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MAY | JUN 2015 | VOL 51 | NO.3 PRINT POST APPROVED PP100007333

’TANKS FOR THE

INSPIRATION ROOFING 7 fascinating new Australian roofs

HEATING What’s popular in hydronic systems

ACOUSTICS Choosing materials to help heal people


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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

OES MELBOURNE’S UNIQUE NEW WATER TANK-CLAD HOUSE ON THE COVER LEAVE YOU FEELING INSPIRED? OR DO YOU SIT WITH THE ‘TANKS, BUT NO TANKS CROWD?

of acoustics (page 8), hear how important it is to get the balance of sounds right to help patients heal as quickly as possible. There are tips from experts, for example on how certain materials can absorb pesky, low frequency tones.

We can tell you - based on direct feedback to our articles at ArchitectureAndDesign. com.au – that the design and building industry audience is torn about the house (page 4). It’s probably the most polarising of projects we’ve seen this year.

We were also careful not to overlook the role that flooring finishes and materials can play in creating health-supporting spaces, such as the importance of colour, pattern, texture and the interplay with lighting, as well as the many performance considerations like acoustic control, toxicity, dirt retention, ease of cleaning, slip resistance and many others.

D

Whichever way you feel, it hasn’t failed in the mission to prompt thinking about environmentally sustainable building; and quite timely too, as the region’s reportedly on the cusp of the next el Niño weather event, which would spell a hot and dry and very water-precious period. Rethinking building materials is also the subject of our article about a new book and a new industry event (page 32); the story comes complete with quotes from Groucho Marx and Game of Thrones. But first, our features tackle the topic of making buildings to support occupant health; from page 6 Geraldine Chua explores how design and material composition influences both our physical health and state of mind. Next, more specifically on the subject

Our feature on heating (page 26) also happens to look down at the floor, examining the benefits offered by hydronic systems. Interestingly, they also include occupant health, because the radiant heat source is allergen free. But there’s a host of other advantages. We also turn our eyes upward, in a fascinating feature (page 22) on interesting and innovative roofing applications from some of the country’s leading designers. They showcase both new technologies and traditional materials being used in new ways to take roofs to new heights. We hope you enjoy!

DAVID WHEELDON

ON THE COVER: WATER TANK HOUSE BY ARM ARCHITECTURE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY AARON POUPARD (MORE ON PAGE 4).

NEWS

4 How far would you go for sustainability?

HEALTHCARE

6 The ultimate benchmark

16

for buildings

8 Noise vs sound: their effects

16 Latest products to meet

on hospitals and healing

your flooring needs

ROOFING

22 Exploring seven Australian roofs and what they’re made of

HEATING

06 ACOUSTICS

10 Conrad Gargett Lyons’

EDITOR DAVID WHEELDON E-MAIL: DAVID.WHEELDON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU JOURNALISTS

SUSTAINABILITY

32

sound strategies for Brisbane’s largest children’s hospital

ReThinking Australian building products

12 Looking ahead in acoustics

PRODUCT SHOWCASES

FLOORING

34 Information on new and

14 When flooring choices in

exciting building and architectural products. Introduced with the full directory and how to enquire

healthcare affect patient well-being

PUBLISHER MARTIN SINCLAIR E-MAIL: MARTIN.SINCLAIR@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

26

The workings of hydronic floor heating

GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART DIRECTION LOUIS SANTOS PHONE: 02 8484 0724 E-MAIL: LOUIS.SANTOS@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

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ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER PAUL RYAN PHONE: 02 8484 0612 MOBILE: +61 (0) 439 663 222 E-MAIL: PAUL.RYAN@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

FOR SUBSCRIPTION ENQUIRIES CALL CUSTOMER SERVICE: 1300 360 126 ISSN 1039-9704

NATHAN JOHNSON PHONE: 02 8484 0688 E-MAIL: NATHAN.JOHNSON@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU

TOWER 1, LEVEL 13, 475 VICTORIA AVE, CHATSWOOD, NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA LOCKED BAG 2999 CHATSWOOD DELIVERY CENTRE NSW 2067, AUSTRALIA PHONE: 02W8484 0888 | FAX: 02 8484 0633 ABN 80 132 719 861 WWW.CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU © Copyright Cirrus Media 2013 All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

GERALDINE CHUA PHONE: 02 8484 0759 E-MAIL: GERALDINE.CHUA@CIRRUSMEDIA.COM.AU Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in BPN do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine. 24,970 CAB AUDITED DISTRIBUTION SEPTEMBER 2014

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NEWS

ARCHITECTS PUSH BOUNDARIES WITH WORLDFIRST WATER TANK HOUSE “HOW FAR WOULD YOU GO FOR SUSTAINABILITY? IS YOUR DOMESTIC AESTHETIC FLEXIBLE ENOUGH?” ARM ARCHITECTURE In a world first for residential design, ARM Architecture have completely covered a Port Melbourne house in a combination of black water tanks and modular vertical planter beds. While the architects admit that ‘Water Tank House’, as a single detached dwelling, is not an ideal model for sustainability, they contend the project publicly questions the importance of design aesthetic in the greater context of sustainability. “The façade is palazzo-like in that it appears to seal off the household from the outside environment, yet it is not a forbidding security fortress: its message is about protecting species and environmental elements,” says Howard Raggatt, ARM Director. “It chooses shared, functional sustainability over a personal luxury ideal.” Visit ArchitectureAndDesign.com. au for a more detailed article.

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SOUTH ELEVATION TANKS & SCREENS

ARM chose black-coloured tanks to protect the water from light and therefore discourage the growth of photosynthesis bacteria within the tanks. The ‘Fatboy’-style tanks were also chosen to emulate the Renaissance-period palazzos which had bold, robust and defensive exteriors.

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WEST ELEVATION SCALE 1:50

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EAST ELEVATION TANKS & SCREENS

Nineteen Aquarius Slimline water tanks, each 2sqm and holding a combined 38,000 litres of water, form the bulk of the façade and will collect rainwater to service the home’s toilets, laundry and extensive gardens. Photography by Aaron Poupard.

Between the tanks, and covering the rest of the building, is Atlantis Gro-Wall, a plastic modular structure that will support the home’s vertical gardens in the future and form a micro-ecology as it grows.

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NORTH ELEVATION SCALE 1:50


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HEALTHCARE

THE ULTIMATE TEST: DO OUR BUILDINGS AND SPACES CAUSE HEALTH? [WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA

“WHAT IF OUR HEALTH BECAME THE BASIS FOR JUDGING EVERY BUILDING AND EVERY PUBLIC SPACE? WHAT IF EACH OF US – EVERY PERSON, EVERYWHERE – ASKED, ‘DOES THIS PLACE CAUSE HEALTH? HOW DOES IT MAKE ME FEEL?’” - TYE FARROW, FARROW PARTNERS The word ‘health’ usually brings to the architect’s mind an image of a hospital or clinic project, but health isn’t just a building typology. For Canadian architect Tye Farrow, the term has links to both the medical and design realms, bridged by the fact that a building’s design and material composition has an influence on both our physical health and state of mind. The ultimate design test for Farrow when looking at new spaces – be it a streetscape, an office building, or the traditional ‘healthcare sector’ hospital – is assessing how healthy they are; whether a space ‘causes health’, allowing people to thrive mentally, socially and physically. “In recent years, expectations for environmental impact have been expanded to include awareness for how physical surroundings affect our state of mind,” said Farrow at an Australian Institute of Architects talk earlier this year. “We believe that sustainable building objectives must embrace human health issues as well as environmental effects. This means that the public should expect design to make a holistic, meaningful contribution to their lives.” Drawing on the idea of ‘salutogenesis’, which refers to the focus on factors that support human health and well-being rather than those that cause disease (pathogenic), architecture which ‘causes health’ is not isolated, placeless and rootless, but promotes five vital elements. We explore five projects that capture these elements.

NATURE

A reference to things that grow from, or are a part of, the natural world. Letting in natural daylight as it moves with time, for instance, has been proven to stimulate the brain. A more concrete example is the Credit Valley Hospital: Peel Regional Cancer & Ambulatory Cancer Centre by Farrow Partners (pictured above), where the design team was told to deliver “something alive”. In response, they designed a lobby with glulam tree-like structures, which communicated a specific message to staff and patients, as well as the community at large. “What we hear from our clients is that the prominent use of wood raises people’s spirits and helps reduce stress,” explained Farrow. Photography by Tom Arban


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HEALTHCARE

AUTHENTICITY

Designs that draw on things we know; our memories. For example, St. Mary’s Hospital by Farrow Partners in association with Perkins + Will in Sechelt, British Columbia, depicts well-known cultural symbols and features artworks that tell stories. Its lobby is animated by a sunburst mural that spans 70 feet long, instantly recognisable and understood by patients, staff and members of the community.

VITALITY

Designs that come alive and activate spaces. The Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre in far north Ontario brings together two 100-year-old hospitals that use wood as a structural material to reflect the area’s lumber industrial past, and symbolise regional revival. The project is the first cancer centre in Canada to incorporate direct natural light skylights within the cancer radiation treatment rooms – spaces typically devoid of fresh light – while harvesting the sunlight to power the radiation monitors. Photography by Peter Sellar

Photography by Andrew Latreille

LEGACY

Designs that make a lasting contribution. The Kyabram District Hospital in Victoria was transformed by Cloud Architecture Studio from a perfunctory and depressing building into a vibrant and cutting-edge healthcare facility that will be the primary health service for the town and much of the surrounding precinct. The theme of place marking is evident throughout the project, but most notable at the entrance to the building where “Kyabram” is etched into a perforated metal screen (Ripple Iron) that wraps the building. The deep-red fibre cement sheeting (James Hardie Scyon Matrix) on the building’s exterior wall bleeds through the perforations and marks a clear indication of where the building’s entrance is and who the building belongs to.

VARIETY

Photography by Jeremy Wright Buildings don’t have to be stock-standard, but can be experimental in communicating the aspirations of organisations. For the Shoalhaven Cancer Care Centre on NSW’s South Coast, HASSELL swapped out the institutionalised healthcare diagram of yesteryear for more informal and personalised spaces. According to the architects, the use of natural native timber, concrete, steel and glass throughout the interior and exterior blurs the boundaries between the indoor areas and the bushland setting, engaging the centre with the landscape to create a resort-style, positive healing environment. Photography by Mike Chorley


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HEALTHCARE

SOUND STRATEGIES FOR NURTURING HEALTH

[WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA

I

N ALL PROJECTS, ARCHITECTS HAVE AN OBLIGATION TO RECONCILE THEIR DESIGNS WITH A BUILDING’S FUNCTION AND PURPOSE, ALTHOUGH SOME WOULD SAY THIS SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY BECOMES HEIGHTENED WITH HEALTHCARE BUILDINGS, WHERE DESIGN AND MATERIALS CAN SIGNIFICANTLY INFLUENCE THE HEALING PROCESS.

The use of timber furniture and materials, for example, has been proven to directly improve the health and wellbeing of patients. Planet Ark’s recent report,

‘Wood – Housing, Health, Humanity’, shows that the feelings of natural warmth and comfort that wood elicits contributes to lowered blood pressure levels and heart rates, and reduces stress and anxiety.

THE LADY CILENTO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL (SEE P10) BLOCKS NOISE AND WELCOMES SOUND WITH A RANGE OF ACOUSTIC TREATMENTS IN THE WALLS, PARTITIONS AND TIMBER PANELLING. PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER FREDERICK JONES

While material palette and selection are a big part of the healthcare design process, a successful holistic design also moves in the realms of good acoustic management, which has to stand up to the hive of activities often found in hospitals and other healthcare environments. “Hospitals and healthcare buildings …include a multitude of different spaces with a wide range of privacy requirements, and noise levels can vary

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HEALTHCARE

greatly, depending on the department, users and activities taking place,” says Andrew Jackson, Director at SAS International. “Neglecting to manage the acoustics in these spaces can have a negative effect on patient comfort and slow down recovery.”

SOUND VS NOISE So what does successful acoustic management in healthcare environments look like? For architect Tye Farrow, it boils down to the fundamental distinction between sound and noise. “If you’re in an active urban environment, sometimes the dancing of noise from the street outside can be quite stimulating,” he says. “That sound on the other side, can be seen as noise. Ambulances or fire trucks screaming past, or the buzz of an air-conditioner from the building next door can be very distractive, and that leads to the element of causing stress.” Noise is therefore unwanted sound, and in hospitals and clinics, architects and consultants should design spaces and specify products that reduce noise levels, but enhance those sounds that make occupants feel better. “What you begin to do is look at your experience from a sound standpoint,” explains Farrow, “from when you walk from the parking lot into the building and there’s music that’s been chosen specifically to relax

you and reduce the stress of the unknown. Because what happens is if we don’t totally understand what’s happening or about to happen to us, such as going to a hospital to visit somebody we know is in bad shape or going into an operation, our senses begin to fill the gaps of the things we don’t know – what we see, what we smell, and what we hear. “If we hear overhead speakers calling for somebody to come here, there, urgently, it tingles our senses in a bad way.” Good acoustic management also relies on a careful selection of products and materials that fit a space’s function and purpose to absorb noise, and bounce back the right sounds. For instance, Jackson points out that soft surfaces can absorb certain high frequency tones but struggle with mid-to-low frequency noise, such as the typical ‘rumbling’ or ‘humming’ of monitoring equipment. “Low frequency sounds especially require additional acoustic treatment as it can travel relatively long distances without much attenuation,” he explains, suggesting the use of metal ceilings which are highly sound absorbing but also easy to maintain, humidity resistant and meet the hygienic demand of healthcare environments. Metal ceilings’ mineral fibre counterparts also offer good sound attenuation – the sound control between two spaces divided by a ceiling height partition.

Longer product life Better performance Reduced operating costs

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ACOUSTICS

CASE STUDY: LADY CILENTO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL BY CONRAD GARGETT LYONS Getting the balance right between quietness and areas that can be lively and slightly noisier was paramount for Australia’s largest and most advanced children’s hospital, which brings together staff and services from two hospitals into a new purposedesigned, 359-bed building. “Our role was to design spaces for healing that had the appropriate levels of sound or noise reduction for the functions and activities, from public waiting areas to treatment areas and patient bedrooms,” explains Bruce Wolfe, Managing Director at Conrad Gargett. “It was also important to design tranquil/quiet spaces both within the building and within the landscape. Healing is greatly enhanced if patients are relaxed rather than stressed and if clinicians are working within a comfortable environment. These two aspects were considered in designing the LCCH acoustic environments.”

1 1 The most significant challenge for the team was dealing with ambient noise. As the hospital is located near a busy road, traffic noise threatens to filter into the naturally ventilated lower level areas, which could create a stressful environment for patients, staff and visitors. Screening and attenuation therefore had to be carefully considered, and the team used perforated and insulated panelling extensively to block out these noises. A helipad at the top of the building also meant the team had to formulate a design solution that eliminated helicopter noises to a level that would not be disruptive for patients trying to rest and sleep. This was done by employing a curtain wall with a plasterboard systems backing, multiple glazing layers, insulation and internal mass of concrete and masonry used selectively.

2 Just as important to blocking out external noise was controlling the noise and sounds generated within the hospital so that they were appropriate to each environment. “In the case of LCCH there are many types of environments, for example two extremes – we sought to have acoustically lively public areas in an attempt to normalise the environment and bedrooms that are quiet,” says Wolfe. To meet these design aims, the team specified timber veneered panels backed with insulation in the public areas. Depending on the location, either Amerind plywood or fire retardant Flameblock MDF supplied by HPP Group and manufactured by Briggs Veneers was used.

2


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ACOUSTICS

3 Consultation spaces necessitated yet another set of acoustic considerations – in this case, acoustic separation – which were realised with a combination of ceiling and partition performance, soft furnishings for noise reduction, and controlled background noise levels. “Some level of background noise contributes to privacy, whether that is air conditioning noise or general background from people’s activities,” explains Wolfe. Acoustic performance in the walls and partitions are delivered by Knauf plasterboard and appropriate insulation from Fletcher, while ceilings throughout the hospital feature either flush set plasterboard (perforated where required), timber panelling as was used on the walls, or lay-in Bioguard Acoustic tiles from Armstrong. “Products were selected based on their performance characteristics. In the case of the timber panelling the use of a warm material with a natural feel was important,” says Wolfe.

“NOISE IS OFTEN AN ISSUE WITH PATIENT DISTURBANCE AND RESULTANT COMPLAINTS. IT CAN ALSO CREATE ISSUES WITH SERVICE DELIVERY, DISTRACTION OF STAFF AND POTENTIAL MISTAKES. AT THE OTHER END OF THE SCALE, PATIENTS IN PARTICULAR CAN BE INTIMIDATED BY SPACES WHICH ARE ‘DEAD’ OR TOO QUIET.” – BRUCE WOLFE, CONRAD GARGETT

3 PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTOPHER FREDERICK JONES

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ACOUSTICS

WHAT’S NEXT IN ACOUSTICS? Despite the importance of sound acoustics, a huge gap exists in the market in terms of services that acoustic consultants are offering to clients. One of the key issues raised by Cundall Australia is how the technical aspects of acoustics are being communicated to clients. The firm’s new head of acoustics, Dr Chris Field, notes that most acoustic consultants today are still very “old school” and rely on providing complex reports that clients don’t necessarily fully understand. Rather than saying ‘trust me, I’m the expert and here’s my report’, he says consultants should focus on providing listening environments where clients can listen to and visualise designs before they are built. These sound simulations, or ‘auralisations’, are similar to architectural visualisations, and allow clients to experience a project’s acoustic environments. This often evokes an emotional and passionate response, whilst giving end-users a chance to offer their feedback. “[The technology] is out in the marketplace now, but definitely the next step for auralisation is to get into Augmented Reality and virtual worlds. We’re already experimenting with our acoustics team in the UK with virtual goggles called Oculus Rift which uses 3D gaming engines…to bring those to 3D architectural models of a project that you can walk through and visualise but also listen,” says Dr Field. The industry should also look out for new alternatives to traditional acoustic materials such as mineral wool and polyester. He points particularly to crushed recycled glass, which is 100 per cent recycled glass crushed almost to granules and bound together by heat, meaning no binders or chemicals involved, and which provides acoustic absorption. The rise in these new materials are driven by demand from clients, who are requesting for more sustainable solutions, including the use of less toxic materials and virgin materials if recycled alternatives are on offer. “The materials and supply chain is one area of sustainability that has lagged behind. There’s been a lot of focus on energy, water, indoor environment quality, but materials have always been seen

as too hard,” adds David Clark, Director of Cundall Australia. “There are some challenging standards coming from overseas for materials, things like environmental product declarations, and we need to see more of those for materials. “One of the hardest things to get information on is what goes into products, what they are made of, what toxins are in there, where is it sourced from. There’s a whole pile of work that needs to be done on improving the supply chain.” ■


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FLOORING

REMEMBER TO LOOK DOWN IF YOU WANT TO FEEL BETTER [WORDS] GERALDINE CHUA

FLOOR FINISHES AT THE SWAN HILL DISTRICT COMMUNITY REHABILITATION CENTRE BY DWP|SUTERS FEATURE VARYING SLIP RESISTANCE LEVELS AND GRADES THAT PROVIDE A RANGE OF MOBILITY EXPERIENCES AND PRACTICE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PATIENTS, AIDING THEM IN THEIR RECOVERY PROCESS. THEY ALSO SERVE AS WAY-FINDING TOOLS.

F

LOORING IS AN OFTEN FORGOTTEN PART OF THE IDEA THAT DESIGNS HAVE A POSITIVE EFFECT ON A PERSON’S ABILITY TO RECOVER, WITH MANY PRACTICES FOCUSING LARGELY ON SPATIAL RECONFIGURATIONS (TOWARDS MORE INFORMAL AND PERSONALISED SPACES) AND UTILISING MORE WARM AND HOMELY MATERIAL PALETTES INSTEAD. However, the role that flooring finishes and materials play is significant, and their contribution to a centre or facility’s aesthetics is as important as its walls, lights, and furniture. “Flooring contributes to the design of healthcare facilities in a multitude of ways,” notes Angela McGregor, Marketing Communications Manager at Shaw Contract Group. “It contributes aesthetically to the overall look and feel of a facility and its different spaces, and helps provide comfort for those being treated as well as those operating and working within the facility. “Flooring through design also assists with designating areas and provides way-finding within a healthcare facility. In the case of a mental health facility the use of certain colours can guide patients from one area to another calmly. These colours can also be used to designate high traffic and low traffic areas – signifying areas of activity, quiet and stillness.”

According to the Australasian Health Facility Guidelines’ (AusHFG), flooring for healthcare should be ‘fit for performance’ – a concept the 2009 TS7 ‘Floor Coverings in Healthcare Buildings’ defines as covering both the physical and functional performance of the product and design, as well as factors like acoustic control, level of toxicity, colour, texture and comfort. “The use of colour, pattern and texture for practical purposes is particularly relevant in flooring, and is used for the following outcomes,” the Guide says: • maintain appearance and improve service life by reducing the unwanted effects of staining and marking • provide an interior environment that assists the intended outcomes, e.g. healing, ‘home like’, stress reduction. • create designs that identify, unify or separate spaces, and add aesthetic and functional value • serve as a way finding device for general use or for specific user profiles, e.g. patients with dementia. “You could think of the [healthcare] building as a small community with its reception area, staffing areas, treatment areas, food and beverage areas, high care and low care areas,” advises McGregor. “For each of these areas the key considerations

can be broken down into these different categories: • Area function • P atient and visitor safety requirements– slips, trips and falls • The needs of special user groups • A coustic and aesthetic considerations • Infection and odour control • S taff safety – OHS and manual handling • Maintenance “Working through these key considerations for each area will ensure the flooring selected is fit for purpose.”


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FLOORING KEY AESTHETIC CONSIDERATIONS IN SELECTING THE RIGHT FLOORING Looking specifically at how the look of a floor can affect patients, architects and designers must first understand the effect different flooring patterns can have, particularly in mental health or rehabilitation facilities. For instance, high contrast colours combined with strong graphic patterns, may be visually disorienting to some patients, and can create feelings of confusion, unsteadiness or instability. Free-flowing, organic patterns however, may contribute to feelings of well-being and reduce uneasiness. “Colour and pattern selection appropriate for a patient bedroom area or a corridor would be unsuitable for an operating room where sharp visual contrast is required for the rapid identification and recovery of small dropped items, such as micro surgical needles,” the NSW Health guidelines note. “Inappropriate patterning and floor patterns can create a risk for some users by causing disorientation, dizziness or impeding movement and can adversely affect intended outcomes or the tolerance of occupants, to the point of requiring early replacement. The successful use of colour and pattern is a design skill requiring the services of professionals with healthcare experience in collaboration with appropriate

healthcare staff. An unsuccessful design or selection can result in costly and disruptive replacement.” In general, light colours reflect more light, but could deteriorate in appearance more rapidly. Darker colours can absorb downward lighting, while pure or bright colours will show staining more than their duller counterparts. Polyflor’s UK Market Manager, John Mellor, suggests in an opinion piece that using flooring with a matte appearance could cut down on glare. He also says that designers in dementia or aged care environments should stay away from glossy surfaces that could be perceived to be ‘slippery and wet’, which could lead to anxiety and change the gait of patients. Shaw Contract Group’s McGregor adds that carpets can also absorb light, cut down on glare and ease eye stress and patient anxieties, while offering noise reduction. Of course, functionality cannot play second fiddle to aesthetics for flooring, and an understanding of the demands that would be placed on the finishes utilised in a particular environment is just as important. Slip resistance, durability and hygiene are essential qualities in health applications, where flooring must be able to withstand the

push and pull of equipment and soiling without requiring tedious maintenance. What products are to be selected, in what designs, patterns and colours, and at a deeper level, with particular appropriate fire hazard properties, methods of joining, and dirt retention and control, are dictated by a space’s purpose.

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MBMO ARCHITECTS SPECIFIED A MINIMALIST BUT HIGH QUALITY FLOORING PALETTE FOR THE SYDNEY ADVENTIST HOSPITAL. ARMSTRONG’S VINYL FLOORING AND ONTERA CARPETS WERE CHOSEN TO MEET TWO OF THE MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS IN HEALTH PROJECTS: HYGIENE AND EASE OF MAINTENANCE. PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRETT BOARDMAN.


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FLOORING

FOUR FLOORING OPTIONS TO MEET THE NEEDS OF YOUR HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENT

IF YOU WANT TO CREATE A CALMING ENVIRONMENT Collective Time is Shaw Contract Group’s most recent carpet tile and broadloom collection designed specifically for healthcare environments. The collection takes inspiration from the shifting light of day captured from day to night, mimicking the internal clockwork of people’s daily routines of activity and rest with soft fading gradient colours that create a sense of calm and tranquillity in spaces. The design team from Shaw Contract Group was initially intrigued by the body’s circadian rhythm, and tracked their daily

routines, including sleep and wake cycles, with wearable technology. The metrics from this personal data served as inspiration for the range. Each featuring different colours and patterns representing movement or calm, the three carpet tile styles are manufactured with 100 per cent PVC EcoWorx backing, which is bitumen free and has antimicrobial properties, while the two broadloom styles feature a polymer laminated woven secondary backing called Ultraloc. Both use the 100 per cent solution dyed Eco Solution Q Extreme

Nylon as their face fabric, which allows the carpet tiles to have eight times the tear strength, five times the tensile strength and two times the delamination strength of traditional tile backing. Collective Time is Cradle-toCradle Silver certified, completely recyclable and made with recycled content. It was awarded a Green Star ‘Level A’ product rating, and is backed by a lifetime warranty protecting against abrasive wear, static build-up, tuft bind, edge ravel and delamination.

IF YOU NEED FLOORS TO WITHSTAND THE RIGOURS OF FREQUENT CLEANING Brintons Healthcare carpets are said to “offer a wealth of benefits” for end users, but one of their key highlights include an impervious backing, which is part of the manufacturing process and not “glued on as an afterthought”. Designed for areas that see frequent spills from coffee cups to other bodily fluids, the impervious back provides a watertight permeability to prevent liquid ingress, and has been tested to withstand the rigours of the British Spill Test. This means that when accidents happen, spills can be contained and easily cleaned, with nothing passing through into the building fabric. It also means that regular wet cleaning is possible, although Brintons recommends

supplementing it with the use of Solution Dyed Nylon, found in its Vital range – a 100 per cent Solution Dyed Nylon woven Axminster collection that is a synthetic alternative to the company’s wool blend carpets. Vital also comes with sanitised antimicrobial treatment, which protects floors against bacterial and fungal growth with the active biocidal substances, benzisothiazolinone / octylisothiazolinone / permethrin.


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FLOORING IF YOU NEED GREAT SLIP RESISTANCE Polysafe Verona PUR is the latest carborundum-free safety flooring collection from Polyflor, which has been built around a colour palette that mixes subtle pastel shades with bolder statement colours to create distinctive designs for front or back of house spaces. The mix of strong and light hues can be mixed and matched in tonal combinations, with accent colours used to create borders or demarcations between rooms to aid the visually impaired. Suitable for use in showcase areas or traditional safety floor locations where wet spillages or trafficked moisture are found, the vinyl flooring product incorporates non-intrusive coloured quartz and natural recycled aggregates for improved traction. It achieves 36+ on the Pendulum Wet Test, an R10 according to AS/NZS 4586, has a surface roughness of Rz ≥20μm and meets the EN 13845 50,000 cycles abrasion test. The 100 per cent recyclable product (via the Recofloor scheme) features the Polysafe PUR reinforcement – a cross-linked and UV cured maintenance enhancement that allows for maximum appearance retention. Verona has also achieved a GreenTag Level A Silver certification.

GREAT FLOOR DESIGNS, SUPERIOR QUALITY Premium Floors has the largest stocked range of hard flooring in Australia as well as a full design service for non-standard requirements. Present in every mainland state of Australia, Premium Floors are national market leaders in Timber, Laminate, Cork and Bamboo flooring and offer the full package for all flooring sold. As the experts in their field and with a rich 34 year history of well supported, quality products in Australia, Premium Floors continue to develop their range and drive innovation into the Australian hard flooring market. Contact us at commercial@premiumfloors.com.au Phone number 03 9798 0808 www.premiumfloors.com.au, www.quick-step.com.au


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FLOORING IF YOU NEED TO MEET A TIGHT TIME AND COST BUDGET Altro has announced the release of “the world’s first ever adhesive-free safety floor”, the Altro XpressLay, which is installed using a tape system instead of an adhesive. This means the product can be installed without a surface DPM. Easily removed post-installation and re-used elsewhere, or recycled at the end of its life, the Altro LooseLay double-sided tape is supplied free of charge with the XpressLay, and formulated to work with the underside of the flooring. It can be applied on a new concrete floor, existing tiles and flaky paint, and used where traditional adhered safety flooring is inappropriate, such as in listed or temporary buildings.

specify.caroma.com.au

The product can be straight laid or self-coved, and installed over existing sound and secure flooring surfaces such as vinyl tiles. There is no wait time for the adhesive to ‘cure’ – builders are promised “same day welding” while underfloor heating can be kept on during installation. ■

design

At Caroma, our local team of designers give careful consideration to the needs of all Australians. Caroma bathrooms are beautiful to look at, brilliantly efficient and a pleasure to use. As our country’s tastes have evolved, so too have our designs. As a result, we’ve set trends and celebrated a range of national and international accolades, including the 2014 Good Design of the Year Award, in partnership with Marc Newson.

#inspiringbathrooms


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A-1097-0315

SOLUTION FOR

LATICRETE Pty Ltd 29 Telford Street, Virginia, QLD 4014 1800 331 012 www.laticrete.com.au ©2015 LATICRETE Pty Ltd. All trademarks shown are the intellectual properties of their respective owners.

THE

Façades

Al Hamra Tower, Kuwait City, Kuwait

Proven Products Around the Globe Snap for more information.

For nearly 60 years architects, engineers and contractors across the globe have relied on the proven performance of LATICRETE systems, technology, warranties and technical support to ensure the tile and stone work on their projects are a success. Contact us regarding your next project.

Part of a total Tile and Stone Installation Materials System covered by a comprehensive System Warranty.

www.laticrete.com.au

l

1800 331 012


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ADVERTISING FEATURE – SAS INTERNATIONAL


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manufacturing world-class interiors

For over 45 years, SAS International has been trusted worldwide to deliver long-term value. For more information on our comprehensive range of performance and design led systems, please contact us. www.sasint.com.au

+61 (02) 8823 0000

enquiries@sasint.com.au


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ROOFING

SEVEN INTERESTING ROOF DESIGNS AND THEIR MATERIALS [WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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OOFS DO MORE THAN JUST PROTECT WHAT LIES (AND LIVES) UNDERNEATH; THEY ALSO PLAY AN INTEGRAL ROLE IN THE FUNCTIONALITY OF A BUILDING AND HAVE VAST POTENTIAL AS A SPACE FOR ARCHITECTURAL EXPRESSION.

Roofs can hide plant rooms, support photovoltaic arrays and solar evacuated tubes, capture rainwater and wind, house gardens, direct natural light and also provide a level of insulation for a building—just to name a few. But while a roof is the second largest element of a building’s façade, it can be overlooked as a space for design creativity, particularly when compared to a building’s exterior walls. One reason for this is that roofs with multiple peaks, varying and steep pitch lines and unique shapes come at a cost, and can also necessitate the involvement of one or more special contractors. But that’s not to say that Australian building designers aren’t experimenting with roofing design, and while some are turning to new and innovative technologies to take their roofs to new heights, others are simply using traditional materials in new and interesting ways. The designers responsible for the projects that follow have chosen both their roofing materials and profile for more than just their protective function. Each roof has a specific purpose and was designed to complement, improve or lead the entire project outcome. Read on to see why the architects chose them:

1. FOR LIGHT: 50 MARTIN PLACE BY JOHNSON PILTON WALKER ARCHITECTS

ALL PROJECTS EXCEPT FOR THE PANTANASSA MONASTERY WERE ENTERED IN THE AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS NATIONAL ARCHITECTURE AWARDS AND THE PHOTOS WERE SUPPLIED BY THE INSTITUTE.

Product: China Southern Glass tripleglazed units with an interlayer of expanded aluminium mesh. Why: The new three storey glass dome on the roof of 50 Martin Place is more a fifth façade than a roof. It allows high levels of natural light to penetrate deep into the building’s

atrium and interior spaces that were previously trapped inside the building’s claustrophobic exterior envelope. The dome now features light-filled conference facilities, client meeting space and terraces overlooking Sydney’s busy Martin Place. Photography by Brett Boardman


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ROOFING

2. FOR HISTORY: PANTANASSA MONASTERY BY DESIGN DELTA ARCHITECTS Product: ‘Roja La Escandella Curvado’ tiles available at Bristile Roofing Why: The Pantanassa Monastery at Mangrove Mountain, about 90 minutes north of Sydney, is Australia’s first Greek Orthodox monastery produced in the ancient Byzantine style. The whole church is a concrete shell and all the three dimensional shapes such as the domes and cross vaults were formed in either Styrofoam or sheet steel. The Styrofoam moulds were created by a Newcastle boat builder and coated in fibreglass to resist the impact of the concrete and surface deformation when it was poured on top. The sheet steel was used to form simple shapes such as a half cylinder as it was cheaper and easy enough to manipulate. Terracotta half barrel tiles were then laid in an overlapping fashion and fixed on a wet bed of flexible mortar to avoid interior water ingress and resistance to mortar cracking.

3. FOR DIRECTIONAL LIGHT: ST BARNABAS ▲ BY FRANCIS-JONES MOREHEN THORP Product: Curved Fielders Kingklip Why: The architects chose the curving trapezoidal roof form at St Barnabas to separate the different planes and purposes of the building, and provide different types of natural light to those spaces. The worship space at the back of the site faces north and is provided with diffuse light by sun catchers in its façade. The smaller curve in St Barnabas’ roof signals the centre of the building which is an intermediating space for the public and worship spheres. The light is directional and captured by a glazed crucifix under the curved form. Photography by John Gollings

4. FOR SHELTER (OR NOT FOR SHELTER) MARGARET COURT ARENA BY NH ARCHITECTURE IN ASSOCIATION WITH POPULOUS ▲ Product: Lysaght’s Colorbond KLIPLOK 700 HI-STRENGTH Why: The new $366 million retractable roof at Melbourne’s Margaret Court Arena (MCA) is the fastest to close in Australia. It comprises a series of Colorbond Metallic steel gable roofs in a vibrant ‘Copper Penny’ colour that was chosen to reflect some of the traditional elements of Melbourne architecture, particularly the sandstone, zinc and copper of buildings along the Yarra River. The roof is a unique system which sees

only two downturned operable trusses, spanning the width of the MCA (on each end), supporting the bulk of the operable roof. Each truss is connected to a 57m x 32m operable lateral panel which is joined to seven adjacent gable roofs sections that make up the bulk of the MCA roof. The whole structure is driven by drive bogies and has a tiny straight-line dimension of 1.25 m between the top of the operable roof panel and the top of the fixed roof. Photography by John Gollings


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5. FOR ENDURING REFERENCE: SHOALHAVEN CANCER CENTRE BY HASSELL Product: Aramax roofing Why: HASSELL actively sought building components that reflected the landscape for the Shoalhaven Cancer Centre, but budget constraints forced the architects to look at inexpensive materials that could be used in an interesting way. “External and internal materials are cost driven and the use of native timber, concrete, untreated galvanised steel and Aramax roofing blur the boundaries between the indoor clinical and respite areas and the Centre’s bushland setting,” said the architects. Photography by Michael Nicholson

6. FOR HARVESTING RAIN: CLUB MAITLAND CITY BY TERROIR ARCHITECTS ▲ Product: Lysaght’s Colorbond KLIP-LOK 700 HI-STRENGTH Why: Key to Terroir’s sustainability strategy at Club Maitland City was the new roof that worked as a ‘sustainability backpack’, providing rainwater harvesting, solar protection and containing new spaces and new services integrated with the residual building shell below. Colorbond® steel and Zincalume® steel products are suitable for rainwater harvesting, and are independently tested to AS/NZS 4020:2005 “Products for use in contact with drinking water”. The 5,000sqm of roof sheeting have a completely concealed fixing and the depth of the trays means it can deal with cross falls that the roofscape design generates. KLIP-LOK fixing system allows roof sheets to be removed and replaced if future works below the roof are required. Photography by Brett Boardman

7. FOR ART: PORT MELBOURNE TOWNHOUSES BY DUCKBUILD Product: Colorbond Trimdeck in Woodland Grey and CSR Cemintel Barestone Cement Sheeting Why: The townhouses were an open canvas for Duckbuild who combined CAD software and solar modelling with their own artistic flair to create what

might be one of the most interesting new residences of the year. The material choice kept prices down while the angles and planes of the extruded boxes and sun shading portals gave the residence its uniqueness. Photography by Michelle Williams


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TIMBER VISION AWARDS 2015

Is your timber project distinctive by design?

2014 Commercial Interior Winner Nishi by March Studio Photograph by John Gollings

The 2015 Intergrain Timber Vision Awards are open for entry. The Intergrain Timber Vision Awards are back in 2015, inviting design professionals to showcase their visionary use of timber in residential, commercial and landscape design projects.

Commercial Exterior, and for the first time for ITVA, Public Space and Young Architect.

This year’s entries will be judged by a prestigious industry audience over six categories, including: Residential Interior, Residential Exterior, Commercial Interior,

There are a number of prizes on offer, with $2,000 + 100L of Intergrain product for category winners. The process is easy, and there is no entry fee.

For your chance to win, simply submit 3-5 images and a brief description of your project.

Entries are open from 7 April 2015 and close 30 June 2015. For further information, visit www.intergrain.com.au


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HEATING

SUSTAINABLY WARM: HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING IN FOCUS [WORDS] NATHAN JOHNSON

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NE TYPE OF FLOOR HEATING SEEING INCREASING USE IN AUSTRALIAN BUILDINGS IS THE HYDRONIC SYSTEM, WHICH PROVIDES RADIANT HEAT TO A ROOM BY PASSING TEMPERED WATER THROUGH PIPES CIRCULATING WITHIN THE FLOOR SLAB, A TOPPING SCREED OR BELOW THE FLOOR.

The water is warmed by a heat source to around 40-55ºC and pumped at low pressure throughout the pipes to keep the floor at a comfortable temperature of between 22- 30ºC. A thermostat tells the heat source and pump when to work and a manifold directs water to different piping circuits situated throughout a building. Hydronic heated floors offer benefits beyond foot comfort. They keep entry and bathroom floors dry, are completely silent, can reduce heating bills and are an allergen free type of heating—a relief for Asthma and allergy sufferers. Beyond the radiant heat provided by floor heating, a floor heating system also works on the principle of convection, meaning natural air circulation will force warm air up from the floor to the rest of the room. Having your floor heated can also eliminate it as one of the major sources for heat loss in a building and can reduce the reliance on other convection style heating. KEY COMPONENTS OF A HYDRONIC HEATING SYSTEM

THE HEAT SOURCE A major benefit of hydronic heating, and one of the main reasons that it is seeing an increasing specification in Australian buildings, is that the heat sources used to warm the water can be powered by energy efficient and environmental means such as natural gas and LPG, heat and geo-exchange pumps, solar evacuated tubes and even wood stoves. The type and amount of heat energy required by a heat source is determined by the size, location and insulation performance of the space to be heated, and should be a project-specific calculation.

TASMANIA’S CORE COLLECTIVE ARCHITECTS USED AN IN SCREED SYSTEM AT THEIR PRESS HALL IN HOBART. THE ARCHITECTS ADDED AN INSULATING LAYER, A NETWORK OF HYDRONIC PIPES FROM REHAU AND A 90MM CONCRETE TOPPING SCREED. PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUKE BURGESS.

FOR IN SCREED APPLICATIONS AN INSULATING LAYER AND THE HEATING PIPE IS PLACE ON TOP OF THE FINISHED SLAB AND IS COVERED IN A MINIMUM OF 30MM OF CONCRETE (THEREFORE A MINIMUM SCREED DEPTH OF 50MM). IMAGE: COMFORT HEAT AUSTRALIA.


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2015-05-11T15:19:10+10:00 5MAT12973_AirHasEvolved__AUSTRALIANPUB__Trim:235mmx297mm__Bleed: +5mm__CMYK

AIR: REINVENTED Introducing AirVolution-D by MacroAir, the worlds most advanced High Volume Low Speed Fans. Blades up to 7.2 metres in diameter are propelled silently and intelligently by ultra-efficient DC motors. The simple genius of a MacroAir fan can be seen in the aerodynamic blade design driven by a sleek, gearless drive system. The result is outstanding performance with air movement of up to 9,800 cubic metres per minute for as little as 35 cents per hour in electricity costs*. These functionally elegant, minimalist design fans lower effective temperature as much as 6° Celsius by creating a gentle and efficient airflow in virtually any space. AirVolution-D is the perfect comfort solution where energy intensive air conditioning is simply not a viable option. To discover the full story on AirVolution-D, visit macroair.com.au or phone 1300 733 833

Š 2015 MacroAir Technologies, Inc. 1995 - 2015 All Rights Reserved. MacroAir fans are distributed in Australia and New Zealand by Pacific HVAC Engineering. 2/63 Wells Road, Chelsea Heights, Victoria, 3196. Phone: 1300 733 833. Email: info@pacifichvac.com. www.pacifichvac.com * Based on AirVolution-D model MA24XL7806 7.2m diameter fan operating at full speed with an electricity tariff of 22 cents per kW Hour.


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HEATING GEO EXCHANGE A geoexchange system comprises an earth pipe loop and a ground source heat pump. The loops are constructed of Polyethylene

(PE) pipe in a vertical (borehole) or horizontal (trench) configuration and use water as the heat transfer fluid. Water is pumped through the

ground-loop, extracting heat from the earth or a body of water, before it is distributed throughout the flooring pipes to heat the floor. COX ARCHITECTURE’S SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS RESEARCH CENTRE (SBRC) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG USES A GEO SOURCE HEAT EXCHANGER THAT FEEDS GROUND TEMPERED WATER INTO THE BUILDING’S IN-SLAB HYDRONIC SYSTEM. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GOLLINGS

KEY CONSIDERATIONS FOR HYDRONIC HEATING COURTESY OF THE CEMENT & CONCRETE ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALIA 1 The Australian Standard AS 2870 Residential slabs and footings —Construction states that when hydronic pipes are embedded in the slab, slab thickness must increase to at least 125mm and reinforcement mesh must be increased by one level, such as from SL72 to SL82 mesh. 2 For suspended slabs where the underside of the slab is exposed to an unheated area, the underside should be insulated with a 25mm-thick layer of polystyrene or equivalent insulation to avoid heat loss through the underside of the slab. 3 Solid wood floors can go over a heated slab but will dry and shrink when heated, so the moisture content of the wood should be tested before specifying a type of floor heating.

COX CHOSE BOTH A VERTICAL BOREHOLE AND HORIZONTAL PIT LOOP (PICTURED) TO TEST THE EFFICIENCIES OF THE SYSTEMS. THE ENVISION® SERIES NSKW FROM GEO EXCHANGE AUSTRALIA.

4 A good quality (minimum 200 micron) vapour barrier should be laid under the slab on a 50mm sand bed.

6 WONDERS OF HIGH GRADE ANODISING Refer: Anodising White Paper on AAF website ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY Independent sustainability analysis confirms the significant environmental advantage of anodising. Powder coatings principally embody large petro-chemically based products and polymers. Refer KMH Sustainability Report at the AAF website. NATURAL BEAUTY AND LUSTRE Anodising is the transformation of the aluminium itself into a natural metallic finish. In modern building design anodising complements and blends with other natural building materials. DURABILITY In everyday use we touch anodised products such as iPhones and kitchenware. With hardness comes durability, and Evershield High Grade anodising rates 9 on MOHS scale of hardness. The iconic Australian buildings, such as AMP Circular Quay, where the anodising finish has now exceeded 50 years and still in great condition. LUSTRES AAF’s Evershield new colour range includes “Illustro” series. A unique mid-range lustre providing a silky feel, touch and look. Anodising bright finishes provide exceptional gloss readings. EDGE-COVER In the paint/powder industry “edge pull” refers to pulling back from edges leaving lower film builds creating weak points. In Anodising’s immersion process, and with over 20 times the etching rate, the process converts edges into anodic film. Ideal for perforations, punching or indeed any aluminium extrusion. SEA - SIDE PROTECTION Extensive use of anodised aluminium in the boating industry demonstrates the proven durability and suitability of Evershield High Grade anodising for architectural seaside locations

AAF: With Anodising and Powder Coating facilities located in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, AAF is the largest anodiser and powder coater in Australia. AAF provides the technical support, service and quality to back up warranties and the full range of quality finishes.

Architectural representatives 0411 746 700 or 0413 055 070

www.aafonline.com.au Ph:1300 1300 40


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HEATING GAS Gas is the most popular, easiest and most cost effective installation option for hydronic floor heating and can be installed when space is limited. Most gas packaged boilers come with an inbuilt pump, expansion tank, safety valves and temperature controls. Natural gas is much more cost effective to run than LPG and new condensing technology is seeing gas hydronic heating systems become even more efficient and better for the environment. Condensing boilers work by recovering as much of the waste heat that is normally rejected to the atmosphere from the flue of a conventional (non-condensing) boiler as possible. This is accomplished by using an extra-large heat exchanger or sometimes two heat exchangers within the boiler. By doing this, the flue gases emit 90 per cent less CO and 80 per cent less NOx (acid rain) compared to conventional boilers.

BOSCH BOILERS ARE COMMONLY USED THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA FOR HYDRONIC FLOOR HEATING. HERE CORE COLLECTIVE ARCHITECTS USED A BOSCH BOILER AS A HEAT SOURCE FOR THEIR IN-SCREED HYDRONIC SYSTEM AT THE PRESS HALL, HOBART. PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER WHYTE


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HEATING WOOD FIRE As the name suggests, the heat exchange process in a wood fired system comes from the burning of wood in a stove which is fitted with an inbuilt water jacket or ‘wet back’. The water in the jacket is warmed and then pumped throughout the floor when it is at a steady 45 ºC. Because of their nature, wood fired systems take longer to get the water temperature suitable for heating. They can also experience some issues if the thermostat is not properly installed and water is returning to the boiler to cold.

‘HOUSE FOR BOB AND SUSAN’ BY AUSTIN MCFARLAND ARCHITECTS USES A WOOD FIRED WETBACK HEAT SOURCE FOR THE HYDRONIC IN-FLOOR HEATING. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALEC HAMILTON.

Bosch Hydronic Heating Network Specialists who can provide comfortable, healthy and efficient heating for Australian homes. VICTORIA

NEW SOUTH WALES

Foster Heating Pty. Ltd. T 03 9988 1261 W hydronic.com.au

Comfort Heat Australia T 02 9119 7450 W comfortheat.com.au

Hydrotherm Australia T 03 9998 2210 W hydrotherm.com.au Nissl Eichert Heating T 03 9988 9188 W nissleichertheating.com.au SOUTH AUSTRALIA Eckermann Heating & Cooling T 08 7007 0752 W hydronicunderfloor.com.au AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY Canberra Hydronic T 0411 021 353 W canberrahydronicheating.com.au

Smart Heat T 02 9119 7460 W smartheat.com.au TASMANIA Central Heat T 03 6266 4445 W centralheat.com.au

SOLAR EVACUATED TUBES Solar evacuated tubes have come to the Australian market and are replacing flat plate collectors as they are more efficient in cloudy and cold conditions. The system consists of lines (usually between eight and 12) of double glass tubes filled with water that are oriented to absorb the sun’s solar radiation. Once the water is warm enough,

it is sent down to a heat exchange tank and then out into the hydronic heating circuit. Because the output of solar is unregulated a solar evacuated tube system requires a suitably large storage tank and is generally used in conjunction with a backup boiler that is automatically turned on when the water needs a heating boost.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA Enviro Plumb Pty Ltd T 08 6500 0645 W enviroplumb.com.au

Bosch has established a network of preferred Hydronic Heating Specialists in Australia. An accredited “Bosch Hydronic Specialist“ has the required knowledge and expertise to optimally design, install, and service hydronic heating systems incorporating Bosch hydronic boilers and accessories.

THE APRICUS EVACUATED TUBE COLLECTOR IS AVAILABLE AT GIPPSLAND SOLAR.


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Exclusive State Agents Required for Leading Edge Aluminium Composite Panel ; Architectural Facades. National Resources Pty Ltd are the exclusive Australian Distributors for this range of high quality, sustainable architectural products, installed on landmark commercial, civic and private developments around the world. ALMAXCO manufacture state-of-the-art aluminium composite panels (ACP), which are currently supplied to 35 countries. Almaxco already has a proven track record, here in Australia, but we are looking to expand our market footprint further. National Resources seeks to identify exclusive State Agents, that have an experienced sales force, and a history of involvement with architects, property developers, building practitioners and product specifiers. The following support will be offered to successful agents:  National Resources will centrally warehouse a local stock holding of major colours and sheet sizes, and offer tailored payment terms to support growth strategies.  National Resources and Almaxco will commit considerable resources to training each exclusive state agent. Almaxco products are leading edge and offer several advantages in their architectural panel product range:  Almaxco ACP offers a range of cores, including the option of Australian Standard AS/NZ 1530.1; CSIRO approved non combustible fire rating.  Almaxco ACP offers class leading warranties for the Australian market.  Almaxco ACP offers the option of Nano – Self Cleaning/ Anti-Graffiti Technology.  Almaxco ACP offers a fantastic value proposition against established competitors.  Almaxco ACP offers shorter project lead times , with ex factory or custom made sizes and colours delivered to site within 10 weeks from order, subject to client’s size/colour/alloy/core specification. To register your interest, please contact: Leon Cox, Managing Director, National Resources Pty Ltd. Email: natres@nationalresources.com.au Initial submissions should outline experience and capability to assume the role of an exclusive State Agency for this market sector and product category. Additional information can be obtained by telephoning 03 9708 2595 if required.


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SUSTAINABILITY

AUSTRALIAN BUILDING PRODUCTS RETHINK TANK – NEW BOOK AND SHOW [WORDS] WARREN MCLAREN

A MIND NEEDS BOOKS AS A SWORD NEEDS A WHETSTONE, IF IT IS TO KEEP ITS EDGE.” GEORGE MARTIN, AUTHOR, ‘GAME OF THRONES’.

If this is true, Australia has long strived to maintain its edge in green architectural design, evidenced by the seminal books we’ve published on the topic. Think of Alistair Knox’s 1952 tome, Building Your House of Earth, which inspired generations of environmentally conscious owner builders. In 1979 Szololay & Sale explored both passive and active solar design in The Australian and New Zealand Solar Home Book— A Practical Guide. The 90’s were a boom period for home-grown green design publications. In 1991 it was Australian Earth-Covered Building, by Sydney and Joan Baggs, with son David (now Technical Director of EcoSpecifier). 1995 saw the Royal Australia Institute of Architects produce their Environmental Design Guide, an exhaustive collective of succinct expert treatises, later adopted as a project of the Australian Council of Building Design Professionals. Hitting bookshops the same year was Nick Hollo’s Warm House Cool House: Inspirational Designs for Low-energy Housing (now in a second edition). For many years the definite work on embodied energy and life cycle assessment was 1996’s Building Materials Energy and the Environment ~ Towards Ecologically Sustainable Development by Bill Lawson. The Centre for Design at RMIT published A Guide to EcoReDesign—Improving the environmental performance of manufactured products. Then Michael Mobbs came along with his personal tale, Sustainable House, first published in 1998, quickly attaining consumers association CHOICE’s bestselling book status. In 2001 the Australian Government, ably aided by University of Technology Sydney’s Institute of Sustainable Futures, developed Your Home, a comprehensive guide to environmentally sustainable homes, now into its fifth edition. “And we could go on. But you get the picture.” As BPN stands for Building Products News, it should come as no surprise that we spend a bit of time obsessing about materials. Passive design, universal design, adaptive design, cradle to cradle design and their brethren are all just theoretical ideas. To make them work in the real world you have build something and make things using materials. Of course the selection of those materials and how they are used has a massive impact on the sustainability, or otherwise, of the final structure. So of course we are enthused that a new Australia book has joined the aforementioned illustrious ranks. How to Rethink Building Materials— Creating ecological housing for the

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designer, building and homeowner. Released last year, is a book edited by Dick Clarke, principal of Envirotecture, and the Building Designers Australia’s Director of Sustainability. With 40 years in the arena of eco-design, Dick has rubbed shoulders with all the leading lights of his speciality. In Rethink he has gathered together their collective wisdom in one place. This cadre of Australia’s green architecture crack troops, (a reThink Tank, if you will), are given a print forum to espouse their ideologies of choice. Don’t think these are dry academic treatises. Sure, there is a healthy smattering of essays laden with statistics, graphs and acronyms, but these are slotted in around other more narrative pieces. Some authors represent the views of their specific industry, association, or business, while others relay the personal experience gained from decades in the trenches. This collection of diverse views won’t necessarily clarify issues for the building neophyte, but it does

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SUSTAINABILITY

bring together thinking right across the gamut. For example, the Engineering Manager for Brickworks cites ten years’ worth of research indicating, “Reverse brick veneer is not the holy grail and the insulated cavity brick still performs better”. Yet later on, in a different article, Think Brick Australia note that an eight year study “concluded that a reverse brick veneer walling systems offers the least energy consumption and indoor temperature fluctuations in all of the hypothetical modules.” Or juxtapose this statement: “The building industry has, at times, been too quick to change— pursuing short-term gains without addressing the risks: the proliferation of asbestos, [… etc],” with the two included articles from James Hardie Industries, who were one of our core miners and manufacturers of asbestos building products. It is clear that How to Rethink Building Materials is more than comfortable with the contra views found between its pages. Dick Clarke even alludes to this aspect himself, musing over whether the book is “a collection of wild cats in a paper bag—disparate and contested ideas fighting to be proven?” The title is, after all, Rethink, not Accept. The cornucopia of thoughts gathered in this book provides the reader with plenty of food for thought. The status quo is both defended, and challenged. While it might be ‘nice’ to think there is some easy answer to the question of how to build sustainably, the reality is there are many grey areas to selecting green solutions. It could be argued that this is indeed How to Rethink Building Materials’ central strength. It presents the latest reasoning across a broad spectrum and leaves the reader to arrive at the conclusions which make the most sense to them. Hopefully this is a book that sets readers off on their own journey of discovery, or as Henry Thoreau put it to: “be a Columbus to whole new continents and worlds within you, opening new channels, not of trade, but of thought. For all their colossal worth, books are static things. A frozen moment, a time capsule. For those of a scientific bent, even a proven fact is like an Olympian athlete, soon to be displaced from the podium by the next better fact to come along. One example is, BioBuild, a European Commission funded project to investigate the use of biocomposite materials to reduce the embodied energy in building components which can be used to replace aluminium, steel, brick and concrete. Materials have included hemp and jute, with Arup and GXN winning a 2015 European Innovation Award for their flax-based façade panels. So maybe one could think of Rethink Building Materials not so much as a treasure chest of green building gems (although it is that too) but more as a key. One that opens minds, and ongoing future discussions. Take, for example, the inaugural SEE Sustainable Experience, billed as Australia’s Dedicated

1. How to Rethink Building Materials encourages the use of rammed earth walls because they are cheap, require little transport in the way of building materials and can produce comfortable indoor conditions.

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Sustainable Building Show touching down at Brisbane’s Showgrounds during 18-20 June 2015. It could be seen as an updated dynamic version of this book. Exhibitors at SEE will include the likes of Brickworks Building Products, CSR, James Hardie, Kingspan and Weathertex, who, not surprisingly, are also among the 13 showcased product profiles contained in Rethink Building Materials. The book’s target audience of designers, builders and home owners can use it to bone up on the best current thinking, and then suitably educated, approach such materials suppliers, to get the good oil— direct from the horse’s mouth. Not only will the SEE Sustainable Experience provide ready access to manufacturers and distributors, it will do likewise for architects and designers. The Australian Technology Association (ATA), publishers of Renew and Sanctuary magazines, will roll out a Brisbane version of their Speed Date a Sustainable Designer project. Homeowners can sit down with “skilled architects, building designers, builders and consultants” and unfurl their physical plans, or cerebral visions, to garner feedback on whether they are heading in a green direction. Or not. Again the SEE Sustainable Experience can be seen as a living, breathing version of the book, in which eight design practitioners discuss real world projects. Homes that have employed the likes of: bamboo flooring, re-used bricks, low VOC paints and oils, rammed earth, fly ash cement and mortar, hydronic floor heating, FSC certified timber, green roofs, strawbales, double glazed windows and doors, and so forth.

2. How to Rethink Building Materials by Dick Clarke.

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For all the deep discussion points raised in the book, it is not hard to digest. The topics are mostly broken into bite-sized, two page morsels. The design is attractive and visually rich, encouraging readers to dip in and out. Hopefully this will help it engage those contemplating more sustainable housing, and thus contribute to raising the calibre of debate in this hugely important sphere of design. It seems incumbent on book reviewers to find a tome’s achilles’ heel. There is a very comprehensive contents page, but alas no index, which is a let-down, in a world accustomed to Google searches. For example, the book contains a useful discussion on Phase Change Materials (PCMs), which were the subject of a recent BPN|Infolink feature article, but you’re left to fossick among the 186 pages to find it. Although How to Rethink Building Materials does redeem itself, by concluding with a ready reckoner A-Z of building materials, briefly describing their respective environmental impacts. I did have a pithy conclusion all typed up, but deleted it in favour of Groucho Marx’s wonderful summation of books. “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.” ■

3. INEX >RENDERBOARD wall systems are a low carbon fibre reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC).

4. BIO BioPCM’s phase change products are created with the waste product derived from the manufacturing process of soy, palm and coconut oil. These are then blended with a nano scale thickening agent made of spherical bits of silica to make a gel, which is contained within a multitude of pockets in a flexible roll of plastic film. This allows BioPCM to be easily installed in new structures, but also by home owners as a retrofit.


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

GET THE INFORMATION YOU NEED AUSTRALIA’S LEADING SOURCE OF NEW & EXCITING BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS

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Caroma introduces its first thermostatic mixing valve

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Light-weight Maxi Beams are all the rage

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AM-BOSS Access Ladders & Fall Protection Systems STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

CAROMA INTRODUCES THEIR FIRST THERMOSTATIC MIXING VALVE The new high performance Caroma Thermostatic Mixing Valve (TMV20), designed to comply with AS4032.1 offers the ideal solution for healthcare and commercial applications. Caroma’s TMV20 can service multiple outlets simultaneously, safely supplying 42L/min of mixed water to plus or minus 2˚Celcius within a range of inlet pressures and temperatures. It offers protection against scalding by providing a rapid shut-down of mixed water flow from the outlet. For ease of maintenance, Caroma offers the capability to replace the Thermostatic Cartridge as a complete, integrated unit. This unique cartridge design allows for quick and simple onsite servicing which will minimise disruption to the facility and save time.

water. The core range consists of four boxed configurations which allows maximum flexibility and speed during installation. Supported by a comprehensive spare parts offer, Caroma TMV20 ensures quick and easy maintenance providing a total solutions package. A complete stainless steel housing unit is available with either a removable lockable hinged door or removable lockable cover panel, suitable for either a concealed or exposed wall mounting. Discover more at specify.caroma.com.au

The valve also features an antiscaling coating which is applied to all brass components within the cartridge for durability in hard

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES AM-BOSS ACCESS LADDERS & FALL PROTECTION SYSTEMS AM-BOSS Access Ladders are installed in all types of buildings: government, factories, hospitals, domestic, new and existing. The AM-BOSS system is the ideal way to create safe access to the ceiling space for a storage facility, or access to plant room and rooftop access. AM-BOSS raised the standard of workplace safety by being the first pull-down access ladder to comply with the Building Code of Australia (BCA) and are CodeMark Certified. AM-BOSS pioneered installations of access ladders into suspended ceilings and we manufacture, supply and/or install to suit each individual environment.

AM-BOSS Access Ladders Pty Ltd provides superior customer service through the manufacture, supply and installation of quality products. The company’s philosophy of providing consistent product quality and adhering to agreed customer service levels, has resulted in its continuing success, and helped establish AM-BOSS as a leader in the commercial, industrial and domestic industries. AM-BOSS Access Ladders Pty Ltd is totally committed to understanding and meeting the quality needs and expectations of all our customers.

AM-BOSS also offers a pull-down access ladder that is Fire-Rated to AS1530.4-2005 with a -/90/90 rating. We supply and install Fall Arrest Systems, Anchor Points, Walkways, Guardrailing, Fixed Access Ladders, etc.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

ANOTHER BRIGHT IDEA FROM HÄFELE LOOX LED LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY Decorative illumination has the power to transform any residential or commercial building. It accentuates architecture, adds mood and can be as important as any significant furniture piece. Häfele understands the importance of lighting and with LOOX – the innovative plug and play LED furniture light system, selecting the perfect illumination has never been easier. The product of several years of Häfele engineering and development, LOOX is being used by furniture manufacturers and designers around the globe to set their designs apart. Our motto is “plug and play”. LOOX has a driver with an integrated switching function that makes a direct connection to your most frequently used switches such as push switches; sensor switches; dimmer switches and motion detectors. LOOX gives you a beautiful lighting solution that’s future-proof and guaranteed to the highest safety standards. To shine a light on the LOOX product range and hundreds more of our brightest lighting ideas, visit a Häfele showroom in your state or download the latest LOOX catalogue from www.hafele.com.au today.

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES ECOPLY BRINGS LIGHT TO JURY CAFÉ’S DARK PAST Jean-Pierre Biasol has brought Jury Café, located within the bluestone walls of the former Pentridge prison, to life through the clever application of ply including ECOply® by Carter Holt Harvey. The sombre history of the site prompted Biasol from Biasol: Design Studio to develop a light and playful look. Plywood is used consistently throughout floor areas, walls, sub-frames, joinery, tables, chairs, planter boxes, even menu frames. ECOply CD Grade has been used across the back wall cabinetry where the grainy texture adds warmth and movement in contrast to the pale grey concrete expressed on the adjoining wall. The natural timber appearance of ECOply helps create a fresh, organic look at Jury Café and the small, intergrown knots that feature in the CD Surface Grade enhances its natural form. Known for its strength and durability, ECOply is also surprisingly easy to handle and use in a variety of applications. It has been a popular choice not only in eateries like Jury Café but in office fi t-outs, apartments and homes particularly for

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joinery, interior lining, sheathing, bracing and soffi ts. Sustainability also makes plywood a popular choice. ECOply is locally made from renewable, plantation grown pine and is

available AFS and FSC® certified on request. For designers looking for sustainability, workability and affordability the jury is unanimous: ECOply is a smart design choice. Photographer: Martina Gemmola

ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

THE ADVANTAGE OF AN AUSTRALIAN MADE CEMENT AND DRY MIX PRODUCTS Demand continues to grow for residential and commercial development in this country and the need for trades to compete and win business in this competitive area is more important than ever. Cement and dry mix products like concrete mix, render or mortar feature heavily in these projects. An important aspect of their use is to ensure that the products will stand up to the tests of quality and convenience – with these leading to job satisfaction, improved profit and reduced construction time. Good quality jobs also ensure positive referrals and repeat business. Using cheaper products from uncertain or off-shore origins or ‘home brand’ products may come under consideration when bidding for a contract. There is some risk that these products may not perform satisfactorily to meet the job specifications, or worse, may fail after the job is completed.

support local communities through providing direct and indirect employment opportunities. Cement Australia’s packaged products are produced its own manufacturing facilities using the same high quality ingredients required by our bulk customers who supply products for use in major infrastructure, large commercial building projects and some of the nation’s largest mines. Cement Australia’s packaged products also feature innovation and high performance standards. With the largest products distribution network in Australia, the power of international support and a dedicated team of professionals, you can count on Cement Australia to deliver the best products, through the best resellers - when and where you need them.

By contrast, using branded products from domestic manufacturers provides confidence and the opportunity to follow up with the manufacturer for full product support, including technical advice from product experts. Domestically produced cement and dry mix products that have been specifically formulated to meet Australian Standards and varied weather conditions provide the level of confidence needed to ensure a job is done right first time with minimal risk. Locally manufactured products feature high levels of quality control, consistent performance and local back-up if needed. Importantly, local manufacturers

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PRODUCT SHOWCASES POSISTRUT CASSETTES ARE FLOORING CUSTOMERS Many builders and developers – especially those working on large, multi-storey projects are specifying MiTek PosiStrut Flooring Cassettes. The floor includes allowances for deflections, reactions, plumbing locations, voids stacks, wastes and duct chases and recessed wet areas. Plus, MiTek PosiStrut Flooring Cassettes can utilise top chord support for ease of installation.This means they can be craned into position on-site and fixed in minutes! ‘Two men can do in a day what it takes three to four to do in 7 days – the results are that dramatic! Another advantage is: there is no storage issue on-site. The truck rolls up and within minutes the first cassette can be craned into position. Once installed and fitted (and relevant safety scaffolding erected) the cassettes can be walked on so the next part of the construction process can get underway. The implications this has on-site are substantial…with more square metres of flooring laid by less labour in a lot less time! To view the video or for more information about MiTek PosiStrut Flooring Cassettes, visit: mitek.com.au

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

LOW COST COOLING FOR BIG INTERNAL SPACES The concept of using overhead fans to create cooling air flows has been around for a long time and everybody is familiar with the humble ceiling fan. High Volume Low Speed or HVLS fans have taken the ceiling fan idea and scaled it up to produce highly efficient large diameter fans for cooling big spaces and often, big crowds. These functionally elegant fans in sizes up to 7.2 meters across spin slowly and silently but move huge volumes of air at summer breeze speeds. The result is improved comfort in large building spaces with very low running costs. Air volumes of up to 9,800 cubic meters per minute are achieved for as little as 35 cents per hour. HVLS fans come into their own where refrigerated air conditioning is simply not a viable option due to high equipment and ongoing running costs. Typical applications include indoor sporting facilities, schools, churches, retail stores, offices and entertainment venues.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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PRODUCT SHOWCASES

LIGHT-WEIGHT MAXI BEAMS ARE ALL THE RAGE

GALVIN PROLAB™ - QUALITY TAPWARE SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR RESEARCH LAB

Over the past few years, trends have seen a rapid revival of maxi exposed beams being used in commercial fit-outs. An innovative architectural element, designers have recognised the value and versatility of maxi beams for their unique ability to enhance any interior space both functionally and aesthetically.

We collaborate with designers, consultants and end users, to pursue excellence in your laboratory facilities. Our extensive history of key projects provides us with the knowledge that allows us to continually develop and improve our product offerings, so they meet your clients’ needs and specifications.

The development of light-weight, decorative, pre-finished maxi beam products has provided designers with a new flexibility to meet clients’ differing needs and an alternative solution to working with solid timber. Light-weight maxi beams offer a new look of finishes and application possibilities for your next commercial fit-out.

For more information, contact your local Galvin representative P:1300 514 074 or W: www.galvinengineering.com.au

Contact Supawood – www.supawood.com.au

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS

REDEFINE YOUR ENVIRONMENT WITH THE LATEST PREMIUM RANGE OF ACOUSTIC SOLUTIONS FROM AUTEX Incorporating Autex’s Interior Acoustic products into architectural and interior design greatly diminishes reverberated noise by absorbing sound and creating a comfortable and productive environment.

HEALTHY AND COMFORTABLE HEATING WITH BOSCH THIS WINTER! Hydronic heating is a method of heating utilising heated water to distribute warmth throughout a building. It offers superior comfort, operational efficiency, and silent operation. Hydronic heating is also known to minimise the negative effects to allergy and asthma sufferers caused by the circulation of airborne particles that occurs with alternative heating technologies employing blown air. Bosch is a global supplier of Hyrdonic heating boilers and accessories. Bosch boilers utilize condensing technology that delivers additional efficiency gains over conventional gas appliances by converting flue gases to liquid condensate. Bosch has established an Australian network of preferred Hydronic Heating Specialists. An accredited Bosch “Hydronic Specialist“ has the required knowledge and expertise to optimally design, install, and service Hydronic heating systems incorporating Bosch boilers and accessories. Please contact Bosch on 1300 30 70 37 or visit www.bosch-climate.com.au for more information.

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Manufactured under Autex’s ISO 14001 accredited Environmental Management System, Autex’s Interior Acoustic products contain a minimum of 65 per cent post-consumer recycled material and are 100 per cent recyclable. Being non-toxic, non-allergenic and non-irritable products, the Autex Interior Acoustic range is suited for environments where controlling the echo of background chatter and reducing reverberated noise is essential while ensuring occupant health and safety is a priority. This includes, but is not limited to, office spaces, hospitality and the education sector. The Autex Interior Acoustic range can fit any architectural approach and adds a unique finishing touch to your project.

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ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU/PRODUCTS


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DO MORE WITH YOUR WALLS

Writable & Magnetic

Impressions

Impact Resistant & Anti-Microbial

Clipwall

Laminex® Wall Panel solutions are more than just walls, they’re a complete solution. From a variety of textures and patterns to writable walls, almost any commercial design you can think of can be created.

WRITABLE & MAGNETIC

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Laminex Writable Walls have a decorative face that can be written on and easily cleaned, as well as an embedded metal foil layer that ensures magnetic objects will hold strongly to the laminate surface.

Laminex Impressions Textured Surfaces, Laminex Veneers and Laminex Plywood add an extra dimension to any space. With a diverse range of contemporary woodgrains, linear and stone patterns plus solid colours, you’re bound to make an impression.

Laminex Clipwall is a revolutionary wall lining system that allows you to incorporate patterns and textures into your interior walls with up to five times faster installation than traditional wall lining materials.

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To see the full range of Laminex Wall Panel solutions, visit laminex.com.au or call 132 136.

IMPACT RESISTANT & ANTI-MICROBIAL Laminex® Multipurpose Compact Laminate is designed for heavy traffic areas. It’s impact resistant, antimicrobial and can be easily matched with your Laminex Partitions.

Infolink Building Product News, May/June 2015  

Tanks for the inspiration, Roofing, Heating, Acoustics,

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