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MAR | APR 2016 | VOL 52 | NO 2 PRINT POST APPROVED PP100007333

OPEN THE DOOR TO THE FUTURE OF OFFICE DESIGN TIMBER PRODUCTS CLT on the rise in Australia

DOORS Automatic options for commercial buildings

KITCHEN COMPONENTS & DESIGN Functional kitchen products for 2016


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FOREWORD

Change

IS A CONSTANT IN OUR

C

WORLD OF WORKPLACE

ONSTANT INNOVATION WITHIN BUSINESS, VARIABLES AROUND COMMERCIAL PROPERTY AND URBAN DESIGN, RETAIL AND LIFESTYLE ALL INTERSECT WHEN WE LOOK AT THE DESIGN OF OFFICE BUILDINGS AND THE WORKPLACES THEY HOLD.

Within our studios at dwp|suters we are developing designs for buildings and interiors across a broad range of typologies. These include workplace architecture and interiors, education environments from schools to universities, hospitality, retail, health and seniors living as well as residential. This provides us with an opportunity to understand and interrogate a range of client aspirations and generational shifts giving us an insight into the convergence occurring across many areas and a lens into our future. On the macro scale we see cities evolving and old established areas being renewed, wharf and transport areas being reconfigured to develop large floor plates for new workplaces that can no longer fit in the tight city grids and older smaller sites being reinvented for new agile businesses. In our own Martin Place the bankers are gradually moving out and the software companies are in. It wasn’t that long ago that the skateboarders were being chased out of the plazas of the city by council officials; they’re now setting up businesses in its core.

Change is inevitable and somewhat inherent in human behaviour. It is also evolutionary with respect to innovation and competition. Our design industry is at the centre of this constant renewal and its questioning for survival, growth, inventiveness in the market led business world. Clients want answers and security about the future to protect investment but also to attract and retain staff and grow that bottom line. This change and market competition gives our industry the opportunity to provide variety through design innovation. All of this underpinned by sustainable initiatives. All in all a great time to be imagining the future workplace.

STEVE PEARSE Principal dwp|suters

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Stephen Pearse is an award-winning architect and current Sydney Managing Principal at dwp|suters, architecture + interior design. He has over 35 years’ experience in architecture and urban design and is active in a number of capacities for the Australian Institute of Architects, the Association of Consulting Architects and is a founding member of the Australian Architecture Association. We are privileged to have Stephen act as the contributing editor for this issue of Infolink|Building Products News Magazine.


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

I

WRITE FROM MY DESK AT THE CIRRUS MEDIA OFFICES IN CHATSWOOD, NSW. I AM ON THE TOP FLOOR OF THE BUILDING AND I SIT IN ONE OF THE MANY WORKSTATIONS THAT ARE SCATTERED AROUND THE ROOM IN PODS.

The space is open plan, has various breakout zones, and includes views to Sydney city from certain areas, but I spend the majority of my day looking at my computer and interacting with colleagues via email. When I do look away from my screen I see grey carpet, speckledwhite ceiling tiles, and other workstations where colleagues sit hidden behind chest-high partitions typing away, answering phones and mostly minding their own business. It’s a familiar picture and I must admit that until I read our contributing editor’s feature, Designing a Workplace Future (see page 26) I thought our offices were pretty normal, if not pretty modern. But now I realise, courtesy of Steve Pearse’s enlightenment, that while our offices could be considered normal, they’re far from modern.

It’s hardly a creative or interactive way to work. Pearse’s feature posits that the workplace of the future will be partly shaped by a change in managerial attitudes from management by sight to management by outcomes. In turn, this will open up a whole new world of possibilities for the designer because the idea is that as long as we’re getting the work done, we can work from anywhere we want. Basically, designers can now design ‘offices’ that the worker wants to work in.

ON THE COVER: DWP|SUTERS ARE LEADING THE FIELD OF AUSTRALIAN ARCHITECTS DESIGNING NEW, INNOVATIVE AND FUTURISTIC WORKSPACES. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROGER D’SOUZA

NEWS

5 Melbourne’s glut of non-compliant clad buildings on the rise

In the same light, technology is also changing the way we design in other sectors outside of the office space. Our exploration into the changing perception of cross-laminated timber in Australia (page 7) shows how improvements in CLT technology and supplier offerings could be the catalyst for change in the way we design and build mid-rise buildings in Australia.

NATHAN JOHNSON

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR STEPHEN PEARSE E-MAIL: S.PEARSE@DWPSUTERS.COM

GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART DIRECTION JULIA GEE EMAIL: JULIA.GEE@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

DEPUTY EDITOR NATHAN JOHNSON E-MAIL: NATHAN.JOHNSON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER ADRIAN WILSON PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0612 MOBILE: +61 (0)417 779 215 EMAIL: ADRIAN.WILSON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

COMMERCIAL INTERIORS & FITOUTS

26

dwp|suters Principal, Steve Pearse comments on the future of the office space

TIMBER PRODUCTS

7 Cross-laminated timber is

KITCHEN COMPONENTS & DESIGN

on the rise in Australia

But this is only possible thanks to new technology that allows us to complete our daily tasks from these new spaces and to a level of degree that pleases management.

To be fair we do have a kitchen, a pool table and a foosball station, but they’re rarely used and certainly don’t aid productivity – they’re more like office props than office tools. Even on the rare occasion that I do interact with a colleague in a breakout space, we generally agree that it’s best we go back to our computers to continue the conversation via email where it will be documented.

CONTENT PRODUCERS LUCY MARRETT E-MAIL: LUCY.MARRETT@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

26

34 Functional kitchen products for 2016 and beyond

SUSTAINABILITY

7

40 Mechanical insulation will save you money and is good for environment

WINDOWS, DOORS & HARDWARE

16 The latest fire and smoke reduction window systems

21

Selecting the right automatic door form commercial applications

The theme of this issue is the future. We want you to question whether or not you’re truly designing for the future. We also hope to offer you some of the product solutions that will provide the necessary inspiration to get you there.

40 PRODUCT SHOWCASES

32

21

Information on new and exciting building and architectural products. Introduced with a full directory and how to enquire

PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR KIM CHURCH PHONE: +61 (0)2 8484 0731 E-MAIL: KIM.CHURCH@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU HEAD OF CLIENT SUCCESS SHEREE BRYANT E-MAIL: SHEREE.BRYANT@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1300 360 126 ISSN 1039-9704

TOWER 1, LEVEL 13, 475 VICTORIA AVE, CHATSWOOD, NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA LOCKED BAG 2999 CHATSWOOD DELIVERY CENTRE NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA PHONE: 02 8484 0888 | FAX: 02 8484 0633 ABN 80 132 719 861 WWW.CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

TRISTAN DENNIS E-MAIL: TRISTAN.DENNIS@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Infolink BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 23,303 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION SEPTEMBER 2015

© Copyright Cirrus Media 2016 All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

PRINTED BY BLUESTAR PRINT 83 DERBY STREET SILVERWATER, NSW 2128 PHONE: 02 9748 3411


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NEWS

VICTORIAN BUILDING AUTHORITY AUDIT FINDS HUNDREDS OF BUILDINGS WITH NON-COMPLIANT CLADDING The list of Melbourne buildings found to have non-compliant cladding grew significantly at the beginning of 2016 as the Victorian Building Authority (VBA) published the findings from its External Wall Cladding Audit of high-rise building permits in Melbourne. The VBA audited 170 high-rise building permits issued in the past 10 years for central Melbourne and its immediate surrounding suburbs. 51 per cent of those audited were clad in non-compliant aluminium composite panels. At the conclusion of the Audit, the VBA listed a number of ‘important lessons’ they said can be learned from the findings to inform future practices of the building industry, regulatory reform and consumer awareness. These findings include:

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALEX PROIMOS/WIKIMEDIA

• The levels of non-compliance identified by the VBA are too high – however, they generally do not

pose a risk to safety. Apart from the Lacrosse building, only one other building identified through the VBA Audit was deemed to pose a significant safety issue due to the non-compliant use of external wall cladding material • There are many types of external cladding material in use throughout the Victorian building industry but whether one is “fit for purpose” over another is not always properly understood by architects, designers, engineers, building surveyors and builders • The National BCA requirements for external walls, including the suitability of materials, are inconsistently applied and poorly understood • No single category of practitioner involved in the design, approval or construction of those building projects audited is consistently responsible for the non-compliant use of cladding ■


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MELBOURNE

W E D N E S D AY 4 M AY 2 0 1 6

RACV CLUB REGISTER ONLINE AT www.futureseries.co/sustainability-connect-melbourne KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

JEREMY MCLEOD Founder and Director Breathe Architecture

PROF. MARTYN HOOK Director Iredale Pederson Hook Architects

EXPERT PANELLISTS

ANN LAU Director Hayball Architects

MICHAEL SMITH Director Atelier Red + Black

CRAIG YELLEND Director Plus Architecture

DOMINQUE HES Senior Lecturer in Sustainable Architecture University of Melbourne

SOPHIE CLELAND Senior Associate ARM Architecture


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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

THE

TIME

IS

NOW FOR CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER CONSTRUCTION IN AUSTRALIA

IMAGE: B&K STRUCTURES, UK


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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

W

E HAVE IT ON GOOD AUTHORITY THAT CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER (CLT) WILL BE A MAJOR PLAYER IN SUSTAINABLE MID-RISE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION IN THE FUTURE. HOWEVER, HOW FAR INTO THE FUTURE THAT IS, AND HOW WIDESPREAD ITS EFFECT ON AUSTRALIA’S BUILT ENVIRONMENT WILL BE IS STILL A LITTLE UP IN THE AIR, AND ACCORDING TO SOME IS MUCH IN THE HANDS OF THE DEVELOPER.

However, it is only one step in the normalisation of Mass Timber Construction (MTC) in Australia and if timber really does “hold the key to construction for the 21st century”, as architect Alex de Rijke says, then there is still a lot Australia has to do in short space of time to position it as a viable alternative to concrete and steel construction this century.

DEVELOPMENTS FOR CLT Since migrating from England, Nick Hewson, Senior Structural Engineer at Aecom has become somewhat of a spokesperson for MTC in Australia, lecturing for universities, advising government and the ACBC, writing academic and news articles and consulting as an engineered timber expert for Aecom.

Cross-laminated timber (CLT) is used around the world as an alternative to concrete and steel for all or part of a building’s construction and we’ve seen it used in projects up to 10-storeys in height. It is basically formed as timber panels that are fabricated by bonding solid-sawn timber together in transverse and longitudinal layers with structural adhesives. They are said to provide strength and stiffness properties similar to reinforced concrete and, depending on timber species and method of assembly, have much lower embodied energy consumption than many other building processes, such as the production of steel and concrete.

Upon hearing the news that the NCC was changing to encourage more tall timber buildings, Hewson notes that while he wasn’t surprised (he actually wrote a design guide for these type of buildings which was instrumental in the change happening) he was relieved, mostly because it will save his team a lot of time and effort in getting tall timber buildings over the line at planning stages.

But while the environmental performance and structural strength of CLT has been well known in Australia for years now, its uptake as a viable alternative to concrete and steel in mid-rise building construction hasn’t been so obvious.

“The biggest shakeup in Australia has been the number of the suppliers of CLT and the increasingly sophisticated services they offer,” says Hewson.

In fact, since Australia’s first CLT building went up in 2012, promising a “new era in the future of sustainable development” in the process, less than a handful of projects using the material have been completed on our shores.

RECENT PROMISE In January 2016, the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) announced changes to the National Construction Code (NCC) that will enable timber buildings up to 25 metres in height to be lodged with planning under Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions. The proponents of CLT construction rejoiced unanimously because the change ultimately takes away another barrier dissuading developers and consultants from using CLT. Currently, timber building systems are restricted to three storeys under the NCC’s Deemed-toSatisfy Provisions, with taller buildings requiring an ‘alternative solution’ to be designed and documented to gain building compliance. The code change, to be effect from 1 May, will bring Australia up to pace with much of the rest of the world in terms of regulation and, for some, is an obvious move away from outdated laws with origins as far back as the 1666 Great Fire of London.

Hewson is more excited about a few other MTC developments in Australia, most notably some recent changes to the local supply chain of CLT products that could be the tipping point for widespread MTC uptake in Australia.

“There are a lot more European CLT manufacturers with Australian representatives nowadays and they’re beginning to take our market a little more seriously.” The suppliers Hewson talks about are also beginning to understand that Australian builders, designers and engineers who are considering CLT for their project want more than just sticks of timber—they need an integrated service that makes the transition from concrete/steel to CLT easier. “A couple of years ago there were a lot of people who could deliver timber into the country but it wasn’t enough,” he explains. “We needed a much more integrated solution to compete with concrete frame contractors—they needed to supply a full system, which includes things like engineering, design input, costing and installation.” Rob De Brincat, Business Development Manager at Xlam Australia, a subsidiary to Xlam New Zealand who is the only manufacturer of cross laminated timber in the Southern Hemisphere, agrees with Hewson on this point. “While we still consider ourselves suppliers, not contractors, we understand that we need

to provide enormous amount of support in all of the consulting, design and certification services, as well as installation,” he explains. “If we ignore that, the market won’t accept our system.” For both De Brincat and Hewson, the sophistication of services from Australian CLT suppliers also comes in response to two of the major barriers still facing CLT and MTC in Australia, both of which are inexplicably linked. The first is that the Australian construction industry is inherently conservative and (mostly) unwilling to go beyond our traditional methods for construction; the second is that there is a crippling lack of information and hard data about the true cost benefits of CLT. Both agree that addressing the latter holds the key to increased uptake in CLT construction in Australia, and perhaps fortunately for them, this data and information is beginning to come in.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY While there will always be a degree of intellectual property that CLT companies will want to keep close to their chest, there’s also a degree of information the market needs in order to evolve and develop into something that’s of reasonable substance. Information on the performance of completed CLT-buildings in Australia is relatively scarce, however there are new industry studies coming to the fore that provide detailed analysis of its viability as an alternative to concrete and steel construction. Mass timber construction as an alternative to concrete and steel in the Australia building industry: a PESTEL evaluation of the potential was released by Paul Kremer and Mark Symmons of Monash University in late 2015. As the name suggests, the report analyses the viability of timber as an alternative to concrete and steel in Australian construction using the PESTEL (Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal) tool which is used in business management studies to assess the viability of technology from a business perspective. A very basic summary of the Kremer and Symmons report is that there are many advantages on offer for Australian developers choosing CLT, including - against popular belief - financial savings. These savings come primarily from the reduction in on-site labour costs however there is also scope, due to CLT’s comparatively low embodied energy, to capitalise on government incentives to reduce carbon footprints. This could come from policy that rewards carbon sequestration or a reduction in emissions from a shift from the more carbon-intensive concrete and steel production, or if some MTC production can be derived from recycled timber. More specifically in the case of financial savings, the most up to date study of MTC cost comparison comes from Forest & Wood Products Australia who released Final report for commercial


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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

THE LIBRARY AT THE DOCK BY CLARE DESIGN & HAYBALL WAS AUSTRALIA’S FIRST PUBLIC BUILDING TO USE CLT. PHOTOGRAPHY BY DIANA SNAPE

“The vast potential and versatility of engineered timber holds the key to construction for the 21st century, just as the 18th century was about brick, the 19th steel, and the 20th was concrete.” ALEX DE RIJKE OF LONDONBASED ARCHITECTURE FIRM DE RIJKE MARSH MORGAN ARCHITECTS. – “We believe the use of engineered timber products is the solution of our generation.” JAMES FITZPATRICK, MANAGING PARTNER FITZPATRICK+PARTNERS – “CLT uses a more efficient construction process that is environmentally sustainable, durable, better quality and safer.” HEAD OF TIMBER SOLUTIONS LEND LEASE, ANDREW NIELAND

building costing cases studies: traditional design versus timber project in December 2015, showing ‘realistic’ timber costing information for building professionals in the non-housing building sector.

Engineers. And while the results show a modest saving of 2.2 per cent when using CLT over a traditional construction solution, Hewson notes these are still very conservative estimates.

It summarised an experiment that compared the cost of constructing four commercial buildings in both timber and traditional materials in Australia. The building types were a seven-storey office building, an eight-storey apartment building, a twostorey aged care facility and a single-storey industrial shed. In all cases constructing the building in timber had lower costs than for the competing non-timber solution.

“They’re talking about a relatively modest saving but when you actually look at the detail of it they’re still being very conservative and ignoring a few things, like that the building is lighter and has reduced foundations.”

• Xlam Australia

“They take account of a small program savings, but we know from Europe that you can knock a third off the construction time of a lot of these buildings and that’s worth a huge amount of money.

• Meyer Timber

CLT was only used on the eight-storey apartment building which, not coincidently, was designed by Nick Hewson as a representative of Aecom with help from Studio 505 architects and Taylor Thompson Whitting Consulting

“We would estimate anywhere between 10-30 per cent cost savings on these medium-rise constructions, but you would need a builder that understands where these efficiencies and savings are.”

CLT SUPPLIERS WITH AUSTRALIAN REPRESENTATIVES

• Stora Enso (Europe) • Sustainable Building Resources (Australia) • Novatop


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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

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1 THE LIBRARY AT THE DOCK BY CLARE DESIGN AND HAYBALL Essentially a glulam post and beam structure, The Library at The Dock also incorporates CLT wall panels and composite floor panels. The three-storey building is 55.3 metres long and 18.1 metres wide and used approximately 1,000 tonnes of European Spruce CLT. The weight of The Library at the Dock was reduced by approximately 30 per cent, over concrete and steel alternatives. It is constructed primarily with CLT, glulam and recycled hardwood. Photography by Diana Snape 2 VERDE APARTMENTS, ADELAIDE BY PROSKE ARCHITECTS Designed by South Australian architects Proske, Verde Apartments at Kent Town Adelaide is a five-storey mixed use residential project which uses CLT for all the load bearing walls, floors and ceilings on the apartment levels, with conventional concrete and steel construction for the lower two levels. Image: Proske Architects

2

3 SUSSEX STREET OFFICES, SYDNEY BY FITZPATRICK + PARTNERS Fitzpatrick + Partners have a research department devoted to MTC and also hybrid construction systems. Pictured is a proposed multi-storey A-Grade commercial office project at Sussex Street in Sydney complete with MTC including CLT. Image: Fitzpatrick + Partners 4 FORTE, DOCKLANDS MELBOURNE BY LEND LEASE At 10-storeys and 32.2 metres high, Forte by Lend Lease is the world tallest modern timber apartment building and highest made from CLT. It comprises 759 CLT panels of European Spruce weighing a total of 485 tonnes. Photography by Emma Cross

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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

AUSTRALIA’S FIRST CLT HOUSE, MAIANBAR, NSW BY ECOBUILD DESIGN Ardea Oosthuizen of Ecobuild Design recently completed the first CLT House in Australia at Maianbar, NSW on a modest budget and within an incredibly tight construction timeframe. Ninety-five per cent of the structure is CLT which was prefabricated offsite and erected in eight days. Oosthuizen says that while CLT was cheaper than suspended concrete floors and solid brick walls it was a dearer option than conventional timber/steel frame or brick veneer construction. Oosthuizen says that he would “absolutely” use CLT again and that it “was a delight to design with” but did suggest that there are some challenges associated with designing with engineered timber. First off, finding and selecting a CLT supplier was a challenge for Oosthuizen, who eventually went with Rob de Brincat (mentioned previously) from Tillings (now working with Xlam) who on all accounts did an excellent job of sourcing the CLT from KLH (Austria) and arranging

shop drawings, stuffing, shipping, customs, de-stuffing and delivery directly to site. The next challenge came in the design phase where a heavy load of detailed shop drawings were needed for individual CLT panels to ensure everything was correctly sized when it arrived to site in containers– “I couldn’t just run down to Bunnings to get replacement panels,” as Oosthuizen explains. The delivery phase went extremely smoothly, notes Oosthuizen, the only challenge here was factoring in the sequencing and numbering of panels to ensure delivery to site in the right order for immediate installation to optimise number of crane lifts required. At the final stage of the CLT experiment – the actual erecting of the frame – the only problem was a teething one for the builders who had never built with CLT and didn’t initially know how to connect the CLT to the concrete and steel foundations. That was overcome however and the structure was completed in eight days.


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TIMBER PRODUCTS, FINISHES & TREATMENTS

THE ‘BELIEVE IN BETTER BUILDING’ IS THE FIRST MULTI-STOREY TIMBER COMMERCIAL OFFICE TO BE BUILT IN THE UK. IT WAS DESIGNED BY ARUP ASSOCIATES AND HAS A GLULAM AND CLT STRUCTURE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON KENNEDY

IT’S A CHICKEN-AND-EGG/ WAIT-AND-SEE POSITION Kremer and Symmons, Hewson and De Brincat all suggest that there is a stance of vigilance from the larger tier one developers against CLT in the Australian market at the moment who are either waiting for a competitor to begin using the material or for a change in the market’s awareness of CLT. De Brincat believes this change could come from the collective sharing of performance data and information about completed CLT projects among suppliers. “We’re starting to make some progress along these lines and we’re hoping to work with other CLT suppliers to get details into the Australian marketplace so that it can gain the confidence it needs to grow a bit quicker than it did in Europe.” Hewson believes that uptake will quicken once more Australian projects are completed and developers/builders fully realise the benefits of CLT construction. “It’s a chicken and egg thing,” he explains. “Until you get people to work on these buildings and to understand the time savings and efficiencies it is very difficult to actually to get a builder to put a dollar figure against them.” On that, De Brincat also agrees.

“A builder will do the calculations and it becomes clear that it’s much faster to build with CLT and identify that there is $500,000 cost savings in their own internal labour on a project but they’ll only choose to put $250,000 in their costing model because they’ve never used it before. “That’s a decision they make purely based on the risk profile they’re willing to take entering into this phase. It isn’t until the builder actually does the project – touches it, feels it, understands it – that they’re going to be able to throw a proper figure at it.”

WHERE TO NOW, FROM THE EXPERTS At the conclusion of Paul Kremer and Mark Symmons’s PESTEL report, the duo made a list of recommendations designed for those looking to promote the uptake of CLT in Australia. • Industry stakeholders can spearhead the promotion of MTC when tendering for government-funded projects citing the ‘timber first’ policy adopted by France, Canada and Japan as case studies, or road maps, driving the local market. • Industry stakeholders can lead the charge in publicising the virtues of MTC through the marketing of research findings – such as the Dunn’s (2015) timber-concrete comparison paper – to the wider construction, architectural, property developer and engineering sector.

• Industry should back peakbodies and associations. This is an approach supported by the key fi ndings in the Survey of International Tall Wood Building (Forestry Innovation Investment and Binational Softwood Lumber Council 2014) for the development of MTC in places, such as Europe, Canada, and the United States. • Industry can collaborate to secure funding to pursue a full feasibility appraisal for the development of MTC plant in Australia. Anecdotally, making a case for the establishment for a MTC plant in Australia is not so much about the level of investment required in plant and equipment to establish a viable facility, but rather the relative proximity to plantation resource and the capacity utilisation given the demand for product. • Industry stakeholders could support researchers in exploring the barriers to entry and formulate roadmaps aiding industry in the progression of MTC. • Those considering supply agreements for the distribution of MTC in Australia should ensure negotiations include considerable collaborative components – inclusive of product and design training, shared intellectual property, support for local testing (fire and acoustic) of product, etc. – and cooperative project management to ensure the delivery of projects given the manufacturers considerable expertise. ■


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – STORMTECH

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THE LATEST FIRE AND SMOKE REDUCTION WINDOW SYSTEMS FOR BUSHFIRE-PRONE AREAS

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[WORDS] LUCY MARRETT

In the month of October 2013 alone, over 100 fires wiped out a total of 118,000 hectares of land and almost 300 homes across the state of NSW. More recently, we saw similar devastation from bushfires along Victoria’s Great Ocean Road and across various regions in Western Australia.

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USTRALIA IS KNOWN FOR ITS DRY HEAT, SCORCHING SUN AND UNPARALLELED TRACK RECORD FOR DEVASTATING BUSHFIRES. FIRES CAUSED BY ELECTRICAL FAULTS AND KITCHEN ACCIDENTS ARE ALSO QUITE COMMON IN OUR COUNTRY AND THEY TOO THREATEN DEVASTATION TO AUSTRALIAN LIVES AND FAMILIES.

And while these instances are just partand-parcel of living in Australia, a lot of the damage caused by these fires to property and buildings could have been avoided had certified fireproof and smoke reducing building products been used when they were constructed, and had best-practice design of buildings in bushfire-prone areas been followed. One of the major hurdles facing designers of homes in bushfire prone areas is the perception that building to high Bushfire Attack Levels (BAL) is difficult and expensive, another is that our most common and low-cost building materials are not suited for these areas. The most commonly specified windows in Australia for example are either standard aluminium or timber frames, both of which are highly combustible and encourage flames and smoke to spread at a fast rate in the case of a fire. Glass windows, if not properly treated, can also be a hazard in their own right as sudden rises in temperature can see glass crack, shatter and fracture from the severe stress.

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But mandatory design standards for Construction of Buildings in Bushfire-Prone Areas (AS3959) means highly-combustible windows are things of the past and, suitably, we’re now seeing window frame and glazing manufacturers produce new lines of products designed to combat or resist

the threat of building fires in line with AS3959. These specialised ranges of window and door systems offer smoke and fire reduction/control, and include seals and sealing systems, fire rated frames, doors, windows and glass panels. Other than AS3959, Australia also has product standards for fire reduction and resistant performance. All products claiming to be fire safe and rated to building standards and regulations should state exactly what regulations and requirements they meet, as well as being able to provide technical and specifications to ensure peace of mine and complete confidence in the product selection and suitability of application.

STANDARDS AND GUIDES INCLUDE: • AS3959:2009 Construction of buildings in bushfire-prone areas • AS1530.4 Fire resistance tests of elements of building construction • AS1530.8.1 Tests on elements of construction for buildings exposed to simulated bushfire attack – Radiant heat and small flaming sources • AS1530.8.2 Tests on elements of construction for buildings exposed to simulated bushfire attack – Large flaming sources • AS1851 Maintenance of fire protection systems and equipment • AS1905.1 Components for the fire protection of openings in fire resistants walls • Bushfire Attack Levels (BAL) • BCA Flammability Index, Spread-of Flame Index, Smoke Developed Index

The following are products that provide various levels of fire protection, reduction and control.


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1 Research architect Dr Ian Weir set out to debunk the theory that designing to high levels of bushfire resistance was expensive. His and Kylie Feher Architect’s Karri Fire House in Western Australia achieved a BAL-40 construction, the second highest of the AS3959, for under $2,900 per sqm. Designing to BAL-40 (rather than BAL-29) also meant that less vegetation needed to be cleared around the home which in turn minimises its direct environmental footprint. 2 BAL-FZ (BUSHFIRE ATTACK LEVEL FLAME ZONE) WINDOWS & DOORS BY PAARHAMMER Paarhammer BAL-FZ are tested and approved to Australian Standards AS3959-2009 and AS1530.8.2. BAL-FZ is the highest rating on the Bushfire Attack Level rating scale. The products in the BAL-FZ range can withstand temperatures of up to 850°C and have half the heat transfer of the 15kwh allowance and windows are double glazed for the highest energy efficiency. Products in the range include: tilt and turn windows, French doors, fixed glass units and sliding doors. 3 WINDOWS AND DOORS BY TECHNICAL PROTECTION SYSTEMS Especially designed systems from TPS are designed to be fire resistant and approved to AS1530.4. The range includes insulated glass and fire doors and windows, non-insulated fire doors and windows, timber glass fire doors and fire windows, bushfire windows and doors. 4 DOOR AND WINDOW FIRE AND SMOKE SEALING SYSTEMS BY RAVEN Raven provides innovative smoke seals including heat expansion intumescent seals. The seals can be used in conjunction with a fire door to meet various building regulations and levels. Raven have fire tested Raven smoke frame seals and mechanical door bottom seals for up to four hours whilst maintaining the fire doors labelled integrity rating. The seals are quality certified to ISO9001, Ecospecifier Global certified and tested and compliant to NCC BCA. 5 VISIONEERING GLAZING BY SMOKE CONTROL Visioneering Glazing from Smoke Control is virtually maintenance free and all the products in the range are certified to various Australian Standards. Available in varying frameless systems, the clear break resistant glass is a Class A in safety. Smoke Control offer a range of decorative glass finishes available along with their fire integrity’s ranging from 30-120, they also offer excellent radiation shielding properties and smoke containment. 6 UPVC WINDOWS BY MINT WINDOW & DOOR SOLUTIONS The windows and doors offered from Mint Window and Door Solutions have thermal efficiency insulation as well as fire safety. Fire tests show that uPVC materials are flame retardant through their product life. The profiles do not support combustion and are actually self-extinguishing. In addition to this, they are also weather resistant to extreme temperatures and severe weather conditions and will not be affected. 7 BATWING SMOKE SYSTEMS BY LORIENT The Lorient Batwing series is primarily designed to contain sound and restrict the spread of medium temperature smoke around hinged door assemblies. Seals restrict the spread of medium temperature smoke (200°C). Lorient also produce Retro-Fir seals as a solution to upgrade existing fire doors that have perimeter gaps to ensure they are compliant to building and fire safety regulations. ■


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – COWDROY

DESIGNING ENERGY EFFICIENT HOMES WITH MINIMAL POWER BILLS

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NERGY USAGE AND SUSTAINABILITY IS A GROWING CONCERN IN AUSTRALIA, WITH HOME ENERGY CONSUMPTION A SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTOR TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.

The size and characteristics of Australian homes greatly impacts on household energy use, with the amount of floor space affecting the amount of energy needed to heat or cool a dwelling. The size of homes are increasing, but household sizes in Australia are decreasing. Between 1994 and 2008, the number of homes with four or more bedrooms rose from 21 per cent to 29 per cent, while the number of one, two and three bedroom homes all decreased. The 2.6 people per household in 2001 is projected to decrease to 2.2 and 2.3 people per household in 2026. This means that more space needs to be heated and cooled per person, requiring more energy.

Furthermore, Australians are looking to reduce their energy consumption (and consequently, their energy bill). Between 2007-2008, almost nine in ten Australians said they took steps to limit their personal energy use. Heaters and coolers are major contributors to household energy use. In 2005, they accounted for more than two-fifths (41 per cent) of household energy use and nearly one-fifth (19 per cent) of residential sector greenhouse gas emissions. Nearly eight in ten dwellings (77 per cent) across Australia had a heater in 2008 and more than one-third of households (39 per cent) nominated ‘Comfort/convenience’ as the main reason for their choice of heater. Cooling has a low contribution to household energy consumption compared to heating, although energy consumption for cooling has been growing rapidly. Two thirds of Australian homes used some form of cooling (i.e. air conditioner or evaporative cooler) in 2008, up from

59 per cent in 2005 and 35 per cent in 1999. The use of coolers has been rising, with households using their cooler for three to 6 months, rising from 26 per cent in 2002 to 33 per cent in 2008. A well designed house needs very little energy to maintain a comfortable temperature. If the home is built with appropriate insulation, passive solar design and is weather sealed, it can require low or no energy for heating and cooling. Even for existing homes there are many ways to reduce energy bills, improve comfort and help the environment.

Lean more about the benefits of a weather sealed home here:: http://buff.ly/1SgxYN8


17-19 May 2016 Melbourne Convention & Exhibition Centre

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We connect your industry The largest international HVAC & R and Building Services trade exhibition ever held in Melbourne

d hundreds of national & international manufacturers & suppliers d cutting-edge products & technologies, informative seminars & tech talks d the ultimate networking event

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1/29/16 11:14 AM


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Invisible by day FORMIDABLE BY NIGHT

Trellis doors for straightine shopfronts

Trellis doors for curved shopfronts

RETRACTABLE CONCERTINA TRELLIS DOORS FOR COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS

Safety barriers and crowd control barriers

Trellis doors for counter tops, serveries and canteens

SECURITY that’s affordable and attractive

www.trellisdoors.com.au


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Selecting

the right automatic door

FOR COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS

SLIDING VERSUS SWING, REVOLVING VERSUS FOLDING, LOW ENERGY VERSUS HIGH ENERGY: OUR SELECTION GUIDE EXPLORES YOUR OPTIONS.


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UTOMATIC DOORS ARE ONE OF THE SIMPLEST ENTRY AND EXIT SOLUTIONS FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS. AVAILABLE IN A WIDE RANGE OF PROFILES AND OPENING STYLES, AUTOMATIC DOORS OFFER A MULTITUDE OF BENEFITS AND FEATURES INCLUDING CLIMATE CONTROL, ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND A PRACTICAL MANAGEMENT OF FOOT TRAFFIC.

AUTOMATIC SLIDING DOORS Automatic sliding doors are available in a range of options including single slide, bi-part slide and telescopic slide configurations that differ in suitability depending on the application. The slide door operators have been designed as suitable for all levels of duty including light usage through to heavy and frequent traffic. The convenience of sliding doors ensures that all able bodied pedestrians are able to move in and out of a building with minimal effort and ease. Many automatic slide doors are operated and activated through hands-free sensors but some products that are used less frequently will require a button to be pressed before the door automatically opens for the user. Barrier free, automatic sliding doors offer an unencumbered passage through the doors. Sliding doors are a very efficient way to manage traffic flow and are ideal for controlling directional traffic in both entry and exit doors. They are also useful as climate control, as there is no danger of them being left open by accident thus ensuring that inside and outside temperatures have minimal effect on each other.

AUTOMATIC REVOLVING DOORS Automatic revolving doors are typically offered in a winged design; two, three and four wing options. The doors are manufactured as complete packages and can either be centre or perimeter driven. Smaller diameter door systems are typically offered in a security version for controlled access with integral night shields so as

to protect the door when it is closed and locked. These doors are ideal for high-traffic applications that require simultaneous entry and exit as well as controlled access. They can also be used as an airlock to help manage energy expenses.

AUTOMATIC FOLDING DOORS Automatic folding doors are offered in both single or bi-fold options and come as a complete package. When the automation is activated the door panels fold simultaneously and swivel to the sides. This creates a smooth transition between the opening and closing processes. Folding doors are considered a space saving solution as the doors move from being open, to a compact folded solution creating more room for pedestrians to pass through. Single folding doors are best suited to one-way and directional traffic. Specific applications for automatic doors include the following: • • • •

Security access Monitored/ limited access Climate control Revolving doors for constant and seamless traffic • Management of traffic flow • Disabled bathrooms and ambulant accessible requirements

AUTOMATIC SWING DOORS Automatic swing doors are designed to be used for either single, paired or double egress


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applications. The swing doors can generally be supplied as either a complete package including the door, or just the operator with the header and drive arm. Automatic swing doors offer effortless entry and exit with seamless operation. Automatic swing doors are most suited to one way traffic. Typically one is used for entry and another, separate door used for exits. They are not recommended for two-way traffic however, depending on the application, exceptions can be made provided the application has been well planned out.

HIGH VERSUS LOW ENERGY Depending on the primary application, automatic doors will use either low energy or high energy power operators. The main differences between these two power operators include opening speed, force and safety device requirements.

LOW ENERGY Low energy devices are those which operate on demand through the use of a pushed button or sensor. These doors are designed to enhance accessibility, but do so at a slower operating pace with minimal force and do not require safety devices. There are a string of benefits to low energy automatic doors including costing less money than high energy doors and being easy to maintain. Another important factor for low energy automatic doors is the speed at which they open. A slow opening door will allow for a simpler passage for pedestrians passing through. People

who have walking aids or disabilities are able to position themselves in the correct place as the doors are opening. And similarly there is no need to rush through the doors once opened, as they provide an adequate time from for pedestrians to pass through them before slowly closing again. Other benefits include: • Smaller in size and are installed on a typical frame • Simple installation process • No maintenance required • Suitable for existing doorways as well as new • Can operate as a standard door in the event of power failure

HIGH ENERGY High energy automatic doors operate quickly and are more effective for large crowds and the continuous movement of pedestrians. Due to their quick and continuous movements, safety devices are required along with the installation of high energy automatic doors. There are shorter time delays and higher traffic requirements associated with the high energy doors. Due to this they require safety devices including guardrails and sensors. The benefits of high energy include: • • • •

High speed and uninterrupted passage Suitable for able-bodied users High frequency Able to be applied to all automatic door applications ■

IMAGES: COURTESY OF DORMA


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – SMOKE CONTROL

THE BURNING ISSUE OF FIRE PROTECTION IN BUILDINGS: ARE YOU AT RISK?

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REATING A COMFORTABLE LIVING ENVIRONMENT ISN’T THE ONLY OBJECTIVE OF GOOD BUILDING DESIGN. FACTORS SUCH AS SUSTAINABILITY, PRACTICALITY AND SAFETY ALSO COME INTO PLAY WHEN DESIGNING AND CONSTRUCTING A BUILDING. WHILE GREEN AND PRACTICAL DESIGN PRINCIPLES ENSURE A GOOD QUALITY OF LIFE TO THE OCCUPANT, IT’S THE SAFETY ASPECT OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT THAT ASSURES COMPLETE PEACE OF MIND BY ELIMINATING RISK OF INJURY OR DEATH. ‘Fire is a real and constant threat in any building environment, especially in the hundreds of multi-storeyed blocks, towers and skyscrapers that make up the average city’s skyline. There have been incidents where a fire in a lower floor apartment spread upwards, quickly engulfing almost half of the building in minutes. This happens when the building’s fire protection system fails to limit the flames to one area, allowing the fire to spread quickly into other zones. Implementing multiple safeguards is fundamental to the concept of building safety, especially in the matter of fire protection. Can sprinkler systems, then, continue to be the primary fire protection mechanism for buildings?

EVALUATION REPORT ESR-2397: SPRINKLER SYSTEMS VS FIRE RATED WALL ASSEMBLIES Introduced in 2003, Evaluation Report ESR-2397 allowed the use of special purpose sprinkler systems with fixed glass assemblies in buildings as an alternative to fire rated wall assemblies. Fundamental flaws in the criteria, especially its limitations in real-life situations, led to the document’s withdrawal in 2011. A revised Evaluation Report ESR-2397 was issued in 2014 following a technical review

with heavy limitations on the use of sprinklers for glass walls in lieu of fire rated walls. Even if these limitations are adhered to, fixed glass walls can shatter on exposure to direct flames and the sprinkler system can fail to challenge the spread of fire into other building compartments, preventing safe egress for occupants from the building. Many building owners and property managers are unaware of the regulatory changes involving the use of sprinkler systems on glazed walls in buildings and are exposing themselves to potential litigation in the event of a fire. Architects as well as building certifiers, owners and employers can be held liable for non-compliance with ESR-2397 in the event of an incident. Similarly, building insurance can be voided or refused for non-compliance. Smoke Control Managing Director Brendan Kennedy, who has over 18 years of experience in the industry, underlines the commercial impact of the new evaluation report. While the document clearly identifies the requirements to building certifiers and fire services, it also means the capital cost of the system will increase and the architectural benefits will decrease. Being a multi-billion dollar sector

with commercial systems costing between $400,000 and $15 million, the sprinkler industry is understandably silent about these legislative changes that may impact their business.

FIRE PROTECTED GLAZING SYSTEMS Smoke Control has engineered a range of fire protected glazing systems that do not require sprinkler systems to be installed for fire safety. Developed as an alternative solution for buildings with fixed glass assemblies, Smoke Control’s Visioneering range will help architects, developers, building owners and employers address these compliance issues cost-effectively in both new developments as well as retrofit installations to replace existing sprinkler/glass wall systems. Visioneering SmokeGlaze frameless glazing systems achieve the specified fire resistance level when fire tested in accordance with AS1530.4 requirements for both Deemedto-Satisfy and Alternative Solutions. Supplied in any combination of fire, smoke, sound, energy, light and security specifications, Visioneering’s floor-to-ceiling glazed systems assure freedom of design and function.

For more information please download the full whitepaper here: http://buff.ly/1ONN71M


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d brick’

oral &

Boral Bricks have combined with PGH Bricks & Pavers . You now have access to even more beautifully crafted bricks so you can Make Your Mark. TM

“We worked closely with the PGH team to compose a unique blend of five different bricks for the new courtyard walls, yielding a surface quality and nuanced colour palette similar to that of recycled brick.” Stuart Vokes, Double Courtyard house, Vokes and Peters Architects. Learn more: pghbricks.com.au/case-studies PGHTM Bricks: Macarthur Mix, Blackett, Mowbray Blue, Black and Tan, Copper Glow.


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DESIGNING A WORKPLACE FUTURE


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[WORDS] STEPHEN PEARSE

SYDNEY PRINCIPAL OF DWP|SUTERS REFLECTS ON THE CHANGING FACE OF AUSTRALIAN OFFICE SPACES


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HE CYNICS SUGGEST THAT LOOKING INTO THE FUTURE IS A SAFE PLACE FOR COMMENTARY, AS NO ONE HAS BEEN THERE IT’S UNLIKELY THE PREDICTIONS WILL BE PROVEN WRONG.

We see the definition of the value of space change through cultural shifts, lifestyle shifts and more recently social responsibility.

However looking into the future is a major expectation from most of our clients when designing for their investment.

Tenancies are advertised with star ratings, key landlords advertise with green guides positioning their buildings for energy efficiency, end of trip facilities encouraging new behaviours. We have experienced staff requesting advice on these facilities in interviews and this loop then drives new innovations. Refining both landlord offers and tenants demands.

We are constantly imagining the future to provide the best outcome for their brief.

One key aspect affecting the commerce is the relatively recent impact of sustainability on our built environments. This is now a fundamental driver for prime real estate leasing.

It is an essential part of what we do. Projects can take substantial time to come to fruition and a significant investment is crafted by large teams with the expectation to be appropriate for as long as possible. So while futurists practicing futurisms may sound like an esoteric occupation, it is a key component of what we do for all our projects To guide us we do have the significant knowledge of past solutions and how they have performed or been modified through new technologies and cultural shifts. This knowledge can give us valuable insights when we design new commissions. There are some continuing underlying drivers throughout time, such as the commerce or cost of space. The application of such a driver can change drastically over time.

The property market has in fact been a key driver of change in the sustainability area. It sensed the change often spurred by public sentiment, government incentives, subsidies and corporate branding through social responsibility initiatives. Another key area of development is obviously new technology. A massive driver of change about which much has been written, the impact of computers, new software like the PDF, the wireless, cloud-based and ‘follow me’ technologies. We are also seeing the development of complex analytical software for peer-to-peer, place-to-place mapping in the workplace by firms such as Optimice shining new lights onto how the workplace actually communicates. This is breaking down long established structures from the old working models of management by sight to management by outcomes.

Unwork’s and Mirvac and the notion of Jellybean Working explore cloud-based technologies allowing people to indicate their availability to connect irrespective of location.

CHANGE IS INEVITABLE AND IS IN DAILY ACCEPTANCE. Disruption and having a workplace ready to adapt and innovate are all acknowledged attributes of a modern business. This has recently even formed a key strategic initiative of our national government. This disruption and innovation will challenge the actual notion of the workplace.

WHAT DOES THIS ALL MEAN FOR THE DESIGN OF OUR WORKPLACES? What we are seeing in both disciplines of architecture and interiors is a merging / overlap of spatial outcomes, using spaces smarter, all focussed around similar drivers. This is creating a blended flexible outcome across typologies which traditionally were very different. • A school never looked like a university • A café never looked like a workplace • Retail centres were for shopping not necessarily fine food and entertainment

WHAT’S DRIVING THIS SHIFT? There will be many reasons, but the core driver is the need to attract • The landlord needs to attract the tenant • The tenant the staff • Café owner, the customer and so on.


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1 Shaping the arrival with light and form. The main reception area at The Hills Shire Council Offices by dwp|suters encourages face-to-face interaction between the public and staff. Photography by Richard Glover PRODUCTS: RECEPTION COUNTER DU PONT CORIAN VINYL FLOORING BOLON 2 Pattern, light and durability provide a flexible public space at The Hills Shire Council Offices. The council chamber on ground floor is enclosed by an operable wall system. Photography by Richard Glover. PRODUCTS: PANELS ECHO PANEL WOVEN IMAGE VINYL FLOORING BOLON MODULAR SEATING SCHAUMBURG + ALVISSE 3 Layered elements, colour and lighting. The staff break spaces on each level of The Hills Shire Council Offices encourage collaboration and interaction between the different teams and departments. Photography by Richard Glover PRODUCTS: RUBBER TILES SIGNATURE FLOORING TIMBER BATTENS SUPAWOOD CEILING PANEL QUANTUM INNOVATION PENDANT LIGHTS JSB LIGHTING VERTICAL GARDEN SCHIAVELLO TABLE AND CHAIRS CONET


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4 Office, collaboration and breakout spaces are linked by sightlines to external views at the AIHI Workspace, Macquarie University by dwp|suters. Photography by Richard Glover PRODUCTS: CARPET INTERFACE CHAIR HAY COFFEE TABLE STYLECRAFT WALL PANEL FABRIC KVADRAT MAHARAM CEILING TILES ARMSTRONG

The education of our society has started to build almost a consensus of desirability.

have the latest technologies which will again impact on work settings.

The rise of design awareness, food and health and sustainability within our communities is leading us to a number of common communal goals often then playing out in the attract market.

Our research into the future and what might it mean for our workplaces coalesces around a number of themes. Each one explored and developed to varying degrees as we work through designs with our clients.

We are seeing this in our fitouts, demonstrated by a prevalence of timber, natural light, colour and plants. The recent expansion in the use of natural materials and the reduction of finished surfaces is driven by a combination of aesthetic and sustainable objectives. If you have one set of finishes, a look, it says I AM SUSTAINABLE, a responsible member of the workplace community. Of course in most cases where the objectives run deep in the application by the proponent this is the case, in other areas this could be part of an image or fashion and just be surface treatments. Another big area of change just starting to gather force is the new generation of workers who will be truly tech-savvy from birth. Every new generation to some extent wants to overthrow or at least adapt the previous. It is this push from the emerging workforce who will adapt, design new systems and software, implement the Jellybean technologies and redefine the notion of work again. These new systems of collaborating online though will bring the need for more change and adaption such as bigger screens. The ability to have a real time presence for diverse partners will further amplify the variation in work style settings to suit the acoustic and engineering needs for human comfort and effectiveness. This future worker will demand a new design response through explicit request but also through their desire to

THE DIGITAL NATIVES ARE RESTLESS The shifts in skills and expectations of the new workforce are driven by their technology thirst, the work processes learnt from an early age at school, their ease of movement across new platforms, the variety of ways for connecting, social platforms that encourage knowledge sharing and the fluid workplace. Generational mobility is changing, the next generations are happy to rent and can move with much less impediments.

CHANGE, MORE CHANGE AND DISRUPTION Constant change and the need for a flexible workplace means our buildings must be readily adaptable. Churn and movement is a permanent state of being. International connectivity and the 24-hour cycle mean we will access work through the cloud to meet peaks and troughs and varying work patterns. This will affect the commerce taking advantage of currency exchange and staff availability. The growth of the service industries across traditional boundaries will require a new level of trust and partnerships.

LOOKING FOR THE OFF BUTTON In our overstimulated, collaborated and outsourced environment - what is the value of calm? Production, connection, create, solve, communicate – where is the off button in the workplace? Workspaces for everything, everything in the workplace. We see the need to develop


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5 QUT Design School (D Block) by dwp|suters The design school needed a revamp to provide spaces conducive to student collaboration, and to encourage extended use of existing non-effectual spaces. The application of recycled hardwood timber battens to an existing semi-external off-form concrete environment invokes a typical Queensland architecture, and pushes the limits of the materials ability to provide both an artistic/creative backdrop and a sense of place for design students to mingle, collaborate and ‘pause’ to have design based conversations. A 24/7 student study space encourages students to stay on campus for extended periods of time to collaborate and workshop in a design focussed multipurpose space. Photography by Roger D’Souza PRODUCTS: TIMBER RECYCLED AUSTRALIAN HARDWOOD PAINTS RESENE PAINTS FLOORS MARMOLEUM ACOUSTIC LININGS WOVEN IMAGE ECOPANEL, KVADRAT MAHARAM BOARDS AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING FABRICS SOLID SURFACES LAMINEX AND FORMICA FURNITURE SCHIAVELLO STYLECRAFT AND CHAIRBIZ


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6 The variety of work settings take advantage of outlook at dwp|suters’ Brisbane office. Photography by Roger D’Souza PRODUCTS: WORKSTATIONS SCHIAVELLO PENDANT LIGHTING ECC LIGHTING CHAIR DIFFERENT WORLD CHAIR HUMAN SCALE MOBILE CADDIES ZENITH INTERIORS

places of calm, with views, vistas fresh air and the time out room (a good place to be). Bring back the occasional daydream.

Work places and lifestyles are merging and access to the benefits of culture, social and natural assets are as important as salary.

Remember when all the good ideas came in the shower and I now have a waterproof phone.

These are part of the kit for employers to attract the talent.

PROCESS BASED TASKS ARE LONG AGO OUTSOURCED

CITY AS A CAMPUS

Uberised if you like, employment has shifted with process tasked outsourced and key collaborative tasks now to occur in centralised space. This recent shift is again under challenge with the notion of the Jellybean work. The new skills now being developed in our schools will encourage the enquiring mind to search for an opportunity. Our children are taught to explore and be entrepreneurs of ideas; to explore, test and refine. Kids are now taught coding at primary school; they work more on project based activities with new technologies. They are being trained to think and innovate, find what needs to be done better. Collaborating from an early age across traditional classroom barriers are now gone.

CITIES ARE PART OF THE CV Cities are fighting for global recognition to attract the talent and the corporations. I work in New York, I work in Sydney, I want to work in Paris, and I want to be where the skiing is good or where the entertainment is great.

Increasingly we have clients who are looking at what they need to achieve in their workplace to attract the right staff and adapt to the new economy. When analysing sites for relocations, clients are balancing the difference in rents between suburban areas and city locations and considering the potential neighbourhood amenities for staff and clients. In most cases, inner-city opportunities provide good on the street amenities, such as access to cafes, gyms, retail, health and meeting hubs. The client is willing to pay higher rent for this shared amenity and lifestyle that the employee wants, often through a reduction in the square metres they need to lease. The city itself becomes an integral part of the workplace. We will continue to see a blurring between the private domain and traditional public domains within our buildings. The breakout areas, cafes and meeting zones will feel more like quality public places rather than private only zones. They will, in effect, become interchangeable. In order for us to meet sustainability objectives our buildings will need to be designed for this change, flexibility and adaptability over a longer lifespan.

This will become easier with wireless technologies. Together with the evolution of spaces to suit a variety of work styles, flexible hours and changing work patterns, this leads to the need to consider the bigger picture around designing for an Activity Based City (ABC). The ABC considers the local neighbourhood when designing workplaces. For example, we see small, agile enterprises wanting access to the best services and localities for their high value employees and co-working space delivering shared spaces globally. They are now thinking like this: ‘if my staff want to work outside, then why do I need to build this space into our fitout?’ We expect this shift will lead to a fundamental change as to how we design for work. The office buildings of the future could appear more along the lines of retail, with a mix of services and settings to suit ever-adapting corporate needs. Engineered for adaption and the ability to embrace nature and environmental advantages of the locality. The workforce of the future will be different and the key is to design now for flexibility. We need to think about a sustainable campus city, a flexible hive with off zones designed to be available when and where needed. It will be a mix of vertical and horizontal initiatives stretching the workplace boundaries within this Activity Based City. ■


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A LIFETIME OF

STYLE ADD STYLE AND BEAUTY TO YOUR HOME THAT WILL LAST FOR A HUNDRED YEARS* WITH LA ESCANDELLA CERAMIC ROOF TILES. Designed in Europe, La Escandella ceramic roof tiles from Bristile Roofing bring a new level of class to Australian roofing. Meticulously crafted, they offer unmatched quality and lasting beauty for your home. Backed by an incredible 100 year Product Warranty* and Colour For Life Guarantee, exclusive to Bristile Roofing, La Escandella are Australia’s most desirable roof tiles. Discover the colour, profile and finish to suit your style.

Phone 1300 274 784 or visit www.laescandella.com.au/style Bristile Roofing’s 10 Year Total Roof Warranty applies where the company supplies and installs any La Escandella roof tile. The warranty is for installation services for 10 years from the original date of installation. Bristile Roofing warrants that its ceramic roof tiles will retain their colour for the life of the product. Bristile Roofing warrants its La Escandella Planum profile ceramic roof tiles for a period of 100 years. All warranties are separate and independent. Full warranty terms and conditions are available at www.bristileroofing.com.au


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KITCHEN COMPONENTS AND DESIGN

FUNCTIONAL KITCHEN PRODUCTS FOR 2016 AND BEYOND [WORDS] TRISTAN DENNIS

K

ITCHEN DESIGN TRENDS COME AND GO ALMOST AS FREQUENTLY AS AUSTRALIAN PRIME MINISTERS, MEANING TODAY’S MID-CENTURY MOD MASTERPIECE CAN QUICKLY BECOME TOMORROW’S BOURGEOIS BLUNDER.

But regardless of how frequently colours, tones, textures and shapes fall in and out of favour, the specification of smart, simple and functional kitchen products will remain timeless. Cabinets, handles, drawers, draw runners and sinks are the unsung heroes of a good kitchen, and central to the aesthetics and ergonomics of the kitchen. Check out these modern-day kitchen hardware classics, which when integrated with a well-defined work space can provide lasting aesthetic appeal and practical workflow.

CAROUSEL 270º CORNER UNIT BY HAFELE The Hafele corner unit can carry loads of 25 kg per shelf and comes in an anti-slip coated base and a bright chrome finish. It is complete with height adjustable axle and trays / baskets.

LEGRABOX PURE BY BLUM Legrabox Pure box system from Blum comes with slim 12.8mm drawer sides and a completely new runner system which provides high range of motion and high load bearing capacity. It’s made from steel and comes in a matte coating of terra black, orion grey or silk white. A carrying capacity of 40kg and 60kg and low sag values makes solutions close to the floor possible.

SENSYS DOOR HINGES BY HETTICH Sensys door hinges are made from high-grade steel and a dampening element that is hidden inside the hinge, ensuring functionality whilst blending seamlessly into any design. Requiring just a light touch for the door to close smoothly and silently, the unique pull-in function gently closes the door as soon as the open angle is less than 35 degrees.

SQUARELINE SINK BY HAFELE The Sqaureline sink is constructed from 304, 18/10 brushed stainless steel and is 1.2mm thick. All edges are laser welded for smooth, clean lines producing a seamless internal 5mm radius for ease of cleaning. Each sink in the range comes with contemporary square basket strainers with built in waste plugs thank link directly to an overflow assembly.


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KITCHEN COMPONENTS AND DESIGN

TRIOMAX DRAWER RUNNER SYSTEMS BY HARN Triomax draw runners feature a standard load capacity of 35kg and 60kg, catering for a wide range of storage requirements. Triomax allows drawers to be fully extended to allow a clear view of drawer contents, and incorporates a double out-stop feature to prevent the drawer coming off its runners when fully open. An integrated cushioning system automatically adapts to the weight and closing speed of the drawers, ensuring soft closure.

SQUARELINE PLUS SINK BY EVERHARD The Squareline Plus range is constructed from 304 Stainless Steel and available as either a top or under mounted system. Each sink model features 90 degree corners and a satin finish keeping it looking new for longer. The drainer has a three degree fall to aid in the effective flow of water to the bowl.

MELAMINE SHEEN CUPBOARD DOORS AND PANEL BY POLYTEC Melamine doors and panels deliver high levels of practicality for the kitchen environment. They are are durable, hygienic and made from low maintenance materials. Edging options include a range of 1mm edge tapes, and the new rolled edges, designed to give the doors a sleek and seamless look. Polytec’s Melamine Sheen range comes in 23 colours, 14 solid and nine timberprints, and is distinguished by its glossy, smooth to touch and easy to clean surface.

METRIC COLLECTION LED LIGHTING BY FURNWARE DORSET The Metric collection integrates a ‘light sandwich’ composed of a 24 LED module and a high-performance pix-screen light. The high performance of the LEDs, carefully selected colour temperatures, high yield pix-screen light, and wide range of mounting accessories makes the Metris collection a truly versatile light source.

SERVO DRIVE BY BLUM Blum’s electric motion support system can be used on traditional lift and pull cabinet systems as well as pull-out drawers. Cabinets and drawers open mechanically with a single touch on the furniture front and close again softly.


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KITCHEN COMPONENTS AND DESIGN

KITCHEN HANDLES BY KETHY Kethy’s architecturally designed handles are available in a broad range of sizes, shapes and colours to complement any kitchen setting. Materials include die-cast zinc, stainless steel, timber and anodised aluminium.

KINVARO F-20 FOLDING FLAP FITTING BY GRASS For wall cabinets with split fronts, it provides comfortable opening and closing of heavy flaps with spring support. With integrated adjustable closing damper, it is ideal for a wide range of applications for many different flap materials.

CASSETTE ROLLER SHUTTERS BY REHAU Rehau’s polymer roller shutters are available in a large selection of styles and configurations. With patented soft hinge connecting individual slats and high scratch resistance, the shutters will not swell or stick in humidity like wood roller shutters.


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Builder: Stephen Edwards Constructions | Architect: Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp

DESIGN FLEXIBILITY AND EASE OF CONSTRUCTION

When it comes to great architecture and building design Kingspan creates products that inspire. The Australian National Maritime Museum’s state-of-the-art Warships Pavilion is a unique building in an iconic location. The design of the building, with curves and swoops, required a bespoke approach and flat panels that could be installed quickly to minimise costs and meet construction deadlines. Kingspan’s BENCHMARK Evolution wall panels provide sleek appeal, durability, ease of installation, continuity of colour and weather resistance. All supported by unique technical service.

Façade & Roof Systems

BENCHMARK Evolution

Kingspan Insulated Panels 38-52 Dunheved Circuit, St Marys, NSW 2760 Australia t: 1300 KINGSPAN (1300 546 477) email:info@kingspanpanels.com.au www.kingspanpanels.com.au


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – AUSCO MODULAR

MODULAR CONSTRUCTION – THE WAY FORWARD FOR HEALTHCARE Modular building expert Ben Knight of Ausco Modular explains why pre-fabricated modular buildings are the solution for healthcare professionals in the 21st Century.

CANBERRA HOSPITAL, ACT

W

ITH THE FACE OF CONSTRUCTION IN AUSTRALIA RAPIDLY CHANGING, THERE ARE NOW MORE OPTIONS THAN EVER WHEN IT COMES TO BUILDING HOSPITALS, MEDICAL CLINICS AND TREATMENT FACILITIES.

To have your next healthcare infrastructure project delivered faster and with less inconvenience, it’s worth considering modular building technologies. With 55 years’ experience in Australia’s modular building industry and 17 branches across Australia, Ausco Modular is a true industry leader. The company has a proven track record in providing efficient building solutions within strict timeframes to a range of industries. Delivering full turnkey modular solutions through a unique 360 Degree Service, Ausco Modular guides clients throughout the entire build from start to finish by providing expert advice in design, build and installation. Not to be confused with outdated demountable buildings, Ausco’s buildings are aesthetically pleasing and can be custom-made to suit all needs.

Ausco Modular General Manager Modular Sale, Ben Knight, said modular building solutions were becoming increasingly popular with healthcare professionals for many reasons. “Providing safe and healthy medical facilities is incredibly important to our healthcare clients and we have helped them achieve reduced waiting lists and greater room availability through our services,” he said. “Reducing the time spent on building new facilities means they can be operational quicker, allowing better medical services to be provided. This is a major priority for our clients and we’re proud to help them deliver on their building objectives time after time. “Ausco Modular recently delivered and installed 84 modular units for Canberra Hospital, allowing patients and medical staff to occupy the Hospital well ahead of schedule.”

Modular building technology was also used to construct a brand new medical clinic in Ivanhoe in September 2015 for NSW Health Infrastructure. The Ivanhoe HealthOne Clinic redevelopment saw Ausco Modular replace the town’s existing ageing health facility in Far West New South Wales, providing its signature turnkey solution across design, construction and installation. The now-completed 300sqm facility includes consult and treatment rooms, dental, podiatry and back of house areas for staff and medical supplies. Australian and global research shows that pre-fabricated and modular buildings save operators a significant amount of time over the span of a project. It’s estimated that modular buildings can decrease project schedules by 66 per cent. On a major transport infrastructure project in Sydney, Ausco Modular was able to reduce the in-situ build estimate time from 36 to 18 months – a 50 per cent reduction in time, which saved the client millions of dollars in build-related costs. As well as cutting down on precious time, modular buildings serve a range of


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – AUSCO MODULAR

DALE CHRISTIAN COLLEGE, WA

other benefits to operators because the construction process is managed off-site.

Waste and pollutants is another key consideration for healthcare professionals when it comes to building new facilities.

“Using modular technologies ensures noise interruptions are kept to a minimum as the majority of work is conducted in an Ausco Modular factory,” Ben said.

With modular buildings constructed off-site, minimal waste and dust is left on-site, which minimises impact on existing facilities and patients.

“As such, healthcare operators are able to run existing areas of hospitals or medical centres with minimal impact on the treatment and care of existing patients and hospital staff. CANBERRA HOSPITAL, ACT

“Neighbouring businesses and residents also experience far less inconveniences that come with an in-situ build because there’s less traffic entering and exiting the site as tradespeople work on the building off-site.” Ben said modular buildings provide a safer option for project managers. “The benefits of being constructed in a factory-controlled setting are vast,” he said. “Ausco Modular employs qualified tradespeople across all of our factories, all of whom are required to adhere to strict safety protocols.

“Our factories have achieved ISO9001, ISO14001 and AS 4801 accreditations through independent industry regulators for quality, environmental and safety.

With Ausco Modular’s extensive network across Australia and longstanding history of providing quality made-to-order modular buildings, it’s worthwhile considering Ausco Modular for your next healthcare build. “Our modular buildings have a proven track record of allowing earlier occupancy of new facilities, which result in a faster return on your investment.”

“These allow for maximum productivity through a better quality of build, better finish and the testing of all services prior to installation. “Weather can be unpredictable in Australia and delay in-situ builds considerably. With the majority of construction done off-site with modular buildings, unfavourable weather doesn’t impact the timeline of our builds.”

Download the full whitepaper here.


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INSULATION SOLUTIONS

MECHANICAL

INSULATION:

IT ISN’T sexy, BUT IT’LL SAVE YOU MONEY

[WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

INSULATION IS THE RODNEY DANGERFIELD OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY—IT RECEIVES VERY LITTLE RESPECT AND IS TAKEN FOR GRANTED.” FORMER AMERICAN NATIONAL INSULATION ASSOCIATION (NIA) PRESIDENT, RON KING OPENED WITH THIS LINE IN AN ARTICLE HE AUTHORED FOR A 2007 ISSUE OF THE PERENNIAL AMERICAN INSULATION MAGAZINE, INSULATION OUTLOOK.

It’s titled Insulation: The Forgotten Energy Technology and starts by suggesting that the knowledge base of mechanical insulation systems at the engineering, architectural, and facility-owner levels over the last 15 to 20 years has, in most cases, eroded. Why? Well King reckons that a major reason is because insulation systems don’t have the moving parts, bells and whistles, or fancy gauges of other building products to engage keen interest. Or, to put it as bluntly as King did, because insulation “isn’t sexy”. So if insulation is the “forgotten technology” of the construction industry because it isn’t sexy, then mechanical insulation might just take the cake as the most forgotten (read: ugly) building technology known to man. Mechanical insulation is used on all types of mechanical systems and equipment throughout a building, including boilers, HVAC systems, piping and ducts. It is generally more prevalent in commercial and high-density residential buildings, and it is used to retard heat energy flow for energy conservation, control the temperature of

process equipment, control surface temperatures to protect personnel, reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, prevent or reduce condensation on surfaces and provide fire protection. In his article, King states that there are many implications for those overlooking, undervaluing or not maintaining mechanical insulation in their buildings. The most relevant to those involved in a project’s construction and maintenance is that inadequate or incorrect mechanical insulation means missing out on a healthy amount of energy and cost savings, and could lead to massive maintenance bills.

ENERGY CONSERVATION Along with maximising profit, providing practical architecture, protecting the environment and creating a landmark building, reducing the energy consumption of a building is always high on the list of priorities for a developer. Insulation is one of the easiest and cheapest technologies that can aid a reduction in overall energy bills and is one that can provide a faster

return on investment than a lot of the fancier building technologies (King says that many times the ROI occurs in less than a year). Heating and cooling already accounts for up to 50 per cent of a commercial building’s energy use and that’s before you consider that an estimated 20 to 30 per cent of all installed mechanical insulation is either damaged or missing and that one of the biggest causes of energy loss in mechanical building systems is through faults in piping and ducting insulation. Section J5 ‘Energy Efficiency of Air-conditioning and Ventilation Systems’ of the National Construction Code (NCC) Volume One addresses the need for adequate and correctly installed mechanical insulation in an energy efficient building. Specifically, J5.2b contains the requirements for the insulating of supply and return ductwork and fittings used in an air-conditioning system and J5.2c, the insulating of piping, vessels, heat exchangers and tanks containing heating fluids or cooling fluids used in an air-conditioning system.


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INSULATION SOLUTIONS

1

THE ANIA SAYS ASK THESE QUESTIONS BEFORE SPECIFYING: • What’s the process? • What are the process temperatures? • What’s in the process and in the exterior environment? • Is the piping located around people? • Is fire an issue?

2

1 When 21 per cent of pipe insulation is missing or damaged, only 52 per cent of the potential heat-loss savings is obtained. Image: Sekisui Australia 2 Choosing an insulation product with the lowest thermal conductivity and vapour permeability should be of the highest priority. Image: Sekisui Australia

Both have Deemed-to-Satisfy Provisions that require that the insulation technology complies with AS4859.1 - Materials for the thermal insulation of buildings, and meets minimum material R-values, depending on the material that is being insulated and where it is located within the building. Both provisions also provide details on how to correctly install the insulation for specific areas and types of insulating material. For example, when insulating the ductwork and fittings of an airconditioning system the provision says the insulation must be protected against the effects of weather and sunlight and be installed so that it abuts adjoining insulation to form a continuous barrier and maintains its position and thickness.

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY K-values are not explicitly mentioned in the NCC but it is the more frequently used measure of mechanical insulation thermal performance. It measures the thermal conductivity of a material which is its ability to reduce heat exchange between a surface and the environment, or between one surface and another

surface. Generally, the lower a material’s thermal conductivity, the greater its ability to insulate for a given material’s thickness and set of conditions. When choosing an insulating product, particularly for spaces with tight clearance issues, consider its thermal conductivity in relation to its thickness.

VAPOUR PERMEABILITY Vapour permeability is one of the leading causes of condensation and corrosion, which greatly affect thermal conductivity and acoustic insulation over time. In severe ambient conditions, where high temperatures and high relative humidity exist, vapour will permeate through insulation until it reaches dew point conditions and condense to form water that saturates insulation. Beyond that, it is also important to use insulation that will offset condensation from pipes and ducts in attic and crawl spaces where mould, mildew and odours are difficult to remove or repair. Some high-end insulation products come with inbuilt vapour barriers while others require impermanent coatings to achieve an acceptable

“INSULATION IS ONE OF THE EASIEST AND CHEAPEST TECHNOLOGIES THAT CAN AID A REDUCTION IN OVERALL ENERGY BILLS AND IS ONE THAT CAN PROVIDE A FASTER RETURN ON INVESTMENT THAN A LOT OF THE FANCIER BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES.”

level of permeability. Consider the initial cost of vapour coatings as well as their recoat and maintenance costs before specifying.

SO WHAT’S TO LOSE? As conduits for heating or cooling to reach other areas of the building, if your building’s elements such as boilers, HVAC systems, piping and ducts are not insulated, you’re essentially allowing energy to escape to areas of your building you never use. The ANIA completed a heat-loss analysis of the “typical” insulated piping systems in an oil refinery to illustrate the difference between the worst-case scenario (uninsulated piping), best-case scenario (all piping being insulated), and the case of reality (where 21 per cent of the pipe insulation was damaged or missing). The experiment showed that when 21 per cent of pipe insulation is missing or damaged, only 52 per cent of the potential heat-loss savings is obtained. King says this begs the question: “why does this condition exist when it could be corrected to provide a significant return


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INSULATION SOLUTIONS

EASE OF INSTALLATION

SUSTAINABILITY

However, it shouldn’t be understated that the thermal conductivity performance of an insulation material is only as good as its applicability to the project at hand, and therefore specifiers should consider a range of other things that will affect the performance and costs associated with insulation projects.

Size, operability and adhesive performance play an important role in the ease of installation. Substandard products need to be used in thicker applications to get the same thermal conductivity performance as high-end products which means they can be more difficult to install, especially in spaces with tight clearance. A smooth surface that allows for adhesion to a wide range of surfaces also saves installers time, and money, and where needed, specifiers should look for manufacturers that offer optional repositionable tissue acrylic adhesives on their products. Unlike conventional direct coated adhesives, products with adhesive backing provide 100 per cent coverage on the duct surface and on the foam insulation, ensuring no seepage or thermal bridging. This feature also provides the additional benefit of repositionability, an essential requirement during installation.

Insulation’s contribution to a sustainably built environment goes beyond its role in reducing energy used to regulate a building’s temperature. A product’s material makeup and the methods used to manufacturer it are arguably more important because its often the case that a product specified to lessen the environmental impact of one building is actually doing more damage to the environment during its material sourcing, manufacturing and transportation stages. Buyers and specifiers should look for products that have been accredited by leading green building councils and product assessors such as LEED, Estidama and Australia’s Green Star.

FIRE AND SMOKE STANDARDS

CALL BACKS

All insulation products should display relative compliance with BCA and Australian Standards for Fire Resistance, Combustibility, Flashover Point and Smoke. They should also be able to demonstrate manufacturing compliance with relative testing authorities. Some products, particularly those manufactured overseas, will also display other standards compliance certificates and while some are industry leading, others might not be up to Australia’s high compliance standards.

A poorly adhered or poorly performing product will result in callbacks that result in loss of money for installers.

on the capital employed or maintenance dollars spent at the refinery?”

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS The extent of savings achieved using best practice thermal regulation is in direct relation to the quality and type of insulation used and for those looking to create the most energy efficient buildings, choosing a product with the lowest thermal conductivity and vapour permeability is of the highest priority.

APPEARANCE AND DURABILITY In some instances the insulation product must remain unchanged for the life of the building and needs to retain its aesthetic without sagging or giving a quilted look.

doors for ALL industry

THIRD PARTY CERTIFICATION Code Mark is a third-party certification scheme for building products and systems, developed and managed by the ABCB. Code Mark certification provides reliable evidence of a building product or system complying with the NCC. Obtaining a Code Mark Certificate of Conformance involves not only demonstrating that a product is in full compliance with the NCC, but demonstrating it is installed in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, without compromising its performance. As such, Code Mark is more of a ‘building system’ certification scheme. ■

doors with intelligence, designed to reduce your energy costs Ph 1800 281170 www.dmf.com.au sales@dmf.com.au

HIGH SPEED CARPARK DOORS

SPECIALISED HIGH SPEED DOORS FOR PRODUCTION AREAS

HIGH SPEED FOLDING DOORS

SPECIALISED HIGH SPEED INSULATION DOORS

HIGH SPEED EMERGENCY DOORS

DMF International Pty Ltd has been providing PVC door solutions for temperature and dust control for over 40 years. These products WILL save you energy costs, and therefore reduce your carbon footprint. Visit us at Most of our products are TOTAL FACILITIES manufactured here in Australia EXHIBITION 2016 Melbourne April 6-7th by DMF, and now with the Stand B19 exclusive operating agency with the German company Efaflex, we are able to supply and service a greater range of door applications, including very large doors, and fast action doors for insulation or security. Sales and service is available Australia wide, and throughout NZ, SE Asia, and UAE.


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BBQ Giveaway

Rinnai – Customised hot water solutions to meet your building design criteria Drawing from over 40 years experience in designing and manufacturing hot water systems our commercial division has supplied solutions to many challenging projects. Knowledge gained from these projects tells us that providing a hot water plant to meet a set delivery requirement is simply not enough anymore. The look and feel of the building, whether a new build or a renovation, is of utmost importance and the hot water plant must not compromise this yet still provide each hot water outlet with a constant supply of hot water. Modern and highly efficient water heating systems are modular and use multiple gas fuelled continuous flow units. This provides a challenge when the plant is situated internally as many

Phone 1300 555 545 rinnai.com.au/commercial

flue terminations would deter from the aesthetic feel of the building. Working closely with architects and hydraulic consultants we design and manufacture common flue, whether natural draft or fan assisted, to provide one single discreet termination point. Our goal is to offer a complete service from concept to commissioning to maximise energy efficiency and reduce up front capital costs. Rinnai centralised gas hot water systems are easily integrated into the building with minimal fuss yet easy access for future serviceability.


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – USG BORAL

CREATING SAFER AND MORE RESILIENT HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS WITH FIBEROCK® INTERIOR PANELS

H

OSPITAL DESIGN IS A SPECIALISED FIELD OF ARCHITECTURE THAT NEEDS TO BALANCE GOOD DESIGN PRINCIPLES AND PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS WITH THE UNIQUE DEMANDS OF THE HIGHLY SENSITIVE ENVIRONMENT. WHEN IT COMES TO SPECIFYING PRODUCTS FOR THE FACILITY’S INTERNAL WALLS AND CEILINGS, CONSIDERATIONS SUCH AS INFECTION CONTROL, MOISTURE CONTROL, IMPACT RESISTANCE, FIRE RESISTANCE, ACOUSTIC CONTROL AND MAINTENANCE TAKE PRECEDENCE. HOSPITALS ARE CLASSIFIED AS CLASS9A BUILDINGS BY THE BCA, WHICH ALSO STIPULATES DEEMED TO SATISFY PROVISIONS FOR HEALTHCARE CONSTRUCTION.

various internal walls, in addition to the need to ensure noise control, which has a bearing on patient recovery and staff wellbeing.

HEALTHCARE DESIGN CHALLENGES

FIBEROCK®’s impervious surface is not only moisture and mould resistant but also ensures a smooth and seamless surface that can be easily cleaned and disinfected to prevent the spread of germs. The tough interior panels can stand up to hard knocks in high-traffic healthcare environments with their exceptional impact resistance preventing damage or repairs to walls.

Infection control is prioritised in any healthcare facility to prevent transmission of disease. Given the potential for walls and surfaces to become breeding grounds for pathogens, it’s important to specify internal walls and ceilings that are impervious, easy to clean and non-porous. A water-resistant finish on these surfaces, especially in the wet zones will additionally support moisture control. Hospital walls take a lot of hard knocks from trolleys, carts and beds, resulting in impact damage and expensive repairs. To prevent downtime and maintenance costs, internal walls should be able to withstand soft as well as hard body impacts. Additional challenges come from BCA’s Deemed to Satisfy Provisions for fire protection, which set out the required Fire Resistance Level (FRL) for

USG Boral is helping architects reduce the complexity of specifying for hospitals with FIBEROCK®.

FIBEROCK® BY USG BORAL A lightweight panel for internal wall linings and ceilings, FIBEROCK® by USG Boral combines the impact toughness of masonry products with the design and installation convenience of plasterboard. As a high performance BCA compliant product, FIBEROCK® addresses all the key concerns of material selection in healthcare design from infection, moisture and acoustic control to fire and impact resistance.

FIBEROCK® meets the BCA requirements for fire protection within hospitals with two-way fire rated systems up to 60 minutes (single layer) and 120 minutes (two layers). The excellent acoustic performance of the interior panels ensures superior noise control, sound isolation for privacy and comfort, and reduced sound transmission in noisy areas. FIBEROCK® by USG Boral is ideal as an internal lining material for both wet and dry areas. The use of a single product across all

interior walls and ceilings minimises handling, simplifies installation, and reduces downtime.

CASE STUDIES Two major healthcare projects recently specified FIBEROCK® for their internal walls and ceilings, helping them meet time and budget constraints as well as address all healthcare design concerns. FIBEROCK® Aqua ToughTM was specified for the Gold Coast University Hospital (GCUH) to provide a full system solution across both wet and dry areas. The hospital is impressed with the interior panel’s qualities including its toughness, resistance to cracks and superbugs, low maintenance requirement, and ongoing savings in after-build costs. FIBEROCK® Aqua ToughTM was also specified for the $200 million South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) with the single multipurpose composite board used throughout the 30,000-square-metre facility to streamline the fitout process and meet time and design objectives. FIBEROCK® by USG Boral is not only simplifying the specification process with a single-product internal lining solution but is also helping create safer and more resilient healthcare environments.

To find out more about FIBEROCK® interior panels, please visit: http://buff.ly/1oXurrK


Next generation joinery coatings. Distributed locally by Intergrain Timber Finishes, Teknos coatings are manufactured in Scandinavia to produce finishes of the highest quality and performance. With its advanced formulations, Teknos delivers highly durable, factory-finished coating systems that protect against weathering, UV degradation, mould and fungal growth. A Teknos factory applied coating system can be customised to meet your needs. To find out more, call 1800 630 285 or visit www.teknos.com.au.


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

GET THE INFORMATION YOU NEED

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Spantech Construction System Simple, strong, versatile WASTE MANAGEMENT Expert drainage solutions tailored for the aged care industry WINDOWS & GLAZING Performance with sustainability is Schueco’s goal

PERFORMANCE WITH SUSTAINABILITY IS SCHUECO’S GOAL As a result of over 60 years’ experience, the premium-quality, thermally broken windows, doors and façades solutions in Schueco Australia’s aluminium portfolio are able to perform to a higher level than competing systems. This enables them to satisfy even the most HIQERHMRKWTIGM½GEXMSRKMZMRKEVGLMXIGXWXLI KVIEXIWXTSWWMFPIHIWMKRJVIIHSQ4IVJSVQERGI¾ exibility is achieved through the use of built-in thermal insulation ranging from zero to Passive House standard (eg the Schueco FW 50+.SI façade can achieve Uf values down to 0.70 W/m²K), a level commensurate with achieving a properly carbon-neutral building. Overall energy performance may be further increased by automating opening vents through a building management system. This is simply achieved in a Schueco window through the use of ‘TipTronic’ concealed activators. Impressive sound insulation can be achieved in combination with the correct glass, reducing noise by up to Rw 49 dB. Finally, Schueco’s emphasis on sustainability means that the company now has components made from natural materials, making Schueco’s highestperforming systems some of the most environmentally friendly on the planet.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES SUSTAINABLE AND SUPER HYGIENIC FOR COMMERCIAL APPLICATION Geberit, a global leader in sanitary systems and piping solutions, introduces a truly sustainable product for commercial applications. Geberit’s touchless sensor taps Hytronic 185 and 186 produce their own power. The flowing water generates power to recharge the units, eliminating the need for a mains supply and standby power consumption. The mini power station and small scale generator makes the HyTronic taps independent from the mains supply r Whenever the tap is in use, the flowing water charges the accumulator r Reduces the ecological impact by 80% compared to an electrical connection and by 50% compared to the use of batteries r Ideal solution for all sustainable building projects r Maximum - 6 star - WELS rating

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The addition of a touchless tap with a built-in sensor can increase the levels of hygiene by removing the need to touch any buttons, especially in high traffic applications. r All setting can be remotely accessed with a service remote r Designed with elegant curves and a functional body r Available in two different designs, both manufactured in chrome Read more at www.geberit.com. au/sensor-tap

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

TURN YOUR UNIQUE IDEAS INTO REALITY Do you need expert help to turn your unique ideas into reality within your client’s budget? SUPAWOOD’s Design & Construct service will take your idea and turn it into a workable final design by designing or adapting products to suit. Their understanding of value management means they can adapt their products to suit any design intent or budget. SUPAWOOD liaise between all involved, supplying samples and budget pricing until the design is finalized, then recommend an installer and advise on installation through to a successful end result.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES A 3-IN-1 HIGH VELOCITY SOLUTION FOR ANY WASHROOM This neat unit is an affordable, integrated cabinet with three features in one installation, offering the following features and benefits: r High Velocity Hand Dryer – suitable for high traffic areas r Holds 500 Standard Multi-Fold Paper Towels – large capacity means less work for maintenance staff r 26 Litre Waste Bin With SpringLoaded Lid – prevents paper towel from blowing out of the bin r Options For Recess & Semi-Recess – makes the unit fl exible depending on the application required r 2 x Tumbler Locks, Keyed Alike – keeps the unit secure and allows for ease of maintenance r Satin Stainless Steel Finish – offers modern and stylish design r Accessible Compliant This stylish and affordable 3 in 1 unit provides a solution suitable for any washroom environment.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

EXPERT DRAINAGE SOLUTIONS TAILORED FOR THE AGED CARE INDUSTRY The benefits that a lineal solution can bring over centralised drainage solutions for today’s Aged Care facilities are numerous. Unlike conventional drainage solutions, lineal designs conform to the strict accessibility requirements of the AS-1428, whilst ensuring superior drainage flow. Lineal drainage solutions are designed to work with a single gradient fall, they remove the necessity of the hob, allowing seamless and self-sufficient access for residents (for e.g. including those using wheelchairs, walkers and frames), eliminating dangerous trip hazards. Lineal drainage solutions are also designed to eliminate traditional barriers and expand the area of drainage. With less need for a carer to assist entry, residents are offered more personal access into the shower space. Stormtech’s vinyl clamp (providing a screw down flange to mechanically clamp the vinyl beneath), offers seamless integration into vinyl floor surfaces commonly found in care settings.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

HÄFELE NOW PARTNERED WITH GEZE OPENING THE DOOR TO NEW OPPORTUNITIES Häfele Australia and Geze are proud to announce the foundation of a new partnership. This exciting development combines the strength of Australia’s most progressive Architectural Hardware company with one of the world’s leading manufacturers of door technology. 'IVXM½IHXS-73+)>)´WHSSVGPSWIVWLEZIFIIRMRWTIGXIH ERHGIVXM½IHMREGGSVHERGI[MXLXLIETTPMGEFPIWXERHEVHW)2 )2)2ERH%7 %PPXLIWIQIEWYVIWTPYWSZIV]IEVWSJMRHYWXV]I\TIVMIRGI from Häfele guarantee a high quality product and service. When ]SY[ERXXSWIX]SYVTVSNIGXETEVXXLEX´WEQYWX 8S½RHEWSPYXMSRJSV]SYVRI\XTVSNIGXGSRXEGX]SYVRIEVIWX ,mJIPIWEPIWSJ½GISVZMWMX[[[LEJIPIGSQEY

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

SPANTECH CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM – SIMPLE, STRONG, VERSATILE The Spantech Construction System provides building solutions for numerous applications. The system is simple and strong, yet elegant and graceful. The Spantech System is based on site-rolled metal building panels of various sizes and thickness. Panels are capable of use either ¾EXSVEWWIPJWYTTSVXMRKGYVZIH arches. The system can provide unsupported spans of up to forty metres.

Acting compositely with reinforced concrete, the Spantech System provides earth covered hardened buildings which are used extensively by Defence agencies. Whether applied to conventional works, self-supporting arches, hardened buildings, composite storage systems, or permanent formwork, the Spantech system has many uses. Our team of Engineers, Construction Managers, Site Supervisors and Specialist Site Crew offer their expertise to a HMZIVWM½IHVERKISJMRHYWXVMIWXS produce one of the best building systems on today’s market.

Panels interlock to form a continuous structural membrane with minimal screws or bolts. All attendant works – skylights, ventilators, lights, insulation, ducts, ceilings, and so forth – can be incorporated easily and economically.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES TOURNIKET Revolving doors are the most energy efficient entrance solution available in the market today. The always open, always closed principle of a revolving door ensures a controlled environment where the outside air is given less opportunity to mix with the air from inside of the building. Due to the fact that there is less energy required to maintain the conditioned climate inside of the building, it helps reduce the carbon footprint of the building, whilst saving on both energy and cost. The Tourniket is the most versatile revolving door in the market as it can be fully customised to reflect your building’s design and functionality. It can simply be a cost effective standardised product, or we can deliver a high specification revolving door with extreme dimensions, that acts as the key feature of any design. It is available with three or four door wings, with manual or automatic operation and in virtually any colour or finish you can imagine. The Crystal Tourniket also provides another unique option, as a stunning all glass model. Extensive experience and continuous innovation over more than a century has led us to be the global market leaders in revolving doors, and the perfect partner to tailor a solution for you.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

MULTI-FUNCTION MULTI-USER MULTI-BENEFIT Boost your productivity with the HP Designjet T2500 eMultifunction Printer.

TUSCAN LIMESTONE WALL CLADDING Tuscan Limestone is a beautiful natural stone cladding ideal for both internal and external walls. Tuscan Limestone is only 25-35mm thick and comes with single piece wrap around corners. Tuscan Limestone is also available in matching capping.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

)RNS]XVYIGSQTEGXIJ½GMIRG][MXLXLIEFMPMX]XSTVMRXWGERERHGST]JVSQ a single device. )ZIV]EWTIGXMWFYMPXXS]SYVRIIHWXLIMRXIKVEXIHSYXTYXWXEGOMRKXVE] HIPMZIVWTVMRXW¾EXERHGSPPEXIHXLIGSPSYVXSYGLWGVIIRKIRIVEXIWYWIJYP TVMRXTVIZMI[WERHFYMPXMR[IFGSRRIGXMZMX]QIERW]SYGEREGGIWWZMI[ and print projects from virtually anywhere.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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Dream it. Print it.

Bring your ideas to life with 3D printing We have a range of 3D printers that are changing the face of the architecture industry. Our 3D printing technology helps you visually communicate your ideas to clients, quickly and at low costs, helping you to win more business. To ďŹ nd out more and discover the possibilities visit konicaminolta.com.au/3D

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