a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

jan-mar 2020

/

V o l 5 6 NO 1

/

projects

products

people

Kitchen, bathroom + toilet design The value of insulation Sun control & shading P r i n t P o s t A pp r o v e d 1 0 0 0 2 8 2 8 0


ADQ1_2020_RocksOn_IFC.indd 1

21/1/20 4:23 pm


Editor’s Letter branko miletic

content producers

Nathalie Craig Prue Miller Hamish McDonald Thida Sachathep Matthew McDonald Sam Murden Stephanie Stefanovic Philip Drew Nicci Leung Matt Kennedy Annabelle Chapman

we live.” They describe the sequence of design tools and methods that guide their work: “reading buildings by their ‘spatial structure’; replacing the notion of form by ‘format’; articulating rooms without interior; eroding the scale of things; doing austere buildings, hundreds of paintings, over and over

SUN CONTROL & SHADING

46

BATHROOMS

50

LAMINATES & SOLID SURFACES

56

again, ‘no more no less’.

Contents PLACES

Practical

new south wales

2

People INTERVieW 1

6

INSULATION

62

INTERVieW 2

8

KITCHENS

72

INTERVieW 3

12

BUSHFIRE DESIGN UPDATE

80

BOOK REVIEW 1

84

BOOK REVIEW 2

86

projects BRISBANE BUSHFIRE HOUSE

14

SUMMER HILL COTTAGE

20

Products

MELBOURNE MULTi-RESIDENTIAL

26

showcase

SYDNEY RESIDENTIAL TOWER

32

SECTIONS SQUARED

38

PODCASTS BRIEF

44

87

JAN-MAR 2020

advertising SALES MANAGER

Sarah Buckley

knowledge that provides “a tool to experience, read, and eventually understand the world in which

/

Deputy Editor

city of Concepción in 2002. According to their website, they believe that architecture is a form of

co n t e n t s

Designers

Branko Miletic editor@architectureanddesign.com.au

Sofia von Ellrichshausen and Mauricio Pezo founded Pezo von Ellrichshausen in the southern Chilean

/

Editor

On the cover Rode House, Chiloé Island, Chile, 2018. Image courtesy Pezo von Ellrichshausen.

A rc h itect u re & desig n

It would be an understatement to say that the bushfires that continue to rage around the country have not had an impact on the collective psyche of the design industry. Far from it in fact. If one ‘good’ thing – and I am trying to be both careful and optimistic here – has come out of these fires, it is that they have managed to galvanise everyone behind the notion that something needs to be done, and needs to be done as of yesterday. The other fact, now patently obvious to all, is that the design industry cannot, and for that matter, should not rely on governments for any form of direct climate action. The ‘ABCDEF sector’ – Architecture, Building, Construction, Development, Engineering and Facilitieshas the most to lose and also the most to give when it comes to helping mitigate the repercussions of our ‘out of whack’ environment. Let me be crystal clear on two things - I am not only talking about macro anthropogenic climate change here. I also include other climatic effects like El Nino and La Nina, the Indian Ocean Dipole along with micro climate issues like excess wet ground, for example, that promotes evaporation and increases atmospheric humidity. All of these have in one way or another contributed to the horrific bushfires of the past five months and all of these - including global climate change, are things that can be influenced in a positive and constructive way by the ABCDEF sector. The second thing is that while economics has a crucial role to play here, myths involving widespread wealth redistribution, enforced collectivisation or what has been labelled as ‘Care Bear Economics’ are not the answer. Anyone doubting this should visit any former socialist country, many of which continue to suffer some of the highest pollution-induced health problems on the planet. A visit to the uber-polluted Lake Baikal in Siberia should also be on the to-do list for those that want to understand how socialism was never the environment’s best friend. In order to fix this problem, the architecture and design sector has to step up and work together, and the time to start is right now. Waiting is no longer an option.

Follow us Facebook @archanddesign

LinkedIn architecture&designaustralia

Instagram @architectureanddesignaustralia

Louise Gault Harry O’Donnell Adrian Wilson Phone: +61 (0)2 9018 2037 Mobile: +61 (0)417 779 215 adrian.wilson@architectureanddesign.com.au

operations manager

Stuart Geach Phone: +61 (0)2 9018 2035 stuart.geach@architectureanddesign.com.au DIGITAL CONTENT CO-ORDINATOR

Yvonne Grice Phone: +61 (0)2 9018 2029 yvonne.grice@architectureanddesign.com.au subscription enquiries

Opinions and viewpoints expressed by interviewees, writers and columnists in Architecture & Design do not necessarily represent those of the editor, staff or publisher of the magazine.

Call Customer Service: 02 9018 2029 ISSN 1039-9704

Architecture & Design

Level 1, 50 Marshall Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010 Phone: +61 (0)2 9368 0150 architectureanddesign.com.au © Copyright Architecture & Design 2020. All rights reserved. No part of the publication can be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Utmost care is taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial matter. Product specifications and claims are those of the manufacturers.

Printed by Bluestar Print, 83 Derby Street Silverwater, NSW 2128 Phone: 02 9748 3411

1


WOrds Tone Wheeler

Architecture & design

/

p l a c e s - n e w so u t h w a l e s

/

Jan-mar 2020

Do we need to kill the NSW Design Building Practitioners Bill?

2

The Design and Building Practitioners Bill currently before the NSW Parliament must heed the lessons of the Banking Royal Commission or the bill will fix nothing and could even make things worse.

Big banks. Big profits. Big profiteering. For years conservatives refused an inquiry into banks, the most profitable companies in Australia, saying it wasn’t necessary as they had a ‘tough cop on the beat’ (i.e. ASIC and APRA). When the inquiry finally happened, we discovered two things: there was a deep-rooted rottenness within the banks; and the ‘cops’ had been utterly incapable of dealing with it. It turns out no amount of policing was able to detect, prevent, or cure the ingrained and corrupt behaviour at the very heart of the banking industry. The public expects banks to reform the way they conduct their businesses, and act in a far more ethical and moral way, or be sanctioned by newly beefed up ‘police’. The parallels with the construction industry are striking. Both are significantly large parts of Australia’s economy - construction is the largest single sector of employment - and both are under heavy scrutiny right now for the same reasons: a failure to meet decent standards. And just as it was with the banks, there are refusals to have a (Royal) Commission of Inquiry into the construction industry, the conservatives saying that there are already ‘cops on the beat’ (but adding that they need to be tougher). As it was with the banks, so will construction ‘cops’ (in this case certifiers, architects and engineers) be incapable of reeling in the

problems coming to light in recent apartment failures, no matter how tough they are. However, this idea of ‘better policing’ is the deluded approach that the LNP has made in its ‘Design and Building Practitioners Bill’ — trying to stiffen the requirements of the ‘cops’, but failing to address the real problem: developer-builders are currently not held responsible for the defects they create. The scenario is easy to understand: profits from construction are huge, particularly in apartments for sale. Seven of the 20 wealthiest people in Australia made their fortunes in construction and real estate, so the sector attracts a lot of attention, and ‘wanna-be’ millionaires. Large established firms are often the developers as well as builders and are not at issue here, but a lot of the newer, smaller developers rely on builders who have a licence to build apartments, and who have competitively tendered to build at the lowest price. The problem for these smaller developers is that their builders can have no responsibility whatsoever for the defects they create should they choose to walk away. The builder closes the nominated building company by declaring bankruptcy and takes the builder’s licence to a new ‘phoenixed’ entity. They never look back or go back to clean up the mess they made.

And the developer follows suit, folding the tent and disappearing into the night. For these shonky builders, the desire to make up for a low tender price or to increase profits by ‘cutting corners’, is great. If the banks require pre-sales to guarantee a loan, then the builder loses all incentive to build well. There are lots of ways to dumb the building down: changing the design, omitting parts, lowering standards, substituting cheaper, nonconforming materials, thereby forcing lower prices from sub-contractors and then not paying the last instalment. That’s profiteering. The ‘Shergold-Weir Report’ was written in response to these problems, but it missed the mark as it answered the wrong questions, avoiding the issue of builder’s liability. The key remedy is to hold the builder directly responsible to fix any problems for a period of, say, six years after occupation. This requires that the building licence nominated at the time of issuing a construction certificate should not be able to walk away. Frequently, the holder of the builder’s licence is nominated to a company, which allows the ‘phoenixing’ of the company — closing one and opening another, so directors avoid liability. The solution is easy: change the Corporations Act to make directors (and hence the builder’s licence they operate


/ Jan-mar 2020

apartments has become so fraught. The answer is twofold: extraordinary increases in the complexity of design and regulation, and a consequent complexity of contractor arrangements. Some 17 years ago, NSW introduced legislation to ensure ‘apartment design quality’, which it has done for the external appearance, but it has driven perverse and undesirable changes internally as it was based on the flawed assumption that an apartment building is a stack of houses. Just two of the many issues are the demand for sunlight in the middle of winter which has produced thousands of apartments with huge windows facing east and west that overheat in summer, and ‘cross ventilation’ that has created some of the most contorted plans imaginable to show an imaginary path for wind, the very wind that will never eventuate on the hot still nights when it is needed. As well as design, increased building regulations and standards, such as sprinklers, higher acoustic requirements and fire ratings have added complexity and costs. Their undoubted necessity was in part driven by changes in materials: where once double brick sufficed, the costly lack of bricklayers meant that other options have been developed and they needed to be regulated.

places - new south wales

under) responsible for their work. However, this would require a massive change to Australian corporate law and would be totally unacceptable to the Conservatives or even the market-obsessed Labor party. So that’s never going to happen. Perhaps that’s why the Shergold-Weir Report’ was misdirected by the government to avoid the issue of builders being held primarily accountable. The solution is to bind the builder’s licence to a person, not a company, and then require that builder to pay a bond, or have insurance, or both. Quality builders, (those that are financially stable), have nothing to fear, and the risk-averse insurance industry would soon weed out the ‘shonks’. This is the only way to make the authors of the defects, and the consequent misery, pay for rectification. The NSW bill, which has just been deferred for further amendments, will ultimately fail as it does not address this key issue, but rather seeks to make more onerous demands on the practitioners (‘building police’) without offering any increased powers or compensation. Trying to force ‘the cop on the beat’ to undertake more and more onerous inspections on a ‘shonky builder’ who can walk away, will not stop the rank profiteering. At the same time, however, in the builder’s defence, we must answer why building

/

ratings have added complexity and costs. Photography by Zhang Kenny on Unsplash.

Architecture & design

Above Increased building regulations and standards, such as sprinklers, higher acoustic requirements and fire

The demand for increased ‘quality’ has also added complexity: apartments are larger, with tiles and timber floors (rather than quieter carpet) more bathrooms (with double the basins in each), air-conditioning (that needs external fans that have to be hidden), more glazing (with more curtains); the list goes on in the real estate culture wars. On the opposite side of the same coin, builders’ contractual arrangements to deal with this increased complexity have become, themselves, more complex. Where once a contractor would have a foreman in charge for the length of a project, overseeing employees of the main firm, we now have a hired ‘site supervisor’ overseeing dozens of sub-contractors with sub-sub-contractors to them and so on. The person actually doing the work may be four or five times removed from the head contractor. It’s nick-named ‘pyramid building’, not for what they are building but the way it is built. Long gone is the practice of the owner or developer having a ‘clerk of works’ on site every day to check quality. A highly costeffective solution that the government is trying to emulate by having multiple ‘building practitioners’ make increased site visits, and increased reports. Some firms are finding the old clerk of works, often an experienced but semi-retired builder, is a better way forward. And being on a building site is more dangerous than going to war; the second highest number of workplace deaths in Australia. And who polices the staggering number of possible ways a worker can be injured? Not the local council inspectors whose numbers have been drastically reduced. And not the state’s workplace authorities who are overwhelmed not by the increased activity, but by the unions. Yes, that would be the same CFMMEU that the federal government wants to emasculate. Trying to remove one loud-mouthed obnoxious official, who has been making sites safer, could end up making every building site more dangerous. When building gets more complex, when construction processes gets more complex, when sites get more dangerous, when the possibility for failures is exponentially increased, we need a wholistic solution, not more ‘cops on the beat’. The sad irony in the NSW Design and Building Practitioners Bill is that, not only will it not address the key problem but it will reduce down the number of ‘cops on the beat’ that it seeks to promote. Engineers, architects and particularly certifiers, are having their costs massively increased; insurances are rising up to ten-fold for PCA’s. That will drive them out of the industry, leaving shonky builders even more scope to build badly. Let’s hope the bill is stalled for good.

3


WOODS

TRACELESS LAMINATE WITH FINGERPRINT RESISTANT TECHNOLOGY Distributed by:

wilsonart.com.au/traceless

TREACELESS.indd 1

31/08/2018 11:59:57 AM


p r o m o t i o n f e at u r e

Different at the Core: Distinguishing Between Laminates and Veneers

w i l s o n a r t. c o m . a u / A&d x wilsonart /

Laminates Versus Veneers: Understanding the Difference Veneer is an engineered timber product comprised of a thin slice of timber adhered to a backing sheet of medium-density fibreboard or other engineered substrate. Due to its real timber surface layer, veneer has the aesthetic qualities of natural wood, but also some of its drawbacks including a tendency towards scratches and elevated maintenance requirements. Laminate is a composite comprised of a core of resin-impregnated Kraft paper, a decorative face paper material, and melamine resin-impregnated overlay. High pressure (HPL) and compact laminates have Kraft

paper cores of varying thicknesses. Low pressure/melamine-faced board laminate does not have a core. Lasting performance Testing indicates that laminates are highly durable, outperforming veneers in terms of wear performance and scratch resistance. The shock absorbent cores of HPL and compact laminates offer a high degree of impact resistance, making them suitable for high-wear areas. By comparison, an unprotected veneer surface is prone to dents, scratches, impact damage and moisture damage. Cost effectiveness at all stages Laminates are generally more cost-effective than veneers when considering materials, longevity and ease-of-maintenance. The price of veneers depends on the timber species being used, while elevated maintenance requirements such as the need to reapply protective surface coatings drive up the overall lifecycle cost.

Versatility and breadth of design opportunities Modern laminates offer face papers that are virtually indistinguishable from natural timber, while offering customisation of surface features like texture and gloss. Veneers are limited to the qualities of the particular species and can only be used in low-wear areas due to being susceptible to surface damage.

jan-mar 2020

With growing industry demand for building materials that offer durability, versatility and minimal maintenance, laminates and veneers have emerged as a popular choice for designers and specifiers. While used for similar purposes, laminate and veneer have markedly different attributes – such as their performance, availability, lifecycle and cost.

Wilsonart For over 50 years, Wilsonart has led the global laminate market with its diverse catalogue of stylish, highly functional laminate surface solutions. Renowned for its quality and innovation, Wilsonart has a presence in over 100 countries worldwide. The Wilsonart portfolio ranges from affordable laminate panel solutions, compact laminate for high-wear areas to marker board laminate and laminates featuring fine metal finishes.

Download the Whitepaper bit.ly/WilsonArt_20Q1

5


Interview with Natasha Mulcahy

In the 2019 Sustainability Awards, Natasha Mulcahy of Sekisui House’s West Village project in Brisbane won a Women in Sustainability Award for her significant contribution to the built environment industry in Australia over the past five years.

Architecture & design

/

people

/

Jan-mar 2020

WOrds Hamish McDonald

Through her role as sustainability manager for the $1 billion West Village urban renewal project by Sekisui House, she has been instrumental in precinct sustainability planning and has driven ambitious initiatives, resulting in a 6 Star Green Star Communities rating for the development – the highest recognition for a master-planned precinct in Australia. Sekisui House arrived in Australia in 2009 and is known for constructing and developing intelligent, highquality homes and communities, drawing on their Japanese heritage. Natasha Mulcahy talks with Hamish McDonald: A & D : Can you tell us what took you into the field of sustainability?

6

N M : My career in urban development evolved from one in economic development. I was working for Brisbane City Council’s inward investment team and loved the site selection and city planning elements of the job. The turning point was probably assisting with the expansion of the iconic XXXX Brewery in Milton. I realised that this was something I wanted to pursue and began post-grad studies in property. A focus on sustainability was a natural fit for me. I always had a strong interest in this area – completing a research masters in ethical consumerism before I had any interest in urban development. When the opportunity presented itself to work for Sekisui House on their West Village project, I just couldn’t turn it down. It is such

an iconic project for Brisbane, and an enormous opportunity for me. It is an honour to help shape any neighbourhood, but this one is particularly special. Anyone who comes here really understands the significance of the site and the opportunity that it presents. A & D : Tell us about the site: what was there before and why is it such a special place for Brisbane? N M : West Village is a 2.6-ha master planned, mixed-use development around 1km from the Brisbane CBD. It’s on the site of the historic Peters Ice Cream Factory, built in 1928, which includes the ice cream factory itself and the ice cream cone and dry goods storage building. They are really the centrepiece of West Village, the development wraps around them and they create a very distinctive sense of place. They are built in the “restrained inter-war free classical style” and are heritage listed for their importance in providing employment for waves of migrants for over 70 years. At the site, Sekisui House has already delivered three residential towers, a new urban park and laneways, heritage office tenancies, plus construction on our retail centre commenced in January 2020. This will deliver a 4,000m2 Woolworths, large greengrocer, gym, childcare, medical precinct, specialty stores and restaurants. One of the great things about this site is that it’s such an easy walk to the CBD. It also

fronts onto Boundary Street which provides great access to public transport and promotes walkability to the cultural facilities of South Bank like the Gallery of Modern Art. A & D : With that choice location, and what must be its high land value, you still managed to keep half as green vegetation? N M : Fifty percent of the site is parkland, garden-filled laneways, podium-level green space and rooftop gardens. It was a key focus for us to make sure the site was heavily landscaped to create lush, green spaces that reflected the sub-tropical environment and promoted the outdoor Brisbane lifestyle. We have already delivered one of the parks, called The Common, and we have a second park starting construction in 2020 to be called the Mollison Green. A & D : So if the park is called The Common, is it open to the public? N M : It’s accessible to the public 24 hours a day. We’ve hosted many popular community events in the space already. For example, we have an open-air children’s art studio and have had about 40,000 children through since it opened. A & D : What are some of the other sustainable features? N M : Sekisui House’s focus is very much on the public realm as part of our Six Star Green


/ Jan-mar 2020

N M : Very much so. It was a surprise to be a finalist and then to win the award was such a huge honour considering the high calibre of finalists. West Village has been incredibly challenging to work on, so to be recognised by industry peers for our work is really special. Celebrating the successes of women in our industry I hope will lead to greater diversity, not just of gender but of experience, age, and culture amongst decision makers. For me personally, whilst working on this project I’ve had two children, and am trying to achieve everything I can for West Village whilst working part-time raising my young family – I always feel like I could do more if I just had more hours in the day. This award helps to diminish those concerns and has given me the confidence to pursue big projects, ask for more resources to support our initiatives and get a seat at the table. The accompanying exposure is also opening doors and new opportunities for future sustainability projects for Sekisui House at West Village.

people

N M : Sekisui House truly values sustainability and has an impressive pedigree – they have built more than 47,000 net-zero energy homes in Japan. The sustainability ethos is deeply embedded in the company’s culture. I recall the time when a senior executive from Japan visited West Village shortly after we received our Six Star Green Star certification – the highest rating for master planned precincts in Australia. He wasn’t just interested in the headline, I had to go through the credits line by line and explain why we had not targeted every credit, and he suggested ways we could improve! It’s certainly inspiring having people who are passionate about sustainability within the company and who are pushing you to reach higher. Sekisui House also has a number of fundamental philosophies that the company adheres to. One is Satoyama, the co-existence

A & D : Was this Women in Sustainability award a surprise to you?

/

A & D : Is this project already being taken as a model around Australia, where elsewhere highenergy McMansions seem to be the norm – perhaps not because people want them but they aren’t shown the alternatives like this?

A & D : How much does this thinking pervade Sekisui House, the company behind West Village?

of humans and the environment, the idea of ribbons of green where humans and nature can mutually connect through careful planning. The other is Gohon-no-ki (or Five Trees) a landscaping concept focused on conserving and promoting biodiversity of local ecosystems.

Architecture & design

Star Communities rating. We have extensive landscaping to mitigate urban heat islands, have designed for active transport with 1600 bicycle parking spaces, have LED lighting throughout public spaces, and an on-site food waste recycling system where food waste from the retailers will be converted into compost for the site. We also have rainwater collection and we are working on the installation of a grey water treatment plant which will eventually drought-proof our public realms and gardens. For our commercial public car park, we’ll have 10 car-share vehicles and eight electric vehicle charging stations. That is one of the largest car-share fleets in the country. The three residential buildings all have a NatHERS [Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme] score between 6.7 and 7.7, which we achieved through naturally ventilated hallways, ceiling fans in all sitting and bedroom spaces, deep balconies, tinted glass, LED lighting, rainwater harvesting and large solar systems on the rooftops. From a social sustainability perspective, we have an artist-in-residence program and in 2020 we will welcome Metro Arts to West Village in a bespoke 150 seat theatre, gallery and artist development centre.

N M : We are seeing a shift toward smarter designed, better insulated and more energy efficient housing, however this is happening in both infill and greenfield development projects. In greenfield we are seeing higher densities, with accompanying amenity and increased walkability. In urban-infill, the focus is on increasing connection to the street and nature. No one development model can provide the solution to Australia’s growing population and changing demographics; it is important that we continue to focus on improvement across all housing typologies and precincts. However, one thing I feel strongly about is moving to a system where we have mandatory disclosure of energy ratings across the country. The ACT is the only region with mandatory disclosure of an energy rating upon the sale or lease of a property. If mandatory disclosure was made national, it would empower the buyer or renter to choose more sustainably designed homes and create healthy competition between developers and builders to improve building performance.

A & D : I guess that having newly-born children, the whole idea of sustainability becomes something that helps you feel as a mother and woman that you are doing your bit for their future. N M : Absolutely. I think it’s a driving force for many people working in the built environment industry. You want to build the kind of place that can be enjoyed by future generations, and one that is resilient in the face of climate change. I’m proud that our team has this focus at West Village.

7


This is the full version of the Sustainability Awards keynote speech as delivered by architect Mahalath Halperin on 7 November, 2019 at The Star, Sydney.

Architecture & design

/

People

/

jan-mar 2020

Imagine, for a moment…

8

Imagine, for a moment, there was no such thing as a hypothetical situation. Imagine, for a moment, that in a future world, tonight’s Sustainability Awards, are redundant, because sustainable buildings and products are the norm.

Imagine, for a moment, that in a future world, there is no need for Leadership in Sustainability, because everyone is doing it every day in every way. Imagine, for a moment, that in a future world, there is no need to lobby, advocate, campaign and promote sustainability to governments and authorities, because they are already doing everything they can. Imagine, for a moment, that in a future world, the term ‘living sustainably’ is tautology because it’s the only way to live. Imagine... Back in the last decade of the last century, a group of people imagined a world of quality, sustainable housing, and Solar House Day was born. Later to become Sustainable House day, it was a chance to exemplar and showcase homes that were deemed solar and sustainable. It was a challenge to find houses suitable for the cause. Anything that faced true north, had a solar hot water system on the roof, maybe some double glazing or wide calculated eaves, maybe even half a dozen PV panels, and some basic fundamental passive solar design, qualified. These houses were considered leading edge, and worth showing off to the world on how to do it better. It changed from Solar HD to Sustainable HD in recognition that it wasn’t just good solar design that makes a house sustainable. That energy efficiency and environmentally friendly design, materials and systems, were factors too.

30 years down the track, we at least now have compulsory insulation, legislation for efficient, double-glazed and thermally-broken windows, some degree of minimum energy efficiency, LED lighting, greater uptake of recycled materials and products, and consideration of life cycles and embodied energy. But now, where in some places the ‘odd one out’ is the roof without the PVs, are even all these improvements enough? What makes a home, or for that matter an office, apartment block, hotel, factory, office building, hospital or school, a sustainable building? Tonight’s awards recognise and celebrate the current round of new works and practitioners that have gone beyond the basic models and skills of the 1990s. There are projects that challenge the rules, take risks and address a wide variety of design, functionality and usage issues; Larger scale works that take into account ecological and financial aspects reflective of the intended clients; Recycled buildings, innovative ways to recycle waste materials into new products, and sensitively sourced raw materials; There are people taking the lead and willingly sharing their ideas and motivation with others. But, and there is a but... Is the little eco house – off-grid, carbon neutral, and has a small footprint – really sustainable if it is only occupied on weekends, and left sitting empty and unused the rest of the week?


Architecture & design / jan-mar 2020

Could I suggest that perhaps next year’s Sustainability Awards should only consider buildings or products that have a few years’ worth of evidence that prove their worthiness? Awards that reward long-term reality rather than just short-term theory. And what of the building’s context? Buildings are not, usually, built in isolation. Likewise, a product or a material, is made to be incorporated into something, be it a building or something else. For a building, context is its relationship to the land – the site, the streetscape, the neighbourhood, the community, the city. That context then influencing transport, food and lifestyle, how we live and work within not just the building, but the neighbourhood, the community, the city. How we use the building but also how we use its relationship to everything around it – be it the backyard full of veggies, the local bike path, the city park, the carbon neutral public transport system, an ever widening circle of influence – both by and of. We are influenced by what is around us and we can influence what is around us. And better still, with good design and systems, we can influence others too. As practitioners in the construction industry, the built environment is one area we can all influence. We, here tonight, are the ones who can create a more sustainable future. Creating homes

/

where have those materials and systems and equipment come from? What are the equivalent ‘food miles’ of that bag of concrete, or piece of timber, or window frame? Are they healthy materials, non-toxic and non-polluting? Better still, how about the whole building being adapted and recycled for an improved or new purpose once it’s current one is outgrown or no longer needed. But wait, there’s more. A floor plan is two-dimensional. Architecture is three-dimensional. The fourth dimension is time – a building’s use, operation and impact, in the present and in the future. And maybe the fifth dimension is influence – how a building or product can change behaviour and usage, prompting people to think, whether subtly or overtly. Good design can influence good behaviour. We can inspire building users to be more sustainable in their actions. Whether inhabited as a residence, or used daily for productivity or manufacture or creativity, or used in the care or education or nurture of others, that action – usage and operation – is a critical aspect of a building’s sustainability. If we never turn on a light, we’ll use less energy, but if we don’t have enough light to live or work by, what is the point? Likewise, never using heating or cooling, but sitting there not really warm or cool enough, again, is that sustainable? Buildings, albeit some designed as works of art in themselves, still need to be used.

People

Is the amazing prefab, engineered-timber modular-framing system, replacing the raw, custom-built energy-intensive local structure, really that much better if it has been shipped from the other side of the world? Is the wonderful, new conscientious building so much better if it meant demolishing one that could possibly have been refurbished and upgraded instead? And what about architecture? Is a superefficient, high-tech or low-tech, zero footprint building worthy of kudos if it falls down in terms of quality architecture? What if it is just a simple and efficient – but boring and uncomfortable – box? What about the wellness of its users? Are all of these examples truly sustainable? Or is there more to it than that? So I ask, what is sustainability? Yes, we know – and we are quite capable of doing it as tonight’s awards will show – that a building that hopefully, as well as being good architecture, can be passive solar, energy efficient and environmentally friendly. But is it, and should it, be more than that? Yes and yes. What we build from is recycled and renewable and recyclable materials and systems; Designs that result in less wastage during construction; Designs that take into account the potential end-life of its initial use, and later, recyclability of the materials and spaces. Then take a step further than that –

9


Architecture & design

/

People

/

jan-mar 2020

“We are living in dangerous times. As a direct result of climate change, NSW is gripped by unprecedented drought and fire.”

10

that require less energy and resources, but also encourage liveability and relationships to the outdoors such that creating good spaces that fit comfortably with human-scale, focusing on wellness, with colours that soothe or stimulate and creating work places that encourage communication, interaction, and reduce resource demand. Creating buildings to nurture not just the body but the human spirit. The trendy word, ‘biophilic’, relating the building to all things natural and human, but in a way that allows us to connect with living things, rather than feel isolated inside an artificial, albeit highly efficient, box. As the designers and users of these buildings and these products, all of us here tonight have the power to influence those choices. And for those of you showcasing your own homes ie as both designer and client, all the better, as you don’t have to convince the client to take on this ethos. You walk the talk. With our knowledge and skills, I challenge you that we no longer have the right to design and build better, but that we have an obligation to do so. To take action and take leadership, to drive change and embrace a more holistic approach. To share our capabilities, our understanding and our ethos – which is why of course, you’re all here tonight to win an award or two. But while all here tonight are presumably already striving for best practice, I challenge that we should all do more. Sustainability, in all its definitions, is no longer a luxury – it is an imperative. Once again, I ask you all to consider what being truly sustainable is. There is, as we all know, no silver bullet. No building is perfect. None of us are perfect. Even those of you worthy of tonight’s awards are not perfect. But it is about getting 90 percent of it right to 90 percent efficiency for 90 percent of the time. Doing two or three aspects to 120 percent and not addressing the rest of the design is not a sustainable solution. Rather, we need a combination of many factors, one that takes a holistic approach, that makes a building, or a precinct, itself a system, ‘work’. And especially work sustainably.

We are all here tonight because we are passionate about sustainability, whatever definition you give it. We all carry that passion to act in different ways. But do you have the courage to care – not just for yourself and your family, but for your community, your peers, your country, your planet? Even the smallest changes are a step in the right direction. But now is the time for bigger, stronger, braver changes. We are living in dangerous times. As a direct result of climate change, NSW is gripped by unprecedented drought and fire and many of you living and working in cities still do not comprehend the severity and long-term consequences that this is creating. It’s not just a matter of needing some rain. We are living in an ever-changing climate where the house that was once rated 8 stars may well end up only performing as a 5 star, or even worse within a decade. With climate data soon to be updated from 1990 to 2018, should we perhaps overdesign some aspects now to anticipate changing performance in another 10 to 20 years? We are depleting, polluting or wasting our resources. We design buildings, materials, and equipment for redundancy, when we should be designing for durability and longevity. We keep building new buildings when often the existing one could possibly be refurbished and improved instead, maximising its existing embodied energy and saving on resources. How have we got to this point? How have we created such a resource-guzzling, climatechanging built-environment? How are there so many illegal and unsafe buildings around and so many toxic materials? How have we created such untenable, urban sprawl and congested cities that ignore and disrespect the land on which they are built? How are suburb after suburb of black roofed, inefficient, unsustainable McMansions still being built? For so long, we have got away with it and we’re stuffing it up. We aren’t necessarily the people that build or design these things, but we can do better. We

must do better. We must take leadership, as the powers that be are simply not doing enough. So I put forward the challenge – is it enough? Can you, me, we do more? We live in an enlightened and capable society, be it technological, behavioural or social. I challenge that we must do more, try harder, push limits and strive for a truly sustainable world. Will you go home tonight, and wake up tomorrow, and do just that bit extra and more? Whether it is as simple as researching some greener products, or as major as only specifying preferred accredited green suppliers. Whether it’s simple as employing recycled materials up front, or as major as planning through to disassembly and recyclability when the building is no longer needed. Whether it is as simple as convincing a client they don’t really need that extra bedroom or bathroom, or as major as forming a social housing collective for those who will most benefit from efficient, affordable and sustainable homes. Whether it’s as simple as subdividing a large block to create infill development, or as major as lobbying government to free up unused land for integrated development that considers the social as well as physical needs of the community. Whether it’s as simple as walking to work, or as major as getting all your work mates together to only car pool or use public transport. Whether it’s as simple as planting your first veggie patch, or as major as starting a new community garden and food co-op. Whether it’s as simple as inviting your neighbour in for a cuppa and a chat about our future, or as major as joining a climate action movement and taking on your local council to sign, and enact upon, the Climate Emergency Declaration. So thank you for listening. Thank you, hopefully, for hearing. Thank you for all your efforts so far. Make change happen. We all have the power and the responsibility to create a more sustainable future in whatever definition you give it. And, just imagine, what one day, it might it be like.


ALIGN YOUR BRAND with the biggest and longest-running sustainability awards program for the Australian building and architecture community.

CONTACT US TODAY sustainablebuildingawards.com.au 12 NOVEMBER 2020 | PLAZA BALLROOM, MELBOURNE IMAGE Welcome To The Jungle by CplusC Architectural Workshop | 2019 Sustainability Awards Winner of the Single Dwelling (New) and Intelligent Building categories.

01_A&D_FP_AlignYourBrand.indd 1

3/2/20 12:09 pm


WOrds Nicci Leung

Most of us live in cities. Cities are as beautiful as they are terrible, as unique as they are similar and as liberating as they are limiting. They are vibrant, everevolving, complex ecosystems and demonstrate the extent and impact of our interconnectivity with each other and our planet at scale. The best of them are places for the people created by the people but, cities are also doing us harm.

12

The way we design, build and live in our cities has disrupted the natural systems on which all life depends, and in the face of rapid urbanization and devastating weather events, it is time for a serious rethink. Moving towards a zero-carbon future is urgent, but the way we resolve this transition for the AEC sector is critical to its long term success. To an industry that employs around seven percent of the global working population and attracts over $US10 trillion of spending per year (McKinsey 2017) change seems risky – fearing that a kneejerk reaction could do more harm than good. But there is no doubt that we need to act now. Extracts from Architecture 2030 summarises the statistics from the UN Environment Global Status Report 2017 and various other sources as follows:

/ Architecture & design

PEOPLE

/

Jan-mar 2020

Cities: Beauty or Beast? – It depends on what we do next

“We are adding about 1.5m people to cities every week for the foreseeable future.” “Cities are responsible for over 70 percent of global energy consumption and CO2 emissions.” “Buildings generate nearly 40 percent of annual global GHG emissions.” “Embodied carbon (supply chain) will be responsible for almost half of total new construction emissions between now and 2050.” And the Australian context is just as scary. Extracts from A study by UNSW for the Sustainable Environment Conference 2016 state: ‘Australia is one of the highest emitters of GHG emissions per capita in the world.’ ‘.. the construction sector makes up 18.1% of Australia’s carbon footprint.’ almost 90% of which is indirect (embodied in supply chain and electricity use).

In a recent SMH article NSW minister of Planning and Public Spaces calls for a ‘National Settlement Strategy’ fearing ‘Australia is sleepwalking its way towards becoming a nation of three megacities.’ So, what can we do? Cities have everything we need to facilitate real change; diversity of thought, ingenuity and innovation, interdisciplinary skills and expertise, and they provide the perfect environment for small-scale experimentation to find quality pathways to larger scale positive and enduring change but it is intelligent technologies that will enable real and lasting success. Machine Learning (ML) can help us make sense of the mountains of complex and interconnected information and input required to understand the challenges, model, test, design and deliver the solutions, and continually monitor and improve the outcomes. But what interests me the most is that Artificial Intelligence (AI), when combined with human ingenuity and other advanced technologies, has the potential to provide options and outcomes that were previously out of our reach, and solutions that are limited only by our imagination, and perhaps gravity. At the Architecture & Design Sustainability Awards held in November 2019, I had the opportunity to discuss this with fellow panellists. We were asked to consider three ways in which new and emerging technologies will contribute to city-based sustainability transitions, prioritising the importance of the human experience on which the success


ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN / PEOPLE /

PHOTOGRAPHY Clement Falize via Unsplash

In the wake of the recent devastating bushfires and the threat of more dangerous conditions ahead, I cannot write anything without first acknowledging the direct, indirect and ongoing pain and suffering that the beautiful people, wildlife and vegetation of our unique countryside and country towns have had to endure and will likely continue to endure for some time. Apart from giving whatever, whenever and wherever I can to help with the recovery efforts and preparation for the next event, I pledge that my focus is to live as sustainably as I can and to help others to do so too. More importantly, to do everything within my power to ensure that we all take responsibility, individuals, communities and the institutions that represent us, and work towards real, accessible, liveable climate change solutions.

JAN-MAR 2020

of urbanisation depends and keeping in mind that any transition to a carbon neutral built environment must address both new construction and existing buildings. Those who attended the event know that I have lots of ideas on this, and an incredible number of people reached out to me personally after the panel discussion, in order to continue the conversation. This is exactly how true innovation starts. Throughout 2020, I will be working with Architecture & Design to prepare a series of ‘Cities: Beauty or Beast? – It depends on what we do next’, interactive articles featuring the latest ideas, research, innovation and experimentation in this space. I will investigate and showcase the incredibly innovative work emerging from the progressive universities, studios, labs and factories from across the globe and at home, and work through the implications for the Australian urban context and discover how we can all access and leverage these technologies to find the right solutions for our shared future.

Nicci Leung is the owner and founder of Lifepod Evolution & the creator of The Lifepod Project.

To get you started visit Matterdesign’s ‘Walking Assembly’. I have some ideas about why this

NICCI LEUNG

demonstrates a critical change in what is possible. And try augmented reality with this ARCode created by Pixelcase.

13


architect Arke photography Scott Burrows words Branko miLETIC & MATT KENNEDY

Architecture & design

/

projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

Passive design that responds directly to the Australian bush

14

An in-depth understanding of the site and its characteristics along with an intimate knowledge of the area were the starting points for the design of this home.

According to principal Matt Kennedy, Arke is one of those architecture practices that concentrate on designing unique and creative residential projects in and around Brisbane. This particular design he says, “evolved to harness local breeze patterns and capitalise on northern light for advantageous winter solar gain and to address a bushfire overlay (Bal-19).” The resulting ‘L’ shape notes Kennedy, “addresses the desirable northern orientation, harbouring a courtyard that enjoys breezes and views through the house.” The slender, elongated living platform, positioned along the southern edge of the site, allows generous light penetration and the narrow girth facilitates cross-ventilation. Pedestrian entry takes precedence as one

arrives along a crafted brick path that rises from the street level to the front entry. What he calls “The gentle arc of the brick wall that frames and grounds the deck,” is deliberate in order to reflect the contours of the land and provides a welcoming arrival. “Through the use of large windows and doors, moving about the home becomes a joyous engagement with landscape,” says Kenendy. The earthy tonality of the brickwork was carefully selected to reflect the colours of the land, while sustainably and locally-sourced blackbutt timber is used in key areas where it provides textural warmth. The clients, a retired couple with adult children, provided a brief centred around the creation; a comfortable and compact home that


Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

15


Jan-Mar 2020 / projects / Architecture & design

Being located on Brisbane’s city fringe, backing onto extensive bushland, the house also had to address vegetation and bushfire overlays through innovative design solutions.

16

takes advantage of the bush views and inherent breezes of the elevated block of land, which is a carved off 500m2 section uphill from the couple’s original property. The client’s requirements included a certain number of bedrooms and bathrooms, but the emotive brief included designing for light and transparency. Kennedy notes that there is a beautiful quality of light that permeates the home and a transparency to spaces that celebrates the ambiguous distinction between interior and

exterior, resulting in a curated calmness within the architecture. “The building truly responds to and connects with the landscape in a symbiotic co-existence.” Because the site has what Kennedy calls “a unique microclimate that differs from the broader Brisbane climate,” an in-depth analysis and understanding of its specific characteristics was required in the first instance. Being located on Brisbane’s city fringe while backing onto extensive bushland, the house also had to address a number of vegetation and

bushfire overlays through innovative design solutions. In some places it embeds itself within the landscape it occupies, whilst in others it looks as if it is literally floating above the ground. The roof pitch parallels the fall of the land, opening up to the higher northern elevation where high louvres vent rising hot air. The generous eaves’ overhang was calculated to allow penetration of relatively subtle winter sun while also shielding the building from the intense south-east Queensland summer heat, says Kennedy.


Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

17


Architecture & design

/

projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

The building truly responds to and connects with the landscape in a symbiotic co-existence.

18


design in motion

#SATURDAYINDESIGN SATURDAYINDESIGN.COM

IT’S bACk! Join us for a day of inspiration at Saturday Indesign 2020. Explore the latest design discussions, workshops, new product, installations and more!


Jan-Mar 2020 / projects / Architecture & design

The timeless beauty of the Summer Hill House architect Annabelle Chapman Architect photography The Palm Co Arc words Branko Miletic & Annabelle Chapman

The clients wanted to retain the main section of the timber Victorian cottage for use as bedrooms and demolish the rear section of the house with the idea of adding living areas, plus a master bedroom suite to an upper level.

20


Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

21


22

Architecture & design

/

projects

/

Ja n - M a r 2 0 2 0


Architecture & design / projects /

Left The new wing kept the cottage proportions and vernacular of the existing house.

The owners bought this cute but dilapidated timber Victorian cottage in 2017 in what has become a very much sought-after suburb in Sydney’s inner-west, says the architect. The four front rooms and the hall of the cottage were retained as bedrooms and a bathroom, while the rear ‘lean-to’ section of the house was removed in order to make way for a new wing containing the living rooms, kitchen, terraces, plus laundry and a rather sumptious Butler’s pantry. The new wing deliberately kept the cottage proportions and vernacular of the existing house, thereby respecting the local Heritage Conservation Area. This part of the rebuild is barely visible from the street, says the

Jan-Mar 2020

above The rear of the house was removed to make way for a new kitchen and Butler’s pantry.

architect, who also noted that the master suite including a bedroom, bathroom and wardrobe were relocated above the kitchen and pantry, allowing the dining and living room below to have a vaulted cathedral ceiling. As the rear of the property faced south, a courtyard in the centre of the house was created to allow the northern sun to penetrate through to the living rooms and kitchen, a rare commodity in a house of this vintage. With a large, and suitably Sydney-esque Jacaranda tree visible from the living rooms and master bedroom, the owners can expect an annual purple carpet to be dutifully rolled out across the compact lawn each and every November.

23


Jan-Mar 2020 / projects / Architecture & design

Above The master suite including a bedroom, bathroom and wardrobe were relocated above the kitchen and pantry.

Project specifications Project size: 175 m2 Site size: 465 m2 Completion date: 2019 Building levels: 2 Engineer: Peninsula Consulting Engineers 24

Builder: Renotech Building


Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

25


Carbon neutral becomes a Melbourne ‘thing’

Architecture & design

/

projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

ARCHITECTS Austin Maynard Architects words Sophie Watson

26

Built by Lucent, Melbourne’s bayside Slate House is set to become one of bayside’s first carbon neutral property developments.

The project is carbon neutral in operations not through its materiality. Slate House capitalises on renewable energy by sourcing through an embedded energy network to deliver a building that operates 100 percent free of fossil fuels. This all-renewable embedded energy network provides reduced metering costs and running costs across the lifetime of the home. Strengthening the shift away from fossil fuel usage, gas is not connected to Slate House. Instead, each kitchen features induction cooktops that are 40 percent more efficient than typical ceramic electric, while also delivering improved safety, fewer indoor pollutants and zero-emission cooking. To achieve its high-performance, the development of the 14 apartments will use an all-renewable embedded energy network to deliver a building that operates free from fossil fuels. Lucent managing director, Panos Miltiadou says he plans to translate his sustainable development principals to a more luxury end of the market.

“We’ve been really excited to bring some of the learnings from our projects in Melbourne’s inner north to Brighton. The wave of sustainable development has been so successful there, so much so it’s now become somewhat expected from apartment buyers,” says Miltiadou. “We plan to deliver a collection of high-quality, premium homes with environmental integrity – we really believe this is what the upper-end of the market is looking for. They want homes that combine refined design and functionality, while also treading lightly upon the earth. Slate House will demonstrate that luxury and sustainability are not mutually exclusive.” “In line with our fossil-fuel-free philosophy, hot water is supplied by a well-insulated and efficient direct-electric centralised hot water system,” he says. The design also makes the most of passive design principles to ensure energy usage for heating and cooling can be minimised. Preliminary energy ratings modelling has the building achieving an average NatHERS rating of 8.2.


Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

27


Architecture & design

/

projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020

Improved thermal efficiency in the fabric of a building can be achieved through doubled-glazed windows and a robust use of insulation.

28

ABOVE The development also achieves a minimum NatHERS rating of 7.5 stars, which far exceeds the Brighton average of 5.5 stars.


INSPIRED BY EUROPE. DESIGNED FOR AUSTRALIA

LYSAGHT DOMINION®

THE LYSAGHT ZENITH™ RANGE: FIVE STRIKING CLADDING PROFILES Lysaght’s ZENITH™ range provides a stylish suite of profiles to add to your design palette, offering valuable design versatility which is made even greater when you consider the wide variety of finishes you can specify. These include the contemporary COLORBOND® steel colour range, the superb COLORBOND® Metallic steel colour range and the stunning COLORBOND® steel Matt colour range. The ZENITH™ range offers you the peace of mind only genuine Australian made COLORBOND® steel can offer – supported by the technical expertise of Lysaght.

So, when it comes time to build, build on with Lysaght at www.lysaght.com

LYSAGHT LONGLINE 305®

LYSAGHT BAROQUE®

LYSAGHT IMPERIAL™

LYSAGHT ENSEAM®

LYSAGHT® and COLORBOND® are registered trademarks, ZENITH™ is a trademark of BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058.

ADQ1_2020_Lysaght_FP.indd 1

15/1/20 5:02 pm


30

Architecture & design

/ projects

/

Jan-Mar 2020


/ projects

and for further reduction in energy use and impact,” says Miltiadou. Strengthening the shift away from fossil fuel usage, gas is not connected to Slate House, with kitchens featuring induction cooktops instead. The development also achieves a minimum NatHERS rating of 7.5 stars, which far exceeds the Brighton average of 5.5 stars. A scheme which measures a home’s energy efficiency based on design, all new developments in Victoria must achieve a minimum NatHERS average of 6 stars.

Architecture & design

Improved thermal efficiency in the fabric of a building can be achieved through doubled-glazed windows suites and a robust level of insulation. This combined with considered orientation of buildings and interiors spaces for both solar access and ventilation means that occupants can regulate the comfort of their homes without the use of artificial heating and cooling. “From a utilities and technology perspective, having a building that operates solely through the use of electricity sourced from renewables, means that living can be carbon neutral. High efficiency appliances are readily available now

“To date, there haven’t been any new developments in Melbourne’s bayside that take this kind of integrated approach to luxury and sustainability, so we wanted to deliver a fresh alternative,” explains Miltiadou. “We want to show buyers that sustainability does not mean you have to compromise on good design or a luxury living experience.” Designed by Austin Maynard Architects, Slate House comprises eight two-bedroom and six three-bedroom apartments, spread across three levels. The design will feature natural, robust and raw materials throughout, with double-glazed windows orientated to maximise the opportunity to passive heating and cooling of homes. “Slate House adapts the best parts of traditional Brighton homes – beautiful tiled roofs, robust materials and lush gardens – yet takes away the inefficiencies, the sprawl and the high maintenance,” says Miltiadou. Slate House is designed to cater to both young families and older ‘downsizers’, looking for well-designed, sustainable homes. “As developers we have a responsibility to adapt our practices and find new ways to limit the impact on the natural environment. Aligned to deliver high-quality buildings, we have ensured that ecologically sustainable design is woven throughout this project,” Miltiadou adds.

/ Jan-Mar 2020

LEFT Designed by acclaimed architectural practice Austin Maynard Architects, Slate House comprises eight two-bedroom and six three-bedroom apartments, spread across three levels.

31


No need for red or blue pills to liven up Sydney’s Matrix

Architecture & design

/

P ro j e c t s

/

jan-mar 2020

WORDS Branko Miletic & Tony Owen architect Tony Owen Partners

32

The southern end of Sydney’s Sussex Street is home to a number of historic masonry buildings, where the rule of heritage infill is typically to not attract too much attention – unless, of course, the building is called ‘The Matrix’.


Architecture & design

/

Projects

/

jan-mar 2020

33


34

Architecture & design

/ Projects

/

jan-mar 2020


A r c h i te c t u r e & d e s i g n

Above The facade consists of individual window bays. Each window is separately angled to

/

maximise its solar aspect at the time of day it receives sun and sometimes even light. right The facade is dominated by a mosaic of angled window bays in a palette of bright colours

Projects

to liven up the quiet street. Opposite The main lobby reflects this high level of finish.

/ jan-mar 2020

The Matrix is a 14-storey mixed-use residential and commercial building that consists of a four-storey retail/commercial podium with 37 units situated above. The unique, and some would say, striking facade is dominated by a colourful mosaic of angled window bays in what the architect’s have called a “palette of bright colours to liven up the quiet street.” In fact, this facade has a much more practical environmental purpose, where the window bays are angled to maximise the natural light to unit, as the site is surrounded by tall buildings and has northerly aspect. This presents a challenge for a residential building where access to solar amenity is both crucial as well as difficult.

By using parametric modelling, it was found that each portion of the facade receives sun at different times of the day. The studies of the angles and direction of the sun at different times then led to a calculation of the exact angle of reflected light from adjoining buildings. This led to a design where each window is separately angled to maximise its solar aspect so that it receives optimum sunlight. This makes it possible for this residential building to have light in a facetted facade that also sparkles like a mosaic sculpture. The mosaic effect is reinforced by the use of coloured side panels which frame the windows, resulting in an urban sculpture which at once reinforces the heritage streetscape, and also enlivens it. The masonry podium is similarly a

marriage between this parametric geometry and a traditional entry portal. The faceted geometry is further used on the side masonry facades which are angled in and out to create a play of light and shadow. The main lobby also reflects this high level of finish that incorporates large areas of offform concrete which compliment the masonry entry portals. The main ceiling is back-lit glass to dramatically bring additional light to the space. Other ceilings are timber clad and incorporate timber beams from the original building on site. A feature wall reinterprets the faceted geometry in illuminated sandstone, while the lobby also includes a café/bar, which is designed to further enliven the space.

35


SAVE THE DATE 12 NOV 2020 Recognising and rewarding the leaders in Australian sustainable design.

ENTRIES OPEN 3 JUNE

sustainablebuildingawards.com.au 12 NOVEMBER 2020 | PLAZA BALLROOM, MELBOURNE IMAGE Dales of Derby by Philip M Dingemanse | 2019 Sustainability Awards Winner of the Commercial Building (Small) category.

02_A&D_FP_SaveTheDate.indd 1

3/2/20 12:09 pm


TRUST OUR PLYWOOD

Trust the consistent quality of our plywood – Ecoply,® Plyfloor ® and Formrite.® • Proven, durable and easy to work with • Ecoply & Plyfloor available H2S glueline treated against termites and H3 treated against rot & termites • EWPAA ‘Product certified’ for peace of mind • Manufactured from sustainably-grown Australian and New Zealand plantation pine • Environmental Product Declaration for Green Star credits

IEZZI I719/1 A&D

Download the EPD at ecoply.com.au

Formrite

Plyfloor

Project shown: CABN / @cabn.life

Disclaimer: While the products in this document possess the characteristics described, no representation is made that the products will be effective in all locations and circumstances. Much depends upon building design, construction practices and the environment in which the products are used. Products must be installed in accordance with Carter Holt Harvey recommendations, industry accepted guidelines and good building practice.

ADQ1_2020_CarterHolt_FP.indd 1

24/1/20 12:03 pm


Architecture & design

/

sections2

/

jan-mar 2020

Sections2 Welcome to Sections2, where we highlight the very best section drawings from architecture and design students from our many universities.

Buildings, just like humans, experience the test of time, when they are reaching their end, death and demolition. However, we often have the desire to prolong death or try to reach out for the concept of “immortality”. Just like buildings, our desire and affection towards these historical buildings created an increase in heritage preservation practice where our heritage building life is beginning to become younger - 100 years old in comparison to 1000 years. Unfortunately, too often heritage sites either merely become physical shells of the new or relics to be sanctioned as “significant”, to simply “exist”. Yet, we have a tendency to put our buildings on life support, invading heritage sites with foreign programs that fail to forge a relationship with the past. Do these preservation methods truly extend the life of these buildings or mark the beginning of their death? Therefore, my thesis research aims to define the lifespan of Jack’s Magazine, and explore a method that embraces the loss of the old, in hope to create a transition of heritage building into the new.

Right The journey begins on the elevated timber platform above the heritage canal that was once used as the entrance. It is a threshold between different versions of Jack’s Magazine. Slowly transitioning down into the river and foundation of 38

the site, visitors can feel the weight and mass of their surrounds within the space, depicting a sense of loss.


Architecture & design

/ sections2

/

jan-mar 2020

39


40

Architecture & design

/

sections2

/

jan-mar 2020


Architecture & design / sections2 / jan-mar 2020

Top left Upon arrival, two vertical retaining walls define the entrance hall where visitors see and follow a long track that was once used for the transportation of gun powder. This pathway leads into the entry hall/chamber within the mounds, where visitors are met with two walls made using existing blue stone reflecting the new and old Jack’s Magazine storage building. Bottom left Exiting the long entry tunnel, the visitor arrives at the exhibition hall hosting a memorial of Jack’s Magazine and a living museum of the west. The existing pebbles are left on the middle stand, allowing visitors to take home a piece with them. The act of keeping the pebbles symbolise the responsibility of keeping and remembering the memory of Jack’s Magazine. Once the pebbles slowly disappear, it forms a new gathering spot for future generations and events.

41


jan-mar 2020 / sections2 / Architecture & design

Top right Arriving at the end of the ramp, the visitor reaches the peak of the site where the garden and viewing platform showcase both the old and new Jack’s Magazine. In contrast to the tunnel, this provides a more open and light atmosphere, hinting towards a release from the past. Bottom right Exploring the second mound, visitors enter the second exhibition hall where they are met with a void that takes shape of Jack’s Magazine foundation. In

Sze Ming Tan, Master of Architecture graduate from the University of Melbourne, was born in Malaysia, has lived and studied in Singapore, and is currently based in Melbourne. He has worked at Co - Lab Architecture for the past two years whilst completing his studies. He has participated in multiple architecture design competitions, was the state winner of Superstudio 2018, and has helped publish a design magazine Global Architecture Profiling (GAP) as graphic designer. Internationally, Tan has participated in various architecture programs worldwide including in Hong Kong, Seoul and Cambodia. He is particularly inspired by Tadao Ando, Carlo Scarpa, their architectural philosophy and detail towards their work. “If the architecture is any good, a person who looks and listens will feel its good effects without noticing.” - Carlo Scarpa

addition to a symbol of memorialising Jack’s Magazine, the void has turned into a new opportunity, a new beginning; where landscape and an outdoor platform

42

Follow us

is inserted carefully into the space, hosting events and

Facebook @archanddesign

exhibitions. The mega-columns erected from the void,

LinkedIn architecture&designaustralia

hold up the proposed ‘Jack’s Museum’.

Instagram @architectureanddesignaustralia


Architecture & design

/

sections2

/

jan-mar 2020

43


Talking Architecture & Design Podcast As Talking Architecture & Design podcast enters season 3, we cover issues and ideas the industry needs to know.

Episode 2: Helen Lochhead president of the Australian Institute of Architects. Identifying Sydney as one of the most inequitable cities in Australia, Lochhead says the homogenous city of her childhood, which had a large middle class, a small upper class and a robust working class, now shows a clear divide between the ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’, often described geographically as the ‘latte line’.

Episode 29: Jodie Taylor International Towers’ head of Marketing & Stakeholder Engagement. During FRONT 2019, we sat down with Jodie Taylor, to talk about, corporate design, her Indigenous heritage and how the big end of town is learning to embrace and promote Australia’s rich and deep Indigenous heritage.

Episode 7: Sandra Furtado We talk to Sandra Furtado, principal and director of Sydney-based architecture studio Furtado Sullivan on a range of topics from environmental efficiency in design, vernacular design, architecture across different continents, carbon neutrality, women in architecture, leaving a legacy and more.

Episode 21: Jo Gillies architect, designer and survivor talks about male & female design and the redemptive role of architecture. As an architect, Jo Gillies has been a mainstay on Sydney’s Northern Beaches for over 20 years, but in 2013 the business further expanded in vision, director and staff, to be re-born as Archisoul Architects in Manly.

Episode 19: Kathlyn Loseby & Peter Poulet. Founding Australian Institute of Architects NSW Chapter president Kathlyn Loseby joins former NSW government architect Peter Poulet to speak with Talking Architecture & Design about design, heritage, technology and the gender imbalance in the built environment.

To listen to the podcast go to bit.ly/Talking-AD-podcast Have something to share? Get interviewed! Contact branko.miletic@architectureanddesign.com.au or call 02 9018 2039 to discuss your ideas for a podcast. Proudly sponsored by


SOURCE PRODUCTS SHARE SOLUTIONS CONNECT @ARBS Visit Australia’s only international HVAC+R & building services trade exhibition, with the largest range of suppliers, products and solutions, all under one roof. Featuring the highly regarded Speaker Series, the new IBTech Insight Series and the celebrated ARBS Industry Awards, ARBS 2020 should not be missed.

REGISTER ONLINE NOW AT ARBS.COM.AU 19-21 MAY 2020 | MCEC | MELBOURNE

ARBS2020_Visitor_297x235.indd 2 ADQ1_2020_ARBS_FP.indd 1

22/1/20 8:56 4:33 am pm 23/1/20


words Stephanie Stefanovic

Jan-Mar 2020 Architecture & design

/

practical

/

Keeping your cool: Innovations in shading for Australian home design

46

Australia is among the hottest, sunniest countries in the world. While this tends to be reflected in our contemporary residential architecture, this wasn’t always the case.

Victorian terraces for example, are common throughout many parts of Australia. These homes tend to be dark and overly moist with poor insulation that makes them bitterly cold in winter and oppressively hot in summer. Even Queenslanders, homes with much better ventilation and temperature insulation, are being upgraded to take advantage of the latest innovations in sun control and shading. Modern residential designs take a cue from the Queenslander in terms of indoor-outdoor spaces that help ventilate the home and forge a better connection with the environment. Natural light is also being prioritised more than ever. But with this comes the need to create shade – bonus points for a solution that is both practical and architecturally appealing.

Outdoor shading solutions When looking for a shading solution, it may sound counter-intuitive to choose a solution that will let more sunlight in, but in the Australian climate it’s actually a very attractive option. The Vergola is a good example of this. Essentially a pergola with operable louvres, this is one of the best options for outdoor shading because it has the flexibility of acting as a full shade in rainy or overly bright weather conditions or bringing in some light and ventilation when the weather is pleasant. This roofing solution features louvres with a unique aero-foil wing shape that incorporates an air gap, which along with the use of double

Colorbond steel provides maximum insulation, reducing air temperature by up to 18 degrees Celsius compared to other fixed roofs, according to Vergola. It is also designed to withstand the Australian climate, with the use of BlueScope Colorbond instead of aluminium alternatives that weather more easily. This option is suitable for the front or back yard of a detached or semi-attached home, or even the rooftop of a multi-residential building. Another roofing solution, LouvreTec’s Retractable Opening Roof can be used to make a bold architectural statement. Not only do the louvres have the ability to open and close overhead, but they are also able to retract and stack back to less than 20 percent of their opening space.


Architecture & design

/

practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020

47


48

Architecture & design

/ practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020


SUPPLIERS & COMPONENTS Vergola architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ vergola-nsw OpenShutters architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/open-shutters LouvreTec architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/LouvreTecAustralia Blindware architectureanddesign.com.au/ com.au/suppliers/verosol-australia

/ Jan-Mar 2020

Inside the home, shutters are a good option for shade and insulation. With up to 40 percent of a home’s heating lost and 87 percent of heat gained through windows, shutters can be a solution to regulate the internal temperature, improving comfort and lowering overall energy use. While shutters are not currently part of Australian energy rating schemes, timber shutters have strong insulation qualities, with R-values (thermal resistance measurement) between 2.77 and 3.17. This is certainly superior to alternate materials such as aluminium or plastic. One solution suitable for residential applications is OpenShutters’ Ultimate Interior Plantation Shutters, which are designed for maximum light, airflow and view. Made from sustainably sourced Western Red Cedar, they are made-to-order and designed for Australian conditions.

While it is not a shading solution itself, Blindware’s ZeroGravity spring technology can be implemented with roller blinds and shades, allowing them to be raised and lowered by simply urging the base rail up or down by hand with very little effort. The technology can be used with chain blinds, chainless blinds and motorised blinds. Chainless blinds are particularly wellsuited to residential applications as not only are they simple to use, but they are also safe for children. For reach management, using a chain retainer is certainly an option, but “ZeroGravity is really a better answer to child safety with no cord, no chain, no risk,” says Sebastien Vanderbeken, national business development manager at Blindware. The ZeroGravity technology was recently used in a home renovation in Mount Eliza, Victoria. “[The client] redecorated the whole thing and she chose chainless ZeroGravity for a few reasons,” says Vanderbeken. “She liked the chainless roller blinds for their minimalistic, practical approach and their uniqueness … She wanted something modern.” According to Vanderbeken, more and more people are choosing to use motorised blinds for residential applications. AC motors will often be used for this purpose, which (depending on the amount of windows) can incur substantial electrician costs. The ZeroGravity technology does not work with AC motors, but instead allows the use of a small DC motor. The advantage of this is that it is rechargeable, so you don’t need all the wiring and the electrician costs when budgeting a residential project. Some DC motors can also be connected to smart home systems, creating further ease of use.

practical

Indoor shading solutions

According to the company, the Plantation Shutters’ advantage is their ability to enhance the interior design of a wide range of architectural styles. They are also a practical solution that can function with any window or door, whether it is hinged, sliding or bi-folding. Another good window shading solution is Verosol’s SilverScreen Performance window covering, which can reflect up to 85 percent of solar radiation. According to Verosol, by incorporating a microscopic layer of aluminium onto fabric (the silverscreen layer) it’s possible to reflect heat and glare outside the building and regulate the heat and light indoors, while still retaining views to the outside. This solution works well in a residential application and was in fact used in Harry Seidler’s Meller House. Having designed Meller House in 1949, Seidler was not expecting to make any alterations to the home, but when owners Joanne and Enzo Marchione bought the home in 2002, they convinced Seidler to lead the restoration and extension project. The stunning architectural design features glass walls on every level, capturing sweeping bay and bushland views. While these expansive glass walls may look aesthetically pleasing, they can actually have negative effects on the interior, such as excess heat and fabric fading from UV radiation. In a bid to counteract these impacts, SilverScreen blind fabrics were installed at Meller House. According to Verosol, the window covering is designed to ensure that daylight exposure, views, heat and glare are in balance, creating an environment with strong UV protection, comfort and thermo-regulation.

/

According to LouvreTec, the Retractable Opening Roof was recently installed as part of a Port Macquarie home renovation. “We wanted an outdoor room that would naturally attract our family members to it and become a link or a connector from our home out onto the upper deck area,” says the client. “We didn’t want to feel the full force of the sun at all times but then in saying that on beautiful clear evenings or clear early mornings we might want to enjoy the view forward and sky above. The Retract Roof allows us [to do] this and we get to choose our setting. It has become the eye-catching finishing touch to our renovation.”

Architecture & design

suppliers/blindware Aerosol architectureanddesign.

49


50

Architecture & design

/ practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020


Bathrooms, toilets & water savings words SAM MURDEN Architecture & design /

The widespread drought across NSW and QLD has forced many homeowners in drought-affected areas to reconsider their water usage in the home. One surprising solution has proved highly effective: water-saving toilets.

practical /

“The performance issues (of some toilets) can impact on some customers in terms of amenity and the need for them to manually clean the pan with a brush.” Average demands of water usage in toilets, showers and basins can dramatically shift the modern residential bathroom design since the installation of water-efficient appliances can be highly cost effective. One major example is dual-flush toilets, a recent addition to the market over the past few years. These toilets offer alternating water levels – higher for solid waste, lower for liquid waste. Replacing a single-flush toilet that uses, on average, 4.5L of water with a dual-flush toilet not only saves 9L of water but can also reduce water bills. Saniflo’s Sanicompact is a recent example of a new toilet technology that has been introduced to the market. According to the company’s website, “Where normal toilets use 4.5L of water in full flush and 3L of water in half flush, Sanicompact only uses 3L and 1.8L respectively.” “The added benefit of this product is that

you can add a powder room anywhere in your home without needing the main sewer lines nearby. The integrated macerator grinds the waste into slurry and pumps it up to 3m vertically and 30m horizontally to connect with the main sewer pipes; you can also connect a vanity basin for the complete toilet.” Another variant of a water saving toilet is the low-flush, or the half-flush toilet. Lowflush toilets do have their advantages and disadvantages overall, and designers should take these following factors into account when planning the modern residential bathroom. On the plus side, low-flush toilets can be cost effective for the consumer by lowering the amount of water consumption for each individual flush. These toilets contribute to preserving the environment from depletion and potential contamination from groundwater. For a consumer looking to fit their bathroom with a low-flush toilet, having a piece of hardware that is easy to use and clean can also be a fairly persuasive factor. Despite this, there are some disadvantages of low-flush toilets. One example of this is how

Jan-Mar 2020

The toilet has to rank alongside the shower and the garbage bin as one of the most innovative, yet simple, pieces of sanitation hardware ever designed. The notion that devices can quickly and conveniently remove human waste may sound childish to some. But the toilet is key to any modern residential bathroom design, and the value of saving water in the home cannot be understated. Recent coverage of drought and bushfires in NSW and QLD has dominated news headlines. Now more than ever, households in droughtaffected areas are looking for innovative ways to save water for essential use. The residential bathroom forms a major component of water use in commercial properties. The United Nations estimates that roughly 50L of water per day are needed for each household, a figure that does not begin to factor in toilet flushing. According to a 2019 report from the Australian Government Department of Environment and Water, “At least 25 percent of indoor residential water use is due to toilet flushing.”

51


Architecture & design

/

practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020

“Average demands of water usage in toilets, showers and basins can dramatically shift the modern residential bathroom design since the installation of water-efficient appliances can be highly cost effective.”

52

some older models may require flushing more than once to adequately clean the toilet bowl. Doing so can present the risk of clogging or blocking the toilet up. One company that has designed water-saving products intended for residential bathroom designers is Kohler. Specifically, the company’s Veil Wall-Hung Intelligent Toilet is a sustainable and innovative piece of bathroom technology. According to the company’s website, “The Veil Wall-Hung Intelligent Toilet offers the perfect balance of form and function to encapsulate the essence of the modern intelligent toilet and the benefits and features most sought out by designers and users alike.” Kohler’s Veil Wall-Hung Intelligent Toilet features a “rimless dynamic flushing system dispensing an exceptionally clean and efficient flush”. For designers curious about how to replace older single or dual-flush toilets with a waterefficient alternative, it can either be done by replacing the entire toilet or switching the flush mechanism around. Vacuum-assisted toilets also deserve a mention among the better variations of water-saving designs for the modern residential bathroom. One of the more pressing issues with toilets is finding a solution to removing dirt and stains that can contaminate a bowl, subsequently creating hygiene and cleanliness issues in the process.

This is where vacuum-assisted toilets come into play; by forcing waste out from above, these toilets depressurise the trapway, effectively sucking waste out from below and pulling waste out of the bowl via a vacuum. Pressalit, one of the leading manufacturing businesses focussing on specialised bathroom solutions for people with disabilities and the elderly, is also focussed on improving residential bathroom designs by re-thinking the modern toilet. According to a 2014 brochure, Pressalit designed “A solid toilet seat with stabilising buffers, which hold the seat securely in position of the toilet bowl, providing an extra sense of security when transferring a user to and from a wheelchair.” “The area in the immediate vicinity of the toilet is central in bathrooms designed for special needs. It is important to have plenty of space around the toilet, so mobility aids can easily be moved around and any carers can avoid awkward or strenuous working positions.” Of course, it wouldn’t be a complete discussion of the evolution of modern residential bathroom designs without mentioning an Australian icon: Caroma. Earlier in 2019, Caroma announced the launch of its new collection – Elvire. According to the company, Elvire was inspired by the nature and wilderness of Australia.

“The intent was to translate and bring the Australian environment into a bathroom space. The result is a stunning and truly unique collection, targeted at the discerning consumer who seeks the very best bespoke luxury bathroom experience.” Another range recently released is Everhard’s Artesan Series Concrete Basin range. According to Everhard, “The Artesian Series is the perfect combination of Concrete Nation’s high-end design and Everhard’s well established legacy in the concrete manufacturing industry.” “These two Queensland-based, familyowned companies began in concrete, but their products are completed by water. Artesian was inspired by the Great Artesian Basin, one of the largest underground freshwater reservoirs in the world.” Perhaps one of the more exciting prospects for the future of residential bathroom design is the introduction of toilets with a spray-on lubricating coating. In a recent paper published by Penn State University researchers, the team developed a coating that not only reduces water consumption, but also lowers the prevalence of germs and odours. The group’s aim was to develop a “liquid entrenched smooth surface”, also known as LESS.


Natural colour linear grates.

100MND20 Marc Newson Design Grate

With Stormtech.

ARCHITECTURAL GRATES + DRAINS Create perfect harmony in the bathroom with Stormtech’s range of luminous brass, copper and bronze metallic grate finishes. Designed and manufactured in Australia from marine grade stainless steel, Stormtech remains the gold standard for design and sustainability with full Greentag Certification. View our complete selection of designer stainless steel grates on the Stormtech website, and match the perfect drainage to your design needs.

Telephone 1300 653 403

• Extensive Range + Styles • Linear Threshold Drainage • Pool Surrounds + Courtyards • Custom Fabrication

Visit stormtech.com.au for tools + inspiration.

Pictured : Stormtech 100MNDi Linear Drainage System. Brass finish, marine grade stainless steel, 100mm Marc Newson designed grate. Copyright © Stormtech Pty Ltd FPMNDBYB24

ADQ1_2020_Stormtech_FP.indd 1

23/1/20 5:22 pm


SUPPLIERS & COMPONENTS Saniflo architectureanddesign.com.au/ suppliers/saniflo Kohler architectureanddesign. com.au/suppliers/kohler-australia Pressalit architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/pressalit Caroma architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ caroma Everhard architectureanddesign.com.au/

Architecture & design

/

practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020

suppliers/everhard-industries

54

Tests suggested that toilets with the LESS coating were able to withstand up to 500 flushes yet needed to be replaced after 50 urinations had taken place. Writing in the Nature Sustainability journal, lead author Tak-Sing Wong notes, “less coating is capable of reducing adhesion up to 90 percent solids and requires only 10 percent of the cleaning water required for an untreated control surface.” “With an estimated one billion toilets and urinals around the world, it is anticipated that incorporating LESS coating into sanitation systems worldwide could lead to significant water saving and improved global sanitation.” Overall, many easy-to-install toilet developments already exist on the market, with many more water-saving fixtures to be introduced in the future. It is essential that residential bathroom design evolves over time as water scarcity becomes more of a pressing issue for homeowners in rural areas. While using the half-flush button can assist in lowering water bills, designers should pay more attention to the humble commode and how the right toilet can help Australia save water for the future.


Architecture & design

/ practical

/

Jan-Mar 2020

55


WORDS Nathalie Craig

Architecture & design

/

Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

Top tips: The hard and fast rules of wet area surfaces

56

When searching for the perfect choice of solid, surface material in the residential design sector there is much to consider. Homeowners not only want benchtops, vanities and counters that look the part, they also need the material to be durable, easy to maintain and fit in with their lifestyle and budget.

Manufacturer of quartz surfaces, Caesarstone, champions the benefits of quartz for kitchen benchtops, bathroom vanities and counters. Quartz surfaces are created from approximately 90 percent natural quartz aggregates, organic pigments and enhanced polymer resins. The end result is heat, stain, scratch and chip resistant. Caesarstone is available in 48 quartz finishes, each of which has the authentic look of stone or marble. The design flexibility with quartz is another benefit of the product. Caesarstone’s brand manager, Linda Hannah, says when it comes to the latest trends in solid surfaces, more and more customers are leaving the stark white kitchen and bathroom behind and moving over to darker tones. This desire for darker colours has seen Caesarstone’s ‘dark rituals’ collection of quartz surfaces highly sought after. Global trends forecaster and frequent collaborator with Caesarstone, Li Edelkoort, notes that kitchens are traditionally very white, but in a dramatic shift they are now making a move to the dark side, featuring black quartz, charcoal granite and black cast iron. “While at first, the choice of black for the kitchen seems surprising, it is actually logical and connected – it is as stylish as the black bowls and plates we are now choosing to present our food on,” she says. Another trend that continues to build momentum as a top choice for floors, walls, benchtops, vanities and splashbacks alike, is the concrete look.

“We saw the concrete decorative trend beginning to emerge about five years ago and launched Australia’s first concrete quartz surface finish, Sleek Concrete, in 2014,” Caesarstone’s brand manager Linda Hannah says. “Since then we have released eight other concrete finishes and have seen both the commercial and residential sectors embrace them.” Caesarstone’s concrete-inspired finishes take influence from unique materials such as oxidised steel, weathered cement and handpoured concrete. For a more refined look, Fresh Concrete, Raw Concrete and Sleek Concrete offer choices from the white, grey and taupe colour palettes. Meanwhile, Topus Concrete combines mineral formations found in nature with the rugged patinas of industrial materials. “The concrete-look collection is suitable for benchtops, splashbacks, vanities, walls and furniture,” Hannah says. One of Australia’s favourite cooks, Maggie Beer, is already on board with the concreteinspired trend. The kitchen in her new Adelaide city apartment by kitchen designers, Farquhar, features Caesarstone’s Rugged Concrete. “When I first walked into Farquhar and saw the stone display, this stone [Rugged Concrete] was on it, and I never deterred from it. I just loved it. I love the graduation of colour; it’s not all matte, it’s real. It feels like concrete,” Beer says. Another material that no doubt comes to mind for solid surface choices is laminate. Laminates have been a popular option for


Architecture & design

/ Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

57


influence from unique materials such as oxidised steel, weathered cement and hand-poured concrete.

A r c h i t e ct u r e & d e s i g n

/

Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

above The design flexibility with quartz is another benefit of the product. Previous Caesarstone’s concrete-inspired finishes take

58

surface materials for the better part of 85 years, but over that entire period, they’ve been getting better and better. Australian company, Laminex, which has been producing laminates for more than 80 years, is paying ever-increasing attention to contemporary design movements and the changing needs of architects and designers. Neil Sookee, Laminex product design manager, explains that materials such as timber and stone are not perfect in nature and that’s part of their appeal, but nowadays, laminates are able to reflect these characteristics with incredible likeness. Decor in the Laminex Woodgrains collection, such as Raw Birchply, Natural Walnut and Rural Oak, delivers an authentic representation of the colour, texture and character of natural timber grains. Combined with the low-gloss tactile chalk finish, it’s realistic to the touch too. Neil notes a desire among architects and designers to honour and respect trees, using every possible piece of them, including those with sap lines or mould stains.

“This same philosophical approach now spills over into digital print representations of timbers, where we aim to celebrate the grain of the wood itself and interfere with its characteristics as little as possible,” he says. This is particularly evident in textural woodgrain decor such as Laminex Delana Oak and Planked Urban Oak, which replicates the look and character of aged timber. This realism is also reflected in the Laminex Minerals range, where marble-inspired decor finishes like Crema Venato and Nero Grafite are detailed with true-to-life veining patterns and shifts in tone and colour. In line with Ceaserstone’s style predictions, Laminex has also pinpointed the rising prominence of dark interiors, particularly in kitchens. To cater for this, the company has launched Black Birchply within the Laminex Colour Collection. It offers the textural effect of blackstained plywood, with an almost tonal character created by the woodgrain detail visible through the black colourwash effect. It comes in a natural finish and low-gloss, tactile chalk finish.

The other key driver behind the return to laminate benchtops is an increasing awareness of their hard-wearing performance. Even a stone will discolour over time, and in direct light, veneers will fade fairly rapidly, but laminates just keep on keeping on, as they have great UV resistance. “The porosity of laminates is also so low that it’s negligible in most circumstances and this makes them highly water resistant,” Sookee says. When considering using laminates, it is important to understand the difference between high-pressure laminate and low-pressure melamine in order to choose the right product for the project. Because while they may look the same, they do not perform the same. High-pressure laminate, or HPL is created when sheets of technical kraft paper are treated with water-based resin and decorative surface papers are treated with water-based melamine resin; the papers are dried and cut to size, then collated together and pressed under high pressure and heat. The end result is a versatile and highly-durable decorative


A r c h i t ec t u r e & d e s i g n / Practical / jan-mar 2020

Above iGlobal trends forecaster and frequent collaborator with Caesarstone, Li Edelkoort, notes that kitchens are traditionally very white, but in a dramatic shift they are now making a move to the dark side

59


jan-mar 2020 / Practical / Architecture & design 60

surface that’s resistant to heat, UV, moisture and everyday wear and tear. By contrast, decorated board, also known as low-pressure melamine or LPM, uses medium density fibreboard or particleboard as a rigid core, with melamine-impregnated decorative paper bonded to both sides. HPL is the best choice for medium-impact applications like kitchen benchtops, bathroom vanities and wall panelling, where it’s adhered to a solid substrate. In comparison, the extra thickness of LPM and the fact that it is a prefinished panel, makes it a cost-effective solution for structural work such as cabinetry carcasses, doors, panels and furniture. Moving away from laminates, another alternative to consider is Corian. Created by Dupont in 1967, it is produced through a mixture of acrylic polymer and natural minerals. The main ingredient is Aluminium Trihydrate, derived from bauxite ore, one of the main components in the manufacture of aluminium. It is primarily used as a countertop and benchtop surface, although it has countless other uses. Corian is also non-porous, so stains cannot penetrate its surface.

With proper cleaning it also resists the growth of mould, mildew and bacteria, making it a healthy choice for kitchens and bathrooms. In terms of visual appeal, it is available in a wide spectrum of colours with the choice of three finishes – matte, satin (standard) and gloss. A recent project where Corian was a standout feature, was in the design of two luxury beachfront penthouses in northern New South Wales by architectural interior design company, Ultraspace. Mark Gacesa of Ultraspace says the company chose Corian for most of the hard surfaces in its custom design work to achieve the “calming and high-end look of a light natural stone but without the fragility and maintenance”. “Because I was using Corian, I was able to allow several thermoformed sweeps and curves into the design process and Corian also allowed me to have the design as seamless which is something that I love,” he says. Corian says it can also provide unique opportunities within the bathroom space. In one renovation, it provided the opportunity to create an entire bathroom without any tiles or grout. It also meant that the basins, benchtops

and splashbacks could be seamlessly joined so no silicone joints were required. Avoiding tile grout and silicone means the bathroom will never have mould issues and remains easy to maintain and clean on a daily basis. The thermoformed basins, thermoformed benchtop to splashback detail, thermoformed vanity drawer fronts and thermoformed floor to wall details are also incredibly unique. With hundreds of colours, patterns, and textures to choose from for surfaces across the home, it’s easy to be spoiled for choice.

Suppliers & components Caeserstone architectureanddesign.com.au/Suppliers/ Caesarstone Laminex architectureanddesign.com.au/ Suppliers/Laminex Corian architectureanddesign.com. au/suppliers/casf-australia


ADQ1_2020_Easycraft_FP.indd 1

15/1/20 5:07 pm


62

Architecture & design

/

Practical

/

jan-mar 2020


How your insulation choice affects energy and lifestyle WORDS MatThew MacDonald

Architecture & design / Pr a c t i c a l

The need to reduce energy consumption combined with the desire of homeowners to cut costs and enhance their quality of life means that, right now, insulation is a critical topic for specifiers.

/

a house. The good news is that the products on offer in this space are only improving, making it simpler for Australians to not only reduce their ecological footprint but to create liveable homes for themselves and their families. So, what are these products, and who are the key players in this important market?

Made in Australia, it is easy to handle and install, CodeMark certified for NCC Compliance and has Group 1 NCC Fire classification. It allows for quick-response heating and cooling, and is resistant to the passage of water vapour.

jan-mar 2020

Up until now, Australia’s climate policy debate has centred mainly around energy sources. The focus has been on whether we will shift from our current reliance on fossil fuels to renewables, and if so, when and how quickly. Another key factor - energy efficiency - has received less attention. Even though – at least in the construction context – it has just as important a role to play in a low carbon future as renewables, we don’t hear much about it. And we don’t hear much about the fact that one of the best ways to reduce energy use is by installing insulation. As the Victorian government points out, insulated homes can cut energy usage and its associated costs by 40 - 50 percent. What’s more, because of these reductions, these products will pay for themselves in five to six years. Energy efficiency isn’t insulation’s only positive. It delivers other benefits like reducing moisture in homes and, in the case of acoustic insulation, making living spaces more liveable and reducing stress. In other words, insulation is an important consideration for anybody building or designing

Knauf Insulation Kingspan In the insulation market, Kingspan’s products include Kooltherm K18 Insulated Plasterboard, a high performance, fibre-free rigid thermoset, closed cell phenolic product. The product’s insulating material is sandwiched between a front-facing, tapered edge gypsum-based plasterboard, and a reverse facing of low emissivity foil autohesively bonded to the insulation core during manufacture. One of the key benefits of Kooltherm K18 Insulated Plasterboard is that it provides a continuous thermal line for the walls of homes and therefore, improved performance as compared to products that can only be installed within a frame.

Knauf Insulation offers a range of thermal and acoustic systems for walls, roofs and floors. However, unlike other manufacturers, Knauf offers Earthwool – a brand that features Ecose Technology. A sustainable binder that contains no added formaldehyde, this technology is certified by Eurofins Gold as an ‘outstanding material’ according to Volatile Organic Compound’s (VOC) indoor Air Quality emissions regulations. Softer than traditional glasswool products and therefore easier to handle and install, Earthwool products are odourless and are brown in colour. They are manufactured using up to 80 percent recycled glass bottles and contain no

63


Architecture & design

/

Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

Energy efficiency isn’t insulation’s only positive.

64

phenols, acrylics, artificial colours, bleaches or dyes. Despite this, they lose nothing in terms of performance. On the contrary, Earthwool insulation products deliver high level thermal and acoustic performance, along with fire resistance. They comply with all the required Australian and European Standards for glasswool. AIS Building Insulation The commercial and residential building arm of the Perth based AIS Group, AIS Building Insulation, is the Australian distributor for the global Rockwool and Rockfon product range. The company offers a large suite of non-combustible thermal and acoustic stone wool insulation materials. These include the Rockwool Safe‘n’Silent range, which is designed and manufactured to achieve excellent acoustic insulation performance in all types of drywall partition configurations. Recommended for use in residential buildings and elsewhere, its benefits include a high noise absorption co-efficient, excellent thermal efficiency and low water vapour absorption. Further products include Rockfon Facett, a versatile insulating ceiling tile that is fixed directly to the building soffit envelope and recommended for parking garages and building entrances; and Rockwool HardRock roofing boards, which are suitable for flat roof construction.

All these products are made from rock, basalt, anorthosite and carbonates, in a process that is not unlike the natural production of lava in volcanoes. The rocks are melted in a cupola (furnace) then spun into fibres and processed in different ways to produce a range of products ideally suited to their intended applications. This may vary from rigid slabs, flexible rolls, flexible wired mattresses, pipe insulation, ‘construction’ rockwool for sandwich panel cores, ‘loose fill’ for cryogenic insulation and even slabs suitable for growing plants in. All of them being low cost, non-combustible, durable and recyclable. Bondor Metecno An Australian manufacturer of insulated wall, ceiling and roof panels, Bondor Metecno offers products in three globally accepted options including a PIR insulated wall panel, mineral wool insulated wall panel and an EPS-FR insulated wall panel. One of the strengths of these offerings is that they share common features, regardless of whether they are designed for use on roofing or walls. “The products are a three-in-one panel, offering a roof sheet, insulation and ceiling sheet as one compact unit,” explains Geoff Marsdon, executive general manager of Bondor Australia.

“They replace the traditional approach of built up systems using individual products (roofing, insulation and ceiling products). The structural nature of the products also means there is no need for trusses, therefore, the panel can achieve long spans. They open up living, retail or warehouse space very effectively.” According to Marsden, because the insulating material is held in place and the panels lock together with airtight joints, it does not suffer from crumbling, sagging or gaps that can mean that traditional approaches to insulation lose as much as 70 percent of their effectiveness over time. “Replacing three individual products with one also means a better outcome for the environment with less site waste and few site deliveries to deal with,” he says. CSR Bradford Covering all areas of residential homes, CSR Bradford’s offerings include Bradford Gold Hi-Performance insulation for ceilings and external walls; Bradford Anticon roof blankets for metal roofs; Airomatic roof vents and Eave Vents for both tiled and metal roofs; Bradford Enviroseal roof sarking for tiled roofs; and Bradford SoundScreen, an acoustic insulation solution designed to reduce airborne noise transfer between floors.


Insulat i o n

How will you deal with

thermal bridging after 1

st

May 2020?

National Construction Code (NCC) 2019 adoption is looming and from May 1st 2020, thermal bridging needs to be addressed and architects & designers could be forced to build thicker walls. Section J, thermal envelope calculations need to be considered from an early stage of building design. Thermal bridging is a big change in Section J & will result in significant implications to building design and thermal requirements. In many cases, it will affect the size of the windows and doors, forcing designers to reconsider thermal design and performance. Specify Kingspan KoolthermÂŽ products, which easily address thermal bridging. Kingspan KoolthermÂŽ is thermally efficient with a slim profile, helping you save real estate space while keeping the building thermally efficient. Call Kingspan Insulation for technical assistance at 1300 247 235.

Image Courtesy Australian Building Codes Board

Kingspan Insulation Pty Ltd Tel: 1300 247 235 Email: info@kingspaninsulation.com.au

www.kingspaninsulation.com.au Authorised Stockists: Eureka Sustainability Group Pty Ltd | Primo Building Services Pty Ltd | PlastaMasta Melbourne City | PlastaMasta South Side | Network Building supplies | Hume Building Products | Archiclad Building Products Pty Ltd | Archiclad Pty Ltd | Melbourne Building Supplies | 4 Corners Insulation

ADQ1_2020_Kingspan_FP.indd 1

24/1/20 4:37 pm


com.au/suppliers/bradford-insulation Bondor Metecno architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ bondor AIS Group ais-group.com.au Knauf Insulation Kingspan architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/ kingspan-insulation

Architecture & design

/

/

architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/knauf-insulation

P r act i ca l

jan-mar 2020

Suppliers CSR Bradford architectureanddesign.

On top of that, the company offers Bradford SoundScreen to help minimise noise transfer between rooms, as well as Bradford Enviroseal, a vapour permeable wrap for external walls. Mark Pohlner, CSR Bradford’s architectural business development manager explains that the company has played a role in the development of high-performance glasswool products over recent years. “Traditionally, these products had a density of around 10kg a cubic metre. With our highperformance products, we’ve doubled the density. We’ve gone to densities of 20 – 32kg a cubic metre. This has improved the thermal performance of the products without making them any thicker,” he says. The Future

66

Those bemoaning the lack of political progress in reducing Australia’s carbon emissions can take heart from developments in places like the home insulation market. While parliaments have failed to reach consensus, manufacturers

continue to take significant steps on the path to a low carbon future. Anticipating a shift in the NCC, from the insulation performance to conductive performance of buildings, Pohlner is positive about the future. “There’s going to be a seismic shift in the industry. We’ll go from just chucking insulation in homes to producing carbon neutral homes. Most of the major builders are already building higher energy efficiency homes,” he says. “They are improving the insulation performance of the outer envelope of the building. The thermal envelope – the floors, walls and roof – will be improved.” “We will head down the road of introducing additional insulation in the form of a deeper stud on the external envelope. We’ll also look to make houses far more airtight. We’ll wrap them externally in tape and we’ll tape up all the penetrations around windows and doors.” Along with improvements in areas like window design and the increased use of solar panels on houses, insulation is set to play a key role in creating the zero carbon homes of the future.


Complete your design with Bradford’s Total Home Comfort Upgrades Work with a technical team that supports you with exceptional experience and knowledge and a suite of insulation and venitlation upgrades to deliver truly superior home designs.

Meet the DesignSmart technical team on LinkedIn.

Joe Timi Technical Service Manager

Liam Thai Technical Sales Engineer

Ed Hanley Technical Sales Engineer

Mark Pohlner Architectural Support

For more information visit BradfordDesignSmart.com.au

ADQ1_2020_CSR_FP.indd 1

21/1/20 4:20 pm


Talking Architecture & Design Podcast Uncovering what really goes on behind the scenes in the world of architecture and design… Talking Architecture & Design aims to uncover the industry’s most interesting personalities at the cutting edge of design, technology and practice. Find out who they are, what they’re doing, where they’re headed, and how we can learn from their experiences.

Now available for listening on Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Google, Soundcloud and Buzzsprout. Search Talking Architecture & Design to stream or download episodes.

If you enjoy the podcast, please subscribe and leave a review.


Episode 15: Koos de Keijzer (left) founding partner and principal of DKO Architecture has both a passion in typology research and an ongoing commitment to architectural integrity, contemporary residential development and the inherent beauty of applying simple design principles.. Episode 31: Ros Moriarty (right) is managing director and co-founder of both Balarinji and the Moriarty Foundation and is a passionate advocate for Indigenous design. Moriarty, who is best known for the Balarinji-Qantas collection of art aircraft featuring Aboriginal designs, talks about why Indigenous design matters and how it is becoming more important for architects and designers alike to understand and appreciate the 65,000-year old culture from where it evolved.

Proudly sponsored by


Made to Order: The Benefits of Custom Kitchen Design

billi.com.au

/

A&D x billi systems

/

Jan-mar 2020

p r o m o t i o n f e at u r e

According to recent reports, the average size of an Australian home is at a 22-year low. Shrinking living spaces reflect changes in modern lifestyles, needs and preferences. This trend is particularly relevant to kitchen design. As kitchen spaces become smaller, the challenge for designers and specifiers is to address a multitude of practical concerns such as bench space, storage and access to water and electricity, while keeping footprints minimal. The emergence of custom kitchen designs and integrated kitchen solutions provide an opportunity to create optimised spaces tailored to the needs of modern users. Residential Kitchen Design: Key Considerations Some of the fundamental considerations when designing a kitchen include: • meeting the mandatory design and performance requirements set out in Australian building standards and regulations; • inclusion of features that meet the client’s functional needs and lifestyle; • selecting products that deliver long-lasting performance and easy maintenance; • provision of adequate and ergonomic work space; • provision of cabinetry and storage; and • delivering a cohesive, high quality aesthetic.

70

Kitchen Design Trends As a response to shrinking residential floor space, a common theme in modern kitchen design is a focus on increasing the size of

bench and work areas. Custom kitchen designs are growing in popularity as homeowners become aware of the range of customisable, space-saving solutions on the market. There are also a growing number of solutions, such as fridges, dishwashers and coffee machines, that are designed to blend seamlessly with the rest of the kitchen. Benefits of Custom Kitchen Design Enhanced Functionality Unlike ready-made kitchens, custom kitchen designs can be optimised to accommodate the actual dimensions of the room and any special functional requirements. Stand-alone appliances can fulfil specific needs but require additional bench and storage space that can impact overall comfort and efficiency in the kitchen. Custom and integrated solutions can free up work space, making the kitchen easier to use and providing room for additional features. Space and Storage Efficiency Standard kitchen cabinets may not be suited for smaller, non-standard layouts. Custom designs can maximise space usage and enable integration of appliances in unique spaces within the kitchen. The underbench footprint of certain kitchen solutions should not be overlooked. Water systems with ventilation requirements or underbench systems and other factors, such as internal clearances, space tolerances and warranty compliance, can impact cabinet design and require additional space. Leading suppliers offer water systems with

comparatively smaller units and products which do not require ventilation cut outs. The use of tubing extension kits can also alleviate some of the problem. Design Flexibility Custom kitchen designs and integration allow for a broad scope of finishes, colours and materials, enabling designers to easily achieve a modern aesthetic. Carefully-specified appliances, water systems and tapware can also contribute to a visually coherent and impactful style. Leading suppliers will offer a range of profiles, finishes and colour options. Billi For nearly 30 years, Billi has been at the forefront of the tapware and instant boiling and chilled filtered water system industries. Originating from Australia but used worldwide, Billi’s premium solutions are celebrated for their combination of functionality, performance and contemporary aesthetics. Billi offers an extensive range of high quality tapware and instant filtered water systems that feature eco-friendly technologies, enhanced functionality and compact designs that meet the changing needs of today’s residential market. The company’s comprehensive offering features extensive customisation options on most popular models enabling designers to choose solutions that complement current tapware trends.

Download the Whitepaper bit.ly/Bili_20Q1


p r o m o t i o n f e at u r e

billi.com.au

/ A&D x billi systems

/

Jan-mar 2020

71


Kitchen trends that are here to stay

Transform the space from being purely practical, to encouraging well-being and entertainment.

Architecture & design

/

Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

WORDS Thida Sachathep

Right With the use of low emission panels, water-based lacquers, energyefficient technologies and social and environmental certifications, Snaidero 72

says that it works to ensure that overall well-being in the home is achieved.


Architecture & design

/ Practical

/

jan-mar 2020

73


Practical

jan-mar 2020 /

right Fisher & Paykel have a suite of appliances that can be distributed throughout

Architecture & design

/

the kitchen to support different functions.

74

Learning from the past and innovating for the future, residential design is unmatched when form, function and quality are equally considered. Whether advancing in the latest ergonomic or modular design, or taking advantage of long-wearing and sustainable materials, designing within the home has wholly overturned. A space that has been primarily affected by this is the kitchen. Demonstrating that this has altered to cater for changes in lifestyles and behaviours, specific materials and technologies have been utilised today to integrate ample storage for the kitchen, whether or not the residence boasts an open plan or has a smaller footprint. Open-plan spaces often require a seamless transition between living, cooking and dining areas – therefore, architects take into account the multitude of uses by applying and organising appliances in specific ways. Standard utilitarian kitchens of the past made use of the working triangle, often fitted with stainless steel and white porcelain. Developed in the early twentieth century, the working triangle is a time-honoured principle. It is a theory that follows the arrangement

around three significant spaces within a kitchen – storing, cooking and cleaning (refrigerator, stove and sink respectively). Although the approach represents ideal traffic flow within a kitchen; it was specially designed for scenarios when there is only one person in the kitchen. Moving away from a working kitchen triangle – today’s residences now celebrate freestanding or distributed kitchens that can spark confidence within the space. Today, cooking is a communal activity that families and friends enjoy together. A distributed kitchen is one that architects seek to design as it is the ideal way for kitchens to be functional for the way people live and work today. Supporting contemporary patterns of use, architects consider the kitchen as an immersed space. Ensuring that residents interact with the overall area, kitchens are no longer relegated to the back of the home. It has become the centre of entertaining, and it is one of many reasons why it closely resembles a living or dining room. The adaptable nature of the new kitchen also sees the design of appliances to be more classic, timeless and minimalistic. By aligning interior and architectural design concepts with a high degree of functionality,

multiple brands have worked hard to ensure that kitchens look not only great, but also feel great. Unobstructed by visual clutter, integrated and built-in kitchens can provide a sense of flawlessness with a design that is confident and smooth. Larger appliances are hidden from view, and slimmer products (such as fridges and ovens) provide a more holistic solution. In saying that, statement ovens and fridges from various brands are popular today because the trend for concealing appliances and services is continuing to grow. When integrated appliances are coupled with pioneered technology, performance and convenience enable each integration to bring more enjoyment to the act of cooking. For that reason, fixtures and appliances are thought of from a human-centred design perspective and seamlessly fit into people’s lives and routines. Apart from appliances, cabinetry has also changed. Considered with the same principles as custom-made furniture, kitchens often include integrated tables that can act as a gathering point – whether it is for family dining or for kids to do their homework. Although integrating the kitchen island and dining


The new standard in Acrylic Solid Surface

RETHINK THE POSSIBILITIES Exclusive Australian and Commercial Reserve ranges

Complete with sinks, basins and accessories

New concrete textures, veined patterns and pastel terrazzos

Thermoforms to almost any shape

Mt. Cremo Carrara M009

Modern Concret e

View the full range at:

ForestOne are proud to be the sole distributor of Meganite in Australia

meganite.com.au

M024


76

Architecture & design

/ Practical

/

jan-mar 2020


“A distributed kitchen is one that architects seek to design as it is the ideal way for kitchens to be functional for the way people live and work today.”

jan-mar 2020

With collections and materials that allows everybody to personalise a solution – from a Pininfarina (famously known for designing Ferrari’s) limited edition kitchen to an affordable multi-residential offering –

Saniflo is renowned in the industry for being the global leader in small bore grey water pumps, macerator pumps, and lifting stations. Saniflo pumping systems enables wastewater to be transferred into an existing line without major structural work. As plumbing relocation of the kitchen is not always feasible, Saniflo’s greywater pumps directly provide an easy to install solution that ensures functionality is achieved in the least obtrusive way possible. Having been involved with Daramu House by Lendlease (the second timber building in Barangaroo), Saniflo was specified when the kitchen needed to be relocated to meet the client’s needs. Considering the sensitivity of the structure, builders were not able to transfer pump lines. Saniflo’s Sanicom 2 served as the ideal system that provided an alternate solution to bring wastewater from the kitchen fixtures back to the mainline. Sanicom 2 is fitted with two powerful motors that provide continuity and reliability in one easy installation. It can handle temperatures up to 90 degrees Celsius (which is the same operating temperature of a commercial dishwasher) and pumps water up to 11m vertically and 110m horizontally.

/

Snaidero

Saniflo

Practical

Fisher & Paykel have a suite of appliances that can be distributed throughout the kitchen to support different functions. With a robust design philosophy that challenges conventional appliance design, the company has developed a variety of products that offer ultimate freedom tailored to human needs. Specifically, products such as the CoolDrawer Multi-Temperature Drawer and DishDrawer ensure that appliances are considered as furniture. When intuitive technologies such as these are integrated into appliances, Fisher & Paykel assures that cooking will be more comfortable. Fisher & Paykel’s Integrated Columns Refrigeration series that features Variable Temperature Zone technology gives consumers a new level of storage flexibility. The personalisation of temperature settings (between Chill, Fridge, and Pantry modes for the refrigerator or between Freezer, Soft-Freeze and Deep-Freeze options in the freezer) has been designed to provide optimal food care.

“With the move towards modern cabinetry and beautifully detailed tactile veneers that celebrate natural elements,” according to Tom Fisher, Zip marketing director, “kitchens today must work hard at hiding the working areas and showcasing or integrating into social spaces.” Drinking water systems have been on trend for a while, and Zip taps are seen in an array of premium kitchens around the world. This is because filtered water systems are now considered as essential as other appliances. Moreover, filtered water systems also eliminate the need for plastic water bottles, minimising environmental impact. “We have recently completed in-home persona research and some of the interviews that I attended emphasised to me how kitchen designers and homeowners are thinking about their kitchen as an extension of their living area,” Fisher explains. These decisions affect choices of taps, handles and the selection of Zip HydroTap, which can contribute to the desired overall style. We hear that while [Zip] HydroTap may have been a late inclusion in the kitchen renovation realm, it is now often the very first appliance that homeowners specify in the new kitchen project.”

Snaidero is capable of accommodating a broad range of demands and desires. With the use of low emission panels, waterbased lacquers, energy-efficient technologies and social and environmental certifications, Snaidero says that it works to ensure that overall well-being in the home is achieved.

/

Fisher & Paykel

Zip

Architecture & design

table is an architect’s direct response to cater to smaller footprints, it still ensures that the kitchen is the heart of the home. Additionally, sustainability within the kitchen is more profound than just creating an environmentally conscious space; it also considers the appliances that are chosen and the materials that are employed to fit out the area. Technology and material development have come a long way, and now focuses on improved environmental quality.

77


Billi

A rc h it e ct u r e & d e si g n

/

Pr a c t i c a l

/

j a n - m ar 2 0 2 0

As a brand that offers instant filtered boiling, chilled and sparkling water, Billi is a healthy option for families. Removing sediments, chemicals, minerals, cysts and even led, Billi provides a space-saving solution for residences with under bench units. Additionally, the design impact of kitchen benchtops and islands is more advanced than ever. For this reason, architects and designers often choose to specify Billi in a place where everybody in the household can enjoy it. The residential range from Billi is finished with the latest designs and trends. Whether an open plan or a compact space, Billi tapware sits standalone on the island bench, over a sink or even on a front installed off the sink, which drains. These designs allow Billi to cater for a kitchen that has been designed with integration in mind.

above Fisher & Paykel’s Integrated Columns Refrigeration series that features Variable Temperature Zone technology gives consumers a new level of storage flexibility. page 76 With the use of low emission panels, waterbased lacquers, energy-efficient technologies and social and environmental certifications, Snaidero says that it works to ensure that overall well-being in the home is achieved.

SUPPLIERS & Components ZIP architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/zip-industries Billi architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/billi-australia Saniflo architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/saniflo 78

Snaidero snaiderosydney.com.au Fisher & Paykel architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/fisher-paykel-appliances


THE KITCHEN ESSENTIAL All your drinking water needs, All-in-One beautifully designed system. Remove the need for multiple taps in your kitchen with a single, beautifully designed system that delivers boiling, chilled and sparkling filtered drinking water, as well as hot and cold unfiltered water for your sink. The Zip HydroTap All-in-One offers every water option you need from one multi-functional tap and a single intelligent compact under-bench system. That’s why the Zip HydroTap will be the one and only hydration solution for your kitchen. Discover more at zipwater.com

ZIP HYDROTAP | PURE TASTING | INSTANT | BOILING | CHILLED | SPARKLING

T H E W O R L D ’ S M O S T A D VA N C E D D R I N K I N G WAT E R S Y S T E M

ADQ1_2020_Zip_FP.indd 1

24/1/20 12:05 pm


words SARAH BUCKLEY

A rch i t ec t ure & d es i g n

/

Practical

/

j a n - m ar 2 0 2 0

Design’s response to tragedy: “Build houses that don’t contribute to the fire front”

80

At the beginning of 2020, Australian firefighters brushed the sweat off of their brows as they braced themselves for another horror bushfire season.


Practical / jan-mar 2020

With brick being a traditionally popular option for those less enticed by the modernised ‘bunker’ – mortar and brick, a fire-rated roof and bushfire shutters are a considerable compromise in the happy medium of a modern classic that the contemporary frontage, Stewart House, provides. And even metropolitan designs such as the recently built Protagonist by Cumulus Studio at the Arts Centre Melbourne using Kaynemaile – a polycarbonate chainmail mesh which is a secure, fire and UV resistant product – is to be taken a leaf from. As ember attack is the primary cause for the loss of thousands of homes during the bushfires’ havoc, practicality over the wooden porch seems rife (and legally binding) in BAL40 zones. Weir adds, “The cheapest thing to do is exclude verandahs and decks, and work with either the verandah being internalised or have masonry terraces – integrating landscape design with the house design as a first principle.” “For the Karri House, we found that the BAL40 specific requirements added 3 percent to the construction cost, but this would have been much less if the house did not have to be elevated above the ground due to the steep slope.” “The next is to eliminate all combustible materials and use products such as corrugated steel on steel wall framing – this is applicable up to BAL-40 and FZ in some instances.” Rammed earth also has numerous benefits including its non-combustible and highin-thermal-mass features, and is simpler to construct and durable (when protected adequately), so houses like Bush House by Archterra Architects inspire the simplicity yet modesty of a natural-material feel. And so does limestone – with insulated framed walls, cement rendered walls and concrete floors, Wall and Wall House by Dane Design Australia pervades the simplicity of natural materials to blend into its environment, yet aesthetically peacocks its groups of blade walls. No matter the materials you use, “think beyond the paradigm of the timber hideaway in the bush.” “Understand that living in bushland settings is an immense privilege and with that comes responsibility – build houses that don’t contribute to the fire front.”

/

reason they chose the site in the first place.” In 2013, architecture critic Philip Drew argued that entirely bushfire-proof communities need to be built. And perhaps he had a point – as six years, 10 million hectares and 2,500 homes later, Australia finds itself reaching for its closest concrete-walled haven. The Bushfire Building Council of Australia (BBCA) estimates a percentage of only 10 percent of bushfire resilient homes exist in bushfire prone regions in Australia. “The BBCA is garnering support with state and federal governments for a five-star rating scheme, whereby entire communities can be assessed for their bushfire resilience, and then the best, most cost-effective methods of mitigating against bushfire can be strategised.” Weir says the scheme addresses the national problem of exceptionally poor integration between the NCC which deals with buildings, and the various state planning policies, which deals with large-scale subdivision design. Alongside Weir’s speculation and proactive steps towards safeguarding Australia’s homes, he practices what he preaches – his Karri house, which boasts large glass sliding doors protected by steel mesh, and Ocean Fire house, are both strategised responses to the nation’s repetitively fiery climate. But as Weir mentions, the tragedy-bred trend of building bushfire resistant homes has become a challenge for architects; navigating the majority’s perception of bushfire resistant homes equalling to a ‘boring’ bunker style, as opposed to a beautiful house. Field Office Architecture’s Mount Macedon house has since offered confidence in the balance of beauty and bushfire resistance in its use of non-combustible materials. With Corten (rusting steel) cladding wrapping the building and settling into its natural environment, its shutters provide protection to the glazing behind it, with steel mesh screens over living areas designed to balance natural light and protection. Similarly, the Mercieca family, who created Australia’s first passive house to meet the development requirements for the highest bushfire risk rating, has fire resistant cladding and triple-glazed windows. The house survived fires that swept through the Blue Mountains in 2013, and only costs the equivalent to a cup of coffee a day to run.

Architecture & design

As a nation that has historically been prone to bushfires and its fatal repercussions – shown through the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires – it is curious as to how initiatives like the Victorian Bushfire Reconstruction and Recovery Authority’s We will Rebuild initiative, stopped short after a mere 19 pro bono designs, and even fewer houses materialised thereafter. With renowned firms such as Donnovan Hill and John Wardle involved, and an increasing popularity in the supply and demand for bushfire resistant products on the market, the question must be asked: Why are bushfire resistant homes so scarce in Australia? Research architect and spokesman for the Bushfire Building Council of Australia (BBCA), Dr Ian Weir, says, “Architects work in a bit of a rarefied atmosphere and I don’t think the quite speculative designs from that initiative resonated with the mums and dads that the scheme intended to help.” After Black Saturday, Weir pointed to architect Glenn Murcutt for bushfire resistant designs in mainstream media’s coverage of the crises. With Murcutt’s innovations utilising black ceramic house tiles, sprinkler systems, leafshedding gutter designs and flat-roof water features in the 20th century, it is only to be imagined what could be achieved in 2020. Weir, having previously believed in 2016 that the bushfire resistant home designs could have been too ‘prototypical and expensive’, also stated that the designs seemed to some, ‘a bit foreign, a bit alien.’ But in 2020, Weir states that these are a part of a number of misconceptions, “One – that we simply can’t build any house to withstand the fire events we are currently experiencing (catastrophic conditions). Surprisingly, many architects unfortunately share this view.” “Two – that any house designed to the standards is going to be cost prohibitive. This is warranted for BAL-FZ homes but building in bushfire prone areas attracts a cost premium anyway due to other factors such as remoteness, slope, distance to services and the need to harvest water.” “Three – people assume they would have to live in a bunker-like structure.” “And the last perception, which is valid, is that people don’t want to clear massive areas around their homes just for bushfire safety because it destroys the amenity and the very

81


Australia is on fire. Since late 2019, Australia has experienced bushfires on an unprecedented scale. Exacerbated by severe drought and scorching temperatures, the fires have been ferocious and wild, killing people, destroying ecosystems and burning property to the ground. Indesign stands with the communities affected by these devastating blazes. We encourage our wider community to assist in the efforts to contain the fires and recover from their effects.

How we can help In the architecture and design industry, we are uniquely placed to assist with the rebuild effort, which will take a large financial and emotional toll on the communities and families who have lost so much. We are proud to support the efforts of Architects Assist, who are committed to providing much needed disaster relief by way of pro bono architecture services. With the help of Architects Assist, people who have lost their homes and livelihoods are connected to local design professionals who are able to provide free services to rebuild the places lost to the fire.

Find out more at indesign.com.au/fire-response


Sydney XXXL by Ed Lippmann

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

/

BOOK REVIEW

/

JAN-MAR 2020

WORDS PHILIP DREW

84

There is a popular saying in Idaho - a wilderness state in the US northwest, “Please don’t Californicate Idaho!” The meaning is pretty obvious, please don’t spoil nature with over-population and overdevelopment. We like it just the way it is so, please, please, don’t tell anyone. Keep Idaho a secret. No one thought to issue the same plea: Please don’t Californicate Sydney. Pity.

In 1957, Denis Winston, professor of town planning at the University of Sydney, published Sydney’s great experiment on the progress made in putting the Cumberland County Plan (1951) into operation effecting 1650 square miles. At the 1954 census the population of the county stood at 1,941, 220. In 2018 it reached 5 million, more than double on a footprint of

almost 12,400 square kilometres. Meanwhile, Government and business proudly proclaim Sydney has become a ‘global city’ whatever that means. No one, it seems, considers it worthwhile to ask whether Sydney is a more liveable city. Just that it is bigger, much bigger, and that is all that matters, regardless of increased congestion, transport mayhem, overcrowding, housing unaffordability, air quality, uncontrollable bushfires, smoke pollution — and certainly not the quality of life of residents. All hail ‘big’. This brings me to the book title SYDNEY XXXL (Altrim Publishers). Many readers might not get it initially, unless, like Ed’s family, at one time you were in the rag trade. XXXL indicates clothing sizes and is industry shorthand for EXTRA LARGE! Lippmann makes the point, since at present any suggestion that Sydney might be too big is greeted with rancour. Sydney Morning Herald columnist, Elizabeth Farrelly, enthusiastically endorses densification from the comfort of her Waverly home. Densification is a euphemism

for congestion, inadequate infrastructure, air pollution and denaturing the city. Population boosters who enthusiastically promote a Sydney of eight million, ignore geography. There is no more land. The market gardens, farms, orchards, reclaimed industrial sites, and contaminated swamp, have been swallowed up and re-zoned. There remains only one alternative — vertical Sydney. In 1982, Ridley Scott explored that possibility in his sci-fi movie, Blade Runner, a world not built to human scale, sad apartments where the future is style and not much else. The promoters of a supersized Sydney forget that Sydney, unlike its rival Melbourne, is physically constrained within a sandstone girdle: The Blue Mountains and Hawkesbury, Nepean Rivers in the west, the rugged Hornsby Plateau in the north, and the Woronora Plateau to the south. It has nowhere to spread further. If grow it must, it will be compelled to follow Scott’s dystopian nightmare by turning Sydney into a southern Manhattan and go vertical.


Architecture & design / book review

PHOTOgraphy Jamie Davies via Unsplash

programme could be found having adequate water, transport connections and viable employment opportunities? This illustrates how manic and irresponsible the current high immigration levels are. People should read Sydney XXXL. It could not be more timely. In The City in History, Lewis Mumford warned about the slavery of the large and predicted the outcome of the bursting container was necropolis. Sydney is bursting. We need to pause and think. Jared Diamond gives instances of societies that have failed in collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Survive. We may think we can escape, that we are privileged and ignore the bushfires, smoke haze, dwindling water storage, soil depletion, species extinction, clear warning signs of climate change at our peril. Or we can act now and limit population responsibly. We have a choice. Sydney XXXL offers modest practical solutions that go a long way to securing a future for Sydney and for our children.

Jan-Mar 2020

a benign neglect to build infrastructure ahead of arrivals. Retrofitting infrastructure to existing cities is doubly expensive and destroys existing houses, nature reserves and anything that becomes an obstacle-even entire communities. Instead, the general population is burdened with the cost and made to suffer a lower quality of life. High immigration rates cannot be justified on economic grounds and the real actual cost is many more times dearer than the quoted benefit of $35,000/person. It’s been 55 years since Tom Uren in the Whitlam government set out a responsible plan for urban growth that identified and invested in establishing regional cities outside the major metropolitan cities. Nothing similar has been attempted since. The reason is simple: The cost of accommodating each yearly influx of immigrants would necessitate building a new city the size of Newcastle or Geelong annually. Who would pay, even if suitable sites for such an ambitious urban

/

No one asks, what is the optimum size for a city? What is the most liveable size and shape that assures a good life, wide and varied employment opportunities, short commute distances on quiet, comfortable and flexible public transport, recreation near residential, access to beaches and nature reserves, and rich cultural experiences? It isn’t eight million, and not four million. We know firsthand what that feels like. I suggest two million, the size Sydney was in 1954. Australia has a dysfunctional urban profile with an absence of such middle-size cities. Political reasons dictate population growth is confined to just a few state capitals. Australia has failed to acquire a balanced urban profile with population spread evenly across a range of liveable medium-sized regional centres such as in the USA, France, Germany and Great Britain. The iconic outback and interior of Australia is dry and empty, forcing population into a relatively few major metropolises on the coast. Frank Sartor, former lord mayor of Sydney, remarked at the launch of Sydney XXXL that it was “a city in search of a plan.” True. There have been many attempts to capture Sydney’s future in a plan. None have lasted very long: greed, developers, big business and real estate interests, anyone with something to gain, undermine the public interest. Examples abound. James Packer and his obscene tower in the harbour, had to be accommodated. His tower is now bigger, taller, even more obscene than before, any sense of proportion, of sensible scale, overruled and public parkland shredded. There have been too many plans. One good plan, followed and effectively enforced, is all that was needed. Lippmann has eight points: freeze expansion; cap population; decentralize by making Sydney polycentric with a number of centres; higher densities with a floor space ratio of at least 6 : 1 and a maximum height of 50m; improved circulation; access to nature; equitable housing; and lastly, design excellence suggesting architects lead instead of developers dictating to government. These are modest suggestions, if unlikely to be accepted by the powers who decide policy. The federal government’s lack of population planning means that large numbers must be accommodated in a relatively few bursting capital cities while neglecting to build essential infrastructure beforehand. Big business insists on high immigration levels because it grows the consumer base, but big business doesn’t pay the cost of providing road and rail connections, additional schools, hospitals and health services. There is, instead,

85


Breaking Ground, Architecture By Women Jane Hall, Phaidon

Far from being a picture project, or a lightweight, and even still further from being a folio of feminist bleatings, this book is a powerful, important and damn beautiful book about (1) architecture (2) women.

Architecture & design

/

book review

/

Jan-Mar 2020

words PRUE MILLER

86

Breaking Ground, Architecture by Women, has been orchestrated for Phaidon by Jane Hall, a founding member of the Turner prize-winning English studio, Assemble, who also happens to be a very engaging writer. Turner calls the book a ‘global survey’, which somehow denudes it of any sort of magic, marginalising the wonder of the work in favour and a more clinical descriptive. However, her passion for the women, the work and the struggle for recognition is unveiled in her must-read foreword. Here Turner’s discussion of partnerships, and the blurring of the sometimes conflicted needs of the private versus professional relationships, is both fabulous and eye opening. Part of the

invisibility of female architects has been caused by the lack of recognition of the female partner in collaborative design. Just ask Marion Mahony Griffin (if one could), a name familiar to Australians, and a woman who stood in the shadow of more than one great designer. Romantic, marital, spiritual – whatever the extra layer of involvement between practice partners is, it too often blurs the ability to clearly see who did what. And for whatever reason, it seems the woman is the one who sort of disappears. “In many ways,” writes Hall, “the synchronicity of architecture husband-andwife teams makes it a futile task to separate individual contributions from the collective identity for which their work is known.” Similarly, in large design firms extruding the female input, even for this book, is too often an awkward assignment, “This posed a real problem when researching this book,” writes Hall, “with many practices themselves rejecting inclusion of certain works due to their female partner’s lack of involvement in a building’s design, overlooking the fact that her role enables design activity simply to take place.” Jane Hall’s knowledge of architecture and insight into the workings of practices both past and present gives her a very much informed lens through which she focuses on the work, and the architects featured in Breaking Ground. From a reader’s point of view the layout

of this book is a sheer delight, almost all full colour images attest to the architects’ works, arranged in alphabetical order. It was with deep personal guilt that I realised how few of these great architects were familiar to me – even when the buildings themselves were familiar. The futuristic, languorous and almost reptilian Belarus football stadium – so very much a male dominated sport, was designed by Spela Videcnik. The Ordos Museum in China, created by Dang Qun, Kazuyo Sejima’s furutistic Sumida Hokusai Museum in Tokyo and Di Zhang’s Museum of Contemporary Art in Yinchuan. All amazing, all female driven. And what of the wonderful Jeanne Gang of Studio Gang? She was the only architect of any gender to be included in Time Magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people of 2019. Sprinkled throughout the book are quotes that reflect the difficult climb many architects have suffered, a punctuation in the book that adds both reflection and self-deprecating humour. Most reviewers have included the Zaha Hadid line, “Would they still call me a diva if I were a man?”, an excellent line, however I feel the other quote from Ms Hadid says a little more. “As a woman in architecture you’re always an outsider. It’s okay, I like being on the edge.” In time, and maybe not far from now, women in architecture won’t be ‘outsiders’, they’ll be seen, heard and recognised just as architects. No gender, just outrageous talent.


Product Directory

PRODUCTS

To find out more about a specific featured product or to download a related brochure please use the unique product code provided on each module and follow these 3 simple steps:

/

PRODUCT CODES

ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

Welcome to the Architecture & Design

/

Visit architectureanddesign.com.au

STEP 2

Type unique product code into search bar

STEP 3

Locate and review further product and supplier information

JAN-MAR 2020

STEP 1

ONLINE Visit architectureanddesign.com.au/products/jan-mar20 to view all featured products from this issue in one place

EMAIL Subscribe to the Architecture & Design eNewsletter to receive product updates, news and projects directly to your inbox architectureanddesign.com.au/subscribe

87


AUtoAqUA electronic tApwAre for wAter conservAtion The AutoAqua range of electronic tapware offers exceptional water savings while offering a beautiful piece of contemporary tapware for commercial applications. In public spaces where high traffic exists the WELS 6-star, 3.5L/min rated AutoAqua products can equate to significantly lower water use. Intelligent features such as timed auto-flush are also standard. wall Mount and Deck Mount options: The AutoAqua range of tapware blends seamlessly with all modern bathroom furnishings. The clean, simple form allows designers to integrate the tapware with a variety of finishes and complimentary products. Multi-tap installation compatible: Autoflo’s Multi-coupler system allows up to 8 AutoAqua taps to operate from a single mains power source. This makes it perfect for areas where banks of taps are required such as shopping centre facilities, entertainment complexes and recreational area facilities. The Multi-coupler system provides LED lighting feedback to confirm connectivity of the taps. outdoor installation possible:

Jan-Mar 2020

The AutoAqua range of electronic tapware is designed in such a way that outdoor installation is possible. The sophisticated, waterproof electronics avoid reflective interference and are able to self-range to their environment meaning the installation possibilities are not limited to the indoors. The AutoAqua range is proudly Australian Made.

architectureanddesign.com.au

/

AU2659

ArtisAn Folding door by CAprAl Aluminium

Architecture & design

products

/

Enquiries: 03 9380 8244 autoflo.com.au

The Artisan Folding Door incorporates a technologically advanced folding door system that surpasses that of ordinary folding doors on the market. It moves and feels like no other, because it’s made like no other. At the heart of it all – Effortless Motion Technology (emt), Capral’s AGS ‘Smart Hinge’ and ‘Easy Gliding’ Channel. This product combines aluminium with high quality 316 marine grade stainless steel components. The integrated folding door system has excellent weather tightness, security, environmental and structural performance. Additional functionality is also incorporated includes internal and external 90° corners. Features AND BENEFITS: • Heavy duty roller, capable of taking 100kg load per panel • AGS ‘Smart Hinge’ using 316 marine grade stainless steel • AGS ‘Smart Groove’ technology for superior fabrication • AGS multi-point locking system n Sill options including channel, flat and high performance • AGS ‘Easy Gliding’ Channel n Slim operating handle with adjustable positioning height • Lockable twin bolt mechanisms for additional security • Up to 4-point locking system allowing dual side entry • Single- and double-glazing options available • Designed & tested to comply with Australian Standard AS2047 Enquiries: 1800 258 646 capral.com.au

88

CA2606

architectureanddesign.com.au


WoodWall®: REal timbER WallpapER Produced from high-quality, real timber veneer, WoodWall® is an innovative, natural, prefinished surface material for direct application to internal walls without the need for substrates or framing and at less than half the cost of traditional veneer paneling. Suitable for interior walls, columns and ceilings, in public, commercial and residential applications, WoodWall® is available in a range of Eveneer and natural timbers. A Group 1 Fire Rating means WoodWall® is perfect for installation in foyers, egress corridors and lift interiors. and it can be wrapped around curved surfaces and profiles down to a 1mm radius for seam free corners. An innovative and flexible natural material for creative space making advantages: • Group 1 fire rating • Available in 16 Eveneer FSC certified veneers and a wide range of natural timber veneers • Quickly and easily installed by wall-covering professionals with standard tools and minimal time on site • Environmentally friendly- up to 300% yield of conventional veneer slicing- saves trees • Saves time and money- less than half the cost of conventional timber wall panelling • Applies to plaster, plasterboard, MDF, metal, plastic and more. • Flexible – for application to curved surfaces • Long sequence runs- matched and numbered • Packages in easy to handle boxes for convenient site delivery Enquiries: 1300 133 481 eltongroup.com architectureanddesign.com.au

/

EG2609

Architecture & design

• Folds around a 1mm radius – parallel to the grain- for seamless corners

Jan-Mar 2020

Our Relik range makes ideal use of the finite resources of genuine reclaimed timber, and features easy-to-fit boards which are so stable they may even be used over underfloor heating (conditions apply, enquire with Havwoods).

/

Relik embraces Havwoods’ ever-more-popular collection of genuine reclaimed and reproduction reclaimed timbers under one range. Havwoods Relik includes reproduction engineered timber as well as genuine reclaimed timber products in a 15mm thick, incredibly stable and beautifully textured engineered timber plank.

products

Relik: genuine ReclAimed & RepRoduction ReclAimed timbeR flooRing

Sawing, scraping, brushing, and oiling makes them a captivating work of art for creating a stunning floor in any space. The Relik result is a unique, character-driven timber flooring range in a stunning array of colours and finishes. Ideal for use as flooring, cladding or bespoke joinery in residential, retail, hospitality, and commercial offices. • Produced as a stable, pre-finished engineered board • Easy to fit and extra-tough • Genuine reclaimed and reproduction reclaimed products • Suitable for glue down installations

Enquiries: 1300 428 966 havwoods.com/au HA2608

architectureanddesign.com.au

89


Plank Floors EuroPEan oak CollECtion: thE CommErCial Flooring solution Plank Floors European Oak collection has been created for durability, longevity and high performance in commercial and residential applications. The series encompasses a wide range of colours with UV Oil and lacquer finishes that give the floors a natural, timber look. All products in the Plank range have low VOC emissions to ensure they are environmentally safe. They also come with a P3 slip rating to comply with current commercial standards and regulations. Manufactured with a cross laminated, Russian Birch multi-layered plywood base, the boards’ structure reduces the impact of expansion and contraction with changes in temperature and humidity. As a result, Plank Floors are able to supply structurally stable, wider and longer boards ranging from widths of 190mm to 220mm and lengths of 1900mm to 2200mm. The 4mm or 6mm top veneer of European oak increases the longevity of the floors which is essential for high traffic areas in both residential and commercial spaces. With the potential to be installed in both flooring and cladding applications, Plank Floor’s engineered timber boards can be the feature of your next design and add further value to upcoming projects. Features & benefits: • 25 year residential structural warranty • 7 year commercial structural warranty • Available in both Largo (2200 x 220 x 20mm) and Mezzano (1900 x 190 x 15mm) sizes • WOCA Denmark UV Oil or Lacquer finish to increase wear resistance • 4mm or 6mm European Oak top veneer for longevity Jan-Mar 2020

• Tongue and groove profile for secure installation • Low VOC emission • P3 Slip rating

PF2634

architectureanddesign.com.au

WAttyl I.D ADvAnceD - A neW level of protectIon

Architecture & design

/

products

/

Enquiries: 02 96981251 plankfloors.com.au

Determined to mitigate toxins and enhance air quality, Wattyl’s most advanced interior paint has an impressively low VOC formula that surpasses the Green Star requirements, and is GECA (Good Environmental Choice Australia) certified. I.D Advanced is the latest in Wattyl’s centennial company history in protecting and enhancing high performance coatings of Australian buildings. Wattyl offers a paint that eliminates the shock of ingesting the chemical smell and toxins within a new finished project. Durable, versatile and dynamic, the product’s Total Protection Technology™ delivers a new level of protection offering advanced cleanability, washability and stain resistance. Environmentally sound and refined, Wattyl I.D Advanced boasts architectural and ethical advancements all in one product. The application of this superior paint sets the tone for other commercial spaces throughout Australia. Wattyl I.D Advanced offers a brilliant aesthetic finish encompassing vast colour palette options and a choice of 3 sheen levels: low sheen, matte and satin. With health and wellbeing at the forefront of the product and brand’s philosophy, it recognises that healthy, human-centric spaces should be at the start of every conversation. The finished product of I.D Advanced is designed for the present, married with an exceptional awareness for a better, cleaner and healthier future. Enquiries: 132 101 wattyl.com.au/Specifiers

90

WA5305

architectureanddesign.com.au


SW200I SWING DOOR OPERATOR FROM ASSA ABLOY ENTRANCE SYSTEMS AUSTRALIA The ASSA ABLOY SW200i swing door operator is the perfect choice where high performance and superior safety is of extra importance. Energy-efficiency ASSA ABLOY automated door systems are sustainable by nature and automatically convenient as they ensure opening only when needed to pass, eliminating unnecessary air infiltration and keeping climate zones separate. The innovative electronics in the ASSA ABLOY SW200i ensure minimal energy consumption for optimal door performance. Safety The ASSA ABLOY SW200i is safe to use for all, despite age and physical ability. In case of an obstruction by a person or object, the obstruction control ensures stop on stall and reverse operation. Furthermore, the ASSA ABLOY SW200i swing door operator is fully compliant with Australian and New Zealand Standards; one version for surface mounted installations and one for concealed installations. Convenience An entrance equipped with a ASSA ABLOY SW200i operator is always accessible due to an optional battery backup.

Enquiries: 1300 13 13 10 assaabloyentrance.com.au architectureanddesign.com.au

/

AA7825

Architecture & design

Aesthetics The ASSA ABLOY SW200i swing door is providing maximum performance. The ASSA ABLOY SW200i can be retrofitted with existing doors and thereby keeping the overall door system design and environment aesthetically intact.

products / Jan-Mar 2020

ProGlide UltraFlat™ commercial slidinG doors

Kooltherm ® K17 Insulated Plasterboard

The ProGlide UltraFlat™ Sliding Door from Alspec® allows architects and designers the freedom to achieve large expansive openings whilst also offering a weather resistant wheelchair compliant sill to AS1428.1 without the need to compromise on performance or aesthetics.

Kooltherm® K17 Insulated Plasterboard is a high performance, fibre free, rigid thermoset phenolic insulation, sandwiched between a front facing of tapered edge gypsum-based plasterboard and a reverse tissue based facing that is autohesively bonded to the insulation core. It is lightweight and has a thin profile, resulting in more net lettable area for rented space, and easy and fast installation.

Specifying Alspec’s® ProGlide UltraFlat™ ensures the client receives a solid, durable high performance product offering a continuous accessible path of seamless transition between internal and external floor finishes. Designed and manufactured in Australia to meet the extremes of the Australian environment, the Alspec® ProGlide UltraFlat™ is the first choice amongst architects, builders, home owners and fabricators when performance and quality matter. Enquiries: Alspec® 1300 ALSPEC alspec.com.au al2616

architectureanddesign.com.au

It is CodeMark-certified for BCA compliance and has Group 1 NCC fire classification determined in a full room AS ISO 9705 test in accordance with AS 5637. It is manufactured in Australia without the use of CFCs/HCFCs and has zero Ozone Depleting Potential (ODP) and low Global Warming Potential (GWP). Enquiries: Kingspan® 1300 247 235 kingspan.com KI2631

architectureanddesign.com.au

91


Louvretec Rectangular Sun Louvres Collection A design alternative to conventional shaped louvre blades. Rectangular sun louvres are well suited to the clean minimalistic lines of modern architecture. Within this range Louvretec introduces a new range of 'squared' louvres in a range of sizes. Louvretec’s rectangular sun louvres offer unprecedented options and choices. Certified for residential and commercial use. Applications include motorisation, hand operable, and more.

Architecture & design

/

products

/

Jan-Mar 2020

LA1104

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Crimsafe Ultimate In the Crimsafe Ultimate range, we’ve evolved the benefits of regular Crimsafe security screens to the next level – delivering ultimate security, ultimate flexibility and the ultimate in good looks. Crimsafe Ultimate screens are 40% stronger than our regular product and seven times stronger than the impact level required by the Australian Standard. Warranty up to 15 years. CS1110

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Expression Series Black Range

Smoke actuator controller BACnet & KNX

With a proud history of being an innovator of modern interior design, Easycraft has developed a new range of decorative finishes which provide the latest in contemporary styling, offering stunning and versatile aesthetics for any project.

The WxC 310/320 Plus series supports both BACnet IP, BACnet MSTP and MODBUS TCP/IP. The controller provides status information of each motor line as to the actuators current position and also indicates if all actuators are fully closed removing the need for limit switches on the windows to indicate when they are closed.

The Expression Series Black Range features unique, grooved patterns as a decorative wall paneling to provide designers new opportunities in commercial and residential projects. EA5814

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

DuraGrip Plus - Slip Resistant Non-Slip Sealer for All Floor Types DuraGrip Plus Anti-Slip Sealer can provide increased slip resistance to most floor surfaces, allowing property owners/ managers to meet NCC, BCA and OH&S requirements. Unique additives provide excellent adhesion capabilities allowing it to be used on just about any floor surface. DuraGrip Plus non-slip sealer can achieve P3, P4 and P5 slip ratings, making it ideal for a large range of applications. GG1117

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Blindspace ® Blindspace® is a unique solution to conceal any type of blind, in ceilings and skylights. Access is easy, with an integrated panel that simply clicks out and snaps shut leaving a discreet slot for blind movement. Blindspace® by Shade Factor's unique design provides an elegant finished aesthetic and is easy to integrate, saving you time in both design and construction.

AI2432

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Height Safety and Fall Arrest Systems by AM-BOSS Hazardous falls severely injure or result in deaths. This is regardless of experience or age. AM-BOSS offer a comprehensive range of Harnesses and Height Safety Kits developed with the highest quality materials for long lasting reliability and strength. Suitable for a variety of roof, metal and tower workers, Height Safety and Fall Arrest systems are available, including Ladder Brackets for Gutter, Parapet and Rail. AA1119

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Bosch Hydronic Heating Boilers Bosch is a global market leader in high efficiency, condensing hydronic heating and water heating technology. Condensing technology makes best use of energy, so that heat is produced economically and with lower CO2 emissions. With Bosch Condens 5000W hydronic heating boilers you gain from our experience and innovation. The range includes 18kW, 30kW and 37kW models

92

SF1121

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

BH4939

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/


FreeForm™: Innovative, flexible, and highly versatile FreeForm™ is an innovative roofing profile offering incredible flexibility and design capabilities to suit varying roof configurations. The flexibility of FreeForm means that it can meet the most demanding of architectural requirements, including single skin roof, vertical wall, and conical tapered applications. It can also be rolled onsite for extremely long lengths that wouldn’t be feasible to transport. FI1124

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

QUATTRO Modular Stages Select Staging Concepts presents QUATTRO Modular Stages. The preferred portable or permanent stage solution across multiple industries. Backed with a full 10 Year Manufacturer’s Warranty on parts and pabour, the QUATTRO Portable Staging System is currently used by more than 400 Schools, Tafes and Universities Australia-wide. QUATTRO Modular stages are designed and manufactured in Australia. SC4938

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Lopi Gas Fireplaces

Maxi Perforated Panels are manufactured using Maxi Panel Baltic Birch, a premium product that produces strong, durable and attractive acoustic panels. The panels are delivered prefinished with our hard-wax oil system and are available in the following profiles: Optic Square, Optic Diamond, Vague Square, Vague Diamond, Sonic and Groove. Fire Group Ratings available. Suitable for internal purposes only. FSC® Certified - FSC-C139021

Lopi Gas Fireplaces are more traditionally sized zero clearance units comprising of six models. There are four models for a minimal finish, one more higher heat output and a more traditionally shaped double-sided fireplace. Each model can be built into a mantelpiece or finished in a painted wall with a finishing trim or tile.

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

AA1135

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Pink® Thermal Slab: Commercial under slab/ soffit insulation Pink® Thermal Slab is Group 1 Fire Rated Insulation for concrete soffits suitable for use in commercial under slab soffit applications where thermal and acoustic properties are pivotal in controlling noise levels and temperature fluctuations of concrete roofs, floors and walls. Pink® Thermal Slab provides excellent fire performance for ceiling lining applications achieving a AS ISO 9705 Group 1 NCC fire classification. FI1137

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

The LYSAGHT ZENITH™ range consists of stylish architectural steel cladding profiles that combine classic, European elegance with trusted, highquality Australian steel. The profiles are striking, and are sure to add visual texture to your project whether used as roofing or wall cladding.

LY4950

Jan-Mar 2020

Merging purity of form with function, the Brass Core range presents a collection of elegant lever designs that enhance the surrounding architecture.

LYSAGHT ZENITH™ architectural cladding

/

Proudly designed and assembled in Australia with Lockwood’s trusted quality at its core, the new range of brass lever styles has been designed to integrate with the character of a building; providing aesthetic continuity throughout.

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

products

A new design era: Lockwood Brass Core range

LF1132

/

MA1109

Architecture & design

Maxi Perforated Panel

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Vitrabond FR/A2: Aluminium Composite Panels Leading Fairview’s product portfolio, Vitrabond Aluminium Composite panel consists of two aluminium, or other natural cover sheets, enclosing a fire rated core. Vitrabond Aluminium Composite panel (FR and A2), has been thoroughly tested to the Australian Standards by the Australian approved CSIRO and/or Warrington Fire, including full room burn tests.

FA7245

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

93


Key-Lena: Cost Effective, Prefinished Panels With an endless list of prefinished options to choose from, Key-Lena panels can be perforated, patterned, slotted or shaped to provide maximum noise reduction. Key-Lena ceiling and wall decorative panels are suitable for a variety of applications, both commercially and residentially. They can give your space a pop of colour with various finishes, or choose timber for a more natural look. KL1140

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Architecture & design

/

products

/

Jan-Mar 2020

Linear Lighting that is a flexible & elegant LED solution A versatile extruded aluminium profile, available in system kits to be assembled for ceiling or suspension installation, to draw infinite shapes in space. Designed and manufactured by Italy's leading lighting innovators Luciferos The File Flex asymmetrical section is designed to achieve unique lighting effects while ensuring optimal illumination levels.

GL1149

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Brick Inlay: An innovative facade solution Brick inlay delivers the look and feel of traditional brick, with the time and cost savings of precast concrete panels. This proven facade system inlays real brick, porcelain, or stone tiles into precast concrete panels to create the look and feel of a traditional brick facade. With brick inlay, your design is only limited by your imagination.

RF1121

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Billi Eco: Instant filtered boiling and chilled drinking water systems Leading the Billi range, the Eco boiling and chilled drinking water systems are space saving, efficient & elegant. The functional style is designed for high use and meets green building design principals – providing you with the ultimate in environmentally sensitive appliances.

94

BA2031

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Fusion Carpet Planks Statement carpet planks for any installation Imagine a single design piece not only bold on its own, but with the ability to melt into its counterparts and change the statement, the look, the narrative depending on what you need. The new Fusion planks collection from Signature Floors is formed as one. Designed for versatility, the collection features three ranges; CORE, CONNECT and COMPOUND. SF1145

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Terrazzo: Versatile, natural cladding material Architectural Terrazzo is a recomposed stone comprising three natural elements – marble chips, Portland cement and water. Using state of the art machinery, these elements are combined using a fully automated system that digitally transmits “recipes’ for each terrazzo type, with stringent quality control. Best of all, with over 3000 colours to choose from and a wide range of finished products available you’re sure to find the perfect solution for your needs. RB1152

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Ecoply® plywood is proven, durable, and easy to work with Ecoply® Structural Square Edge plywood is structural-grade plywood. With a range of uses throughout the building industry, it is commonly selected for uses such as bracing, interior linings, membrane substrates, hoardings and DIY projects, where known structural characteristics are required. It is available in a wide range of surface appearance grades, sheet sizes, thicknesses and treatments. CH4530

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Caroma Opal Collection The Opal Collection, a comprehensive and versatile range, specifically designed to enhance your independence in the bathroom without having to compromise on style. Discreet design features such as raised height toilet pans and integrated shelf space on basins are just some of the simple additions offered to reduce challenges for the elderly and make the bathroom a more comfortable and practical space. CA1158

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/


Webnet stainless steel mesh facades from Tensile

Stunning Feature Linings in 10 Days or Less

Jakob Webnet stainless steel mesh is an impressive versatile and durable material. Its multi-functional applications include providing support and guidance on railings or in staircases; subtle room partitions; training systems for plants and green facades; zoological enclosures through to fall protection and security structures. Webnet mesh has been rigorously tested and complies with all applicable standards.

ExpressFit by SUPAWOOD is a range of decorative panels, slats and beams that can be manufactured and despatched in 10 working days or less. For architects and designers, it’s the simple way to meet tight deadlines without compromising design intent or end quality. Suitable for ceilings, walls and screens and available in acoustic, fire group and durable finish options.

TE1123

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Austral Verta Range

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Turbo-Chic hand dryer Introducing ASI JD MacDonald’s TurboChic high-speed hand dryer. At only 100mm deep the Turbo-Chic is a sleek, stylish and compact solution for hightraffic environments. Automatically activated with a fast dry time of approx. 15 seconds, the dryer automatically shuts off when the user removes hands from the sensor zone. Available in either matte black or satin stainless steel. 5 year warranty.

AJ2417

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Select from the warm character of natural wood, the cool vibe of stone, the textural interest of linen or the chic reflection of metallics.

AF4952

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Protect: Antibacterial porcelain tiles and slabs PROTECT is an exclusive cutting-edge antimicrobial technology that has been infused within a large range of Rocks On’s porcelain tiles and large format slabs, where bacteria protein & enzyme activity is blocked and such organism DNA is damaged, stopping important cellular functions that cause biofilms, bad odours and cross contamination. Ideal for any environments where bacteria easily multiply and effect human health. RO1103

Jan-Mar 2020

VA1101

Whiterock Wall Designs will transform your interior environment whilst retaining a high level of functionality. It’s the perfect combination of style and strength.

/

Verosol’s groundbreaking SilverScreen roller blind fabrics reflect up to 85% of solar radiation. To ensure wellbeing, creativity & productivity are maintained, it’s essential to create an environment with good visual & occupant comfort. This is achieved when daylight exposure, unspoiled viewing out and heat & glare control are in balance. SilverScreen blind fabrics have been designed to support these requirements.

Welcome to the latest vision in wall decoration: Altro Whiterock Wall Designs

products

SilverScreen by Verosol

Altro Whiterock wall designs

/

AL1131

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Architecture & design

Stemming from modern trends, the new Verta™ Series door hardware from Austral Lock encompasses innovation, design and style. Verta™ boasts a classic shape reinvented with modern touches and precision engineering that will enhance your home inside and out. From the striking entrance pull handle, to the ingenious design and detailing of the levers, Verta™ will add designer accents to every aspect of your home.

SA1125

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Promat Bushfire Board GTECH Lightweight external plasterboard for BAL-FZ Promat Bushfire Board provides BALFZ protection to residential homes in bushfire prone areas, and allows construction to be completed all year round. Promat Bushfire Board can withstand exposure to rain, air moisture, and direct sunlight prior to the finished roofing product being installed.

PA2418

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

95


The Kitchen Essential All your drinking water needs, All-in-One beautifully designed system. Remove the need for multiple taps in your kitchen with a single, beautifully designed system that delivers boiling, chilled and sparkling filtered drinking water, as well as hot and cold unfiltered water for your sink. That’s why the Zip HydroTap will be the one and only hydration solution for your kitchen.

Architecture & design

/

products

/

Jan-Mar 2020

ZI7114

The Corian® Washplane represents the epitome of linear design, form and function. We have reimagined the traditional channel-style Washplane. This new collection combines our original linear form with individual basins to personalise and enhance the public washroom experience. The new multibasin Washplane family is a complete bathroom solution that can also be used in residential spaces. CA2423

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

RAB™ Board from James Hardie

FlameGuard® FRL & noncombustible wall

Introducing RAB™ Board, the rigid air barrier by James Hardie. Designed to meet the building industry's changing requirements for high-performance weather barriers, this unique green panel is sealed with James Hardie’s innovative CoreShield™ penetrating sealer technology, keeping water, air and wind out, while allowing moisture vapour to easily escape - enabling the framing cavity to drain and dry.

FlameGuard® is a non-combustible and fire-rated walling product with a non-ozone depleting Mineral Wool core, encased in BlueScope® Steel prefinished in Colorbond®. FlameGuard® has been tested & certified to achieve up to a 3 Hour Fire Rating, also offering a range of cost-effective FlameGuard® wall configurations.

JH2424

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

MetecnoKasset®: The revolutionary new insulated façade system Leading Australian manufacturer of thermal building solutions and lightweight architectural systems, Metecno PIR, has launched MetecnoKasset®, a revolutionary new panelling system for builders and developers. The new insulated system can be used as a curtain wall system while installed from inside the building and offers a range of improved thermal properties. ME2648

96

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

The New Corian ® Multibasin Washplane

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

BO7428

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Tourniket: World's bestselling revolving door Tourniket is a high-quality Dutchmanufactured revolving door with an extensive range of options and finishes available. Tourniket is a highly versatile entrance solution, with current installations in a huge range of applications globally, including corporate, office, retail and consumer buildings as well as healthcare and other facilities. Boon Edam's Tourniket range is customised to suit the unique requirements. BE2426

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

Tarkett: AirMaster® clears the air

Weathergoove 75mm panels by Weathertex

Desso AirMaster® is a carpet tile which marries great innovation and performance with strong design to boost health and wellbeing in offices, schools, healthcare environments and other public buildings.

Weathertex’s strikingly modern 75mm architectural panel is the company’s slimmest profile yet and is sure to be in hot demand as builders, renovators and designers across Australia embrace the finishes this groovy product creates.

Its patented technology has been proven to reduce the concentration of fine dust in the air four times more effectively than regular carpets and eight times more effectively than hard floors.

Fusing minimalist style with the strength of natural timber, Weathergroove 75mm doubles the grooves of Weathertex’s popular 150mm weatherboard while retaining every measure of durability and safety.

TA2427

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/

WE4911

architectureanddesign.com.au/magazine/


Take home INDE Gold Save the date INDE.Awards Gala, 14 August, Sydney

Tickets on sale in May

04_INDE20_ADQ1_2020_FP_V3.indd 1

indeawards.com

5/12/19 5:32 pm


Discover the subtle art of standing out. COLORBOND® steel Matt is a highly attractive and versatile design material that utilises innovative paint technology to diffuse light for an elegantly soft, textured appearance. Available in a range of neutral colours, it can be contrasted with other COLORBOND® steel products to create sophisticated palettes for commercial, industrial or residential projects. Visit Steelselect.com.au/COLORBONDsteelMatt or call 1800 064 384.

COLORBOND®, BlueScope and the BlueScope brand mark are registered trade marks of BlueScope Steel Limited. © 2019 BlueScope Steel Limited ABN 16 000 011 058. All rights reserved.

BLU0507_COLORBOND_Richmond High_FP_235x297.indd 1 ADQ1_2020_Bluescope_OBC.indd 1

15/7/19 4:05 pm 23/1/20 8:59 am

Profile for Indesign Media Asia Pacific

Architecture & Design January_March 2019  

Architecture & Design in Australia

Architecture & Design January_March 2019  

Architecture & Design in Australia