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MAY | JUN 2016 | VOL 52 | NO 3 PRINT POST APPROVED

PP100007333

REINVENTING HERITAGE ARCHITECTURE ACOUSTICS The products engineers use

FLOORING Slip resistant products

ROOFING Your guide to green roofs


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FOREWORD

Renewal significance

WHILE RETAINING

IS THE CHALLENGE FOR CURRENT HERITAGE PRACTICE

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ERITAGE BUILDINGS CANNOT BE MOTHBALLED AND BECOME MUSEUM PIECES - AS SOME BUILDING USES CEASE OR DECLINE, WE NEED TO FIND NEW AND VIABLE WAYS TO KEEP THESE HERITAGE BUILDINGS AS ACTIVE AND VIBRANT PLACES THAT ARE SUSTAINED INTO THE FUTURE.

These new uses and upgrades must be undertaken sensitively to retain the values and significant aspects of our heritage places. Sensitive reuse should include consideration of new uses that are a good fit with an existing building to maximise retention of existing heritage fabric and enable new services and technologies to be added. As Conrad Gargett celebrates 125 years of practice with a legacy of a vast body of work we also reflect on what makes for good practice in heritage conservation. Our heritage and adaptive reuse team of around 15 includes expertise for the full spectrum of heritage practice; conservation planning, providing high level advice to guide conservation process and approvals as well as expertise in the physical building conservation and reuse process. Best heritage practice requires following a proper and rigorous process. This includes guidance using best practice heritage philosophy and by conservation plans and protocols. The key to a successful project outcome is to take the time to understand a place – both its history and its physical fabric (to understand how the place was as built and what changes have been made during the life of a building). This process can then inform how best to conserve and reuse a

place – which parts are of very high value and should be protected and which parts are less important and can be altered, changed or removed. Best practice conservation work requires the using trades with appropriate skills as well as the specification of appropriate materials and products. Building owners are looking for affordable solutions that also offer longevity to reduce future maintenance costs. Some of the key challenges for heritage projects include adding new services and technologies in a sensitive way. Equitable access can also create great challenges and required innovative solutions to be done sensitively. As we advance into the digital age at high speed our need for connection to place and memory becomes more of an imperative. Heritage buildings provide these anchors to place and memory – they are conduits to our collective past and shared culture. The challenge for building owners and heritage practitioners is to keep these places occupied, vibrant and commercially viable.

DAVID GOLE Principal and Senior Heritage Architect Conrad Gargett

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Goyle has a wealth of experience in contemporary design, adaptive reuse and heritage conservation, working across a broad range of project types, from complex heritage sites to aged care and residential. He is an accredited UNESCO assessor for world heritage sites and was awarded a Churchill Fellowship in 2000 to study conservation in Venice. His passion for bringing new life to existing buildings has resulted in many successful projects including the nationally awarded restoration and adaptive reuse of the former West’s Furniture Showroom and the current redevelopment of the former Red Hill Skate Arena. We are privileged to have David act as the contributing editor for this issue of Infolink|Building Products News Magazine


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

W

HILE I AM NOT SURE WHO SAID IT (SO PLEASE EMAIL ME IF YOU ARE), THERE IS ONE QUOTE FROM A UNIVERSITY HISTORY READING THAT HAS ALWAYS STUCK WITH ME. IT READ SOMETHING ALONG THE LINES OF: “OLD BUILDINGS AREN’T GOOD BECAUSE THEY’RE OLD, THEY’RE OLD BECAUSE THEY’RE GOOD” AND THE MESSAGE WAS THAT IF A BUILDING HAS MANAGED TO SURVIVE THE TEST OF TIME THEN IT HAS PROVEN BOTH ITS STRUCTURAL AND CULTURAL WORTH AND IS THEREFORE WORTHY OF PROTECTION. But for David Gole, architect, heritage expert, and principal of Conrad Gargett, it isn’t quite so simple. He’d prefer to see buildings reinvented to suit contemporary uses and new cultural environments, rather than simply left as is, or “mothballed” as he puts it. Of course, being a devoted heritage practitioner means Gole will always follow a rigorous design process to ensure his upgrades retain the significant heritage aspects of the building and remain as anchors to place and memory. But that doesn’t mean he’s entirely anchored in the past. For heritage buildings to remain relevant they must be reinvented to suit contemporary needs. The same could be said about other forms of architecture such as aged care and retirement buildings. A

project in Victoria by Six Degrees Architects (page 12) shows how architects are beginning to borrow research, data, and design methodologies from other architecture disciplines to design according to the desires of their new clients. That said, and as Gole emphasises in his feature (page 24), designing the new shouldn’t mean overlooking the old, and this is also applicable across the breadth of building disciplines. While new aged care facilities and heritage buildings are beginning to look more like cafes, universities, and hotels, they are different and do require special considerations. For heritage buildings this involves adhering to conservation plans and protocols, while for aged care it is mostly about safety and access concerns and things such as slip-resistant flooring (page 40) will always remain an integral part of the industry. Reinventing buildings usually coincides with technological improvements that dramatically alter the way we can design them. The key challenge is adding new services and technologies in a way that is sensitive to place, briefs, and building codes. Our features in this issue, including a great green roofs guide (page 6), all demonstrate how building designers are embracing new building materials and technologies to create buildings of cultural and architectural significance.

NATHAN JOHNSON

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR DAVID GOLE E-MAIL: DGOLE@CONRADGARGETT.COM.AU

GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART DIRECTION JULIA GEE EMAIL: JULIA.GEE@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

DEPUTY EDITOR NATHAN JOHNSON E-MAIL: NATHAN.JOHNSON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0612 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 EMAIL: ADRIAN.WILSON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

CONTENT PRODUCERS LUCY MARRETT TRISTAN DENNIS JASMINE O’DONAGHUE JULIA GEE

24 ON THE COVER: CONRAD GARGETT’S ‘LIGHTWEIGHT’ REFURBISHMENT OF THE QUEEN VICTORIA BUILDING IN SYDNEY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTHEA HORTON

ROOFING & ACCESSORIES

6 A guide for specifying

HERITAGE ARCHITECTURE

24

green roofs in Australia

Contributing Editor David Gole highlights the best way to approach heritage architecture design

ACCESSIBILITY & AGED CARE

ACOUSTICS

34 Engineer Tim Hewitt shows

12 Six Degrees Architects use

why working with an acoustician produces sound results

cross disciplinary research for an aged care facility in Victoria

34 FLOORING

40 Preventing injuries in aged care environments with slip and fall resistance flooring

12 HEATING

20 Gas fireplace technology heating up in Australia

PRODUCT SHOWCASES

43

Information on new and exciting building and architectural products. Introduced with a full directory and how to enquire

PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR KANE GREEN PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0902 E-MAIL: KANE.GREEN@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1300 360 126 ISSN 1039-9704

TOWER 1, LEVEL 13, 475 VICTORIA AVE, CHATSWOOD, NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA LOCKED BAG 2999 CHATSWOOD DELIVERY CENTRE NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA PHONE: 02 8484 0888 | FAX: 02 8484 0633 ABN 80 132 719 861 WWW.CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,303 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION SEPTEMBER 2015

© Copyright Cirrus Media 2016 All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

PRINTED BY BLUESTAR PRINT 83 DERBY STREET SILVERWATER, NSW 2128 PHONE: 02 9748 3411


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Nominations close

14 July 2016

NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN! Nominations are now open for the 10th annual Sustainability Awards to be held in Sydney on 13 October 2016. A total of 15 awards, including six new category prizes, will be presented on the night, recognising the work of those at the absolute forefront of sustainable building and design in Australia. CATEGORIES Single Dwelling

Large Commercial

Industrial & Transport *NEW

Best Newcomer (Company)*NEW

Single Dwelling (Alterations or Additions)

OfďŹ ce & Retail Fitout *NEW

Outdoor Structure *NEW

Lifetime Achievement (Person)*NEW

Multi-Density Residential

Public Building

Green Building Product

Best of the Best (Product or Project)

Small Commercial

Heritage *NEW

Innovation of the Year (Project or Product)

VISIT: SUSTAINABLEBUILDINGAWARDS.COM.AU PROUDLY SPONSORED BY:


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ROOFING & ACCESSORIES

THE GREEN ROOF AT FLORENCE STREET BY NEST ARCHITECTS PROVIDES INSULATION AND THERMAL REGULATION FOR THE HOME, NEGATING THE NEED FOR AIR-CONDITIONING DURING SUMMER

green roofs A GUIDE FOR SPECIFYING IN AUSTRALIA


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THE MUCH-AWARDED FOREST LODGE ECO HOUSE BY CHRIS KNIERIM OF DESIGNER CONSTRUCTIONS HAS A LITTLE-KNOWN GREEN ROOF OASIS COMBINING PRODUCTS FROM SIKA AND ELMICH AND DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION INPUT FROM TENSILE

[WORDS] JASMINE O’DONOGHUE

G

REEN ROOFS ARE SPROUTING IN POPULARITY AROUND THE COUNTRY AND ARE USED TO CREATE HEALTHY, ECOLOGICALLY RESPONSIBLE BUILDINGS. THEY IMPROVE A BUILDING’S PERFORMANCE AND SUPPORT LIVING VEGETATION ON A FLAT OR PITCHED SURFACE.

So why go green? Green roofs can extend the lifespan of a roof by protecting the waterproofing layer from weather and temperature changes. They can provide sound insulation, reduce the heating and cooling requirements and slow stormwater runoff, alleviate the urban heat island effects, capture gaseous and particulate pollutants and improve air quality. The structures can support local biodiversity, create a new open space for recreation, growing food and support the inhabitants’ physical and mental health. Green roofs have come a long way since the Viking and Middle Ages when most houses in Scandinavia had “sod roofs”. Modern green roofs have been gaining momentum across the globe since marketed on a large scale in the early seventies in Germany. Last year in France a law was passed which mandates rooftops on new buildings built in commercial zones either be partially covered in plants, or solar panels. In 2014, The City of Sydney adopted the Green Roof and Walls Policy. Under the policy, the City of Sydney will encourage installation of quality green roofs and walls by supporting, promoting, researching and monitoring green roof installation and addressing key barriers to their uptake.

BUILDING A GREEN ROOF The first consideration when building a green roof is the weight and purpose. There are two types of green roofs.

Extensive green roofs have a thin growing medium while intensive green roofs have deeper soil and are much heavier. Extensive green roofs are shallow and can provide the environmental benefits of a green roof, but cannot support regular foot traffic. Extensive green roofs have a growing medium of less than 200mm and a roof structure similar to conventional roof coverings. They weigh between 60–200kg/sqm and are relatively economical. They can support less water and root growth, so grow a limited variety of more hardy plant options. They provide some thermal and acoustic insulation benefits and are relatively easy to retrofit on existing roofs. Intensive green roofs are the big-brother of extensive green roofs. They have a larger profile of up to 1m deep, allowing them to support larger plants and have a greater waterholding capacity. They can weigh between 180-500kg/sqm or more and require a stronger physical roof structure. This makes them a more expensive option but they have a wider scope for design and use. They have greater thermal and acoustic insulation benefits but are difficult to retrofit existing buildings. Once you’ve decided on the type of green roof and ensured the engineer has allowed for the total weight of saturated soil plus all the plants, the next step is to choose the materials for each layer.


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VEGETATION GROWING MEDIUM

GREEN ROOF LAYERS A typical green roof has seven layers on top of the structural components. 1. A WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE

FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE LAYER

There are three major categories of waterproofing membranes: liquid applied membrane treatments, preformed sheets, including ‘single ply’ and integrated systems. Liquid applied membrane materials are made from bitumen emulsions, modified bitumen, polymer cement systems, polyurethane, polyurethane modified acrylic, acrylic or two-part polyurethane hybrid elastomers. The material is in a liquid state, is applied manually and is suitable for small roofs or roofs with a number of upstands, penetrations, corners or steep slopes. Liquid applied membranes are easy to apply, tolerant to surface imperfections and easily repaired, however they are not root resistant and may become brittle if exposed to sunlight and high temperatures. A preformed membrane suits larger, flat or gently sloping roofs. The majority are either asphalt-based or polymer-based and are either loose-laid or fully bonded to the substrate. They have a uniform thickness and asphalt base systems are torched down and seam welded for additional sealing and strength but are not usually trafficable, UV stable or root resistant. PVC membranes and Ethylene Propylene Diene (EPDM) and Butanoyl membranes are root resistant and Thermosetting and Thermoplastics are UV stable. Preformed membranes require a high level of skill for installation and there is the possibility condensation or moisture may soften the glue or adhesive tapes along the seams and bonding. 2. ROOT BARRIER LAYER

The root barrier layer protects the waterproofing membrane from damage caused by plant roots. It may not be necessary if a root-resistant waterproofing membrane is used. Typical materials used are polyethylene (plastic) sheets and polypropylene geotextile fabric. Ensure the root barrier sheet is compatible with the waterproofing membrane so no adverse reaction or chemical action occurs. 3. INSULATION (OPTIONAL)

Green roofs provide significant thermal insulation but since it is difficult to obtain accredited insulation values for green roofs, it may be necessary to use conventional means of insulation to meet the BCA’s thermal insulation standards. 4. DRAINAGE LAYER

INSULATION (OPTIONAL) ROOT BARRIER LAYER WATERPROOF MEMBRANE

A drainage layer carries away excess water and should strike a balance between storing water in the soil and draining storm water. Plastic drainage sheets or boards are common drainage materials for green roofs and are installed as a continuous layer. Plastic drainage layers may be rigid, open mesh structures or they may have a cup style design, enabling water to

be stored at the base and used later by the plant. Cup-style drainage sheets should be overlapped to eliminate gaps between sheets while other plastic drainage types should have adjacent sheets butted together. For green roofs with high traffic, install rigid draining layers to avoid compression. 5. FILTER FABRIC

Laid on top of the drainage layer is a filter fabric made of geotextile materials such as fleece or other woven materials. This layer holds the soil in place and separates the drainage layer from the growing medium, preventing the growing medium from blocking the drainage layer or stormwater system. 6. GROWING MEDIUM

Next up is the growing medium, which is manufactured soil, crushed brick or other inorganic material which may be supplemented with organic material such as coconut fibre or coir. Using a mixture of native soil and organic or mineral additives can help with water retention, permeability, density and erosion control. As a general guide, the growing medium should be 75-80 per cent inorganic material such as expanded slate or crushed clay and 20-25 per cent organic material such as humus and clean top soil. 7. VEGETATION

The final layer is the vegetation. Extensive green roofs require low maintenance vegetation and many native plants from coastal and arid inland regions are suitable. Intensive green roof plants can be treated in a similar way to ground level gardens and require the same level of maintenance, but native plants are preferred. Plants suitable for extensive green roofs include low growing succulents and herbaceous perennials originating from dryland habitats. Annual to biennial plants can be used successfully on green roofs and tend to fall into the groups of quick growing annuals and ephemerals. Members of the Sedum family, which consists of 600 types of succulents are a safe choice. Intensive green roofs with substrate deeper than 250mm can also support small shrubs and turf. Sports turf requires a designed soil or growing medium to ensure effective drainage and regular irrigation, fertilising and mowing. Species with excessive vigour, such as Couch Grass and Kikuyu, should be avoided as their rhizomes may damage waterproofing membranes. Instead opt for Nara native turf, St Augustine grass and Tall Fescue. Vegetables require irrigation and a substrate depth of at least 200mm. Substrate deeper than 500mm can grow shrubs up to 2m but plants with dense, upright habits should only be used where there is minimal wind exposure. Substrate deeper than one metre can support small trees up to five metres. Trees with sparse canopies, flexible stems and high tolerance to heat are best in areas of high wind exposure. Try the Bottle Tree, Acacia stenophylla and Silver Princess.


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PROJECTS IN FOCUS FLORENCE STREET BY NEST ARCHITECTS

The Florence Street project is a personal one for Emilio Fuscaldo, founder of Nest Architects. Australia’s affordability crisis prompted Emilio and his partner to purchase 180sqm of land in Coburb, Melbourne, on which they built their 80sqm ‘beach shack’ with a 50sqm green roof. The green roof provides insulation and thermal regulation, negates any need for air-conditioning during summer and reduces winter gas bills. The 200mm layer of soil reduces urban heat radiation and encourages diversity in flora and fauna. Water collected from the roof feeds into the toilet, is used on both the roof garden and the dwelling’s ground garden.

so stupid. After some preliminary research and a frank discussion with the engineer it didn’t seem that hard to do, so why not.” Fuscaldo wanted to show green roofs can be incorporated into a modest, inner-city house, he wanted to prove they are “not just reserved for the big house in the country or on top of a sky scraper.” “As an architect, I never want to be in the position when a client would ask why we didn’t do a green roof and I answered ‘because I couldn’t afford it.’ We really wanted to show that although it adds a lot to the project cost, compromises could be made in other areas to get the house in on a tight budget.”

Florence Street grows succulents which require little to no watering. Despite a watering system being installed, after a year Fuscaldo turned off it off and the “plants are doing just fine”. In the centre of the roof is Sir Walter Buffalo, which replaced Kidney Weed (Dichondra repens) after it died off in summer. Growing successfully atop of Florence street is Lamb’s Ears (Stachys bizantina), Blue Chalk sticks (Senecio serpens), Hen & Chicken plant (Echivera glauca), Inland Pigface (Carpobrotus modestus) and Blue Flax-lily (Dianella revolute).

The green roof came at a cost of about $30,000, but Fuscaldo says incorporating the green roof “just made sense”.

Fuscaldo found the most important aspect to consider before building his green roof was the weight of the soil and the plants.

“It really was trial and error with the planting types and luckily everything apart from the Kidney Weed has made it due to being very tolerant of the wind, sun, inconsistent rain and somewhat thin soil profile,” Fuscaldo explains.

“Why build high performance floor, walls and windows then leave the roof to be insulated by some low tech glass wool batts? It just seemed

“The more they grow the heavier they get and the stronger your roof structure will need to be,” he says.

“The plants were also selected due to the fact that the soil is very permeable…the last thing we want up there is a pond.”


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SYDNEY ZOO BY MISHO + ASSOCIATES

Misho + Associates are behind the design of Sydney’s new zoo set to be developed in Sydney’s west. It will be home to the first green roof habitats in Australia, which will contain animals and nocturnal animals for exhibit, support wildlife, shelter and biodiversity intensification. Architect Misho Vasiljevich of Misho + Associates says the green roof was decided upon straight away due to the environmental consideration and since the location was in the middle of exhibits.

CONCLUSION

The three exhibits need to provide a stable, temperature and humid controlled environment without air conditioning. They needed to allow complete darkness and controlled artificial lighting and cut out unnecessary noise from material movement. This will be achieved using prefabricated concrete panels to create tunnels, which will be landscaped on top. Misho has chosen Humes Concrete road culverts, along with salvaged wood from Tasmania for external cladding. The design will also incorporate Xlam Cross Laminated Timber.

Green roofs can beautify and dramatically increase the sustainability of a design. Despite an initial cost, the insulative properties of a green roof will pay itself off in savings from energy bills. Nest Architects advises those looking into green roofs to select plants which grow, and cover up exposed dirt quickly and ensure the waterproof membrane and drainage cells are UV tolerant and perform well over the long term. Incorporating a green room will allow for healthier buildings and healthier inhabitants. ■

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STICKING with nature: STOCKLAND MERNDA RETIREMENT VILLAGE CLUBHOUSE BY SIX DEGREES ARCHITECTS


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[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON [PHOTOGRAPHY] DAVID COLLOPY

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UMAN CONTACT WITH NATURE HAS BEEN TIED TO IMPROVED HEALTH IN MANY STUDIES WITH SOME EVEN SUGGESTING THAT THE LESS GREEN A PERSON’S SURROUNDINGS, THE HIGHER THEIR RISK OF MORTALITY. MORE SPECIFIC TO HEALTH OUTCOMES, THERE HAVE BEEN MANY STUDIES THAT DIRECTLY TIE A PERSON’S EXPOSURE TO NATURE WITH IMPROVED LEVELS OF HEALING AND WELLBEING WHEN UNDERGOING TREATMENT FOR PHYSICAL OR PSYCHOLOGICAL DISEASES.


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The implications of this research and information for building designers, particularly institutional building designers, are profound because they lend to suggestions that the designer plays a pivotal role in the health, wellbeing and even survival of building occupants.

Research is thus having a profound impact on many types of architecture regardless of the discipline it originated in. It was also one of the guiding principles for the design of the brand new Stockland Mernda Retirement Village Clubhouse (SMRVC) in Melbourne, by Six Degrees Architects.

“The duration of retirement and the benefits of ageing in place are becoming evident to the next generation of retirees, and in the coming decade, their choice of housing or retirement provider is going to be increasingly influenced by the quality of the buildings and the sense of community offered,” he says.

At the same time, research into occupant behavioural trends is also driving changes in education, commercial and aged care architecture. Traditional learning, working and retirement spaces around the world are being substituted for new hybrid spaces that combine and blur the lines between learning, socialising, working and living, and all in the pursuit of better user experience.

Six Degrees have completed a number of university projects involving student study spaces and libraries and are familiar with the sticky campus concept, in particular the principle of enhancing occupant experience through better designed and more appealing community spaces.

“The feel is far more domestic and comfortable, rather than being based on ease of cleaning or simplicity of operation.”

In the education sector, architects are designing what are being called ‘sticky campuses’ or multi-functional spaces that encourage students to stay on campus for longer periods of time to socialise, learn and work. In the aged care sector, the shift is aligned with the notion of ‘aging in place’, whereby retirement homes are no longer being designed for the high needs of late retirees, but as hotelesque places for people in various stages of retirement to come and live in comfort as they age.

In more than one sense, the contemporary retirement village could be seen as similar to the sticky campus. Not only do most occupants of these spaces rarely leave, they are also voluntarily there to experience a range of services. Similar to new universities, new retirement villages are now offering facilities and amenity akin to hotels, shopping centres and community spaces in a bid to create a more appealing environment for buyers/renters. This is the case at the SMRVC which Peter Malatt, Director of Six Degrees says was designed to appeal to the next generation of retirees, looking to age in place.

In appeal to this generation, the SMRVC was designed as an emulation of a town square, where a diverse range of indoor and outdoor amenity and facilities articulate from a central communal space. A series of social areas, including a bar, dining, lounge, billiards, pool and gym, are grouped for a northerly orientation, capturing morning sun. They open up onto the ‘Common’, an area with a bowling green, productive garden and contemplative park. Private spaces, including wellbeing, doctor, and hairdressing services, have a southerly aspect, acting as a buffer to the road and carpark.


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1 The injection of nature into the project was a driving principle for Six Degrees who understand the warmth, welcome and wellbeing it brings to a project 2 A series of social areas open up onto the ‘Common’, an area with a bowling green, productive garden and contemplative park. Private spaces have a southerly aspect and act as a buffer to the road and carpark 3 Flashes of colour break up the timber and grey hues of the floor

3


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4 Outside, the building is all about low maintenance, environmental sustainability and, again, user experience 5 The walls were created by Omni Constructions


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The injection of nature into the project was also a driving principle of Six Degrees’ design strategy who understand the warmth, welcome and wellbeing it brings to a building. This was achieved through a mixture of passive design and selection of building products. Northern orientation to all public spaces and clerestory windows over the major common room that spills out onto the BBQ area and Bowling Green optimise natural light for the internal spaces. Timber, plywood, fabric and brick finishes are used throughout the building to, as Malatt puts it, “privilege the user experience” and create a healthy and welcoming environment. But probably the most unusual choice of building material, particularly for a mass market development like a Stockland project, is the rammed earth wall that spreads throughout the SMRVC. Outside, the building is all about low maintenance, environmental sustainability and, again, user experience. CSR Cemintel Barestone and Carter Holt Harvey Shadowclad clad the bulk of the building while timber, rammed earth and brick details anchor it to the site and provide a natural, warm and tactile quality to the user experience. The final, and most obvious guiding principle of the SMRVC, is sustainability, something we’ve come to expect from Six Degrees. A part from maybe the limitations on the materials used for floors in aged care, Malatt suggests that guidelines for sustainable design are applicable across the full spectrum of architecture typologies, including designing retirement homes.

The project is rated a 4-star Greenstar ‘Custom Design’ and achieved points through use of kitchen waste composting, an integrated landscape strategy and its social sustainability through the principles of aging in place. It is fit with highly durable building materials to prolong building life and makes use of solar heating for pool and hot water systems. The rammed earth walls also add to the building’s environmental credentials and is an effective use of natural materials to increase the internal thermal mass of the building. Australia is getting older. About 40 years ago eight per cent of our population was aged 65 and over. Now it’s more like 14 per cent. And in that period, those 85 and over increased almost four fold. In the next twenty years Australia population is projected to grow by 28 per cent, whereas growth for those in the 65 and over age bracket is expected to increase by 82 per cent, and greater than 100 per cent for 85 and overs. In short, more of us are readying for retirement and we’re likely to live longer while in it. The World Health Organisation calls it the ‘longevity revolution’ and its certainly effecting the way we design aged care facilities. For Six Degrees, it’s all about providing a product that is appealing and attractive to a wide group of people - people who want and need different things. At the SMRVC, the services are diverse, the spaces varied and most importantly, checking-in is voluntary. No one has to be there, but they want to.

6 Rammed earth walls. fabric linings and furnishings, forest certified plywood linings and timber finishes were used throughout for warmth and greater durability while high clerestory windows provide light for the bar and common room


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7 The Clubhouse features a variety of spaces to suit different users including a softly-lit library 8 Circular windows are scattered in and around building and break up the solid mass of the rammed earth wall

PROJECT CREDITS: ARCHITECT SIX DEGREES ARCHITECTS BUILDER DUCON QUANTITY SURVEYOR STOCKLAND STRUCTURAL ENGINEER SEDGMAN YEATS SERVICES ENGINEERS SIMPSON KOTZMAN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT FFLA BUILDING SURVEYOR BANYULE CITY COUNCIL ACOUSTIC ENGINEER ACOUSTIC LOGIC PRODUCTS: LOUVRES SHADEFACTOR AUSTRALIA CEMENT SHEETING CSR CEMINTEL BARESTONE 9MM GLAZING SYSTEM CAPRAL 625 NARROWLINE DOUBLE GLAZING FLOOR TILES CLASSIC CERAMICS STONES BASALTINA NERA, 600X300 TIMBER LINING BOARDS HOOP PINE TIMBER VENEERED MDF AUSTRAL PLYWOODS RAMMED EARTH OMNI CONSTRUCTIONS RECYCLED TIMBER URBAN SALVAGE CARPET ONTERA KARONA SHADES, COLOUR MEAD 1063 FURNITURE JARDAN CEILING PLASTERBOARD BULKHEAD FABRIC WOVEN IMAGE ECHOPANEL FLOOR TILES CSR CEMINTEL BARESTONE 9MM EXTERIOR CEMENT SHEETING CSR CEMINTEL BARESTONE 9MM EXTERIOR CLADDING CARTER HOLT HARVEY SHADOWCLAD â– 


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – HLS HEALTHCARE

BUILDING SAFETY AND INDEPENDENCE INTO AGED CARE

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GED CARE FACILITIES CAN PROVIDE A CHALLENGE FOR ARCHITECTS AND DEVELOPERS, AS THE FACILITY MUST HELP STAFF DELIVER A HIGH LEVEL OF CARE AND ENHANCE THE QUALITY OF LIFE OF RESIDENTS. Finding the balance between providing care, respecting privacy and encouraging independence can be difficult, but is aided through a well-thought out design. The Department of Human Services supports the principle that aged care residential environments should meet the objective of ‘Ageing in Place’, where a building can be flexible to provide the right level of care, despite changing circumstances, such as a reduction in mobility. An environment should be provided that residents can regard as their home and be safe and happy within. The environment should provide residents with self-respect, social opportunities and continuous improvement in their quality of life. Assisi Aged Care in Melbourne offers its residents and staff flexibility after installing the Elsi Smart Floor system. The system provides the opportunity to improve safety, reduce falls and reduces pressure on staff by monitoring the in room activities of a resident and providing alerts and alarms

of particular, user defined events (i.e. falling, going to the toilet, being in the toilet for too long). Assisi Aged Care Head Nurse, Fiona Kool says “they have had incidents where a resident has fallen and they can’t go over to press the call bell system, so this flooring with all its activation points will be so much quicker and precise”.

Elsi Smart Floor helps nurses to be at the right place at the right time by activating various alarm and notifications, which can be relayed to Smart Phones or DECT Phones. The alarm options are: fall alarm, bed alarm with or without automatic light (thus reducing the risk of falls due to poor light), toilet alarm, toilet alarm with timer, burglar alarm and an entrance/exit alarm for the main and/or terrace door. The Software also provides the opportunity to review movements leading to a particular event and how long it took the staff to respond to the event. It is quick and easy to install in either existing or new facilities and is installed in the same way as the traditional top floor carpets are installed. Elsi Smart Floor is easily and quickly laid, and is fully protected by the top floor carpet, giving it a long life time.

“It allows their independence without being intrusive so it’s a monitoring system that they’re not aware of so it promotes their independence.” Elsi Smart Floor works in a similar way to today’s touchpads and detects and tracks the movement of human bodies around the floor, looking out for certain types of activity that sets off a notification or alarm.

Download the full whitepaper here. http://buff.ly/1VZnO65


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GAS FIREPLACE TECHNOLOGY HEATS UP [WORDS] JULIA GEE

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ONE ARE THE DAYS OF THE BULKY, TRADITIONAL FIREPLACE. INTERIOR DESIGN TRENDS HAVE SEEN MODERN GAS FIREPLACES EVOLVE INTO SLEEK, COMPACT AND UNOBTRUSIVE UNITS THAT CAN FIT IN ALMOST ANY SPACE. THESE SIGNIFICANT ADVANCES HAVE PROVIDED DESIGNERS WITH NEW AND STRIKING HEATING OPTIONS FOR THEIR PROJECT THAT SAVE BOTH SPACE AND ENERGY.

Contemporary gas fireplaces are ideal for providing consistent heat and alleviate a lot of the concerns associated with traditional fireplaces such as ash, smoke, fire dangers, sourcing wood and fireplace inspections. They’re also offered in an unparalleled range of aesthetic and installation alternatives meaning they’re both flexible and functional. Large glass viewing areas, simple operation, and their easily-customisable exteriors make the new generation of gas fireplaces an attractive and effective heating choice for any modern project. Here are nine of the latest gas fireplaces available in Australia:

AF960 BY ESCEA The AF960 combines style and function in a sleek design, with a power that heats effectively and even more efficiently than its smaller counterpart. The large viewing window makes the most of the flame, and its versatile, minimalist aesthetic translates well to both traditional and modern interiors.

1250 BY RINNAI At over 1300mm in length, the 1250 is a statement piece, designed to heat large, open plan living spaces. It features Rinnai’s high performance heat exchanger technology and up to a 5.5-star energy efficiency rating. It is available with either glowing pebbles or Australian Eucalyptus logs and a safety mesh guard to provide peace of mind and eliminate reflections.

GREENFIRE 1500L BY REGENCY This extra-large gas fireplace provides a linear view of the flame, driftwood logs and glowing coals, and is ideal for contemporary, open-concept living areas. Features include a 3-speed fan, electronic ignition and RF remote control that allows the fireplace to be operated from another room.


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4415ST HO GS2 BY LOPI This double-sided fireplace features ceramic glass for increased radiant heat, and its dual blowers offer additional design flexibility. They can be directed equally to both sides of the fireplace, or adjusted to blow out just one side for ease of placement. Designed to heat large or multiple connected rooms, this fireplace has a heating capacity of up to 195sqm, and also adds extra charm with its huge viewing window.

GRANGE SLIMLINE BY COONARA A powerful, Australian-made log heater with a 5-star energy efficiency rating, the Grange Slimline has the capacity to heat up to 20sqm. It can be installed into a stud and plaster frame, and with its extra-thin 20mm fascia and availability in 10 colours, this fireplace can be easily customised to suit its surroundings.

WONDERFIRE BY NECTRE The Nectre Woodfire combines the best of both worlds: a traditional aesthetic, with the ease of a modern gas fireplace. Best suited to a period home, the natural gas fire can supply warmth to 45sqm of living space. The ceramic coals or woodfire logs not only look realistic but reach their maximum temperature in a matter of minutes.

DOUBLE SIDED DX1500 BY ESCEA The Escea DX1500 features a huge 1500mm wide flame, a 4.3 Star energy efficiency rating, and sophisticated heat ducting technology that distributes warmth through ceiling and floor ducts to heat multiple rooms. Escea’s exclusive Smart Heat control system means the fireplace can be controlled via any device connected to the internet, and operated remotely. It also comes with a range of surround options for design flexibility.


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HORIZON 3 SIDED FIRE BY JETMASTER All controls are seamlessly concealed, and the high flame gas fire appears to float above the base on its realistic pebbles or coals. The Horizon provides radiant heat and is available in a variety of colours.

PIT FIRE BY REAL FLAME The Real Flame Pit Fire is designed for external ambience and heating, and can be installed in al fresco areas as well as integrated into architecturally landscaped surrounds. Conceived, designed, developed and built in Australia, Pit Fire comes in three different shapes and has the option of five types of media.


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RE-IDENTIFYING USE AND RETAINING THE SIGNIFICANCE

heritage buildings

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HERITAGE ARCHITECTURE

[WORDS] DAVID GOLE

PRINCIPAL AND SENIOR HERITAGE ARCHITECT OF CONRAD GARGETT REFLECTS ON CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS FOR HERITAGE ARCHITECTS

BRISBANE CUSTOMS HOUSE, QUEEN STREET – REUSE AS FUNCTION CENTRE AND CITY OFFICE FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND. PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER FREDERICK JONES


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EPURPOSING HERITAGE BUILDINGS (ADAPTIVE REUSE) FOR VIABLE NEW USES IS A MAJOR FOCUS OF CURRENT HERITAGE PRACTICE. THESE NEW USES PROVIDE A COMMERCIAL CASE FOR BUILDING OWNERS TO UNDERTAKE CONSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE WORKS, AS WELL AS COMPLIANCE AND SERVICES UPGRADES THAT INCREASE THE LIFESPAN AND VALUE OF HERITAGE ASSETS.

New work such as additions to a place may be acceptable where it does not distort or obscure the cultural significance of a place. New work should be identifiable as such. Typical upgrades to heritage buildings include;

The most important thing for a heritage building is that it is occupied and used. An occupied building is more likely to be properly maintained. Conversely, the biggest risk is to have buildings sitting vacant where they can quickly deteriorate and become a liability to their owners. The first step toward identifying potential new uses for significant national-, state-, and locally-listed heritage places requires expertise to develop an understanding of the history and significance of a place. This understanding informs the drafting of policies and protocols to guide the future reuse and conservation process. This methodology is now well established in current heritage practice through the use of the Conservation Management Plan as guided by the processes outlined in the Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter. Ideally, the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings should consider uses that retain and enhance the values of a places as well as the significant heritage building fabric. New uses should also be a good fit for the building typology and the existing spaces within the building while also respecting former uses. Over the past 20 years of practice there have been some clear trends emerging in

the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings. In particular the buildings subject to reuse have been civic and commercial buildings where the original use no longer exists or the ongoing use requires either a smaller or larger footprint. This includes buildings such as customs houses, post offices and bank buildings. As congregation sizes diminish, many churches and religious buildings are also now being repurposed. Many of our cities still contain an early industrial core in or close to the city centre in what is now prime real estate. The relocation of industry provides warehouse and industrial building stock for reuse. Contemporary heritage practice includes a number of facets; works to repair and conserve heritage fabric; works to adaptively reuse a building (including new services and upgrades required to enable new uses); and contemporary additions to heritage buildings. The adaptive reuse and upgrade of heritage buildings to meet current codes and standards involves making changes to heritage places that often include the introduction of new elements and services to facilitate the new use as well as making the building safe and accessible. The ICOMOS Burra Charter guidance on this (Article 22) states that:

• Upgrade of fire services and egress routes (including smoke and thermal detectors, exit signage, fire hose reels, fire extinguishers and in some cases sprinkler systems) • Upgrade of lift or the addition of a new lift fitted retrospectively • Equitable access – this can include the addition of ramps or platform/ chair lifts and compliant toilets • Upgrading of plumbing fittings and fixtures (to more water efficient fixtures) • Upgrade of electrical and mechanical systems • New data, communications and security • Upgrade of lighting (to newer technology LED and energy efficient fittings) both internal and external lighting – often the new use of a building requires a different lighting level to the original use • Upgrade of insulation for better thermal performance • Roof repair and replacement • Rainwater goods repair and upgrade Equitable access is a particular challenge with many solutions (such as ramps) being expensive and having a big physical impact on a heritage place. Recent developments in equitable access include stairs that can collapse and be turned into a platform lift.


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As heritage building stock ages the repair and conservation of building fabric is becoming an issue of focus and priority for heritage practitioners, building owners, asset managers and authorities.

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There are some key companies like Westox that lead the way in providing a suite of materials and methods for use in best practice heritage projects including their desalination system (Coccoon) and their products for paint removal, plaster repair, stone and brick repointing etc.

Typically many heritage buildings face similar issues including roof repair or replacement, failing box gutters and rainwater goods, failed flashings and cappings, rising and falling damp issues, failed damp proof courses, weathering of facades including doors and window and termite damage. While many of the archetypical heritage buildings are stone and brick (or, in Queensland, timber and tin) we are also seeing many buildings from the modern movement era (1950s through to late 1960s) on heritage registers. These buildings have their own materiality and associated unique conservation issues. This includes concrete carbonation and corrosion of reinforcing which can expand in section by up to 10 times causing concrete to blow or delaminate (otherwise known as concrete cancer) Best practice heritage outcomes for repair and conservation rely on working with a range of experts and using a range of appropriate methodologies and associated specialist products. Good outcomes rely on working with skilled specialist tradesman. In Australia the industry is facing a shortage of these heritage trades and skills which in some sectors are in decline and very short supply.

Each of these specialist trades can use a range of materials and products on the market.

Some of the key challenges for heritage projects include;

Some of the key skills and specialists needed in heritage conservation includes; • Underpinning • Desalination (removal of salts from stone and brick masonry) • Stone cleaning, repair and repointing • Brick cleaning, repair and repointing • Brick crack repair • Plaster and render repair • Paint removal • Specialist painters – using traditional finishes such as limewash, colour washes and distempers • Joinery repairs and refurbishment (doors and windows in particular) • Lead specialists for traditional lead flashings, weatherings and cappings • Roofing experts in copper, slate and timber shingle • Bird proofing

• Safe access for inspection and undertaking repair and conservation works • Sensitive building cleaning (with appropriate products and methods) • Removal of plastic paints (which over brick and stone can stop the building breathing) • Removal of hard cement renders to allow building facades to breathe • Using breathable lime based mortars and plasters for repair and repointing • Using new breathable paint (mineral and silicate based) finishes – there are many new products that allow moisture movement from the inside out • Addressing rising damp issues – many early buildings had no damp proof course • Bird proofing • Addition of new services – how to run these new services in a sensitive way • Finding materials to match original fabric for making repairs (such as stone and timber • Box gutters and overflows • Flat tanked roof areas relying on physical membranes


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1 Queen Victoria Building, George Street, Sydney – refurbishment as retail space including introduction of new services such as escalators detailed to have a light weight appearance. 2 Queen Victoria Building, George Street, Sydney – new signage, lighting and services introduced to upgraded retail space. Photography by Anthea Horton 3 Former West Showroom, Wickham Street, Fortitude Valley – reconstruction and reuse as retail space and architects studio. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones 4 Africa Hall, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – conservation work includes a focus on conserving and upgrading an aging reinforced concrete structure 5 Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital Foundation Building, Stanley Street – new extension added to the heritage building to provide new services including lifts and fire stairs. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones 6 Former National Australia Bank Building, corner of Queen and Creek Streets repurposed as boutique offices. Photography by Jon Linkins 7 Mayne Medical Building, Herston – south pediment façade soffit – bird netting installed

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New additions to heritage buildings allow for additional floor area to be added to a heritage building or site to assist with increasing the yield and business case for a project. Often many of the services for the heritage building can be incorporated into the new addition.

8 University of Queensland Goddard Building (School of Biological Sciences) – modern rooftop extension

New additions should be contemporary in design and detail yet respect the existing heritage building in form, scale and materiality (again guided by the Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter). ■

9 Contemporary copper screen detail to conceal new openings and provide a simple unified façade treatment. Photography by Christopher Frederick Jones


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A BETTER WAY TO BUILD BATHROOMS Prefabricated modular bathroom pods are the future of construction. Contact Interpod today to find out how you can achieve a new level of project efficiency, cost certainty and quality control.

Visit www.interpod.com or contact us on 1300 00 PODS


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – STORMTECH

STORMTECH GRATED DRAIN SYSTEMS ONLY CHOICE FOR ARCHITECTS AT LUXURY PACIFIC BONDI DEVELOPMENT

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TORMTECH WAS THE BRAND OF CHOICE FOR THE ARCHITECTS INVOLVED IN THE DESIGN OF BONDI’S NEWEST LUXURY DEVELOPMENT, PACIFIC BONDI. WHEN IT CAME TO SPECIFYING GRATED DRAINAGE SOLUTIONS FOR THE HIGH-END MIXED DEVELOPMENT PROJECT, PTW ARCHITECTS CHOSE STORMTECH FOR ITS ABILITY TO PROVIDE THE PERFECT BALANCE OF FORM, FUNCTION AND CUSTOMISATION.

drains with a narrow profile have also been integrated into the sub-sill of the sliding door frames, providing a level entrance with minimal impact on design, and enabling seamless flow between the indoor and outdoor spaces.

Located just minutes from the CBD in one of Sydney’s most popular neighbourhoods just across from the iconic Bondi beach, Pacific Bondi takes luxury living to an entirely new level, combining 112 designer residential apartments including 19 penthouses, a boutique hotel offering 69 apartments, and premium retail sites for stores, restaurants and bars, all positioned around a six-level atrium.

Stormtech’s threshold drains were also specified for the atrium of the Pacific Bondi to be installed around the entire perimeter. Surrounded entirely by glass and featuring a courtyard in the middle, the atrium also required drainage in the middle of the structure to drain water from the courtyard. For this application, Stormtech made changes to its manufacturing process to design and produce a drainage solution to fit the varying depths of the space.

Designed by Andrew Andersons of PTW Architects, Pacific Bondi also had three different designers working on the interiors of the project to create three bespoke design schemes that defined a high-end lifestyle destination for buyers. Stormtech was specified not only on the strength of its reputation as a manufacturer of high quality grated drains but also on the quality of service as well as its ability to adapt various products to meet specific project requirements. The harsh beachfront environment as well as the expected high traffic demanded grated drains made from 316 marine grade stainless steel to be installed throughout the project including the bathrooms and balconies of the apartments as well as the atrium area.

The project presented several challenges for Stormtech: Being a redevelopment of an existing structure, the installers not only had to deal with the old concrete slab but also the new floor zones where the grated drains had to be accommodated. Additionally, only shallow depth grates would suit the existing conditions. Stormtech’s grated drains were customised into a very narrow and shallow profile to meet the specific tolerances of the project. Stormtech’s Ti Tile Insert drains were specified for the bathrooms where the design called for linear drains to blend seamlessly with the tiled floor. These drains were required both for the shower as well as underneath the wall hung toilet and vanity basin running the full length of the bathroom. Given that there were multiple designers working across different segments of the project, the requirements were unique for many bathrooms. Stormtech assessed each bathroom before providing the Ti Tile Insert drains in three different styles, ensuring every bathroom had a perfectly matched grated drain. The linear drains from Stormtech’s TR range were installed in the balconies of all the residential and hotel apartments. Threshold

The technical support that could be provided by Stormtech personnel during the execution of the project was also one of the reasons the brand was a preferred choice for the architects. Stormtech staff were involved in the work from the beginning of the development all the way to completion, allowing the entire project to run smoothly and hassle-free.

Download the full whitepaper at http://buff.ly/1ThtbaW


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ARCHITECTURAL GRATES + DRAINS

Grate lines. The finest linear grate selection from the people who invented them. Stormtech grates and drainage systems draw a perfect line connecting unmatched durability, superb craftsmanship and world class design.

Bathrooms

Showers

Give your bathroom or courtyard the best grate selection available, or create contemporary transitions from indoors to outdoors with our seamless threshold range.

Pools + Surrounds Thresholds

Designed and manufactured in Australia from marine grade stainless steel, Stormtech remains the gold standard for design and sustainability

Special Needs Access

Doortracks

with full Greentag certification. View our complete selection on the Stormtech website, and match the perfect drain to your design needs.

Visit us at stormtech.com.au for tools + inspiration.

Telephone 1300 653 403


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ACOUSTIC DESIGN SOLUTIONS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MARMARAS

SOUND insights:

3 CASE STUDIES SHOWING ACOUSTICIANS WORKING WITH ARCHITECTS

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NGINEER KEITH HEWETT MAKES A GOOD POINT WHEN HE EMPHASISES THE ROLE AN ACOUSTICIAN CAN PLAY IN ACHIEVING OPTIMAL SOUND PERFORMANCE FOR A PROJECT. THE KEY FOR HEWETT, WHO IS LEAD ACOUSTICIAN OF AUSTRALIAN ENGINEERING FIRM TTM, IS THAT ACOUSTIC STRATEGY BE INCORPORATED INTO THE DESIGN FROM THE OUTSET TO OPTIMISE PERFORMANCE AND TO AVOID RESORTING TO COSTLY AND UNATTRACTIVE BAND-AID SOLUTIONS AFTER PROJECT COMPLETION.

“It’s not impossible to solve noise issues retrospectively, but your options become more limited and expensive, and it can impact on the integrity of the original design,” says Hewitt. “Acoustics need to match the architectural function and aesthetic value of the project. Some sounds you want to travel, others you don’t.” Hewitt is also a firm believer in the acoustician working hand in hand with the architect to achieve the right outcome for the space, which, he says, isn’t always about reducing noise. “It’s about creating the right sound for the space, which will naturally be very different for a library, house, office or restaurant.” So we put it to Hewett. We asked him to give us a variety of examples where an acoustician has worked with an architect to achieve a sound acoustic outcome, overcoming many challenges that architects commonly face in the process. Here they are:

KINGSGATE, FORTITUDE VALLEY BY HASSELL BRIEF The client was experiencing noise build-up in a break-out area outside meeting/ training rooms, which was then being transferred into an open plan work space causing disturbance to people working. Also a meeting room adjacent to reception was suffering from noise build-up for occupants during meetings and teleconferences. It was making the room uncomfortable to be in and had poor speech intelligibility during teleconferences, where noise gets picked up by the microphone and is transferred to the other end of the call (then forming a feedback loop). In addition, noise from the meeting room was breaking out into the reception area resulting in disturbance to others and poor speech privacy for any confidential information being divulged in the meeting room.


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN MARMARAS

CHALLENGES 1. The breakout area and open plan office had an open soffit to meet sustainability (Green Star) targets and architectural intent. This allows noise to be reflected efficiently off the ceiling to other areas. 2. Pivot glass doors were used for architectural design to the training rooms that opened out to the breakout area. They are inherently difficult to seal and let noise leak out of the rooms unabated. 3. Glass rooms, glass façade, open soffit ceiling and thin pile floor covering meant that virtually no absorbing surfaces are available to prevent noise build-up and specular reflection. 4. In the meeting /teleconference room a tiled floor, open soffit, glass façade, glass wall and door to reception and lunch space, and timber panel wall meant a highly reverberant space. Pivot double doors to reception with visible gaps around the perimeter and meeting stile was an open conduit for noise transfer between spaces.

SOLUTIONS 1. It is very difficult to improve the performance of pivot doors as they have no frame and therefore it is inherently difficult to provide an effective seal. We did however, recommend brush seals (Raven RP2a for the threshold with an RP82 threshold plate and PR74 for the top of the door where it meets the ceiling) around the perimeter of the doors, where there were none previously. These are expected to provide only a slight improvement. 2. Armstrong’s Soundscape vertically hanging baffles were recommended to be arranged along the open ceiling soffit, because they hit several birds with one stone. First of all, they introduce much needed absorption into the space and, because they are vertically hanging and have two sides, provide double the amount of effective absorption area. By hanging vertically they also breakup specular reflections off the ceiling soffit which is the cause of noise travelling large distances across the office. Another architectural benefit is that still leave the soffit

largely open to provide the thermal mass required for meeting sustainability targets. 3. The same acoustic baffles were recommended for the soffit in the meeting/ teleconference room however more absorption was still required. A 600grams per sqm (gsm) velour theatre type curtain was recommended to be installed along the glass wall that faced the lunch area to break up reflections and provide visual privacy for occupants. In addition, this can be pulled back when desired for a different acoustic or visual purposes. Additional acoustic absorption was recommended for the underside of a plasterboard bulkhead over the pivot doors. This would provide absorption close to the meeting room occupant and break up a cue-ball effect specular reflection that the geometry presented. The products recommended here could be anything from Supawood perforated ply panels or a low flow resistance fabric covered panel with 50mm Tontine Acoustisorb 2 behind. Alternatively, they could use Sound Sorba’s Cloudsorba product.


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GOLLINGS

SURRY HILLS LIBRARY AND COMMUNITY CENTRE, SYDNEY BY FRANCIS-JONES MOREHEN THORP BRIEF This facility was designed to cater specifically to the needs of its local community, and includes an integrated local library, community centre and child care centre. CHALLENGES The combination of services under one roof presented a number of challenges – most significantly the acoustic conflict of merging traditionally quite library spaces, with the high-energy and noise levels of child care and community engagement facilities. The contrasting nature of the combined spaces meant a unique acoustic design approach was required for each zone.

The architecture also incorporated a number of modern design features, including glass, atriums and sharp lines and surfaces – that provide poor acoustic performance. SOLUTION Interestingly, the library spaces were designed purposefully using sharp lines and hard surfaces that reflect and amplify sound to encourage users to keep quite. The inherent high-energy and high-noise of both the childcare and community centre zones require acoustic absorption to allow users to engage and interact without excessive noise carrying into the library. To achieve this, the architects used pre-finished, fire-rated, perforated acoustic panels (Décor Zen and Décor Style– by Décor Systems) extensively throughout these spaces, achieving up to 88 per cent of incidental noise absorption.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHIEU FALIU


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39 HUNTER STREET, SYDNEY BY JACKSON TEECE BRIEF Maintain heritage features of 1920s building whilst meeting acoustic Green Star points for Australia’s first 6-star Green Star Heritage office fitout. CHALLENGES To maintain heritage features meant retaining the period ceiling detailing, which included, open plastered ceiling with intricate cornices. As the ceiling is the major reflective plane in an office, it is the most desirable and effective place to locate acoustic treatment to control reverberance to meet Green Star reverberation Time Targets. SOLUTION No construction element or services were allowed to be directly fixed to the ceiling. The design team including building services, acoustics, lighting, fire and the architect came up with the idea of fixing all the required services and acoustic absorptive treatment into a bespoke ‘Lilly Pad’ designed floating panel minimally suspended from the ceiling. This was the only way to meet the brief and maintain the heritage features whilst meeting all the available Green Star credit points. The central spine of the panel and perimeter consisted of highly absorbent acoustic treatment. It was important that the material was highly absorbent since there was limited area in which to locate it. Secondly, it needed to be

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHARRIN REES

rigid to some degree to avoid it sagging and spoiling the architectural aesthetic. Therefore, we specified a product similar to Fletcher

Insulation FI96 HDEI. The glass wool sheet was a very high mass of 96kg/sqm, which gave it it’s stiffness and high absorption coefficient. ■


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – AUSCO MODULAR

MODULAR CONSTRUCTION – THE WAY FORWARD FOR HEALTHCARE Modular building expert Ben Knight of Ausco Modular explains why pre-fabricated modular buildings are the solution for healthcare professionals in the 21st Century.

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ITH THE FACE OF CONSTRUCTION IN AUSTRALIA RAPIDLY CHANGING, THERE ARE NOW MORE OPTIONS THAN EVER WHEN IT COMES TO BUILDING HOSPITALS, MEDICAL CLINICS AND TREATMENT FACILITIES.

To have your next healthcare infrastructure project delivered faster and with less inconvenience, it’s worth considering modular building technologies. With 55 years’ experience in Australia’s modular building industry and 17 branches across Australia, Ausco Modular is a true industry leader. The company has a proven track record in providing efficient building solutions within strict timeframes to a range of industries. Delivering full turnkey modular solutions through a unique 360 Degree Service, Ausco Modular guides clients throughout the entire build from start to finish by providing expert advice in design, build and installation. Not to be confused with outdated demountable buildings, Ausco’s buildings are aesthetically pleasing and can be custom-made to suit all needs.

Ausco Modular General Manager Modular Sale, Ben Knight, said modular building solutions were becoming increasingly popular with healthcare professionals for many reasons. “Providing safe and healthy medical facilities is incredibly important to our healthcare clients and we have helped them achieve reduced waiting lists and greater room availability through our services,” he said. “Reducing the time spent on building new facilities means they can be operational quicker, allowing better medical services to be provided. This is a major priority for our clients and we’re proud to help them deliver on their building objectives time after time. “Ausco Modular recently delivered and installed 84 modular units for Canberra Hospital, allowing patients and medical staff to occupy the Hospital well ahead of schedule.”

Modular building technology was also used to construct a brand new medical clinic in Ivanhoe in September 2015 for NSW Health Infrastructure. The Ivanhoe HealthOne Clinic redevelopment saw Ausco Modular replace the town’s existing ageing health facility in Far West New South Wales, providing its signature turnkey solution across design, construction and installation. The now-completed 300sqm facility includes consult and treatment rooms, dental, podiatry and back of house areas for staff and medical supplies. Australian and global research shows that pre-fabricated and modular buildings save operators a significant amount of time over the span of a project. It’s estimated that modular buildings can decrease project schedules by 66 per cent. On a major transport infrastructure project in Sydney, Ausco Modular was able to reduce the in-situ build estimate time from 36 to 18 months – a 50 per cent reduction in time, which saved the client millions of dollars in build-related costs. As well as cutting down on precious time, modular buildings serve a range of


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – AUSCO MODULAR

DALE CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, WA

other benefits to operators because the construction process is managed off-site.

Waste and pollutants is another key consideration for healthcare professionals when it comes to building new facilities.

“Using modular technologies ensures noise interruptions are kept to a minimum as the majority of work is conducted in an Ausco Modular factory,” Ben said.

With modular buildings constructed off-site, minimal waste and dust is left on-site, which minimises impact on existing facilities and patients.

“As such, healthcare operators are able to run existing areas of hospitals or medical centres with minimal impact on the treatment and care of existing patients and hospital staff. CANBERRA HOSPITAL, ACT

“Neighbouring businesses and residents also experience far less inconveniences that come with an in-situ build because there’s less traffic entering and exiting the site as tradespeople work on the building off-site.” Ben said modular buildings provide a safer option for project managers. “The benefits of being constructed in a factory-controlled setting are vast,” he said. “Ausco Modular employs qualified tradespeople across all of our factories, all of whom are required to adhere to strict safety protocols.

“Our factories have achieved ISO9001, ISO14001 and AS 4801 accreditations through independent industry regulators for quality, environmental and safety.

With Ausco Modular’s extensive network across Australia and longstanding history of providing quality made-to-order modular buildings, it’s worthwhile considering Ausco Modular for your next healthcare build. “Our modular buildings have a proven track record of allowing earlier occupancy of new facilities, which result in a faster return on your investment.”

“These allow for maximum productivity through a better quality of build, better finish and the testing of all services prior to installation. “Weather can be unpredictable in Australia and delay in-situ builds considerably. With the majority of construction done off-site with modular buildings, unfavourable weather doesn’t impact the timeline of our builds.”

Download the full whitepaper here.


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FLOORS, FLOORING & ACCESSORIES

PREVENT INJURIES IN AGED CARE ENVIRONMENTS WITH SLIP AND FALL RESISTANCE FLOORING PRODUCTS [WORDS] LUCY MARRETT

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LIPS AND FALLS LEAD TO THOUSANDS OF INJURIES IN AUSTRALIA EVERY YEAR, AND FLOORING SURFACES PLAY A MAJOR PART IN MANY OF THESE INCIDENTS. ASSESSING THE RISKS AND CHOOSING FLOORING PRODUCTS THAT ARE SLIP-RESISTANT AND SUITABLE FOR EACH APPLICATION IS THEREFORE PARAMOUNT FOR THE DESIGNER AS IT ENSURES THE SAFETY OF USERS AND A REDUCTION IN RISK LEVEL AND THE LIKELIHOOD OF LITIGATION. Many of those whom suffer from slips and falls are the elderly as many have trouble with balance and are therefore more susceptible to risk and injury. Due to Australia’s aging population, this safety issue is only expected to grow. In aged care environments, carers have a duty of care to those people who reside and use the facilities, and thus flooring and surfaces are a major factor that must be considered when designing and building such environments. To assist in the prevention of slips and falls, slip-resistant coatings and treatments can be applied to existing flooring or when new flooring is installed, products that are slip-resistant and meet the current Australian Standards should be preferenced. The two main standards for flooring and surfaces to adhere to are: AS4663 Slip resistance measurement of existing pedestrian surfaces and AS4586 Slip resistance classification of new pedestrian surface materials. Here are 10 slip-resistant flooring products designed to prevent trips and falls:

TACTILE GROUND SURFACE INDICATORS AND STAIR NOSINGS BY BIRRUS MATTING SYSTEMS Ideal for those with vision impairments and those who have trouble with balance, Tactile Ground Surface Indicators can make flooring surfaces safer and easier for walking across. With a non-slip surface and a durable/ wear resistance guarantee, these Surface Indicators have been rigorously tested to ensure their slip-resistance.

G A O

POLYSAFE VERONA BY POLYFLOR Polysafe Verona is a stylish and innovative safety flooring product with a sustainable wet-slip resistance. Manufactured as safety flooring, the quartz-chip infused floor works to improve both traction and safety underfoot. Polyflor guarantee wet-slip resistance for the life of the product. 100 per cent recyclable and Silver Tag certified, Polysafe Verona is a reliable flooring product.

TREADRITE SLIP RESISTANT COATINGS BY DY-MARK The solution to slippery and low traction surfaces – Tread Rite Slip Resistant Coatings. Tread Rite provides a high traction texture that transforms floors into safe and slip-resistant surfaces. Suitable for both interior and exterior applications across a variety of surfaces from untreated timber through to pebble finishes. Tread Rite complies with the Australian Standard AS/NZS 4586:2004.

WOOD COMPOSITE DECKING BY FUTUREWOOD Futurewood composite decking is a great choice for outdoor surfaces that might become slippery when wet, such as ramps. The decking surface has been tested by the CSIRO and achieved an R11 classification using the oil-wet ramp methodology. The decking is rot and termite resistant and is pre-finished never needing to be oiled, varnished or painted making it a low maintenance timber alternative.


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SLIP RESISTANT AND HYGIENIC FLOORING BY ALTRO SAFETY Altro Safety Flooring is a slip-resistant product that maintains its slip-resistance even when wet and for the life of the product. Providing outstanding durability, it’s the ideal choice for heavy duty applications where safety and extra protection are required. Altro Safety flooring is easy to maintain, clean and is backed by a 20 year product guarantee.

ACCOLADE SAFE VINYL FLOORING BY ARMSTRONG FLOORING Accolade Safe offers supreme safety, without the impregnated silicon chips of conventional non-slip flooring that attract and hold dirt. This minimises maintenance and wear and tear on cleaning equipment. It can be coved up walls and is made from inert materials that do not harbour bacteria.

SLIP RESISTANT NEOFLEX RUBBER FLOORING BY REPHOUSE AUSTRALIA The Neoflex Rubber Flooring system from Rephouse Australia is a durable environmentally friendly, homogenous EPDM/recycled flooring product. Neoflex recycled rubber flooring is designed for high traffic areas such as offices, public building and retail sectors.

DURA GRIP PU ANTI-SLIP SEALER BY GRIP GUARD NON SLIP Dura Grip is designed to increase the slip-resistance of pre-existing floorings and surfaces. Providing protection for the surface, the life of the flooring is extended and a safe pedestrian environment is maintained. Dura Grip provides protection to many flooring surfaces including vinyl, timber, linoleum, rubber and epoxy. Increasing both safety and hygiene, Dura Grip works to ensure that flooring surfaces are safe and durable for everyday usage.

ELSI SMART FLOOR BY HLS HEALTHCARE An innovative under-floor surface, Elsi Smart Floor is a system proven to reduce falls as well as contribute to the security and wellbeing of those who use it. The system is devised of touchpads, including capacitive sensors and conductance sensors that send alarms and notifications to staff workers to alert them to a fallen patient. It also allows carers to track patient movements and motions.

NOVA RUBBER FLOORING BY NOVAPRODUCTS GLOBAL Novaproducts Global have a range of flooring options including the Assurance anti-slip safety vinyl flooring. This flooring system is resilient and features anti-slip properties in both wet and dry areas. The vinyl makes it an ideal flooring material for health and aged care facilities as it is durable and hardwearing.


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Designed for use in light commercial applications such as shops, restaurants and classrooms. Daikin’s SkyAir series includes built-in DIII Net capability for easy connection onto our centralised controllers and feature R22 retrofit capability to enable a cost effective replacement solution*.

CEILING MOUNTED CASSETTE

CAPACITY RANGE

5.0kW 14.0kW - TO -

MODEL NUMBER - FCQ

• Available in 6 models • 360° airflow ensures uniform temperature distribution for greater comfort • Drain pump with 850mm lift included • Fresh air intake (optional kit required) • Simplified maintenance with silver ion anti-bacterial drain pan and anti mould filter

CEILING SUSPENDED

MODEL NUMBER - FHQ

CAPACITY RANGE

5.8kW 13.2kW - TO -

• • • •

Available in 4 models Suitable for high ceilings of up 4.3m (13.2kW Model) DC fan with 3 fan speeds Programme Dry Function, automatic airflow and temperature control to reduce humidity • Quiet operations down to 35dBA (5.8kW Model) *R22 retrofit capability is only applicable when paired with RZQS condensers, specific guidelines apply Note: Ceiling suspended unit displayed is the 13.2kW unit, other capacities in this series have a different appearance

CONTACT US ON

1300 368 300

FOR MORE INFORMATION

commercial.daikin.com.au


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

GET THE INFORMATION YOU NEED AUSTRALIA’S LEADING SOURCE OF NEW & EXCITING BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS

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WAYS TO USE INFOLINK:

SHOWCASE INDEX CEILINGS & INTERIOR WALLS Ecoply plywood helps take sustainable living to new heights

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ROOFING & ROOFING ACCESSORIES Achieve more with aluminium cladding & roofing SIGNAGE & DISPLAY SYSTEMS Clegg Media for speciality signage

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WASTE MANAGEMENT Expert drainage solutions tailored for the aged care industry WINDOWS & GLAZING U -MAX aluminium framing– realise your vision

U-MAX TM ALUMINIUM FRAMING – REALISE YOUR VISION The strength of aluminium, the insulation of polyurethane and the design freedom of EDGE combine in one product –our U-MAXTM thermallybroken aluminium framing systems. U-MAX™ represents a revolution in Australian architectural glazing. Our advanced Pour-and-Debridge technology allows our U-MAX™ thermally-broken frames to retain 93% of the structural integrity of pure unbroken aluminium. This allows for the safe design of bigger, more spectacular windows and doors, whilst VWLOOUHWDLQLQJDOOWKHHQHUJ\HIÀFLHQFLHVRIDWKHUPDOO\ broken system. U-MAXTMDOVRIHDWXUHVDOOWKHRWKHUEHQHÀWVRIRXU premium products, driven by EDGE’s extensive R&D. Like the WatershedTM drainage system, which eliminates drainage holes in the faces of sills and transoms. Our high-performance gaskets, made from co-extruded Santoprene. Our captivated glazing beads, which can’t unseat themselves. Dozens of little things that make up the EDGE DNA and keep our customers coming back. Sourced from Australian aluminium and manufactured locally, what other reasons do you need to go EDGE? *HWLQWRXFKWRGD\WRÀQGRXWKRZZHFDQKHOS\RX EDGE Architectural Glazing Systems – Take your vision from design to reality.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES CLEGG MEDIA FOR SPECIALITY SIGNAGE, LARGE FORMAT PRINTING, WINDOW FILMS AND GRAPHICS, LENTICULAR PRINTING, BACKLIT AND 3D SIGNAGE. Clegg Media has been involved in many large speciality signage projects around Australia. Currently they are helping to re-brand over 300 Max Employment sites Nationwide. This re-brand includes cut vinyl lettering, backlit signage, large wall wraps and printed Contra Vision window signage. They were the number one choice for printing and installing the G20 signage throughout Brisbane City. Clegg Media helped the Brisbane river foreshore at Southbank to come alive, printing and wrapping letters on the BRISBANE sign. They have also installed quirky and bold designs at several bus shelters showcasing several different products from Gold Lotto, BP and XXXX, just to name a few. These designs comprise of routed timber signage, printed paper posters, large printed self adhesive stickers and props from feathers, books, moulded plastics and timber shelves. Clegg Media specialise in lenticular printing technology. This process uses lenses to give a printed image the ability to change or move as the image is viewed from different angles. ,QDGGLWLRQ&OHJJ0HGLDFDQSULQWFXVWRPĂ RRUJUDSKLFVIRUH[WHUQDODQG internal applications on either short or long term products. With specialised machines Clegg Media can print onto almost anything, using the best hard wearing UV inks suitable for outdoor solutions. The new Agfa Graphics Jeti Mira helps make Clegg Media stand out, with 6 colours plus white, high resolution printing and large quantity run capacity.

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ECOPLY PLYWOOD HELPS TAKE SUSTAINABLE LIVING TO NEW HEIGHTS Building with a tiny footprint on a tiny footprint requires lofty ideas. Ownerbuilder Ralph Alphonso aimed for the stars with his 5 x 4 metre, four storey mini-skyscraper in East Melbourne, made almost entirely from sustainable Australian timber, including a wide range of EcoplyŽ plywood manufactured by Carter Holt Harvey. In fact, ninety percent of the timber used in the SURMHFWFDPHIURPFHUWLÀHGVRXUFHV Comer & King was given the task of creating the interior colour scheme, VRXUFLQJDVHOHFWLRQRILQWHULRUÀQLVKHVDQGÀ[WXUHVDQGVSHFLI\LQJVXVWDLQDEO\ produced materials such as locally made Ecoply structural plywood. In an interesting twist, FormriteŽ – which is usually reserved for concrete IRUPZRUN²ZDVUHSXUSRVHGDVFDUFDVHVIRUWKHLQWHULRUÀWRXW(FRSO\ZDV expressed throughout the interior spaces as multi-purpose built-in cabinetry and joinery. Ecoply plywood, a low cost material, adds warmth and depth to the compact space. Environmental responsibility was the driver for all material choices at 5x4 Hayes Lane from the geothermal heating and cooling; the solar panels; the automation system that will measure the on-going energy use; right through to the materials used, including Ecoply plywood. The sum of which have helped make this mini-skyscraper not only incredibly well designed, but also more sustainable.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES HÄFELE NOW PARTNERED WITH GEZE OPENING THE DOOR TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES Häfele Australia and Geze are proud to announce the foundation of a new partnership. This exciting development combines the strength of Australia’s most progressive Architectural Hardware company with one of the world’s leading manufacturers of door technology. 'IVXM½IHXS-73+)>)´WHSSVGPSWIVWLEZIFIIR MRWTIGXIHERHGIVXM½IHMREGGSVHERGI[MXLXLIETTPMGEFPI WXERHEVHW)2)2)2ERH%7 %PPXLIWIQIEWYVIWTPYWSZIV]IEVWSJMRHYWXV]I\TIVMIRGI from Häfele guarantee a high quality product and service. ;LIR]SY[ERXXSWIX]SYVTVSNIGXETEVXXLEX´WEQYWX 8S½RHEWSPYXMSRJSV]SYVRI\XTVSNIGXGSRXEGX]SYVRIEVIWX ,mJIPIWEPIWSJ½GISVZMWMX[[[LEJIPIGSQEY

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TOURNIKET Revolving doors are the most energy efficient entrance solution available in the market today. The always open, always closed principle of a revolving door ensures a controlled environment where the outside air is given less opportunity to mix with the air from inside of the building. Due to the fact that there is less energy required to maintain the conditioned climate inside of the building, it helps reduce the carbon footprint of the building, whilst saving on both energy and cost. The Tourniket is the most versatile revolving door in the market as it can be fully customised to reflect your building’s design and functionality. It can simply be a cost effective standardised product, or we can deliver a high specification revolving door with extreme dimensions, that acts as the key feature of any design. It is available with three or four door wings, with manual or automatic operation and in virtually any colour or finish you can imagine. The Crystal Tourniket also provides another unique option, as a stunning all glass model. Extensive experience and continuous innovation over more than a century has led us to be the global market leaders in revolving doors, and the perfect partner to tailor a solution for you.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES EXPERT DRAINAGE SOLUTIONS TAILORED FOR THE AGED CARE INDUSTRY The benefits that a lineal solution can bring over centralised drainage solutions for today’s Aged Care facilities are numerous. Unlike conventional drainage solutions, lineal designs conform to the strict accessibility requirements of the AS-1428, whilst ensuring superior drainage flow. Lineal drainage solutions are designed to work with a single gradient fall, they remove the necessity of the hob, allowing seamless and self-sufficient access for residents (for e.g. including those using wheelchairs, walkers and frames), eliminating dangerous trip hazards. Lineal drainage solutions are also designed to eliminate traditional barriers and expand the area of drainage. With less need for a carer to assist entry, residents are offered more personal access into the shower space. Stormtech’s vinyl clamp (providing a screw down flange to mechanically clamp the vinyl beneath), offers seamless integration into vinyl floor surfaces commonly found in care settings.

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Next generation joinery coatings. Distributed locally by Intergrain Timber Finishes, Teknos coatings are manufactured in Scandinavia to produce finishes of the highest quality and performance. With its advanced formulations, Teknos delivers highly durable, factory-finished coating systems that protect against weathering, UV degradation, mould and fungal growth. A Teknos factory applied coating system can be customised to meet your needs. To find out more, call 1800 630 285 or visit www.teknos.com.au.


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BBQ Giveaway

Rinnai – Customised hot water solutions to meet your building design criteria Drawing from over 40 years experience in designing and manufacturing hot water systems our commercial division has supplied solutions to many challenging projects. Knowledge gained from these projects tells us that providing a hot water plant to meet a set delivery requirement is simply not enough anymore. The look and feel of the building, whether a new build or a renovation, is of utmost importance and the hot water plant must not compromise this yet still provide each hot water outlet with a constant supply of hot water. Modern and highly efficient water heating systems are modular and use multiple gas fuelled continuous flow units. This provides a challenge when the plant is situated internally as many

Phone 1300 555 545 rinnai.com.au/commercial

flue terminations would deter from the aesthetic feel of the building. Working closely with architects and hydraulic consultants we design and manufacture common flue, whether natural draft or fan assisted, to provide one single discreet termination point. Our goal is to offer a complete service from concept to commissioning to maximise energy efficiency and reduce up front capital costs. Rinnai centralised gas hot water systems are easily integrated into the building with minimal fuss yet easy access for future serviceability.


infolink Building Products News, May/June 2016