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MAR | APR 2018 | Vol 54 | No 2 Print Post Approved PP100007333

The evolution of hotel & hospitality design Floors and flooring surfaces Insulation for the hospitality sector Trends in technology

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mar | apr 2018 | Vol 54 | No 2 Print Post Approved PP100007333

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CONTENTS

EDITOR’S LETTER

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HE THEME OF THIS ISSUE IS HOTELS & HOSPITALITY, WHICH IS JUST AS WELL, CONSIDERING WE ARE STILL VERY MUCH IN THE FESTIVE SEASON.

This sector, most will admit is probably more design-conscious than most others out there. There are several reasons for this of course, not least of which is the fact that it is part and parcel of the ‘experience economy’, meaning that look and ambience literally are everything. But there are also hard cash figures behind the hotel and hospitality sector. According to federal Trade, Tourism and Investment minister Steven Ciobo, the recent wave of record spending by both Australian and international visitors is creating and supporting jobs across the country. “Tourism employs about one in 12 Australians, so this growth in spending and visitor nights means more jobs, more economic growth and more prosperity for all Australians,” he says. In July of 2016 – in other words, in the middle of Australia’s winter —a report by property analysts Colliers International suggested that the country’s hotel scene would likely see a construction boom lasting for at least another two years as tourism spending, predicted to reach $167 billion by 2025, plays an ever-larger role in Australia’s economy.

EDITOR BRANKO MILETIC EDITOR@ARCHITECTUREANDDESIGN.COM.AU ASSISTANT EDITOR STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC CONTENT PRODUCERS GERALDINE CHUA NICHOLAS RIDER PRUE MILLER

The country’s hotel market, particularly in Sydney and Melbourne, is experiencing an “unprecedented alignment of positive fundamental indicators,” according to Gus Moors, head of hotels for Colliers International.

ON THE COVER: LOCATED IN HONG KONG’S OLD-MEETS-NEW WESTERN DISTRICT, NOC COFFEE CO. IS A 140SQM BOUTIQUE COFFEE SHOP THAT FEATURES A PARED-BACK AESTHETIC AND A WHITE AND GREY PALETTE TO HIGHLIGHT THE SENSE OF SPACE, AND ALLOW ZONING CUES TO STAND OUT. ADDED TO THAT, RAW CEMENT FLOORING WAS APPLIED, INTENDED TO FLOW COHERENTLY WITH THE EXISTING GREY CONCRETE STRUCTURE, AND DESIGNED FOR BRINGING IN A NATURAL, RUSTIC FEEL INTO A CLEAN INTERIOR SPACE.

As for the hotel sector, most analysts concur that the continuing trend of high occupancy rates, a benign supply outlook and increased capacity from key markets like China and India mean that hotels are likely to keep proving profitable.

INDUSTRY

SPECIFY

06 The upcoming INDE Awards

insulation for the 28 Sound hospitality sector

All this means that the money and inclination are there to keep rebuilding and renovating our thousands of pubs, clubs, bars and restaurants. The fact is also that the competition for design and style is heating up, something we have seen in not only the projects that we have featured in this edition, but also in a range of other well-known builds from the noveau corporate elegance of Barangaroo to Erskineville’s Pricilla Queen of the Desert fame Imperial Hotel.

PEOPLE

design as an 32 Hospitality art and a science

with GroupGSA’s 10 Interview Angela Spillane

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40 Flooring for hotels and hospitality

Interview with Scott McKeag from Techne

DETAIL Kyubi: eastern 16 Campbelltown’s styling in the south-west chalet that turns up 20 Athesnow heat on hospitality design the good design tips from 24 All Melbourne’s Bad Love Club

Gone are the days of monotone tiles and stainless steel sterility, and in their place is warmth, depth and a love of all that is meant to be celebrated.

32 solutions for 46 Technology the hospitality sector

For architects and designers, this means a boon in work in what perhaps was a hitherto overlooked sector.

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8 - 10 May 2018 ICC Sydney, Darling Harbour

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industry

People’s Choice voting for the INDE.Awards Luminary and Prodigy of the Year is now open

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ho moves you in A&D in APAC? Beyond the pleasure of an award, the value lies in building discourse around achievement and identifying the leading edge of practice and considering where that edge may take the industry next. Indesign’s Luminary program is a longstanding tradition that recognises and honours the tireless work of leading established figures in the A&D industry. Over the years the program has honoured many of our most respected industry colleagues, and last year it was welcomed into the region-wide fold of the INDE.Awards alongside a new honour for up-and-coming talent. The Luminary and its new compliment The Prodigy are now cherished components of the INDE.Awards. This year the program honours four Luminaries and four Prodigies who have been handpicked by the regional Indesign Media editorial team.

and leaving an indelible mark on the design world in our region and beyond. In the spirit of industry-wide dialogue, people’s choice voting has been established in addition to the honours bestowed by the Indesign Media editorial team. Members of the A&D industry across Asia Pacific are invited to vote for The Luminary and The Prodigy of the year via the INDE. Awards website. Based on the voting results, one from each group of four will be honoured with an INDE.Awards trophy at the gala night in June.

Meet the Luminaries of 2018 Khai Liew (Khai Liew, Australia): Designer of exquisitely crafted furniture and Australian colonial furniture specialist. Ma Yansong (Mad Architects, China): Architect seeking a new balance between city, environment and society.

Luminaries are those who strive to change the world of design; who challenge the design industry to be better; to push us all in the direction of innovation and constant improvement. The Prodigies demonstrate a spirit of progression, expertise and big-picture thinking.

Mia Feasey (Siren Design Group, Australia and Singapore): Interior designer changing the game around APAC.

They are bold, fearless and entirely unforgettable – pushing the boundaries

Vote for your ‘People’s Choice’ Luminary of the year at www.indeawards.com/the-luminary-2018

Vo Trong Nghia (Vo Trong Nghia Architects, Vietnam): Architect using greenery to rehabilitate Vietnam’s urban centres.

Meet the Prodigies of 2018 Briar Hickling and Alex Mok (Linehouse, China): Architects and interior designers transforming the mundane into performative acts. Olivia Lee (OLIVIA LEE, Singapore): Designer creating new experiences and uncovering new rituals and behaviours. Nick Harding (Ha, Australia): Architect with an interest in future models for Australian cities and a focus on people. David Neustein and Grace Mortlock (Other Architects/Otherothers, Australia): Architects seeking out ‘other’ approaches that challenge convention. Vote for your ‘People’s Choice’ Prodigy of the year at indeawards.com/the-prodigy-2018/ The Luminary category partner is Wilkhahn – a company with a global reputation for pioneering designs, state-of-the-art engineering, and a demonstrated commitment to design finesse and distinction. The Prodigy category partner is Cosentino – a company that aims to innovate with responsibility. With up-tothe-minute R&D fuelling leading-edge designs and supporting an international reach, this is a company that sparks new possibilities for A&D. n


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GroupGSA gets creative with new principal appointment

Asked as to what she hopes to achieve as the new principal at GroupGSA, Spillane says, “The ability to collaborate across the studios and the disciplines has open ended opportunities.” And as to which sector that has really got interior design perfectly balanced, she notes that, “I’m not sure anything is truly balanced in such a changing world. But globally the hospitality work of interior designers has become truly inspirational, and an area that I think will keep pushing the boundaries.”

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roupGSA has added interior designer and design lecturer at Queensland University of Technology Angela Spillane as a principal.

Noted as being an inspiring leader and mentor, Spillane honed her craft at Arkifield and brings more than 20 years’ professional experience in Sydney, London and Brisbane to her new role. Spillane’s practice draws upon the intersections between interiors and architecture and has led design practices, project teams and managed projects from evolving concepts through to delivering the built form. As one of the principals for GroupGSA’s Brisbane interiors team, Spillane says she is eager to bring her knowledge and expertise

to the group where her passion lies in impacting daily life through design. Describing herself as being passionate about design and the merging of practice with teaching, Spillane also says that she “enjoys the interface between human experience and built environments.” “As an interior designer, I’m really interested in the impact that design can have on everyday life and the change that we are able to create in the places that we make.” “I think Australian design and architecture in particular is very good at integrating inside and out due to our outdoor lifestyle, but it’s true that sustainability is often dealt with differently by the two disciplines,” she says.

As to her biggest design inspiration in life, Spillane says, “I’ve always loved working to create places that a lot of people inhabit as they go about their day - like airports and hotels and restaurants. I’m inspired every time I travel somewhere new by the people and their art, lives, and of course their food.” “In her previous roles, she has successfully delivered a diverse range of hospitality, tourism commercial and retail projects, including the Brisbane International Airport Departures Hall and Domestic Airport retail upgrade.” Spillane complements her keen knowledge of contemporary design with a deep understanding of how people and places connect and interact, while “her inclusive approach creates beautifully realised designs that harmonise interiors, architecture and their surrounding environments,” says a statement from GroupGSA. n


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Steve McKeag: TechnE’s new director on the evolution in hospitality design

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teve McKeag joins founders Justin Northrop and Nick Travers as the third director at TechnE, which has recently completed the Garden State Hotel, Rooftop Bar and Cinema, and Brunetti Flinders Lane.

For McKeag, the connection between human relationships and design excellence is an area of fascination.

Interior design, furniture and lighting, graphics and collateral, flatware, cutlery and glassware all need to interlock and work together.”

As to how hospitality design has changed over the decade, McKeag says that over the last 10 years, hospitality customers’ expectations have changed completely.

“Clients expect an integrated and collaborative approach from us in order to deliver the memorable, differentiated experience they are looking for,” he says.

“While great architecture and design may have been optional 20 years ago, and desirable 10 years ago, these aspects are now a definite prerequisite for the success of any new major restaurant in Melbourne today.”

For example, he notes, “Working closely with Sandhill Road on projects such as the Prahran Hotel, Garden State Hotel and more recently, The Espy, has been a welcome exercise in evaluating the available space of a venue carefully”

“A strong design identity that builds in a sense of welcome and enjoyment needs to be interwoven with the food and beverage offering of any venue,” McKeag says. “This is because, particularly in the inner city, bars and restaurants are increasingly being seen as the natural environment for urban residents to ‘outsource’ entertaining family and friends.” “Now more than ever, it’s key for architects and designers to approach hospitality design in a way that is highly engaging and shows an awareness of how every corner of the space will be utilised,” he says. As to whether clients are expecting more from the architect these days in terms of what they can get out of an available space, especially in the hospitality sector, McKeag says that these days, the intensity, expenditure and attention to detail that is applied to contemporary projects is at another level. “As designers and architects, we’re required to consider hospitality design in holistic terms.

“A site has to be meticulously considered from end to end, and entry to exit, in order to achieve the ideal use of space. In the best possible way, architects need to make every square metre work its hardest,” says McKeag. “Personally, I feel that what’s most important in hospitality is the sense of personal engagement that design can foster between a venue and the customer,” he says. “While we may be experimenting with technologies such as self-serve kiosks and adaptive service models such as Uber Eats, the architecture of a space should be more personal and play into the tactile, inhabitable elements that make up the DNA of a successful venue.” “That said, social media platforms such as Instagram can generate ‘destination venues’ whose popularity has arisen through the power of the shared image, which can be great. Just to give one example, it could create the opportunity for top regional venues to attract visitors,” he notes. n


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s temperatures reach new extremes, energy consumption via heating and cooling is an increasingly pressing concern. Heating and cooling costs make up 40% of the average Australian household’s energy consumption, far outstripping any other energy need. it is evident that more effective climate control measures than ducted air conditioning must be investigated.one such measure is hydronic in- or underfloor heating, which poses an attractive, cost-efficient, and low energy solution for residential and commercial projects alike.

An overview of heat pumps The two most common methods for extracting heat from the environment are geothermal and air-to-water-heat pumps. Both draw in heat from the heat source or ‘heat sink’ around them – either the air or the ground – and transfer this heat to water. This water is then circulated through pipes in or beneath the floor, in the process releasing heat that rises up through the floor and warms the space above.

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pumps offer operational cost savings of up to 70% of the average household electricity bill.

Environmental benefits As climate change and greenhouse gas emissions remain topical, the environmental impact of any heating or cooling system cannot be ignored. Heat pumps also excel in this regard, outperforming conventional boilers in terms of CO2 emissions in kilograms per year. Heat pumps produce CO2 indirectly through the electricity they use to operate, unlike wood fired and natural gas boilers, which themselves contribute directly to emissions. Additionally, heat pumps draw from the fully renewable resource of heat stored naturally within the air and ground, as opposed to finite (in the case of natural gas) or slow-replenishing (in the case of wood pellets) resources.

Geothermal heat pumps Geothermal heat pumps are quieter and require less maintenance than their air-to-water counterparts. However, significant excavation is required to lay the necessary closed-loop pipework, which poses a potential difficulty in renovations and retrofits.

Air-to-water heat pumps Air-to-water pumps are a viable alternative where budget is a key constraint or other factors make geothermal heat pump unfeasible. Easier to retrofit and cheaper than geothermal pumps, air-to-water pumps draw in heat energy from the surrounding air. They are heavily dependent on climatic conditions, with colder temperatures allowing less heat to be extracted from the air and harnessed to heat the water in circulation.

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The high-upfront costs and labour requirements of geothermal heat pumps are often offset in the long run by their efficiency and reliability. Geothermal pumps are not dependent on outdoor weather conditions, and have a streamlined design that allows quieter operation when compared with air-to-water heat pumps and other heating technologies.

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modern ASIAN dining combines contemporary design with antique artefacts ARCHITECT: Scott Carver words: Nicholas Rider PHOTOGRAPHY: Mark Syke


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WHEN THINKING OF EATERIES INSPIRED BY THE EAST, IT MAY BE WORTH YOUR WHILE TO TRAVEL TO THE SOUTHWEST OF SYDNEY TO FIND THE BEST ASIAN-THEMED ESTABLISHMENTS.

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hen thinking of high-end dining in Sydney, destinations such as Circular Quay and Darling Harbour, among others, will come to mind. But Sydney and its fine experiences go further than the CBD. Take the Scott Carver-designed ‘Kyubi Modern Asian Dining’, for instance. “The brief was to create a fine-dining experience in the heart of Campbelltown, providing local residents an alternative to travelling to Sydney [CBD] for such an experience,” says Shehani Kumarasinghege, graduate interior designer at Scott Carver. “Kyubi is symbolic of the deep collaboration between food and design, detailing a design response that is both contemporary and captivating. With a menu drawing upon traditional flavours from across south-east Asia, the focus was to create a rich sensory journey, without targeting a specific culture.” Located at the Campbelltown Catholic Club, the space selected for the restaurant was a former administration office on the first floor. It was set apart from the rest of the club’s dining offerings. “The design solution needed to address the arrival experience as guests approached the restaurant from the grand staircase, to create a sense of excitement and anticipation of what lay beyond the doors,” says Kumarasinghege. An entry through a dramatic foyer and bronze glass doors welcomes the guests to a lounge

and cocktail bar. Past this are intimately curved booths, flexible banquette seating and an open kitchen. The space features a regal colour palette of teal, navy and green, which complements the warm timbers, antique brass and leather finishes. Original artefacts appear throughout the space to provide authenticity against the custom contemporary design elements. Among these artefacts are a pair of Indonesian sculptures at the entrance, Burmese puppets, a Buddhist gong, and handmade cotton Thai temple hangings. Working within a completely internal space came with its obvious challenges, though. “…Getting the lighting right was critical to creating a moody and luxurious dining atmosphere; befitting the design and the food on offer,” explains Kumarasinghege. “The use of indirect lighting integrated into wall panelling and joinery gives a sense of something beyond and makes the lack of daylight and view a non-issue.” The restaurant – situated within a Registered Club – also needed to appeal to a broad demographic. “The design provided an upscale hospitality experience which was influenced by Asian culture, but was in essence, timeless,” says Kumarasinghege. “As such, a young couple [on] a first date [will feel] just as comfortable in the space, as [would] a couple celebrating their golden wedding anniversary.” n


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BOOTH ELEVATION: Located at the Campbelltown Catholic Club, the space selected for the restaurant was a former administration office on the first floor.


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KYUBI FLOOPLAN: Kyubi is symbolic of the deep collaboration between food and design, detailing a design response that is both contemporary and captivating.


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Astra Lodge: A new ‘star’ is born ARCHITECT: GRANT AMON ARCHITECTS words: STEPHANIE STEFANOVIC photography: Peter Bennetts


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Sharp, clean lines and ample curves juxtapose in the newly-renovated Astra Lodge at Falls Creek, much like the ski slopes it sits on. Finished in 2017, the new Astra Lodge is a shining beacon of contemporary alpine design, ushering in the clientele of a new era.

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lmost 30 years after its original construction, Grant Amon of Grant Amon Architects was given the opportunity to refurbish the iconic Astra Lodge. Amon was actually the design and project architect of the 60-bed lodge along with Hayball Architects (HLS at the time) in the late 1980s. This time, Amon was given the brief to completely renovate and extend the lodge. “The refurbishment has been an amazing opportunity for Grant Amon Architects to revisit, complement and even complete the original design,” says Amon. “For example, the distinctive raking and curved main roof was extended to cover the new addition, which features a new ‘rounded end’ clad in stone, copper and metal panelling. This final addition completes the overall form and shape of Astra, with its ‘ship liner and snow sled’ overtones.”

External changes The project brief included external re-cladding of the existing roof and walls, as well as new windows and glazed doors for the balconies. The opportunity also arose to extend the lodge at the rear of the site, which required the extension of the main roof. According to Amon, “The building has benefitted from its re-cladding with durable and lasting quality materials: Extension of the beautiful base stone work, the developing patina of copper, the neutral tones of grey ribbed metal cladding and the interpretation of the classic European balcony balustrades in ochre-coloured metal panels.”

Internal changes There were extensive internal changes to Astra Lodge. Over a short design and build timeframe, the existing facility was re-planned, decorated and altered to improve the existing layout and offer a better alpine hotel experience. The lodge saw an upgrade to its bar, lounge, dining and kitchen area, as well as the lower level pool, spa and sauna.

The guest rooms were also completely refurbished, along with the addition of a new day spa facility, guest library, lounge and children’s games/TV room. On the lower level, a new ski room was linked with specialist ski boot fitting services and a wine cellar. The linkage of new guest, ski and drying rooms to the lift system marked the final stage of the refurbishment.

The new Astra In the completed Astra Lodge, “The bespoke foyer chandelier sparkles to announce the arrival into the main space of the venue, featuring a new oak floor, rough-sawn cedar-clad walls and ceiling, traditional shiplap timber-clad bar, honed brown granite bar top and red glowing backlit display,” says Amon. Bespoke materials and fittings have been used throughout Astra, giving it a luxurious feel and marking it as Falls Creek’s premier lodge. According to Amon, the lodge’s renovation represents “a truly contemporary enhancement of the original 1980s design”. “It represents an example of retaining the working ‘bones’ of the building and providing a new point of reference departure for the new owner’s expressed desire for ‘the best ski hotel in the country’,” he says. This substantial project was certainly helped by the client’s choice to re-engage the original architect, along with the client and builder’s vast alpine experience, says Amon. This is evidenced by the fact that Astra Lodge was named Australia’s Best Ski Boutique Hotel at the World Ski Awards in 2016 – before it had even opened. The lodge went on to take out the coveted award once again in 2017, proving that Grant Amon Architects had undeniably met the project brief with its contemporary upgrade of the lodge. “[It was] a fantastic opportunity to re-brand and upgrade the entire building,” says Amon. “A new Astra ‘star’ is born.” n


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PREVIOUS: A close-up of one of the bar’s bespoke interior features – a wooden overhang reminiscent of the icicles hanging from the building outside. ABOVE: Icicles hang from the eaves of the Astra Lodge, highlighting its clean lines and contemporary alpine design. BELOW: Copper cladding shines on the building’s new ‘rounded end’.


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THE DUAL PURPOSE club that ALSO SHOWS OFF REALLY GOOD design ARCHITECT: BOARCH words: Nicholas Rider PHOTOGRAPHY: Armelle Habib

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DESIGNED FOR A DUAL PURPOSE, Melbourne’s “boozy bakery” takes design inspiration from the Californian desert and an American diner

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PREVIOUS: Vivid pink and maroon coloured bands wrap the rear wall, which according to the architects, allude to the desert landscape. LEFT: Transparent and otherworldly green “tree” structures allow for hanging plants, creating a new field of flora.

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riefs for architectural projects come in all shapes and sizes. Some are just a little more non-traditional.

A perfect example was the brief for a new “boozy bakery”, located in the Melbourne suburb of Footscray. “Our clients came to us with one hell of a brief, we were asked to imagine the space where Frenchy and Rizzo (from Grease) have a wild love affair and end up hanging out with Eric Clapton in Joshua Tree,” says BOARCH. “In addition to the aspirations of our clients, [the design] needed to provide an inviting atmosphere that connected with the Footscray community, would help ensure repeat visits as well as providing for a safe, functional working and baking environment. All of [this] needed to be achieved within a finite budget.” In response, Bad Love Club was conceived – a café by day, a bar by night. BOARCH didn’t have great bones to work with though. The establishment was housed within an existing shop front tenancy, formerly a noodle bar that required complete demolition and internal redesign. “…[The] existing shop front was within a neglected strip mall between a busy road and carpark,” says the architect. “This presented many design challenges around how to create an inviting destination that could

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transition from the day to night program (bagels and coffee in the mornings, paired cocktails and desserts in the evening) while also attracting passing pedestrians and vehicular traffic.” The project came to light through considering a range of influences: mirages, the specificity of the Californian desert, the otherworldly flora of Joshua Tree and the comforting American diner. These references have been interpreted in the design through a number of elements. For instance, vivid pink and maroon coloured bands wrap the rear wall, which according to the architects, allude to the desert landscape. On the other hand, transparent and otherworldly green “tree” structures allow for hanging plants, creating a new field of flora. According to BOARCH, the placement of mirrors and perforated materials create qualities of a mirage, while booth seating and colour blocking rift on the interiors of the classic American diner. “Colour in this project was not just a consequence of a material choice,” explains the architect. “It was a decision founded on interpreting the references above to create a place of unique and specific identity.” In addition, the project was designed with people in mind. A variety of atmospheres were achieved by fixed and loose seating differentiated by the trees, giving diners a variety of choices. n

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Keeping the noise down in restaurants and hotels words: Stephanie Stefanovic

A combination of thoughtful design and effective insulation is needed to control noise levels in all buildings, including hotels and hospitality.


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coustic performance is an important yet sometimes underrated element of building design. Acoustics shouldn’t just be considered in building types like concert halls and theatres, but also hotels, bars and restaurants. However, while the design for concert halls and theatres may focus on producing the perfect sound quality, designing hotels and restaurants often calls for sound to be minimised as much as possible. Minimising sound in these building types requires a combination of thoughtful design and effective insulation. In hotels for example, there is the potential for many noise sources. Some of these include noise from guests in the halls or in adjacent rooms, noise from plumbing, HVAC and elevators, noise from function rooms and exterior noise from vehicles. There are a few key design elements which can reduce these noise sources: • Using resilient channel in walls to improve sound isolation. If there are items such as headboards and artwork mounted against the walls however, this will be less effective, requiring other measures such as increased mass, increased air space and double or staggered stud walls. • Sealing all air gaps and wall perimeters with an acoustic sealant. • Avoiding the placement of back-to-back outlets in party walls. If unavoidable, putty pads should be installed at the back of the outlets. • Isolating all elevator infrastructure from the building structure. • Using double-glazed windows to block out exterior noise. • Planning spaces effectively (eg. No guest rooms under function rooms). While noise in bars and restaurants is somewhat more acceptable and even expected, that does not mean acoustics should go

unconsidered. Noise should be minimised where possible to adhere to Work Health and Safety regulations for staff and patrons, and to ensure patrons’ comfort. Noise reduction should be considered in the following areas: Kitchens: While it is a common trend today for kitchens to be open and visible to the patrons, and sometimes even incorporated into the dining area, this means the clanging of dishes and shouted orders of the staff can be audible. The best way to reduce this is of course to design an enclosed kitchen that is off to the side of the venue. However, as sound can transmit through walls, this still leaves some patrons exposed to the sounds of the kitchen. To prevent this, appropriate sound insulation materials are required. Building systems: HVAC and plumbing equipment can noisy when improperly installed or installed in the wrong location. While some restaurant owners may choose to override this with music, this sometimes turns into a vicious cycle where music is being used to drown out building noises and patrons must increasingly raise their voices to be heard over the music and over other loud patrons. This can be avoided by choosing quieter equipment in the first place and making sure it is configured properly. The location of noisier equipment should also be considered in relation to the patrons. Exterior noise: For restaurants located along major roads or in urban areas, noises from traffic, aircrafts, other venues and people on the streets can be an issue. While some venues may prefer to be open to the street, this needs to be considered in relation to the location. Most venues are better served with enclosed walls and doors, and good quality windows that will help maintain both temperature and quiet. Appropriate sound insulation is also recommended in this case, particularly for more high-end restaurants where patrons expect a more quiet, formal environment where they can enjoy the ambiance and easily hold a conversation.

Choosing the right sound insulation When it comes to sound insulation for walls and ceilings, there are a lot of options and it can be hard to make the right choice. Some issues to include sound transmission vs. sound absorption, aesthetics and resistance to fire, water, mould and wear and tear. Here are a few options that can serve different purposes in hotels and hospitality: Acoustigard – CSR Bradford: Acoustigard is a glasswood fibre insulation engineered to reduce sound transmissions in walls and ceilings. Made in Australia for Australian conditions, the product comes in a range of densities and is also certified as a thermal insulation for non-combustible external walls. Applications include partition walls, intertenancy walls, externals walls, services and ceilings. When installed with Gyprock plasterboard, Acoustigard Partition Rolls can achieve a high range of Rw and Rw+Ctr acoustic ratings. Asona Triton Baffle Beams and Fabwall – USG Boral: The Triton Baffle Beam is a linear high sound-absorbing non-combustible glass fibre ceiling designed to control unwanted noise reverbation and provide an attractive linear aesthetic. The beams can be directly fixed to lining or suspended affixed to the ceiling by a C Channel and are available in a range of widths, depths and lengths. The Triton Fabwall is a pre-fabricated fabric-covered acoustic wall panel with resin-reinforced edges and a compact impact layer, which is designed to produce a plush, high-end aesthetic. Asona Triton Baffle Beams and Fabwall are suitable options for hotel spaces, large public spaces and hospitality areas to control unwanted noise and reverbation, making the space more comfortable for patrons. The beams can be designed in a helpful ‘way-finding’ manner to easily direct patrons to different areas of the building. Fabwall panels can also be installed in a 3D arrangement that effectively controls the acoustics and the reverbation of spaces while adding drama and interest to ceilings or walls.


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Absorb Black – CSR Bradford Absorb Black is thermally-bonded polyester fibre insulation designed to provide high-performance sound absorption. This product creates a black backdrop for semi-exposed ceilings and slotted panelling, and is certified as a Group 1 fire-rated internal lining. Applications include semi-exposed ceilings, behind perforated linings or slotted panelling, HVAC ducts, under soffit, partition wall cavity infill, suspended ceilings and outdoor environmental acoustic applications. This product’s ability to act as a black backdrop makes it especially suitable for hotels and hospitality where aesthetics are a major concern. Fiberock Aqua-Tough Panels – USG Boral Fiberock Aqua-Tough Panels are a gypsum fiber product that have strong impact resistance. They can be utilised in fire-rated wall systems up to 120 minutes, while their high mass produces effective noise control, even in intertenancy walls. The product forms a good substrate for paint and tiles and a number of abrasion-resistant coatings. The panels are also a paperless board (which means there is no paper face to tear or feed mould), and have superior water and mould-resistance to plasterboard linings. This product’s fire, water and mould-resistance makes it a suitable option for restaurants, while its resistance to wear and tear makes it a suitable option for hotels where walls need to stand up against furniture, luggage, high traffic and even unruly guests. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: USG BORAL usgboral. com, CSR BRADFORD bradfordinsulation.com.au

PREVIOUS: The Triton Fabwall is a pre-fabricated fabric-covered acoustic wall panel with resinreinforced edges and a compact impact layer, which is designed to produce a plush, high-end aesthetic. BELOW: The Triton Baffle Beam is a linear high sound-absorbing non-combustible glass fibre ceiling designed to control unwanted noise reverbation and provide an attractive linear aesthetic.


advertising feature – WOVEN IMAGE

Balancing Acoustic Performance with Design Aesthetics: A Specifier’s Guide to Decorative Acoustic Coverings

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raditionally, the term ‘acoustic coverings’ has been associated with acoustic panels that prioritise functionality over style. However, thanks to advances in technology and design thinking, today’s acoustic market abounds with solutions that both manage acoustics and contribute to the overall aesthetics within a space.

Why is acoustic control important? Noise control is crucial to functionality and occupant wellbeing, particularly within today’s high-traffic commercial spaces. Across all commercial sub-sectors, managing noise has become an increasingly pressing concern: in open plan offices, excessive noise has been identified as a key cause of worker disruption and irritation, and in healthcare environments poorly managed noise poses a significant health concern. In the latter, studies have shown that continuous background noise negatively impacts patient care by causing sleep disturbance and elevated levels of post-operative medication requirements in patients. Noise also impacts on the ability of healthcare workers to accurately hear and act on instructions, further compromising care levels. The scenario is mirrored in education spaces, where reverberation has been linked with increased teacher stress and fatigue.

What type of acoustic control do I need?

Structure-born/impact noise results from soundwaves induced directly into the ground or structure. The resulting vibration allows the sound to be heard. The two types of noise can be addressed using two different strategies. Absorption is most effective for controlling airborne noise and echo within a room. Soft and porous materials – usually textiles – absorb soundwaves and inhibit reverberation, resulting in a quieter indoor space. Blocking cuts off the path of vibrations caused by soundwaves. Dense materials affixed directly to a wall, floor, or ceiling contain sound within the space, minimising the level of sound exiting the space and preventing unwanted sound from entering. Decorative acoustic panels incorporate noise blocking and absorption properties alike, whilst also enhancing the appearance of a space.

Designing for Different Sectors

The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) identifies two main types of noise.

Regardless of the commercial sub-sector, consider room usage, noise from outside the room, room shape and dimensions, and other surfaces within the room.

Airborne noise travels away from its source via a direct or open path in the air. The soundwaves are only stopped by a solid surface or when they fade out on their own.

In conjunction with these basic factors, designers must also take into account a number of sectorspecific considerations. In healthcare environments, for example, decorative acoustic coverings

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can be used to craft lively, uplifting spaces with positive impacts on patient mental states, while in open plan offices decorative acoustic coverings can enhance the overall environment by adding colour, texture, and shape. Similarly, appropriate acoustic management may improve levels of concentration and performance within education spaces, and can be used to enhance the visual and aural experience within retail environments.

Woven Image Since 1987, Woven Image has led the global market in sustainable, decorative acoustic management products. Ranging from wall-mounted solutions to freestanding screens, the company’s acoustic solutions deliver outstanding interior sound absorption without compromising on style. Around the world, the Woven Image brand has earned a reputation for combining cost effectiveness and high functionality with a distinctive bold, contemporary aesthetic that is perfect for today’s lively interior spaces. Modular systems mean that solutions can be tailored to fit the demands of a space, while third party sustainability certifications such as GreenTag give designers peace of mind that they are choosing a truly future-oriented product.

To download whitepaper http://bit.ly/2GczfFU

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Many flavours required for the perfect serving: Hospitality design as an art and a science words: Prue Miller

Once upon a time, before Trip Advisor, Snapchat and Instagram, the dining experience was almost entirely about the quality of the faire. Word of mouth and newspaper reviews were the be-all and end-all in deciding where to wave our shiny new Diners Club cards on a Saturday night.


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alendar wipe to 2018 and the scene is entirely different. Australians dine out 24/7, are offered an all-embracing experience that can be shared, liked, disliked and retweeted in seconds. Despite the hard liners from a small pack of foodies, dining is no longer just about the food, and the competition for that ‘like’ is more fierce than ever. “Ambience is your first impression,” says Stewart White. “You walk in the door, do you like the vibe?” White has a long history with the hospitality industry and is National Chair of Judges & Catering Association SAVOUR Awards. When judging venues he and fellow judges, just like avid consumers, take in everything, objectively. “We judge on how it presents on the day – it’s not about me – it’s this works, that works, how long does it take for a reservation to be confirmed?” It is clear that restaurants are being judged for more than their bisque du jour. Restaurants are notoriously risky businesses, and designing or re-designing a space is a pricey commitment, and it comes down to how many covers are needed to pay the bill. So how many seats are needed? How many tables will fit? Can we afford pavement space? “It’s a matter of size and doing your sums,” adds White. “You can have tables almost touching each other, which is very Parisienne. Or a hole in the wall joint who can do thirty covers, but with Uber eats or whatever, you can add another ten. It’s all an equation.” But a highly malleable one, and a feature is without doubt the value of expert design. Successful hospitality in 2018 requires a holistic approach. “We have to get involved in everything,” says George Livissianis, a talented and in demand designer who has created more than a few beautiful dining spaces including Cho Cho San, The Apollo, The Dolphin Hotel and Billy Kwong in his seven year history in the game. However, no matter the space, old or new, Livissianis has a process. “I walk through the space when it [a new restaurant] is empty, or when it’s something else. It lets my instincts get a feel for the space. There’s nothing like experiencing the

space. And then if I have a basic brief from the client, then it’s about sketch planning.” But briefs can vary, and successful designers have to be clued in to the nuance. “There’s a functional part of a brief which describes how many seats, the size of the kitchen and what they are trying to achieve with food and drinks.” But some clients, such as Jonathan Barthelmess, owner of both The Apollo and Cho Cho San, can use a rather stylish shorthand.

“That last one at Bondi Beach, that’s all about concrete. So we used precast concrete for the bars, we put concrete onto the floors, we sprayed something that looked like concrete onto the ceiling but is in fact sound insulation,” says Livissianis, who describes restaurants and bars as material specific. “Cho Cho San has a lot of plywood detail in it. The Dolphin was about calico…” It is this correct interpretation of the owners’ vision of what they plan to do with food and beverage that creates a brand with a buzz, with that certain frisson of excitement that makes the social snappers reach for their iPhones. Add fire to the mix, and you have created drama.

“Ambience is your first impression,” says Stewart White. “You walk in the door, do you like the vibe?”

“When he gave me the brief for the Apollo, he said “polished village food”, and that’s kind of all it needed to be.” Another client, Maurice Terzini (who Gourmet Traveller once described as a fashion-forward renegade restranteur), is owner of both the The Dolphin Hotel, as well as the Bondi Beach Public Bar. He briefed Livissianis on the beach side venue by saying “It’s like Rick Owens comes to Bondi Beach.” The now completed and highly successful venues reflect how well Livissianis took the concept, understood “The Brand” if you will, and ran with it. The Dolphin is chilled playfulness – the white washed exposed brick/industrial finish is brought to life by the graffiti printed plastic covered banquette and seats in the pool room. But the white calico walls in the wine room, while more subdued are none the less frisky and fun – in fact the series of rooms, including the voluminous dining room are a cohesive and upbeat experience in both dining and design fields.

The open kitchen - the exposure of the culinary backstage to the patrons in the not-so-cheap seats continues to excite patrons. They are transformed from diners to members of the audience. It’s in these restaurants that cool, clean almost Spartan design styles can be seen leaving the building. A striking example is found in Billy Kwong, owned by the vibrant and talented chef Kylie Kwong. She describes the dining experience here as one of “celebration, collaboration and community”, and the fitout by Livissianis as “intuitive”. Indeed, the noisy action and drama of the open kitchen reflects an almost familial, warm aesthetic – and a blend of cultures. A chance for designer Livissianis to use a more vibrant palette in both colour and texture. Go west about 4000 kilometres and a different design concept is making waves in Perth. Chilli Panda in suburban Northbridge is an almost deconstructed style, were wide open spaces and cool concrete made the shortlist for interior design in the 2017 competition. Mata Design Studio took an 287sqm industrial and thoroughly unassuming shell, and created a sharply modern concept for Hunan cuisine (a style of cooking steeped in glorious chilli flavours). Here is a relaxed, less salubrious concept, ideal for the brand’s demographic; an affordable eatery for those who like a bit of spice in their lives. “There are various seating options provided, however with budget in mind, cost effective seating such as picnic benches were specified


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PREVIOUS & LEFT: Chilli Panda was created by Carr Design Group, headed by Sue Carr, Dan Cox and Chris McCue. The boutique bonanza’s long list of accolades is now headlined by World Hotel Interior of the Year 2018. PREVIOUS & LEFT: Chilli Panda in suburban Perth is an almost deconstructed style, were wide open spaces and cool concrete made the shortlist for interior design in the 2017 competition.

RIGHT: George Livissianis is a talented and in demand designer who has created more than a few beautiful dining spaces including Cho Cho San. NEXT PAGE: Jackelope is owned by Louis Li, whose first love was film-making. His decision to turn that creative spirit to benefit a different audience in hospitality is one every guest would applaud.

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and the ‘hawker-style’ concept of table-sharing has been utilised,” says associate Kylene Tan.

might call the spooky sci-fi (albeit intimate and sexy) nature of the bar, Flaggerdoot.

For once the space is very roomy, and in fact designers at Mata had to create a way of breaking up the large volume – cleverly and inexpensively building open pine screen ‘walls’.

“Spaces reflect and embrace the alchemists workshop – eclectic, experimental and contemporary in detailing – forming something truly unique and rare,” says Carr Director of Interiors, Dan Cox

“It was a cost-effective way of creating zones in the space as opposed to being presented by a sea of tables, whilst still allowing a visual transparency through the space.” For the diners of Chilli Panda that transparency includes the kitchen, which again takes on a stage presence. “We saw an opportunity to create a sense of drama in the restaurant. We also thought it was good for patrons to see that everything is prepared fresh, and that the produce is good quality – there is nothing to hide.” A greater contrast you could not see between Chilli Panda and the multi awarded Jackelope. Created by Carr Design Group, headed by Sue Carr, Dan Cox and Chris McCue the boutique bonanza’s long list of accolades is now headlined by World Hotel Interior of the Year 2018. The rather whimsical modern alchemy theme is embraced at each venue – from the breathtaking globular glass ceiling in the dining room (the 10,000 globe chandelier installation was created by created by Jan Flook Lighting), to what some

It is a magical mystery tour, set in dense blacks (not even the guest rooms retreat from the dark drama) entirely unconventional with slashes of gleaming metal tones – a complete juxtaposition to the location, being an acreage of grapevines on the sleepy, semi-rural Mornington Peninsula. Jackelope is owned by Louis Li, whose first love was film making. His decision to turn that creative spirit to benefit a different audience in hospitality is one every guest would applaud. This property is a perfect hybrid between art and function, a concept celebrated by the breathtaking and brand celebrating seven metre sculpture by Emily Floyd which gives patrons their very first impression of the hotel. At which point each must ask themselves, “Do you like the vibe?” and the answer will most assuredly be yes. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Mata Design matadesign.com.au, Carr Design Group carr.net.au, Jan Flook Lighting.janflooklighting.com


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advertising feature – ALTRO

Designing Healthcare Facilities for Quiet and Wellbeing

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here is an established link between workplace noise levels and worker performance. Research shows a negative correlation between noise and worker wellbeing: as the former rises, the latter declines. Careful management of this relationship is particularly crucial in healthcare environments, where worker performance may seriously impact patient health.

Why is noise bad? Noise is unavoidable in healthcare facilities, where the busy, fast-paced environment exacerbates noise generated by mechanical equipment. Noise in itself is not inherently bad, but at prolonged and high levels it can have damaging effects on patient recovery and staff performance.

Understanding the effects of noise on patients Continuous background noise in hospitals has been linked to sleep disturbance amongst patients, and may prevent patients from getting much needed sleep. In neonatal intensive care units, loud noises have serious repercussions, decreasing oxygen saturation, elevating blood pressure, and increasing heart rates. Studies also suggest that noise may negatively impact wound healing and elevate post-surgery medication requirements.

is that prolonged exposure to sounds louder than 80 to 90 dB in the workplace causes some hearing degeneration. Noisy workplaces can also cause stress, increased perception of work pressure and fatigue, emotional exhaustion and burnout, and communication difficulties.

The situation in hospitals Hospital noise levels have risen steadily since the 1960s. To curb this, the World Health Organisation has released guidelines for continuous background noise levels, capping these at 35 dB during the day and 39dB at night. Nonetheless, peak levels of hospital noise often exceed 85 dB to 90 dB.

Why is this the case? Noise in healthcare environments is in large part caused by operational noise. Staff conversation in particular is a major source, with 83% of communication in the emergency department being speech related. The hard, smooth surfaces often specified for walls and ceilings – largely due to their hygienic properties – also elevate noise levels. Sound reflects easily off hard surfaces and travels down corridors and into patient rooms far from the original noise source.

How sound affects staff

How can we address the problem?

Healthcare facilities are workplaces, and should be treated as such: general consensus

Excessive noise can be curbed in one of three main ways.

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Eliminating or reducing noise sources by turning off equipment when it is not in use, minimising the volume of alert tones, and speaking quietly. Single-bed rooms confine noise to its source and minimise the number of affected patients. Design-based solutions incorporate controls into the building itself. Examples include acoustic insulation, sound absorbing ceiling tiles, floor materials, or wall linings.

Altro For nearly 100 years, Altro have been pioneers in resilient wall sheets and flooring systems. Taking a targeted approach to design that considers each space on the basis of its unique needs and challenges, Altro helps shape environments that improve hygiene, safety, and user wellbeing. Combining specialised knowledge with a broad product catalogue and experience in designing for healthcare environments around the world, Altro delivers spaces that are stylish and highly functional.

Download whitepaper here: http://bit.ly/2GQEb0L

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the FLOW OF FLOORING ARCHITECT: Cayas Architects & Studio Adjective words: Geraldine Chua

PHOTOGRAPHY: NOC Coffee Co. & ALH Group

WHILE expectations and tastes may change, hospitality venues have always and will continue to create a visually appealing experience for customers.


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esign undeniably plays a major role in this experience, with flooring often acting as the foundational backdrop. While it may not be the first element a patron notices when stepping into a venue, flooring design can make or break the energy and feel of a space.

Mixing and matching flooring materials further achieves a depth in design, which prevents ‘cafeteria syndrome’— the boring or stale atmosphere that can result from flooring that is too indistinct from the layout, furniture, joinery, ceiling and general finishes.

For example, custom broadloom is often used to craft a plush, cosy feel—perfect for luxury hotel rooms. Yet, it may look out of place at a casual coffee shop or an old school-inspired diner. Deciding what material to install underfoot is essentially driven by—and to—a project’s overarching defined design concept. Two main strategies may be employed here: using multiple flooring materials to break up and add interest, or relying on a singular flooring aesthetic.

However, it is important to ensure that transitions in varying floor materials are seamless and gentle in tone and texture. For instance, a simple change in tile pattern can add interest to a breakout space that feels well-considered. Sticking with a defined material palette also prevents flooring transitions from being too jarring to the eye.

MIXING & MATCHING

Of course, there are merits to sticking with a homogenous flooring design too.

For many projects, particularly larger venues, employing more than one flooring material or product can help create a sense that the service being delivered is unique and varied. “In parting with their money, patrons want to feel appreciated, unique and well-serviced,” says Jeremy Ward, partner at Brisbane-based Cayas Architects. “Using different types of flooring can assist with this by creating smaller pockets of ‘special spaces’ within a larger environment.” The art of using flooring to zone and delineate also allows venues to appeal to a broader audience. Take for example a location with a casual tiled bar area and a carpeted dining room. The former is ideal for relaxed, after-work drinks, while the latter will appeal to clientele seeking a more formal or exclusive setting.

A STANDARD AESTHETIC

“Some venues have a target market that appreciate simple but highly detailed design—usually high end. In this instance, a single flooring aesthetic is sometimes preferred as it does tend to showcase and exemplify the detailing of its junctions, connections and construction,” Ward explains. Specifying one flooring product can also be valuable to low-cost, high-volume environments—think Ikea dining, he adds. For businesses that need to keep their operational expenses low, this is ideal as it means having just one cleaning and maintenance technique. Following are two projects in two cities, each employing a different flooring strategy to create a vibe and flow unique to their design and purpose.


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NOC COFFEE CO. Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

PREVIOUS & BELOW: Located in Hong Kong’s old-meets-new Western district, NOC Coffee Co. is a 140sqm boutique coffee shop that features its own bean roasting area and bean storage. Focusing on a pared-back aesthetic, the architects selected a white and grey palette to highlight the sense of space, and allow zoning cues to stand out. Following these floor lines, customers will recognise different zonings—for example the bean roasting area, the bean storage, the cashier and the retail shop.

Located in Hong Kong’s old-meets-new Western district, NOC Coffee Co. is a 140sqm boutique coffee shop that features its own bean roasting area and bean storage. Its design, by Studio Adjective, seeks to offer guests a complete coffee tasting and complementary visual experience. Focusing on a pared-back aesthetic, the architects selected a white and grey palette to highlight the sense of space, and allow zoning cues to stand out. Raw cement flooring was applied, intended to flow coherently with the existing grey concrete structure, and favoured for bringing in a natural, rustic feel into a clean interior space. Coffee-themed pictograms and white lines designed by the team are added playful elements that became a focal point of the interior design. “Following these floor lines, customers will recognise different zonings—for example the bean roasting area, the bean storage, the cashier and the retail shop,” Emily Ho, Studio Adjective’s marketing director, tells Infolink-BPN. “These lines heighten the feeling of a warehouse and also act as indications to different zones and activities in the space.”

THE COFFEE BAR THE BAR SEATING

COUNTER

THE STORAGE THE ROASTING AREA

THE COMMUNAL TABLE


advertising feature – LevantaPark

Smart City Design and automatic parking systems Ideas to future-proof your parking design

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HE SMART CITY DESIGN MOVEMENT IS INCREASINGLY GAINING MOMENTUM IN ARCHITECTURE – AND WITH GOOD REASON.

They can even use far less space to park the same number of cars – or fit greater numbers of cars in the same space, depending on your requirements.

Our cities are rapidly growing in population density. A staggering 89% of Australians currently live in urban areas, a figure which is forecast only to rise in the coming decades.

To request an information pack or arrange a presentation for your business, call LevantaPark on 1300 993 548 or email enquiries@levantapark.com.au

Smart City Design aims to overcome these issues through planning, designing, and delivering more sustainable urban development. It’s a philosophy that can work hand-in-hand with the latest automatic parking system technology.

When correctly designed and installed, automatic parking systems can be a greener, more efficient alternative to conventional parking. Auto parking systems can not only be utilised by today’s conventional vehicles, but are also ideal for tomorrow’s electric and autonomous vehicles too.

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Their answers are featured in our latest downloadable eBook – 5 reasons why automatic parking systems work with Smart City Design. It shows you why automatic parking systems are ideal for inclusion in your building design, to ensure it meets the principles of Smart City Design into the future.

And along with this increasing urbanisation comes ever-increasing problems with pollution and traffic.

How automatic parking systems suit Smart City Design

will integrate with the Smart City Design school.

These are just some of the reasons why it makes sense for your building design to take full advantage of automatic parking technology.

Ensure your building design remains relevant into the future We asked LevantaPark’s consultants for their thoughts on how automatic parking systems

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LEFT: The landmark Davey’s Hotel in Frankston, Victoria, underwent a major renovation in 2017 to prepare for its relaunch as a James Squire alehouse.

THE CHEEKY SQUIRE, Australia

SUBSTANCE & STYLE

The landmark Davey’s Hotel in Frankston, Victoria, underwent a major renovation in 2017 to prepare for its relaunch as a James Squire alehouse. The design brief, assigned to Cayas Architects, mandated the use of real, tactile and natural materials to lend the brand a sense of integrity and history.

“Ultimately, functionality plays a crucial role in the choice of flooring,” Ward notes.

Avoiding manufactured finishes, the team used as much of the existing building fabric as possible, and overlaid new finishes only where necessary. The existing carpet and tile floor finishes were removed, and the existing concrete slab was simply patched, lightly grinded and sealed. According to Ward, the imperfections of the original concrete slab were deliberately kept to achieve the desired aesthetic, and to coordinate with the recycled brick and blackened timber walls, hammered copper bar front and concrete bar top poured in-situ.

“For example, while a polished concrete floor may be the perfect fit for a modern industrial vibe, a better slip resistance may be required due to the provision of oily foods or proximity to a wet area (bar) that cannot satisfactorily be provided without changing the look and serviceability of the concrete finish. In this instance, tiles may be a better option.” “A strategy needs to be in place that can balance the need to achieve a particular vibe with the reality of maintenance, slip resistance, the need to acoustically treat a space, and ease of cleaning.” Here are four hospitality-ready products on the market that you may use alone, or to mix and match.

“Acoustic treatment of the ceiling did need to occur to compensate for the noisy environment that this choice of flooring could have created,” he says. “Behind the bar, vinyl flooring was used (Polysafe Vogue Ultra PUR) to create a safe, slip resistant and easy to clean work area.”

• Forbo’s Allura Luxury vinyl tile and plank collection is a realistic wood and stone flooring series designed with maximum dimensional stability, which allows for ease of fitting, improved durability and a timeless, seamless flooring flow.

Natural timber flooring was also specified to contrast the concrete with warmth and texture, with raised areas of timber flooring differentiating the intimate breakout spaces from the communal bar area.

 arkett’s Square Compact is a vinyl • T loose lay tile developed specifically for heavy-traffic areas. It is quick to install with no need for permanent glue or hot welding, and may be quickly replaced

without damage to the substrate or subfloor. Easy cleaning and resistant to food and liquid spills, Square contains Sanitized, an anti-bacterial treatment that helps to prevent the proliferation of potentially health damaging organisms.  avwood’s Italian Collection consists • H of narrower planks of chevron and herringbone timber blocks. The thinness provides flexibility for laying in complex patterns or mixing with tiles in other materials. A highly consistent engineered board with two layers, the boards feature a lacquered finish, are FSC certified, and are suitable for fitting over underfloor heating.  haw Contract Group offers • S designers the opportunity to custom design carpets for their projects, either by enhancing one of its running line products with personalised touches, or creating a signature product from scratch. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Forbo Flooring Systems forbo.com, Tarkett tarkett.com.au, Havwoods havwoods.com.au, Shaw Contact Group shawcontractgroup.com.au, Cayas Architects cayasarchitects.com.au, Studio Adjective adj.com.hk


advertising feature – DUNLOP

Beneath the Surface: The Need for Heavy Duty Underlays for Commercial Flooring

A

s the lines between commercial and residential design blur, carpet has become an increasingly popular choice in commercial environments. Carpet is an effective means of bringing the warmth, softness, and comfort of the residential sector into commercial spaces, and brings with it a new and diverse range of design possibilities including colour, pattern, and texture. However, it also presents a unique set of challenges.

Understanding the Demands High foot traffic levels in busy commercial environments are a major cause of premature wear. As a result, commercial carpets must be able to withstand heavy traffic – both foot traffic and that caused by the movement of equipment – without requiring frequent repair or replacement. A distinct advantage of carpet in comparison with other flooring materials is its soft, plush surface. Ideally, this softness should be retained for as long as possible and the carpet should remain “springy” underfoot even after prolonged use. This is particularly important in school and childcare environments, where children often sit and play directly on the floor. Additionally, appropriate noise control is crucial to ensuring functionality and occupant wellbeing within a commercial space. Studies have demonstrated that excessive noise is a major problem in all major

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commercial sub-sectors including offices, healthcare environments, and schools. According to the National Center for Health Housing, carpets accumulate significant volumes of dust per square metre of surface area, which may become problematic if they are not appropriately maintained or treated with antimicrobial surface. Low quality carpets may also pose health risks in the form of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions, which are linked to a range of health symptoms.

The Benefits of Carpet Underlay Carpet underlay allows commercial carpets to withstand high traffic, manage acoustics, and deliver outstanding user comfort. Certain underlays may also reduce the overall VOC presence within a space. Beyond this, carpet underlays absorb surface impact, thus reducing the risk of damage and extending the life of the carpet. Thick, dense, and absorbent underlays absorb crushing forces applied to the carpet surface and help it spring back into shape.

reductions. Their porous surface absorbs sound waves and reduces reverberation, while their thick, dense composition prevents soundwaves from travelling through floors and between rooms. Advances in manufacturing and materials technology mean that many underlays on the market are free of VOCs and will not release harmful toxins into the air. Some underlays are Green Label accredited for indoor air quality and are impregnated with antimicrobial treatment for allergy and asthma control.

Dunlop Flooring For over 45 years, Dunlop Flooring has led the Australian market in floor covering solutions. Dunlop Flooring’s high quality foam carpet underlays meet the demands of busy commercial environments and significantly enhance the performance of commercial carpets. They are fully compliant with AS 4288 – Soft Underlays for Textile Floor Coverings and are proudly Australian-made.

A high quality carpet underlay makes carpet feel denser and plusher underfoot and provide a comfortable seating surface for students or young children. Underlays provide a valuable support layer, instantly making carpet feel thicker and more luxurious. Carpet underlays tackle excessive noise in two ways: noise absorption and impact noise

Download whitepaper here: http://bit.ly/2DMz8eB

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The digital kitchen - how technology is changing the face and soul of hospitality words: Prue Miller

Atmosphere, ambience, character and charm all are qualities that each and every restaurant, bar, hotel lobby and coffee shop seeks to create.

“E

ach hospitality business has its own unique building and interior design that sets the right mood for patrons and communicates the overall brand,” explains Steve Hughes, manager for Mood Media Australia. “Whether we aware of it or not each of our five senses are engaged when we walk into a venue, none more so than in the world of hospitality. Businesses are more aware of this than ever and are increasingly proactive in all of these areas.” There has been a noticeable increase in the use of digital screens appearing across the hospitality terrain. Giant glowing, LED and often 4K panels, (with controllable and programmable luminance) offering what is called atmospheric content - solutions and suggestions for the flesh and blood customer. Relax, socialise, imbibe, be welcome – and oh yes, the weather forecast is poor and the airport is experiencing hours of delay. The combination of up-to-the minute information, while having your digital brow de-furrowed is a service that does serve a purpose. It’s positive branding, hosted from a local network, or of course distilled from the omnipresent cloud. A more subtle visual cue is offered by lighting. Far more than utilitarian, lighting design offers an extra dimension to the dining experience.

Award winning designer Jan Flook, a graduate of the Florence Design Academy in Italy, is the man behind (or indeed under) the breathtaking Jackelope Hotel chandelier. Flook is a luminaire designer. A lighting designer takes a fixture and positions it just so. Flook designs the piece, constructs it and installs it much like an art installation. “It is highly collaborative,” says Flook who sympathises with the general dislike for LED lighting but speaks optimistically of the improvements, explaining that the new colour temperatures around the 2800k mark offer a flattering apricot kind of light. “It is soft on faces,” he adds. Soft it might be is but the hardware behind it is highly technical and is more often than not controlled sectionally by remote or hardwired systems such as Dali’s Rapid system. Flook’s work in Melbourne, the evocative Longsong Restaurant is a key component in the atmosphere aesthetic. A customer drawcard, the concept came to him almost immediately. While both evoking the beautiful tradition of letting loose paper lanterns into the heavens, here the many translucent fixtures produce that warm soft light, while also filling the architectural void with a heartwarming and beautiful sculpture in light.


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“Lighting adds a dimension to experience, it is hugely important,” says Flook, whose current range of projects promises amazing revelations later this year.

However the heart of any restaurant lies at its stomach – the kitchen itself, now boldly on display in most restaurants is also a source of automation and innovation.

So, the eyes are sorted – but what of the ears? There is perhaps a no more contentious issue in restaurant management and design than noise. In a recent survey by Zagat, a national restaurant review and ratings service in America, noise came in as the second greatest irritant, apparently even more annoying than bad food and high prices. There’s even an app launched, again in the states, called iHearu where patrons rate the ability to hear conversations in restaurants. It seems not everyone enjoys din with their dinner.

Executive chef Paul Rivkin has been a member of the Australian Culinary Federation since 1991 and has helped design countless commercial kitchens – and then worked rather brilliantly in them.

Actual sound baffling pads, whether underneath tables and chairs, on the ceiling, or present in the cosiness of upholstered banquettes are just some ways designers are meeting the challenge. However, not all noise is bad. “Businesses are wanting full control over their music programs, including the ability to customise them at any time,” says Ray Medhurst, head of Playlist Curation and brand music consultant for Mood Media. “Every hour in hospitality is different to the next. For example, some times of the day are more upbeat or energised, and other times you want to encourage longer or more formal atmospheric dining experiences.” The system is used across many large hospitality organisations, including the Hilton Hotel in Sydney where the music is controlled by managers within the hotel, who can pick from hundreds of carefully curated playlists for all its venues - the Glass Brasserie, The Marble Bar and Zeta Bar. The control is achieved wirelessly and according to Michael Knott, Food and Beverage manager at the hotel “It is easy to use and we have complete control.”

“Every half footstep adds time,” says Rivkin. Who has seen many changes take place in the hottest room in the house. “Solid fuel cooking, such as on a Parilla top sort of thing, using wood or charcoal has demanded some changes in kitchen design,” says Rivkin. Advances in exhaust systems range from water vapour exhaust hoods (which also aid in fire control), to air conditioning systems that don’t cool food on the pass, while still being strong enough to vent smoke away from grills and the dining room. On the cooler side, fridges and freezers can now be remotely monitored. A change in temperature can be addressed in minutes, sending an alert to Rivkin’s mobile phone, and reports and records generated and stored electronically for review the next day. Dishwashers, notoriously expensive in labour, water and chemical costs are also updating. Machines such as those created by Granuldisk fire 80,000 granules at pots and pans every second, and suggest they offer water savings of up to 90 percent. Lower staff costs, quicker turn around – and the machine will export a wash log data. The sustainability continues into waste systems. One such machine, branded Orca can devour one ton of food waste in a day, and within 24 hours bio chips and micro-organisms convert the material to environmentally safe water. This sort of ‘green cred’ counts in social media profiles.

Chef Danny Russolini of Russolini Consulting has many years of experience in diverse venues, all over the world with credits in such foodie bibles as Conde Nast Traveller, and the New York Times. His consultancy has helped create dining experiences from fine dining to some of them the best pub fare you could ever hope for. Involved in every aspect of hospitality, including kitchen and menu design, and even staff training, his services are highly sort after across the dining board, including what one might call, ‘feeding the masses.’ “Like any innovation, tech has its good or bad points. If a tweet or post tells thousands of people about my new dish, then great. But a picture will never convey the whole experience,” says Russolini. “And self-ordering on digital devices will never replace a sexy accent or a full description of a dish. A tablet can only tell you so much and won’t open the door for you on the way out,” he says. So maybe offering free Wi-Fi to customers is a good thing. And once those customers log in beacon technology could open up those very devices to send messages to its patrons. According to Mood Media, this can work in conjunction with the in-house sound system, and sends an inaudible ‘cue’ that is detected by the customer’s smart phone. A special cocktail on offer? A room discount? Perhaps in the not-too-distant future the menu and, as sure as night follows day, the bill will one day light up your iPhone screen. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Mood Media, moodmedia.com. au, Jan Flook Lighting janflooklighting.com, Russolini Consulting russolini.com, Granuldisk granuldisk.com


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PREVIOUS: Jan Flook Manhattan ABOVE: Jan Flook’s breathtaking Jackelope Hotel Chandelier continues to illuminate the industry on installation lighting. BELOW: Flook’s work in Melbourne, on the evocative Longsong Restaurant is a key component in the atmosphere aesthetic.

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new age MATERIALS FOR HIGH-TRAFFIC HOSPITALITY AREAS words: geraldine chua


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“A well-designed benchtop not only looks good, but feels good to touch and draws you in. It makes you feel warm and comfortable.”

W

hether you are in a hotel, restaurant or café, Marblo Group’s Rany Obaid’s remark rings true: Bench tops are one of the most utilised and visible features in hospitality design, and play a major role in contributing to the success of any business. As Obaidi puts it—“We all know the feeling when we approach a counter that is stained or unsightly.” A great bench top merges design with performance, functionality and reliability— a combination that is especially important in high-traffic areas such as reception counters, drink bars and even commercial kitchens. According to Jessica Almeida, marketing coordinator at Wilsonart Australia, such spaces require surfaces that outperform other products across a variety of factors. These include durability and resistance to scratches, as well as impact resistance, which addresses the structural impact of use—important for the edges of benchtops and tabletops. “Is [your material] going to work into the lifespan of your project?” Grace Simitzis, national sales manager at Cosentino, suggests designers ask before specifying a bench top product. Also high on the checklist is the ability of a chosen surface material to resist stains, spills and chemicals, its maintenance requirements and ease of cleaning. How the material feels and works in the practical nature of the space is also important, Simitzis adds. Can it withstand the design proposed? Is it conducive to curves, overhangs, cantilevering, exposed edges, or larger formats for minimal joins?

COMMON MATERIALS The most common bench top materials range from entry-level laminates and natural stones, to timber and solid surfaces. Those

manufactured for hospitality applications should meet the requirements listed earlier, in addition to low porosity levels and high fire—and often heat—resistance.

LAMINATE Considered to be one of the most cost-effective, stain-resistant materials, laminate is a popular choice for benchtop design in commercial and hospitality projects. However for heavier-duty applications, High Pressure Laminate (HPL), as opposed to Low Pressure Laminates (LPL), is recommended, says Almeida.

Another HPL example is Wilsonart’s AEON HPL benchtops. According to the company, AEON’s interior surface is “measurably clearer and stronger” than standard laminate because of its high intense technology, which outperforms traditional laminate on wear, scratch, scuff and mar resistance. “A new way of making high-pressure laminate results in finer and more accurately layered aluminium oxide particles sitting in the top layer of the material, protecting it when objects slide across the surface,” Wilsonart explains.

A phenolic resin-based product cured under high pressure and heat, HPLs have a dense core that contributes to their high impact resistance and surface durability. This makes them ideal for surface applications that need to support heavy loads.

Coming in several design options and textured finishes, AEON HPL benchtops are easy to work with during construction. Builders don’t have to worry about preventing scuffing in transit, on the job site, during fabrication and installation. These also help counteract moisturerelated issues in high-traffic interior areas.

One such product is Laminex’s Multipupose Compact Laminate—a thick, self-supporting panel designed to stand the test of time in the most demanding spaces. It is scratch and stain resistant, non-porous, and features antimicrobial and antifungal properties. It is also versatile, able be installed both horizontally and vertically.

However, there are some downsides to certain HPL surfaces. For one, the material may be more vulnerable to heat compared to other surface materials, which means it may not be ideal for certain applications, including commercial kitchens. Gloss and darker coloured laminates are also prone to easy marking over time.

SOLID SURFACES A great bench top merges design with performance, functionality and reliability—a combination that is especially important in high-traffic areas such as reception counters, drink bars and even commercial kitchens.

In the 1960s, the DuPont chemical company designed a new surface that looked like natural stone, but unlike stone, was non-porous and homogenous in color and material. They named it Corian. Today, Corian is one of the most popular solid surface materials on the market. It is a mineral-filled acrylic material with exceptional versatility—suitable for use in a variety of applications, from wall claddings and bathrooms to bars and reception desks. Thanks to its thermo-formability, it also enables creative freedom, allowing designers to “play with shapes and adapt the material to any space”.


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Its other key highlights include seamless joins, which has hygienic benefits as it makes bacteria growth less prominent, and allows for easier cleaning. It is also durable, non-porous, stain-resistant and scratch-resistant, and will not delaminate. Importantly, it is ‘repairable’ onsite. Marblo is another solid surface material on the market with similar properties. Designed to stand the test of time, Marblo combines superior stain and chemical resistance for a bacteriafree, clean and seamlessly jointed surface. A serious choice for high-traffic hospitality areas, solid surfaces tend to be more expensive than laminate, although most advocates will say it is a worthwhile long-term investment.

PREVIOUS: CDekton Bar Trilium Orix

ENGINEERED STONE

BOTTOM PAGE: Cosentino - Rafael Renzo

More popularly known as quartz, engineered stone has a similar aesthetic to natural stone products, but is not cut from pure marble or granite. It is instead made from quartz crystals formed by a resin binder. Like HPL and solid surfaces, engineered stone benchtops are durable, easy to clean, stainresistant and non-porous. It is also uniform in pattern, with less hue variations than most natural stone slabs. Furthermore, it has low maintenance requirements, with most products requiring only a wipe-down with a soft, damp cloth and pH neutral household liquid detergent. Caesarstone is one of the major engineered stone manufacturers in Australia, and offers several finishes fit for different design requirements. Rugged Concrete, for instance, has the authentic look of hand-poured concrete benchtops, accentuated by gradients

TOP LEFT PAGE & RIGHT PAGE: The versatlity of laminates. Pictures courtesy Cosentino


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of grey textural patterns, white haze patina and a rough matte surface finish. Smartstone Australia is another quartz manufacturer, offering surfaces that feature a luminous, three-dimensional natural vein. Silestone, another compound made predominantly of natural quartz, shares the same benefits as Caesarstone and Smartstone. Offered by Cosentino, it is a non-porous surface that’s highly resistant, and available in four different tones, three styles and four finishes. These include suede—a textured surface that offers a uniquely soft touch and effect—as well as their newest finish, volcano—a soft, rustic texture that’s suited to a more rugged aesthetic. However, one of the main disadvantages of engineered stone is its low resistance to ultraviolet radiation—in the presence of UV rays, its colours are prone to fading.

ULTRA COMPACT SURFACES Ultra compact surfaces, pioneered by Cosentino’s Dekton, are a relatively new type of benchtop material that is a blend of the raw materials in glass, porcelain and quartz. The material employs Sinterised Particle Technology to boost its durability and scratch resistance.

tech process which presents an accelerated version of the metamorphic change that natural stone undergoes when subjected to high temperatures and pressure over thousands of years,” Dekton notes. “Electronic microscopy allows us to fully appreciate the material’s zero porosity, a consequence of the sinterization and ultra-compaction process exclusive to Dekton. This zero porosity and lack of the micro-defects that cause tension or weak spots mark the difference as far as Dekton is concerned.” Resistant to abrasion, ice and thawing, and almost completely stain-proof, Dekton is over five times the flexural strength of granite. This means it can be installed in thinner forms over greater spans, allowing for up to a 12-inch unsupported overhang on benchtops, islands and bar tops. With high UV resistance, it is suitable for both indoor and outdoor applications, the company says. n

SUPPLIERS & CONTRACTORS: Marblo Groupmarblo.com. au, Cosentino cosentino.com, Wilsonart wilsonart. com, Corian casf.com.au, Caesarstone Australia caesarstone.com.au, Silestone silestoneoceania.com,

“Sinterised Particle Technology is a high

Smartsone smartstone.com.au, Dekton dekton.com.au


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FLOORS & FLOORING

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LIGHTING & LIGHTING ACCESSORIES

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new Linear tiLe insert drainage system stormtech introduced australia to linear drainage for bathrooms in the early 1990s and has since then provided efficient architectural drainage solutions. a favourite product for architects and designers is the tile insert drain: developed to make the drain disappear, the ti series incorporates tile or solid surface material within the grate frame, ideal for use of large format tiles or a stone slab. the tile insert drain is available in 65mm and 100mm wide and for different tile thicknesses allowing it to be used for different building situations. the latest addition to the tile insert drain range is the shallowest tile insert drain on the market. with an overall depth of only 23mm, the 100tii20 it is an ideal product for projects involving a redevelopment of existing structures that can have concrete slabs with flaws and cracks or where new floor zones need to be put in. stormtech’s use of grade 316 marine grade stainless steel illustrates its dedication to a higher quality of material. stormtech offers global greentag™ certification to help with greenstar credits and works with regulators, legislators, end users, trades and distributors to develop problem-solving products contact stormtech +61 2 4423 1989 stormtech.com.au

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Building with Brick at height has never Been easier corium from Pgh Bricks & Pavers is a break through brick look, ventilated rainscreen façade system that combines the natural beauty of real brick, with cost effective, fast track installation of ‘system’ based cladding. It offers a genuine brick finish for projects where a lightweight cladding system is required. the look of brick can now be used to stunning effect in the design of mid to high-rise buildings, new construction and re-cladding projects through this unique cladding system. The CORIUM system comprises brick tiles manufactured to fix mechanically to a galvanised steel backing section. These profiled lengths are mounted in horizontal rows onto a vertical support system and the brick tiles are then clipped in place. The mechanical ‘clipping’ feature is unique to corium and ensures a strong, durable façade that enables adjustment of brick tile position during installation. corium brick tiles can be mounted at any angle to achieve truly dynamic finishes – even overhead for soffits and ceilings. Decorative and textural patterns, as well as mosaic, are easily created to add that extra dimension to project design. And with the large and exciting range of colours and textures available, there is no limit to what can be done. corium. Brick evolved. contact corium 1300 267 486 corium.pghbricks.com.au

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eVer art Wood ® eXPress PaneLs Where beauty and performance merge. covet’s Japanese made aluminium express panel cladding raises the bar in natural-look timber alternatives. With excellent weather resistance, the ever art series lends itself to spaces that pose environmental challenges for real wood. • range of photorealistic colours & textures • Variety of profile widths & flexibility to form flat or curved surfaces • matching wood look detailing, flashings & cappings • Performs well when tested to as/nZ 1530.3 (spread of flame / index 0) and as/nZ 3837-1998 (result / group 1) • no ongoing treatment or intensive maintenance • suitable for external and internal applications contact covet 61 3 9398 8128 covet.com.au

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PROMATECT 100 – SLIMLINE WALL AND CEILING SYSTEMS PROMATECT®100 is a new generation of calcium silicate board based on our patented PROMAXON® technology. PROMAXON® is a synthetic hydrated engineered mineral in a spherical form. The spheres form a linking network in the boards chemical makeup which is a key factor in the boards cohesion and stability in fire conditions. The end result is a board with significantly better fire insulation properties than a traditional calcium silicate or gypsum based boards. This technology allows the PROMATECT®100 board to be able to reduce the physical footprint of a fire rated wall or ceiling without compromising on performance. For wall systems with Fire Resistance Levels of up to 120/120/120 the system consists of a single layer of board on either side of standard stud frame system. This translates to an over 10% reduction in the wall foot print compared to an equivalent fire rated plasterboard system. It also has a 50% saving in installation time and cost as only a single layer is required on each side. The system has a smooth finish which most common architectural finishes can be applied to. With a standard stud and track system heights up to 8.5m can be achieved and with an alternate framing system the height can increase to 15m. The system is also available for 1hr and 4hr FRL’s using board thicknesses of 15mm and 40mm (2 x20mm) respectively. The system also has a full range of acoustic testing. For ceiling systems, a single layer above and below a ceiling purlin can achieve an FRL of up -/120/120 for fire protection from both above and below. Four-hour ceiling systems are also available using 2 layers of PROMATECT 100 either side of the steel framing for fire protection from above and below. A further innovation for the PROMATECT 100 is the ability to line the underside of a timber or steel framed timber floor system to achieve ratings of up 120/120/120 for fire from below. Contact Promat 1800 PROMAT (776 628) promat.com.au

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Bigger and Better – Weathergroove architectural Panels By Weathertex Weathertex, the local hunter company that makes natural australian hardwood cladding, panels and weatherboards, is continuously striving to improve their product offering for a market that is turning to timber more and more due to the materials aesthetics, flexibility, and ability to be sustainable and carbon neutral. their popular Weathergroove panelling range comes in some of the largest available sizes in australia (3660x1196mm) which means that the vertically grooved panel makes installation on large buildings much quicker than traditional cladding. the exclusive joining system has been designed to clip onto the rebated edges of each panel, blending in perfectly with each Weathergroove sheet for a continuous panel finish. Weathertex has just superseded their current Pvc Weathergroove joiners with a stronger and more durable aluminium version. these joiners can be used with the Weathergroove natural range, which means this range can now be joined off-stud. this is a huge innovation because it means not only easier installation but less wastage. available in the three current Weathergroove Panel sizes, they are maintenance free without the need for silicon. the joiners can be left as is (silver), powder coated or painted, allowing for a wide spectrum of different design aesthetics. Weathertex 1800 040 080 weathertex.com

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is it time You got a LittLe more education? When it comes to providing specialist bathroom and kitchen equipment for people with a disability, the only name to remember is PressaLit. With the increasing requirement to install adult change tables in public buildings along with height adjustable benchtops for schools, you can be assured we have a wide range of solutions to match your need. having over 17 years’ worth of experience in the australian market, we can advise you quickly and confidently on what the appropriate design outcome should take into account. contact Pressalit 0415 425 461 au.pressalit.com

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altro release a new range of front of house Products... it’s time to rediscover altro! finally, a total project solution for technically superior, highly durable and customisable wall and flooring products. in response to market demands, altro releases a new range of price competitive front of house wall and flooring products. combined with their renowned back of house products, altro now offers technically superior, highly durable and customisable wall and flooring products for a total project solution. altro operetta™ a robust floor perfect for medium to high traffic areas, operetta coordinates with the altro back of house range to create a seamless look throughout. altro orchestra™ for areas where comfort and sound reduction are important, 2.85mm altro orchestra has been engineered to create the ideal environment to learn and live. altro serenade™ silence is golden. whether softening the sounds of little feet or maximising privacy at work or leisure, acoustic altro serenade is more than up to the task. trusted out the BacK, admired out the front. the three ranges draw from the same colour palette so you can create the right atmosphere for each room. for environments that need to promote wellbeing, altro floors and walls can be used to create a biophillic design – using shades and images found in nature. this helps create a sense of calm and studies have shown it can speed up the recovery process. contact altro 1800 673 441 www.rediscoveraltro.com.au

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innoceil - the comPosite timber ceiling solution with high acoustic Performance for many years innowood has been at the forefront in the innovation of sustainable comPosite timber solutions. innoceil ceilings solutions are one of the industry’s most highly recommended and specified products by many architects, designers and home owners for both indoor and outdoor applications. enhancing and adding to the natural appearance of commercial or residential buildings by not only offering the closest natural timber appearance but also touch and feel. innoceil also offers high acoustic performance by providing spatial noise reduction though sound absorption and sound transmission reduction. innowood prides itself on producing high fire-rated and tested material which self-extinguishes without aiding further combustion. innoceil is locally tested to the most relevant australian standards for fire rating and upon request and requirement can be formulated to achieve as1530.3 and can achieve up to a group 1 rating (asnZs 3837 – specification a2.4 of bca) or up to bal- 29 rating (as3959:2009 – construction of building in bushfire Prone areas, appendix f). “with continuous product improvement and innovation we ensure our clients have access to a wide range of profiles and colours to precisely match their design intent, such as the latest Premium range innoceil shiPlaP fiXing the cl26423 & cl21923” contact innowood 1300 787 717 innowood.com

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arcPaneL, the neW name For riteK rooF sYstems the custom PaneL – tried & tested the arcPaneL custom Panel combines a coLorBond® corrugated profile roof sheet with a coLorBond® corrugated profile ceiling sheet bonded either side of varying thickness of a polystyrene (ePs) core. the arcPaneL custom Panel is ideal for use in residential & commercial applications; education; community; sports and recreation; entertainment; defence; train stations and infrastructure amongst many others. 12.5m spans, 4.5m cantilevers, panel lengths up to 24m, and thermal values of r6.5 are easily achieved. add to this the availability of straight, curved, multi-curved, bull-nose, and elliptical configurations, the arcPaneL custom Panel is a tried & tested industry performer. arcPaneL – offering high performance architectural insulated panel systems today for the energy efficiency and sustainability demands of tomorrow. Benefit from our industry leading panel spans and cantilever performance, with peace of mind through full tested and ncc/Bca codemark certified systems. talk to our arcPaneL team today contact arcPaneL 1300 200 004 arcpanel.com.au

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decor stone introduces their new and unique dry stone modular system to australia there’s nothing quite like the unique beauty of a dry stone wall in your home or fireplace. around the world, the beauty and longevity of natural stone have made it a favourite of generations of designers and home renovators alike. in spite of this, achieving elegant stone wall construction is often a complex, arduous task. however, this no longer need be the case. decor stone dry stone Panels™ significantly reduce the labour and cost requirements of laying individual stones, and remove the hassle of finding a qualified stonemason or tradesperson capable of traditional stone wall construction. the easy to install modular profiles combine contemporary ease of installation with the classic beauty and romance of natural stone. individually rounded edges on each stone create a realistic natural look, while pre-cut and sized panels make construction a breeze. an extension of decor stone’s successful ledge stone range, decor stone dry stone Panels™ are perfect for those seeking a country charm look, an organic textured façade, or a unique feature wall that sets their home well and truly apart. available in three colours, decor stone dry stone Panels™ can be specified to suit projects of any style. contact decor stone 03 9888 9888 decorstone.com.au

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the carPet that imProVes acoustic carpet can contribute to improving the acoustics in many environments, such as offices, schools and aged care. desso soundmaster performs even better against all acoustic measures. carpet in general reduces the impact of sound by between 20 and 30 decibel. desso soundmaster offers an impact sound insulation value up to 10 dB above the standard value, thereby setting a new industry standard in carpet performance.

safe and innovative access solutions gorter hatches proudly supply safe and innovative access solutions to commercial and residential customers in australia, new Zealand, singapore and dubai. We offer a wide range of products and services suitable for builders, architects and consumers alike. We also specialise in customising our products to match your unique safe access needs. our products:

desso soundmaster achieves an improvement in sound absorption performance up to +0.15 (ɑw), equivalent to up to +100% improvement in comparison to standard carpet designs (ɑw value between 0.15 and 0.20).

We are the leader in safe access solutions. our products are rigorously tested, elegantly designed, and available for fast delivery within all serviceable regions.

through these two improvements desso soundmaster also positively influences the signal-to-noise ratio and the reverberation effect by lowering the background noise.

We want to transform your vision into reality - we custom-make any access product, and have experience in large-scale as well as smaller building and design projects.

contact tarkett 1300 851 484 tarkospec.com.au

contact gorter hatches +61 2 8580 4436 gorterhatches.com.au

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aramaX FreesPan structural cladding system Brought to you by Fielders, aramaX Freespan roofing and walling is unlike any other. Bringing together new ideas that work, armaX is at the head of innovation. aramaX Freespan is bigger, bolder, and can go deeper than conventional roofing and walling profiles, allowing for huge roofing spans of up to 20 metres with no purlins or grits. this eliminates the cost and complexity of secondary structures, saving money without compromising on performance. a visually stunning and structural component with multiple cover widths available, aramaX Freespan can accommodate your unique project requirements by tapering the sheeting along its length to produce spectacular curves and designs.

a touch of luxury – side made in italy since 1982, the side range of architecturally designed external and internal luminaires are an integral piece in the gerard lighting product portfolio. a distinguished and established leader in the professional architectural lighting space, side products offer a contemporary solution to professional designers and specifiers.

specialist engineering assistance is available for design of aramaX Freespan structures.

With its sleek homogenous design, the new family of side Quadrat location and wall lights provide the perfect balance of aesthetics and lighting performance, and are now available in four styled finishes: black, chrome, white and deep brown, each ensuring a complimentary lighting solution to any architectural project.

contact Fielders 1800 182 255 fielders.com.au

contact gerard lighting 1300 799 300 specify.gerardlighting.com.au

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SPECIFY Decorative acoustic wall coverings from Woven Image

SolaMaster series

Mura represents the evolution of the Woven Image ® acoustic wallcoverings family, combining environmental thinking with the concept of traditional wall-covering.

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DN8000 multi-point lock system The DN8000 Multi-Point Lock System is a new award winning multi-point Euro groove locking system.

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The Solatube SolaMaster Series uses advanced optical technologies to balance illumination intensity, consistency, and thermal performance while reducing system costs and maintenance.

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Optimise natural light with the new 3M™ Daylight Redirecting Film 3M’s daylighting solution makes use of the natural light whilst mitigating the burdens of solar heat gain, glare and fading of interiors.

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H.M. Cowdroy window and door seal range

CAPRI handleless profiles

H.M. Cowdroy offers an extensive Window and Door Seal range to help minimise and eliminate problems such as light, sound, dust, draughts, wind, rain, insects and rodents.

Introducing new European inspired finishes in your favourite Stefano Orlati handle styles, including a bright polished copper, a brushed antique copper and antique iron from Titus Tekform.

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Constructed of 100% solution-dyed nylon, the Vila Rica plank collection offers premium soil-repellence, stain protectors and is backed with EcoSoft.

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Easycraft Expression Series

Vila Rica plank carpet tile collection by Carpets Inter

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Easycraft have developed a new range of decorative finishes which provide the latest in contemporary styling, offering stunning and versatile aesthetics for any project.

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SPECIFY RUBBER FLOORING Create timeless harmony with norament ® 926 arago rubber flooring. Ideal for busy public spaces, such as hallways and entryways, norament ® 926 arago balances durable materials with timeless beauty.

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Structural laminated curved glass This engineered glass solution incorporating a structural interlayer allows a seamless, virtually invisible balustrade without compromising safety, function or performance.

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LINAK DESKLINE sit and stand desks, an ergonomic solution for a modern office DESKLINE lead the industry in easy to operate, tailored to the user, ergonomic custom and comfort built desks and workstations.

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ARBS 2018: Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and Building Services Trade Exhibition ARBS, Australia’s only international air conditioning, refrigeration and building services trade exhibition will open in Sydney at the International Convention Centre (ICC) on 8 May 2018.

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Corian ® Sparkling Sink collection Corian® Sparkling Kitchen Sinks combine the beauty of Corian® with durable stainless steel which resists heat, is easy to clean, hygienic and can be integrated into a matching Corian® benchtop.

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Architectural sealing solutions for sound, fire, smoke & energy containment from Kilargo Kilargo’s innovative products are designed to contain the spread of fire, smoke and sound, with many also providing weather protection and energy savings.

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Bedarra Bi-Fold Door Created to withstand the harsh Australian elements while providing an uninterrupted view, the Wintec Bedarra Bi-fold Door offers stylish design without the sacrifice of durability.

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Armstrong’s TrioGuard powder coating Trioguard™ is a new powder-coat finish that is factory applied on select Armstrong MetalWorks products, formulated to resist the build-up of dust to keep them looking bright and clean for longer.

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SPECIFY Venetian Plaster Collection

Altro Whiterock Digiclad

The Venetian Plaster Collection blends traditional artisan craftsmanship with contemporary style to deliver truly distinctive and unique finishes suitable for both residential and commercial settings.

Altro Whiterock Digiclad™ is created by reproducing vector graphics or highresolution images onto Altro Whiterock. Ideal in high traffic environments, it is scratch resistant and easy to clean.

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COLORBOND ® steel launches Matt collection in five colours COLORBOND ® steel, Australia’s favourite steel building material for over 50 years, introduces an elegant matt finish to complement the latest building design trends.

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MiTek Studlok MiTek’s NEW StudLoks provide a fast and easy way of fixing wall plates to studs. They come in two sizes to accommodate single or double wall plates.

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Facade series commercial shutters For a long-lasting façade solution that improves commercial buildings energy efficiency, Shutterflex offer the façade series commercial shutters.

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Hot water heating pumps: harvest the energy in the air to create energyefficient hot water Stiebel Eltron develop heat pump technology for energy efficient hot water. Tried and tested in Germany for over 40 years to ensure real energy and money savings whilst being environmentally friendly.

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Stacked Stone natural stone in 14 colours with preformed corners available to match Beautiful natural stone panels in a wide range of 14 colours with matching preformed corners, offering a distinct style to accent walls or clad pillars for both exterior and interior applications.

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Arens electric window chain winders and linear actuators Arens range of electric window controls is an effective and efficient way of providing passive or natural ventilation in buildings.

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SPECIFY Billi Quadra: Premium instant filtered boiling and chilled drinking water systems Leading the Billi range, the Quadra boiling and chilled drinking water systems are environmentally sensitive, space saving, efficient & elegant.a

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MetecnoKasset ® : The revolutionary new insulated façade system MetecnoKasset® is an easy to install and more affordable insulated system that can be used as a curtain wall system, offering a range of improved thermal properties.

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DayRay - flexible day lighting

EzyJamb Single Rebate

DayRay™ harvests daylight by the conversion of solar energy via a Solar Panel. This new green technology is known as a Hybrid Solar Lighting Device or HSLD.

Give your project a clean-cut edge with EzyJamb ® Single Rebate - SRC. This trimless door jamb system allows for a seamless finish that defines a new standard in modern interiors.

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SIGA - Building envelope airtightness weathertight system

URIDAN ADMIRAL LAUNCHED WITH ‘NEXT GENERATION’ WATERLESS URINAL TECHNOLOGY

Zero Emissions Planet produces passive house and high-performance building products. The SIGA System consists of highly advanced vapour diffusible airtightness membrane structure wraps and tapes.

The NEW Uridan Admiral features Uridan’s innovative NEW waste trap design, providing simplicity, improved functionality and further operating cost savings.

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RIGID RAIL SYSTEMS BY SAYFA GROUP (OH250) The Raptor™ Rigid Rail System can be used for either fall arrest or rope access applications. It may be operated by multiple workers, providing effective fall arrest and rope access protection for facade access and elevated work environments for maintenance and cleaning processes.

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pULL-DOWN ACCESS LADDERS BY AM-BOSS ACCESS LADDERS The range of Pull-down Access Ladders by AM-BOSS Access Ladders feature a spring assisted counter-balance mechanism allowing for safe, quick and easy operation.

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MELBOURNE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE 2–4 May 2018

DesignBUILD 2018: 12,036sqm Exhibition Space | 22hrs to Network | 300+ Brands | 7,000+ Professionals

IT’S ALL IN THE DETAIL Whether it’s being exposed to the latest construction innovations, keeping up to date with architectural trends, or connecting with the rest of the industry… DesignBUILD has every detail covered.

ARCHITECTURE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DESIGN

Register at designbuildexpo.com.au #DB2018

Supported by:


WOODMATT

Pre-finished Board. High Pressure Laminate. Decorative Battens.

Available in 14 stunning new colours, WOODMATT is a next generation product innovation from polytec achieved through advanced print quality, improved surface finish - and tweaking natural timbers with more contemporary tones. Combining the best of natural timber with technology advancements, the matt finished subtle woodgrain embossing – is designed to match perceptions of

AFS/01-31-145

authentic timber veneer – in look, feel and warmth. www.polytec.com.au

p 1300 300 547


Get close to greatness. Join us. Who will be your 2018 INDE. winners? Find out at the INDE.Awards gala in Singapore (live streaming in Australia) on 22 June. Reserve your seat now! Meet the future of A+D in our region. indeawards.com

Platinum Partner

Gold Partner

Trophy Partner

Industry Partner

Launch Pad Partners Principal Partner

Founding Partner

Category Partners

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Our Wall & Ceiling Products

Job Well Done USGBoral.com © 2018 USG BORAL. All rights reserved. The trademarks USG BORAL and INNOVATION INSPIRED BY YOU are trademarks of USG Boral Building Products or one or more of its affiliates.

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