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ENGINEERED TIMBER FLOORING COMMERCIAL BUILDING SECURITY STRUCTURAL & PERMANENT FORMWORK PRINT POST APPROVED 100028280

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Editor’s Letter BRANKO MILETIC

CONTRIBUTORS

Nathalie Craig Prue Miller Hamish McDonald Matthew McDonald Stephanie Stefanovic

curtain swept across the foyers and around the auditorium creating a fluid movement that intrigues, drawing patrons into the performance within. Glimpses through the concrete curtain are accentuated through vertical glass slivers that reveal interior colour to the neighbourhood beyond.

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SUMMIT TOPICS

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PENRITH CIVIC CENTRE & LIBRARY

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AWARD CATEGORIES

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JURY

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AMBASSADORS

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Photography by John Gollings.

Contents NEWS

2020 SUSTAINABILITY AWARDS

PEOPLE INTERVIEW 1

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INTERVIEW 2

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PROJECTS

PRACTICAL WINDOWS & DOORS

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COMMERCIAL FLOORING

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SYDNEY COLISEUM THEATRE

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FACADES & EXTERIORS

ADELAIDE CASINO

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STRUCTURAL &

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PERMANENT FORMWORK

AKACEMEIA HIGH SCHOOL

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COMMERCIAL BUILDING SECURITY 80

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PRODUCTS

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SA UNDERS HAVILL GROUP OFFICE

SHOWCASE

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Sarah Buckley

is distinctive; a flowing concrete

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DEPUTY EDITOR

Sydney Coliseum Theatre’s form

CONTENTS

Branko Miletic editor@architectureanddesign.com.au

Coliseum Theatre, Australia. The

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EDITOR

ON THE COVER The Sydney

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

I don’t know about you, but I’ve had way too much of the C-word. Yes, that C-word that we are being flooded with day, in, day out. I, of course am talking about ‘coronavirus’, a word I bet that many readers wish they had never heard of in the first place. The world as we know it is in a state of flux to say the least. And the economic predictions for the built environment vary from a full-on apocalyptic demise to being on the verge of a new gold rush. It all depends on who you talk to. According to a recent article in The Guardian, “A survey by the Australian Institute of Architects of 300 architecture practices at the end of March found that 89 percent had had projects cancelled or put on hold. The survey included both small and medium practices, with the cancelled projects worth a total of $5bn.” At the same time, NSW planning minister, Rob Stokes recently announced $70m of support for parks and major drainage works, while his colleague, transport minister, Andrew Constance, said his department will consider bringing forward transport projects. Meanwhile in the federal sphere, treasurer, Josh Frydenberg has downplayed the industry’s concerns. “I saw plenty of construction workers out there with their fluoro vests and hard hats getting to work and I’ve seen that in my home state of Melbourne as well, so it is good news that many of those construction workers are back at work,” he told The Guardian. Staying in Victoria, plans for Australia’s tallest building, worth some $1.5 billion have been fast tracked by the Andrews government in a bid to keep the state’s building industry operating during the pandemic. When complete, the 101-storey Green Spine building will tower nearly 360m above Melbourne’s CBD. So, I’m not sure how someone reads those tea leaves, but what is obvious is that there will be winners and losers. Just on which side of the ledger you fall on may depend as much on luck as it does with hard economic realities. Regardless, I think the consensus remains that the sooner the C-word disappears from our daily vernacular, the better we’ll all be, and not just in potential health terms.

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Talking Architecture & Design Podcast Uncovering what really goes on behind the scenes in the world of architecture and design… Talking Architecture & Design aims to uncover the industry’s most interesting personalities at the cutting edge of design, technology and practice. Find out who they are, what they’re doing, where they’re headed, and how we can learn from their experiences.

Now available for listening on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google, Soundcloud and Buzzsprout. Search Talking Architecture & Design to stream or download episodes.

If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a review.

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Episode 37: Dick Clarke (left) speaks openly and candidly about the reasons behind the devastation of the recent bushfires across the country, why they happened, how embracing climate science will ensure the severity of any future bushfires will be minimised and how the design community must be at the forefront of changing the way we design and build our homes so that the impact of the next bushfires will hopefully not be anywhere near as catastrophic as those in 2019/2020. Episode 42: Nermine Zahran (right) talks about how it is vital to continually learn and to educate others in the industry and in the general public about ways to minimise the impact of the built environment on the planet. Zahran explains her journey from one side of the world to another and how she is currently working to make the world a better place-one sustainable design at a time.

Proudly sponsored by

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5/5/20 4:34 pm


WORDS MATT DAVIS

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Investing in high-quality design will pay well into the future

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As NSW planning and public spaces minister Rob Stokes recently announced an initiative to boost the building sector in the state, this initiative has been warmly received by the property and construction sector. Employing 1 in 4 workers in NSW, this sector is a significant contributor to the Australian economy; according to the RBA, construction accounts for eight percent of Australia’s GDP, making it a key national economic force. The Planning System Acceleration Program announced by Stokes has two clear intents. First, to keep people working in the short-term, purporting to create 30,000 construction jobs over the next six months. And second, to ensure there is a pipeline of significant projects to sustain the industry as we slowly emerge from the COVID-19 crisis. Both objectives are essential to keep the Australian economy moving. It is equally essential that we recognise the long-term impacts of development and ensure that what we do today provides lasting public and private value for years to come. Minister Stokes – Australia’s only ‘Public Spaces’ minister—presides over some of the best design policy in this country. The Better Placed and Greener Places policies prepared by the NSW government architect clearly define design quality that we should demand of all projects. Now more than ever, NSW needs to maintain its focus on design quality and creating great places for people. This won’t be easy, as good design

is too often understood to be slow, indulgent, exclusive, and expensive. And sometimes it is. But really good design is about places and spaces that are designed to provide lasting value to communities. These kinds of places and spaces work well, are sustainable, joyful, easy to move around, efficient, connect people to nature, and connect people to each other. They also consistently return excellent value for money: The Better Placed policy notes that, on average, the initial investment in design amounts to a modest 0.5 percent of whole-oflife project costs. Despite the proportionally small investment in design, this is precisely where the opportunity for greatest long-term benefit is found. The evidence of the social and economic value derived from good design is apparent across all kinds of buildings and places, from homes to hospitals. In healthcare, an industry that often tracks return on design, the tangible benefits of well-designed primary health facilities include faster patient recovery, reduced medication, and improved workforce productivity. Importantly, these and other benefits are often derived through simple, thoughtful design measures, such as good access to natural light or nature, rather than elaborate technical moves.

Cities are shaped by many professional design hands—architects, urban designers, placemakers, retailers–but so too by those patrons of the built environment, developers and governments. If we want to make places that generate high social, economic and sustainable capital, then developers and governments need to resist being blinded by the current shortterm imperative for construction activity and choose to invest in and approve projects that are designed to achieve enduring value. The NSW Government will cut red tape and fast-track planning processes to keep people in jobs and the construction industry moving throughout the COVID-19 crisis. Australia’s recovery from COVID-19 is going to be slow and uncertain. More than ever we will need development that will make life easier and better, well after the pandemic abates. We need architecture, parks and precincts imbued with a sense of civic generosity. Fast approvals are essential, but also investing in design quality will payback both now and well into Australia’s future. Matt Davis is a leading Australian architect and urban designer. He is a studio director in the Sydney studio of Bates Smart.


P R O M O T I O N F E AT U R E

The Vaucluse House

OPENSHUTTERS.COM.AU / APR-JUN 2020

of the shutters and, most importantly, so is the client”, reveals Porebski. “The installation from Open Shutters was meticulous, and they successfully recessed the shutter head boxes to create a flush, seamless finish – a key requirement from the client. Aesthetically, the shutters tie in perfectly with the rest of the house and I’m really proud of how we’ve managed to integrate old and new. The result is a home that is both clean and contemporary, while appearing to have always been here”.

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Challenge Porebski and his team were tasked with a fullscale renovation of the property – including the addition of new bathrooms, living areas and a car port. The main challenge was transforming

the property’s existing small terraces and balconies into spacious, usable indooroutdoor living areas that could capitalise on its outstanding views. “We extended the main balconies to create two generous 4x5 metre curved terraces”, explains Porebski. “These expanded the wrap-around views and created a wonderful sense of openness – but we needed to find a solution that could keep out sun and wind, and work with the terrace curves without encroaching on the views”.

A & D X A u st r a l i a n T i m b e r S h u tt e r s

Background Vaucluse is a suburb synonymous with affluence and exclusivity. Sitting just eight kilometres east of Sydney’s CBD, Vaucluse boasts panoramic views of the Harbour Bridge and Opera House, as well as an impressive concentration of some of the most expensive properties in Sydney. With extensive experience of working on high-end, luxury properties, Alex Porebski, Director of Porebski Architects, was the first choice for a Vaucluse couple looking to improve their – admittedly, already beautiful – home on Vaucluse Road. Located at the top of a hill, the large, west-facing, three-level home commands beautiful harbour views; however, these views were hampered by intense afternoon sun, high winds and a recently built property in front of the house.

Architect: Porebski Architects Solution After assessing several different options, such as a retractable awnings and louvres, Porebski’s team settled upon Open Shutters’ Ultimate 115 timber shutters. Not only were the 8 metre long, 12-panelled bi-folds one of the only solutions capable of tracking around the curved perimeter of the terraces but, when closed, the operable shutter blades allow the panels to significantly reduce glare while maintaining the stunning views. “We’re extremely happy with the final finish

Key requirements: Provide sun and wind protection, without obscuring harbour views. Project specs: Total 8-metre long, 12-panelled bi-fold timber shutters installed along two curved terraces.

bit.ly/ATS_20Q2

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APR-JUN 2020 / NEWS / ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 6

Penrith Civic Centre and Library: A design perspective from the Australian Architecture Association (AAA) WORDS TONE WHEELER

Penrith Civic Centre and Library, designed by Feiko Bouman, is an excellent example of the change, away from the formal actions and seriousness of the Brutalists that had been the hallmark of public architecture of the late twentieth century.

The forms lose their rigidity and symmetry, the face is friendlier and the spaces are drammatic but welcoming. There is still the blockwork and concrete, but it is often politely painted and rendered. The foyer is generous and filled with light from ample upper level glazing, now bouncing off warmer surfaces. And the steelwork is painted in colours, but looser in its forms to reach the same structural goal. Through the latter half of the twentieth century, Penrith City Council had operated between five separate buildings in the area. Under increasing strain, the growing region of Western Sydney was in dire need of a consolidated council precinct, and in 1988 plans for such a facility to be established were realised. The new Civic Centre and Library would be the largest civic construction effort undertaken by the Council. Feiko Bouman was elected from twenty-two design proposals to lead the project. Bouman is noted for a number of significant public works, notably in North Sydney, and particularly the Australian

Stockmans Hall of Fame, a sublime series of corrugated arcs and bright red steel vaults described as the “Opera House of the Outback”. A comparable eclecticism is carried through the design of Penrith’s Civic Centre. The precinct does not simply bring together public administration for the region, but culture, recreation, and retail. The site, near Penrith train station, is connected by a network of food and retail outlets to a Westfield shopping centre to the east. To the south east, the Nepean Community College and Joan Sutherland Performing Arts Centre face High St. The Civic Centre and Penrith City Library was completed in 1994, and bookend the western end of the precinct that brings together much of the region’s community processes. The building’s contribution to the cityscape is deceptively passive, the Centre set deep within the block, shielded from a heavily greened carpark. On approach, its personalities multiply as high blockwork planes descend into a network


ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / NEWS /

off-white painted concrete. Maximising the utility of such a well lit space, the offices that line this foyer step inwards into the foyer. The subsequent opening provides clerestory glazing that permits the same light to permeate these offices while remaining entirely distinct. A major element of the facility is the 3,000sqm Central Library and 100 seat theatrette to the south-east. While comparatively pared-back, the same structural vocabulary runs through this wing of the Centre, curved orange steel beams supporting clerestory glazing that lights a large portion of the public Library. The Penrith Civic Centre and Library resides comfortably between a modern architectural tradition of honest structural and material expression and a communal desire for formal expressionism in the public realm. In 1995, Elizabeth Farrelly spoke of the “bytes of surprise visual joy” those who worked in the Centre would lyricise over. Partly eccentric brutalism, partly thrifty structural expressionism, it performs - in every sense.

ABOVE The welcoming quality of the Civic Centre is

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of curved glass awnings, circular windows and corrugated vaults, supported by vivid orange and blue structural steel. These strong colours carry through the Centre in articulated steel structure and handrail detailing, enlivening the structure predominantly composed of blockwork and concrete. The welcoming quality of the Civic Centre is in part due to its focus on accessibility, the entrance’s broad curved opening a consequence of both ramped and stepped external entrances to the second level. Such steady curves run through the structure in a fluid network of public and administrative spaces. Assisted by lifts in the foyer, these entrance wings provide access to a first floor Council Chambers, with a seating capacity of 120, and a function room that seats 320. The central administrative area and foyer is composed of a double height atrium, naturally lit under a glazed roof supported by the same orange detailed structural steelwork. Red tiles and rich timber cabinetry further warm the space otherwise composed of two-tone blockwork and

in part due to its focus on accessibility, the entrance’s broad curved opening a consequence of both ramped and stepped external entrances to the second level.

Prepared by the Australian Architecture Association, AAA: researched, and written by Jackson Birrell. Photos courtesy of Birzulis Associates. Edited and additional photos by Tone Wheeler. For more information on the AAA and its activities to promote architecture, go to architecture.org.au

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On design for COVID-19 WORDS TONE WHEELER

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The US senator Bernie Sanders once said, “Difficult times bring out the best in people”. So, he’s as much a failure as a presidential candidate as a commentator on the contemporary crisis.

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He cannot have been thinking about Australia. Which is worse? Having the country run by an economy obsessed party for business or a population of toilet paper obsessed selfishness? Depression appears now, not in six months. But we must be positive, and design is our trump card. Design is inherently problem solving for the future. Design ideas are needed now more than ever, and every design idea must primarily address only two things: inequality and sustainability. With that in mind I have gathered some 12 ideas in three areas: addressing the crisis, making a future and investing for the future.

ADDRESSING THE CRISIS 1: Stop Social distancing Just stop using that expression. We need more spatial distancing and less social distancing. Rather as we are further apart, we need to socially support each other, using social media for good (its original purpose before the troll takeover). Social distancing is an oxymoron in these times; stay physically apart but emotionally close. 2: More alcohol You’re thinking a tasty drink, I’m thinking sanitisers. Hand and surface sprays are 60 percent to 90 percent alcohol, and we don’t have enough. This in a country that makes and loves a drink. Home made sanitiser has flourished as sales of methylated spirits and isopropyl have soared, along with Aloe Vera (hint: three-parts meth, one-part AV, shake well and put in a spray bottle – if you can buy one). We should make a lot more sanitizer than we can in DIY. In France LVMH converted their perfumeries to making sanitisers, and here Aussie icon Shane Warne has followed suit, converting his gin distillery into a sanitiser factory. More widely reported in India than here. ‘Howzat?’

3: The Swan Song Who do you turn to for truth? In the COVID-19 crisis it is ABC veteran health report commentator Dr. Norman Swan. Calm, informed and absolutely clear he’s the best presenter we could wish for, check out his Coronacast. This following on from the ABC’s outstanding broadcasts during the 19-20 bushfire crisis. That’s my preferred Swan Song, whereas the LNP would love to sell off the ABC, their swan song for the ABC. Now is the time to spend more on the ABC, not less. We desperately need an antidote to the Murdoch fake news RWNJ’s (look it up). The answer is on your TV, laptop and phone. The ABC should be funded immediately to employ more journalists, more reporters, more photographers, and to buy AAP to keep independent local news alive. Australia needs to be better informed than it has ever been. 4: A Ministry of Truth How to pay for these initiatives? Here’s an idea: raise a tax on social media fake news, the misleading, damaging and possibly fatal rubbish that fills the internet. How to stop it? A loss of income is the only thing that social media will respond to, but they have avoided all attempts to tax them, particularly in Australia. We need a Ministry of Truth, without the Orwellian downsides. Every time the ministry, actually, every member of the public, thinks fake news has been posted, ‘the social media’ is notified. The clock starts ticking. If it is not immediately taken down until it can be fact-checked to prove it is true, or at least not harmful, then a tax fine is levied for every minute it stays polluting the airwaves. It assumes that Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram et al are publishers, which they are, and that the fines raised are due and payable in Australia and cannot be shopped offshore. The only way they will understand their responsibility is if they have to pay for their troll support or be deleted from the web.


MAKING A FUTURE 5: More node nerds The NBN cost twice what it should have, with about half the performance. And now that so many are working from home, or binge watching, the full disaster is being found out. We urgently need a thousand technicians to help to rectify the situation by connecting fibre to every house and apartment. If that means nationalising it then so be it. It’s hard to believe that somebody as supposedly technologically sophisticated as Malcolm Turnbull could really believe that his cut-down approach was a better solution. The extreme right wing of his party would have conniptions if it ended up being government-owned, at a knock-down price. How sweet an irony.

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11: Condo Clutter Corps To ‘while away’ the extra time at home and in apartments why not encourage people to edit their life and cull their clutter, just as Marie Kondo suggests. What to do with the collected extras? Repair, reuse and recycle of course. There would be an army-style ‘corps’ formed to collect the discards safely, sanitise them repair and recycle them. And with government subsidies the goods would be given away to those in need – a small means to redistribute wealth at the behest governments that learn a little social intervention.

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10: Low Costa gardens Now many people have more time at home we should encourage them to grow vegetables and fruit. They can have better food, become more self-sufficient, and be better connected to seasonal cycles. All they need is some encouragement and a government subsidy or grant. So, let’s start a program to supply DIY assembled garden beds, with fresh soil and fertilizer and seeds for several plantings (COVID-19 could go on for a year). We would see potatoes, carrots, lettuces, mint, passionfruit being grown in every suburban house and on every rooftop now so common in apartment buildings. It’s would be promoted by the ABCs wunderkind Costa Georgiadis, at a lesser cost than the ‘Block-head’ spruiking for apprentices. ‘Gardening Australia’ would start a whole new wave of community gardens and allotments, all part of the reinvigorated and funded ABC.

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8: If we make it, they will come We’ve lost a lot of manufacturing in the last 30 years, but not the ability to make stuff. We still have a highly-skilled and trained workforce, but we will lose it quickly if we continue to close down industries. So now is the time to reverse the trend and start making lots of things for the new world order.

9: Burn Units Not to be confused with the extraordinary ‘Burns Unit’ at Fiona Stanley Hospital in WA. This proposal is to set up units throughout regional Australia to hazard reduce the bush by the use of indigenous methods of burning. Funded by the federal and state governments, the units would be led by indigenous elders who would teach traditional methods for managing the land to reduce the bushfire risk in the next big bushfire season. COVID-19 is not our only disaster to avoid.

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7: Prefabulous homes Australia needs lots of emergency housing. Their necessity in towns ravaged by bushfires is now plainly obvious. Temporary buildings could also be corralled to form an isolation ‘village’, or a temporary hospital. We need units now to make temporary hospitals, and we will need to re-deploy them when the next tsunami strikes or the next tropical cyclone. We already have a caravan, prefab and mobile building industry, albeit concentrated in site sheds and the lower end of the market. With a push we could pivot to a high-quality recyclable and stackable ‘apartment style’ home that could be useful in emergencies as climate change strikes deep after COVID-19 has gone. But we need them now, so pens and hammers out please.

INVESTING IN THE FUTURE

12: More pepper and salt Finally, and importantly, a biggie. The state governments (with federal backing) should take advantage of plummeting house prices to increase the stock of social housing. This is the biggest inequality in Australia, and no better time than a crisis to address it. Let’s redistribute houses from those that have 10 to those that have none. It hasn’t been actively pursued since the days of Tom Uren’s Department of Urban and Regional Development, but we need to do it now more than ever. The idea would be to spot-buy houses and apartments, particularly from investors, as they come onto the market at this distressed time, and then re-assign them as social housing. This could be a short-term housing solution, putting to good use the 11 percent of houses that currently lie empty; they could be held as a long-term asset or gifted / sold off to a community housing provider (CHP). By acquiring them seemingly at random the social housing would be ‘pepper and salt’ through the suburbs, in contrast to the ‘ghettos’ of, often experimental, housing in the past. The housing would not betray its form of finance. It’s a form of equalisation; it is important not to stigmatize the residents in the social housing. Lastly, let’s say COVID-19 goes on for a long time, and rental stress becomes a huge issue. The government introduces rent control to avoid exploitation and eviction. Investors see their assets value decline, and are keen to sell – and the government steps in. Yes, it’s socialism in its worst (best) form, but for me it is one way for the government to learn the difference between and economy and society. Maybe our readership has other design ideas to combat COVID-19, I would be pleased to hear from them on the email below and publish them next week. Let’s find creative ways of dealing with COVID-19 to stretch our design imagination.

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6: Getting ventilated Let’s make hospital ventilators. As many as will ever be needed as they are essential in treating acute pneumonia that arrives with COVID-19. We are told there are patent and IP issues, but if ever there was a time to ignore those niceties, damn the torpedoes and full steam ahead, it is now. If Australian authorities are so slack to allow serial knock off merchants to flog furniture that is clearly copy-righted, or unsustainable one star or two-star fridges that are banned in every other OECD country, we can have no qualms about paying for the patents long after we have made the life-saving equipment.

What to make? Let’s start with masks gowns and everything our over-stretched hospitals (or emergency hospitals made from pre-fabs) could possibly need. We could also start making ingenious devices to address COVID-19, such as acrylic shields that fit behind the a taxi or Uber driver’s seat, in the same way as in the old New York taxis, not to protect the driver from violence, but against disease.

Tone Wheeler is principal architect at Environa Studio, Adjunct Professor at UNSW and is President of the Australian Architecture Association. The views expressed here are solely those of the author and are not held or endorsed by A+D, the AAA or UNSW. Comments can be posted here or addressed to toneontuesday@gmail.com

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In conversation with Penelope Seidler WORDS HAMISH MCDONALD

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Hamish McDonald talks with Australian architect, Penelope Seidler, the wife of world-famous Australian architect Harry Seidler and the daughter of Clive Evatt QC (1900–1984), a prominent barrister and NSW Labor politician.

A & D : So when Harry Seidler started the practice, was it mostly focussed on domestic architecture? P S : Although he was well-known, he had a minute practice and just worked in his living room by himself. It was the houses themselves that created the media. The house he designed for his parents became a sensation. A & D : His houses sit very nicely in the landscape, but they don’t try to hide, whereas a lot of houses that came a later adopted all these dark browns, earthy tones, and a low profile. P S : His first houses were sort of (US East Coast) New England mid-century modern houses, this is where he’d come from just before Sydney: white, timber, though his parents’ house had a concrete floor. But by the time we build our own house (1966-67), he (and we, I might say, as I was a qualified architect by that stage) built more substantial houses, more tough, more permanent materials. And really, it’s worked: 53 years and nothing’s changed. It’s concrete, bricks, stone and wood, but only interior wood. It has a very medieval quality: durable. Modern-medieval, I call it. A & D : Would you say as he started getting commissions for commercial buildings and was called on by Dick Dusseldorp (the founder of Lendlease), he flowered into these famous large projects, working in concrete?

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P S : Yes, it’s interesting it was another foreigner, or immigrant, who recognised his potential, and grew to trust him entirely. Harry’s

buildings: first of all they’re logical, they make sense. They’re structurally pure. There was nothing capricious. Then there was the aesthetics of it, but the practical side came first. It all came together. He’d think it all through, and once he’d settled something, he very rarely changed it. We would discuss it, and I’ve never put myself forward as a particularly creative architect but over the years I’ve developed a strong sensibility, and I did have quite an influence. He’d never do anything weird without showing it to me and talking about it, which was great. A & D : Did the advances in concrete building methods and systems allow him to become more adventurous, adding longer beams and then curves? P S : Yes, our house of the 1960s where I am sitting does not have one curve in it. But when he was designing Australia Square, which was finished the same year, 1967, he had been in Rome for six weeks in 1963 working on it there with Pier Luigi Nervi, the worldfamous structural engineer. I was doing my final architecture exams. Nervi didn’t speak English and Harry didn’t speak Italian, but by drawings, etc they got along very well. And at that time Harry discovered Baroque architecture and he became very influenced by its underlying geometry. So his buildings designed post that time tended to have curves - first quadrants in plans and then from the 1980s more flamboyant curves. But it was always structurally pure. There wasn’t just a curve for a curve’s sake. Where there was one curve there’d always be an opposing curve somewhere else.

A & D : Would that be most visible in the Horizon apartments in Darlinghurst? P S : Definitely. That’s quite a lot later (1998) But even the Paris embassy (1977) is based on a quadrant curve and counter curve plan, as did almost every major building from then on involved either a quadrant plan or curves. A & D : These buildings, from Grosvenor Place to Australia Square to the MLC Centre to the Horizon, are a kind of white thread holding the city together. One wishes there were more, instead of these forgettable, disposable buildings. P S : They are very strong designs, because they are solid, they are gutsy. They’re not fun and games. Which I think is the problem with architecture today: capricious. Buildings from time immemorial have always been about defeating gravity: the columns, the great Gothic buildings, and then the 19th century when all of a sudden you could do a lot more with steel, and 20th century, with concrete. But there were still things you couldn’t do. Now you can bloody well do anything. You can draw a silly thing, doodle on a piece of paper and build it. But it’s got no logic, it’s got no integrity. And as for glass buildings, it’s ridiculous in our climate. A & D : Did Harry see a future where Sydney would shift to a high-rise ring of apartments around the harbour? P S : I think so. He always said McMahon’s Point was an ideal place for high density, also Woolloomooloo, and he used to say:


A & D : Do you conclude that our state doesn’t think big enough? P S : I’m not too keen about what they’ve been doing lately. This nonsense about the Powerhouse Museum – they should restore it. The dilemma there is that people didn’t visit the Powerhouse: it was run down and they charge a lot of money to go in. When the State Government told NSW Art Gallery director Edmond Capon he had to charge for entry for the Art Gallery, he refused and they backed

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P S : It’s okay. When Harry arrived in Sydney, they were still building the old part, the Maritime Services building. Designed prewar, then built post-war. It’s a hard building. The new wing has only one new gallery in it, one major space, the rest is all admin. And by doing that they destroyed the only gallery in the original building that had a high ceiling.

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P S : I am supporting it, in a modest way financially, but I think they are going to have

A & D : What did you think of the extension to the Museum of Contemporary Art at Circular Quay? Should not the old building have been demolished and a competition called for an entirely new gallery?

off. So people flock to the Art Gallery, but the Australian Museum and the Powerhouse, they charge a lot. Are you going to pay $15 to pop in for half an hour? For a family it’s prohibitive. They want to move it to where the people are but if they still charge $15 they’re not going to go. The other thing is the football stadium – a disgrace. There was nothing wrong with it. From what I understand, they want more corporate seating and entertainment. It was Labor governments that built the two things that people like about Sydney: the Bridge and the Opera House. They had their troubles but what monuments they are to Sydney. If people come for one day, they go to lunch at Circular Quay and walk around the Opera House. They’ve done Sydney.

PEOPLE

A & D : You’ve been deeply involved in the art world. What do you think of the extension to the Art Gallery of NSW?

problems with it. I don’t think the structure is logical and there’s too much glass. I think it’s flimsy. It’s got a lot of columns in it. I’m sure it will be very pleasant, but I think it lacks gravitas. The Art Gallery of NSW has nice harbour glimpses, but it’s a very substantial building, imposing. I’m not opposed to the site, as a lot of people are, and I am sure it will be wonderful. But in the long term they are going to have problems with that building.

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in a hundred years, the low-rise buildings won’t be there anymore. In 1957, the year I met him, Harry was working with a group of young architects, most of them students at that stage, on a concept on what you could do at McMahon’s Point. Everybody would have a view, young families would have a garden, that sort of thing, an ideal city if you like. They were lobbying against the authorities who were going to re-zone McMahon’s Point as industrial– and he said rather this is the best place in the world for high density living, and he with this group of keen architectural volunteers built the model. But as everyone knows the only thing to ever emerge from this idea was Blues Point Tower (even though it was not actually in the original concept). Alas Blues Point Tower, which has been much maligned – only because it sticks out there all alone. The North Sydney Council didn’t allow more buildings there. But you could – they should be on the ridge, not at the bottom at the edge of the water. People get all upset about high buildings, but it’s just the way they’re placed so closely to and blocking each other that’s the problem. When he did an apartment complex in Vienna, he was very admiring of the city government. You could not develop until the infrastructure was already in place: the transport, the schools. Everything was designed first, then you put the people in, whereas here it’s the other way around.

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RIGHT Penelope Seidler, photo: Dirk Meinecke.

A & D : What now? Do you have any causes? P S : I am still running the business, Harry Seidler Associates, and it’s still afloat. And recently I’ve given money to Sydney University for a chair in the history of architecture, to get a distinguished international professor to come and work with the students and give some lectures. I’ve given one sum to the University of NSW for a professor of practice, because I think it’s important for people who teach architecture should know what buildings are all about. I’m having a wonderful time now, being at home because of the Covid-19 restrictions. I used to say I never had enough time at home. When you’ve lived in a house 53 years, it gets full of stuff. I’ve been going through everything, trying not to declutter so much but trying to reject things that have no place to be in this now historic house.

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Dr. Peter Sweatman on Caroma’s LiveWell range Dr Peter Sweatman has been working with Caroma R&D to launch the first generation of aged-friendly toilets to the market and has recently completed a PhD in user centred bathroom design for older people at UNSW Built Environment faculty. In a recent Talking Architecture & Design podcast interview, he explained how he has helped create a new range of bathroom products that Caroma calls the LiveWell range that has been designed to work as an integrated space that can also be tailored and adapted to individuals to provide convenience, comfort and safety in both the aged care and home environments. So what exactly is Caroma’s LiveWell range? Caroma LiveWell is a range of innovative and great-looking products that cover bathroom functionality from stylish load bearing support rails and raised height toilets with integrated armrests, to modern rail showers and ergonomically-designed extended-lever tapware.

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Why was the LiveWell range designed and what are some of its components and features? We designed the LiveWell range for people who need support, for older people, and of

course people with disabilities, but in reality, the LiveWell range is for anyone that needs or wants extra support in the bathroom, whether that be in Aged Care or in the home environment. Aged Care facilities can be designed around a number of different models of operation and Caroma LiveWell delivers a range of products suitable for all bathroom requirements. For example, the Care 660 toilets suites are AS1428.1 Ambulant compliant, incorporate CleanFlush rimless technology, can be fitted with Caroma armrests and are available with coloured seats to improve usability for people with vision impairments or those that are living with dementia. Caroma’s Caravelle three-piece tapware feature a traditional, familiar design with large colour indicators to facilitate ease of use by those living with dementia and feature a smooth half or quarter turn ceramic disc cartridge. As for AS1428.1 Accessibility compliant facilities, Caroma’s LiveWell range includes high-quality products to suit all needs and budgets. The Care 800 suite combines CleanFlush rimless technology with a premium seamless design, in-wall cistern option and includes sturdy backrest and range of compliant seats. The Care 610 suite is attractive, functional and available in Accessible and Ambulant

configurations. The Care basin range is available in three sizes 500mm, 600mm and 700mm with shelf. They are AS1428.1 compliant with additional splash prevention and hygiene benefits making them suitable for a range of health and aged care facilities and applications. How did the LiveWell range come about and what can it do for consumers? It grew out of the work that we did at the University of NSW School of Built Environment. It was a project led by Professor Catherine Bridge and was quite a large undertaking. It involved what we call the ‘Liveability Lab’, where we extensively tested ideas and solutions with older people and where we had a mixed method approach for the collection and analysis of data, all within the physical space of a simulated bathroom. This research led to the comprehensive Caroma LiveWell range that enable the creation of beautiful and modern bathrooms that can be tailored to meet the needs and preferences of a wide variety of people. The specifications of products have been designed to meet and exceed compliance requirements for relevant codes and standards for multiple operational scenarios. The range has been built on a solid foundation of industry experience and


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What else has been added to the LiveWell range? We also designed a range of CleanFlush rimless toilets that are far easier to clean since no rim means they have less chance of collecting germs. They also have the armrests that you

can use to get up and down. We tested those in the lab to ensure getting up and down is made much easier while at the same time, they are aesthetically integrated into the toilets. One great feature is that if you choose to install the toilet that has these support brackets, you don’t need to install the armrest immediately. You can just put covers over the holes where they come out from the ceramic bowl giving you the option of adding them later as and when you need them. So now there’s less of a barrier for improving the amount of support that your bathroom offers both now and in the future. And if you get your knees or hips replaced and you need extra support for a while, you can fit them on, and use them for as long as you need them and then remove the armrests once your knees or hips have healed. All the products within Caroma’s new LiveWell portfolio can also be retrofitted, enabling easy upgrades to existing bathrooms, meaning that all these ideas open up the flexibility of the bathroom space and have been designed to create a space that just works better for you without looking like you have turned your bathroom into something that you would find in a hospital.

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What was some of the challenges and outcomes when designing the LiveWell range? We had some preconceptions like for example; we thought that older people wouldn’t be interested in technology. But when we took them through the process of understanding the problems that they had or things they would like designed better, they naturally took to technology and used that same technology to help us redesign fixtures and layouts to better support and align with their own needs that they’d identified. They themselves suggested things like Bidet toilets, body air dryers to replace towels, various bathroom fixtures that allowed physical support throughout the bathroom that would make them feel more stable and also safer. We also found some other interesting outcomes. For example, there’s a negative

sort of perception about grab rails and that something about them being in the bathroom is stigmatizing. We had one of our participants say that when her husband had health issues and they needed to get their bathroom modified and grab rails installed, I forget the exact quote, but it was something like the ‘shudders went through me’. Although we need to be honest and recognize that bathrooms can be a slippery and potentially dangerous place. After this input, we looked at designing grab rails that were more aesthetically pleasing and better integrated to look more like conventional products. So from that input we’ve developed the Opal support rail system that has a bright Chrome finish and then further extending this idea, we’ve had them integrated into the shower in a configuration that takes approximately 110kgs of weight in any direction. You end up having quite a nice-looking and very stylish bathroom that offers far more support than any conventional bathroom.

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engagement with experts, stakeholders and the people that use our products. Over many years, this collaborative research with UNSW Built Environment looked into the needs, experiences and preferences of older Australians in the bathroom revealed the importance of appealing designs that deliver the appropriate level of support to create environments that support positive ageing over extended timeframes.

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The Sydney Coliseum Theatre puts on a grand show WORDS TAHLIA SVINGOS ARCHITECT COX ARCHITECTURE PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN GOLLINGS

The curtain gently ripples, the atmosphere builds and the anticipation of impending performance tingles the senses. The Sydney Coliseum Theatre, Sydney’s newest theatre located at Rooty Hill draws both onlookers and patrons into the grandeur and drama of the theatre experience.

RIGHT Designed in collaboration with Yellow Goat, crystals appear to be suspended in animation to embody 14

a special moment like the crescendo of a symphony.


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This project elevates the practice of interior design by showcasing the skill of sculpting space.

The Sydney Coliseum Theatre’s form is distinctive; a flowing concrete curtain swept across the foyers and around the auditorium creating a fluid movement that intrigues, drawing patrons into the performance within. Glimpses through the concrete curtain are accentuated through vertical glass slivers that reveal interior colour to the neighbourhood beyond. A shimmering white concrete curtain gently glimmers by day, and as the light dims, the glow of performance illuminates the night sky. The Sydney Coliseum Theatre is a key component in Western Sydney, forming the heart of this vibrant community and lifestyle precinct. With a 2000-seat proscenium arch theatre, the Sydney Coliseum has capacity to host world-class musicals, concerts, stage plays, ballets and symphony orchestras, promoting community engagement and showcasing Western Sydney as an arts, entertainment and cultural hub. THE FORM The Sydney Coliseum Theatre, in its form, sequence, atmosphere and crafting, seeks to draw all into the drama and heightened senses commensurate of a true ‘evening at the theatre’. The Sydney Coliseum Theatre is an embodiment of delight that begins and ends well beyond the rise and fall of a stage curtain. The brief was to design a multi-functional 2,000 seat theatre that could host world class musicals, rock concerts, stage plays, ballets and symphony orchestras. Of equal importance was the clients desire to promote community engagement and showcase Western Sydney as a cultural hub. In other words, a venue to suit everyone and every performance. Fully retractable curved seating allows the theatre to be transformed into cabaret, banquette or concert mode with operable acoustic treatments to suit the performance type.

into deep reveals, veils the mundane surrounds, minimises solar gain whilst also creating a dramatic dancing light pattern across the honed floor. The atrium required sculpting on a vast scale to create a multi-layered and activated volume. A generous stair connects the multilayered space and carves out multiple vantage points to peacock and take in the charged atmosphere before the quiet calm of curtains up. The dramatic interplay between layered mezzanines and sweeping staircases creates a symphonic quality to the interior, imbuing the heart and soul of performance into every inch of its built form. THE DESIGN Design is at its most powerful when it creates positive change. This project transcends fashion, finishes and form. It delivers beauty but more importantly provides a cultural heart to unite a steadily growing community. The curved volume of the theatre is mirrored in the facade. An exemplary project in exhibiting the rigour of designing from the inside and out. On arrival at The Sydney Coliseum Theatre, anticipation begins well before the performance. As patrons take in the elegant form of the folding curtain viewed from across the street patrons are guided towards the top of the theatre curtain, from where they cross an elevated glass bridge. Passing through the curtain, guests are invited into the theatre’s interior, transitioning from simple spectator to an integral element of performance itself. Patrons now mingle within a vast, light-filled atrium as a largeyet-delicate crystal chandelier floats elegantly above. Pausing a moment to take in the scene, patrons behold a grand flowing staircase and the bustling human drama of the foyer below. THE SCALE

THE CONTEXT

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The surrounding context, a busy road and lowcost housing, required careful consideration. A rhythmic pattern of ribbon windows carved

The grand staircase sweeps down against the flowing white concrete curtain to form an open bar below and associated seating booths at mid-landings along its progression. A delicate

timber veil offsets the concrete curtain, concealing intimate seating banquettes. Creating moments to pause, this warm timber veil folds to provide for moments of both intimacy and grandeur, in parts penetrating through the exterior concrete curtain to form glazed seating alcoves. Here, patrons are again performers on show, as the foyer’s colour and drama are revealed to the street below. The design confidently rejects superfluous decoration and employs a purposely restrained use of three primary materials; timber, terrazzo and plaster. The considered palette heightens the transcendent journey into the theatre stirring souls in amplified expectancy towards what lies within. Dramatically shifting from an ivory lined façade and dove grey terrazzo floors, deepening to a fluid ribbon of timber enveloping the central volume into an inky dark performance space that focusses all attention on centre stage. A chandelier within the atrium provides a focal point and sense of grandeur. Designed in collaboration with Yellow Goat, crystals appear to be suspended in animation to embody a special moment like the crescendo of a symphony. THE LOOK Materials were carefully chosen to maximise the experience of arriving, socialising and being entertained. Colours were also specifically chosen to reinforce the essence and principles of the design philosophy. To ensure a 50-year lifespan, practicality and durability of materials was an important factor. All the materials are sustainable and easily maintained, ensuring they will remain looking as good as the day they were installed. As the building must maintain a statue of the cultural centre of Western Sydney it must always look good and present well. Natural timber finishes are timeless and give undeniable warmth to the spaces. Honed concrete facades and terrazzo flooring give a sense of class and elegance akin to great civic buildings. The intricacies of the timber balustrades and oval handrails add to the ambience of the spaces. The whole palette of material is harmonious calming and timeless.


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THE SUSTAINABILITY Sustainable considerations were at the forefront of decision making while selecting appropriate materials and construction methodologies for the various elements of the building. In areas of long spans, such as the auditorium trusses, the link bridge and the upper balcony, steel framing was adopted to utilise its superior strength to weight ratio, minimising raw material usage. While in areas of concrete structure, posttensioning was primarily used to ensure material usage was minimised. The facade design looks to further the sustainable credentials through maximising the use of solid precast elements which reduces the area of glass and sub-structure. This together, with deep recesses in the faรงade for the glazing, adds to the reduction of solar heat gain into the building. The selection of a locally sourced precast concrete supplier assisted with minimising the carbon footprint of the building. The venue makes provision for an on-site detention and stormwater quality treatment systems and rainwater tank which are beneficial to the environment. The venue included an 80,000l rainwater tank re-use system which reduces dependence on water supply mains.

The unique design for this project presented several design challenges that required creative and out of the box engineering solutions such as the custom steel framing behind the precast faรงade around the northern nose of the building to provide lateral support adjacent to the quadruple height foyer space. Acoustics were incredibly challenging given the diversity of performance and the expectation from the client that the venue would operate at a world class level. Alongside the functional diversity the space atmospherically required a chameleon quality to appeal to a broad spectrum of users from opera to rock enthusiasts. The space needed to host cultural connoisseurs accustomed to the Sydney Opera House and venues of that ilk, but also create a welcoming and comfortable place to encourage cultural engagement to the uninitiated. Throughout the design process we made use of software tools to allow real time acoustic analysis of the auditorium whist the shape and orientation of room surfaces were manipulated in Rhino. This allowed the best acoustic use of all surfaces whilst working around the constraints of other spatial demands (e.g. mechanical plant, theatre equipment and aesthetic preferences.

ABOVE The design confidently rejects superfluous decoration and employs a purposely restrained use of three primary materials; timber, terrazzo and plaster.

SUPPLIERS & COMPONENTS EXTERNAL Walls, Facades Artedomus architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/artedomus Brickworks Roofing architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/brickworks-building-products Stramit architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/stramitbuilding-products INTERIOR Signature Floors architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/signaturefloors Polytec architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/polytec Autex architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/autex Caroma architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/caroma


design in motion

#SATURDAYINDESIGN SATURDAYINDESIGN.COM

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27/4/20 4:28 pm


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The city in the sky WORDS MADDIE DANAHER DESIGN BUCHAN PHOTOGRAPHY BUCHAN

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Buchan is providing master planning, architectural and interior design to SkyCity by creating a design statement for the redevelopment of Adelaide Casino.

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• An expansion of general gaming at ground level and premium player gaming at level 01 and level 09 • A 120 key all-suite hotel at levels 03-08 • Publicly accessible restaurants and bars and roof bar

The new building has been designed as a glittering, flowing “jewel” of a building as a piece of built “sculptor” resting on the ground plane of an infinite faceted array of glass presenting a shimmering luminous quality by day and most especially by night. The abiding objective is the creation of more than a “beautiful building” but instead the creation of a “beautiful object”. A grand urban gesture, an object of national and international iconic recognition and imagery for the Adelaide Casino and the City of Adelaide. The new building is presented with consistent and coherent architectural expression in the round, with a layered, wave linear and predominantly glazed built form approach - a design response that references the meandering river setting, acknowledges the flow of pedestrian movement around the building and evokes banners waving, hinting at the festival spirit at the heart of this entertainment facility. In a more pragmatic sense, this layering provides, at the

lower levels, a reference and alignment to the horizontal expression of the railway station building. The interweaving wave linear plan forms have moments of intersection where the form bridges the horizontal layers to provide elements of vertical expression adding to the dynamic sculpted quality of the building form. The form is further articulated with expressed vertical glazing mullions as a counter point to the horizontal recessed balcony bands. The entire façade is made up of doubleglazed vision and spandrel panels that possess the same gold/bronze reflective properties accentuating the singular form of a sculptured object. The reflective quality of the glass changes colour throughout the day reflecting the weather conditions and its surrounds. The building is set against one of the most historical buildings in the Adelaide CBD - the rail station. It’s been purposefully set off the northern side of the station to allow breathing room between the two iconic buildings, the breathing room has, in itself, become important, creating a three-level atrium zone conceived as a ribbon of glass that divides the two buildings but also unites them. Glazed walls either side and a light weight ETFE (Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) roof, triple layered cushions of air designed to achieve a high level of translucence.

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THE BRIEF CALLED FOR:

• Function venue located on level 02, providing two main function rooms • Hotel reception, poll, gym and wellbeing facilities • An expanded back of house facility at the lower levels to support the new hotel, food and beverage, dining, staff and gaming operations

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Buchan is providing master planning, architectural and interior design to SkyCity by creating a strong design statement for the redevelopment of Adelaide Casino. Designed to provide an integrated entertainment complex, the redevelopment incorporates an expanded multi-tiered Casino; 123 luxury hotel rooms and suites; a 750 capacity multipurpose function centre; wellness centre offering pool, sauna, gym and day spa; a range of new signature restaurants and dining experiences; a destination roof top bar and upgrade of the existing facilities in the historic Adelaide Railway Station Building. This is a transformative project for the Adelaide Casino, designed to deliver a vibrant entertainment and dining venue for the people of Adelaide. The design seeks to realise the potential of this location in the heart of Adelaide’s rejuvenated Riverbank Precinct, actively engaging with the interconnected public realm and the considerable pedestrian traffic that will invigorate this precinct.

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OPPOSITE The new building has been designed as a glittering, flowing “jewel” of a building as a piece of built “sculptor” resting on the ground plane of an infinite faceted array of glass presenting a shimmering luminous quality by day and most especially by night. PAGE 20 The entire façade is made up of doubleglazed vision and spandrel panels that possess the same gold/bronze reflective properties accentuating the singular form of a sculptured object.

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The abiding objective is the creation of more than a “beautiful building” but instead the creation of a “beautiful object”. A grand urban gesture, an object of national and international iconic recognition and imagery for the Adelaide Casino and the City of Adelaide.

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A high level of engineering has gone into the building all aimed at the comfort of the user, 6-star acoustic requirement, JV3 performance report on the façade to help identify areas where solid spandrel sections were needed to offset the vision glass to meet the comfort levels. Columns have also been moved away from the building perimeter creating cantilevers of three metres or more. SkyCity comprises over 2,560 panels of high-performance glass, not only aesthetically beautiful but its reflective make up provides crystal clear vision looking out and has outstanding thermal acoustic properties. Products were chosen for their quality,

aesthetics and durability, and low VOC. Early on Buchan also engaged with a Feng Shui expert that provided a holistic reading for the development, taking into account the location, design elements, material palette and celestial readings.

• the material and colour palette provided balance between the elements • canopy outriggers required and end plate (not pointing) to remove the aggressive arrow pointing out and into the building and surrounding area.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS:

The façade was one of the key design challenges getting the detailing and the junctions right between interesting plans and 3-way connections to produce a seamless result, while the majority of the wall treatments are a bespoke design and required multiple workshops with the trades and prototyping to get the detailing right.

• to make sure the entry circular entry doors were not constantly rotating (snapping turtle is undesirable) • the buildings curves counterbalanced the aggressive nature of the river (bow being drawn)


Introducing

Friday 14 August 2020 Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney

The INDE.Summit is a brand new, one-day, CPD endorsed conference that will bring together regional and local speakers to explore how the Indo-Pacific region’s architects and designers are responding in the face of critical global and local challenges. indeawards.com/summit

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27/4/20 6:08 pm


Milking history by turning a milk bar into a hotel

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WORDS LORNA GLORIA ARCHITECT KP ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY SCOTT BURROWS

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Originally built in the early 1930’s as a milk bar for the locals, the Camden Valley Inn, located south-west of Sydney NSW, quickly became a popular hang-out spot. Built to promote the pure and wholesome milk of Camden Park, today the inn operates as a restaurant and a luxury hotel.


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These materials were selected for their honesty and natural finish that complemented the qualities of the brick.

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Camden Valley Inn closed its doors in November 2018 for major renovations and re-opened in September 2019. Set on five acres of land with views of the Razorback mountains from almost every point of the venue, the hotel was tired, weathered and in urgent need of attention. The brief to KP Architects was to refurbish the hotel to reflect the expectations of today’s customers, and to take advantage of its rural setting while celebrating the history of the old inn. According to KP Architects director Kon Panagopoulos, this was achieved by removing layers of additions that had been constructed over the years to meet short-term demand but without a long-term vision. “By removing these redundant structures, we could reveal the original architecture while introducing new structures that were sympathetic and celebrated the history of the venue and its heritage neighbourhood and setting,” says Panagopoulos. The brickwork to the original building had a painted finish with several layers applied over the years. “We decided to contrast this to clearly define the new work with face brick. The face of the brick was softened with an application of a whitewash to provide a textural patina effect,” says Panagopoulos.


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IMAGES The new buildings take cues from the original architecture, in the roof form and general farm/ rural scale.

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Other materials used in the project includes granite cobble stone for the laneways, recycled pavers for the beer garden, Zincalume and galvanised finishes for metal detail and roofing, concrete for general walkways, terracotta tiles in amenities areas and solid timber for fixed seating. “These materials were selected for their honesty and natural finish that complemented the qualities of the brick. These materials are real, they/and speak to their rural surroundings,” says Panagopoulos. While the new work was extensive, there is a human scale to the outcome that does not overwhelm the original heritage building or its setting. “We set out to ensure that the original heritage building, and its rural setting were the

heroes, draw people to the venue, and create a memorable stay.” The new buildings take cues from the original architecture, in the roof form and general farm/ rural scale. The two pavilion buildings are positioned parallel to the original building, not connected but separated by a narrow, covered laneway that not only directs customers from south to north entries, but also clearly delineates the new from the old. The central pavilion forms a backdrop to the heritage building but also extends to the south to form an edge to the common entry and beer-garden space. According to Panagopoulos, the project ran relatively smoothly. The builder had full access to the site as the pub was closed for the duration

of the construction which minimised delays during staged construction. “While we encountered wet weather, the project was constructed on time with the assistance of a number of incredibly talented contractors including a dedicated bunch of brickies.” “Since opening, the response from the local community has been very positive. They have truly engaged with what we set out to do, to create a venue that speaks to them as a community and reflects its rural setting. Humble and honest,” says Panagopoulos

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WORDS PRZEMO ŁUKASIK & ŁUKASZ ZAGAŁA ARCHITECT MEDUSA GROUP ARCHITECTS PHOTOGRAPHY JEDRZEJ & JULIUSZ SOKOŁOWSCY

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Private school teaches how sustainable design should be done

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A new generation of young people which recently entered high school has forced the Polish authorities to launch a thorough reformulation of their overall approach to education.

LEFT The Akacemeia High School in the Polish capital Warsaw has been designed to meet the needs of today’s youth and also to attract ambitious young people.

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OPPOSITE The school’s canteen design on the other hand is closer to a fashionable restaurant than a traditional

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In the LEED ecological certification program, Akademeia High School obtained the platinum level. This confirms that it is a sustainable build with the highest standard of ecological and energy-saving solutions used. Currently, only 64 schools in the world have received LEED platinum certification, including only eight projects outside the United States. Only two educational facilities in Europe - Poland and Greece - can boast of platinum certification. At the same time, the Akademeia High School project in Warsaw received the highest number of points (86 points in the 2009 program) among projects carried out outside the USA; which puts it first in Europe. Such a high score was given to the facility for the sustainable design solutions aimed at lowering its energy consumption and the use of ecological materials in the course of construction, which comprised of recycled raw materials of regional origin, the use of non-toxic, certified wood and a range of other sustainable materials.

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This is a place where you can read, meet with a psychologist, wait for parents and at the same time, sit at a laptop and do homework or prepare for assignments. We also wanted pupils in small groups to learn the culinary arts and get to know the flavours and make inspiring, culinary travels – geography if you like, with a touch of gastronomy. That is why we decided to extend the cafe design to the roof space, where the garden is located. There, students are able to look after beehives during the summer season, grow basil, rosemary, thyme, herbs that is used later in the school canteen. The main school hall is nothing like a collection of school corridors, rather, we looked for simple materials that conduct a dialogue between warm and cold, grey with beige, sometimes cheap and others, expensive. But we also looked for materials that are assigned to young people - we do not want the bench or seat to be associated only with the chair. We want young people to sit on what they like to sit in the city. This was what we were looking for when designing this place - ambiguous, multifunctional and inspiring places. The intention was to obtain the highest level of certification in the LEED certification system, which is a unique approach to educational construction in our country.

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It also forced a review of the principles of shaping the actual design of school buildings. The failure of the public sector began meant that the private sector needed to produce a product that meets the requirements of education for young people. The Akacemeia High School in the Polish capital Warsaw has been designed to meet the needs of today’s youth and also to attract ambitious young people who would like to develop in different directions and who would like to one day study at the world’s great places of learning like Columbia, Oxford or Stanford Universities. The actual functional structure of the school was clearly specified by the designers to be simple but also borrowed from the Temple of Divine Providence, one of the most important Roman Catholic buildings in Poland. A secondary design concept was taken from the school depicted in the hit movie Dead Poets Society. These are two worlds separated by a simple, unpatinated 10m high façade. The school’s canteen design on the other hand is closer to a fashionable restaurant than a traditional school canteen. The reasoning here was that this space was to be made open not only at lunchtime, but to work continuously and with changing functions, from the canteen, to the cafes with the reading room and the live art-desk.

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school canteen.

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Office design with a strong acoustic need

What happens when an interior design company is asked to come up with an office design for an urban design and planning firm? The result is the Saunders Havill Group office in Queensland, which encompasses both style and acoustic ingenuity.

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Squaredesigns Corporate (SDC) designed Stage 1 of a workplace office fitout for Saunders Havill Group. This project was to design an interior space that would provide a designerorientated workplace for urban designers, landscape architects and surveyors. The site is an existing warehouse that is situated next door to the current Saunders Havill Group office in Bowen Hills. The intention was to create a beautiful and functional environment for their employees. Due to the height of the building envelope, careful consideration of the acoustics was required throughout both the ground level and the mezzanine in order to reduce unnecessary interference. The brief for Stage 1 of this project included: • At least 36 workstations including five to six hot desks for the field ecologists, • Directors office, • Utility area and storage for the field equipment, • A strong connection to the main office/ building • Retain existing kitchenettes and facilities and upgrade if needed • Small waiting area at the front entry but no reception area and no lunch space as this was to be incorporated in Stage 2 of the project. • The main office/ building to be developed in the second stage of the project.

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The existing building, with its high-raked ceilings, brick walls and exposed services,

provided a solid starting point for a raw, industrial design aesthetic with an interior space that encapsulated feature elements to help provoke a real sense of warmth and ambience. SDC used these elements to help uncover a unique atmosphere by peeling the existing paint back from the walls to reveal the heritage of the external brickwork. The use of Tasmanian Oak timber panelling conveys a sense of rhythm and repetition throughout the internal walls and ceiling features. The high ceilings and the existing exposed air-conditioning units were elements that expedited the use of acoustics throughout the interiors. A combination of timber with acoustic backing and wall and ceiling products played a vital role to accomplish a design where the client could functionally work within the space with minimal background sound. Each individual space was considered from offices, breakout spaces, collaboration hubs through to workstation areas. SDC added acoustic treatment throughout so no unnecessary interference would be endured, while the design also required the lowering of ceilings over breakout spaces and collaborative hubs and used wall panelling to assist with the acoustics to these areas. The floor finishes helped enhance the style and industrial feel of the design. The carpet tiles played a role in the acoustics to help disperse sound throughout and the cobblestone design of the carpet tile alludes to the intended aesthetic. The herringbone vinyl plank and

existing concrete flooring break up and lighten the spaces as well as providing a sense of calm and natural influence. The colour scheme throughout this fitout aligns earthy tones of nature and history, and the charcoal and white finishes highlight or hide surfaces. The use of this palette was added to accentuate the beauty of the textured and natural tones of the brick and timber. These references encompass a harmonious conclusion to the space with the idea being to design a space that was individual, industrial, earthy and rich, enhancing the original building envelope and giving light to the sector professions of Saunders Havill Group. Overall, the key design challenges that where faced throughout the interior of this existing building were: • Unknown factors working within this structure. • Having the ability to create good acoustic design throughout the open workstation, collaboration/ break out spaces, offices and meeting rooms achieving functional acoustics with minimal background sound and/ or interference. • Maintaining the industrial look of the exposed brick building when installing and selecting locations for the new power and data cabling avoiding existing exposed services and using existing beams and columns to manoeuvre these services to ducted skirtings to the perimeter of the building for workstation spaces.


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The 2020 Sustainability Summit Topics After 13 years, the oldest and biggest sustainable built environment educational event in the country, Sustainability Live, has evolved to become Australia’s pinnacle of sustainable designs, ideas and innovation-now known as the Sustainability Summit. The five 2020 Sustainability Summit panels will be: WATER CONSERVATION AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

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In designing buildings to be as sustainable as possible, the importance of implementing water-saving ideas and technologies is integral to any new building’s designs. So, what are the latest water conservation ideas and technologies that need to be adopted in the built environment on a continent where water scarcity is an ever-present crisis? Where should we start with water conservation in Australia? Are water storage & water recycling and water desalination the answer? What about water efficient fixtures and appliances, rainwater and greywater reuse? What are the ideas that architects and designers could and should implement into their designs to ensure water is being recycled, reused and ultimately conserved? DESIGNING AND BUILDING FOR THE NEW BUSHFIRE PARADIGM

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After the bushfire crisis in Australia, the way we design, and construct buildings is set to change. What else should we be doing to prevent what we saw in the ‘black summer’ of 2019/2020? Does our entire approach to design and building need an overhaul and where do we need to start? Along with designs, what materials should we be looking at to build the fire-proof structures of the future? When it comes to the bushfires, what can we learn from the First

Nations of Australia and can this knowledge help us manage future bushfires and help us reduce the impact of fires across our built environment? PASSIVE DESIGNS, PASSIVE HOUSES AND MULTI-RESIDENTIAL BUILDS The Australian climate requires that homes be designed or modified to ensure that the occupants remain thermally comfortable with minimal auxiliary heating or cooling in the climate where they are built. So does passive design fit into the eight climate zones in Australia and how is this design managed by the National Construction Code (NCC)? And while the northern European-derived passive house design is not always the best solution for Australia’s climate, do we need to instead concentrate on vernacular design and focus more on local needs, local materials, and local traditions and how does Australia’s growing love of high-rise apartments fit into all this? Do we need an Australian version of passive house design and what would that look like? PLANNING FOR A CARBON ZERO / CARBON POSITIVE FUTURE Urban developments around the world are using smart design and new materials to create net-zero energy structures and even carbon positive districts that challenge everything we have learnt about design to date. When it comes to being sustainable, one of the most effective

ways to lower a carbon footprint is to reduce or even entirely eliminate a building’s reliance on external fossil-fuel derived energy for power and lighting. How can residential homes and for that matter, precincts reduce their carbon environmental footprint and how have some precinct around the world been designed to be carbon positive and what can we learn and borrow from these designs? HOW DOES BUILDING AUTOMATION LEAD TO BETTER BUILDING SUSTAINABILITY? The future of building design belongs to structures with extensive sensor networks that can control temperature, monitor power and energy, and water consumption, track sustainability performance in real-time, and much more. In fact, automation is key in buildings when we are considering their longevity and the future since sustainable buildings emit less pollution and greenhouse gases, while at the same time have lower operating costs while increasing the value of the assets. They are also able to reduce energy (and water) consumption by optimising the operational efficacy. So how is all this technology changing the way buildings are designed, built and managed and how do we measure it’s impact on sustainability? The 2020 Sustainability Summit November 12, 2020, Melbourne Tickets on sale – August


The 2020 Sustainability Awards Categories

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Now in its fourteenth year, Architecture & Design’s annual Sustainability Awards will bring together the highest calibre of innovation and design and you’re invited to be a part of it.

ABOVE Winner of Women in Sustainability Award 2019, Natasha Mulcah (left), Sekisui House Australia. Winner of Emerging Architect/Designer Award 2019, Oliver Steele, Steele Associates (right).

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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT A person who has over their career, shown exemplary efforts in advancing the progression of the sustainable built environment in Australia.

COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE (LARGE) A Class 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 building used for professional and / or commercial purposes of over 500sqm in floor size.

EMERGING ARCHITECT/DESIGNER Open to architects/designers in their first five years of their career and recognises an outstanding achievement or development in the field of sustainable and/or environmental architecture planning or design across any of the building categories.

COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURE (SMALL) A Class 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 building used for professional and / or commercial purposes of under 500sqm in floor size.

WOMEN IN SUSTAINABILITY Presented to a woman who has made a significant contribution to the built environment sustainability in Australia over the past five years. The nomination must be supported by a person (female or male) working in the built environment industry.

EDUCATION & RESEARCH A child care preschool, primary, secondary or tertiary educational facility and / or joint research facility in which an educational institution is the major partner. PUBLIC & URBAN A building or facility or artwork which primarily services, or is used, by the public (except educational and healthcare facilities).

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ABOVE Winner Best of the Best Sustainabiltiy Award 2019, Biophilic Design for the City of Hope Eco Housing, SCHIMMINGER ARCHITECTS.

MULTIPLE DWELLING The design of a new townhouse, duplex or residential complex that contains multiple residential dwellings. Projects nominated under this category are classifiable as Class 2 buildings.

PREFAB & MODULAR Recognises prefabricated modular architecture that can be produced more efficiently in order to create less waste with the outcome being sustainable residential and commercial projects.

GREEN BUILDING MATERIAL A building product that is renewable, rather than non-renewable, environmentally responsible and where the impact is considered over the entire lifetime of the product.

SINGLE DWELLING (NEW) The design and construction of a singleresidential building to which a Class 1a Building category.

BEST ADAPTIVE REUSE Recognises the adaptive reuse of a building that has minimal impact on the historical significance of the building and its setting, while also pursuing a design that is sympathetic to the building in order to give it a new purpose.

WASTE ELIMINATION Covers any process in the environment that is designed to reduce or eliminate waste where possible; minimise waste where feasible; and reuse materials which might otherwise become waste. This Award is open to both commercialised solutions and designs as well as experimental or non-commercialised ones.

SINGLE DWELLING (ALTERATION) Extensions or alterations to at least 50 percent of a Class 1a building.

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LANDSCAPE & BIOPHILIA Buildings or non-building projects at the intersection of architecture, landscape design and urban planning. Examples include parks, pedestrian bridges and walkways, pools, shelters, picnic facilities, toilet blocks and children playgrounds. Can also include green roofs, green walls and other urban garden and similar type installations.

INNOVATION INTELLIGENT BUILDINGS Any class of building that uses smart design and / or a range of automated processes to automatically control the building’s operations including heating, ventilation, air conditioning, lighting, security and other systems in order to help improve asset reliability, performance, reduce energy use and minimise the total environmental impact of building.

BEST OF THE BEST Selected from among all the category winners and based on the highest score.

To find out about entry terms and conditions, go to sustainablebuildingawards.com.au


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Integrating Security in Design: A Guide to Specifying Security Screen Windows and Doors

WINTECSYSTEMS.COM.AU / A & D X W i n tec S y te m s /

• Natural Surveillance refers to making potential criminals easily observable using, for example, windows and doors looking out onto entrances. • Territorial Reinforcement refers to design features that enhance the sense of ownership over an area.

Principles of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design According to the National Crime Prevention Institute, crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) is the “proper design and effective use of the built environment” to reduce fear and incidence of crime. CPTED utilises opportunities for access control, surveillance and territorial reinforcement to elevate the perceived risk of detection for would-be offenders. • Natural Access Control refers to denying access to crime targets by using real (e.g. fences and doors) and psychological barriers (e.g. changes in architecture to signify the integrity or uniqueness of an area).

Security Screen Windows and Doors: A Design Solution Security screen windows and doors are an effective design solution for implementing CPTED strategies. Security screens provide a physical barrier that is more difficult to break or cut through than standard openings and are semi-transparent to enable clear sightlines to the outside. Security screens also offer an appealing and unobtrusive design, unlike grilles and steel bars, which contribute to a prison or fortresslike aesthetic. In addition, security screens provide natural light, ventilation and outdoor views, all of which contribute to increased health and wellbeing.

Design Considerations Specifiers should verify that the security window or door solution meets the performance requirements set by Australian security standards. The material used in the solution should be suitable for Australian conditions. Any security hardware should be tamper-resistant. Custom-made windows and doors are often needed to meet the strict installation requirements in Australian building standards and regulations.

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A key challenge in preventing crime through architectural design is selecting design features that balance security with cost, performance and aesthetics. Security screen windows and doors are an effective security solution that meets these needs while elevating occupant health and wellbeing.

Wintec Systems An Ullrich Aluminium company, Wintec Systems has offered a range of innovative, stylish and functional windows and door systems since 1997. All Wintec aluminium door and window systems are Australiandesigned, tested and manufactured. Ulltrasafe is Wintec’s innovative security window and door screen solution. bit.ly/Wintec_20Q2

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Meet the 2020 Sustainability Awards judging panel

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For the 2020 Sustainability Awards, set for November 12 and for the first time to be held in Melbourne, the judging panel that has been chosen is a mix of both experience and wide industry knowledge and as such, this year’s judges will have a unique and as always, a laser-like focus on delivering the very best winners of what is sure to be a record-breaking pool of entries. To say that this year, our 14th in a row, has not been without its challenges would be an extreme understatement. From fires to floods and now the global COVID-19 pandemic, 2020 will go down as either ‘The year we didn’t need to have’ or ‘The year we all had our mettle tested’. Regardless, while all this madness and mayhem is around us, those of us tasked with keeping the 2020 Sustainability Awards on track have a job to do and that also includes establishing a top-notch judging panel, a mission which I believe we have accomplished. By that I mean that this year’s jurist’s panel has what many we exactly need to get the perfect results, not surprising really as the 2020 panel is a mix of expertise, wisdom, experience and hands-on sustainability experience, all neatly bundled up in a group of people that are diverse in their outlook and experience and also have an acute understanding of what are the crucial elements in the sustainable built environment. I cannot finish off this brief introduction

to our judging without mentioning that for the second year running, we have managed to surpass gender parity, with four out of the total seven judges being women. As I mentioned last year, this is a reflection of not only our determination to ensure a level of true equity in our panel, but also an indication of the talent and sheer skill of the many women who are making enormous contributions to sustainability in the built environment. DICK CLARKE Principal, Envirotecture Dick Clarke is principal of Envirotecture, with over 35 years’ experience focusing exclusively on ecologically sustainable and culturally appropriate buildings, as well as sustainable design in vehicles and vessels. He is director of Sustainability for Building Designers Australia (BDA) and is a member of the Association of Building Sustainability Assessors (ABSA) and the Australian Sustainable

Built Environment Council (ASBEC). This is Clarke’s 14th year on the panel and he is once again the Jury chair. JEREMY SPENCER Director & builder, Positive Footprints Jeremy Spencer is a director and builder and energy rater, at Positive Footprints, a multi award-winning design and construction company that is working to show that energy efficient sustainable design and highperformance construction is a cost-effective option and can be a mainstream reality. Spencer is passionate about spreading the message of environmentally sustainable design, and to help bring about change in the way we build homes. To this end, he gives lectures, teaches, builds, and currently sits on the board of the Building Designers Association of Victoria, where he continues to advise and advocate for energy efficiency and broader environmental change in the built environment.


ABOVE (left to right) Dick Clarke, Jeremy Spencer, Malhalath Halperin.

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Mahalath Halperin, FRAIA, is an architect and environmental consultant living and working in regional NSW. As well as running an architectural practice since the 1990s, addressing everything from domestic renovations through to large commercial buildings, resorts and education facilities, she also conducts energy and environmental audits and assessments, and has always tried to tie the scientific with the aesthetic to achieve highly sustainable but liveable works where possible. Halperin has also developed and delivered courses on environmental and architectural issues, and is also a published author, including assorted children’s books, including one about her cat building a house. In 2010, she established HELP - Holistic Environmental Lifestyle Planning, which both looks into the bigger picture, beyond just the physical building itself, but can also drill down to the basics, provide audits and assessments, and offers a Green Concierge Service as well. As an architect, for Halperin it has long been a case of it’s not just about the building, but the people who live and/or work in it as well.

Michael Faine has been a registered architect since 1980 and to date, has worked on a multitude of building types, designs, construction and procurement methods. His diverse career led him to a teaching position at the University of Western Sydney in the Bachelor of Building/ Construction Management degree, and saw him acting as the Head of School for a time. After 17 years as an academic, and juror positions on both the Building Designers Association of Australia and the HIA Awards, Faine is attuned to analysing the work of builders and designers, and understanding the price in the work they are carrying out. SANDRA FURTADO Co-founder, Furtado Sullivan Sandra Furtado is a co-founder Furtado Sullivan, an architecture studio based in Sydney. The practice enjoys the challenge of translating a project’s complexity into a design that works with its environment, combining large-scale efficiency and sophistication with a bespoke design approach. In the past, she has been intrinsically involved in notable

large-scale projects including 8 Chifley, Barangaroo Masterplan and International Towers, and One Circular Quay hotel in Circular Quay. Furtado has an extraordinary ability to understand urban complexity. Through holistic design thinking, she seeks synergies with multidisciplinary practices, harnessing collective knowledge in order to achieve goals creatively and drive the sustainability agenda

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MICHAEL FAINE Registered architect, Faine Group Architects

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MAHALATH HALPERIN Director, Mahalath Halperin Architects

NERMINE ZAHRAN Sustainable Design Leader, Gensler Nermine Zahran is Gensler’s Sustainable Design Leader for the Asia Pacific region. She has worked in Australia and internationally on a number of large and-small-scale projects covering a wide range of architectural typologies. She has been described as having a contagious passion for sustainable design as well as a comprehensive understanding of industry best practices. Zahran also believes that it is vital to continually learn – and to educate others in the industry and in the general public – about ways to minimise the impact of the built environment on the planet. Beyond her aim to positively influence materials selection, construction methods, and ongoing energy-

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To say that this year, our 14th in a row, has not been without its challenges would be an extreme understatement.

efficient operations strategies, she also seeks to ensure that the buildings and spaces we create are human-centred and improve human health and well-being. She is a true champion of Gensler’s belief that every project, no matter how large or small, is an opportunity to make our communities, and ultimately our world, more liveable and resilient. SUZANNE TOUMBOUROU Director, Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council

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Suzanne Toumbourou is the executive director of the Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council, a body of peak organisations committed to a vision of more sustainable, productive and

resilient buildings, communities and cities. Toumbourou is a renowned trailblazer and sustainability champion with a passion and expertise in communication, collaboration and an inclusive agenda for a sustainable Australia. Toumbourou has broad experience encompassing Federal and State Governments, industry and non-profit organisations including the Australian Conservation Foundation and GetUp. She played a coordinating role with the Australian Business Roundtable on Climate Change and was a foundational member of the steering committee for Al Gore’s Climate Project in Australia. Find out more at sustainablebuidlingawards.com.au

ABOVE (clockwise from top left) Michael Faine, Sandra Furtado, Nermine Zahran, Suzzane Toubourou.


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Sustainability Awards 2020 Ambassadors

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For the first time in its 14-year history, the Sustainability Awards will have ambassadors to help promote what has become Australia’s largest and most popular sustainability event for the built industry.

These ambassadors that we have chosen are not only leaders in their field, they are at the same time, veritable icons of the industry who have each contributed in their own unique way in helping and promoting sustainability and a better environmental outcome for all. HY WILLIAM CHAN Urbanist, entrepreneur, University of Sydney

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HY William Chan is an entrepreneur and urbanist with a passion in innovating our cities and communities. Chan has designed for Cox Architecture, Hassell, Arup Foresight and Innovation, and the Australian Government Department of the Environment. An outspoken advocate, Chan is a Forbes ’30 Under 30’ innovator and TEDx speaker. His sustainable development projects have been showcased across 40 cities. This year, he was inducted into the Australian of the Year Honour Roll, named as one of Pro Bono Australia’s top 25 most influential Australians in the social sector, and features in the Qantas Centenary publication of ‘100 Inspiring Australians’.

NICCI LEUNG Founder and facilitator, Lifepod Evolution creator and design lead, The Lifepod Project Nicci Leung began her career providing design and project services to two of the most highly regarded architectural and interior design practices in Melbourne. As her interests broadened, Leung’s career evolved to embrace the incredible potential for innovation that new and emerging technologies offered. Lifepod Evolution facilitates exploration and experimentation for clients and collaborators. Combining her passions for design, innovation and technology, Leung assembles multidisciplinary teams to ‘prototype’ pathways and solutions that inspire constructive change; putting the needs of our people and our planet front and centre and rethinking the way we design, build and live. The Lifepod Project is one of these investigations, focused to find the housing solutions of the future. Leung’s vision for the future is a positive one and involves Australian talent in across sector

collaboration to create real solutions to the many challenges and complexities associated with increasing population and urbanization across the globe. CHRISTIAN HAMPSON Co-founder and director (Woiwurrung | Maneroo), Yerrabingin Christian Hampson is a proud Woiwurrung and Maneroo Aboriginal man interweaving Indigenous tacit knowledge and collaborative design thinking to walk a new path, away from conventional approaches. Yerrabingin has launched the world’s first Indigenous rooftop farm in 2019, located high above Sydney on the roof of Yerrabingin House in South Eveleigh with over 2,500 Australian native plants. JEFA GREENAWAY Director, RAIA (Wailwan | Kamilaroi), Greenaway Architects Jefa Greenaway is director of Greenaway Architects, a University of Melbourne senior


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JOHN GERTSAKIS Sustainability | Stewardship | Advocacy | Communications, Cambium Communications John Gertsakis is an experienced sustainability, policy and communications practitioner across diverse industries, sectors and portfolios. He operates at the highest levels with ministers,

members of parliament, government officials and other industry associations. Gertsakis served as executive director of Product Stewardship Australia representing global consumer electronics brands in the design of the Product Stewardship Act. As an honorary fellow of the Design Institute of Australia, he understands the issues confronting the design industry. His work has covered appliances, electronics, furniture, floor-coverings and textiles. Design management has often been at the centre of these engagements including greater attention to how we transition to a circular economy. His early work on cradle to cradle thinking represents a pioneering phase at RMIT’s Centre for Design. Gertsakis is also director of Communications with Equilibrium consultants, senior policy adviser with the DIA, and an adjunct professor with the Institute for Sustainable Futures at UTS.

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academic, and a regular design commentator on ABC Radio Melbourne. He’s championed Indigenous led design thinking for over 25 years, including as co-founder of Indigenous Architecture + Design Victoria, as co-author of the International Indigenous Design Charter, and as Regional Ambassador (Oceania) of INDIGO (International Indigenous Design Network). He’s a founding signatory of Architects Declare Australia an initiative foregrounding architecture’s role in to tackling the challenges of climate change and biodiversity loss, is co-curator (with Tristan Wong) of the Australian exhibition at La Biennale Architettura di Venezia 2020 and is a recent 2020 DIA Hall of Fame inductee.

ABOVE (clockwise from top left) Hy William Chan, Nicci Leung, Christian Hampson, John Gertsakis, Jefa Greenaway.

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CELEBRATING SUSTAINABILITY LEADERS Building a better future through the acknowledgement of design excellence. Now in its fourteenth year, Architecture & Design’s annual Sustainability Awards will bring together the highest calibre of innovation and design and you’re invited to be a part of it.

ENTRIES OPEN IN JUNE sustainablebuildingawards.com.au

sustainablebuildingawards.com.au 12 NOVEMBER 2020 | PLAZA BALLROOM, MELBOURNE IMAGE Nightingale 2.0 by Six Degrees Architects and HIP V. HYPE Sustainability | 2019 Sustainability Awards Winner of the Multiple Dwelling category.

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Best of the Best

Green Building Material

Emerging Sustainable Architect/Designer

Single Dwelling - New

Commercial Building - Small

Lifetime Achievement

Event Partner

Strategic Partners

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P R O M O T I O N F E AT U R E

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Over the Threshold: Specifying Door Sills for Universal Access, Functionality and Performance

Modern building design must include features that enhance accessibility while balancing concerns for performance, functionality and longevity. As exterior doors serve as entry points for the general public, careful specification of door sills is required when designing inclusive environments. The Importance of Door Sills and Thresholds In addition to enabling entry into indoor spaces, door sills and thresholds on exterior doors fulfil a variety of other purposes, including: • protecting against the entry of water, heat, cold air into an indoor space; • keeping small pests from entering indoors; • reducing the amount of interior air leaking out under the door frame thus improving a building’s energy efficiency.

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AS1428.1-2009 “Continuous path of travel” Under AS1428.1-2009 Design for Access and Mobility, new buildings must provide continuous paths of travel for people who use

wheelchairs or have other mobility issues. AS1428.1 also outlines the design and performance requirements of door handles and other related hardware. Care should be taken to avoid features that could impede access for users with a disability or mobility issues. Insufficient circulation space, insufficient landing space and trip hazards around doors can make operating doors difficult for such users, especially those utilising wheelchairs. Door Sill Specification: Accessibility with Performance Door sills that comply with AS 1428.1 may not meet the minimum Water Penetration Resistance in AS 2047-2014 Windows and external glazed doors in buildings. Sills with drainage systems balance accessibility with protection against water ingress. Designers and specifiers should confirm that the door system has been independently tested to meet the requirements for operational force, air infiltration and water penetration.

A range of other factors will affect door sill specification including requirements for energy efficiency, acoustic control, flyscreens and fire performance. Door systems require regular maintenance to maintain quality and performance, so ease-of-maintenance and durability should also be considered. Alspec Established in 1974, Alspec is the market leader in the design and distribution of innovative aluminium systems to the architectural, industrial and home improvement markets. Alspec has invested heavily in research and development to ensure a continual supply of groundbreaking, versatile door systems including the Hawkesbury Top Hung Sliding Door, Hawkesbury Multi-Fold, ProGlide UltraFlat and the Swan Evo 45mm Shopfront Door.

bit.ly/Alspec_20Q2


THERMALLY BROKEN WINDOW AND DOOR SYSTEMS

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Getting a grip on more than just brass handles ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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a peek into what suppliers should be ‘gearing up to give’, for lack of a better term. Rising trends like green technology and energy efficiency in building construction, together with technology modification and integration, are major factors influencing the demand of windows and doors worldwide. “Home automation technology has been increasing rapidly, which is driving the growth of smart doors and windows in the market. [Conjunctively], automated or smart-product demand is expected to follow a positive growth trend in the coming years due to enhanced security and comfort,” according to Global Market Insights Windows and Doors Report. But don’t let the term ‘home automation’ fool you. Commercial industries are using smart technology to reel their doors up, and down. The idea of a market’s evolution spreads far and wide, and what we see today (focussed on a commercial industry of doors and windows) are some of the most effective products that reflect the global demand in this market.

LOUVRETEC Louvretec Sliding Shutters provide privacy, are highly functional and add to the aesthetic of commercial buildings. Ideally used as outdoor sliders, the Louvretec range of shutters include sliding, hinged & bi-folding options with smooth operation. Louvretec shutter systems provide a modern look that will complement a multi-storey apartment complex or an office block all the whilst enhancing privacy, aesthetics and functionality. Louvretec shutter systems can assist with thermal control by reducing overall energy consumption, allowing the user to control the amount of daylight and glare. Designed with coastal environments in mind, the componentry used in Louvretec’s shutters has completed extensive corrosion resistant testing. Available in a large range of colours, including powder coated or anodised finish, the shutters can be colour matched to existing joinery.

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In a digital new age, life has changed, and so have our entrances and our glass peepholes. But more specifically, so have our materials, the way we interact with them, what we expect from them and how we see our future with them. Them, as in, doors and windows. Firstly, it is beneficial to understand where doors and windows sit in the market in the 21st century. A new report on the doors and windows market estimates the global market valuation will cross US$235.2 billion by 2026, according to Global Market Insights. So, what are the major findings of the window and door market report and why are they important? Notable findings include increased spending on commercial infrastructure, proliferated demand for uPVC profiles, increased replacement of ageing infrastructure and developed building and construction activities in the Asia-Pacific. These findings are important because they’re notifying us of the demand, due to global trends or circumstances, but most importantly, they’re

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Let’s get down to brass tacks – gone are the days of brass handles to open the wooden-arched doors into the castle, house, or the commercial retail space.

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The louvre blades have a hidden woolpile closing strip, which ensures silent closing and a rattle-free operation. Designed to the client’s precise requirements, Louvretec shutter infills can be hand operated or even motorised with a choice of louvre infill sizes. ALSPEC

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Alspec’s ThermAFrame system is a highperformance, energy-efficient window, door and framing option that utilises the latest in European Polyamide Thermal Break technology and combines Australian design principles to achieve the best possible results in energy rating in a system that is easy to fabricate and install. By thermally breaking the aluminium frame extrusion, Alspec significantly restrict the heat flow through the system. As the Alspec ThermAFrame system limits heat flow, it will reduce the load for heating and cooling, along with providing a reduced risk of condensation. Alspec’s ThermAFrame systems have some of the lowest U-Value’s available in Australia, as low as Uw1.7, meaning that they are the most energy-efficient systems available. These systems also have glazing pockets up to 32mm, which means they can accept a huge range of Insulated Glass Units.

An example of this product being used is in the Falls Creek alpine village, where visitors to the Konayuki apartments will find themselves well-protected from both summer and winter weather extremes through the high-performance properties of Alspec’s ThermAFrame systems. The Konayuki development features the ThermAFrame Centre Pocket Framing Suite, Hinged Doors and Awning Windows. The ThermAFrame system has been designed and developed using what is known as Polyamide Thermal Break technology. A ‘thermal break’ is where a different element is added to the aluminium frame during construction. Given aluminium is a good conductor of heat and cold, a product with less conductive properties is inserted between the aluminium’s inside and outside sections. The Centre Pocket Framing is available in two depths, 101.6mm and 150mm x 60mm, and can accommodate glass options up to 32mm thanks to the wide glazing pocket. WINTEC SYSTEMS Wintec systems offers a range of building products, be it weather or energy efficient, doors and windows with larger uninterrupted views, or low-maintenance exterior cladding.

UltraClad is a powder coated aluminium, interlocking-exterior cladding system that can be applied both horizontally and vertically. It is suited to both residential and commercial building applications and is available in a wide range of colours in modern or classic designs. They are produced in six different profiles which range in width from 140mm up to 205 mm and are supplied in five metre and six metre lengths. When installed, the cladding is effectively 15mm thick with the powder coat featuring on the exposed surfaces. UltraClad is extruded from 6060 T5 premium grade aluminium. It is tested to Australian cyclonic conditions and additionally, it’s made up of non-combustible material (BAL 40) – bushfire tested, lightweight, low maintenance and no painting required. UltraClad caters for many design options from feature walls, gable ends to fully clad buildings. The ease and speed with which UltraClad is installed and the fact that it is prefinished makes for faster construction time and reduced cost in scaffolding and painting. UltraClad is supplied as a complete system which consists of weatherboards, (aluminium cladding), locator’s for concealed fixing, internal/external corner moulds, starter strips board jointers, window flashing and accessories.


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AUSTRALIAN GLASS GROUP Insulglass LowE Max is a softcoat LowE Double Glazed Unit (DGU) with special atomic layers that see market leading solar control, by stopping 73 percent of the sun’s heat from entering inside a building whilst also upholding a superior 78 percent insulation standard. Australian Glass Group’s Insulglass LowE Max enables their clients to maintain large units without compromising performance as well as meeting the new NCC2019 significant increase in minimal performance requirements. Some key features of Australian Glass Groups product also include high-acoustic performance, protection from ultraviolet fading factors, reduces energy waste by reducing heating and cooling, reduces energy costs and reduces the overall carbon footprint of clients’ buildings. ASSA ABLOY

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ASSA ABLOY’s automatic door systems can reduce the amount of energy needed to heat or cool a building, resulting in lower costs and a smaller carbon footprint for customers.


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Key Features & BENEFITS Designed and engineered in Australia - systems have been tested and exceed Australian Standard AS2047 Easy to fabricate and install State-of-the-art thermal break technology Available in a wide range of powder coat colours Compatible with Darley's other window and door systems Reduces the need for artificial cooling and heating

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door is bolstered by a bottom tracking system with door frame inserts to prevent deter forced entry of a lateral force. When combined the ASSA ABLOY Entrance Systems SL500 Automatic Sliding Door Operator, the door can also be controlled by multiple inputs including features such as ‘Pharmacy mode’ where the door only opens partially after hours or after a set time, or a full lock down mode for situations that require an immediate response.

Doors are the underdogs of the building world. They’re key, vital even, to privacy, accessibility, and in some cases, can be a life or death matter. DMF’s most popular product, the Series RL3000 rapid roll door is self-explanatorily apart of that narrative. This particular door model is custom manufactured, operating at speeds of up to 1.5 per second, meaning they’re perfect for high trafficked areas requiring a bit of control,

Safety sensors additionally protect users, and the product, meaning, its intensive operational speed is not going to kill you, nor ding the door. Its customisable, up to 6m high by 6m wide, and its speed of operation is faster than what one might expect. It’s title, ‘rapid roll door’ doesn’t lie. Most topically though, its modular in its design, meaning that any service work or replacements parts can be exercised more simply. DMF is locally manufactured, meaning that customising and timeframes can finally coexist peacefully. “Because we make the product, DMF understands the product better than anyone, and so you do not just purchase a product, but you become acquainted with the manufacturer; a feature that is declining in Australia,” according to DMF. DMF recently had a Series RL3000E model Rapid Roll Door installed in one of Bunning’s busiest Sydney locations. The RL3000E rapid door was custommade to size and included two clear full-width window sections for safety and light and is

electromechanical locking system contained within the sliding door mechanism. The middle edges of the door are enhanced by interlocking profiles on the leading edges, bandit proof glass and hardened steel door locating pins to prevent the doors from being pushed in or levered apart. The bottom of the

whether it be temperature, dust, draft or vermin. Its resilience is of equal importance to its functionality, since Australia’s climate can be temperamental, so it’s with much reassurance that the wind capacity of the Series RL3000 is up to about 80km/h, with aluminium door columns with full sealing to the door blade.

operated by an induction loop system. The controller is DMF’s exclusive HMI and encoder system, allowing the doors to operate at over 1.2m/sec. So if we’re really getting down to brass tacks in our digital new age, there’s really no brass used for doors and windows anymore, at all.

DMF

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Yet ASSA ABLOY’s Intrusion Protection Systems is different to most on the market, as it is equipped with additional sensors for fine-tuning opening and closing times, further enhancing its energy-saving capabilities. Regular maintenance helps ensure top performance and extends the life of the equipment, reducing its impact on the environment. The ASSA ABLOY Entrance Systems Intrusion Protection System is the costefficient upgrade to any new automatic sliding door and is now being utilised by some of Australia’s largest retailers as well as banks, service stations and any building requiring further security protection for your business and your staff. The reduction in break-ins not only has a huge impact in regard to reduced costs across the board, but also on staff confidence and safety resulting in higher productivity all round. The Intrusion protection system provides options for securing at multiple points, whether it be top, middle or bottom. The top of the door can be further enhanced with a strengthened

SUPPLIERS Assa Abloy Entrance Systems architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/assa-abloy-entrance-systems-australia DMF International architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/dmf-international AGG architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/australian-glass-group Alspec architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/alspec Wintec 58

architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/wintec-systems Louvretec architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/louvretec-australia


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Schuco Aluminium Systems - combining architecture, design and function As an Australian distributor of Schßco products, Capral Aluminium extrude and supply a comprehensive range of German-engineered aluminium window, door and facade systems suitable for the architectural and residential markets. With one of Australia’s largest R&D capability, we are well-positioned to take advantage of evolving building regulations in Australia and are able to technically back our products.

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The natural appeal of timber flooring WORDS MATT MCDONALD

Handcrafted from hardwood Tasmanian Oak, Woodsmith engineered flooring is available in six modern designer colours. Produced using a quarter sawing technique for a smooth, uninterrupted visual continuity, the product’s straight, consistent grain and

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Engineered timber flooring is an increasingly popular option for commercial projects. An alternative to solid timber floorboards, it is finding use everywhere from office and retail spaces to educational and indoor sporting facilities. Featuring multiple perpendicular plies, as well a single top layer (or lamella) of solid wood (generally hardwood), engineered timber flooring offers all the aesthetic appeal of solid timber minus several of the latter’s limitations. Engineered timber is more affordable and simpler to install than solid wood. While the

165mm profile is intended to create a sense of expansiveness and organic flow. Its 3.2mm Tasmanian Oak lamella makes it hard wearing and resistant to heavy foot traffic. The product was specified on Launceston’s refurbished Bond Store building, an iconic three storey building completed soon after the settlement was established in 1830. The design was left up to local architectural firm, HBV Architects. Wanting to reflect the timber interior of the original building, HBV included Neville Smith’s Woodsmith Tasmanian Oak engineered flooring in ‘Huon Trail’ for interior flooring. As Neville Smith’s marketing manager Drew Freeman explains, Tasmanian Oak was the ideal choice of material for this project. “Our client made contact with us in an effort to identify a Tasmanian timber product that would be suited to both a normal flooring application as well as a lining option for the internal stair case that would seamlessly link the natural Tasmanian Oak at the core of the project with the character and history of this iconic heritage building,” says Freeman. To keep the focus on the original building, HBV created a timber screen over the addition’s windows, creating the illusion of a seamless timber box. Meanwhile, on the interior, they wanted a material that would match the beauty of the updated design. That’s where Woodsmith’s engineered flooring came in. “Stable, flexible, pre finished and resistant to warping & shrinkage, Woodsmith ‘Huon

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latter must be nailed or stapled into position, engineered timber can also be either glued or fixed with a ‘float-and-lock’ system. This flexibility cuts installation time and minimises disruption. It means occupants can get back to work as soon as possible. Engineered timber is also more stable than solid timber. Its cross laminated construction reduces expansion and contraction due to temperature changes and it handles moisture better than its organic counterpart. Engineered products are therefore more suitable for places like pubs, cafes and restaurants, which are prone to liquid spills. This is not to say that engineered timber is superior in every respect. In terms of life span, for example, solid timber has the edge. It can be sanded much more frequently, and if wellmaintained and used in suitable applications, will last for decades. Still, both products deliver a natural look and can be advertised as such. They offer similar resale values. Some local suppliers of engineered timber flooring and the products they offer include:

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Specifiers choosing flooring for commercial applications need to focus on six factors: cost, acoustic performance, durability, ease of installation, maintenance and – of course – appearance. Whether the product in question is a laminate, a luxury vinyl tile (LVT), a carpet tile, polished concrete, tile flooring or natural timber, those choosing it need to ensure that it not only represents value for money but that it will prove durable and attractive enough to justify its purchase. After all, just as the high-quality flooring products can help deliver functional commercial spaces, satisfied occupants, and untroubled facility managers, the wrong flooring choice can be a recipe for dissatisfaction and maintenance headaches.

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Favoured by designers for its aesthetic appeal, and industry for its breadth of application and ease of installation, engineered timber floors create real talking points. Matthew McDonald examines the use of the product – and some lookalike alternatives – in commercial projects.

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Trail’ handcrafted Tasmanian Oak engineered flooring and lining proved to be the perfect material to help bring Macquarie House back to life and we were honoured to be part of the project,” says Freeman. HAVWOODS UK-based supplier Havwoods has been delivering stable and reliable engineered timber flooring to the commercial sector for over 45 years. With nearly 200 products in its catalogue, the company has had a presence in Australian since 2010. Versatile and easy to work with, Havwoods products are used extensively in commercial projects. Apart from flooring, they have been used to custom clad reception desk, seating booths, ceilings, feature walls and more. Microsoft engaged Tom Mark Henry (TMH) to help them realise their first Flagship Technology Centre in Australia. Located above the GPO in Sydney’s Martin Place, the brief was to represent the global brand while reflecting the project’s distinct Sydney context and site. The space needed to host everyone from children to CEOs, and seamlessly cater to their various requirements with a complex spatial plan. A focus on the natural beauty of the Australian landscape was fundamental to the project. Explored using bold textures, colours and forms, this included the choice of timber flooring. To differentiate the multi-purpose spaces, TMH selected Havwoods Pureplank

Clermont for the kitchen areas and opted for Parky Ivory Oak Twist for several of the staff touchdown zones. The timber flooring complemented the other material choices and enabled TMH to create a cohesive aesthetic which was carried throughout the space. According to the architects, they selected Havwoods floor because of its range of formats, colours and finishes. The vast choice made it easy to find the right product. PLANK FLOORS Plank Floors is a manufacturer and supplier of prefinished, durable and sustainable engineered timber floors. Working with Australia’s leading architects, design firms, developers and builders, the company focusses on work within the commercial and multi residential market. With recent projects including a retail job at Coco Republic, Ridge’s Geelong, and an office fit out at Spaces -The Wentworth, the company offers four stocked product categories. These include European oak (in 13 colours), Australian hardwood (consists of two species) Parquetry (Chevron and herringbone) and artisan range (in four colours). These floors feature formulated multi layers of premium coatings from WOCA Denmark which are UV cured in oils and lacquers for high wear resistance. The multiple layers of coating make the surface harder to scratch, while the UV oil finishes enable spot repairs for scratches and give the finished product a natural look and feel.


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plank-floors Altro architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/altro-flooring-and-walling Interface architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/interface-aust

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SUPPLIERS Woodsmith wearewoodsmith.com.au/ Havwoods architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/havwoods Plank Floors architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/

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Engineered timber flooring is a cost-effective alternative to solid timber floorboards. But when looking for commercial flooring, it’s worth taking things a step further. It’s worth considering alternatives to the alternative – that is timber-look products that contain no wood whatsoever. ‘Wood Adhesive Free’, a vinyl flooring product from Altro is an example. Combining cutting edge design, with the adhesive-free innovation of ‘Xpresslay’, Wood Adhesive Free can be installed quickly, with minimal interruption to the end user. Installed using a double-sided tape, Wood Adhesive Free lies flat with no rucking or movement. The chocolate bar emboss on the back allows moisture to evaporate under the surface meaning it can be installed over concrete subfloors up to 97 percent RH. Able to be walked upon on the same day as its installation, Wood Adhesive Free is suitable for high traffic commercial areas like bedroom and ensuites in care homes and hotels; corridors, general circulation, reception and public areas in hospitals, kindergartens and schools; as well as cafes and dining areas.

‘Level Set’, Interface’s luxury vinyl tile (LVT) collection is another product worth considering. Available in both wood and stone finishes, this modular system features the company’s Ceramor+ slip-resistance treatment as well as its Sound Choice backing for enhanced acoustic performance. As is the case with all the company’s products, tiles in the Interface LVT range are carbon neutral. When a customer buys these products, Interface calculates the floor’s carbon neutral credentials and then leverages its established and third party verified offsets programmes to neutralise the floor’s carbon impact. Because tiles in the Level Set collection are the same size and depth as Interface carpet tiles, designers can integrate the two products without need for transition strips. Apart from reducing installation time and waste, this opens up the design possibilities. Used in this way, the two products can create unique patterns, irregular transitions with seamless joins between hardwearing, durable pathways and softer spaces. A.B. Paterson College, a private school based in Arundel QLD unveiled its most recent

addition, The Winton Centre. Conceived as a hub in which Prep - Year 12 students could gather, learn, socialise and work together, the project was completed by Burling Brown Architects. ‘Wellbeing through nature’ was always a strong theme on campus. From the choice of native plants to the choice of furnishing in native colours to the façade mural, it is never far away. “Many design references point back to nature and its preservation, to evoke the feeling of happiness and joy. Maximising natural daylight was crucial,” says Andrew Brewer, architect and associate director, Burling Brown Architects. “The Early Learning area takes the dual approach of bringing the outside, inside and the interior influences out. Albeit a space that demands robust finishing and a balance of textures and patterns, Interface’s Luxury Vinyl Tile was chosen for its soft, natural timber appearance.” Timber has a natural appeal. Its calming effects are well understood, so it makes sense expand its use in commercial projects. The products are there. In terms of flooring, the only choice to be made is which best suits each project – solid timber, engineered timber or one of the many timber-look products available.


Engineered Timber Flooring Plank Floor’s European Oak collection has been created for

Sydney 02 9698 1251

durability, longevity and high performance in commercial and

Melbourne 03 9645 3227

residential applications. Available in a wide range of colours with

Brisbane 07 3059 9448

UV Oil and lacquer finishes, our products have low VOC emissions to ensure they are environmentally safe.

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The ever-changing faces of Australian commercial design

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WORDS STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC

If you ask anyone what their idea of a ‘commercial building’ is, you’re likely to get a different answer every time. Restaurants, offices, aquatic centres, petrol stations and even universities can all be considered ‘commercial’. Yet each of these building types has a unique architectural style and with that comes different cladding needs.

RIGHT The ‘Smoked Ash’ DecoWood finished battens are featured 66

above the store’s entrance, creating a soft, elegant and warm presence.


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ABOVE Te Ara a Tawhaki is a stunning example of timber being used to reflect elements of Maori culture.

For some buildings, external materials are chosen to make a bold statement, while others are more concerned with what’s practical for the climate and conditions of the site. And of course, fire safety is of the utmost importance for all new and existing Australian structures. Considering how wide-ranging commercial structures can be, there are endless cladding and external wall materials to choose from. In saying this however, there are a number of highquality, versatile materials that can serve the purposes of any commercial building. THE RISE OF TIMBER IN COMMERCIAL BUILDS

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The last few years have seen a significant increase in the use of timber cladding for Australian commercial structures. Timber cladding certainly has a long history in Australian residential structures, if we recall the weatherboard cladding of the nation’s Federation and Queenslander houses. But the use of timber for commercial structures is more of a recent trend, particularly with the advent of engineered timber and the growing awareness of timber as a material that promotes physical

and mental wellbeing among employees. There are some negative perceptions timber has had to overcome – such as its vulnerability to termites, moisture and fire. While these are still valid concerns, Australian timber products have come a long way from what they were in the 19th century, with cross laminated timber (CLT) for example offering superior strength, fire protection and energy efficiency when compared to traditional timber materials. There are also a number of resins and powder coats that when applied improve timber’s ability to stand up to harsh Australian weather conditions, not to mention the growing use of techniques such as Shou Sugi Ban, a Japanese method of charring wood to make it fire and weatherproof. Timber is sometimes associated with Japanese design, bringing images of tranquil, minimalist and natural structures to mind. However, it is a material that lends itself to many cultures. Te Ara a Tāwhaki is a stunning example of timber being used to reflect elements of Māori culture. Situated in Otaki, New Zealand, Te Ara a Tāwhaki is part of Te Wānanga o Raukawa

(a unique learning laboratory specifically for Māori). The building houses a library, main lecture theatre, student services and student hub. Designed by Tennent Brown, the facade has a unique criss-cross pattern that is reminiscent of traditional Māori flax weaving patterns. This project required a timber that would be stable enough to cope with this application, while weathering gracefully. Maintenance was also a key consideration given the elevated nature of the structure on a commercial building. The product used was Abodo’s Vulcan Screening, which was chosen for its stability and weathering characteristics. According to Abodo, Vulcan is sustainably sourced thermally modified timber – a chemical-free, heat-based treatment which dramatically increases the durability and stability of the wood. For additional protection, the timber is coated with Sioo:x, a patented silicon technology that cures by reacting with atmospheric carbon dioxide and moisture to form an insoluble and flexible silica network within the timber surface. The formation of this silica network toughens the surface of the timber and forms an effective barrier against insect attack and rot. The application of Sioo:x


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While modern timber products have certainly proven themselves more than capable of facing up to the Australian environment, there are some applications where aluminium or ‘timber-look’ aluminium might be preferred.

also leaves the timber with an aesthetically pleasing natural silver-grey finish. Another stunning application of this product can be seen in South Australia’s Fleurieu Aquatic Centre, a sustainable indoor aquatic centre designed by lead architect Hames Sharley. The building’s facade is clad in Vulcan in a WB10 profile, which has been used to create a vertical shiplap look. In this case, Vulcan was chosen for its aesthetic as well as its invisible fixings and sustainability; Vulcan is FSC certified natural wood sourced from sustainable plantations in New Zealand. KEEPING BUILDINGS ‘COOL’ WITH ALUMINIUM

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While modern timber products have certainly proven themselves more than capable of facing up to the Australian environment, there are some applications where aluminium or ‘timberlook’ aluminium might be preferred. One good example is the BP and David Jones Bayside Store in Melbourne. Designed by Modus Projects, the store is a new petrol station concept that aims to deliver high quality and innovative food options to consumers. The project used Deco’s 50x50 ‘Quick Click’ DecoBattens to create an entrance that is both welcoming but also reminiscent of a high-end convenience store. In particular, the ‘Smoked Ash’ DecoWood finished battens are featured above the store’s entrance, creating a soft, elegant and warm presence.

While they have the appearance of timber, the battens are actually made from 100 percent aluminium. The benefit of the batten series is its easy installation. Available in widths of 50mm and 25mm, the battens have a base and cover system where the batten base is fixed onto the surface and the batten cover is simply clicked onto the base. According to Deco, the battens are a premium timber alternative, providing durability and flexibility not achieved by traditional timber or composite batten products. With their powder coat finish, the battens are also resilient to harsh UV rays and marine environments, while offering a low maintenance solution that never needs painting or staining. Another aluminium product suitable for commercial exteriors is Mondoclad from HVG Facades. Mondoclad was used to reclad two buildings at Federation University’s Berwick Campus in Victoria. As these buildings had a contrasting design to the rest of the site, it was essential that the recladding work met the architects’ strict brief to maintain the original ‘cube’ aesthetic. Mondoclad was chosen not only for its style, but also its strong fire safety ratings. This product was also used in Brisbane office and residential development 183 North Quay, where the building had its existing aluminium composite cladding removed from the ground-level columns and feature portal, then replaced with Mondoclad panels in a natural brushed finish. According to HVG Facades, Mondoclad is an ideal non-combustible cladding alternative for

builds focused on exceeding fire compliance laws, as well as for the recladding of existing projects that may have once used a combustible cladding project. Made from marine grade aluminium, this product is highly durable, with its PVDF architectural paint finish ensuring UV stability and colour retention. It is also a sustainable option that is 100 percent recyclable. REVISITING A TRADITIONAL CHOICE: BRICK Not to be forgotten is brick, a traditional choice that has been coming back into favour in recent years. Kaz Tower is a striking example of a modernyet-traditional commercial and residential building. Designed by Tony Owen Partners, Kaz Tower is a 14-storey tower surrounded by heritage buildings in urban Sydney. There were challenges from the start, with strict heritage requirements from the City of Sydney. One of those requirements was to build a brick podium for the first three floors of the building, considering the Kaz Tower would adjoin several historic brick buildings. With the architect simultaneously wanting a glass façade that would maximise sunlight through each street-front window (a challenge in Sydney’s commercial centre), the design of Kaz Tower required the use of an innovative parametric design technique. “At different times of the day the sun hits different parts of the building,” says Tony Owen, director of Tony Owen Partners.


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ABOVE Kaz Tower is a striking example of a modern, yet traditional, commercial and residential building.

SUPPLIERS Robertson Facade Systems (Brick Inlay): robertsonfacades.com.au/ Britton Timbers (Abodo Vulcan Screening): architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/britton-timbers HVG Facades (Mondoclad): harchitectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/hvg-facades 72

Deco (DecoBattens): architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/deco

“So [using parametric design], we angled the windows in each part of the building according to where the light was coming from at a certain time of the day. And we ended up with a building that had patterned glazing where every window was at a different angle, because the different height would get sun at different times, and at the different times, the sun would have a different angle.” The addition of a three-storey brick podium and side brick facade to the angled red, yellow and white glass facade made for a highly-unique design. While traditional face bricks were selected to construct the podium, a brick inlay facade was the system of choice for the side walls. Choosing a brick product was not easy, as it was crucial to ensure visual continuity across the podium and facade. In the end, the architects chose the Iron Mountains bricks and brick tiles from Robertson Facade Systems. “We just couldn’t find a brick tile in an appropriate colour,” says Marianna Mioduszewski, director of Tony Owen Partners. “We had many samples that did not satisfy anyone. Then Robertson’s Building Products came up with a solid brick and brick tile, which was extremely attractive for us. So, when we found the same face, it was like, that’s it. And colour-wise, it was comparable to the desired look because it was dark – a grey/brown – and not a uniform colour on the face, which was very attractive as well.” The next challenge was figuring out how to combine the angled facade with the bricks. “We thought putting the side façade together would be very difficult, but Hanson Precast suggested Robertson Facade Systems’ Brick Inlay,” says Mioduszewski. “We went to the factory to see how individual panels are formed and shaped and gained a lot of confidence that these panels would be well done. So, we were very confident from day one, and they have proven that it’s definitely the way to go.” According to Robertson Facade Systems, Brick Inlay is a solution that involves placing thin brick, porcelain or stone tiles into precast concrete panels, to create the look and feel of a traditional brick facade or wall with the efficiencies and benefits of precast concrete. The panels are then delivered on site, ready for construction. The benefit of this product is that it speeds construction time which can in turn significantly reduce construction costs. The product also allows you to customise any pattern and texture you need for your facade, efficiently and cost-effectively.


Rethink Façade Design WATER Built-in water repellant barrier, no membrane needed

WIND Withstands wind pressures up to 7kPa

FIRE Suitable for non-combustible construction

Smart façade design is key when it comes to protecting a building from the elements. Finding a balance between water and condensation management, air-tightness and non-combustibility can be challenging - particularly when it comes to designing taller and more complex facades. Introducing RAB™ Board, the rigid air barrier by James Hardie. Designed to meet the building industry’s changing requirements for high-performance weather barriers, this unique green panel is sealed with James Hardie’s innovative

CoreShield™ penetrating sealer technology, keeping water, air and wind out, while allowing moisture vapour to easily escape - enabling the framing cavity to drain and dry. Installed beneath external cladding or rainscreens, RAB™ Board delivers superior water resistance, long-term durability and strength - and is also deemed non-combustible. The result of James Hardie’s extensive innovation and research into durable and resilient façade design, RAB™ Board provides a fully-certified solution that offers superior defence against wind and moisture. Designed to Battle the Elements

For high performance façade design help or more information, log onto www.rabboard.com.au © 2020 James Hardie Australia Pty Ltd ABN 12 084 635 558. ™ and ® denotes a trademark or registered mark owned by James Hardie Technology Ltd. All images shown are for illustration purpose only. Actual product may vary. Contact James Hardie for further information.

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21/4/20 9:18 pm


12 NOVEMBER 2020 PLAZA BALLROOM MELBOURNE After 13 years, the oldest and biggest sustainable built environment educational event in the country, Sustainability Live, has evolved to become Australia’s pinnacle of sustainable designs, ideas and innovation – now known as the Sustainability Summit.

PANEL TOPICS INCLUDE Water conservation and its relationship to sustainable design Designing and building for the new bushfire paradigm Passive designs, passive houses and multi-residential builds Planning for a carbon zero / carbon positive future How does building automation lead to better building sustainability?

sustainablebuildingawards.com.au/summit

sustainablebuildingawards.com.au/summit 12 NOVEMBER 2020 | PLAZA BALLROOM, MELBOURNE IMAGE Sandra Furtadio, Name, Name and Name at Sustainability Live 2019

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3/4/20 10:21 am


SY H T N MO ARRANT

WEATHER DEFENCE AU The revolutionary external gypsum sheathing board

1E2XPOSURE W

Fire Safety in Cladding

Weather Defence is an award-winning external sheathing board which is used behind facade cladding systems to create a pressure equalised cavity. It has transformed building envelope construction and performance. Design benefits it brings include: • Non-Combustible compliant • FRLs up to 120 mins • Weathertight without sarking • Highly breathable to control condensation • Achieves outstanding airtightness

Download your copy of the new Weather Defence AU brochure at www.promat.com.au or call 1800 PROMAT (776 628)

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21/4/20 9:15 pm


WORDS NATHALIE CRAIG

APR-JUN 2020 ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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Permanent formwork solutions used in commercial design

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When it comes to commercial construction, builders and designers are scoping out new ways to improve efficiency, save money and have more streamlined construction sites. One proven solution writes Nathalie Craig, is choosing permanent formwork as an alternative to conventional masonry block, precast concrete or in-situ building methods.

In traditional in-situ concrete construction, the formwork is removed once the concrete is strong enough to stand on its own. Removing this formwork can be a delicate and labour intensive job and great care is needed to make sure the structure is not compromised during the removal process. Permanent formwork, on the other hand, requires minimal bracing compared to in-situ pours and cuts out the need for bricklayers. The formwork is left in place after the in-situ concrete has set to create a permanent structure. This labour saving process is one of the major reasons permanent formwork is becoming so popular, especially in the commercial sector where buildings may be large or multi-storey structures of significant complexity. Many permanent formwork systems on the market use prefabricated lightweight hollow panels or blocks that join together to form walls that have steel reinforcement placed in them and are core filled with concrete. For example, manufacturers offer permanent formwork solutions in polyvinyl chloride, fibre cement, polymer or other similar patented materials. One leader in permanent formwork is AFS Systems with their Logicwall and Rediwall walling solutions. Logicwall is a fibre cement based permanent formwork system that can be

used for both external and internal applications. It consists of lightweight panels created by bonding hard-wearing CSR Cemintel fibre cement sheets to galvanised BlueScope steel stud frames. The panels are delivered with shopdrawn accuracy and feature corresponding labels for easy installation. They are load bearing but lightweight enough for manual installation. The panels provide reliably flat, true surfaces to help deliver high-quality finishes. The Logicwall can be seen in action at The Fiddler Hotel in Rouse Hill in Sydney. “When expanding the offer from The Fiddler to include a 4.5 star hotel and new function facilities, it was essential that we sourced products that could meet our need for exceptional quality and, from our experience using AFS Logicwall, we knew it was the right choice for this project,” contracts administrator at Growthbuilt Eddie Abousleiman explained. “We used Logicwall in external and internal wall applications throughout the build and we relied on HD Projects (an AFS Certified Logicwall Installer) to complete the installation with precision whilst ensuring that our project timeline was met”. “The result was sensational, and we handed over an exceptional, high-quality hotel to our clients Lewis Land Group,” he says.


ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / Practical / APR-JUN 2020

ABOVE Logicwall is a fibre cement based permanent formwork system that can be used for both external and internal applications.

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ABOVE Airdeck was developed to create weight savings compared to a solid CIS floor, in combination with more flexibility in the long-term.

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Another happy customer is Woollam Construction who used Logicwall at University of Sydney, Lismore Campus. They used AFS Logicwall as finished walls from the common areas through to hallways and bedrooms. “The Logicwall system provided us with a superior program advantage and significantly reduced our ceiling partitions contract as we could simply set and paint the walls,” the company says. “Our client, University of Sydney, likes that the Logicwall system is a finished wall and is extremely hard wearing in this high traffic student accommodation, along with the significant reduction in maintenance requirements compared to conventional batten and sheeted walls.’’ The AFS Rediwall on the other hand, is a PVC permanent formwork system. The extruded components either simply snap or slide into place, automatically interconnecting for rapid assembly and achieve an attractive, low maintenance wall surface. It requires almost no machinery-aided installation. And with its highquality semi-gloss finish, it generally requires no extra finishing in many applications. Another innovative product on the market in the permanent formwork domain is the Insulbrick ICF Building System. The construction system by The Insulating Brick Company is used to build walls for domestic and commercial structures and is made from

expanded polystyrene (EPS) formwork and reinforced concrete. The Insulbrick ICF walls simply interlock together like lego blocks. The intervals they interlock ensure that vertical cores of concrete are always continuous therefore creating the concrete wall at its optimum strength. The insulbricks can be easily cut with a handsaw or with specialised hot wire cutters. When properly braced both the Insulbrick ICF 200 and the Insulbrick ICF 240 can be poured up to 3m at a time. Insulbrick says ICF wall construction is “quick and easy”. When interlocked and filled with concrete, they create a solid wall with remarkable insulating properties for both internal and external walls. Using Insulbrick ICF over traditional bricks and mortar walls comes with the added benefit of saving money on the speed of construction. The Insulbrick is also known for improving acoustic performance and customers are not limited by choice as far as external finishes which can be done in stone, cladding, render, timber and Colorbond. Insulbrick ICF has been a popular choice among those building wine cellars. One of the ICF’s latest winery projects was St Andrews for Buttermans Track Wines in the Yarra Valley. Owners Gary, Louise and Joel Trist dropped ICF a line to let them know they were in the process of constructing a small winery on their property in St Andrews and that they had

planned to use ICF primarily due to its superior thermal properties. “Our winemaking philosophy is minimal intervention, so we wanted to ensure we built our winery with the same philosophy,” owner of St Andrews for Buttermans Track Wines Gary Trist says. The winery is built on three levels to accommodate gravity flow winemaking thus eliminating the need for pumps. The barrel room is more than 50 percent in ground to provide good thermal mass and stability. Trist explained that access to their site was also limited so they had to find a building technique that was flexible, did not require huge cranes and material handling equipment but could also suit inground and above ground construction. “The ICF system provided by Insulbrick met all these criteria and their support, professionalism and attention to our detailed construction requirements was outstanding,” he says. ICF is widely used overseas where the temperature fluctuates from very high to very low degrees in temperature and constructions built using this system maintain a steady temperature inside. The building system provides a continuous layer of insulation and is an excellent cold storage facility, maintaining the constant 17 degrees Celcius temperature needed to store wine. All the walls in a cold storage facility must have no empty areas where rats, mice or insects


Permanent formwork, on the other hand, requires minimal bracing compared to in-situ pours and cuts out the need for bricklayers.

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / APR-JUN 2020

quite unique, because it is one of the first highrise hospitals in the country. The hospital has 21 floors, of which 19 are above ground. The total surface of the project is almost 100,000sqm. Airdeck was selected as the lightweight floor system for the total hospital structure, including the underground parking. Flexibility in the project was very important and Airdeck came up with a tailormade drilling protocol to allow future drillings in the hospital building structure. The contractor was also able to have a faster construction speed using Airdeck as opposed to more traditional building methods. On the ground level, the tram is making a new connection in the Antwerp area. The tramway itself was also installed on top of the Airdeck elements. Ultimately, as the construction industry looks for more ways to reduce costs and increase efficiency and sustainability, traditional methods for load bearing walls and floors may not suffice. This is where permanent formwork steps in, creating faster, more cost-effective solutions that can also increase the safety, durability, flexibility and sustainability of a build particularly in terms of large scale more complicated commercial projects.

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columns. This solves a lot of issues that certain buildings are facing when they are trying to install or extend their MEP or even to remodel complete wings. Airdeck was developed to create weight savings compared to a solid CIS floor, in combination with more flexibility in the long term. The product is delivered on-site with a 6 or 7cm concrete plank, including the Airboxes which guarantee concrete savings up to 32 percent. The Airbox can hold a point load of up to 180kg and is safe to walk on. A contractor installs the necessary upper and joint reinforcement. The top concrete layer is casted the traditional way. Next to the concrete, there’s also considerable savings in labour on-site as the product is fabricated off-site and eliminates typical handling like formwork. Post tension is not required except on very large size slab spans. Semi-precast is specifically interesting as it creates wet nodes around the columns which is a good solution for the current earthquake approach of buildings in the new AS3600. Airdeck floors are always customised. Depending on the desired spans and the constructive frame building concept. Airdeck is also a sustainable solution which uses less concrete, steel, water and transports when building. The Airdeck product has been particularly popular for building hospitals. An example of this can be seen at the new ZNA Hospital in Antwerp, Belgium. The build of this hospital is

P rac t ical

could nest, therefore this creates a perfect scenario for the use of ICF construction since the foam is the insulation and the concrete wall becomes your structural element and there is no void between the two materials. “Since the winery has been finished, we have found it has met all our design criteria, the inside temperature has been extremely stable ranging from a minimum of 17 degrees in winter to a maximum of 21 degrees in summer,” says Trist. “As hoped, there has been no need for supplementary heating or cooling which has also kept our operational cost down.” As permanent formwork grows in popularity in Australia new players are entering the market Down Under. Airdeck, which was founded in Europe, is now open for business in Australia. The flooring solution is marketed as a hybrid or semi-precast solution and consists of large concrete elements on which Airboxes are installed. These Airboxes are made from recycled polypropylene and act as void formers, working to create lightweight building structures. Airdeck allows structures to be built with large spans and the extra benefit of omitting beams or supporting walls. This creates flexibility for buildings that have a lot of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) to be incorporated in the building structure, like hospitals, schools, laboratories. With flat soffits, there’s maximal spacing in the fake ceilings to integrate MEP. Airdeck also develops drilling protocols for each floor to allow corings even next to

SUPPLIERS AFS Systems architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/afs-systems-pty-ltd-csr Insulbrick ICF insulbrick.com.au/ Airdeck architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/airdeck

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WORDS PRUE MILLER

APR-JUN 2020 ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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Commercial security

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Although many security issues are shared between residential and commercial premises, it is business that stands to lose the most in the event of a security breach.


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SUPPLIERS Allegion architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/allegion Dormakaba architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/dormakaba-australia Siemens Building Technologies architectureanddesign.com.au/

ABOVE Photography: George Prentzas. PAGE 86 Photography: Chuttersnap.

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suppliers/siemens-building-technologies

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Unlike the intricate and delightful brushstrokes of a Picasso, data (which is virtually invisible) can be worth many times more than the breathtaking ‘Les Femmes d’Alger’. And while a hotel break-in, or electronic key fault may not reap any actual loot for the robber, the reputation of a multimillion dollar hospitality chain can be deeply harmed by tales of lax security on social media, while an actual assault loss can virtually close the doors for good. Security product suppliers have had to adapt to an increasingly diverse range of breaches, designing increasingly complex systems for the changing challenges of design. It has become almost mandatory for workers to go through their day, wreathed in a lanyard with a seemingly simple swipe card, or dangling ID clipped to their hip. There is more that is going on than meets the eye, with leading companies spending millions on granting or denying access. The Siemans access security system is called SiPass, and is a Windows based system that sits on the client’s server and controls access and alarm management – and actually comes with

an Australian design heritage, back from when it was called ASCO. Now SiPass is a flexible application that can handle up to 500,000 cardholders, which in itself is impressive, but very attractive to the client is the fact that the intelligence behind it is user friendly. Installation of the software is reported to take just seven clicks, and then it is a matter of what to connect. Options include a single door reader, or a dual reader, or an eight-door reader and so on. And the client retains the choice of what readers to install, including the option to upgrade to biometric identifiers. Interesting additions to the system include anti-passback reporting, where nonsensical movement of a card reader temporarily cancels any further access. If a worker enters a room once, they can’t enter it a second time without an exit in-between. The system is modular and can be built up to serve many more management roles, including building management, lighting control, OPC server, HLIs etc. Plus multimedia alarm reporting.

BIOMETRICS In America, finger printscanners are now the modality of tech savvy banks, with Bank of America and Wells Fargo just two who have adopted the system. And while that seems pretty cutting edge, it’s technology that has been superseded by our smart phones. Suddenly even security measures from sci-fi and heist films look old fashioned. For the smaller, but perhaps expanding company Allegion offers the combination of the biometric hand reader by Schlage interlinked with the HandNet, a Windows program key reader product that keeps track of what is happening on business premises, or in fact over several premises, utilising the HandNet program. The coverage comes in stages; starting with as few as five readers, then to 25 readers, to (at the top end of the range) unlimited points, all reporting back to one supervised site. However, if the link to the main site is for some reason severed (weather by accident or via the hand of something more scurrilous), the individual readers will continue to operate.


RETHINK SPECS Allegion’s Overtur™ is a cloud-based suite of tools which enables architects and door hardware consultants to come together and collaborate on the specifications and the security design of doors and openings.

Overtur provides a variety of apps to accomplish such tasks as:

Review designs real-time in an online environment

Transfer door data – including electrical requirements

Upload door data, schedule and plans directly from a BIM

Graphically track and review changes

Improved collaboration, coordination and productivity. Overtur is designed to simplify the process of specifying door hardware on your next project.

To learn more, visit allegion.com.au/overtur or contact your Allegion specification consultant on 1800 098 094

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28/4/20 10:01 am


APR-JUN 2020 / PRACTICAL / ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

ABOVE Perhaps the sexiest entry system comes from Dormakaba, and that is the Orthos system that initially appears to be a glass revolving door – but is in fact called a personal interlock (PIL) system.

The flexibility is an attractive option, with for example the program offering customable features such as short-term access of, for example allowing access between certain hours, after which the access is de-programmed with no need for reception or security to chase missing, physical key cards. A question often posed is what happens to this collection of unique biometric identifiers. In the Allegion system, the data is stored locally, to reduce hacker access. Interestingly, most people have not considered how safe their face ID data is – even their face ID on their iPhones. Is it stored in the cloud, and therefor hackable? In fact, no. The iPhone app stores it in the handsets enclave system. HOTELS

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What has been asked billions of times is “did you enjoy your stay?”, the Pavlovian response to any hotel guest requesting a checkout accounting. With each stay dependent on guests feelings, and actually being, secure. A recent article that appeared in Conde Nast traveller magazine quotes Paul Frederick, the former vice president of global security for Starwood

as saying only 10 percent of hotel theft occurs in guests’ rooms, the rest happens in common areas such as bars and restaurants. But as far as the guests go, the room theft, the breach of personal security, has the bigger effect. Dormakaba Australia has been a leader in security access systems of all types, including the lodging sector. With a global reach of 130 countries its experience with access solutions is considerable, and counts in its statistics an annual rate of 500 million guest experiences. Whether guest rooms, or common areas such as gyms and pools, the Dormakaba electronic locking systems are Bluetooth, low-energy devices, and offer the guest the convenience of being controllable by a guest’s own phone, which elevates a customer’s experience and reduces the inconvenience of having to go to reception for a replacement card. It’s the small things that makes guests enjoy their stay, and write glowing reports online. Ilco and Saflok are the recognisable brand names in the Dormakaba stable and are continually researching the access management needs of hotels and resorts. They also offer electronic cylinder locks systems, as well as card readers in their hotel access solution packages.

Interestingly, as a side note, hotel security experts also suggest an old school method for reducing hotel room theft; guests should actually put their suitcases out of view and further suggest not trusting the hotel room safe. Got something valuable? Use the hotel’s safe. Curious also is the trend of hospitality linens being encoded with RFID trackers – one imagines that also means the dressing gowns. You have been warned. Perhaps the sexiest entry system comes from Dormakaba, and that is the Orthos system that initially appears to be a glass revolving door – but is in fact called a personal interlock (PIL) system. This is top of the range entry where a person has to pass multi-layered criteria for access (including weight sensors), and where failure is quite spectacular. Clearly appropriate for monitoring personnel, it also offers a strong deterrent for burglars, and also those malcontents who may like to throw things into a lobby. Things that tick, for instance. It also brings up the subject and issue of tail-gaiting, where people piggy back onto the access created by a legitimate user. The image of a tail gaiter trying their luck with the Orthos system is laughable.


... systems need to be able to communicate speedily in the event of access breach, or indeed a biological threat such as potential contamination, or terrorist threat.

HOSPITALS

PRACTICAL / APR-JUN 2020

call systems integrated with a geographical information system, with the option of also displaying physical locations of security personnel to expedite control. While this has clear applications for many industries it also, sadly, has a place in education campuses where violence is not an unknown event.

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the hospital and healthcare arena and the lighthearted tone dissolves in a puff of nitrous oxide. Hospitals, churches, refuges all suffer from an identity issue when it comes to security; while wanting to appear open, compassionate and welcoming they need to be secure. Striking a balance is not simple. Hospitals in particular require many layers of security support – from the lobby’s front door which, in Australia, has zero security, to that required to access wards filled with drugs, interventional suites where complex nuclear technologies reside alongside theatre instruments that cost as much as a car, and of course vulnerable people who often need expedited access, and those who need to be kept against their wishes. Plus, systems need to be able to communicate speedily in the event of access breach, or indeed a biological threat such as potential contamination, or terrorist threat. This falls into security management rather than access control, and requires systems that operate within a hierarchical structure; alarm displays, information dispersal, and security of access. And at the top of all this is a command and control system. Siemans Siveillance Vantage Control Pro is a good example, bringing multiple stand-alone systems under one emergent umbrella. Vantage interacts with access control, video surveillance, fire alarms, emergency

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

This is an example, albeit a light-hearted one, of multi-layered security. Consider what is at risk in

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P R O M O T I O N F E AT U R E

Follow the Leaders

Z I P W AT E R . C O M / A&D X Zip

Mineral House and the city’s industrial history. This speaks to studio’s wider philosophies about society, community, buildings, space and materials, as well as benefits the project from an environmental perspective by lessening the need for ‘new’ materials and therefore energy. Stripping back various layers of partitions, carpets, paint and false ceilings from decades of “piecemeal conversions” has uncovered various original elements – an original timber fish-bone structure, a series of cast iron columns, a patina of colour and texture. The decidedly modern palette – black timber with steel and brass detailing – also draws on the building’s origins, together letting the building’s heritage “be the hero”. Overall, it’s a design that, as Lloyd says, “elevates both the functional performance and the brand experience of the workspace” – while also providing for the future needs of the practise. And if this is based on COX’s ethos, then the learning, surely, is that agile, sustainable workplaces need to be rooted in genuine collaboration, being adaptable, breaking down traditional notions of hierarchy and future-thinking.

zipwater.com

APR-JUN 2020

COX’s “by the many, for the many” approach to design sees a clear expression here too – where a joinery spine extends the length of the studio and serves as the design review space. It connects “the practice through a collaborative and transparent approach to the creative process, inviting all to participate”. Bordering this area is an array of co-working and break-out settings, including a Virtual Reality space, team tables and a model making workshop, offering staff various spaces to dip in and out of as they need to. The kitchen – which by nature is social – is open, serving as both as an informal gathering space for staff and as a welcome space for clients. Equipped with a seven-metre long dining table, it encourages staff and clients to engage in a relaxed way – more like they would at home. While details, like a Zip HydroTap Arc in matte black, which provides instant filtered boiling, chilled and sparkling water, help facilitate an overall more agile environment. Adjacent to the kitchen is the boardroom, unlike traditional workplaces, the space is not closed off but rather connected by a series of large, glazed pivot doors, creating a ‘Town Hall’ for events and staff meetings without isolating them from the main studio. Another major aspect of the refurbishment is that it celebrates its heritage: the original Old

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Agile working and sustainability have become markers of the modern workplace. It is increasingly agreed that collaboration; multiple ways of working; self-organisation and accountability is key. Workplaces should be sustainable – both in terms of environmental impact and longevity. It should come as no surprise really that architects are leading the way – called on to prompt these ways of working through design. COX Architecture’s Brisbane studio is a real lesson in both agile workplaces and sustainable design. Rather than adopting these values to modernise, COX is a firmly contemporary, design-focused practice whose dual drivers are “fluidity and collaboration”; the refurbishment simply took the studio’s lead. As Director, Brooke Lloyd, says, “The foremost challenge was to design a space to suit both the way we work now and how we want to work in the future.” As such, they took a democratic and open approach to planning and designed a studio that is open, has various spaces to work in, and offers a sense of cohesion and equity throughout. Ensuring the entire office has uninterrupted views to the Botanical gardens and Brisbane River, for example, highlights the studio’s lateral style. They wanted everyone to be able to celebrate the studio’s fortunate proximity.

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Product Directory

P roducts

To find out more about a specific featured product or to download a related brochure please use the unique product code provided on each module and follow these 3 simple steps:

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PRODUCT CODES

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

Welcome to the Architecture & Design

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STEP 2

Type unique product code into search bar

STEP 3

Locate and review further product and supplier information

APR-JUN 2020

STEP 1 Visit architectureanddesign.com.au

ONLINE Visit architectureanddesign.com.au/products/apr-jun20 to view all featured products from this issue in one place

EMAIL Subscribe to the Architecture & Design eNewsletter to receive product updates, news and projects directly to your inbox architectureanddesign.com.au/subscribe

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STUNNING GEOMETRIC ECOPLY SHELTER Eduardo De Oliviera Barata from the University of Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning and Christopher Robeller from TU Kaiserslautern in Germany proposed a collaborative student project using software and the workshop’s seven axis robots to fabricate and then build a temporary structure on campus. Created within the Code to Production elective, the stunning, geometric form of the HexBox canopy is based on a funicular shell geometry which essentially achieves an equilibrium state of form through corresponding loads constrained by a given boundary. It’s a space students can use for the entire day providing shading from the sun and protection from the rain. The timber shell is made exclusively of Ecoply® components without the addition of any metal fasteners for the main load-bearing structure. Ecoply is made from locally-harvested, Australian timber and is incredibly efficient in its use of the resource. And FSC® certification guarantees the timber is also sourced from sustainably-managed forests.

APR-JUN 2020

All the hollow polygonal segments that form the boxes in the canopy were mitred and glued. Once all of the boxes were assembled it was extremely quick to construct without formwork or prior expert knowledge. For its size, the 45m2 structure is exceptionally lightweight and can easily be disassembled when required.

architectureanddesign.com.au

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CH4530

CARE 610 CLEANFLUSH - CONNECTOR TOILET SUITE

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

PRODUCTS

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Enquiries: 1800 338 463 ecoply.com.au

Care connector toilet suites are often considered a dated and lowest cost design. However, they are often the most appropriate accessible bathroom choice, particularly where installation flexibility is needed or there simply isn’t much budget. The Caroma Care 610 offers a modern solution, allowing developers and plumbers on a tight budget to lift the ease of cleaning and aesthetics of an Accessible or Ambulant compliant bathroom. You’ll see from the Care 610 design, Caroma has raised the bar in the world of connector suites. Packed with features including: • Caroma orbital connector allows flexible setout of 267-352mm for Accessible or 115-205mm Ambulant AS1428.1-2009 compliant (includes up to 50mm sideway adjustment) • Caroma Cleanflush® the market’s most effective and hygienic rimless bowl design • Our signature durable care toilet seat can withstand 400kg load, comes in three colours offering both single and double flap • Stylish reliable Caroma ceramic cistern with M5 valves and raised flush buttons to meet accessible requirements As well as aesthetics, our focus with the Care 610 is optimal hygiene. The smooth outer contours of the pan and the rimless bowl allow for fast and thorough cleaning, leaving nowhere for germs to hide. The Care 610 can be installed to comply with either Accessible or Ambulant AS1428.1-2009 requirements.

Enquiries: 131 416 specify.caroma.com.au

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CA4218

architectureanddesign.com.au


PILLAR SENSOR TAPS FOR HYGIENIC HANDWASHING With the renewed focus on hygiene and infection control due to the Covid-19 pandemic, sensor taps have been shown to be effective in reducing the spread of disease, through non-contact handwashing. The Autoflo range of pillar taps, in particular sensor type taps, has recently been expanded with a focus on providing tapware for hygienic handwashing in a variety of situations. Utilising Neoperl’s advanced flow control and aeration technology, there are three distinct variants of the standard Pillar model being offered – economical flow, regular flow, and healthcare. The Pillar Standard Eco-flow uses a spray type aerator to deliver a conservative 6-star WELS rating, for applications where water conservation is critical, without compromising on effectiveness of handwashing. The Pillar Standard Regular flow delivers a 5-star WELS rating for general applications where water usage is less critical.

Enquiries: (03) 9380 8244 autoflo.com.au architectureanddesign.com.au

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AU4616

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

The Pillar Standard Healthcare utilises a special aerator featuring Agion® antimicrobial technology, which offers long lasting protection against bacteria reproduction. Coupled with smooth laminar flow, and timed, automatic flushing of the faucet (in all Pillar models), this model is perfectly suited to health care environments and hospitals.

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The Rocks On Builders Selection ranges have been curated as a cost effective solution in delivering quality fit for purpose floor & wall tiles that are not only affordable for large multi residential and commercial developments, but also on trend in design and format - with all the necessary slip rating certifications that comply to Australian Standards for all internal and external flooring applications, including various 20mm thick porcelain paver options..

PRODUCTS

BUILDERS SELECTIONS: ON TREND PORCELAIN TILES FOR COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL PROJECTS

These ranges comprise of technical rectified porcelain for floor applications and quality ceramics for wall applications - with many selections being in stock and ready for immediate delivery. Those ranges that are indent, only require a 4 week turnaround from order to delivery, including the Waterworld series of porcelain swimming pool tiles. Rocks On also have the ability to develop bespoke porcelain & ceramic tiles to suit any project design and budget.

Enquiries: 02 8303 0100 rockson.com.au/builders RO4216

architectureanddesign.com.au

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HIGH-SPEED RAPID ROLL DOORS DMF International have been manufacturing and supplying high-speed rapid roll doors for over 25 years. Our popular Series RL3000E model is fully manufactured in the Sydney factory. These doors are custom made in our well equipped factory, to suit sizes up to 6mH x 6mW and can accommodate even larger openings on application. The doors operate at up to 1.5m/sec opening speed and close after a programmed time to ensure the environment is well protected against temperature loss, dust, vermin and draft. With many choices of door blade colour and a full width clear window, we can match most corporate or building colours to ensure an aesthetic finish. The doors are well equipped with safety sensors and many forms of activation are available to customise the door to suit the application and traffic flow. The DMF rapid doors are suited for warehousing and logistics, hospitals, carparks, pharmaceutical processing, cleanrooms, workshops, carwashes, and coolrooms.

APR-JUN 2020

For chiller and freezer applications, DMF also can supply our Coldsaver high speed door model, complete with a 15mm thick insulated pane and column heating to ensure ice is not an issue. Contact DMF today to see how we can design a solution for your doorways.

DI4217

architectureanddesign.com.au

STYLISH INTERIORS WITH THE ITALIAN COLLECTION TIMBER FLOORING

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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PRODUCTS

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Enquiries: 1800 281 170 dmf.com.au

Inspired by the intricate floors of Italy and produced in Europe, this collection of narrower, thinner planks, chevron and herringbone timber flooring provide generous flexibility for laying in complex patterns or mixing with tiles and other materials. Harvested from forests that are responsibly managed, socially beneficial, environmentally conscious, and economically viable, the Italian Collection deliver a highly consistent engineered board with two layers: a surface of genuine slowgrown European oak which accounts for over 1⠄3 of the overall depth, which is backed with a spruce or birch ply. The Italian collection features a traditional tongue and groove profile and a durable lacquered finish. These products can also be used on walls, ceilings, stairs, and for bespoke joinery. Suitable for all projects from residential through to commercial, retail and hospitality. Deliver the sophistication of the famous floors of Italy’s ages with modern durability and finishes with The Italian Collection by Havwoods. Free samples are available to order online for next day delivery.

Enquiries: 1300 428 966 havwoods.com/au/range/the-italian-collection/

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HA4216

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ASSA ABLOY SL500 SLIDING DOOR OPERATOR Automate your entrance in a variety of configurations with the range of ASSA ABLOY sliding door operators. Designing entrances which work around your business, traffic flow and facility floorplan is easy, even where existing doors are operational, with the ASSA ABLOY SL500 automatic sliding door operator. The ASSA ABLOY SL500 sliding operator is easily adapted for specific performance. The modular composition of the operator facilitates flexibility in every aspect, enabling businesses of all sizes to tailor entrances to meet their unique requirements, without compromising safety, security or energy efficiency. You can be sure that your entrance suits your people flow as well as your environmental footprint. To make your entrance more sustainable we can offer you different solutions as: additional sealing (ASSA ABLOY TightSeal), sustainable drive mode, intelligent opening width depending on traffic, inner and outer door air locking, and more.

Enquiries: info.au.entrance@assaabloy.com 1300 13 13 10 assaabloyentrance.com.au architectureanddesign.com.au

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ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

To permit safe passage between closing doors, the doors go into reverse mode if an obstruction is detected, and then start moving again slowly to check if the obstruction has cleared. If an obstruction is detected during opening or between opening doors and surrounding walls or interior fittings, the doors immediately stop and then close after a time delay.

APR-JUN 2020

The innovative Zypho iZi uses a unique, patented design that captures heat from waste shower water as it passes through the drain, transferring it back to the cold-water supply via the shower mixer or water heater. Pre-heating the cold-water supply by up to 15°C, before it even reaches the shower heating system, delivers massive energy savings of up to 30% – simultaneously cutting household energy usage and costs.

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Making significant environmentally friendly changes to the way in which we live has never been more pressing, it has to be said that there is a renewed focus on innovation and finding ways in which we can redesign our everyday lives to make a positive impact – of particular interest to Stormtech is what can we do to conserve water and energy usage.

PRODUCTS

STORMTECH INTRODUCES ZYPHO DRAIN WATER HEAT RECOVERY

As a solid-state system, with no moving parts, the Zypho is Watermark Certified and one of the most cost-effective home energy-saving products available. Ideally suited to contemporary linear drainage installations, the Zypho’s compact, award-winning design means it can also be easily retrofitted into any existing plumbing system. The Zypho is fully compatible with the complete Stormtech product range and, as Zypho’s exclusive Australian partner, Stormtech can assist with integration requirements, site specific needs and installation suitability.

Enquiries: Stormtech 1300 653 403 stormtech.com.au ST4131

architectureanddesign.com.au

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EXOTEC FAÇADE PANEL AND FIXING SYSTEM

Classic elegance meets modern living with Herringbone laminate floors by Kronotex. Historically reserved for expensive hard wood floors, the beautiful Herringbone look is now available in affordable and robust laminate boards. Designed and manufactured in Germany, Herringbone by Kronotex combines cutting edge surface structures with authentic timber and concrete patterns to create strikingly realistic floors. Enquiries: 1300 737 155 www.kronotex-aust.com.au AF4224

architectureanddesign.com.au

• Safe and Compliant • High Level of Impact Resistance • A reliable proprietary fixing system for fast, easy and cost-effective install Enquiries: James Hardie 131 104 jameshardie.com.au JH4651

architectureanddesign.com.au

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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PRODUCTS

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APR-JUN 2020

KRONOTEX HERRINGBONE: BEAUTIFUL, DURABLE & AFFORDABLE

The ExoTec™ is a compressed fibre cement façade panel and fixing system. It features expressed joints and is either site-painted or prefinished off site. The ExoTec façade panel and fixing system is suitable for use as an external facade, fascia or soffit on commercial buildings requiring a durable, low-maintenance and impact resistant system with an express-jointed look. It’s suitable for full wrap or composite designs.

PROMATECT ® 250 SINGLE LAYER STEEL PROTECTION BOARD FOR UP TO 2HRS FRL PROMATECT® 250 is a single layer board system that provides up to 2hrs fire protection in accordance with AS1530.4 for structural steel. PROMATECT® 250 comprises autoclaved calcium silicate spheres (PROMAXON® is a synthetic hydrated calcium silicate in spherical form) bound in a mineral matrix. PromaX® technology provides excellent fire performance in most applications. PROMATECT® 250 is off-white in colour. One face is smooth and ready to form a finished surface, able to receive almost any form of architectural/finish treatment. The reverse face is sanded. PROMATECT® 250 is resistant to the effects of moisture and will not physically deteriorate when used in damp or humid conditions. Performance characteristics are not degraded by age or moisture. Enquiries: Promat Australia 1800 776 628 promat.com.au

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EVER ART WOOD ALUMINIUM CLADDING Covet brings the design community a range of stunning interior and exterior decorative cladding systems. Ever Art Wood® timber look aluminium cladding offers an economical and light-weight alternative to timber and steel: • Fire rated and BCA compliant • Suitable for commercial or residential projects • Exceptionally realistic with 20+ timber look colours and textures • Available in an extensive range of batten or panel profiles • Designed and manufactured in Japan • 10-year manufacturer’s warranty Enquiries: Covet International 03 9398 8128 covet.com.au CI7953

architectureanddesign.com.au


KARNDEAN KORLOK CLICK VINYL FLOORING

ACOUSTIC EMBOSSED PANELS FROM WOVEN IMAGE

Korlok is a rigid core flooring product and is an ideal alternative to laminate and engineered hardwood click floors. Offering quick and easy installation and hiding subfloor imperfections, it also has the durable and waterproof qualities of luxury vinyl. With 20 authentic wood designs inspired by Australian, European and North American woods, Korlok can reduce noise transfer to rooms below without the need for separate underlay.

Zen is the first design in our 3D embossed collection, designed to provide a floor to ceiling acoustic solution for commercial office interiors.

KD7708

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

OUTDOOR BLINDS FOR SUN AND WIND PROTECTION ABC Blinds has the widest range of made-to-measure outdoor blinds in Western Australia.

Find these outside blinds, awnings and shutters plus additional styles online and in-store. architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

THERMAFRAME ®: 101.6MM CENTRE GLAZED THERMALLY BROKEN FRAMING Alspec’s® ThermAFrame® Centre Pocket system is a versatile energy efficient Shopfront framing option that utilises the latest in European Polyamide Thermal Break technology combined with Australian design principles to achieve the best possible results in energy rating in a system that is easy to fabricate and install.

AL4222

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

The Accolade Range of sheet vinyl features flooring which has been designed to be both extremely durable, whilst the Accolade Safe and Accolade Foothold Ranges also aid in slip resistance. Applications for these ranges include hospital, aged care, healthcare, education, light industrial, mercantile and hospitality. Accolade Plus is our most durable vinyl sheet floor, made for the ultimate in wear and tear resistance.

AM-BOSS pull-down access ladders are the only pull-down access ladders on the Australian market that comply to the Building Code of Australia, and are CodeMark Certified. AA4019

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

AF4234

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

BESPOKE PERFORATED METAL DESIGNS

INSULGLASS LOWE MAX ® HIGH PERFORMANCE GLAZING

Arrow Metal has the ability to bring even the most complex design concept to life with a bespoke perforated metal design service that has produced everything from architecture building facades to decorative panels, graphics and metal artworks. Using the latest manufacturing techniques and considerable design expertise and metal knowledge, Arrow Metal can custom-create perforated metal panels in even the most complex patterns.

Superior performance to maximise both Solar Control and Insulation, without compromising Visible Light.

AM4247

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

APR-JUN 2020

AM-BOSS fixed access ladder complete with Ladline Fall Arrest System, that allows for safe access / egress between ground level and roof level, as part of Fall Protection as required.

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ACCOLADE SHEET VINYL: AUSTRALIAN MADE

PRODUCTS

FALL PROTECTION SYSTEM: LADLINE

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AB4053

WI4617

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

Our expansive product range includes designer styles and wellknown styles of outdoor window shades that are popular around Australian homes.

Suitable for standard fix wall applications as well as functional operable walls where panels could be installed double-sided, Zen provides a high quality solution with a beautiful tactile surface.

Insulglass LowE Max® is a sputter coated Low Emissivity glass (Low-E). Also known as “softcoat”, this evolution of technology and innovation sees atomic layers of silver and metal oxides provide superior performance as well as no risk of visible haze that other coatings can have. AG4252

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

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FRONTIER™ ACOUSTIC RAFTS Raft brings an innovative, bold new dimension to our Frontier range. Available in four unique designs, Raft is scored, folded and ‘zipped’ together using a locking channel. Arrange and space Raft in countless configurations, without loss of acoustic performance. Suitable for a variety of spaces, including offices, education, retail, hospitality and commercial interior applications. AU4228

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

CAVITY SLIDING DOOR Bris Aluminium’s flagship sliding solution is our Cavity Door Slider.

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

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PRODUCTS

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APR-JUN 2020

Functional, space saving and a modern, minimalist design. With technical drawings and installation videos available online for every Bris Aluminium product, including the Cavity Door Slider, you’ll love the simplicity and ease at every step of your project – from design and specification through to build.

BA4248

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Experience elegance with LEGRABOX. The elegant box system is unprecedented in its level of performance and is characterised by a slim design with straight lines and a particularly high quality of motion. LEGRABOX adds an elegant character to all living areas combining sophisticated design with a new quality of motion achieved by a completely new runner system. BA4250

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

PLASPANEL – MULTI-PURPOSE RECYCLED PLASTIC PANELS Plaspanel® are strong yet lightweight flat panels manufactured from one hundred percent recycled plastic. Almost indestructible, Plaspanel flat sheet panels offer a number of distinct benefits over comparable flat sheet products. The possible applications for Plaspanel are endless. The durability of the product makes it perfect for outdoor and high traffic areas and uses. The only limitations are your imagination.

BP4243

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

GEBERIT TOUCHLESS TECHNOLOGY:

AUSTROFLAMM FIREPLACE: EXQUISITE ENGINEERING

In the design of public and commercial bathrooms, hygiene is an important consideration. With Geberit touchless taps and flush buttons Designers, Architects and Specifiers can offer a stylish, hygienic and easy-to-clean solution. Geberit HyTronic sensor taps with self-sustainable power are designed for green buildings. They include a small generator that makes them independent from the main power supply or battery power.

Austroflamm are the market leader when it comes to fireplace design from both a visual and functional prescriptive.

GE4155

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

HAWTHORN BRICKS BY DANIEL ROBERTSON The rich historic ambience that characterises the Hawthorn collection is ideal for heritage renovations or new developments seeking an aged aesthetic. The collection is offered in a traditional colour palette that brings together reds, greys, blacks, browns and tans. The product’s face is heavily textured and no two clay bricks are exactly the same, lending it a truly unique, handmade aesthetic.

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EXPERIENCE ELEGANCE WITH LEGRABOX

DR4243

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Keramott brick lining is the highest quality fire lining system on the market where the patented technology blackens as the fire begins when combustion is low but then burns back to its brilliant white as the fires burns.

CA4224

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

IMPROVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND COMFORT WITH CLIMATEGUARD Darley’s ClimateGuard range of thermally broken window and door systems - are perfect for delivering optimal energy efficiency and comfort to commercial & residential buildings. The thermal break in ClimateGuard consists of a polyamide insulating strip between the interior and exterior aluminium profiles, that reduces the flow of thermal energy throughout the Aluminium frame. DA4247

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/


DURRA PANEL: FIRE-RESISTANT AND SUSTAINABLE BUILDING PANEL Durra Panel® is the fully certified wall and ceiling board that insulates against sound and heat while being stronger, safer and cheaper than an internal plasterboard wall. Plus, because it is made entirely out of straw sourced from local Australian farmers, it’s extremely environmentally friendly.

DP4139

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

EVERHARD INDUSTRIES LAUNDRY DRAWER SYSTEMS

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

EG4205

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

GALVINCARE ® MENTAL HEALTH ANTI-LIGATURE SHOWER HEAD WITH HAND SHOWER Enables carers to easily detach the hand held shower when no longer required. Features: • Anti-vandalism features. • Anti-ligature design. • Enables assisted and unassisted showering. • Detachable hand held shower. • Promotes a normalised environment. • Chrome plate finish for easy cleaning and added durability. GE4942

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Deciding between blinds and shutters? When it comes to making a stylish investment in your home, you can’t go wrong with modern shutters.

CR4245

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

INTRIM VJ BOARD PRO Intrim’s VJ Board Pro has been machined with precision and is the same high quality you expect to see in all of our mouldings. Crafted from Australian Premium Grade High Moisture Resistant MDF, our VJ board sheeting is quick and easy to install as an alternative to plasterboard, or placed over the top of existing walls in renovations.

IN4246

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

These durable fixtures will not only offer year-round light and privacy control, but they’ll also add value. At Half Price Blinds online, you have the choice of two types of window shutters: timber shutters and aluminium shutters. HP4217

APR-JUN 2020

A premium solution for those seeking superior functionality and style in the alfresco area of their home. The Carinya Select Top and Bottom Bi-Fold System features flat sill options for smooth accessibility and optional mid rails with multi-point locking in a range of opening configurations. For a modern designer look, the Carinya Bi-Fold extrusions are a consistent 85mm wide face on both the stiles and rails.

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EASY-TO-INSTALL DIY INDOOR SHUTTERS

PRODUCTS

SELECT RANGE: BI-FOLD WINDOW & DOOR

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EI4237

Eveneer is a range of sliced, reconstructed, real wood veneers. Produced from wood species grown in agricultural plantations and responsibly managed forests, Eveneer is available with FSC certification. Even in colour and pattern and free from the splits, knots, holes and discolouration found in conventional timber veneers, Eveneer is suitable for use on wall panelling, joinery, furniture, doors, floors, etc.

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

The Nugleam™ and Excellence Drawer System Laundry Units are a redesign of the traditional laundry unit. Featuring two soft close drawers with finger pull functionality and ample storage, a bottom drawer suitable for larger containers, and a full overlay design to modernise your laundry space. Available in white or matte black.

EVENEER - TIMBER VENEER REIMAGINED

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE BOLLARDS FOR PEDESTRIAN SAFETY Community and pedestrian safety is an essential focus in the design of any public open space. Heavy duty safety bollards are often implemented as precautionary measures to secure pedestrian zones in areas that are open to vehicular traffic. Installing bollards made of precast concrete is a worthwhile investment for designers and urban planners wanting to increase the security of an open space. SP4230

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

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KINGSPAN KOOLTHERM K17 INSULATED PLASTERBOARD Insulated Dry-lining Plasterboard for Adhesive Bonding. Kingspan Kooltherm K17 Insulated Plasterboard is a super high performance, fibre-free rigid thermoset phenolic insulation core, sandwiched between a front facing of tapered edge gypsum based plasterboard, and a reverse tissue based facing autohesively bonded to the insulation core during manufacture. KI2631

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

With the look and feel of real quartz stone, Evostone is a unique, innovative and versatile solid surface that can transform any kitchen, bathroom and laundry with a range of warm, beautiful colours. Evostone benchtops are used for kitchen and bathroom projects and renovations.

Louvretec Australia’s Retractable range includes a selection of Retractable Opening Roofs and Retractable Sun Louvre systems. These clever Retract systems let you enjoy your beautiful view, gaze up at the clear sky or alternatively bring your Retract Roof or Retract Louvre system back in place for sun, shade and privacy control.

LA7945

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

SANISPEED GREY WATER PUMP Sanispeed is a commercial grey water pump ideal for cafes, shops, office kitchenet, dental clinic etc. When creating a new dental clinic in an existing offce/retail space, there is often not adequate drainage access and every surgery room requires a sink for which Sanispeed is the ideal option.

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

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NO4201

TRINIDAD SUNBLADES

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

PRODUCTS

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APR-JUN 2020

EVOSTONE: SOLID SURFACE BENCHTOPS

RETRACTABLE SYSTEMS

The Shutterflex, Trinidad is the architect’s choice for streamlined façade sun blades. The Trinidad offers rigidity over a wide span and can be interfaced into curtain wall and glazing systems. The engineered solution of the joiner strip design is superior to any other system in the market and was invented by the Managing Director, Peter Ryan. The unique design allows for a façade to incorporate multiple extrusions joined together, while retaining durability and structural strength. SH4247

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

HYDRONIC HEATING FOR RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL HEATING Comfort Heat has introduced a hydronic floor heating range to its repertoire of products. Hydronic heating is ideal for large floor areas for both residential and commercial floors. The floor heating is not only energy efficient but also extremely comfortable, running costs are kept down and environmentally friendly energy sources can be used as alternatives.

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SA4230

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

COMING SOON TO THE URIDAN COLLECTIONE Introducing the Admiral Mini - a smaller version of uridan’s top selling urinal – the Admiral. The Admiral is easily the most recognisable of the uridan urinals, and the arrival of the Mini allows specifiers to utilise this stunning urinal design in amenities where space is at a premium. Great Design. Great Performance. Sustainable Outcomes. Uridan waterless solutions. UW7843

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

STOREPARK SEMI-AUTOMATIC CAR PARKING SYSTEM OMER’s StorePark semi-automatic parking system utilises both vertical and horizontal movement to park and store the maximum number of vehicles across either 2 or 3 levels. StorePark’s parking bays are accessed from ground level, each independently from the other. The upper and lower level platforms move vertically, while the ground level platform moves horizontally. LE0835

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/


THE KITCHEN ESSENTIAL All your drinking water needs, All-in-One beautifully designed system. Remove the need for multiple taps in your kitchen with a single, beautifully designed system that delivers boiling, chilled and sparkling filtered drinking water, as well as hot and cold unfiltered water for your sink. The Zip HydroTap All-in-One offers every water option you need from one multi-functional tap and a single intelligent compact under-bench system. That’s why the Zip HydroTap will be the one and only hydration solution for your kitchen. Discover more at zipwater.com

ZIP HYDROTAP | PURE TASTING | INSTANT | BOILING | CHILLED | SPARKLING

T H E W O R L D ’ S M O S T A D VA N C E D D R I N K I N G WAT E R S Y S T E M

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Discover the subtle art of standing out. COLORBOND® steel Matt is a highly attractive and versatile design material that utilises innovative paint technology to diffuse light for an elegantly soft, textured appearance. Available in a range of neutral colours, it can be contrasted with other COLORBOND® steel products to create sophisticated palettes for commercial, industrial or residential projects. Visit Steelselect.com.au/COLORBONDsteelMatt or call 1800 064 384.

COLORBOND®, BlueScope and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2019 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved.

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Profile for Indesign Media Asia Pacific

Architecture & Design April_June 2020  

Architecture & Design in Australia

Architecture & Design April_June 2020  

Architecture & Design in Australia