University of the Western Cape - Edition 2

Page 1

edition 2: december 2020

Celebrating UWC’s Women in

Academia& Leadership


2020:

Lessons learned for the future “It gives me great pleasure to release the second edition of our digimag, focusing on excellent women in academia and in leadership. This initiative is part of our Reward and Recognition approach at UWC. In this edition, we share the journeys of top achievers, rising stars and women leaders at UWC. We showcase their achievements, the challenges that they may have experienced in 2020, and their future aspirations. Thank you to all the women who shared your inspiring journeys with us. I hope that other women will gain insight and be empowered through your sharing. UWC has many excellent female academics and women in leadership, giving ample scope for future editions of our digimag!� Professor Vivienne Lawack Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Academic


Faculty of Arts

Doctor Amiena Peck

Dr Peck believes in the power of emotional intelligence coaching and practising empathy

Embrace technology, increase empathy, set firm goals and give yourself a million second chances to get things right

DR Amiena Peck has been working at UWC for over a decade, specialising in communication, soft skills development and, more recently, emotional intelligence. “During the lockdown, I discovered that I am deeply and innately extroverted and this is most likely why being a linguistics lecturer is a perfect fit for me. I have always loved presenting and engaging with students, colleagues and clients alike and to ensure that I kept in contact with people I became quite au fait with Zoom workshops and Instagram Live.” Her extroverted nature and need for human contact drove Dr Peck to become creative about how she communicates in this year, and these are skills she plans to keep using in the digital communication space, as she has found them to be quite fulfilling. Her PhD focused on post-apartheid living and the reimagining of diversity, and during the past five years, she has successfully supervised five Master’s theses and one PhD while co-ordinating the first-year programme for the past seven years. “Interestingly enough, the concept of communication and specifically how we communicate is in a constant state of flux. In the past, ‘Mixit’ language was frowned upon a few years ago, however, it was nevertheless an important form of communication. Today, memes and emojis are a powerful way of communicating. It teaches us that what we deem as language and communication is dynamic and ever-changing. “During the lockdown, I was driven by the desire to interact meaningfully with my students. That meant changing modes for learning and teaching, that is more podcasts, videos, images, group meetings and mobile chat groups. Personally, I believe that the more modes we construe as communication, the more people we can reach – and that is a beautiful thing.” Her final advice as she looks to the new year: “Embrace technology, increase empathy, set firm goals and give yourself a million second chances to get things right. This life is surely what we make of it and what we make of it happens firstly – and most critically – in the heart.”


Professor Diana Gibson

Faculty of Arts

Professor Diana Gibson is seeing a shift in the way her department works Professor Gibson is a Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UWC. She specialises in medical anthropology and is currently focusing on the interfaces between science, biomedicine, herbal medicine, botany, traditional healing and local ways of knowing, as these engage with medicinal plants. But that diversity of interests and knowledge didn’t extend to technology before the pandemic hit. “During the lockdown, I had to quickly become adept at using multiple e-learning tools, social media and multi-modal platforms for asynchronous teaching and learning. Inevitably I was confronted by the reality that not all students have equal access to computers, internet, data or spaces for learning and studying.” She has done extensive and wide-ranging research and has published in national and international journals and books on inter alia medicinal plants and their practices, hospital ethnography, transformation for the South African health care system, ex-combatants’ experiences of war and trauma, youth and genderbased violence and sexuality, masculinity, as well as the social uses of literacy and numeracy. When faced what she thought was going to change permanently in her field in the wake of the pandemic, Prof Gibson suggested that: “Doing and writing ethnography are arguably hallmarks of anthropology, and one of the biggest challenges in the time of Covid has been the necessity to suspend the timeconsuming, immersive fieldwork process of observation, participation and analysis related to the everyday worlds of study participants. Although social media and virtual tools are useful, anthropology will have to reconceptualise research, rethink a variety of innovative methodological tools and ponder anew on research ethics.” The one thing she has noticed is how her department has started a process of completely overhauling the anthropology curriculum, revising its content and working to further develop innovative, flexible pedagogies for blended teaching, learning, assessments, and interaction at undergraduate and postgraduate level. She is also very conscious of the fact that “postgraduate students will have to completely reconceive their research questions and methods in the foreseeable future.”

Although social media and virtual tools are useful, anthropology will have to reconceptualise research, rethink a variety of innovative methodological tools and ponder anew on research ethics


Faculty of Community & Health sciences

Professor Nicolette Roman

Professor Roman’s focus on parent-child relationships has been more vital than ever during the pandemic

Continue to adapt to change, and learn to live in the new normal with a focus on flourishing in survival mode, while at the same time appreciating the opportunity of time

In 2020, Professor Roman’s work feels more important than ever. As the SARChI Chair in Human Capabilities, Social Cohesion and the Family at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Studies of Children, Families and Society, she has a unique insight into the challenges that have come from a lockdown and social distancing. With the necessary isolation that was implemented everywhere, the family unit has played such an important role in all of our lives this year. Prof Roman’s focus on parent/child relationships is illuminating. “Change is never comfortable,” she says, “but it is within the discomfort that we find our strength. The lockdown period, while it did create discomfort, also provided comfort in the form of the people we know best… our families. It provided the comfort of time and the space to acquire and apply new skills in new ways, and that’s valuable.” She has a PhD in psychology and is highly rated as an established researcher. She registered as a psychometrist and in 2015, Prof Roman achieved the Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumni Award in Health Sciences as well as the Dean’s Research Excellence Merit Award in the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences. Three years later, she was awarded the Academic Achievers Award for an Established Researcher in the Faculty of Community and Health Sciences and, this year, she was named the Best Established Researcher at UWC for 2019. Prof Roman’s research focuses on the parent-child relationship, strengthening capable families in order to reduce the transference of capability deprivation to children and enhance social cohesion. “I don’t think we know what lies ahead and so much of 2021 will be much of the same. So I think that this is what we should prepare for – to continue to adapt to change, and learn to live in the new normal with a focus on flourishing in survival mode, while at the same time appreciating the opportunity of time.”


Faculty of Community & Health sciences

Doctor Emma Mckinney

Beliefs and attitudes towards disability shape how people with disabilities access education, employment and healthcare Dr McKinney began her teaching career as a special needs teacher, having taught learners who are deaf via sign language, as well as those with other learning disabilities. That experience had a profound impact on her love for education and her passion to bring about change for learners with disabilities. After completing specialised teaching postgraduate studies and teaching full-time, Dr McKinney completed her PhD through UCT’s GSB, examining the employment experiences of people with disabilities in South Africa. She was then awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the psychology department at Stellenbosch University, where she continued her research into students with disabilities in higher education. She also has a strong international profile and has conducted research and training across South Africa and in Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Ethiopia and Tanzania for a number of international organisations, including UNICEF, the United Nations and the World Bank. She is currently completing research on Covid-19 and people with disabilities for the United Nations and the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities. As a person who is hearing impaired, she is able to straddle the words of the deaf and the hearing, and provide valuable insight in that regard. Being married to her husband, who has quadriplegia and is paralysed from the shoulders down, and having two sons with Tourette’s Syndrome, the pandemic and lockdown has had a significant impact on her life. “When it comes to Covid-19, we have had to be extra cautious, as my husband is unable to cough and the virus would be deadly. We have had to homeschool our young children for more than seven months; and balancing work, research and household chores has been challenging. “We have to keep strong and focus on keeping safe and alive. We have had to make significant changes to personal care, moving from changing shifts every five days to every five weeks, and having to pay R1 700 for Covid testing each shift, which has been challenging. I also fear contracting the virus and being isolated in the hospital being unable to lip-read the healthcare workers due to compulsory maskwearing.” She is passionate about creating awareness around disability and improving the educational and employment opportunities for people with disabilities, as well as access to healthcare. She firmly believes that our attitudes and beliefs toward disability shape how we treat, integrate and accommodate people with disabilities in all spheres of society and that it is our responsibility to bring about change.

We have to keep strong and focus on keeping safe and alive. We have had to make significant changes to personal care


Faculty of dentistry

professor nadia mohamed

Professor Nadia Mohamed: Broadening her horizons through the use of technology

Technology has broadened my horizons and made the world a lot smaller, making it easier to engage with professionals from all over the world

Professor Mohamed currently occupies a full-time post in the Department of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry at UWC’s School of Oral Health. She was appointed as Head of Department of Paediatric Dentistry in March 2012, and has been an integral part of the department for the past 20 years. Her duties include administration and organisation of the Department of Paediatric Dentistry, undergraduate lectures, clinical training and assessment, as well as postgraduate co-ordination of the MSc programme, clinical training, assessment and supervision and much more. The focus of her work is on subjects such as early childhood development, special care dentistry and sports-related injuries, and she is an active member of a great many UWC committees. “I have always considered myself to be rather technologically challenged, but the Covid-19 crisis has challenged me in this regard. I have been forced to abandon my comfort zone where technology is concerned and embrace online assessments, meetings, workshops and virtual conferences. It was a steep learning curve, but now that I have taken the plunge, there are definite aspects of this experience that I will keep, even post-Covid.” She is currently busy on a number of projects including a chapter in the ‘Child in Africa’ book, and a paper on ‘Stimulating critical thinking in postgraduate dental students in Paediatric Dentistry’. “Technology has broadened my horizons and made the world a lot smaller, making it easier to engage with professionals from all over the world, share ideas with people with similar interests and challenges, and keep in touch with my postgraduate students overseas who were still able to complete the didactic component of their course through seminars via Skype. “The new skills I have acquired will only enhance my teaching practices going forward, as it can be used as an adjunct to traditional teaching methods. Examples of this include the WhatsApp tutorials which were used to supplement the voice-over lectures placed on iKamva and the use of Skype to engage with postgraduate students who are out of the country.”


Doctor tineke van zyl

Faculty of dentistry

Dr Tineke van Zyl believes in the power of planning and social interaction to enhance learning Dr Tineke van Zyl is the acting HOD in the Department of Diagnostics and Radiology at UWC, where she has built an extensive teaching portfolio. Her passion is in the creation, implementation and co-ordination of lifelong learning programs, and the development of personalised strategies that propel learning in higher education. “My teaching philosophy is to enhance the knowledge of each student and track their progress on how that develops as a result of the social interactions they have shared, rather than as individuals. That kind of hard-earned knowledge they are getting is the result of many social processes and interactions. Being really engaged, and not just merely observing the world, brings far more meaning to the process of learning.” That way of thinking was very helpful to Dr van Zyl personally when she, like all of us, was forced to come up with new ways of doing things in 2020. “The challenges I faced during this time have taught me to handle each situation with more flexibility and adaptability and to ‘pivot’ quickly when necessary.” As the Acting Head of Department and Module Co-ordinator in the Department of Diagnostics and Radiology for undergraduate and postgraduate students, her duties include organising, planning and implementing preclinical and clinical courses for each year group, as well as assessing and evaluating both students and staff to see if they need additional support and intervention. “I feel like I have explored and reconnected with my creative side by becoming much more tech-savvy. In designing innovative ideas and solutions to provide better education, and not being afraid to fail in anything, I see myself as a lifelong learner and will always strive to get better and better. I learned to be organised and to adapt to different environments, as well as to develop good problem-solving skills.” She is currently developing and compiling all the modules of the Department of Diagnostics and Radiology into interactive study guides with the support of Dr Lundie. “My suggestion for how to plan for 2021 is to formulate a strategic plan you think will help to be successful, but be flexible around it. Don’t get caught off guard by any challenge that faces you. Being level headed minimises stressful situations, anxiety and fear.”

My teaching philosophy is to enhance the knowledge of each student and track their progress on how that develops


Faculty of education

Professor Mokgadi Moletsane

Professor Moletsane’s understanding of the education landscape makes her a vital part of 2020 UWC team

Be conscious of your purpose and use your attributes to give your best all of the time.

As an expert in education and career advancement, Professor Mokgadi Moletsane has seen up close the frightening toll that Covid-19 is taking on educational outcomes for vulnerable learners. “As I dealt with many students that are affected by this pandemic, I had to be the students’ counsellor and mentor. I am not only playing the role of a lecturer or teacher, but providing emotional and learning support as well. I have telephonic conversations regularly with parents who are concerned about their children’s inability to study effectively due to lack of resources such as laptops and internet access.” Prof Moletsane’s love for the transformative power of education began all the way back in 1986, when she studied the French language at L’Universite de Clermont Ferrand in France before returning to teach basic French in Mamelodi to SOS orphan children and others from disadvantaged backgrounds, in collaboration with the French Embassy in Pretoria. She obtained her PhD in Educational Psychology at the University of Pretoria in 2004, having completed a Master’s 12 years earlier. During those interim years, “I had an opportunity of being a visiting scholar at Stanford University in San Francisco (USA) from 2001 to 2002. I was based in the Department of Psychology, where I took part in the postgraduate research seminars, presented lessons and participated in community projects,” she says. She was in private practice as an educational psychologist in Pretoria from 1996 to 2010 before joining UWC and working her way up from PGCE co-ordinator to associate professor. In addition to her teaching schedule, Prof Moletsane is qualified to conduct psychological assessments, therapeutic and counselling intervention. “Career assessment and counselling is also part of my training. I really enjoy assessing university students, school learners and adults and guiding them towards suitable career paths.” In 2020, she was an integral part of an important study that focused on the use of English as the language of learning and teaching (LoLT) for isiXhosa-speaking Foundation Phase learners in a historically disadvantaged school in the Western Cape and the many barriers to learning that children in South African experience. Reflecting on 2020, she says: “My profession will change forever due to the pandemic. Lockdown has created an opportunity to create new skills as well as opportunities to implement the existing skills that were not utilised.”


Faculty of education

D o c t o r Lu c i n d a Du P l o o y

Dr Du Plooy learned at an early age that her history must not determine her destiny “Before the national lockdown, I was not a stranger to online teaching,” explains Dr Lucinda Du Plooy, the Foundation Phase programme co-ordinator in the Faculty of Education. “In fact, I had designed online and interactive lessons for most of my courses after attending the staff development training sessions offered by the Centre for Innovative Education and Communication Technologies (CIECT). So the move to full online teaching in early 2020 allowed me to think creatively and innovatively about teaching, learning and assessment.” Being a senior lecturer at UWC and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Porto, Portugal would have seemed like a fairytale for Dr du Plooy when she was a little girl growing up in the ‘coloured’ area of Manenberg. “It was notorious for gangsterism and other social ills, yet I understood that my history would never determine my destiny. My parents were firm believers in the power of education. My mother was an avid reader and encouraged us to read. My father, who was the sole breadwinner, had an excellent work ethic, something I aspire to daily. A visit to the library was like taking a flight out to the rest of the world.” Following the disruption of 2020, her academic goals for the next few years centre around three major areas: first, to increase her research output in terms of publications, which will place her in a better position to apply for NRF rating in the next two years. Second, to increase her community engagement portfolio through involvement in ECD community projects in South Africa. “My current involvement in the Froebel Foundation Trust projects will help in this regard and assist in forging international collaborations,” she observes. Last, to recommit to being a life-long learner, to constantly improving her teaching so that her students have access to quality teaching and learning. Dr Du Plooy is philosophical about the future, saying that “although it is uncertain, what is certain is change. So rather than go back to ‘traditional’ ways of doing things, why not reimagine university spaces as collaborative, innovative, problem-solving blended learning spaces?”

Reimagine university spaces as collaborative, innovative, problemsolving blended working spaces


Faculty of economic and management sciences

Professor isioma ile

Professor Isioma Ile’s transformative belief in hard work changed her life

Life has endless lessons to teach us… but only if we listen

As a full professor at UWC in the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, Prof Isioma Ile has built an impressive career over the years, but it didn’t start out that way. As a child, she claims she had a lackadaisical attitude towards hard work. “My first real-life lesson was when I took my eyes off the ball in the misguided belief that high achievement was a given. However, I was jolted into reality when I obtained a less than desirable outcome in my Matriculation result,” and she has been putting that right academically ever since. She first embarked on the higher education journey in Nigeria before moving to South Africa, and her hard work led to a PhD in Public Affairs from the University of Pretoria. “The successful completion of my PhD was really meaningful as I successfully demonstrated to my daughters and other female observers that barriers can be transcended and the glass ceiling can be shattered.” At UWC, she is a key figure in the Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, fulfilling the roles of both Full Professor in Public Administration, and project co-leader at the South African German Centre for Development Research. Her many roles include research and research supervision, teaching (postgraduate and undergraduate courses) in public administration, postgraduate programmes in leadership and administration and donor relationship management The life of a professor is a natural fit for her, but she has had to fight for respect every step of the way. “Many years ago, as a senior academic and on arrival at an airport, I was to be picked by a chauffeur, who had my name on his welcome board, but despite all attempts to make eye contact, I was unsuccessful. When I approached him, he was visibly shocked and confessed he was not expecting a black female but was scanning the arrivals and looking out specifically for a male professor. This taught me to see the bigger picture and that I, like anyone else, can and must impact society positively by striving to challenge this narrative and contribute to the development of more female academics. “You cannot rely only on your natural talent, but you must put in the work. That is what I had to do to improve my performance. All of these lessons are enveloped and made easier through the support of loved ones and family, especially my spouse, my now-adult children, and the amazing grace of God.”


Faculty of economic and management sciences

D o c t o r C a r m e n Ch r i s t i a n

Dr Christian fuses economics and health sciences to drive better health outcomes for SA

I aim to continue my contribution to providing quality education for our diverse future generation and conducting critical research that makes a positive difference to society

“I am passionate about understanding public health issues in South Africa. My goal is to use my interdisciplinary experience and skills in health science and economics to advance research that impacts health policy – and, ultimately, health outcomes – for the better,” says Dr Carmen Christian, who has been lecturing at UWC for almost a decade. Her areas of interest are development economics and health economics, and in particular, she pays careful attention to the economics of infectious diseases, health-seeking behaviour, health inequalities, and quality of healthcare. In 2011, Dr Christian exited the private health sector and started teaching at UWC’s department of economics. By 2015, she had completed her MEcon at UWC and the following year, she had enrolled as a PhD candidate in economics at Stellenbosch University, exploring demand and supply constraints to early TB detection in South Africa. “Working as a lecturer at UWC during the past nine years has motivated me to grow as an academic. I aim to continue my contribution to providing quality education for our diverse future generation and conducting critical research that makes a positive difference to society.” She has developed the ability to work independently and oversee multiple projects concurrently, for example, completing her PhD while teaching economics modules at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels where class sizes ranged from five to over 200 students. Her enthusiasm for teaching is demonstrated by the Learning and Teaching Award for Creative Student Engagement that she earned in 2016. “Throughout my teaching career, I’ve undertaken curriculum development, review and renewal based on the ever-changing needs of our students. Also, infusing technology into course content is a tool I depend on. The use of Ikamva and its zero-rated tools has become even more important with the need to incorporate blended learning approaches during student protests and the recent national lockdown due to Covid-19.” From a research perspective she has a proven ability to conduct research, with a track record of five publications in international, DHET accredited, peer-reviewed journals. Dr Christian was selected as a finalist in UWC’s Best Next Generation Researcher category (2018) as well as UWC’s Early Career Researcher category (2019). “During this most challenging of years,” she says, “I was invited to be part of a multidisciplinary and inter-institutional research team that responds to the pressing research needs of the novel coronavirus pandemic in South Africa. Our research outputs on Covid-19 have assisted policymakers with designing evidence-based policies in a high-pressure and fast-paced context.”


Professor Najma Moosa

Faculty of law

Professor Moosa reflects on the implications of Covid-19 on the law in SA While most people are keenly aware of the health implications of Covid-19, very few people stop and think about what it has meant for the legal profession and academia. “The lockdown forced everyone connected with the law (including the judiciary, for the first time) out of complacent comfort zones and ‘virtual’ timewarps. For the first time, many of us really engaged with the technology, and became rather proficient in using paperless e-resources, digital technology and online platforms.” Professor Najma Moosa is a Senior Professor in the Faculty of Law and a renowned specialist in Muslim personal law or Muslim family law. Her career in academia spans more than 30 years, and she was the first Black head of department and professor, and the first female dean of a South African Law Faculty. She is a National Research Foundation-rated researcher. Her research milestones include drafting contributions to two South African Law Reform Commission Projects and she has given many high-profile lectures and presented at conferences, locally and all over the world. She has four law degrees. Both her LLM and LLD degrees were the first awarded at UWC, and these theses were the first to deal, respectively, with the Islamic law of succession, and constitutionalism and Muslim personal law. She has authored several books in the field. In August 2019, she was a nominee for the inaugural Women in Law South Africa (WOZA) award for her excellence in academia. But 2020 also took an incredible toll on Prof Moosa. She explains, “I lost work/life balance, suffered burnout, and contracted and survived Covid. At the same time, I was able to reconnect with my authentic self for the first time in a long time, without the hassles of dressing-up and unhealthy eating. I produced my best research and re-established dormant professional links and networks. If you enjoy your work, time and place become irrelevant.”

If you enjoy your work, time and place become irrelevant


Faculty of law

D o c t o r Y e u k a i Mup a n g a v a n hu

Brick and mortar education is bound to become less important in a post-Covid world

I learnt that resilience and leading a healthy, balanced lifestyle are the keys to carrying you through difficult times

“The lockdown has brought significant changes to the academic landscape,” says Doctor Yeukai Mupangavanhu. “The growing importance of technology to higher education has very much become a reality.” Dr Mupangavanhu obtained her LLD in 2014 with the thesis ‘The regional integration of African trademark laws: Challenges and possibilities’ and, in 2018, she won the emerging researcher in the law faculty award. Her research interests are in contract law and consumer protection, as well as intellectual property law, and her latest work is set to be published in the prestigious African Journal of International and Comparative Law. She has been able to successfully combine her academic interests with her firm grasp on the realworld issues that she gained from her time working in Zimbabwe as an investment executive at the Export Processing Zones Authority and at the African Regional Intellectual Property Organisation (ARIPO). “This period has seen me grow in a number of ways; ranging from being versatile to improving my computer skills. I learnt that resilience and leading a healthy, balanced lifestyle are the keys to carrying you through difficult times!” Dr Mupangavanhu hopes 2021 will bring a new era in which both academics and students are going to have to adapt and embrace the ‘new normal’ characterised by a shift from the traditional teaching and learning methods towards technologically-driven innovative methods. She believes that ‘the role of ‘brick and mortar’ in higher education is bound to become less significant as universities find new approaches to teaching. “The fourth industrial revolution also demands the incorporation of technology into our teaching. This will prepare our students for the fast-changing work environment. “The developments in technology bring both the positive and the negative, the importance of ethics and of lifelong learnership are going to be some of the important attributes which our students will need. There is no doubt that the transformation taking place in higher education will influence how and what we teach in the years to come.”


Faculty of natural sciences

Professor Priscilla Baker

Professor Baker: using skills and knowledge to eliminate pollutants in drinking water The Paris-Seine Initiative for Excellence invites applications from high-level international scholars and scientists in all fields. The programme invites fellows from all disciplines to participate in the institute’s interdisciplinary exchange program. Professor Priscilla Baker competed in the 2020 call and was awarded a four-month appointment at CY Cergy Paris, Chemistry Department. During her residency, she was featured in an interview for the institute’s newsletter and delivered an invited public lecture focusing on policies and practice related to emerging contaminants. Prof Baker arrived in Paris one month prior to hard lockdown due to Covid-19, with the intention of finalising an exciting new partnership agreement, The Associated International Laboratory (LIA) is a partnership which is based on researcher exchanges, joint degrees and teaching engagements. After adjusting to the shock of hard lockdown in a foreign country and reeling from the global impact of the pandemic, it was time to find innovative ways in which to engage. While Covid-19 pandemic regulations, limited mobility and one-on-one contact time, the partnership found a way to successfully launch the LIA in June 2020 and the roll out of the partnership deliverables. “As an academic, many aspects of research management could be maintained with the efficient use of technology,” she explains when thinking about those early months, “but above all, it was the people contact that I missed the most, both in France and in South Africa. One-on-one learning and teaching moments at postgraduate level are crucial to the development of professional character and advanced scientific skills transfer and cannot be substituted by online interaction, no matter how advanced the technology.” Prof Baker was the first female permanent staff appointment in the Department of Chemistry at UWC back in 2003, and she was promoted to full professor of Chemistry in 2012. As the SARChI chair in Analytical Systems and Processes for Priority and Emerging Contaminants (ASPPEC), her focus is the integrated application of analytical tools and technology to develop early warning systems for tracelevel detection and quantification of critical contaminants. The issue of pharmaceuticals in our drinking water has emerged as a critical issue in the health of a nation, which requires constant monitoring and reassessment of guidelines for safe water use. Current approaches to water screening for emerging and persistent chemical residues require considerable effort, with high associated costs, sample processing and lengthy laboratory-centred analysis times. “Electrochemical technologies have reached the state where they are not only comparable with other technologies in terms of cost, but also are more efficient, more compact and easy to implement in the field,” and Prof Baker is at the forefront of making that happen.

One-on-one learning and teaching moments at postgraduate level are crucial to the development of professional character and advanced scientific skills transfer


Faculty of natural sciences

Professor marique aucamp

Professor Aucamp weighs up positives and negatives of the new educational landscape

I see myself as an energetic pharmaceutical scientist, still learning something new every day, eager to impart my knowledge to youth and humbled at opportunities

“I used to think of myself as kind of old-school. My phone was just a device to make phone calls and read a few messages every day. My laptop was a glorified typing machine. But the lockdown and the sudden transition to a virtual format forced me to become technologically savvier.” Professor Marique Aucamp started out her career as a laboratory manager at the Research Institute for Industrial Pharmacy at North-West University in Potchefstroom where she obtained extensive and invaluable experience. “I never fathomed that one day, I would make videos and use multimedia to make online teaching more engaging and exciting.” During her time at NWU, she was enrolled as a full-time PhD student at the Unit for Drug Research and Development. Upon completion of her PhD, she obtained a Postdoctoral Fellowship which afforded her the opportunity to follow her dream of becoming a researcher, lecturer and mentor. To date, she has supervised an impressive 21 completed postgraduate studies, and currently, four PhD and 10 MSc students are enrolled under her supervision. She has authored/co-authored 35 peer-reviewed papers, three book chapters, 19 conference proceedings and is the inventor/co-inventor of three innovations and takes pride in collaborating actively with other pharmaceutical and natural scientists around the world. “I see myself as an energetic pharmaceutical scientist, still learning something new every day, eager to impart my knowledge to youth and humbled at opportunities.” In April 2019, she was awarded a prestigious Royal Society/ African Academy of Sciences FLAIR Fellowship. These fellowships are awarded to individuals who show promise in becoming future leaders in their field of research in Africa. “I think we are moving into a brand new, innovative direction. Although pharmacy is a profession that requires in-depth theoretical knowledge, it is also very practical and hands-on. The pandemic showed us that it is indeed possible to move into a more virtual teaching and learning environment. “On the downside, we have lost that vital social interaction. I’m not sure how many UWC colleagues are starting to feel like robots at the end of each day? Although we still interact with one another online, there is just nothing like the good old-fashioned way of being in one another’s company in real-life, seeing the actual human in its true state of existence.” Prof Aucamp’s advice for 2021 is to be resilient and adaptable. “I think academics and students must both be willing to have our pre-set ideas be a little bit less cast in stone and be more willing to learn from each other each day.”


Faculty of law

Professor Lea Mwambene

Learning how to juggle responsibilities while overcoming a fear of failure AN ACADEMIC career, especially for women, is highly demanding. It requires balancing your academic responsibilities of research, teaching, administration, and community engagement with your family responsibilities as a daughter, mother, sister, and wife. Professor Lea Mwambene is very familiar with that particular struggle. She is a professor in the Department of Private Law with an LLD in African Customary Family Law and Human Rights, as well as an LLM in International Human Rights. “My journey from lecturer, senior lecturer, associate professor, and to full professor stretched over 11 years,” she explains. “I was also fortunate to have been supported by colleagues in the department/faculty, as well as my family. What helped me enormously over the years is the mentorship by Professor Julia Sloth-Nielsen, and her invaluable support with my NRF rating.” This academic growth was facilitated greatly by the fact that she never stopped doing research and publishing extensively alongside her teaching, administrative, and community engagement responsibilities. Her work is driven by a genuine concern about the interaction between law, ideology and social practice, and her hard-earned experience in African Law has been a fabulous resource for the many graduate students she has supervised from countries such as South Africa, Kenya, Zimbabwe, the DRC and more. But fear of failure has stalked her throughout her life, especially when presented with a new responsibility. When asked how she dealt with these, Professor Mwambene revealed that “after questioning my abilities, examining the risks involved, and looking at the bigger picture, I then choose to free myself from the fear of failure.” Apart from presenting at many conferences and workshops over the years, Professor Mwambene has contributed to influential journals and books; most recently a chapter entitled Access to justice, gender and customary law in Malawi for a book called Gender, Poverty, and Access to Justice: Policy Implementation in Sub-Saharan Africa. “What is next for me is to be a mentor to upcoming young academics, and postgraduate students. I believe I should be able to sow back into the community of learning by being able to provide guidance and support for aspiring academics.”

After questioning my abilities, examining the risks involved, and looking at the bigger picture, I then choose to free myself from the fear of failure.


outstanding academic leadership

Professor anthea rhoda

Great opportunities ahead to continue a blended approach to learning and teaching

Developing capacity and intellectual agility has been key to managing all the changes that were brought on by the pandemic and the lockdown

Professor Anthea Rhoda’s research interest focuses on neuroscience within the field of disability and rehabilitation, and specifically the rehabilitation of adults with neurological conditions caused by stroke or spinal cord injuries. She also conducts research in the area of faculty development and inter-professional education. “I have noticed a greater focus on managing virtual engagements, such as facilitating participant engagement during online workshops and seminars, and a greater awareness of the personal situations of staff and students,” she says. She holds a Professorship in the Department of Physiotherapy and has completed a BSc Physiotherapy and a PhD in Physiotherapy at UWC, as well as a BSc Honours in Physiotherapy (Neurology) and an MSc in Medical Sciences (Rehabilitation) at Stellenbosch University. Prof Rhoda is a South African National Research Foundationrated researcher, as well as a faculty member and facilitator of the Southern African FAIMER Regional Institute (SAFRI) Fellowship. This is a programme that focuses on developing leadership skills in academics who teach health sciences programmes in Southern Africa. This work allows Professor Rhoda to work on developing a critical mass of next-generation, emerging academics through her Capacity Building Programme for Associate Lecturers (junior lecturers) within CHS. When it came to creating engagement in 2020, she realised there was a need to create spaces where we provide opportunities for people to share about how the pandemic affected them or their family situations, as well as how the ‘working from home’ was going. “There are great opportunities ahead to continue a blended approach to learning and teaching. Academics can continue to apply the skills obtained to do online/flexible learning and teaching. The online data collection methods applied when conducting research could also continue. “The resources developed for digital teaching are now available for future use. In our experiences, there will be some activities, such as certain meetings, that could continue using an online method, as those have proven to be rather successful. “Developing capacity and intellectual agility has been key to managing all the changes that were brought on by the pandemic and the lockdown. As we were ‘all in it together’, it was amazing the amount of collaboration and sharing that happened both internally, as well as externally,” she says. “Colleagues shared documents and information processes without questioning. There was an enormous amount of support for each other. The changes happened rapidly, hence the reference to ‘emergency remote teaching’. The resilience and resourcefulness demonstrated by the colleagues has been really great.”


outstanding council leadership

ms yasmin forbes

‘There has never been a greater need for a good mind/body balance’ As an IT specialist, Yasmin Forbes was already well aware of the power of digital communications, but the lockdown has given her a new appreciation of the Mute and Video Off buttons on Zoom. These have been used effectively alongside her time management skills, the drive to keep her immune system strong and constantly feeding her curiosity! Ms Forbes is a recognised IT Specialist with more than 35 years’ experience, advanced diplomatic skills and a natural affinity for cultivating relationships and consensus-building. She is a renowned enabler when it comes to achieving business objectives and harnessing the energy to initiate improved technological business efficiencies while boosting bottom-line performance. Her areas of expertise include strategic planning, stakeholder relations, risk management, entrepreneurial initiative, business development and research. “The job has become more demanding with an increase in the frequency of meetings; the need to work closer to strategy and address risks. Lately, I’ve experienced a profound need for conscious leadership and a dependency on technology with uninterrupted connectivity among the UWC family.’ Among her many qualifications, Ms Forbes holds an MBA from Bond University, is a Chartered Director at the Institute of Directors of South Africa and has a certificate in Social Sector Leadership from the University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business. She believes “there has never been a greater need for work/ play balance, as well as balance in body, mind and soul.” When she thinks about the uptake of technology, Ms Forbes stresses the need for embedded ethics in not only Computer Science, due to Artificial Intelligence (AI), but across all disciplines with the objective of fostering ethical leadership and behaviour which is much needed in our society today. Her work experience includes an independent expert evaluation of the activity proposals submitted by partners and other organisations on various EIT proposal calls in the areas of innovation, education and business creation. She was also a Technology Advisor for ENACTUS SA, a non-profit organisation bringing together student, academic and business leaders committed to using entrepreneurial action, to improve lives and address the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as well as deep involvement in crafting a digital strategy to enable the newly defined Transnet 4.0 to take effect. In addressing today’s needs, we have to be patient and agile as we are all in this ‘new normal’ as a collective. “Embrace blended learning and the possibility of being fully online. You can’t be too attached to face-to-face teaching. Adhere to necessary health and safety protocols – be mindful!”

Lately, I’ve experienced a profound need for conscious leadership and a dependency on technology with uninterrupted connectivity among the UWC family


UWC Rising Stars UWC RAISES THE GAME

THEMBI KGATLANA The world at her feet

BABALWA LATSHA Flies higher

HERSCHEL JANTJIES

BABALWA LATSHA

These days, everybody knows who Herschel Jantjies is, but before the hungry scrumhalf joined the Springbok team that would ultimately lift up the Web Ellis trophy, he was helping his University’s team attain another coveted (albeit less famous) title: The FNB Varsity Shield.

Babalwa, who graduated with her LLB degree from UWC in 2019, is the captain of the Springbok women’s rugby team. In 2020, she also became the first South African woman rugby player to turn professional - signing with Spanish rugby club, SD Eibar Femenino. Speaking about the move, Babalwa says:

This iconic victory saw the team promoted to the Varsity Cup, making UWC the first previously disadvantaged institution to qualify for South Africa’s premier university rugby competition.

‘It’s a great dream of mine, as Captain of the Springbok Women, to fly the South African flag as high as possible, and I think the perfect place to do that, is in the international arena.”

Winning hearts at UWC long before the World Cup

Flies higher

Latsha, who hails from Khayelitsha, rose from playing in the Springbok Women’s Sevens team to captaining the 15’s national side in 2019. In her first year on the job, she led the team to qualify for the 2021 World Cup. SA’s inaugural participation in this tournament is anticipated to usher in an exciting new chapter for women’s rugby in the country – one in which UWC is ready to play an increasingly larger role.

THEMBI KGATLANA The world at her feet

When Thembi Kgatlana blasted the ball passed Spain’s goalkeeper into the top left corner of the net, she wrote herself into the history books with her magic right boot. It wasn’t just the first-ever goal scored at the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2019, it was Banyana Banyana’s first goal there – making Thembi the first South African woman to score at a FIFA World Cup.

W

UWC alumna and 2018’s African Women’s Footballer of the Year, Thembi also won the 2018 African Best Goal accolade at the Confederation of African Football (CAF) awards.

UWC SPORT: 2019 HIGHLIGHTS IN REVIEW • KEVIN MARTIN participated in the World Pool Chamionships in Qatar.

• THE UWC WOMEN’S FOOTBALL TEAM qualified for SA’s first National Women’s League.

B

• UWC PRODUCED NO LESS THAN FIVE PLAYERS in the 26-member Banyana Banyana squad that travelled to France for the FIFA Women’s World Cup.

• BONGEKA GAMEDE was selected into the Banyana Banyana team for their first FIFA Women’s World Cup participation.

• KURT-LEE ARENDSE was selected for the Springbok’s Sevens team.

hen Thembi Kgatlana blasted the past Latsha, who graduated with her LLB • UWCball RUGBY MADE ITS DEBUT IN THE VARSITY CUP.abalwa The team • NOXOLO CESANE was part of the Banyana Banyana team that won the COSAFA by becoming the first historically disadvantaged institution Spain’s goalkeeper into the top made lefthistory corner degree from UWC in 2019, is the captain of the Women’s Championships. to qualify for the premier university rugby competition. • BEACH VOLLEYBALL PAIR LEO WILLIAMS of the net, she wrote herself into the history Springbok women’s rugby team. In AND 2020, she • ANTHONY TIMOTEUS AND ROWHALDO RATZ were selected to GRANT GOLDSCHMIDT were also selected to represent the country. represent USSA at FASU Africa University Cross Country Champs in Morocco. In her own words, “Every time I step onto the field God uses me to show off.” books with her magic right boot. also became the first South African Woman Rugby • CHELSEA DANIELS represented South Africa at the FIFA under-17 World Cup in At 23, it would seem Thembi really does have the world at her feet. We look • BEJANCKE DELLA was selected to the national Women’s Beach Volleyball team. to seeing what she does in it next. late 2018. Itforward wasn’t just the first-ever goal scored at the FIFA player to turn professional – signing with Spanish rugby • MOGAMAAD ZUBAYR HAMZA joined the Proteas cricket team. Women’s World Cup in 2019, it was Banyana Banyana’s club, SD Eibar Femenino. Speaking about the move, first goal there – making Thembi the first South African Babalwa says: “It’s a great dream of mine, as captain woman to score at a FIFA World Cup. of the Springbok Women, to fly the South African flag UWC alumna and 2018’s African Women’s as high as possible, and I think the perfect place to do Footballer of the Year, Thembi also won the 2018 that, is in the international arena.” African Best Goal accolade at the Confederation of Latsha, who hails from Khayelitsha, rose from African Football (CAF) awards. playing in the Springbok Women’s Sevens team to Since then, while still playing an integral part in the captaining the 15s national side in 2019. In her first SA team, she moved East to join Beijing’s BG Phoenix year on the job, she led the team to qualify for the Club and has more recently just been signed by 2021 World Cup. SA’s inaugural participation in this European giants, Benfica, in Portugal. tournament is anticipated to usher in an exciting new In her own words: “Every time I step onto the field, chapter for women’s rugby in the country – one in God uses me to show off.” which UWC is ready to play an increasingly larger role. FANELWA NGECE-AJAYI MMAKI JANTJIES SENAMILE MASANGO At 23, it would seem Thembi really does have the Chemistry, Communication & Outreach Using Tech To Transform The World Nuclear Physics For A Brighter Future world at her feet. We look forward to seeing what she Senamile Masango was part of one of the first African-led experiments at Dr Fanelwa Ngece-Ajayi is a senior lecturer in Physical Chemistry at UWC, a Prof Mmaki Jantjies, senior lecturer in Information Systems at UWC, has a CERN - the most powerful laboratory in the world. Since then, she’s received does inleader it next. research in the field of drug metabolism nanobiosensors for antiretrovirals passion for promoting STEM subjects in developing nations and disadvantaged her master’s in nuclear physics from UWC (cum laude), addressed President Since then, whilst still playing an integral part in the SA team, she moved East to join Beijing’s BG Phoenix Club and has more recently just been signed by European giants, Benfica, in Portugal.

and Tuberculosis treatment drugs, and a member of the South African Young Academy of Science. As if that weren’t enough impressive credentials, she’s also the founder and leader of the non-profit organisation, AmaQawe ngeMfundo, which aims to promote and enrich STEM at township schools, providing assistance with academic resources and infrastructure.

communities. She’s been named one of News24’s Young Nelson Mandelas, included in the Mail & Guardian’s 200 Young Top Achievers Under 35, and is one of the Inspiring 50 SA Women In Tech. She also coordinates the Mozilla and UN Women technology clubs for young girls – creating safe spaces for high school girls to learn ICT and leadership skills.

Cyril Ramaphosa on the challenges faced by young scientists, and founded Women in Science and Engineering in Africa (Wise Africa). This is an NGO that provides leadership and role models for young people wishing to enter the fields of science and technology.

YOUNG LEADERS BY THE NUMBERS

8

The number of exceptional young leaders hailing from UWC who were included in Mail & Guardian’s Young 200 South Africans in 2019. This list celebrates under-35s who are leading

7

Seven UWC students have been selected in as many years to attend the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany, invited to share their ideas on science and medicine with some

6

Six UWC graduates were selected out of thousands of amazing academics to make the GradStar Top 100 Students list in 2019, selected by employers for their ability to make a

5

The number of Young Nelson Mandelas who come from the University of the Western Cape. For the Mandela Centenary in 2018, News24 honoured 100 Young Nelson Mandelas, South

3

The number of UWC women who made the #InspiringFiftySA 2018 list. Hundreds of amazing women were nominated in the fields of science, tech, engineering and mathematics,


UWC Rising Stars UWC RAISES THE GAME

FANELWA NGECE-AJAYI Chemistry, Communication and Outreach

MMAKI JANTJIES Using Tech To Transform The World

SENAMILE MASANGO Nuclear Physics For A Brighter Future

HERSCHEL JANTJIES

BABALWA LATSHA

These days, everybody knows who Herschel Jantjies is, but before the hungry scrumhalf joined the Springbok team that would ultimately lift up the Web Ellis trophy, he was helping his University’s team attain another coveted (albeit less famous) title: The FNB Varsity Shield.

Babalwa, who graduated with her LLB degree from UWC in 2019, is the captain of the Springbok women’s rugby team. In 2020, she also became the first South African woman rugby player to turn professional - signing with Spanish rugby club, SD Eibar Femenino. Speaking about the move, Babalwa says:

This iconic victory saw the team promoted to the Varsity Cup, making UWC the first previously disadvantaged institution to qualify for South Africa’s premier university rugby competition.

‘It’s a great dream of mine, as Captain of the Springbok Women, to fly the South African flag as high as possible, and I think the perfect place to do that, is in the international arena.”

Winning hearts at UWC long before the World Cup

Dr Fanelwa Ngece-Ajayi is a senior lecturer in Physical Chemistry at UWC, a research leader in the field of drug metabolism nanobiosensors THEMBI KGATLANA for antiretrovirals and Tuberculosis The world at her feet treatment drugs, and a member of When Thembi African Kgatlana blastedYoung the ball passedAcademy Spain’s goalkeeper into the South the top left corner of the net, she wrote herself into the history books with her magic right boot. of Science. As if those weren’t It wasn’t just the first-ever goal scored at the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2019, sufficiently impressive credentials, it was Banyana Banyana’s first goal there – making Thembi the first South African woman to score at a FIFA World Cup. she’s also the founder and leader of UWC alumna and 2018’s African Women’s Footballer of the Year, Thembi also won the 2018 African Best Goal accolade at the Confederation of African the non-profit organisation, AmaQawe Football (CAF) awards. ngeMfundo, which aims to promote Since then, whilst still playing an integral part in the SA team, she moved East to join Beijing’s BG Phoenix Club and has more recently just been signed by giants, Benfica, in Portugal. andEuropean enrich STEM at township schools, In her own words, “Every time I step onto the field God uses me to show off.” providing assistance with academic At 23, it would seem Thembi really does have the world at her feet. We look forward to seeingand what sheinfrastructure. does in it next. resources

Flies higher

Prof Mmaki Jantjies, senior lecturer in Information Systems at UWC, has a passion for promoting STEM subjects in developing nations and disadvantaged communities. She’s UWCnamed SPORT: been one of News24’s Young 2019 HIGHLIGHTS IN in REVIEW Nelson Mandelas, included the Mail & Guardian’s 200 Young Top • THE UWC WOMEN’S FOOTBALL TEAM qualified for SA’s first National Women’s League. Achievers Under 35, and is one of • UWC PRODUCED NO LESS THAN FIVE PLAYERS in the 26-member the Inspiring 50 SA Women In Tech. Banyana Banyana squad that travelled to France for the FIFA Women’s World Cup. She also co-ordinates the Mozilla • UWC RUGBY MADE ITS DEBUT IN THE VARSITY CUP. The team made history by becoming the first historically disadvantaged institution and UN Women technology clubs for to qualify for the premier university rugby competition. young – creating safe • ANTHONYgirls TIMOTEUS AND ROWHALDO RATZspaces were selected to represent USSA at FASU Africa University Cross Country Champs in Morocco. for high school girls to learn ICT and • BEJANCKE DELLA was selected to the national Women’s Beach Volleyball team. leadership skills. • MOGAMAAD ZUBAYR HAMZA joined the Proteas cricket team.

Latsha, who hails from Khayelitsha, rose from playing in the Springbok Women’s Sevens team to captaining the 15’s national side in 2019. In her

first year on the job, she led the team to qualifywas for the 2021 World Cup. Senamile Masango part ofSA’s one inaugural participation in this tournament is anticipated to usher in an exciting chapter for women’s rugby in the country – experiments one in which UWC is ready to ofnew the first African-led play an increasingly larger role. at CERN – the most powerful laboratory in the world. Since then, she’s received her Master’s in nuclear physics from UWC (cum laude), addressed President Cyril Ramaphosa on the challenges faced by young • KEVIN MARTIN participated in the World Pool Chamionships in Qatar. and founded Women intheir first •scientists, BONGEKA GAMEDE was selected into the Banyana Banyana team for FIFA Women’s World Cup participation. Science and Engineering in Africa • KURT-LEE ARENDSE was selected for the Springbok’s Sevens team. (Wise Africa). This is an NGO which • NOXOLO CESANE was part of the Banyana Banyana team that won the COSAFA provides leadership and role models Women’s Championships. •for BEACH VOLLEYBALL PAIR LEO WILLIAMS AND young people wishing to enter the GRANT GOLDSCHMIDT were also selected to represent the country. fields of science and technology. • CHELSEA DANIELS represented South Africa at the FIFA under-17 World Cup in late 2018.

young leaders by the numbers:

8

7

6

5

6

5

The Seven UWC Six UWC number of students graduates exceptional have been were young leaders selected in as selected out hailing from many years to of thousands UWC who were attend the Lindau of amazing included in Mail Nobel Laureate academics & Guardian’s Meeting in to make the FANELWA NGECE-AJAYI MMAKI JANTJIES Chemistry, & Outreach Germany, invited Using Tech To Transform The World Young 200Communication South GradStar Top 100 Africans in 2019. to share their Students list in Dr Fanelwa Ngece-Ajayi is a senior lecturer in Physical Chemistry at UWC, a Prof Mmaki Jantjies, senior lecturer in Information Systems at UWC, has a Thisresearch list celebrates ideasforon science passion for promoting2019, selected by and disadvantaged leader in the field of drug metabolism nanobiosensors antiretrovirals STEM subjects in developing nations and Tuberculosis treatment drugs, and a member of the South African Young communities. She’s been named one of News24’s Young Nelson Mandelas, under-35s whoAs if that weren’t enough impressive and medicine employers theirUnder 35, and is one Academy of Science. credentials, she’s also included in the Mail & Guardian’s 200 Youngfor Top Achievers the founder and leader of the non-profit organisation, AmaQawe ngeMfundo, of the Inspiring 50 SA Women In Tech. She also coordinates the Mozilla and UN are leading the with some of the ability to make a which aims to promote and enrich STEM at township schools, providing Women technology clubs for young girls – creating safe spaces for high school assistance with academic leadership skills. country into a resources and infrastructure.sharpest minds in girls to learn ICT andreal impact in the brighter future. the world. working world. YOUNG LEADERS BY THE NUMBERS

8

The number of exceptional young leaders hailing from UWC who were included in Mail & Guardian’s Young 200 South Africans in 2019. This list celebrates under-35s who are leading

7

Seven UWC students have been selected in as many years to attend the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany, invited to share their ideas on science and medicine with some

Six UWC graduates were selected out of thousands of amazing academics to make the GradStar Top 100 Students list in 2019, selected by employers for their ability to make a

3

The number The number of Young of UWC Nelson women Mandelas who who made the come from the #InspiringFiftySA University of the 2018 list. Hundreds Western Cape. of amazing women For theSENAMILE Mandela MASANGO were nominated Nuclearin Physics For A Brighter Future Centenary 2018, in the fields of News24 honoured science, tech, Senamile Masango was part of one of the first African-led experiments at CERN - the most powerful laboratory in the world. Since then, she’s received 100 Young Nelson engineering and her master’s in nuclear physics from UWC (cum laude), addressed President Cyril Ramaphosa on the challenges faced by young scientists, and founded but Mandelas; South mathematics, Women in Science and Engineering in Africa (Wise Africa). This is an NGO that Africans who only 50to enter were provides leadership and role models for young people wishing the fields of science and technology. embody a legacy chosen. of hope and change.

The number of Young Nelson Mandelas who come from the University of the Western Cape. For the Mandela Centenary in 2018, News24 honoured 100 Young Nelson Mandelas, South

3

The number of UWC women who made the #InspiringFiftySA 2018 list. Hundreds of amazing women were nominated in the fields of science, tech, engineering and mathematics,


Getting you from where you are, to where you want to be.

W W W. U W C . A C . Z A