchment,” he adds.

Take the largest permeable pavers project in North America as an example. After residents in a few neighbourhoods complained about heavy rains sending runoff and raw sewage into their homes and backyards, the city of Atlanta spent almost US$15.8 million replacing six miles of asphalt streets with permeable pavers. The project is not only set to resolve the unwanted surface runoff problem; it is also expected to provide up to 7.1 million gallons of capacity relief for areas impacted by flooding. “There is a lot of runoff from urbanisation over time and water runs off quicker off of paved services than green surfaces. So basically, this provides a green solution to our stormwater runoff,” Todd Hill, Director of Environmental Management for Atlanta’s Department of Watershed Management, told Atlanta’s NPR Station in 2015.

BUT… Despite the advantages of specifying permeable pavers and the fact that it offers best practice in terms of sustainability, there is one catch: “The installation of permeable paving requires a large amount of sub-grade work,” Dell says, “which generally makes it a more expensive solution than traditional paving systems in terms of installed system cost.” Tori Newton agrees, noting that Stoneset proclaims to be “the best” sustainable paving option, not the cheapest.

This presumed high cost of installing permeable pavers, combined with no or minimal regulations and a natural aversion to trying something new, is manifested in the obvious lack of local projects that employ porous pavers. For instance, when we reached out to a few Sydney and Melbourne practices inquiring about their notable public projects, somewhat certain that permeable pavers would have been used (however minimal), we received responses saying the contrary was true. It probably doesn’t help that the belief that permeable pavers have higher maintenance requirements still exists. Hydrocon’s John Wells says that early cases of permeable pavers relying on gaps for infiltration clogging have led to some inertia in the use of the product. Meanwhile, a 2009 paper by Professors from the University of South Australia and UNSW, and a researcher at the CMAA acknowledges that PICPs are generally perceived to retain up to 90 per cent of solids suspended in the water infiltrating pavements. The paper specifically points to studies that confirm the infiltration capacity of test pavements “decreases as the amount of oil, grease and fine organic and inorganic matter accumulates within the gravel, filling the drainage openings”. However, it goes on to note that these problems are economically and readily resolved by using conventional street sweeping equipment. It furthermore states that since PICP construction in Australia began in earnest about 10 years ago, most pavements using such systems have performed well over time without being subject to any systematic maintenance.


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STONESET SUDSTECH PORUS PAVING SOLUTION HAS A HARD WEARING TOP COURSE 20MM (RESIN BOUND AGGREGATE) AND A BASE OF RECYCLED TYRES THAT IS ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY AND FULLY PERMEABLE. IT IS MIXED WITH HIGH PERFORMANCE BINDER TO PROTECT AGAINST CONTRACTIONS AND EXPANSIONS

ADBRI MASONRY ECO-TRIHEX PERMEABLE PAVERS FEATURE IN THE AWARD-WINNING LANGTREE MALL IN MILDURA, VICTORIA DESIGNED BY HANSEN PARTNERSHIP. THE DESIGN WAS INSPIRED BY AERIAL SITE VISITS OF THE MILDURA REGION, WITH THE AERIAL VIEW OF THE MURRAY RIVER BEING INSCRIBED ONTO THE PAVEMENT AND WINDING ITS WAY THROUGH THE MALL. ADBRI’S ECO-TRIHEX PERMEABLE PAVERS HAVE BEEN USED AROUND TREE PITS THAT PROVIDE SHADE FOR MALL GOERS AND ALSO PRESENT AN OPPORTUNITY FOR WATER HARVESTING


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STONESET SUDSTECH PORUS PAVING SOLUTION

1 Wearing top course 20mm (resin bound aggregate) A top wearing surface consists of a mixture of the desired stone finish together with Langfords Direct’s high performance UV-stable resin 2 Flexible base 30mm (resin bound recycled tyre and stone) A base of recycled tyres that is environmentally friendly and fully permeable. It is mixed with our high performance binder to protect against contractions and expansions 3 Prepared sub base 200mm (type 3 aggregate) Aggregate can also be added for further rigidity and a higher load bearing capacity. Highway Agency requirements dictate a structural layer design in areas where heavy vehicles pass. The thickness of the sub base layer required is dependant on the sub base soil conditions and expected loading. If plastic or silty subgrade is present (CBR>2%) then a granule capping layer may be necessary

CAN’T STOP, WON’T STOP In spite of the multiple studies proving the benefits and low maintenance requirements of permeable pavers, any claims of the goodness of existing products are somewhat delegitimised by the lack of national or state legislation, national standards or planning policies. Yet, the slow uptake of porous paving does not mean no uptake at all, with practices such as Place Design Group and the Brisbane City Council specifying a resin and stone product on all new street tree planting in the Brunswick Street Mall project. Nor has the lag slowed down manufacturers’ drive to innovate and develop new products, such as Stoneset’s Sudstech Porous Paving solution.

“YET, THE SLOW UPTAKE OF POROUS PAVING DOES NOT MEAN NO UPTAKE AT ALL.”

To be released later this year, Sudstech is a high performance resin bound porous paving solution that drains water effectively through its layers, thereby eradicating standing water. Fully compliant with the requirements of Sustainable urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) to better manage water runoff in urban areas, the product is BREEAM accredited and CRE tested; impervious to tree root

intrusion and cracking, and comes with a ten year porosity guarantee that combats flash flooding. It is also extremely low maintenance, and is expected to remain porous throughout its life. The primary difference between Sudstech and earlier incarnations of the product is that it is produced to be even more environmentally friendly; with a unique system of resin bound aggregate over recycled car tyres. Another newly introduced product in Australia is Hydrocera, a permeable ceramic paving product by Hydrocon that has already been used successfully in Japan and Hong Kong. Coming in 10 colours and a range of sizes, Hydrocera boasts a superior finish and is ideal for CBD, suburban shopping centre, apartment and public infrastructure developments. The product’s first specification and installation project is at Fitzgibbon Chase, an outer suburb of Brisbane. It is also important to acknowledge that local government authorities are starting to require permeable paving as a condition of Development Approvals (DA), especially where the proposed impermeable footprint exceeds the specified permeable/impermeable ratio. This means that even while there are no such requirements for porous pavements in water, environment or building regulations, some property owners will need to install permeable driveways or footpaths to meet the soft to hard landscape ratio. Moreover, an increasing number of councils – and the Australian government in general – are concerned about tree protection, which has an indirect impact on the use of permeable pavements.

A QUICK GUIDE Although permeable pavers are not a legal requirement in the BCA, there are some guides that dictate best practice for such products. These include AS 4455 – Masonry Units and Segmental Pavers and the Concrete Association of Australia (CMAA) guidelines if you are specifying concrete permeable pavers. The CMAA further provides ‘Permpave’ and ‘Locpave’ software to enable for hydrology and hydraulic design of the pavement, sub-grade, base, bedding layer and paver thickness. This includes data from the following documents: • Specification guide – Concrete segmental pavements T44 • Design Guide – Concrete segmental pavements T45 • Detailing guide – Concrete segmental pavements T46 Breaking load and slip resistance are other important benchmarks to watch out for when choosing your next permeable paving product.


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IMAGE: HYDROCERA BY HYDROCON

PRACTICAL QUESTIONS TO ASK: • AESTHETICS, FUNCTION, SURFACE TEXTURE: What is the use of the pavement (e.g. vehicular, pedestrian), and does permeable pavers suit the application? What type of product is most suitable (e.g. fine texture surfaces for residential areas to prevent problems for high heels) • COST: What is the total cost of installing a permeable pavement? Can the generally higher cost of the product itself and its installation be justified? • LEGITIMACY OF CLAIMS: Does the product do as the manufacturer or supplier claims? Are there AS test results for breaking load, slip resistance and permeability showing mean and standard deviation data? • PERFORMANCE RECORD: Are there demonstration sites that can be viewed? • MAINTENANCE REQUIREMENTS: How much maintenance does the product require, and is the asset owner prepared to undertake maintenance if it is required? • USE OF FILTRATED WATER: Is the filtrated water required as a water source for mature trees? Is the water to be collected or stored, or will it slowly filtrate into the earth? What is the volume of water required to be stored in the event of a storm? ■

Big River ArmourPanel

®

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Natural and varied 2400 x 1200 sheets with no veneer pattern repeats – no sheets appear the same

Strength and stability Full Australian hardwood construction with balanced face/rear veneers

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For more information on Big River products visit bigrivergroup.com.au Big River Group Pty Ltd ABN 72 000 009 754 A Pidcock Family Enterprise © August 2016


ADVERTISING FEATURE – OPEN SHUTTERS

CHOOSING THE RIGHT MATERIAL FOR YOUR PLANTATION SHUTTERS

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HUTTERS ARE THE MOST VERSATILE WINDOW FURNISHING, WITH THE ABILITY TO BE FITTED TO WINDOWS AND GLASS SLIDING DOORS, AND CAN BE FITTED INSIDE OR OUTSIDE. WHILE THE VERSATILITY OF SHUTTERS PROVIDES ARCHITECTS AND DESIGNERS WITH ALMOST UNLIMITED DESIGN OPTIONS, IT CAN ALSO MAKE IT DIFFICULT TO SPECIFY THE CORRECT SHUTTER FOR THE DESIRED APPLICATION.

The first decision to be made when specifying shutters will be the material choice. Shutters are available in a wide range of timbers, aluminium, composite woods and polymers. The material choice will be largely dependent on design requirements, intended application and budget.

WESTERN RED CEDAR Western red cedar is considered the benchmark for shutter materials, favoured for its rich and inviting earthy tones, adding warmth and elegance to the home. Its inherent attributes include stability, strength and insulation properties. The majority of Western red cedar is sourced from sustainably managed forests in British Columbia, Canada. Western red cedar is by far the most environmentally friendly option, with a zero carbon footprint. Western red cedar wood is uniformly textured, straight-grained and is pitch and resin free, making it far less likely to swell, warp, cup or twist than other woods. It is also a better insulator than other common softwood species and far superior to brick, aluminium and plastics. Western red cedar is most suitable for indoor applications.

OTHER TIMBERS Merbau: Extremely dense hardwood known for its strength, durability and deep colour characteristics. Weight 850kg/m³

New Guinea Rosewood: A medium sized hardwood varying in colour from rich golden brown through to rich deep red. Weight 650kg/m³ Blackbutt: A large hardwood that grows on the east coast of Australia. A pale yellow brown colour which commonly has pin hole borer and gum streak. Weight 900kg/m³ Spotted Gum: An extremely strong hardwood with colours ranging from light yellow greens through to mid browns. Weight 950kg/m³ Victorian Ash/Tasmanian Oak: A medium weight hardwood vary in colour from a pale straw to warm soft browns and light pink, with a very straight grain. Weight 680kg/m³

IMPORTED TIMBERS Economically and cosmetically imported shutters can seem an attractive alternative to local manufacturers’ products. When painted, these products can provide a similar appearance to the genuine timber they purport to be, and at a lower cost. The unfortunate reality is that this similarity does not extend below the surface. The base materials used for the majority of the imported shutter market are low grade cut-offs of waste woods such as basswood, white teak and paulownia. These waste woods are generally fast-growing and therefore much younger at the time of manufacture, and as different ages of timber move at different rates these shutters will inevitably be far weaker, especially at the joints, have a shorter lifespan and will be more prone to failures such as warping.

ALUMINIUM Aluminium shutters are ideal for outdoor applications and with regular maintenance should provide a long-lasting shutter solution. Aluminium shutters will commonly be used for the outside of windows to provide shading and privacy but being a good conductor of heat are not suitable for indoor applications. That said, they can create additional rooms in homes by enclosing balconies, which is becoming an increasingly popular solution.

POLYMER Polymer shutters provide a cheap alternative to timber or aluminium shutters. Plastic shutters provide UV resistance and will not crack, chip or warp, and require virtually no maintenance. Water resistant and durable, PVC shutters are ideal for indoor applications, particularly rooms where moisture is present such as kitchens and bathrooms.

OPEN SHUTTERS Open Shutters has over twenty years’ experience manufacturing quality, custom made shutters. Open Shutters is an Australian owned manufacturer. The experienced team at Open Shutters provides service and support throughout the entire project, from initial design through to manufacture and installation, and with all shutters manufactured in Australia, Open Shutters can provide ongoing support and assistance for the life of the shutter.

Download the full whitepaper here: http://buff.ly/2cRWnun


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SKYLIGHTS

THE LATEST SKYLIGHTS AVAILABLE IN AUSTRALIA AND WHEN TO USE THEM [WORDS] LUCY MARRETT

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LAZED SKYLIGHTS HAVE BEEN USED AS A SOURCE OF NATURAL LIGHT IN BUILDINGS FOR CENTURIES, BUT THEY’VE ALSO COME A LONG WAY AS A TECHNOLOGY SINCE THEIR ORIGINS IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION.

For starters, they’re now mass-produced and available as individual lightweight units, which means they no longer demand high amounts of structural support and are simple to install. Additionally, most suppliers now offer a diverse range of stock to suit most applications and some even offer an assortment of add-ons like high-performance glazing and automated operability. Beyond their obvious benefits, skylights have also been used to varying degrees of effectiveness over the years to minimise heating, cooling and lighting costs within a building. If specified correctly, they can reduce reliance on artificial lighting to illuminate a space and can also aid a reduction in mechanical heating costs by providing a source of solar heat gain to a room. Skylights also serve as a great alternative to windows when there is a sizing restriction or privacy concerns. In transformed attic spaces for example, where windows aren’t suitable, openable skylights can provide both light and ventilation to an otherwise dark and dusty space.

THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF LIGHT While there is a seemingly endless assortment of skylights options in the Australia market they can be roughly grouped into three categories: roof windows, original skylights and tubular skylights. The ideal skylight, according to the Australian Government’s Your Home design guide, allows the right amount of light to penetrate and illuminate a space without facilitating uncomfortable amounts of solar heat gain and glare. The guide’s rule of thumb for spacing of skylights is three to five per cent floor to skylight area ratio and one to two per cent for high performing tubular skylights. The distance between skylights, says the guide, is ideally one and a half times the height between floor and roofing.

LIGHT AND HEAT GAIN The directional facing of the skylight will affect how the building responds to the extra light and heat penetrating its exterior shell, and while it’s best to place

a skylight in the ideal location and on an ideal angle, this isn’t always possible. In response, skylight manufacturers have invented ways to manage unwanted UV, glare and heat penetration caused by the imperfect placement of a skylight. Some manufacturers can provide extras like operable coverings and shade panels which can make a skylight seasonal, while others offer prefabricated tilted bases which angle a skylight to capture the optimal amount of light. Performance glazing is another option which can also effectively manage the type of light entering the space. While plastic glazing is cheaper, it can become discoloured and fragile over time and is generally a poorer insulator against UV rays which can increase fading damage to interiors. New glass technologies on the other hand, like heat-absorbing tints, insulated glazing units and low-emissivity coatings, can help create more thermally efficient skylights whilst optimising the type of light entering the interior space.

ROOF WINDOWS PLUS FROM ACOL SKY LIGHTS Australian made in a unique design, the Acol Roof Windows Plus is fabricated from high strength aluminium and available in standard sizes in both fixed and opening options. The roof windows are glazed with Viridian Smartglass as standard providing exceptional solar control and insulation. Double glazing and translucent glass can be also specified as an option. A unique combination of solar blind and shade screen options are also available.

ENERGY RATINGS Skylights are required to meet minimum performance standards set out by the Building code of Australia (BCA). The Window Energy Rating Scheme (WERS) provides a comprehensive and independent database of energy-rated skylights. An easy to use star rating system ranks the performance of each skylight as well as its potential for both heating and cooling the home and how much natural light it can provide. Each product is ranked on a zero to 10 rating system for easy comparability.

FIRE SAFETY Under the BCA, skylights must meet the fire safety requirements set out that state that for roof lights that are deemed combustible, the area of the roof lights must not exceed 20 per cent of the roof. In particular areas that are prone to bushfires, the Australian standard AS 3959-2009 skylights (along with the rest of the building materials and components) need to be tested and comply with the bushfire attack level requirement. Here’s a list of skylights available on the Australian market:

SOLATUBE 750DS FROM SOLATUBE AUSTRALIA Solatube 750DS is designed to deliver consistent light output throughout the day. Featuring Raybender 3000 Technology, it effectively captures low-angle sun rays in the morning, late afternoon and winter months, but rejects high-angle rays at midday to prevent glare, overlighting and overheating. It’s perfect for spaces where a uniform level of light is required during typical work hours.


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ELECTRONICALLY OPERATED SKYLIGHTS DISTRIBUTED BY ATTIC GROUP The electronically operated skylights, made from pressure treated pine wood, draw in the light and allow for the circulation of air.

ROOF TERRACE SKYLIGHTS FROM TILT INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Tilt’s roof terrace skylights are the only operable glass skylights on the market that can be utilised with a standard staircase. Specifically designed for architectural projects, Tilt skylights enable roof terraces to become seamless extensions of the home while ensuring neighbours’ views are not impacted. The product is 100 per cent Australian made incorporating structurally certified steel frames with laminated or insulated glass panel options.

SUNPIPE TUBULAR SKYLIGHTS FROM SKYSPAN SKYLIGHTS Sunpipe tubular skylights are Australian owned and made. As sunlight passes through the crystal clear dome and bounces down a reflective flexible tube shaft, it filters out 99 per cent of UV rays. A leak-proof diffuser spreads the natural light through the room providing an atmosphere of freshness and vitality. Sunpipe are eco-friendly and save energy through their use while offering high quality and performance.


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SOLAR POWERED SKYLIGHT FROM VELUX (AUSTRALIA) Velux skylights have a 5-star energy rating and have a solar powered panel to enable the skylight window to be opened and closed electronically. This feature allows for air-conditioning to be reduced and fresh air used to cool down the building instead. It also offers approximately 80 per cent heat blocking and a 99 per cent UV block.

THE SPECTRA SYSTEM FROM REDI-LITE The Redi-lite Hybrid Solar Skylight alternative offers a green energy solution for light starved areas around the home or office. With industry leading light output, warranty and build quality, Redi-lite is fast becoming the product of choice for ever increasing high density housing environments. Multiple light fixtures can be operated from a single solar panel with no large roof penetrations necessary. Redi-lite also offers an optional day/night kit.

SKYDOME SKYLIGHTS FROM SKYDOME SKYLIGHT SYSTEMS Skydome’s skylights are suitable for most roofing profiles including corrugated, metal deck and tile. Built to handle the tough Australian climate, the skylights come with a 7 year warranty and are also manufactured with Skyguard which eliminates 99 per cent of UV rays. Their range of skylights is so expansive that they also manufacture bushfire rated skylights and glass glazed skylights.


ADVERTISING FEATURE – WILSONART

UNDERSTANDING LAMINATE SELECTION: MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICE FOR YOUR INTERIOR APPLICATION

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ROM FURNITURE TO BENCHTOPS TO WALL PANELS AND PARTITIONS, DECORATIVE LAMINATE PROVIDES A DURABLE AND DECORATIVE SURFACE FOR A VARIETY OF RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS. The two principal laminate types are High Pressure Laminates (HPL) and Low Pressure Melamine (LPM). Low Pressure Melamine is alternatively known in the market as Melamine Face Board (MFB), Melamine Faced Panels (MFP), Low Pressure Laminate (LPL), Thermo-Fused Laminate (TFL), Thermally Fused Melamine (TFM), Pre-finished board, Melamine board, Decorative board and Decorative panels. The key aspect that distinguishes HPL and LPM is their structure and manufacturing process. Therefore, a basic understanding of the laminate manufacturing process is required to understand their application differences.

HIGH PRESSURE LAMINATE (HPL) Structure & Manufacturing Process HPL is comprised of resin-impregnated kraft paper, decorative paper face material (that provides the pattern, woodgrain or solid colour of the sheet) and a clear melamine-impregnated overlay (that gives laminates its surface strength and scratch-resistance). These sheets are bonded at pressures greater than 1000 kilograms per-square-metre, with temperatures approaching 149°C. The pressed sheets are trimmed, and then sanded on the back to facilitate bonding to suitable substrates such as Particleboard or MDF (Medium Density Fibreboard).

APPLICATIONS

AVAILABILITY

HPL is commonly used in horizontal and vertical applications, both commercially and in residences for such items as benchtops, vanity tops, tables, counters, wall panels and cabinet doors. The structural integrity of the paper core provides a high level of impact resistance, allowing HPL laminate to be used in high traffic areas.

LPM is available in hundreds of solid colours, woodgrains and abstracts with multiple finishes. Depending on the selected substrate, either particleboard or MDF, LPM is available in the following thicknesses 12, 16, 18, 25, 32, 33mm.

AVAILABILITY HPL is available in hundreds of solid colours, woodgrains and abstracts with multiple textured finishes.

LOW PRESSURE MELAMINE (LPM) Structure & Manufacturing Process LPM is generally offered in panel form. It consists of decorative paper impregnated with melamine resin which is bonded directly to particleboard or MDF (medium density fibreboard) substrate. No adhesives are used in making LPM panels as the resins in the paper “fuse” the paper onto the board. Unlike HPL, the LPM manufacturing process works with low press pressure (20-30 bar) and high temperature (170-190°C). As LPM paper is specifically engineered to be thermally fused to a substrate, it does not have the kraft paper core found in HPL, thus impact resistance of LPM is lower.

DECORATIVE LAMINATE SOLUTIONS BY WILSONART HPL and LPM come in a variety of surface finishes and textures. To appreciate the range of finishes, textures and enhanced performance and chemical resistance options available, it is worth looking at the extensive Wilsonart Laminate Range. Wilsonart decorative surfaces are widely adopted by designers and highly regarded by all. Whatever your project – home, school, food outlet or hospital, Wilsonart has a material to suit your needs. Wilsonart offers endless design possibilities through our extensive range of colours, patterns and textures, allowing you to closely match your vision.

APPLICATIONS LPM panels may be used in vertical, low impact or low wear applications, but are not typically for horizontal applications. Commonly used for commercial applications including store fixtures, toilet partitions and office furniture and residential applications for bathroom vanities, entertainment centres and closet shelving systems.

Download the full whitepaper here. http://buff.ly/2bjmElE


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Shape

SHIFTER:

COLOUR AND GEOMETRY LINK SPACES AND BRIGHTEN FACES AT AT NUMURKAH DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES

[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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HREE YEARS ON FROM A DEVASTATING FLOOD THAT SAW THE NUMURKAH DISTRICT HEALTH SERVICES IN VICTORIA DAMAGED BEYOND REPAIR, A NEW-LOOK STATE-OF-THE-ART FACILITY HAS REOPENED TO THE COMMUNITY. The 3,000sqm building is designed by Group GSA and includes a dental clinic, rehabilitation centre, operating theatre, acute wards, urgent care facility and connection to aged care. Apart from all the mandatory upgrades, most obviously an increased elevation to prevent a repeat of the 2012 floods scenario, Group GSA have also delivered an interesting, colourful and unique healthcare building through their selection of building materials.


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1 A panorama of the building’s street address shows the variety of colours, geometry, textures and materials used by Group GSA 2 Black oxide precast concrete panels juxtapose the smooth white panels infront which feature 50mm hexagonal geometric relief. Window frames are Capral Aluminium 406 St Lucia and glazing is either Evantage or Decorcolour (coloured panels) from Viridian New World Glass 3 Group GSA’s design emphasises patient exposure to views and interesting landscapes. Fielders Finesse Shadowline 305 features on the oversized fascia while recycled Ironbark cladding is used as lining boards for the soffits

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The architect’s treatment to the building’s façade and roof for example is as much an artistic collage of colour, textures and shapes as it is a front for a very sincere institution. There are bricks, but they’re glazed and multi-coloured. There is also prefab concrete, corrugated steel and hardwood cladding, but they too are used in unusual ways. But that’s not to say the building is impractical. The material palette, says Group GSA, along with the building’s floorplan and orientation, was chosen to help deliver a building that is connected to nature, easy to navigate, and comfortable for recovering patients. Group GSA says they worked from three clear objectives: 1. Ensure a connectedness between all departments, make wayfinding intuitive and clear and connections simple and direct 2. Create a facility which is open and inviting, pleasant for patients, visitors and residents of the aged care facility, and a wonderful place for staff to work everyday

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3. Embed wellness, wellbeing and recovery as a key consideration in design with an emphasis on patient direct exposure or views of interesting landscape. Promote movement through use of natural and local materials and link design together The intent to link spaces and facilitate wayfinding is again most obvious in Group GSA’s choice of materials. For example, the aforementioned glazed bricks feature inside and out, and are arranged in a mixed colour pattern that transitions from white (interiors) to light green to deep green (exterior). Ironbark eaves lining boards and internal feature panelling also accentuates internal to external connections, as do the hexagonal motifs and splashes of colour that appear both internally and outside. Useability was also an important part of the brief and to promote a sense of connectedness between various building departments the architects chose to locate both the reception and a shared courtyard at the core of the building. This encourages serendipitous encounters between patients, the public and staff, say the architects, as the building’s various departments and facilities are accessed through the same focal point and flow patterns.

4 The reception and a shared courtyard are located at the core of the building to encourage serendipitous encounters between patients. Fineline XT louvres from AGP Fineline Louvres provide operable cross ventilation through the reception area 5 Bright yellows feature throughout the building, including the vinyl flooring from Gerflor. The architects used a variety of ceiling materials throughout including Knauf Stratopanel and USG Boral Powerscape Plasterboard

Additionally, each bedroom or waiting area has views and access to landscape areas which was a key wellbeing and recovery consideration for Group GSA.

PRODUCTS: ROOF FIELDERS KLIPLOK 700 EXTERIOR WALLS EUROA GLAZED BRICKS, ECO TIMBER RECYCLED IRONBARK, FIELDERS FINESSE SHADOWLINE 305 WINDOWS & GLAZING CAPRAL ALUMINIUM ST LUCIA 406 FRONTGLAZE VIRIDIAN NEW WORLD GLASS EVANTAGE AND DECORCOLOUR, AGP LOUVRES FINELINE XT INTERIOR CEILINGS KNAUF STRATOPANEL, USG BORAL POWERSCAPE PLASTERBOARD FLOORING GERFLOR VINYL FLOORING, ONTERA CARPET TILES, JOHNSON TILES CERAMIC TILES, MISC WOVEN IMAGE ECHOPANEL PINBOARD PANEL, LAMINEX LAMINATE


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AGED CARE FOLLOWING HIGH-RISE TRENDS IN ADELAIDE [WORDS] NICHOLAS RYDER

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S AUSTRALIA’S LEVEL OF URBANISATION CONTINUES TO INCREASE, HIGHERDENSITY BUILDINGS WITH MIXED USES ARE BECOMING MORE PREVALENT IN OUR CITIES. As space becomes tight, we’re increasingly building up, and this is not just to meet housing demand. Right across Australia we’re seeing designers turn to high-rise for a variety of building typologies and also to combine a variety of building typologies. But until recently, it would have been inconceivable to consider high-rise and seniors living as compatible. By its very nature, designing for aged care means access and mobility are paramount, so it’s only natural then that flat, sprawling retirement home facilities have become the norm in Australia. But Australia is ageing as fast as it’s urbanising, and in recent times we’ve seen a host of new developments that are catering to those looking to retire in the city. A new project by Woods Bagot in Adelaide has been dubbed by the firm as “radically mixed-use”, that is, they believe it marks a fundamental change in the concept of mixed-use buildings. Ten different services will be squeezed within the 18-storey Uniting Communities’ tower, including retirement living, disability respite and specialist disability accommodation, retail tenancies, a community services hub, convention and meeting space and workplace. The firm suggests that it will generate a ‘onestop’ shop experience for the South Australian community and its full range of stakeholders, including the ageing and disabled. “The redevelopment will deliver the best quality community services, across a wide demographic spectrum, within a welcoming and vibrant environment that attracts and builds a healthy and sustainable community,” says Woods Bagot associate, Alex Hall.

A NEW PROJECT BY WOODS BAGOT IN ADELAIDE SEES AGED CARE INJECTED INTO THE TRENDING CONCEPT OF THE VERTICAL VILLAGE

“We believe it will become Adelaide’s premier CBD social and community services hub.”

OUT OF THE PERIPHERY AND INTO THE COMMUNITY The Uniting Communities’ development is not the first high-density aged care facility in Australia. Mid-rise and apartment-style retirement and aged care accommodation is becoming particularly favourable among church and charitable groups who own land in urban centres.

Two examples are the Cardinal Freeman retirement living, in Ashfield, Sydney, by Allen Jack + Cottier, and Rathdowne Place, a six-storey 162-unit aged care facility in Melbourne’s Carlton by DWP|Suter’s, both of which inject aged care into the ‘vertical village’ concept. The difference with the Uniting Communities’ project, however, is that it brings together a wider mix of residents and activities.

“It is quite a different concept to integrate retirement living in such an active building,” says Simon Schrapel, the Chief Executive of Uniting Communities. “There’s been other high-rise exclusively independent living units, but nothing of this sort of mix and has people living and resident with other people who aren’t old or part of the aged care development.” n


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EVENT WRAP: CARE CONNECT – DESIGNING A HEALTHY FUTURE FOR ALL AUSTRALIANS

N 18 AUGUST A GROUP OF AUSTRALIA’S BEST AGED AND HEALTHCARE DESIGN CONSULTANTS ASSEMBLED IN SYDNEY FOR CARE CONNECT.

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and non-scripted way, while feedback from suppliers was that they enjoyed working with the architects to discover new useful design solutions in a collaborative manner.

The event was invitation-only and its aim was to uncover the challenges and opportunities facing those parties involved in the sector through a novel event platform.

Suppliers also heard feedback and concerns from delegates regarding their products and services, and walked away with invaluable notes that will help guide product development and marketing strategies.

The innovation came in its format which was structured around a series of rotating peer-to-peer discussion tables of up to 10 executives, each focussing on key themes nominated by sponsors with a keen interest in the happenings of the sector. While the idea was to establish a great learning environment for delegates, where discussion could lead to the discovery of new design strategies and solutions, a lot of the benefit also went by way of the sponsors. The format allowed delegates to collectively brainstorm the challenges they face when designing their health and aged care projects, and then give feedback to product suppliers regarding what they needed from them in order to overcome those challenges. Key themes included flooring, access drainage, accessible tapware, prefab bathrooms and high-performance external facades, and the feedback from delegates and sponsors has been excellent. Most delegates agreed that it was refreshing and productive to have building product manufacturers and suppliers engage with them in an honest, forthright

THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT IF WE KNOW HOW TO GET THERE Two keynotes and a panel discussion also occurred on the day and were highlights. Presentations from Arch Fotheringham, Director of Health Projects from Brookfield Multiplex, and Rob Puflett, Studio Leader from Thomson Adsett were particularly enlightening. Speaking with delegates following the conclusion of the event, a general consensus was that Fotheringham’s keynote provided insights for those design consultants seeking to enter the hospital and healthcare facility sector, while Puflett’s presentation gave a clear perspective on what it takes to design top-level aged care facilities. Fotheringham’s presentation focussed on technology and the role it will play in the design of Australian healthcare buildings in the future, and how architects, through their designs and procurement strategies, can best stay on top of such technology. The key, says Fotheringham, is to remain flexible during design and procurement so that the

very latest and best technology can be implemented right before project handover – “just in time” or “at the last minute” as he often said. High levels of consultation between design and construction teams, facilities management teams and end-users is also critical, says Fotheringham, so that the facility and its technology remain relative and useable for as long as possible for end-users. Puflett also emphasised technology and consultation in his presentation and regarded them as two of the pillars supporting his firm’s unparalleled success in the Australian aged care sector. He noted how Thomson Adsett is embracing bio data and new smart technologies, and is integrating cross disciplinary design methods in its new crop of aged care facilities. He also shared valuable insight into Thomson Adsett’s business strategy which emphasises consultation, investing in change, developing diverse design skill sets and providing consumer centrism.

CONNECTING AGAIN IN OCTOBER Care Connect was the third in a series of events Architecture & Design is hosting under the Connect model. Planning is already underway for a fourth – Commercial Connect—which will take place on 13 October in Sydney. Care Connect was proudly supported by Enware, HP, Innowood, Interpod, Polyflor and Stormtech. ■


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SAVE THE DATE: COMMERCIAL CONNECT SYDNEY

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OMMERCIAL CONNECT IS AN EXCLUSIVE INVITATION-ONLY EVENT GATHERING AUSTRALIA’S VERY-BEST ARCHITECTS, BUILDING DESIGNERS, PROJECT MANAGERS AND DEVELOPERS IN THE COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE SPACE. The event format is structured around a series of rotating peer-to-peer discussion tables of up to 10 executives that focus on key themes nominated by attendees and sponsor partners. The aim is to discover and share the current trends and opportunities for all parties involved in Australia’s commercial building sector.

EVENT DETAILS When: Thursday 13 October 2016 Where: Doltone House, Sydney Register: Online at www.architectureanddesign.com. au/Events/Commercial-Connect I L 1 6 0 6 _ E n wa r e _ HP

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SUPPORTED BY

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Enware Wellbeing Designed to enhance the well-being of aged users by allowing greater access to the use and consumption of water. A contemporary yet familiar lever tapware range designed specifically for ageing users. Simple, ergonomic intuitive and familiar to meet the needs of the aged care user right now and into the future. To learn more scan here or go to www.enware.com.au/news/wellbeing

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INTRODUCING THE 2016

SHORTLIST


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2016

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED: 2016 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS SHOWCASE EXCELLENCE IN PURSUIT OF GREEN BUILDING

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HE SHORTLIST HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED FOR THE TENTH ANNUAL SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS, WITH PROJECTS AND PRODUCTS FROM AUSTRALIA’S LEADING DESIGN AND BUILDING INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS VYING FOR TOP HONOURS.

Each year since 2007, the country’s top designers, suppliers and sustainable building practitioners have come together to celebrate excellence in industry practices in the pursuit of sustainability. Continuing the trend of recent years, 2016 yet again fielded a record number of entries, and judges were given the difficult task of shortlisting a maximum five projects in most categories. In total, the Judges have shortlisted 64 finalists across 11 categories, including five in each of the new categories, Heritage, Office & Retail Fitout and Outdoor Structure.

The winners in each category are now in the running for this year’s Best of the Best Award and to mark the program’s tenth anniversary, a Best Newcomer and Lifetime Achievement Award will also be presented on the night.

Re-joining the band of experts was Suzie Barnett, a 2014 and 2015 judge and a key player in establishing the green building movement in Australia. Heading the panel as the jury chair is longtime Sustainability Awards judge Dick Clarke of Envirotecture. Clarke will be overseeing the new special awards including Best Newcomer and Lifetime Achievement Award.

All the honours will be announced at a gala awards ceremony at Sydney’s Doltone House on October 13, 2015. They will also be published online at Architecture & Design and Infolink|Building Products News magazine.

For details on the awards presentation event and to book tickets, please visit to www. sustainablebuildingawards.com.au/tickets/

The task of selecting this year’s winners has been taken on by an impressive group of judges with experience in all forms of architecture, including Sustainability Manager at Frasers Property Australia Rory Martin, Lendlease Sustainability Consultant Darryl Stuckey, Cundall Principal Alistair Coulstock, Norman Disney & Young Global Sustainability Director Tony Arnel, Positive Footprints Director Jeremy Spencer, and Woods Bagot Senior Associate Silvia Cupik.

For further project details and additonal imagery for all the shortlisted projects please visit www.architectureanddesign. com.au/2016-sustainability-awards were you’ll find an extensive write-up for each. We’re very proud to present the 2016 sustainability awards finalists:

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

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Gyprock Perforated Plasterboard • 3 contemporary new patterns with acoustic fabric backing to deliver exceptional acoustic control • Recesses on all 4 sides for easy jointing • Unique, seamless access panels in matching patterns • Can be used in curved installations down to a 6m radius • Range extension coming soon

For more… visit gyprock.com.au/perforated

A valuable partnership Developed by worldwide plasterboard specialist Saint-Gobain as part of Gyprock’s International Alliance program. Improved air quality Innovative Activ’Air patented technology reduces VOCs to provide improved air quality and a healthier indoor environment.


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SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS 2016

WERRINGTON PARK CORPORATE CENTRE BY ARCHITECTUS IS SHORTLISTED IN THE LARGE COMMERCIAL CATEGORY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRETT BOARDMAN

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

Multi-function. Multi-user. Multi-benefit.

Boost your productivity with the HP DesignJet T2530 eMultifunction Printer

• Printing, copying and scanning capabilities in one device • Produce fast, high-quality results—get A1 size prints in 21 seconds • HP Mobile Printing¹ allows you to easily integrate with your other office devices Call us at 1800 816 042 for more details. 1 Local printing requires mobile device and printer to be on the same network (usually Wi-Fi access points bridge wireless to wired connections). Wireless performance is dependent on physical environment and distance from access point. Wireless operations are compatible with 2.4 GHz operations only. Remote printing requires an Internet connection to an HP web-connected printer. Wireless broadband use requires separately purchased service contract for mobile devices. Check with service provider for coverage and availability in your area. See www.hp.com/go/designjetmobility for more details.


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FINALISTS – PUBLIC BUILDING

Saltwater Community Centre by Croxon Ramsay Architects. Photography by Diana Snape Mills Park by Hodge Collard Preston Architects Bold Park Aquatic by Donovan Payne Architects Tonsley Public Realm by Oxigen Northern Beaches Christian School by WMK Architecture Our Lady of the Assumption Catholic Primary School by BVN Port Melbourne Football Club Sporting and Community Facility by K20 Architecture Ballarat Regional Soccer Facility by K20 Architecture

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

Viridian Glass, beautiful buildings people love. Camberwell Public Library, Victoria

Visit us at ViridianGlass.com CSRViridian


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FINALISTS – OFFICE & RETAIL FITOUT

St.George Barangaroo by RFA Architects Gotha Street Fitout by Reddog Architects. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones Melrose Health by Bent Architecture 10 Moore Street by Quintessential Equity Pyrmont Fire Station and Fire Rescue Offices by Group GSA

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS


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FINALISTS – LARGE COMMERCIAL

Centrecare Midland by SIA Architects Werrington Park Corporate Centre by Architectus Building 56 Redevelopment, Monash University by McGlashan Everist Netball Central by Scott Carver 699 Bourke Street by Grimshaw. Photography by John Gollings

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

SUSTAINABILITY AND RECYCLED CONTENT IS KEY The decimation of the world’s native forests is an issue that is important to all of us, as the degradation of the forest impacts the quality of all life immensely. A matter of particular importance at the moment is the illegal logging of Russian forests for European Oak, Ash and Elm. As identified in 2013, in a report on this issue by the WWF; “WWF analysis of Russian customs data revealed that in 2010, the volume of Mongolian oak logged for export exceeded the volume authorized for logging by 200 percent— meaning that at least half of the oak being exported across the border to China was stolen”. (source: https://www.worldwildlife.org/publications/illegal-logging-in-the-russian-far-east-global demand-and-taiga-destruction)

Most of our wood floor ranges are PEFC certified, while Premium Floors carries full Chain of Custody Certification (COC) for the PEFC program. (www.PEFC.org)

Contact us at commercial@premiumfloors.com.au Phone number 03 9798 0808 www.premiumfloors.com.au


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FINALISTS – SMALL COMMERCIAL

Dresden Mobile by Alexander Symes Architect. Photography by Brett Boardman Phoenix College Early Learning Centre by Arkit Mildura Eco Living Centre by EME Design House of Haagen Dazs by Archiblox Garden Gallery by Panovscott Architects

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

WASTE ENGINEERING WASTE MANAGEMENT PLANS GREEN STAR WASTE DESIGN TRAFFIC ENGINEERING ROAD SAFETY AUDITS Getting the balance right between design, environmental performance and usability.

visit salt3.com.au today Prefer a conversation over the phone? SYD +61 2 8415 9781 MEL +61 3 9633 1900 EAST GIPPSLAND AUCKLAND


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FINALISTS – MULTI-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

88 Angel Street by Steele Associates Architects RMIT Bundoora West Student Accommodation, Walert House by Richard Middleton Architects Alphington Townhouses by Green Sheep Collective Artisan Apartments by EME design Monash University Logan Hall by McBride Charles Ryan. Photography by John Gollings

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

WE STRIVE FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT IN OUR SUPPORT AND SERVICE OF CUSTOMERS, BUSINESS PARTNERS AND STAKEHOLDERS USG Boral is a leading manufacturer and supplier of gypsum boardbased wall and ceiling lining systems, mineral fibre acoustical ceiling systems, metal framing, joint compounds, high-performance panels and accessories throughout Asia, Australasia and the Middle East. We are well positioned to service the Australian market with manufacturing facilities in New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria and Australia-wide distribution network of approx. 100 company-owned stores and independent resellers - The team behind the Team that puts plasterboard, compounds, ceilings and accessories on walls & ceilings around the country.

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FINALISTS – HERITAGE

Beyond House by Ben Callery Architects Waltham Jewel by Melbourne Design Studios Shadow House by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design. Photography by Shannon McGrath Pyrmont Fire Station and Fire Rescue Offices by Group GSA P Whitty Building Clinical School by Conrad Gargett

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

Building our future. Schiavello is helping to shape the future of Australia’s great cities. With half a century of experience and a national construction presence, we continue to push the boundaries of innovation, precision, and technical excellence in everything we do.

@schiavellogroup | schiavello.com

MELBOURNE SYDNEY BRISBANE ADELAIDE PERTH

PROJECT_PRIMA TOWER, MELBOURNE


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FINALISTS – SINGLE DWELLING

Alexandria Residence by CplusC Architectural Workshop Mosman Bay House by Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects Avalon House by Archiblox Abbotsford House by Marra + Yeh Architects The Grass House by David Luck Architecture. Photography by Hyatt & Associates Northcote Solar Home by Green Sheep Collective Armstrong by Future Build Construction Property Development H4 Living Tallaron by H4living

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

Naturally brown. Certified green. Earthwool® insulation, the ONLY GreenTag Level A insulation available in Australia. Made using RECYCLED GLASS BOTTLES and with ECOSE® Technology. No added formaldehyde Non-combustible 50 year warranty


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FINALISTS – SINGLE DWELLING ALTERATIONS & ADDITIONS

Yarraville Garden House by Guild Architects Project Zero by BVN Gezellig House by Di Mase Architects Quinees Blackheath by Anderson Architecture Unfurled House by Christopher Polly Architect. Photography by Brett Boardman ‘Fricourt’, St Peters by Hosking Willis Architecture Highlight House by SSD Studio Beyond House by Ben Callery Architects

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

Open Shutters represents the ultimate in window furnishing. With over 20 years’ experience in designing and manufacturing custom made shutters, our clients have the confidence that our bespoke solutions are able to satisfy the requirements of their projects.

If you can imagine it, we can create it.


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FINALISTS – INNOVATION OF THE YEAR

Green Building Online College by Green Building Institute All About Green Roofs by Do it on the Roof Junglefy Breathing Wall by Junglefly Brighton Lakes by Mirvac & CSR Environmentally Sustainable Structural Insulated Panelised Building Systems by Valley Workshop

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

The first window covering manufacturer in Australia to attain GreenTag Certification proudly sponsors the Green Building Product Category

Providing sustainable products that perform whilst adding quality and style to your projects. Talk to us today on 1800 837 845 or visit vertilux.com.au

info@vertilux.com.au Australia • New Zealand • South East Asia


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FINALISTS – GREEN BUILDING PRODUCT

Junglefy Breathing Wall by Junglefy Tractile BIPV-T roofing system by Tractile Knauf Comfortboard by Knauf The Grove Project by Premier Pavers & Stone Luxury Vinyl Tile by Karndean Designflooring

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

PROUD SPONSOR OF

Ever Art Wood® series

Beautiful, Japanese made, timber alternative. Covet’s aluminium screens and cladding sets a new benchmark in natural-look timber alternatives. Designed with excellent weather resistance, and performs well to Australian fire standards. Available in a selection of profile sizes, cladding panels, textural surfaces, and unique installation options.

+61 3 9398 8128 wecovet.com.au


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FINALISTS – OUTDOOR STRUCTURE

Aranda Adventure Garden by Paul Barnett Design Group Sydney Park Water Re-Use Project by Turf Design Studio and Environmental Partnership Wangal Park by Glascott Landscape & Civil Marks Park Amenities by Sam Crawford Architects Fairwater Park by McGregor Coxall. Photography by Simon Woods

VISIT ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/2016-SUSTAINABILITY-AWARDS FOR MORE INFORMATION OAND IMAGERY ON EACH OF THE FINALISTS

ZEGO INSULATED CONCRETE FORMS

A Sustainable Alternative To Conventional Building Systems • Multiple applications • Fast and precise construction • 6-9 times stronger than conventional brick and block • 100% recyclable • Reduces heating and cooling costs by 50-80%

www.zego.com.au | 1300 13 9346


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product showcases

Get the Information you need AustraliA’s leading source of new & exciting building and Architectural products

showcase index

PAGE CODE

BATHROOMS & LAUNDRIES Minimalist design a rich palette of colours – Sigma50 Flush Plate

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Maxi Beam – now more adaptable than ever

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Plywood EPD provides solid environmental data for specifiers

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Glide your way to modern aesthetics

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The evolution of motion

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Superior shop front security with folding, concertina doors

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High performance fitness flooring

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Quality Modular Ax Soft Floor Coverings from 1956 by Tai Ping

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Real Concrete Overlay

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Hand crafted suspended fireplaces

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Opening the fire door on a new dimension in fireplace design

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Superior condensation control with Enviroseal ProctorWrap

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Waterproofing costs tumble with Gripset GC1

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CEILINGS & INTERNAL WALL MATERIALS

DOORS & DOOR HARDWARE

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ways to use infolink: ONLINE

visit architectureanddesign. com.au/products and

download information and or enquire directly to the advertiser

EXTERIOR WALL MATERIALS Burlesque Glazed Clay Bricks by Austral Bricks Vitracore G2: DtS, BCA compliant, non-combustible aluminium composite panel ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCTS Plywood EPD provides solid environmental data for specifiers

e-newsletter subscribe to architecture & design newsletter & get new products & news sent directly to your email.

FLOORS & FLOORING ACCESSORIES

HEATING

KITCHENS & KITCHEN EQUIPMENT Billi Eco: Premium Instant Filtered Boiling and Chilled Drinking Water System Wilsonart Laminate- when design matters as much as performance LANDSCAPING & OUTDOORS Paving and Decking Equipment VersiJack Screwjack Pedestals WATERPROOFING


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

PLYWOOD EPD PROVIDES SOLID ENVIRONMENTAL DATA FOR SPECIFIERS Specifying products with low environmental impact is critical to meeting Green Star ratings and gaining necessary approvals. Not to mention, a requirement most customers now demand. WoodSolutions has developed Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for industry-average, Australian-produced timber products such as Ecoply, manufactured by Carter Holt Harvey. Each published EPD is independently verified and registered, and provides transparent and comparable information about the environmental impact of the timber product through its entire life cycle. Data reported in an EPD is collected using internationally recognised life cycle assessment and ISO 14025. The Plywood EPD helps to showcase the environmental credentials of Australian ply products and provides life cycle data for calculating the impacts at a building level. Ecoply is proven, durable and easy to work with. Manufactured from sustainably-grown Australian and New Zealand plantation pine. Unlike some other common alternatives that are carbon intensive to manufacture, Ecoply is a low embodied energy product that is actually a natural carbon store. On a limited Life Cycle Analysis basis, building in wood sourced from sustainably-managed plantations represents a net removal of carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere for the life of the timber. Ecoply also has Super E0 formaldehyde emissions – making it compliant with the Green Star Formaldehyde credit. And it’s EWPPA ‘Product certified’ for peace of mind. The EPD provides data on the entire lifecycle of plywood, so specifiers can compare with imported and local products and other building materials – Ecoply is sure to compare favourably. Photographer: Martina Gemmola

Photographer: Lakshal Perera

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

Photographer: Ralph Alphonso © Barley Store Productions


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

THE EVOLUTION OF MOTION Minimalist looks with expansive surfaces, clear cut designs and handle-less fronts put the spotlight on the functionality of the furniture. TIP-ON BLUMOTION for MOVENTO helps to discover the many different options you have to create handle-less furniture design. TIP-ON BLUMOTION is a 100% mechanical opening and soft closing support system that offers functional opening and closing support to handle-less furniture designs in living areas throughout the home. Handle-less drawers and pullouts open reliably by pressing on the front and close silently and effortlessly. TIP-ON BLUMOTION applications have a small front gap of only 2.5mm. Additionally the synchronisation feature enlarges the opening trigger for wide and high fronts. The latest MOVENTO brochure is available for complementary download from blum.com or email info.au@blum.com to receive a copy.

591AX

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

SUPERIOR CONDENSATION CONTROL WITH ENVIROSEAL PROCTORWRAP The Enviroseal™ ProctorWrap™ range of construction fabrics represent the latest in vapour permeable water tight membranes. These products are designed to reduce the risk of condensation forming on surfaces within the building envelope. While allowing vapour to pass outward from the inside of the building, these sophisticated membranes prevent the ingress of water and dust from the outside environment both during and after construction. Key benefits: • Reduces the risk of condensation formation • Improves air tightness and energy efficiency • Protects against the entry of wind-driven, rain and dust

TM

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Manage condensation risk with project specific advice and condensation modelling from the CSR Bradford technical services team. Contact CSR Bradford on 1800 354 044 or visit www.bradfordenviroseal.com.au


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

WATERPROOFING COSTS TUMBLE WITH GRIPSET GC1 The Gripset GC1 waterproof and antifracture sheet membrane can reduce labour costs by up to 50% on construction project wet areas, and it comes with a 20 year guarantee. Significant time saving occurs in two ways. 1. The instant waterproof membrane reduces labour time spent on application and drying. 2. There are no wet/cold weather delays for projects, as is the case with liquid membranes. Contractors can complete projects faster, enabling surface finishes such as tiles, screeds and toppings to be applied immediately after the Gripset GC1 membrane system has been installed. Gripset GC1 is delivered in 30m x 1m rolls for ease and ‘speed’ of use.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

SUPERIOR SHOP FRONT SECURITY WITH FOLDING, CONCERTINA DOORS HIGH PERFORMANCE FITNESS FLOORING Neoflex™ High Performance Fitness Flooring has set the bench mark for flooring in the fitness industry since 1985. Rephouse manufactures and supplies a complete range of fitness flooring products for cardio & strength areas, agility & functional areas, free-weight areas, acoustic solutions and sprint tracks. Product can be supplied in rolls, square tiles and interlocking tiles with an optional Fresh Finish™ coating for easier cleaning. Logos and graphics can be easily incorporated to provide stunning effects. Don’t just settle for another boring black floor. Utilise our free design facility to see what can be achieved with Rephouse Fitness Flooring.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

Folding security doors from KRGS help provide protection to shop fronts, bars, counter tops, kiosks and arcades. Available in 300mm and 150mm width panels, these versatile doors allow for extra security in applications of almost any shape, size or design. With no floor track, any potential trip hazards are eliminated, while also allowing adequate airflow into businesses. Proudly Australian owned and run KRGS is committed to supplying quality door products at competitive prices, while offering the highest level of service. krgsdoors.com.au | 1800 897 822

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

OPENING THE FIRE DOOR ON A NEW DIMENSION IN FIREPLACE DESIGN Combining strength in design with quality hand crafted finishing, Sculpt Fireplace Collection are offering some of the world’s most sought after high-end luxury fireplaces. Intent on providing the market a new dynamic collection of designer wood fires that incorporate technology, performance and innovation. At Sculpt Fireplaces we have gathered, tested and complied award winning fireplaces. Our exclusive range includes unique options like suspended fireplaces, 100% pure cast iron Cheminees fireplaces, panoramic fireplaces, the largest single and double sided wood fireplaces available in Australia, the first remote controlled wood heater and the only four sided wood fireplace available in Australia and New Zealand. info@sculptfireplaces.com.au | 1300 851 304

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

REAL CONCRETE OVERLAY Covet is introducing a unique concrete overlay. This modern material possesses excellent low shrink and high strength properties. It is crafted in Australia and is not an epoxy or fibre cement blend, and because it is actual concrete it offers the inherent aesthetic of this timeless material. It is poured to a height of 12mm over a stable substrate then ground back to 10mm using conventional concrete grinding and polishing techniques. The result is a very custom floor with over 16 base colours and 18 aggregate options. A contemporary, refined and very unique concrete surface. Covet is a Melbourne based company offering designers unique building products from Australia and Japan. www.wecovet.com.au

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

MAXI BEAM – NOW MORE ADAPTABLE THAN EVER

GLIDE YOUR WAY TO MODERN AESTHETICS

Designers have embraced Supaslat MAXI BEAM’s unique ability to enhance any interior space without the hassle of working with solid timber.

Cowdroy’s Exposed 90 Sliding Door Set is designed to add a special, sleek touch to the home or office.

Through new innovative developments, Supaslat MAXI BEAM are now as adaptable as your imagination.

Combining unobtrusive seamless functionality with premium aesthetics, the Exposed 90 Sliding Door Set adds a precise and modern touch to ordinary doors and doorways.

MAXI BEAM is now available in tailor-made shapes, extra-large sizes and longer unsupported spans. Now with more finishes, beams can be matched perfectly to panels, blades and slats. The most exciting development is integrated lighting so you can have beams which light-the-way! Release your creativity with MAXI BEAM! www.supawood.com.au

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

Available in sophisticated powder coat black or high quality stainless steel, the Exposed 90 will be a versatile and sleek addition to your home, office or place of business. Trusted by Australians since 1890, Cowdroy products are a culmination of over a 100 years’ worth of experience in the industry and we are proud to bring this expertise to modern homes.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES QUALITY MODULAR AX SOFT FLOOR COVERINGS FROM 1956 BY TAI PING Backed by market-leading EcoSoft® cushion underlay, made from post-consumer PET bottles, the Modular Ax range is sustainable, easyto-install and suitable for a broad range of commercial applications.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

BILLI ECO: PREMIUM INSTANT FILTERED BOILING AND CHILLED DRINKING WATER SYSTEM With a design focus on space saving, Billi’s Boiling and Chilled systems are often half the size of comparative underbench products, allowing you to make the most of the available area. The Eco sets a new standard for space saving at an amazing 180mm wide.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

VITRACORE G2: DTS, BCA COMPLIANT, NON-COMBUSTIBLE ALUMINIUM COMPOSITE PANEL Manufactured by Fairview; Vitracore Generation 2 (G2) is deemed non-combustible when tested to AS1530.1 as per the requirements set out by the BCA. Its special core is constructed from a 100% aluminium structure rather than combustible material.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

HAND CRAFTED SUSPENDED FIREPLACES The Sculpt suspended fireplace collection is a hand crafted collection direct from the South of France. Without a doubt any of the fireplaces in the suspended range will cultivate the aesthetic satisfaction in any living space.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

BURLESQUE™ GLAZED CLAY BRICKS BY AUSTRAL BRICKS Austral’s Burlesque™ are highly glazed, highly versatile and high gloss bricks for making bold statements, either mixed with conventional bricks or on their own as a feature wall.

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PAVING AND DECKING EQUIPMENT VERSIJACK® SCREWJACK PEDESTALS Elmich’s range of high strength, heavy duty, telescopic adjustable paver, beam and decking supports eliminate the need to use mortar or sand beds and brick or metal piers.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

MINIMALIST DESIGN A RICH PALETTE OF COLOURS – SIGMA50 FLUSH PLATE The Geberit Sigma50 flush plate for Geberit concealed cisterns is available in 6 different colours. Designed by the lead designer for TAG Heuer the new Sigma50 button is elegant, made of high quality glass and stainless steel.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

WILSONART® LAMINATE- WHEN DESIGN MATTERS AS MUCH AS PERFORMANCE Wilsonart makes a laminate surface for every need. Made to endure everything from chemical spills to fire damage, Wilsonart® Specialty Laminates are uniquely suited to handle the challenges of performance interiors.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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THE NEXT

GENERATION VRV IV-S SYSTEM FIRST LAUNCHED IN JAPAN IN 1982, THE DAIKIN VRV SYSTEM HAS BEEN EMBRACED BY WORLD MARKETS FOR OVER 30 YEARS. The slim compact design offers improved energy savings, comfort and can be connected to a range of domestic indoor units, with outdoor units measuring as low as 990mm in height* for ease of installation. VRV IV-S capacity ranges from 9kW to 24kW to meet an even wider variety of needs.

Find out more today. Visit commercial.daikin.com.au or call us on 1300 368 300

*Applies to 9, 11.2 and 14kW models


Smart access means Kaba and Dorma joining forces

Kaba and Dorma are merging. Two companies with strong traditions, over 150 years’ experience and outstanding reliability. Our merger brings together what belongs together. A union that allows us to offer even better access solutions from a single source. Because your trust in us is our most valuable asset.

T: 1800 675 411 www.dormakaba.com.au


Infolink | Building Products News, September/October 2016