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Car Wash(es)

Mystery Art pg. 18

Water Colors pg. 30

pg. 27

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THE INDEPENDENT 1993

VOL. 24 NO. 37

May 17, 2017

Traveler Watchman 1826 www.indyeastend.com

Free

Independent/George Bradford Brainerd

Sea-Fairing HiStory in Sag Harbor

Festivals & Fairs Galore On Tap. Celebrate Maritime Culture In Sag Harbor, A Street Fair In East Hampton, And Mucho Music In Montauk. (See Pages 4, 7 & 8)


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Community News

Independent / James J. Mackin

The Amagansett Life-Saving Station will be commissioned and opened after a years-long Herculean restoration effort.

Restored, Renovated, And Opening Saturday

“The purpose of the network of life-saving stations was to rescue

The existing historic station was built on Atlantic Avenue in 1902. For the last several years, the Society has embarked on an ambitious plan to restore

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Formed in 1878, the United States Life-Saving Service was the forerunner to the Coast Guard. It oversaw a string of 31 LifeSaving Stations along the south shore of Long Island, including the Amagansett Life-Saving Station, which was built in 1849 and operated until 1946. There were additional stations at Ditch Plain, Hither Plain, Napeague, and

victims from coastal shipwrecks,“ Hefner wrote. They were staffed by crew comprised of local men, with the names Barnes, Edwards, King, Lester, Loper, Miller, Mulford, Osborn, Schellinger, and Stratton among those who served.

Historically significant due to its association with local maritime history, the station was also the scene of a dramatic World War II

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Caregiver Support Group at John Jermain Library, Sag Harbor

Chair Yoga at Montauk Library

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1:00 PM

Westhampton Library 6:30 PM community planning 5:00 PM Italian for travelers at session Exercise with Laury at Riverhead Library Shelter Island Library re

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6:00 PM Estate Planning Breakfast at Country Corner Café in Southold

Continued On Page 48.

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WEDNESDAY May 17, 2017

the architecturally significant structure. The effort commenced after the donation of the building to East Hampton Town by the Carmichael family. It was moved from residential property back to its original location.

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According to a comprehensive history written by consultant Robert Hefner for the Amgansett U.S. Life-Saving & Coast Guard Station Society, the station was maintained by the Life Saving Benevolent Association, the US Life-Saving Service, and, finally, the Coast Guard.

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Georgica in East Hampton Town.

By Kitty Merrill

8:42 PM

LIRR arrives East Hampton


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Independent / Chris Paparo@fishguyphotos

Shedding Light On Sharks

By Kitty Merrill

He hates Shark Week. Interviewed by The Independent last summer, Southampton High School marine science teacher and one of the founders of The Long Island Shark Collaboration, Greg Metzger, said sensationalized events like the dedicated week on TV do nothing but instill fear.

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Their groundbreaking work bore fruit almost from its inception. In 2015 Metzger and his team were the first ever to put a satellite tag on a “young of the year” white shark

“Virtually nothing is known about juvenile white sharks,” Metzger

Last year scientists from the premier shark research organization Ocearch described the waters off the South Fork as a nursery of sorts for baby great whites. Nine baby great whites, weighing between 50 and 75 pounds were caught off Montauk and tagged with satellite trackers in August of 2016.

informed, “and almost nothing is known about threshers. Those two species are of interest to the team.” Are the fascinating, oftmisunderstood creatures of interest to you? Tomorrow at 5:30 PM Metzger and the Shark Collaboration will give a talk at the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton. They’ll discuss what they’re learning about the host of species that inhabit the island’s south shore waters.

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they caught five miles south of the Shinnecock Inlet. (Young of the year means less than a year old.)

With fellow researchers in the collaboration plus students from Southampton High School, Metzger studies the shy creatures, spending time on the water tagging them every day all summer, weather permitting.

Sharks in the waters off Long Island – and there are plenty of them -- “are not a threat to people. They’re not interested in eating people or biting people or

thurSDAY

interacting with people at all,” he said. There’s never been a shark attack recorded locally.

Register at www.myrml.org or call 631-283-0774 ext 523.

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May 18, 2017

Last Quarter

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History Lecture at Rogers Mansion in Southampton

11:30 AM

5:30 PM

Jewish Yoga at Temple Adas Israel, Sag Harbor

Bridgehampton Traffic Meeting

7:00 PM

Reconstructed Bra 8:00 PM Fashion Show at Outrageous Open Mic Southampton at the Talkhouse Social Club in Amagansett

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11:00 AM

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Edwina von Gal at East Hampton Library

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

A ‘Most Unique’ Street Fair year.”

By Kitty Merrill

For his part, Ringel said he’s enjoying the challenge of putting the fair together. In fact, he’s looking into producing a world class jazz festival this fall.

The East Hampton Chamber of Commerce’s new executive director, Steve Ringel, has been involved in producing festivals and street fairs in San Francisco since the 1980s. But this, the inaugural East Hampton Spring Street Fair, he said, promises to be “the most unique ever.” Where else could you take a free yoga class, learn CPR, adopt a pet, or grill the full slate of candidates running for town offices? Where else can you hear an array of local musicians, meet folks from over 40 nonprofits that represent the heart and soul of East Hampton Town? Where else can you take a free boxing class?

Newtown Lane in the heart of East Hampton Village will be closed Saturday with booths – dozens of them -- located smack dab in the middle of the roadway. “We’re mixing up all the booths,” Ringel explained. “People are going to be looking at things and finding groups they never knew existed.” A Main Stage will be erected at the Newtown/Main intersection with performances from the likes of the East Hampton High School music teachers’ bluegrass band, the folksy Job Potter band, the Judge & the Jury featuring Town Justice Steve Tekulsky. The Lynn Blue band will take the stage and Ringel hinted, “We’re blessed with some of the most famous and talented musicians in the world; there will be special guests.” et c.

Hungry? Local restaurants will be offering specials throughout the day.

shuttle service from John Marshall Elementary School parking lot and the long term lot all day. The lots within the village bounds will also be open and “unaffected,” Ringel informed.

It’s all going down between 11 AM and 6 PM on Saturday.

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Detailing the ambitious undertaking this week, Ringel expressed gratitude for the approval and “real support” from Village Mayor Paul Rickenbach and the village trustees. He said the support for his idea has been so positive, “We’re already talking about next

The 8th annual Long Island Fleece and Fiber Fair rolls into the Hallockville Museum Farm on Sound Avenue in Riverhead this weekend.

From 10 AM to 4 PM on Saturday and Sunday enjoy demonstrations and activities including yarn vendors, sheep herding, shearing, fiber animal displays, spinning, knitting, weaving, rug hooking, needles arts, quilting, basket weaving, crocheting, historic tours, food trucks, and more. It’s the largest gathering of fiber folks on Long Island and promises to be shear fun. Admission is just $6.

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to use during a “test your speed” softball pitch. The YMCA is creating a KIDZONE with a climbing wall, bouncy house, and face painting. The Children’s Museum of the East End will have hands on arts and crafts “for kids to play and learn and touch and see,” said Ringel. East Hampton’s new toy store, Stephenson’s, will be on hand to show off their latest offerings.

If you miss this one, you’re going to feel pretty baaaaaaahhhd.

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Oodles of visitors will be milling about Newtown Lane on Saturday, the day of East Hampton’s inaugural Spring Street Fair.

Hampton Free Ride will provide

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Fleece & Fiber Fair

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Lunchtime coloring at Montauk Library

Garden Fair Preview Party, Bridgehampton Community House

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7:00 PM 8:00 PM Cabaret at North Fork Community Theater in Mattituck

10:00 PM Stecker Band at the Talkhouse in Amagansett


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Independent/Nicole Teitler

Where can our passion take your business?

Team NPF Cycle

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7:00 PM Nonstop to Cairo at MMF at the Memory

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Wickham History in Cutchogue

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Our expanded network of more than 40 branches means we can bring our passion for community banking to businesses from Montauk to Manhattan.

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May 20, 2017

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The National Psoriasis Foundation held its second annual "Team NPF Cycle" event on Saturday starting at Duck Walk Vineyards South in Water Mill. This fun, family-friendly fundraising event was dedicated to connecting those affected by psoriatic disease in an effort to find a cure. Participants had three beautiful scenic routes to choose from (10, 24, and 70 miles) through The Hamptons. A light breakfast, lunch, music, wine tasting, and more were available for riders and supporters.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

Jerry’s Ink

by Jerry Della Femina

Summer Lament, Or The Della Femina Curse I publish this column every year as a public service to make sure your friends and relatives will think twice before they send you an invitation that will screw you out of a precious summer weekend.

I must admit, it is harder to write my annual summer lament column this year because it was such a weird, rainy April. Spring no longer exists because we now go from 42 degrees one day in May to 84 degrees the next. Remember, you can’t blame the miserable cold weather on Global “Warming” anymore. The contradiction of freezing your ass off during a “warming” was too much for even our politically correct hand wringers.

Plus, scientists from the University of Michigan and the University of Florida now show that there were big jumps in climate warming when the dinosaurs went extinct at the end of the Cretaceous Period 65 million years ago.

My theory is that the dinosaurs were roaming the earth, driving around in big – very, very big -- gas-guzzling Cadillacs. But then, what do I know?

So now the new phrase is “Climate Change.” Snow in May? Damn, that definitely must be climate change. But climate change or not, Memorial Day is just days away. So here goes… Why do they do it?

Why do our friends and relatives destroy the summer for us? Why can’t they get married in February? Why do they choose the middle of summer to have birthdays, anniversaries, Bar Mitzvahs and family, college, high school, and even nursery school reunions? That’s not all. Frankly, some of them are thoughtless enough to die in June, July, and August, and there goes another summer weekend.

I promise that if it’s possible, when it’s time for me to go, I will go on life support until some rainy Friday morning in January so that my mourners can bury me early in the morning and still enjoy a three-day weekend. That’s the kind of generous guy I am. Now I know you’re wondering what I’m ranting about, since you’re on top of the world because it looks like another endless summer ahead. Let’s just see how endless it really is. If you work Monday to Friday like me, that leaves you with around 12 summer Saturdays and Sundays, plus three long holiday weekends. So from the minute you’re reading this, summer weekends are a total of about 33 days.

Now you know that at least 9 or 10 of these days will be cold, rainy days where – no matter how hard you try to avoid it – you’ll end up arguing with your spouse. All a man has to say is, “No, I don’t think it’s romantic to freeze my behind off walking in the rain on the beach. Why don’t

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we stay in bed and fool around?” and that’s when the pouting starts. So write off 10 miserable days to weather and you’re left with 25 days. Sound like a lot?

I bet everyone reading this already has one lost weekend coming up when your Aunt Matilda is celebrating her 50th wedding anniversary and she and your Uncle Benny would be broken-hearted if you don’t show up on a beautiful Saturday afternoon to their house in Brooklyn or the Bronx or Westchester or wherever the hell they live. So, now you’re down to 21 days. If you’re young enough to have children, that means you’re stuck with a trip to some summer camp with an Indian ... er ... er ... Native American name in Maine or Massachusetts, in the middle of what always turns out to be the sunniest, most beautiful weather weekend of the summer.

This is where you are sentenced to spend the weekend admiring neatly made bunk beds and ceramic ashtrays (which in these politically correct days have gone from being called ashtrays to being called “candy dishes” to just being called “dishes,” now that candy is seen by some politicians as being worse than cigarettes).

Show me a camp that is wise enough to schedule parents’ visiting days on a Monday and Tuesday and I will show you a camp that deserves the exorbitant amount of money they get to guard your kids for the summer. An amount of money, I might add, that is more than it took, a few short years ago, to cover the tuition of four years at an Ivy League college.

If your children are grown, it’s even worse. They have children and all their children are having birthday parties in town in July, where you will find yourself overcome by heat while you’re surrounded by 20 sticky five-year-olds playing musical chairs. What frosts me is the weather. Did you ever notice that every one of the weekends you have to go to a family event is beautiful? The sun is shining. The sky is blue. And you are stuck in some disgusting catering hall, or, worse, drinking warm white wine out of a plastic cup in some

Continued On Page 49.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Cultural Heritage In The Harbor

Independent/George Bradford Brainerd

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At 2 PM, the Hamptons Take-2 Film Festival presents a screening of The Salt of the Sea. The doc tells the story of commercial fisherman, a vanishing breed.

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Stop by the whaling museum to learn about upsculpting from artist Cindy Pease Roe from noon to 3:30 PM. At 12:30 PM, guided tours of Christ Episcopal Church begin and at 1:30 PM, take a walking tour of Eastville. It includes a stop at St. David AME Zion Church, built in 1840.

The Historical Society hosts an exhibit by Sag Harbor school students who created photographic interpretations of historic paintings of Annie Cooper Boyd. It’s on display at the Annie Cooper Boyd House and John Jermain Library. There’s a new boat-building

On Sunday at 11 AM, learn the story of Long Island’s oldest synagogue at Temple Adas Israel on Atlantic Avenue. Rabbi David Geffen will use archival images to detail the founding of the temple.

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At the library from 10 AM till noon on Saturday, the South Fork Natural History Museum will offer a marine touch tank. At 10:30 AM long time resident Bill Pickens discusses the history and significance of the Sag Harbor Hills, Azurest, and Ninevah subdivisions.

East End Classic Boat Society members will demonstrate traditional wooden boatbuilding on the lawn of the Custom House. There will be free tours of the house, highlighting the work of Henry Patrick Dering, Sag Harbor’s first United States Custom Master.

Ludmilla and Marcello provide live music from 3:30 to 5 PM at the library, and at 5 PM, head down Main Street to Canio’s Cultural Café and Canio’s Books for a discussion about Herman Melville given by Moby Dick expert Lisa Dickman.

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Northwell Health walk at Tanger Outlet, Riverhead

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They’ll stop at the site of the British outpost on Brickiln Road and at the Whaling Museum. At around noon, the troop will march up Main Street for ceremonies

workshop behind the Boyd house that will be open for exploration.

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Cultural Heritage Weekend kicks off with a reenactment of the historic Meigs Raid. The 3rd New York Regiment of 1775 in collaboration with the 6 th Connecticut Regiment commemorate the 240 th anniversary of the raid, marching the same route from Long Beach to Long Wharf at 9:30 AM.

on Long Wharf, at the American Hotel, and at the Old Whaler’s Church.

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Sag Harbor’s rich and diverse cultural heritage is the focus this weekend, with events throughout the village on Saturday and Sunday.

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Sag Harbor’s maritime heritage is the focus of a weekend’s worth of special events.


the Independent

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Burchette of New York who used it as a residence. He and his tenant, Joe Ryle, were the last private owners of the edifice. When they died, the Academy was bequeathed to the community. It was to be used as a library and repository for local artifacts and records.

During the 1990s the Remsenburg Association leased the building from the town and began long overdue repairs. The Remsenburg Academy Association, which provided this history of the structure, was established to oversee fundraising, plus the operation and maintenance of the building. It’s a community resource for public meetings and events. Last summer, the Academy was designated a landmark by Southampton Town. On Saturday, June 3, at 4:30 PM, the association will hold a reception to celebrate the designation and unveil the first official town landmark plaque.

8

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Life drawing at Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill

1:00 PM

Museum Monday at Guild Hall, East Hampton

New Moms Support, Westhampton Library

Southampton Youth Court, Hampton Bays

Monday Meditation at Yoga Shala, Greenport

7:00 PM

Every Day screens at the Hampton Library, Bridgehampton

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Continued On Page 48.

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With the addition of the Academy, Southampton Town landmarks now total 29 properties. “Landmarking of the Academy will help preserve this handsome historic building and document its story for Southampton’s generations to come,” said Councilman John

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From 1958 to 1967 the Academy served as as the local post office. The Tuthill family subsequently sold the building to Robert

“The association hopes that this recognition will further historic preservation efforts in the community,” the announcement notes.   

May 22, 2017

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Tuthill taught several subjects and Maria Vanderpool Studley of Claverack, New York, taught English grammar, Latin, and literature. John Tuthill closed the school in 1869 when he married Miss Studley and turned his

The couple constructed the building directly to the west of the Academy (132 South Country Road) and operated it as a boarding house called Ocean House. By the 1908 summer season, room and board at the Ocean House cost between $8 and $10 per week and a stagecoach met guests upon arrival at the Speonk train station. The Academy building was likely used as part of the boarding house. By the 1930s, the Academy building was used as a rental residence. 

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Speonk was settled around 1760 by John Tuthill. “Hunter John” came to the area from Cutchogue. His great grandson, John Webster Tuthill, was born in Speonk in 1836. A graduate of Quaker Locust Valley Academy as a professor of mathematics, he built the Academy.

One of the few remaining private school buildings in Southampton Town, Remsenburg Academy was located on a former post road that was a leg of the stagecoach run from Brooklyn to Sag Harbor. Students at the school came from Manhattan and boarded with local farm families during the term.

energies to other activities.

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Built in 1863, the Remsenburg Academy was constructed when the entire area was known as Speonk. The portion of the hamlet where the Civil War era building stood was renamed Remsenburg in about 1897.

front façade, it was constructed as a one-room intermediate school for young gentlemen.

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By Kitty Merrill

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Lauding A Local Landmark

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Independent / Stephanie O. Davis

The landmark Remsenburg Academy.

According to release announcing the reception, “The association is very pleased with the landmark designation and wants the public to be aware of the historic significance of the Academy.” To further this objective, they worked with the Landmarks & Historic Districts Board to develop a plaque design that will now be available to all town-designated landmarks.

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i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

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Independent/Lori Bockelkensalidor

Nonstop to Cairo is just one of nearly 100 acts that will take to the stage, the green, and the sidewalks this weekend at the Montauk Music Festival.

It’s Music, Montauk

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tips for navigating music industry legal and business issues. A grant from the state will help support free transportation available to visitors all weekend long. The Hampton Hopper will make 50 stops throughout the Lighthouse District.

The first stop for any music and festival lover is often the MMF website. There, find the lineup of bands and venues, the music schedule, bios of the artists, and the bus schedule. Reviewing the website at montaukmusicfestival. com is how the savvy music lovers plan their weekend. “Last year, a lot of people told me this is their favorite weekend in Montauk,” Giustino recounted. “For someone to say that, when there are always so many things going on here, that’s very rewarding.”

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From 2 to 4 PM on Friday, the popular “Ask the Experts” event for musicians takes place on the green. A&R and recording experts will be on hand to offer strategies for helping artists flourish as well as Ya rd

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“Kenny works very hard to make the festival bigger and better every year,” Creegan pointed out. Working with a small handful of volunteers, Giustino begins reviewing applications right after Christmas. This year he and his team saw some 3500 hopefuls’ work using the online platform ReverbNation to narrow

et c.

Now in its eighth year, the festival is a volunteer run event designed to meet a two-pronged purpose. It highlights the East End’s burgeoning music scene, showcasing new artists and their original music. It also serves as a pre-Memorial Day weekend kickstarter to the spring tourist

The green will be home to beaucoup bands, of course. But it will also host the Friends of Erin at the grill, as well as a pop up guitar kiosk with a selection of vintage instruments. “I only put vendors on the green who don’t conflict with local businesses,” Giustino assured.

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The Montauk Music Festival kicks off tomorrow night, promising, according to producer and creator Ken Giustino, 96 acts, 400 showcases in four days at “I’ve lost count of how many venues.” Don’t diss him for the brain glitch, Giustino’s juggling a lot these days.

There will be two new “nice, professional” stages on the village green, replete with one of the newest and best sound systems, Giustino detailed.

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It’s got beaches, sure. It’s got a lighthouse and historical sites. It’s got world class fishing and fine dining. But for one weekend every May, Montauk is the place that’s got music – and plenty of it.

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“It has a fabulous impact on business,” Montauk Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Laraine Creegan enthused. “People look forward to it every year. People call and ask when it’s going to be so they can book their rooms.” Because every showcase (except the opening night party at Gurney’s) is free, and many area hotels provide free rooms for visiting musicians, Creegan called the festival “a great give back for the hotels and restaurants.”

participants down to around 100 musicians and bands. “We’ll have some returning acts and new ones,” he informed. (See elsewhere in this edition for a profile of returning artists Nonstop to Cairo.)

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season.

By Kitty Merrill

May 23, 2017

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Mini golf at Hampton Library in Bridgehampton

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Senior Meet Up at Rogers Library in Southampton

7:00 PM Benefit For Dell Cullum HBAC Open Forum, at The Talkhouse Community Center, Hampton Bays

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Free Hearing Screening at Hampton Bays Library

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9:00 PM Karaoke at North Sea Tavern


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the Independent

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

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Northwell Health Walk

Independent / Michael Heller

East Hampton Fire Department firefighters were joined by a brush truck crew from Amagansett as they fought a brush fire in the woods near the railroad tracks off of Spring Close Highway last Friday.

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

They Do Wellness Well

By Kitty Merrill

At the East End School Wellness Conference at The Muses in Southampton last Thursday, the Wellness Foundation presented its inaugural School Wellness Leadership awards to one teacher and one school on the East End for their leadership in School Wellness. The purpose of the School Wellness

conference is to inspire healthy changes at the school level in order to help the children and families in the community live healthier lives. Research has shown that good nutrition and physical activity can strengthen academic performance, improve classroom behavior and lead to a lifetime of good health. Participants heard from experts

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and learned practical ideas they can use immediately. A group of community leaders helped select this year’s winners.

The 2017 Excellence in School Wellness Award was given to East Hampton Middle School for its long-term dedication to school wellness. The award comes with $2500 to use for school wellness activities. Health Teacher Lea Bryant and School Nurse Barbara Tracey have led East Hampton’s Bonac-on-Board to

DECISIONS MADE HERE

Wellness program for 13 years. This innovative program hosts different wellness events such as a community 5K, dance classes culminating in a final event, “Mad Heart Ball,” and a “Chef Wars” competition. The pair offers school-wide nutrition education and has been powerful advocates for healthy items in the cafeteria as well as creating a “student awareness program” to eliminate bullying and help students manage stress. 

The runner up for the school award was Remsenburg-Speonk Elementary School for its efforts to reduce junk food in school and cook school lunches from scratch, as well as institute a school Walking Club. The 2017 School Wellness Champion Award was given to Lisa Serrell of Southampton Elementary School. It comes with $400 to use for school wellness activities.

According to award judges, “Lisa brings a deep passion and commitment to her work as a PE Teacher and has strived to promote a culture of wellness throughout Southampton Elementary School. Lisa is not afraid to challenge the status quo and she consistently goes above and beyond to dedicate her time and energy to positive change.” Some of the initiatives Serrell has implemented include having students run a lap at the start of every recess, distributing pedometers for students to track their steps, and creating a fun, annual field day event. She also instructs other teachers in ways to get kids moving, including how to use Brain Breaks effectively in the classroom. An active member of the district wellness committee, Serrell recently advocated successfully to secure PE as a daily class for all elementary school students.

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i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Real Pesticide Reduction Progress possibilities.”

By Kitty Merrill

In the meantime, she said the fact that Vector Control included a goal of reduced pesticides in its work plan is “a huge deal . . . up until recently, they refused to even consider it.”

Four years ago, when he was a county legislator representing the East End, Jay Schneiderman introduced a bill designed to restrict the use of the pesticide methoprene in estuaries. It wasn’t the first time he spoke out against county Vector Control’s use of the insect growth regulator in an effort to combat mosquitoes that harbor West Nile virus.

In 2008, he raised the same concern – that methoprene is harmful to estuarine invertebrates, including crabs and lobsters. With Suffolk County residents in western locales crying out for relief from mosquito infestations, the bill didn’t garner enough support from colleagues on the horseshoe to move forward. Southampton Town supervisor now, Schneiderman has again voiced opposition to aerial pesticide spraying. “Methoprene is a toxic chemical that mimics and inhibits the growth hormone that triggers the transformation from larval to adult mosquitos,” he explained.

“Because crabs and lobster share an similar morphology and evolutionary past, methoprene interferes with their maturation as well. Since the mosquitos that carry West Nile virus primarily come from freshwater bodies, there is no reason to introduce this toxic substance in saline environments like our estuaries. There are other treatment choices that are natural and do not effect non-target organisms.”   

When he’s made that argument in the past, county health department officials expressed doubt. In 2013 then-health commissioner Dr. Humayun Chaudhry noted there are 50 or 60 types of mosquitoes. He didn’t buy the notion that West Nile mosquitoes aren’t found in saltwater wetlands. Upon election following Schneiderman, Legislator Bridget Fleming took up the standard. Last winter she voted to adopt the 2017 Vector Control work plan only after it included the goal of reducing the use of methoprene.

In sum, Fleming hopes to find a way to reduce or eliminate the use of chemicals to the extent public health concerns support it. She’s pleased Iwanejko is on board with seeking out less toxic pesticides to use for mosquito control, but noted, “even environmentalists don’t agree on various choices” in terms of which might be the least toxic,

Local lawmakers continue to push for natural methods to reduce the population of West Nile mosquitoes.

Key to the measure was a plan to work with East End town trustees on educational efforts and wetland management.

Fleming characterized a December, 2016, meeting with East Hampton Town Trustees concerned about spraying in Accabonac Harbor and Vector Control director Tom Iwanejko as “extremely productive.”

While residents in East Hampton and Southampton Towns express concerns about aerial spraying – the Accabonac Protection Committee has even launched a change. org petition in opposition to it -- Fleming reported the health department gets regular complaints about mosquitoes from area homeowners. “We need to balance the interests of the homeowners and restore the ecosystems in Accabonac Harbor to prevent infestations of mosquitoes,” she said.

So far, finding a spot for the pilot has been problematic. But, said the lawmaker, “We’re still exploring

“All over the East End,” Fleming observed. “We have this imbalance in nature. Vegetation that supports the natural predators of these obnoxious insects has been eliminated. We’ve got to figure out how we can restore balance and let nature handle it. . . I think we can make real progress. ”

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To that end, Fleming favors a strategy that entails restoring vegetation to improve habitats for mosquito predators and reducing standing water to get the wetlands moving again. She reported the trustees agreed to consider a pilot project comprised of singling out an area for wetland restoration and cessation of methoprene application.

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i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

Independent / Richard Lewin

Last Thursday at Harbor Grill in East Hampton, the East Hampton Lions Club had Marsha Wynter, coordinator of the Long Island Eye Bank, attend their meeting. In 1925, Helen Keller addressed the Lions Club International Convention, where she challenged Lions to become “knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness.” It is in that spirit that the LI Eye Bank provides sight to those in need locally, through its organ donor program. East Hampton Lions Club president Tina Piette presented checks totaling $750 to the Eye Bank and the Knights of the Blind which are funded by the Lions Club International Foundation, local Lions such as East Hampton, and private donations. 

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Independent / James J. Mackin Circulation through the site is one of the concerns about a car wash proposed on this property on Springs Fireplace Road in East Hampton.

By Kitty Merrill

At The Car Wash(es)

the group posed several questions about the water, and wastewater generated by the two facilities.

Is working on a carwash really “better than digging a ditch?” Applicants trying to develop two different carwashes in East Hampton Town may think not, especially since a local action group has come out in opposition.

Earlier this spring a group called Citizens to Preserve the East End distributed flyers to Springs residents decrying the notion of a car wash on Springs Fireplace Road in East Hampton. The proposal calls for a 5,400-square-foot car wash with a retail auto supply store and waiting area, located on land set between the entrance and exit roads to the town recycling center. When it was debuted to the East Hampton Town Planning Board in February, some members thought the idea was a great use of the acre. People could combine errands, going to the dumps and getting their cars washed.

Member Job Potter was the lone dissenter. He questioned adding to an already busy section of Fireplace Road. Members of CPEE predict such a use would snarl traffic and conflict with the public’s right to use the town facility. “It’s a circulation 18

Independent / James J. Mackin A defunct discotheque is the site of a proposed car wash on Montauk Highway in Wainscott.

nightmare,” Carl Irace, attorney for the group, told The Independent.

The applicant has been directed to conduct a traffic study. The study shouldn’t be about the traffic already on the road, but also traffic at the site. Right now, there’s no traffic on the wooded acre in East Hampton or the Wainscott property, which is home to a vacant building at present. There’s plenty of traffic passing by the site of another proposed carwash in Wainscott. Proposed a year ago, the car wash would be developed on the property that once housed the Star Room (or, for old timers, The Swamp.) With

modern design of glass and steel, it’s been nicknamed “George Jetson’s car wash” by insiders.

Given the location, planning board members were less than encouraging. Residents of neighborhoods nearby came out in opposition, the impact on already heavy traffic at the top of the list of concerns. But that isn’t the only issue.

In both cases applicants or their reps have detailed environmentallyfriendly practices that will be used. Said Irace, “We’re concerned about these applications and the potential for adverse impacts on the environment.” The spokesman for

What chemicals will be used? Where will they be stored? Where is discharge going to go? If wastewater is going to be hauled away, where is it going to be hauled to? “For a bunch of reasons, we just don’t see it,” Irace summarized. He noted, “On Long Island car washes are notoriously cited for DEC (New York State Department of Environmental Conservation) violations.” “It’s hard to imagine either of those are the right uses for the site. They don’t seem compatible for the area,” he said.

The planning board is poised to issue a positive declaration with regard to the Wainscott car wash. That means the applicant will have to compile an Environmental Impact Study of the project. The bane of any developer, an EIS is a comprehensive look at every aspect and alternative for a project. The project sponsor may wait until the town’s hamlet study for Wainscott is concluded before moving forward. Although the board didn’t have as many concerns about the East Hampton proposal, members still want to see a traffic study, as well as a vegetation plan for screening.


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

m ay 1 7 2 0 1 7

National Safe Boating Week

Compiled by Kitty Merrill

Peconic Bay Power Squadron will present “Boat Handling Under Power,” part of the USPS University seminar series, at 9 AM. Attendees will learn techniques for controlling their boats in various situations and under a variety of wind or tidal conditions. The classroom seminar will be followed by an On the Water exercise using boats provided by Strong’s Marine. (Class size is limited, so advance registration is required.)

Each year hundreds of people lose their lives in boating incidences, and they may still be alive if they had been wearing a life jacket. U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in three-fourths of recreational boating fatalities, and that 84 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets.

The National Safe Boating Council will kick off its annual boating safety campaign with National Safe Boating Week, beginning Saturday.

Peconic Bay Power Squadron, eastern Long Island’s local unit of the United States Power Squadrons will participate in “Ready, Set, Wear It!” on Saturday at Strong’s Marine in Mattituck. The worldwide event is designed to raise boating safety awareness. Participants will be part of the attempt to break a world record for the most life jackets worn at one time. Peconic Bay Power Squadron will have an information table set up and will be conducting Vessel Safety Inspections from 9 AM to 4 PM, with the “Ready, Set, Wear It” official photo at 11 AM, followed by a flare demonstration. Larger boats are required to carry pyrotechnic visual distress signals (flares), but few people have ever actually used them or even seen how they are ignited.

“Ready, Set, Wear It!” is sponsored by the National Safe Boating Council and the Canadian Safe Boating Council, with support from

With many different types of boats, drive systems, weather conditions, sea conditions, boating circumstances and more, no two boating situations are exactly the same. Understanding these variations is the first step in being prepared to handle what life on the water throws your way. Independent / Courtesy Seabox Studios On May 10, a multi-agency “swimmers in distress rescue drill” was held off the north side of Montauk Point. East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue, US. Coast Guard, New York State Parks, Montauk Fire Department and EMS, and East Hampton Village Dispatch all participated. (See layout on page 51.)

allied organizations including the United States Power Squadrons, to raise awareness to the importance of wearing life jackets. Last year groups across the U.S. and Canada were joined by life jacket wearing participants in Australia, Brazil, Finland, and Japan. Participants will not only help to break the world record, but will also see and learn about the many different life jacket options that are available to today’s boaters. Some will even inflate the light weight suspender style jackets that

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many modern boaters prefer. If you have never used one of these inflatable jackets, or you have one and have never actually seen how it works, you don’t want to miss this event. The event is free and photos will be taken for world record documentation. To learn more call Larry Hynes at 631-929-4369 or visit www.ReadySetWearIt.com or www.SafeBoatingCampaign.com. Also Saturday at Strong’s, the

The Boat Handling Under Power seminar covers using lines to assist you; close quarters maneuvering; departing & docking; single screw, twin screw or jet drives; steering in reverse and much more. Learn some new skills for the summer season and even have the opportunity to try them on the water.

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

By Kitty Merrill

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To Pull The Plug On PDDs

One day after a special meeting scheduling a public hearing on a three month extension of the current PDD moratorium, Southampton Town Supervisor Jay Schneiderman announced Friday that he has filed a bill repealing the PDD law in its entirety. The additional three months are necessary to consider the repeal, according to Schneiderman.

The current Planned Development District law was enacted in 1995 in order to create additional flexibility in planning and development. Schneiderman and the Democratic town board majority have long been critical of the law, raising concerns about the lack of predictability and certain provisions that allow developers to offer unrelated community benefits to offset gains in value by the additional development garnered through the PDD approval. These so called

“community benefits” are seen by some as an inappropriate form of enticement designed to influence the town board’s decision.

Numerous large-scale development projects have been approved through the PDD process. As public sentiment grew against the zoning tool, a one-year moratorium on new – Councilman applications was Bouvier put in place. The moratorium is set to expire on June 1. Following the enactment of the moratorium, the controversial PDD application for the Gateway project in Bridgehampton, combining commercial and residential zoning, was withdrawn. The resort golf

course development in East Quogue known as “The Hills” is the last remaining PDD still actively being processed. Over the past year, the supervisor has been a member of a working group assembled to amend the PDD law to address community concerns.

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“The law is unfixable and John needs to be repealed,” said Supervisor Schneiderman. “The PDD law is a wildcard. It creates the potential that any parcel of land can be developed in any way a developer envisions. Our community deserves predictability in planning its future.” Councilman John Bouvier, also a member of the working group, echoed the Supervisor’s concerns. “Zoning is not for sale,” said Bouvier. “It is time to pull the plug on PDD’s.” “PDD’s have morphed from what had been a good idea into something that doesn’t seem to be in the best interest of our community,” said Councilwoman Julie Lofstad. “What the community needs should be determined by the people, not by developers.”

A public hearing on the PDD repeal law will be scheduled for Tuesday, June 13, at 1 PM at Southampton Town Hall. The bill is co-sponsored by Councilman Bouvier and Councilwoman Lofstad.

News of the proposed repeal came hot on the heels of an announcement from the Long Island Environmental Voters Forum. The political action group planned a news conference on the steps of town hall. Their mission? To challenge Schneiderman in his bid for re-election this fall.

LIEVF executive director David Reisfield said his group would be seeking anti-Hills candidates among all the major parties unless Schneiderman “stops the delays and brings ‘The Hills’ proposal to a vote.” He added that Schneiderman should also repeal the town’s Planned Development District ordinance which has been the subject of a long moratorium – but one from which “The Hills” has been exempted.”   Independent scientists have warned that the proposed mega resort would pollute groundwater with nitrogen from wastewater and fertilizers and would poison local waters with golf-related pesticides, according to LIEVF.  “We’re prepared to endorse and campaign for candidates who will kill “The Hills” and repeal PDDs, now, Reisfield said, “Enough is enough!”

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i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

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In Depth News

a better town.”

By Rick Murphy

Since moving here in 1991, Cohen immersed himself in community service. He’s been on the Nature Preserve Committee since 2002, is the Vice-Chair of the Springs Advisory Committee and serves on the Deer Management Committee, among others.

Facing a popular incumbent in the wake of a financial scandal that decimated his political party, Zachary Cohen ran a remarkable race in 2011.

Facing off against the incumbent Bill Wilkinson, a Republican, Cohen, running on the Democratic Party line, lost the East Hampton Town Supervisor’s race by a scant 15 votes just two years after a financial meltdown under Democratic leadership cost East Hampton taxpayers $30 million.

One of Cohen’s strong suits is compromise and the ability to listen and work with others. “Politics is not easy. You don’t see perfection. I have the ability to agree and disagree,” he said.

One issue that is emerging is whether to endorse the offshore wind generator farm of the coast of Montauk. Fishing groups are opposed to the project, thinking it will ruin the fishing industry.

In theory Cohen would have been stamped one of the hot fresh faces in the party, an up and coming politician with a bright future in East Hampton Town politics. Yet he was passed over when the screening committee chose town board candidates two years later, and again last month.

But Cohen’s stint on the sidelines is over. He announced last week that he will challenge the two committee designees for town board, Kathee Burke-Gonzalez and Jeff Bragman, in a primary for a place on the November ballot. Cohen said he would not criticize the inner workings of the party for not choosing him. “I don’t have a problem with the committee, I’m not negative,” he said. Cohen was on the verge of becoming town supervisor in 2011 until Frank MacKay, the wheeling-dealing head of the state Independence Party, replaced him with Bill Wilkinson on the ballot. “I still worked hard. I helped get Peter [Van Scoyoc] and Sylvia [Overby] elected.”

“I’ve never stopped being involved,”

“There are issues that pop up every election. Last year was the airport, and I became an expert on it.” Independent / James J. Mackin

Zachary Cohen’s Quest Continues

Cohen said of the days since the fateful election. He does not make decisions based on the party line, perhaps one reason he was bypassed for the nomination. “I’m not one-sided. I go where the research takes me. I want to make the best decisions for the broadest amount of people in this community.”

Cohen has been a successful restaurateur and real estate investor. He’s an accomplished pianist and a

world class bicyclist.

He holds a BA from Sarah Lawrence, a Masters of Business Administration with Honors from the University of Chicago, and has passed Ph.D. exams in Logic, Philosophy(s) of Science, Language, and Mathematics. Clearly, Cohen has a vision. “I’m trying to make something better for all of us. I have the time, the ability and the interest. I’m willing to do the work to make this

The wind generator firm is now on his radar. “I’ve been studying it. I’ve been dealing with distribution on the grid. It may turn out to be the best possible choice, but I haven’t checked all the boxes yet. There’s more research to be done.”

There is some dissatisfaction within the town between tradesmen and the building department as well as the way the Architectural Review Board conducts itself. “There is clearly frustration. Things can be done more effectively. There should be a procedure developed. Get all the players to sit down and ask them, are you OK with how things are handled?”

Cohen, 67, made it clear to the Democratic Party Committee that he would run a primary if he wasn’t selected. “They must have thought I was bluffing,” he said with a laugh. 21


the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

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Wind Power Efficient? Maybe Not

and the blades themselves will kill thousands of birds.

By Rick Murphy

It may be clean energy, but it apparently isn’t going to be cheap.

Some East Hampton residents are concerned about an underwater cable that will link the offshore facility with the mainland.

The backlash over a proposed wind farm to be built off the coast of Montauk is mushrooming and some concerned politicians are now hedging their bets. As estimates for the cost of the electricity start dribbling in critics say ratepayers will have to pay a hefty premium, and charges were leveled last week the utility companies have known as much all along but are keeping the information from the public. LIPA and PSEG officials have taken pains not to release the true costs of the project that ratepayers will bear, according to a recent article by Mark Harrington in Newsday.

Tom Falcone, the LIPA CEO, told The Independent that a cost of 30-cents per megawatt predicted by an East Hampton Town Trustee “isn’t remotely accurate” but he declined to say what the price would be, even though he acknowledged price projections

“I support efforts to promote renewable energy sources such as wind and solar with the caveat that they be implemented with environmental sensitivity,” said Assemblyman Fred Thiele, a lifelong East End resident. “Not every solar or wind project is a good one.” have been made. He said there are too many variables down the road to make an accurate forecast of the true cost.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell said that if projections are true that the town will be facing a power deficit by 2030, then an alternate means of energy must be developed, and right now Deepwater is the one on the table. “When analyzing the cost of

electricity to the South Fork you have to compare it with the cost of traditional generating plants,” he said.

Environmental groups and the fishing industry were the first to voice their opposition to building 15 turbine wind generators in the Atlantic because of the proximity to fertile fishing grounds. They are concerned the noise emanating from the generators will be disruptive to the fish stock

The cable will likely go under the bay bottom across Napeague Bay then be buried under land from Amagansett to Buell Lane; the electricity itself will not be used exclusively for the town but added to the state grid.

A review of documents provided by PSEG and LIPA reveal costs could far exceed the 30 cent estimate as time goes on – the utility is committing to all of the power generated by the facility, dubbed South Fork Wind, and has agreed to annual price hikes.

“Deepwater has to and should respect and address issues brought up by fisherman and that includes the cable and placing the generators on fishing grounds,” Cantwell said. Currently the generators are sited on Cox’s Ledge, a popular codfishing site.

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Zachary Cohen, who is running for East Hampton Town Board, said he is reaching out to European fishing groups who have studied the effects of wind generators on different species.

Phone: (631) 725-0074 Fax: (631) 725-8672

“I am concerned by Cuomo’s energy plan, particularly the $7.6 billion subsidy we will all be paying to keep nuclear power plants open in upstate,” Thiele said. Cuomo seems particularly enamored with Deepwater and some critics said his motives are political in nature.

Continued On Page 24.

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the Independent

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Zeldin Calls Coverage Of AHCA `Untruthful’

By Rick Murphy

Congressman Lee Zeldin, citing biased coverage and Fake News releases, said most of what has been reported about the American Health Care Act is untruthful.

Zeldin said a great majority of voters wanted Obamacare repealed. “Obamacare has resulted in higher premiums, higher deductibles, lost doctors, and cancelled policies.” Under the American Health Care Act, the provisions of Obamacare most favored by Americans have been retained: people with preexisting conditions and adult children living at home will be insured just as they are now.

Brunch for Historical Society

A brunch with the History Bunch to benefit the Hampton Bays Historical Society will take place on Sunday from 11 AM to 1:30 PM at Karamba Tropical Restaurant in Hampton Bays. Tickets are $25 per person and are available at the door. The brunch includes a choice of menu items. Contact the Hampton Bays Historical Society at 631-7280887 for more information.

Bridgehampton Traffic Meeting

The Town of Southampton will hold an informational meeting on traffic safety concerns with the Bridgehampton Business Community tomorrow from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM at the Bridgehampton Nutrition/ Community Center in Bridgehampton. The Town Engineer and the Director of Transportation and Public Safety will discuss what can be done to improve pedestrian safety. Town officials are meeting with community members to hear concerns and ideas for their traffic safety plan for the Hamlet. Call 631-283-6055 for more info.

“Is it true that the American Health Care Act changes the definition of pre-existing conditions? No,” Zeldin asked rhetorically. “Further, the claim made by some local politicians that 310,000 Suffolk County residents with pre-existing conditions will lose their health insurance is a complete fallacy,” Zeldin said. Nor will coverage cost more under the AHCA – in fact, premium costs are projected to stabilize under the new bill after a decade of rapid-fire premium increases.

“It is hysteria to claim that people with pre-existing conditions are not protected,” Zeldin said. Assemblyman Fred Thiele was among the local politicians who blasted the GOP plan, citing “cuts” that will reduce funding to many essential programs. But Medicaid is not shrinking under the AHCA – it’s being restored to pre-Obamacare levels. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicare Services almost 72.5 million people

were enrolled in Medicaid or the affiliated Children’s Health Insurance Program across the United States in 2016. That’s 15 million additional people since Obamacare’s first open enrollment began in the fall of 2013 — a 26.5 percent jump.

GOP critics point out the revenues projected to offset the mammoth hit to Medicaid never happened. Under the AHCA tax credits will be given in lieu of subsidies to help restore stability to Medicaid.

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the Independent

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Deepwater Continued From Page 22.

Deepwater plans offshore wind projects to serve multiple East Coast markets including New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Maryland, and New Jersey.

and thrown hundreds of thousands into its lobbying efforts. Shaw gave Barack Obama’s Organizing For Action committee $1 million, prior to being granted the federal leases.

It May Be Clean Energy, But It Aparently Isn’t Going To Be Cheap

Deepwater at the time had never completed an offshore windgenerating project but was granted the lucrative, exclusive leases on the ocean’s bottom nonetheless.

The company’s first project, off the Rhode Island coast, was completed last season. Deepwater and its lobbyists made a determined effort to sway Rhode Island politicians as well. A hedge fund, which is the majority owner of Deepwater, D.E. Shaw Group, has donated tens of thousands of dollars to Cuomo

More than a few critics charged the LIPA board was pressured into choosing Deepwater even though it wasn’t the lowest bidder.

“Critics of the process are concerned that political considerations and lobbying may have eclipsed less-expensive alternatives to the $1.6 billion wind farm,” Harrington reported.

The Republican minority in East Hampton Town is suggesting landbased wind farms as an alternative to Deepwater. “I have no opposition to wind power on land [but] siting is even harder than offshore,” Thiele commented.

Algae Bloom In Agawam Lake

Recent sampling by Stony Brook University has confirmed the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom, also known as blue-green algae, in Agawam Lake in Southampton. Health officials ask residents not to swim or wade in the lake and to keep their pets and children away from the area.

Contact with waters can result to various symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, skin, eye, or throat irritation, allergic reactions, or breathing difficulties. Cyanobacteria blooms are naturally present in most lakes, but when they become abundant they form groups of algae that is blue, green, yellow, brown, and red. To report a suspected blue-green algae bloom that is in a body of

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water, contact the Division of Water of New York State at 518402-8179. Visit suffolkcountyny. gov for more information on bluegreen algae.

C.T.

Your Choice, Your Voice

The Hampton Bays Civic Association will hold an open forum on Tuesday at 7 PM at the Southampton Town Community Center on Ponquogue Avenue in Hampton Bays. The forum will provide attendees with a chance to speak about a wide range of topics that are important to community members.

The Hampton Bays Civic Association wants to hear your opinions and concerns regarding the hamlet. Bring your voice and speak about what you want to talk about. Visit hbcivic.org or call 631723-2289 for further information.

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24


the Independent

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On The Beat

By Rick Murphy

Cocaine and Ecstasy? East Hampton Town Police arrested a Springs man last Thursday and charged him with dealing drugs out of his residence.

trucks parked at Hampton Bays Diner parking lot.

erratically on Montauk Highway; police said field tests revealed she had been drinking excessively.

Escape Third Degree

Police on the scene said the woman “tensed up” when they tried to formally arrest her and resisted when it was time to cuff her. She eventually was subdued.

East Hampton Town Police charged 21 year-old from Hampton Bays with Third Degree Escape. Adrianna C. Nava was stopped shortly before 8 PM on April 29 because she was allegedly driving

Ten minutes later, en route to

Knudsen was charged with four felony counts of Criminal Sale of a Controlled Substance in the Third Degree, one felony count of Criminal Sale in the Second Degree, and one felony count of Criminal Sale of a Controlled Substance in the Fifth Degree.

Police said the arrest is part of an ongoing investigation of cocaine and ecstasy distribution in the area. Knudsen was arraigned in East Hampton Town Justice Court, then remanded to the County Jail Facility in Riverhead. Police are asking anyone with additional information to contact them at 631-537-7575, noting that all calls will be kept confidential.

Southampton Town Police said Antonio Lucas, 48, of Hampton Bays was pronounced dead after a horrific motor vehicle accident on Flanders Road. Police ascertained after interviewing eyewitnesses that Lucas was headed south around 7 PM when he lost control of his 1992 Toyota Corolla near the Montauk Highway intersection. Lucas’s vehicle careened off a minivan, went airborne then slammed into two unoccupied

That resulted in the charge of Third Degree Escape, in addition to the DWI and Resisting Arrest charges.

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the Independent

i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

By Kitty Merrill

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A New Home For Food Pantry On Tuesday at noon EHFP officially opens its new home at 159 Pantigo Road, on the grounds of town hall, next to the animal control department.

Last summer when members of the East Hampton Food Pantry board learned they were being evicted after 12 years, they were shocked and heartbroken.

“I’ve been talking to the food pantry for a year trying to help them find a more permanent home. They’ve been getting bounced from place to place [since the eviction],� Supervisor

This week they, and the hundreds of residents who use their services every week, have something to celebrate.

Larry Cantwell explained. The renovation of the historic Baker House on the town hall campus freed up space in another section of the site that previously housed the Department of Land Management. That staff will move into the historic house, and the pantry can take over those offices. EHFP Chairman Vicki Littman

observed, “Being on the grounds of town hall with office space, a roomy distribution building, a new freezer and refrigeration unit gives us a sense of permanence that is greatly appreciated. We thank the town board for working diligently to find us a new location within the town. We are grateful for their endless support, guidance, encouragement and compassion for the less fortunate in our community. We would also like to thank all of the town employees for their help in preparing the space.� The food pantry is not a town department; there was no legal mandate for officials to find space. Still, said Cantwell, “When it comes to feeding people, we’re a community and the town felt obliged to help them find a place.�







 





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The facility is in a good location to serve the needs of clients from East Hampton, Amagansett, Montauk and Wainscott. However, Cantwell said that in considering the design for the new senior center on Springs Fireplace Road, officials are evaluating where the new community building can craft space for the food pantry. A pantry set up there would be located near the senior housing it serves and nearer to its original home at Windmill Village.

But, said Cantwell, “At least they’ve got a space for now and they can stay there as long as they need to.� East Hampton Food Pantry’s mission is to address hunger in the town of East Hampton. The goal is to maintain a center for food collection, storage and distribution, to reach out to those in need, to raise public awareness and to encourage and solicit support from individuals, businesses, fraternal and philanthropic organizations, religious institutions and the like, through volunteerism and donations of food and/or funds. Smooth function was interrupted in 2016 by the labor and expense of moving to a location less central to the majority of the clientele, Littman pointed out. Nevertheless, in 2016 EHFP served 12,528 adults, 7,049 children and 4,919 for a total of 24,273 individuals and 8,853 households.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

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Arts & Entertainment

‘Water Color Works’ “Sunny day” by Jerry Schwabe

By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

FR EE

IN SP W EC HO TI LE ON H –C O AL USE LT OD AY

“Water Color Works,” an art exhibition featuring local artists Kirsten Benfield, Johanna Caleca, Barbara DiLorenzo, Lesley Obrock, Kate Rabinowitz, Janet Rojas, Gerry Sacks, Jerry Schwabe and Carol Craig Sigler, will be held at Ashawagh Hall in Springs this weekend. An opening reception is set for on Saturday from 5 to 8 PM.

“Even in abstraction, my work East End,” said Jerry Schwabe of shows how deeply I am affected his art. by the light and Carol Craig color of our “My work shows how deeply Sigler believes surroundings: the water, the woods I am affected by the light and that the East End is the and the open color of our surroundings.” perfect place to fields and all that try to interpret - Jerry Schwabe nature’s beauty light fractured has to offer by water. “I am those of us lucky confident that I will spend the rest enough to live on Long Island’s

of my days searching for this thing that never stays the same,” she said. Kirsten Benfield’s work features landscapes, abstract, transfers, figures, wild life, sea life, and the odd still life.

Johanna Caleca has studied with a number of respected artists including Ralph Carpentier, Michael Viera, Kimberly Monson, Continued On Page 48.

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Hampton Daze by Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Time For Tea Taste Of The Upper West Side

If you know me, you know I love a good tea party. When I heard about a Mother's Day Afternoon Tea happening at The Hempstead House in Sands Point, coincidentally the home where my grandmother grew up, I knew it was meant to be. So, my family and I 28

took the field trip to Nassau County to indulge in a Gatsby-esque afternoon. Always a special place for us, I thought I would share. The location is magnificent and one of Long Island’s greatest treasures. My great-grandfather was the

If you’re looking for something fun to do in NYC before Memorial Day Weekend, the 10th Anniversary Taste of the Upper West Side being held on Friday and Saturday. The event is a two night culinary celebration featuring over 85 restaurants. The first night is Summer in the City: Surf & Turf, hosted by celebrity chefs Alex Guarnaschelli and Adam Richman, joined by The New York Times journalist and author of A Meatloaf in Every Oven, Frank Bruni.

On Saturday, it’s Best of the West Presented by Park West Village, hosted by Jesse Palmer, Renown Analyst and Host of Disney’s ESPN and ABC Networks. The events are held under the Grand Tent on the O’Shea Complex Schoolyard on the Upper West Side.

secretary of the estate, and lived with his family in the Hempstead House for over three decades. During the golden age of the Gold Coast the estate was owned by Howard Gould followed by Daniel Guggenheim. I've always been fascinated by the stories I’ve been told about visitors like Babe Ruth and Charles Lindbergh.

Preserve Conservancy, a non profit organization. The venue provides year round cultural and educational programs, tours, and activities. It’s also been used for many film and TV productions. Some include “Billions,” “Boardwalk Empire,” “Royal Pains,” “Gotham,” and “The Blacklist.”

Today, the Sands Point Preserve (aka East Egg) is owned by Nassau County and one of the few original Gold Coast homes that is still up and running. Many were destroyed over time. The estate is maintained and operated by the Sands Point

The event benefits the Upper West Side community. For tickets visit www.tasteuws.com

It was a beautiful afternoon overlooking the Long Island Sound. We also decided it would be fun to BYO original silver tea set, which was a big hit with the history buffs! For more information on the Sands Point Preserve visit www. sandspointpreserveconservancy.org.


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THE 10TH ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND JURIED FINE ART SHOW ON THE MONTAUK GREEN Friday, Saturday & Sunday - MAY 26, 27 and 28, 2017

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Indy Snaps

The New York Center For Children Independent / Patrick McMullan

Springs Mystery Art Independent / Camila Tucci

Art lovers and those who enjoy a brainteaser came out for the conclusion of the Springs Mystery Art show on Saturday. During the big reveal, those who purchased art to benefit the Springs School visiting artists program found out if their purchase was painted by a school student or one of the area’s famed professionals. 30

The New York Center for Children hosted its 22nd Annual Spring Celebration Benefit on May 8, at Clement Restaurant at the Peninsula Hotel in New York City. The organization celebrated over 20 years of helping children who have experienced abuse achieve their potential. The event featured a silent auction where guests bid on many gifts and experiences, as well as a live jazz performance by Lucas Pino along with strolling magic by Ben Nemzer. The event raised approximately $140,000 toward the organization’s mission to support victims of child abuse and their families.


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Entertainment Guide by Camila Tucci Music Suffolk Theater The Purple Xperience: A Tribute to Prince is set for Friday at 8 PM at Suffolk Theater in Riverhead. The Purple Xperience is five-piece tribute band that has been touring the country since 2011 covering Prince’s hits throughout his career. Tickets range from $35 to $40. Judy Collins performs on the Suffolk Theater stage on Sunday at 7 PM. Tickets range from $50, $60, and $75. For more information visit suffolktheater.com. Piano Concert The Spring Salon presents international concert pianist Nicholas King on Friday at 6 PM at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill. King is multi-award winning, world-class musician from Los Angeles. He has performed in concert halls throughout the United States, Canada, Ireland, Spain, Hungary, Austria, France, and Poland. Call 631-283-2118 for ticket prices and for more information. Southampton Arts Center LIVE from Southampton Arts Center on Jobs Lane in Southampton presents Hip Hop Meets Salsa and Jazz with Baba Isreal and Friends on Saturday at 7 PM. Doors open at 6:30 PM for refreshments compliments of Union Cantina and Wolffer Estate Vineyard. Tickets are $15 and $5 for children. Call 631-283-0967 for more information. Marissa Mulder Southampton Cultural Center presents an Evening of Cabaret with Marissa Mulder on Saturday from 7 PM to 9 PM. Mulder will showcase the music of singer-songwriter Tom Waits with “Tom…in His Words” at

the Levitas Center for the Arts on Pond Lane in Southampton. Tickets are $35 for general admission and $45 for ringside tables. Visit scc-arts.org to purchase tickets. Local Musicians The Montauk Community Church Coffee House hosts Josh and Hannah Faye Huizing on Friday at 7:30 PM. Josh is the music director at Grace Presbyterian Church in Water Mill and Hannah teaches voice and beginner piano lessons. This concert is free and open to the public. Call 631-668-2022 for more information.

Judy Collins

Eaton performs on Saturday at 8 PM. Finishing the night is Hello Brooklyn at 10 PM. Visit stephentalkhouse.com or call 631267-3117 to purchase tickets early or for more info.

Latin Music

Townline BBQ

The First Presbyterian Church of East Hampton and Art of Song in collaboration with Organicion Latino-Americana of Eastern Long Island present nylon string guitar player Gil Gutierezz on Saturday at 7:30 PM at the First Presbyterian Church of East Hampton on Main Street. Gutierezz will be accompanied by Bob Stern on the violin and Peter Martin Weiss on the bass. The concert will feature Cuban and Mexican music. Tickets are $20. They are available at Artofsong.org.

Townline in Sagaponack continues Karaoke Nights every Saturday from 8 PM to 12 AM with a special food and drink menu as guests sing their favorites. Come for free pool and pub quiz night at 7 PM every Thursday evening and come hear some “smokin’ hot tunes” live alongside a happy hour menu every Friday from 5 to 8 PM. Townline is open regularly by 11:30 AM until 9 or 10 PM Thursday through Monday. For more info call 631-537-2271 or visit the Townline BBQ Facebook page.

Wednesday Night Live Ray Red and Mike Rusinsky host “Wednesday Night Live,” a weekly open mic at MJ Dowling’s in Sag Harbor from 8 to 11 PM. Performers include musicians, poets, comedians, and singers. Sign up starts at 7 PM. Performers get a free soft drink or tap beverage. Every Friday, it’s karaoke beginning at 10 PM. Stephen Talkhouse Outrageous Open Mic Night is set for Thursday at 8 PM at the Talkhouse in Amagansett. On Friday night at 8 PM, it’s Katherine C.H.E. Strecker Band take the stage at 10 PM. Inda

Words

BookHampton Joan Juliet Buck will visit BookHampton in East Hampton on Saturday at 5 PM. She will speak about her new book The Price of Illusion. Her memoir follows her time spent in London, New York, Los Angeles, and Paris. Visit bookhampton.com to register for this event.

Theater

North Fork The North Fork Community Theater in Mattituck presents Cabaret, directed by Manning Dandridge, from May 18 through

June 4. Show times are Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 PM and Sundays at 2:30 PM. To reserve your seats call 631-298-6328. For more information call 631-2984500. Guild Hall A final showcase of “Young Cowgirls Make Waves” presented by Kate Mueth and the NeoPolitical Cowgirls is set for Friday from 7 PM to 9 PM at Guild Hall in East Hampton. Admission is free and registration is required. Visit GuildHall.org to register.

Film

Live Screening Guild Hall hosts a National Live Screening of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead on Saturday at 7 PM. Daniel Radcliffe, Joshua McGuire, and David Haig star in this comedy broadcast live from The Old Vic theatre in London. Tickets are $18 and $16 for members. To purchase tickets visit GuildHall. org. Award Winning Film The Parrish Art Museum hosts a screening of The Divine Bell and the Butterfly, directed by Julian Schnabel, on Saturday at 3 PM. The film tells the story of Elle editor Jean-Dominique Bauby. Tickets are $20 and $5 for member. They include museum admission as well. Call 631-283-2118 for more information. 31


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Gallery Walk

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@indyeastend. com. No Boundaries The RJD Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “No Boundaries.” The show highlights artists whose conviction is to push us to see beyond our limits. An opening reception will be held on Saturday from 6 to 8 PM.

ONGOING

Watercolors The Amagansett Free Library presents Kenneth B. Walsh “Watercolors.” In the 1950s, Walsh came to Montauk from New York City to paint seascapes, catch fish, sing of nature’s beauty, put down roots, and later, develop a style of painting all his own. The show will be on display through May 28. Abstract Anarchy The White Room Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “Abstract Anarchy.” The show will feature artists Barbara Bilotta, Jessica Singer, Melissa Hin, and June Kaplan. The show will run through May 29. The Last Baymen “The Last Baymen of Amagansett,”

photography exhibit at the Amagansett Library with photographs by Michael Ruggiero is on display. These images reflect the hard-working class of fisherman known as “Baymen” who are disappearing from the end of Long Island. The show will run through May 30. Tony Vaccaro

Rick Garland, Reach for the Sun, Acrylic on Canvas, 28 x 36” at RJD Gallery.

Pollock-Krasner House in Springs presents “East End Art World, August 1953: Photographs by Tony Vaccaro.” In August of 1953, Look magazine sent Tony Vaccaro on assignment to East Hampton to photograph Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner for a feature article. The piece was killed, but Vaccaro kept the black and white images, a group of which was shown at the Pollock-Krasner House in 2010. The exhibition will feature 20 of these images, some shown for the first time, including a previously unknown color portrait of Pollock. The show will run through July 29.

Deceptive Spaces

Member Exhibition

The 6th Annual Spring Flower Show is on display at Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor.

Guild Hall in East Hampton presents its 79th Annual Guild Hall Artist Member Exhibition. The Artist Members Exhibition is the oldest non-juried museum exhibition on Long Island. Artists from every level participate in this exhibition to show their support of Guild Hall and its role in their community. The show will run through June 3. For more info visit www.guildhall.org.

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Spring Flowers Art

Featuring a variety of styles from realism to impressionism by local and regional artists, the show runs through May 25. Contributing artists include Liz Gribin, Joyce Brian, Joan Tripp, Barbara Groot, Romany Kramoris, Muriel Hanson Falborn, Hazel Shearer, Thomas Gray, Ghilia Lipman-Wulf, Pingree Louchheim, Veronica Mezzina, Richard Udice, and Lois Bender. For more information call 631725-2499. East End Collected3

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Sarah Slappey debuts “Deceptive Spaces” at Roman Fine Art in East Hampton. The exhibition of new paintings by Slappey marks her first major solo exhibit. “Deceptive Spaces” features a collection of new oil paintings. Slappey has described her painting style as having roots in the Southern Gothic aesthetic, an amalgamation of Bible Belt superstition, ghost stories, swamp lore, and mysticism. The show runs through Sunday. For more info visit www.romanfineart.com.

Southampton Arts Center presents “East End Collected3,” curated by Paton Miller. The show is on view through May 29. Artists include Stephanie Brody-Lederman, David Bunn Martine, Arthur Carter, Jennifer Cross, Janet Culbertson, Franco Cuttica, Josh Dayton,

Eric Dever, Adriana Echavarria, Christopher Engel, William Falkenberg, Brian Farrell, Terri Gold, Lautaro Keudell, Mary Lambert, Laurie Lambrecht, Gerson Leiber, Judith Leiber, Brett Loving, Lynn Matsuoka, Dinah Maxwell Smith, Jonathan Morse, J. Alan Ornstein, Pamela O. Ornstein, Simon Parkes, Gabrielle Raacke, Olivier Robert, Maria Schön, Eileen Dawn Skretch, Neill Slaughter, Susan Tepper, Diane Tuft, Sarah Jaffe Turnbull, and Frank Wimberley. Neva Setlow East Quogue artist Neva Setlow presents a new series of wood constructions and paper collages at the Southampton Town Hall. The exhibition is on view through May 30. As in much of Setlow’s work, color is a dominant feature. Her work is celebratory, positive, and joyful. Her collages are alive with color and free-floating images. For more info visit www.nevasetlow. com. ...As Humanly Possible East End Arts presents “... As Humanly Possible,” a new art invitational exhibition at the Southampton Cultural Center featuring five regional photographers. Photographers include Marilyn DiCarlo Ames, Jim Lennon, Steven Schreiber, Meryl Spiegel, and Joan Wozniak. The exhibition, curated by Steven Schreiber, will be on display through Sunday.


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benefit the animals. A cocktail reception will be held from 6 to 8 PM with an exclusive preview hour beginning at 5 PM. The sale is open to the public Sunday and Monday, May 28 and 29. The cost for the exclusive preview is $250 and the cocktail reception is $150. Designers include Rachael Ray Home, Irving & Fine for John Rosselli, Tamara Fraser, Worth Interiors, Cathy Kincaid, Cathy Kincaid Interiors, Inc., Richard Keith Langham, Jeff Lincoln, Jeff Lincoln Interiors, Inc., Kathryn’s Flower Gardens, Ann Pyne, McMillen Inc., and Iris Zonlight, Blue Ocean Design. Co Chairs of the event are Gordon H. Hoppe, Gigi Mahon, Alex Papachristidis, and Marshall Watson. For more information and tickets visit www. arfhamptons.org.

Beauty Event

Sweet Charities

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro

The seventh annual Reconstructed Bra Fashion Show and Auction to benefit Lucia’s Angels and the Coalition for Women’s Cancers at Southampton Hospital will be held tomorrow at the Southampton Social Club, starting at 7 PM. Tickets are $55 in advance and $65 at the door. For tickets visit www.luciasangels.org/ bra.

bring DockDogs to the North Fork by co-hosting the first Annual “North Fork Dock Diving Pet Expo and Fundraiser Event.” DockDogs is the largest and most diversified presenter of dock diving dog performance sports in the world. For more information contact Kim Loper of Harbor Pet at 631-477-1518 or email info@harbor-pet.com or contact Greenport Harbor Brewing Company at 631-4771100. The official website for the event is www.TheGivingTank.org/ NorthForkDogDockDiving.

Wild Things!

Northwell Walk

“Wild Things!” fundraiser to benefit Evelyn Alexander Wildlife Rescue Center and Quogue Wildlife Refuge will be held on Saturday at 6 PM at 230 Elm in Southampton. Ticket price is $55. There will be a silent auction, Chinese auction, live animals, and an exhibition of works by Dean Andrews. Visit www. wildliferescuecenter.org.

Peconic Bay Medical Center Northwell Health presents the “Northwell Walk At East End” at Tanger Outlets in Riverhead on Sunday. Registration opens at 8:30 AM. Funds raised go directly to Peconic Bay Medical Center to serve the wellness needs of the East End community. For more info visit www. northwellhealthwalk.org/event/ eastend.

Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@ indyeastend.com. Bra Fashion Show

Paws In The Park The Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation presents “Paws In The Park” dog walk at Red Creek Park on Saturday from 11 AM to 3 PM. The walk includes a one mile trail, vendors, crafts, and activities for the whole family, as well as pet industry experts and demonstrations. There will be live music by New Life Crisis. Registration is $20 in advance and $25 day of walk. For more info visit www.SASF.akaraisin.com/ pawsinthepark. Dock Diving Pet Expo Greenport Harbor Brewing Company’s location in Peconic will be transformed into a dog dock diving pet extravaganza on Saturday and Sunday from 9 AM to 5 PM. Harbor Pet and Greenport Harbor Brewing Company have joined forces to

Environmental Council North Fork Environmental Council’s 45th Anniversary Celebration will be held at Case’s Place in New Suffolk on Sunday at 4:30 PM. There will be a special tribute to past president Howard Meinke. Starting in 2017, two memorial scholarships will be awarded in his honor. There will be a buffet dinner, cash bar, and a picturesque view from the deck. Tickets are $75 per person. Visit eventbrite.com for tickets.

A Summer Kick Off Beauty Event to benefit The Ellen Hermanson Foundation will take place on Thursday, May 25, from 6 to 9 PM, at White’s Apothecary in Southampton. The event will feature mini-facials and hand treatments, hair styling, makeup applications, swag bags, a $25 White’s Apothecary gift card, a beauty basket drawing, and refreshments. The Ellen Hermanson Foundation ensures access to state-of-the-art breast health care and empowers people affected by cancer. Funds raised will support accessible mammography screening at the Ellen Hermanson Breast Center at Southampton Hospital and its satellite location in Hampton Bays.

The LGBT Network The LGBT Network will welcome the Hamptons LGBT community and supporters to kick-off Summer 2017 at the Bridgehampton Tennis and Surf Club on Saturday, May 27, from 6 to 8 PM. The event is held to raise money for the LGBT Network’s Hamptons Center in Sag Harbor. Prior to this event, LGBT civil rights trailblazer Edie Windsor, will host a classic BBQ at her home in Southampton to benefit the LGBT Network from 2 to 6 PM. For more info and tickets visit www.lgbtnetwork.org. ARF Designer Show House Top interior decorators will transform the ARF Thrift & Treasure Shop into a designer show house, using furnishings from the shop and from their own collections on Saturday, May 27. Everything is for sale to

The Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation presents the 4th annual “A Taste Of Wine” on Sunday, May 28, from 5 to 8 PM, at the Southampton Historical Museum. The event features wine tastings, hors d’oeuvres, and live music. The cost is $50 per person. For tickets visit www. southamptonanimalshelter.com. Oyster Garden Enjoy the East Hampton Oyster Garden Reception on Sunday, May 28, from 3 to 5 PM, at Bay Kitchen Bar in Springs. The event is to support the East Hampton Shellfish Education and Enhancement Directive. Support benefits the oyster garden initiative to educate the community about the importance of oysters to our ecosystem and as a sustainable food source. The cost is $65 per person and includes beer, wine, oysters, light fare and a tour of the nursery. For tickets visit Continued On Page 59.

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A Taste Of Wine

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Nonstop Dabbles Heavy At MMF

By Kitty Merrill

“One guy, cooler than the next.” Fans might use the refrain from “Get the Girl,” to describe the members of Nonstop to Cairo. Surely, the crowd crammed into Amityville Music Hall last January for the launch of NonStop’s latest album, Dabble Heavy, would.

Perched atop the drum set platform in the sold out venue, Alex Turner had a bird’s eye view of audience members singing along even as the newly released cds went on sale for the first time. Fans already knew the words to their songs, how did that feel? “It felt like a dream,” Turner replied.

“It was a wonderful feeling, I must say,” founding member Nick Diamond offered. “It was something that’s always been missing . . . to have that on that night, it felt like we’d accomplished something.”

Independent / Kitty Merrill August Harris and Nick Diamond at the Memory in 2014. Nonstop to Cairo returns to the Montauk Music Festival this weekend.

They’ve accomplished plenty since the late 90s when Diamond (guitar, vocals) began jamming with bassist Matt Ezzo in high school. Fellow Baldwin native August Harris (vocals) joined the pair and since 2009 Nonstop has toured the East Coast developing a cult following. Turner and Andrew Joseph on lead sax round out the quintet whose sound could be described as some ska, some hip hop, some funk, and a heaping helping of charisma and juice.

SEASONED PROFESSIONALS

Dabble Heavy is an aural portrait of all those traits as well as a glimpse at an array of emotions that comprise the human condition. There’s party tunage for sure, but the disc also brings depth -- a little angst in “Get the Girl,” a little frustration in “Not Allison,” a little insecurity tinged with hope in “Chicken in My Oats,” as in, “I wake up every day as if the sun believes in me.” The latter song is a fan – and music critic’s -- favorite. Afropunk contributing writer Nathan Leigh called it one of the band’s best. He said Nonstop is “one of the few ska bands to do something really new with the genre in at least a decade.” Everyone had a hand in crafting the songs on Dabble Heavy, Diamond explained. “Matt or myself would bring a song idea,

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the initial structure. But it doesn’t become a song till we sit with it with everybody and everybody puts their flavor on it.” An uber-proficient percussionist, Turner contributes tasty beats that never overwhelm, adding subtle layers to each song, keeping the energy, as he’s fond of saying, “Wayup!”

Ezzo is a spectacle at shows. With a trademark huge grin behind sexy nerd glasses, he weaves through the audience or jumps across the stage, a dervish with a guitar. On tenor sax, Joseph underwrites Nonstop’s singular sound. At the Music Hall in January, he helmed a horn section featuring guest musicians. On Dabble Heavy this versatile musician provides the foundation upon which colleagues erect exuberance. Harris’ flavor – “Keeping cool, spitting fire through the sound byte”— draws listeners to another standout Dabble Heavy offering, “Influenzska,” with classic rap bravado foreplay to Diamond’s crystal clear evocative vocals.

“Always give them more than they expected. Coming with the live in your direction. Surely to be legends on our exit.”

Maybe their Montauk Music Festival debut in 2012, opening for buddies Oogee Wawa (MC Jess Lee jumps in for a verse on “Intro”) at The Point in 2012, wasn’t the stuff of legend – unless you were lucky enough to be there, or part of the sweat soaked bachelorette party dancing with Harris and Ezzo.

Members returned to close out the festival at the Memory in 2014 and this weekend, there are seven – count em, seven -- opportunities to see them at the MMF. Don’t miss what Good Times magazine called, “A one way ticket to first place.” Nonstop to Cairo plays Atlantic Terrace (5 PM), Memory Motel (7PM), and Shagwong (12 AM) beginning Friday. On Saturday find them back at the Memory at 7 PM, and Tauk at midnight. Sunday they’ll hit the pavilion on the green at 1 PM and finish out the weekend at Zum Schneider at 7 PM.


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Delia, Alive In France traveling and performing with actresses Cristina Chiriac (Abel’s wife), Dounia Sichov (who is also in another film at the festival) and PJ Delia (Montauk native and former radio personality).   The film is full of insights into

the process as cameras constantly follow Abel, Joe, Paul and the others touring and encountering the unpredictable.The premiere is on Saturday with more showings after in Cannes, Paris, Geneva, Rome, Milan, Florence, and Brussels.

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The band will play in Marseilles and Cannes (5/20). Alive in France was near the top of the list of Director’s Fortnight films that will be premiered. The Director’s Fortnight is a prestigious part of the Festival since 1969, hoping to capture more creative and independent films. It continues after the main Festival to Marseille, Paris, Geneva, Rome, Milan, Florence and Brussels.

Don’t Get Stuck In The Heat This Summer. Joe and P.J. Delia

Once again, local music mainstay Joe Delia will be playing at and in a film at The Cannes Film Festival. He’s featured in Abel Ferrara’s Alive in France. The film is a documentary of an autumn, 2016 tour in France by Abel Ferrara with the composer of the soundtracks of most of his popular films — Joe Delia and longtime collaborator Paul Hipp.

Alive in France follows the trio on a tour, showing strategizing, scouting,

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East End Calendar by Kitty Merrill Each week we’ll highlight local community events and library offerings presented by area institutions and organizations. It’s on you to send ‘em in, kids. Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email news@ indyeastend.com.

the dory barn on Atlantic Avenue in Amagansett.

WEDNESDAY 5•17•17

SUNDAY 5•21•17

• The East Hampton Town Marine Museum at 301 Bluff Road, Amagansett will be open until Columbus Day weekend, October 8, on Saturdays and Sundays and some holidays, too.

• The Young Adult Drawing Club for kids in fifth through eighth grades meets at the Amagansett Library at 2 PM. Drawing games, free draw, and collaborative drawing projects are on the agenda.

SATURDAY 5•20•17

WEDNESDAY 5•24•17

• At 10 AM East Hampton Trails Preservation Society presents an historical hike to Dominy Cemetery. Traverse a little used trail from Spring Close Highway to the Dominy Cemetery where local historian and Town Crier Hugh King will speak about the famous and talented woodworking family and their exploits in the 17th and 18th century. Meet just beyond the railroad underpass on Spring Close Highway. Leader: Lee Dion 631-375-2339.

• Stop by East Hampton Library for an informative hour on how to download digital materials to your device. Meet “Libby” the new Overdrive App, designed to make borrowing easier. Bring your device! IPad, IPhone, Android, or Kindle Fire. 3:30 to 4:30 PM. Sign up at the Reference Desk, or call 631-324-0222 ext.3.

East Hampton

• It’s Stewardship Day at Quail Hill Farm on Deep Lane in Amagansett. Beginning at 10 AM, join in the fun at this annual workday and help transplant this year’s seedlings from the greenhouse. Free! All ages welcome. Please park on Deep Lane, reached via Town Lane or Side Hill Lane and meet at the greenhouse. Moderate to heavy rain cancels. For more information and to reserve, call 631283-3195 ext. 19 to RSVP. • East Hampton Village Ocean Rescue hosts its second annual multi-family yard sale from 8 AM to 1 PM at

• Meet Bear, a therapy Dog, at the Amagansett Library at 3 PM. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Come to the library to meet Una, teen volunteer, and Bear, who is a therapy dog. Una will chat about training Bear and the volunteer work they do together.

Southampton

THURSDAY 5•18•17

• The world of resume writing and cover letters has changed dramatically in the past few years. Keeping one’s resume and cover letter up to date is vital in today’s ever changing job marketplace. Check out a workshop at Quogue Library for will show examples of effective resumes and cover letter and less effective ones.  Bring your laptop (Mac and/or Windows) and copies of your resume and cover letter. 6 PM. Register by calling the Quogue Library at 631-653-4224 ext. 101. • Author and story-teller Rosemary McKinley has dug deep into the life

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and adventures of Captain Henry Green (1794-1873). She’ll discuss what she’s learned at the Rogers Mansion in Southampton Village at 11 AM. From 6 to 7:30 PM, it’s the spring open house at the mansion.

and to register, call 631-288-3335 or visit the library website at www. westhamptonlibrary.net.

FRIDAY 5•19•17

SUNDAY 5•21•17

• Stony Brook University astronomer, Marilena LoVerde, will discuss the evolution of the universe, what we know, what questions remain and how we hope to find the answers at 7 PM at the South Fork Natural History Museum & Nature Center in Bridgehampton. Weather permitting, observing the sky through a telescope will follow the lecture. This event is free, but donations to help support our educational programs are appreciated.

• Teens are invited to celebrate National Pizza Day at 3 PM at Westhampton Free Library 7 Library Ave., Westhampton Beach. During the event, teens can try different types of pizza. To register, call 631-288-3335 or visit the library website at www. westhamptonlibrary.net.

• Tweens, ages nine to 12, are invited to participate in a Paint Night at Pawcasso Art Studio from 6 to 7:30 PM at 8 Moniebogue Lane, Westhampton Beach. The Westhampton Free Librarysponsored event will support sheltered animals. The class is $20 and Pawcasso will donate $5 to Bideawee for each registrant. In person registration at the library only. Payment due at time of registration. For more information, call 631-288-3335 or visit the library website at www.westhamptonlibrary. net. • From 6 to 8 PM the Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons hosts a Garden Fair Preview Party. Includes wine and hors d’oeuvres; first choice of our carefully selected plants for sale; and a silent auction of beautiful containers made by talented local gardeners. All are invited. Admission is $60. Location: Bridgehampton Community House, Montauk Highway (cross street is School Street) Bridgehampton. The fair takes place Saturday form 9 AM to 1 PM. It features the sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and trees in addition to gently used books and will take place on the grounds of the Bridgehampton Community House. Admission free. SATURDAY 5•20•17

• The Animal Rescue Fund is slated to visit Marders in Bridgehampton with animals for adoption from 9 AM to 11.

• The Westhampton Free Library is hosting a National Armed Forces Day “Night Out” from 6 to 8 PM, at the VFW Post in Westhampton Beach. The event will feature a special menu created by Justin’s Chop Shop and includes a complimentary beverage or glass of wine. The group Under the Influence will provide music. The cost is $30 per person. For more information

• The Rogers Memorial Library will offer a document shredding event from 10 AM to noon, in the Cooper Hall Parking Lot. Personal or household documents will be shredded in the Mobile Shredding Truck operated by Quality Shredding. There is limit to three standard size storage boxes or three paper or clear plastic bags. Business or office records, plastic, wet paper, metal, books, magazines, newspaper, catalogs, cardboard, photographs, film, CDs are prohibited. Reservations are not required for this event. • Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt 2017 season of the Sundays at Two series will kick off at 2 PM with a presentation about river otters on Long Island. The Long Pond Greenbelt Nature Center is at 1061 Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike and is handicap accessible. All Sundays at Two events are free and open to the public. Refreshments are served.

• Ashley Oliver, South Fork Natural History Museum Nature Educator is your leader for Beach Exploration & Beach-Rock Bingo! Kids ages three to five investigate rocks of all shapes, sizes, and colors. Bring something to carry your rocks in, take home the board you make to play every time you are at the beach, and start your rock collection now! Material fee $3. 10:30 AM, Sag Harbor. Call SoFo at 631-537-9735 for meeting place, admission, and registration information. • Meet Marilyn E. Weigold, author of Peconic Bay, at the Hampton Bays Library at noon. In Peconic Bay, Weigold examines the past 400 years of the region’s history, tracing the growth of the fishing industry, the rise of tourism, and the impact of a military presence in the wake of September 11.

• Marders on Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton hosts weekly gardening lectures Sundays at 10 AM. This week it’s all about dahlias, peonies, and the cutting garden. • The Westhampton Free Library will host a Lunch and Learn discussion on Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood, at 1 PM. During the session, participants will have the opportunity to examine the book, the film and mini-series with Michael Edelson, a Stony Brook Film Studies professor. A screening of the film will take place in advance of the discussion on Friday at 6 PMin the library. To register, call 631-288-3335 or visit the library website at www. westhamptonlibrary.net. • The 10:30 AM Sunday service at the Unitarian Universalist Meetinghouse, 977 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike @ Scuttlehole Rd. focuses on the topic “Falling in Love with Earth.”


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East End Dining

Independent/ Courtesy Hampton Coffee

Local Mom’s Treats At Hampton Coffee

By Jessica Mackin-Cipro

A big part of Hampton Coffee Company’s business philosophy has always been supporting local business. On the shelves at any of their locations you will find great products from local small businesses like Simply Made mugs and Copia Bars. Hampton Coffee has recently added a delicious afternoon dessert selection. One that is made with a lot of TLC.

Locally-baked and handmade “Zuzi’z Zookiez Linzer Tartz” are available at all four of Hampton Coffee Company’s family-owned espresso bars and cafés throughout The Hamptons.

A local mom from Westhampton Beach named Zuzana, with a sweet tooth and a love for baking, has created Zuzi’z Zookiez, which include deliciously delicate linzer tart cookies. Zuzi’z began as a

E

home-based business but has since moved into the Stony Brook University Business Incubator in Calverton as her treats have gained more fans and her company has grown. In the kitchen Zuzana zests lemons by hand, cracks eggs one-by-one separating the yolks from the whites, and mixes the rest of the linzer tart ingredients

- appropriately calling the bright batter “Yellow Heaven.” Once the batter is rolled-out, Zuzana cuts it by hand and bakes each batch to perfection. The tarts get their raspberry filling spread by hand, and then they’re sandwiched together and individually dusted with confectioners’ sugar.

For more info on Hampton Coffee visit www.hamptoncoffee.com.

ASTPORT LIQUORS Monday 9-6, Tuesday-Thursday Friday• &•Closed Saturday 9-9, 12-6 Open 12pm 6pm onSunday Monday OpenSunday Sunday 12pm-9-8, - 6pm Monday 12-7pm

Tastings Every Sat. 3-7 pm

Senior Discount Tuesday

All Cards AllMajor Major Credit Credit Cards & DebitAccepted Cards Accepted

Gift Wrapping LOTTO IN STORE

$

1.00 Off 10.00 Purchase $

Not to be combined with other offers.

$

2.00 Off 20.00 Purchase $

Not to be combined with other offers.

15 Eastport Manor Road • Eastport • 325-1388 • Open 9 am (In the Eastport Shopping Center, next to King Kullen)

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In the dining room Thursday offers a three-course prime rib dinner.

Food & Beverage

by Jessica Mackin-Cipro spicy margaritas and mango-ritas.

Submit your specials! Deadline for submissions is Thursday at noon. Email to jessica@indyeastend.com.

Prime Time Prime Time at The Palm in East Hampton takes place Sunday through Friday from 5 to 7 PM with half off “Prime Bites” at the Palm Bar.

ONGOING SPECIALS Harbor Bistro Harbor Bistro in Springs presents Sunset Happy Hour, featuring $6 cocktails and $8 appetizers. For more info visit www.harborbistro. net.

Southampton Publick House

Harbor Grill Harbor Grill in Springs hosts a two-for-one taco dinner night every Tuesday from 5 PM to close. Guests may choose from four different taco dinners while sipping $4 coronas, $10 margaritas, and $12

Southampton Publick House presents Monday Night Madness specials. Enjoy $5 pints, $7 burger platters, and $6 wings from 5 to 10 PM. Tuesday is two-for-one entrees with two dinner entrees for the price of one. Wednesday is Ladies Night with draft and drink specials in the taproom starting at 10 PM.

Friday is all night Happy Hour from 4 PM on with DJ Dory starting at 10 PM. Saturday night is DJ JetSet starting at 10 PM. Saturday and Sunday brunch takes place from 11 AM to 3 PM for $18 per person. Monday to Friday is happy hour from 4 to 7 PM with beer, wine, and drink specials. For further information visit www. publick.com or call 631-283-2800.   Indian Wells Tavern Indian Wells Tavern in Amagansett offers half-price bottles of wine every Thursday and Sunday night. On Thursdays diners may enjoy half-price bottles of wine alongside their prime rib promotion which includes a soup or salad to start, followed by prime rib served with baked potato and vegetables for $29. On Sunday, diners may enjoy half-price bottles of wine alongside a la carte

Weekly Specials at Cliffs Elbow Too! $19.99

o $3 cans Light Coors ht g Miller Li er plus oth als ci e sp drink

or Soft Drink with the purchase of an entree

Saturday Spe Happy cHiaol ur 4-7p

18 Park Place East Hampton 324-5400 Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner Take Out Orders

m

Burger Sunday $6.00 All Day

Cliff’s Elbow Too!

1085 Franklinville Road, Laurel

298-3262

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

facebook.com/cliffselbowroom

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Phil’s Waterfront Bar and Grill in Aquebogue presents Happy Hour Monday through Friday from 4 to 7 PM. They also feature live entertainment on Saturdays. Call for details. Almond Specials Almond Restaurant in Bridgehampton presents Meatless Mondays, where the restaurant offers a three course meatless menu for $35 all night. For reservations contact Almond at 631-537-5665. Monday Night Paint The Salty Canvas presents Monday Night Paint Parties at Townline BBQ in Sagaponack happening from 6:30 to 8:30 PM. Cost for the evening is $45 and includes one complimentary Happy Hour drink. To participate guests must register at www. saltycanvashamptons.com within 24 hours of the event.

Buckley’s Inn Between

Wings All Day • Large Selection of Sauces & Rubs

Thursday-Date Night Free Glass of Wine, Beer

Phil’s Waterfront

Nick & Toni’s in East Hampton has introduced its own variation of “Nonna’s Sunday Sauce.” Every Sunday, diners may enjoy slowcooked “Sunday sauce,” served over pasta. Cost for the dish is $20 per person. Spaghetti squash will be available as a gluten-free substitution for pasta. Call Nick & Toni’s at 631-324-3550.

16oz. Steak • Soup or Salad Choice of Potato • Special Dessert

Wing Wednesday’s $9.99 All you can Eat $12.99

Chef Specials that will change weekly.

Nick & Toni’s

Tuesday-Steak Night

Friday ur Happy fHiceocold

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www.elbowroomli.com

Wholesale 725-9087 Retail 725-9004

Happy Hour weekdays at Buckley’s Inn Between in Hampton Bays runs from 4 to 7 PM. On Thursdays, it’s Buckley’s famous wing night with $15 all you can eat wings and all you can drink Miller Lite from 10 PM to 1 AM and music by DJ Pauly.

Prime Meats • Groceries Produce • Take-Out Fried Chicken • BBQ Ribs Sandwiches • Salads Party Platters and 6ft. Heroes Beer, Ice, Soda

Open 7 Days a Week


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Recipe Of The Week by Chef Joe Cipro

Gemelli With Duck Confit Ingredients 4 duck legs 1/2 c sugar 1 c salt

1 tbsp black peppercorns (ground) 1 tsp star anise (ground) 10 tomatoes

2 cloves of garlic sliced thin 1/4 c olive oil

1 lb dried gemelli pasta

1 c mâché leaves (washed) grated Parmesan

1 cup diced butter nut squash 1/2 sliced leeks 2 tbsp butter

1 gallon duck fat or canola oil will work in a pinch

When the duck legs are ready, remove them from the oven and use a slotted spoon to remove them from the hot oil. Place them on a towel and let them cool until they can be handled. When they are cool pick the duck meat. 

You are now ready to cook the pasta. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook the pasta stirring often

for about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat a large sauté pan. Add a bit of olive oil and sauté the leeks and squash. When the squash gets a bit of color add the sauce, then the duck. When the pasta is cooked add the pasta and the butter. Garnish with the mash and grated cheese. Enjoy!

Japanese RestauRant and sushi BaR

Salt and pepper to your liking

Method You will start the night before you are going to serve this dish. The duck legs need to sit in the cure overnight before you confit them. Start by mixing the salt, sugar, and spices together then generously coating the duck legs. Cover and let sit in the fridge over night. 

When you are ready to begin cooking, set your oven to 350. Wash the excess cure from the duck legs and pat them dry. Find a large oven proof vessel to cook the duck legs in. Submerge them in the fat. Either duck fat if you can find it or canola oil will work fine.  Place in the oven at 350 for 30 minutes, just to get the oil up to temperature. Reduce the heat to 275 and let the duck legs cook for three and a half more hours. 

While the duck legs are cooking you can dice the leeks and squash.

Go ahead and make your tomato sauce by first cutting the top off the tomatoes. Put them in the oven with the duck legs for 15 minutes. When you remove the tomatoes from the oven, allow them to cool for 10 minutes, then simply peel the skin off. Crush them with your hand, then on the stove top in a large sauce pot. Heat the olive oil and garlic but do not brown the garlic. Put the tomato into the pot and cook over medium heat for 20 minutes. 

Fine Dining Specializing in Japanese Cuisine & Sushi Offering Lunch & Dinner Menus and Exotic Cocktails We also have a Tatami Room

Open 7 Days for Lunch & Dinner

631-267-7600 40 Montauk Highway Amagansett, NY 39


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Where To Wine by Kitty Merrill Lieb Cellars Friday is locals night. Show your ID for 20 percent off glasses and bottles. Noah’s food truck will be on hand serving up awesome tacos while Mother Nature delivers sweet sunsets. 4 to 7 PM. On Saturday there will be live music featuring Jeff LeBlanc from 3 to 6 PM. www.liebcellars.com. Raphael Blue Roots performs from 1 to 4 PM on Sunday. www.raphaelwine. com. Clovis Point Vineyard and Winery Clovis Point Vineyard and Winery

will feature the Earthtones from 1:30 to 5:30 PM on Saturday. On Sunday, same time, enjoy Firefly. www.clovispointwines.com. Shinn Estate Vineyard Shinn Estate Vineyards hosts self– guided vineyard walks all weekend. Reservations are required. www. shinnestatevineyard.com. Castello di Borghese Vineyard There will be a winemaker’s walk, vineyard tour, and wine tastings every Saturday at 1 PM. $20 entrance fee. Call to reserve your spot or sign up online. www. castellodiborghese.com.

Baiting Hollow Farm Baiting Hollow Farm Vineyard presents Craig Rose from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM and The Wild Honey Band from 2 to 6 PM on Saturday. On Sunday, from 2 to 6 PM, it’s Ain’t So EZ. www. baitinghollowfarmvineyard.com.

Wölffer Estate Vineyard Stop by for Candlelight Fridays every week from 5 to 8 PM in the tasting Room. This week, John DiVello performs. www.wolffer.com

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Any Purchase with this ad expires July 2017 Come visit our 13,000 sq., ft. showroom!

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TO ADVERTISE IN THIS DIRECTORY, CALL THE INDEPENDENT @ 631-324-2500! • DIRECTORY 1

AIR COND. & HEATING

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Licensed & Insured Miguel Morales

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DECKS

FENCING

EAST HAMPTON FENCE & GATE

East End

DECKS

FLOORING

CR Wood Floors Installations Sanding Refinishing Free Estimates

Driveway Gate Specialists • New • Existing • Repairs • Design • Powerwashing • Fencing

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DECKS

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DIRECTORY • 3

PEST CONTROL

Tick Trauma! Ant Anxiety! Mosquito

PLUMBING & HEATING

Prado Brothers

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Editorial & Letters road closures.

Hit The Bricks Kudos to organizers of the Spring Street Fair in East Hampton, The Cultural Heritage Weekend in Sag Harbor, The Montauk Music Festival, and the Long Island Fleece and Fiber Fair in Riverhead. Kudos for conceiving events designed to draw crowds to the East End before the official start of “The Season.” We can’t wait to check them all out.

Held in early May or after Labor Day, events like these stretch the “shoulder season,” meaning more customers for local businesses and more visitors exposed to what we already know is excellent about the East End. Visitors – and locals – will also be exposed to what many know is a downside of our summer season: plenty of traffic, parking challenges, and

Dementia, Mom & Me Dear Editor,

I meant to write a letter of congratulations last year when Kitty Merrill became your main editor. Since then, I’ve loved the change in tone in The Independent and the focus on positive news and highlighting local people.

Her column last week lit a fire under my butt. She took on a tough topic and wrote an article that was funny, sweet, and touching, while being sad and raw at the same time. I cried and got goosebumps. Mr. Perelman you’ve got a gem, there. Don’t waste her talent.

MARCIA EICHNER

Web Response To Dementia Essay: Great Piece Dear Editor,

Your story and your Mom's story

The antidote for those looking to get around this weekend? Pay attention to community calendars, find out what’s happening where, and plan trips and errands accordingly.

For several years now, Southampton Town Police have used portable traffic signs to warn motorists of events in the offing that may have an impact on traffic. We wish police in East Hampton would consider similar signage. In the meantime, take a deep breath of our fragrant spring air, drive patiently and safely, and enjoy.

Hey, at least most local highway departments have finished spring paving jobs and those orange cones, delays, and single lanes are but a memory.

hits the feelings we as a society will now feel as we age and change and lose those we love. Ultimately we must come to grips with the reality that everyone will one day do for others or have others do for us when we struggle with the issues of aging and loss. Keep this up it is news that we must receive by you or through experience.

she loves every time that you walk into the room.

Ohh, That Song!

Dear Kitty,

JULIE EVANS

Dear Editor,

Bless your heart, Kitty.

When my mom was declining, I spent two hours each way on the bus to go see her. It was the only time I've ever been grateful to be unemployed, and those visits are something I hold so very dear.

Something I believe deeply is that even when she is agitated, loopy, uncommunicative and knows you not, she's STILL IN THERE. We can't see it, but they're in there, and

Time, the great enemy, will eventually win, and when that happens, I promise you that you will be so grateful to yourself that you saw her this much. My heart goes out to you. Good Work

What a wonderful read. I hope you found comfort with your pain by writing this down. It sounds like you have. A very difficult time for you and your family. Although you will miss her I hope you might find comfort knowing her memory will return and her pain will be gone once she reunites with Grandma and Grandpa, Ellen Jane, John and Joe. You will see her again. You and the whole family are in my prayers. Like my Dad would say "she is the BEST"!

Is it just me?

EDITOR’S NOTE: The letter writer is nephew of Mary Curtin, the focus of Kitty Merrill’s Mother’s Day essay. Romantic Windmills To The Editor,

When we first hear that windmills will be used to produce electric power, most of us will tend to conjure romantic visions of Dutch windmills turning slowly in a field of tulips. The reality of DEEPWATER is something else altogether.

The project gets started with billions in taxpayer subsides (your money, not the investors'), costs over 4X more per megawatt/hr than the same energy produced by natural gas (very clean and abundant in NY), raises electric rates by at least 40 percent, and suffers downtime due to lack of wind just when we need it most

Continued On Page 46. © Karen Fredericks

That’s strange.

Washington Avoids Federal Shutdown

DENISE

PATRICK WHALEN

Washington Avoids Federal Shutdown

I thought they shut down long ago.

Washington Avoids Federal Shutdown

Karen was chosen Best Cartoonist by the New York Press Association in 2017. She’s also the recipient of multiple awards for her illustration of the international bestseller How To Build Your Own Country, including the prestigious Silver Birch Award. Her work is part of the permanent artist’s book collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

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Publisher James J. Mackin

Associate Publisher Jessica Mackin-Cipro

Executive Editors: Main News & Editorial kitty merrill In Depth News Rick Murphy Arts & Entertainment Jessica Mackin-Cipro Copy Editor Karen Fredericks

Reporters / Columnists / Writers Jerry Della Femina, DOMINIC ANNACONE, SKIPPY BROWN, JOE CIPRO, KAREN FREDERICKS, Isa goldberg, Laura Anne Pelliccio, MILES X. LOGAN, Pete Mundo, vin pica, Nicole Teitler, Ashley O’Connell Editorial Interns Camila Tucci, Elizabeth Vespe Advertising Sales Manager BT SNEED Account Managers TIM SMITH JOANNA FROSCHL Sheldon Kawer Annemarie Davin Art Director Jessica Mackin-Cipro Advertising Production Manager John Laudando Graphic Designer Christine John

Web/Media Director JESSICA MACKIN-Cipro Graphic Editor/Archivist/Research Jenna mackin Photography Editor CHRISTINE JOHN Contributing Photographers PEGGY STANKEVICH ED GIFFORD Patty collins Sales Nanette Shaw Kaitlin Froschl Richard Lewin Marc Richard Bennett Bookkeeper sondra lenz Office Manager Kathy Krause Delivery Managers Charlie burge Eric Supinsky Published weekly by:

East Hampton Media Holdings LLC

The Independent Newspaper 74 Montauk Highway Suite #16 East Hampton, NY 11937 P • 631-324-2500 F • 631-324-2544

Letters

Environmentally speaking, the picture doesn't get any better. Thousands of birds, including migratory and endangered species, get chewed up by wind farms, and the developers plan over 200 of them for this site. Thirty miles of a foot-thick cable will transmit over 150,000 volts right through Gardiners Bay, coming ashore at either Fresh Pond Park or Cranberry Hole Road, with as yet unknown consequences for bottomdwelling creatures in its path. Does this sound "sustainable?"

The Town Board and anyone interested in responsible, affordable energy production should take a good look at these and many other negative aspects before wading any further into DEEPWATER.

REG CORNELIA

EDITOR’S NOTE: The author is the chair of the East Hampton Town Republican Committee.

or email to: news@indyeastend.com send photos to: photos@indyeastend.com

Dear Editor,

Financial responsibility for errors in all advertising printed in The Independent is strictly limited to actual amount paid for the ad. Business Hours - Monday to Friday 9 AM to 5 PM Closed Wednesdays

On your Just Asking article question asked, what do you think of Fox dismissing Bill O'Reilly?

I've been watching Bill O'Reilly for eight years and never heard a discriminating thing about women. I've seen him raise money and add thousand dollars of his own for the wounded warriors by purchasing track chairs.

Race and bias look at Congressman 46

Robin Conklin If you don’t do your job you get fired. If he didn’t prosecute Hillary how’s he going to prosecute Trump? He said Hillary used her email server poorly but no judge would try her for it. He’s the head of the FBI but the head of the judicial system? Glenn Stress I’m shocked at the way it was handled but not shocked that it happened, because I think he was polarizing on both sides.

Perhaps most disturbing of all is the impact DEEPWATER will have on our baymen and offshore fishermen. The project is sited on Cox's Ledge, a prime fishing ground and a major source of income for our local watermen. The structures themselves and the restrictions on fishing that will inevitably accompany them will put yet more burdens on an already over-regulated workforce. As outlined in the Indy article by Rick Murphy a few weeks back, there is also a political angle to this story relating to the political aspirations of our Governor, but I refer you to Mr. Murphy's article for the details on that.

By Karen Fredericks

What do you think of Trump firing Comey?

-- summer.

Diss Bill?

Subscriptions by 1st Class Mail: $91 yearly ©2017 Entire Contents Copyrighted

JUST ASKING

Continued From Page 45.

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Maria Cassell It’s another way the President is trying to hide his crimes. I wasn’t expecting it but I’m not sure it made much of a difference. I don’t think they’d have gotten an independent prosecutor because they all want to protect their own jobs. Nicole Nelson I think it seems kind of fishy. I don’t think what Comey did during the election was correct. I think that was also fishy. But at this point in time with everything that’s going on I feel like there’s a lot more behind what happened that we may never know about.

Waters, what a mouth on her. As far as his contract buyout, his contract, money due him.

Fox destroying America how? Please explain and what did Billy O'Reilly have to do with it? Piece of advice: watch Justice Jeannie on Fox on Saturdays at 9 PM.

BEA DERRICO

Russia Invades White House Dear Editor,

LT GEN Flynn was fired from his position as National Security Advisor because he lied to Vice President Pence about his contact with Russian officials concerning the sanctions on Russia.

Chief White House Advisor Bannon has stated in the past he is an admirer of Lenin, the founder of Russian Communism. Former FBI Director Comey was ostensibly fired on May 9, 2017, because of poor performance, but this occurred when Comey was heading up the investigation into Trump's campaign staff possibly

colluding with Russian officials to impact the 2016 Presidential election. Will Trump appoint a Russian sympathizer as the next FBI director?

On May 10, 2017, Trump met with two high level Russian officials at the White House, and barred the U.S. media from attending the meeting. However, the meeting was covered by TASS, the state-run media of Russia.  It appears the Russian invasion of the White House produced a liar and dictator as the leader of our country.

DONALD MOSKOWITZ

Say, Huh? Dear Editor,

Didn't take long for the new owners to show their liberal bias in May 10 edition with one sided articles from the left. Keep it up readership will slowly decrease. Hate to complain about a free paper but it's too one sided good luck.

JEFF LITTERINE


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Rick’s Space

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Let’s all be perfectly frank with By Rick Murphy each other: none of us knows what

The night before we watched La La Land. Karen didn’t like it, I loved it. Ok, I said I loved it.

jazz is except it’s not in tune. It’s random notes that don’t belong together being played by a heroin addict with a horn.

RICK’S SPACE

by Rick Murphy

AND THE WINNER IS . . . We have finally finished watching all of the Oscar nominated films.

And the envelope please . . . Manchester By The Sea, La La Land, Fences, Lion were all good, but in my opinion it was a poor year for movies. We watched Lion the other night. The ‘stars’ are Dev Patel and Rooney Mara, and the poster features the two of them gazing longingly at each other. The movie also stars Nicole Kidman, another babe.

So I’m thinking, “What’s not to like?” The two scantily clad babes get lost in a forest, a lion rips off what little ragged clothing they are wearing, Dev finally finds them and saves them, and they all frolic under a waterfall as the credits roll. We settled in on the couch as usual, with the lights out and my 54-inch Samsung surround sound revved up for action. We long ago stopped going to the movie theater because 1) they don’t serve hot fudge sundaes and 2) our beloved four-legged love child Coco-Belle spends the entire movie nestled in her mom’s lap, softly snoring, covered in my bathrobe.

The movie starts out with two poor brothers in India hustling for food. Karen soon realized the thing is subtitled. To make matters worse, she had an eye examination that day and her pupils were dilated. Then one boy disappears, never to return, leaving a five-year old to fend for himself. No Nicole. No Rooney. Not even

a Dev.

Every time Karen closed her eyes I switched over to the Yankees game and just made up what was happening on screen.

”The boy is gazing into the distance . . .” “The boy is asking a stranger to help him get home . . .”

“The boy is hungry and foraging for food . . .” We fell asleep.

The next night Karen suggested I watch the movie until the subtitles end and Rooney, Nicole and Dev appear and start speaking in English. So I go into the den and turn on the Mets game. “What’s happening now?”

“The little boy is searching for his mother.” “Still?”

“Yes, still searching, men on second and third, one out . . .” “WHAT?”

Finally, the five year old from India ends up in Australia and before you know it he is all grown up. Rooney is his girlfriend. Nicole Kidman plays his mother. Now wait a freaking second. I may be getting old, but Nicole Kidman playing the mother of a 30-year old man is crazy casting. Couldn’t they get Bea Arthur or Betty White?

I won’t reveal the ending other than to say the lion attacks Siegfried and Roy in Vegas.

This goes back to a recurring theme in our relationship. Since Karen’s former boyfriend was a music critic I have gone through great pains to pretend I know everything there is to know about the subject. “I don’t really think the songs are that good,” she said during the movie.

“That’s because it’s jazz, dear. You just don’t get it. You don’t understand the nuances of it.” Then I start snapping my fingers and scat singing. “Bebbily bop do bop biddly do,” I sing. Then I put my beret on. What was La La Land really about? I have no idea. I had the ballgame on my smart phone, nestled discretely under the couch pillow. My basic tenet is when the clothes start peeling off and bullets start flying, pay attention. Otherwise, it’s snap finger, bop head and say, “Cool, daddio” every five minutes or so while secretly watching the ballgame.

“What the hell did the movie mean?” Karen asked after it mercifully ended. “It was metaphor for the greater good, a statement that we all wrestle with mortality, and that to survive in this dog-eatdog world we must be light on our feet and strong in our hearts.”

“You’re talking about La La Land or Lion?” she asked. “Yes,” I replied.

The best movie of the year? Hell or High Water. It’s a western, people ride horses, cool dudes packing guns rob banks, and all hell breaks loose. I don’t want to reveal what happens but WAIT UNTIL YOU SEE THE SCENE WHERE THE GUY GETS SHOT IN THE HEAD!

Coco slept until the end. We had hot fudge sundaes. “It was a metaphor,” I told Karen confidently.

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Water Color Continued From Page 25.

and Linda Capello; and with Janet Jennings for the last seven years. Caleca’s paintings of pastoral and coastal landscapes have been exhibited widely on the East End and her work is included in private collections throughout the country. She is self-taught in how she observes and communicates through art. Photography was an early passion. She works primarily in oil and watercolor, and various

forms of printmaking.

Artist Lesley Obrock works in a variety of media including encaustic, oil, watercolor, fiber, and most recently plaster. She particularly enjoys working with materials that have a tactile sensibility. Fellow exhibitor Kate Rabinowitz has always loved to draw. It has been a source of connection to her creativity for all her life. Janet Rojas got her introduction to watercolor painting by taking a series of adult education classes at East Hampton High School. The beauty and peacefulness of nature are her inspirations.

Gerry Sacks has been living in Montauk for the past 30 years. She’s a fiber artist, knitting by hand and machine, one-of-a-kind clothing and knitted paintings.

Landmark Continued From Page 8.

Bouvier, the town board’s liaison to the Landmarks & Historic Districts Board.

Independent / Linda Bahns Ferrara Indy power couple Rick Murphy and Karen Fredericks celebrate their anniversary as always, where it all began: The Palm in East Hampton. Both won New York Press Association awards this year.

According to Sally Spanburgh, Chair of the Town’s Landmarks & Historic Districts Board, town landmark designation often enhances property values, increases the historic integrity of the neighborhood, and promotes its unique architectural character.

A landmark status does not prevent property owners from performing

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routine maintenance anytime or from improving their property upon review by the Landmarks & Historic Districts Board, which helps ensure the integrity of a historic structure is preserved.

Once a structure is designated as a local town landmark, it also becomes eligible for a tax abatement program, a preservation easement acquisition, and a maintenance award. The town also may grant zoning code relief. For example, the owner of a landmark is allowed to have a legal guest (“carriage”) house on the property without having to acquire a development right and the owner of a landmark located within a commercial zone may be eligible for a use variance. To pursue a Southampton Town Landmark designation for a historic structure at least 50 years old, contact Sally Spanburgh, chair of the Landmarks & Historic Districts Board, at 631-283-6000 or sspanburgh@ southamptontownny.gov.

Restored

Continued From Page 2.

encounter that led to the capture of Nazi u-boat saboteurs who’d come ashore and met up with Coastguardsman John Cullen as he patrolled the shoreline. That meeting is the subject of annual re-enactments.

On Saturday from 3 to 5 PM, the Trustees of the Amagansett Life-Saving & Coast Guard Station Society will preside over the commissioning and opening of the restored and renovated 1902 Amagansett Life-Saving Station.

The public will see the result of the Herculean effort to bring the station back to life. There will be select artifacts and photographs on display, as well as a Beebe surfboat identical to the one that used to be in the station. The U.S. Coast Guard and the Suffolk County Sheriff ’s Department will participate. Children from the Amagansett School will sing, and the society will present engraved plaques of recognition to all the builders, electricians, masons, plumbers, and the many others who made the restoration possible with their donation of labor, materials, and

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Residents and visitors who offered support, both at the inception of the project and throughout, until its completion, will also be recognized.

MAXINE’S WORLD

The Eastville Community Historical Society of Sag Harbor is now presenting an exhibition entitled “MAXINE’S WORLD,” a solo mixed-media show by artist Maxine Townsend-Broderick. The show includes quilts, stained glass, sand art, paintings, etchings, drawings, and ceramics.                  Townsend-Broderick is a retired professional photography teacher and former commercial artist. She views herself as a multimedia artist who has mastered oils, watercolor, mixed media, fabric and sand painting, mural painting, printmaking, etching, collages, photography, encaustics, sculpture, jewelry making, doll making, quilt making, web design, and stained glass.

She is a member of the Long Island Black Artists’ Association, as well as the Long Island Quilters’ Society. “The impression one comes away with after seeing this show is an unbridled celebration of invention and inspiration in the expression of the joys of everyday observation,” said Executive Director Dr. Georgette Grier-Key. “We know the public will be enchanted with her breadth of vision.” On view Saturdays at the Heritage House in Sag Harbor from 1 to 4PM, and Wednesdays from 1 to 5PM, “Maxine’s World” will be up until June 17.


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Jerry’s Ink

Continued From Page 6.

relative’s backyard in White Plains. Which brings me to summer weddings in the city. They must be banned.

There are some facts that people who drag their friends away from the beach for their wedding must be made aware of. Jerry Seinfeld, an East Hampton resident, once had a message for all the newly engaged couples: “Nobody wants to go to your wedding! We are not excited like you are.”

Mr. Seinfeld is so, so right. The only people who must attend a summer wedding are the bride and groom, their respective parents, the best man and the maid of honor and maybe a priest or a rabbi. All the other guests are hostages who may be smiling

By Ed Gifford but inside they are seething because they have had one of their precious summer weekends screwed up.

I remind every dewy-eyed couple in my family that in the summer it’s bad luck to get married any place west of Westhampton. I remind them of the famous Della Femina Curse, which is still going strong. I have, in my life, attended four weddings that took place on a summer holiday weekend (three Memorial Day, one Labor Day) and must report, in all honesty, that not one of these couples is still married.

SATURDAYS 9AM - 2PM MAY NOVEMBER26 26 MAY13 6 --NOVEMBER 85 MILL ROAD

Pass the word – the marriages of people who screw up my holiday weekends are doomed.

If you wish to comment on “Jerry’s Ink” please send your message to jerry@dfjp. com. 49


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Indy Fit

by Nicole Teitler

East End Row: Making Fitness Waves

Stationary bikes are yesterday's news as a new wave of rowing machines are occupying the East End. Making its debut this month with a location at 33 Hill Street in Southampton, East End Row conducts low impact training on The GX WaterRower. The machine is a water-filled flywheel that adds natural resistance and a tranquil "swoosh" sound that emulates the sound of rowing in nature. It's a workout that can burn up to 1000 calories in a single class, so sign up fast! Arriving on a rainy Saturday morning for my debut 50-minute class with instructor Albee Rogers, I wasn’t sure what to expect. Rowing seemed to be a straightforward workout only for back and shoulder muscles, with a preppy connotation to it. I imagine scenes out of Dead Poets Society or The Skulls.

After receiving my complimentary water and fresh towel, as instructed, I prepared a mat, medium weights, and resistance band next to my row machine for weight-based strengthening in between our "waves." Similar to sprints in a cycling class, "waves" are high intensity row intervals to heart pumping music at your own pace. After several minutes of adjusting to the motion, which Rogers so kindly helped me with, the first wave hit. "Legs, abs, chest. Chest, abs, legs." Repetition became second nature as I envisioned myself in one of those movies rowing with my team towards the finish line. The waves began. 300 meters. 200 meters. 100 meters. How far can you get in 45 seconds? Now 20 seconds. Go! By the last wave I had won my imaginary race against the Winklevoss twins.

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Instructor Albee Rogers (left) and Nicole Teitler (right).

Teaching with East End Row since its opening, Rogers has been a professional health and wellness coach for almost ten years. As a dietician, the transition from observing her clients progress, to taking an active role in their lifestyle, seemed natural.

“Rowing is definitely a new trend,” Rogers explained. “I had already been rowing at Crossfit . . . when East End Row opened . . . I thought what better way to lean out your body . . . but still work on the cardio portion that everyone sort of hates. It’s a fun setting that’s choreographed to music so the beat keeps you going throughout the entire class and you never want to stop because once that beat goes you want to go even faster for it.”

Rogers made training off the WaterRower as interestingly selfcompetitive as on it. While playing "Roxanne" by The Police the class was told to do a single burpee (you know, those wonderful full body jump, pushups) every time the name Roxanne was said. To be clear, it’s said roughly 26 times. At another point, the song "Flower" by Moby was used for squats. Fittingly so, as the lyrics say "lift and squat." Each time Moby brought "Sally down" the class squatted in unison, nearly 30 times. Finally, we used

the weights for additional arm and shoulder toning in pulsating movements.

What I enjoyed most about this workout was the surprising full body benefit. Every row motion targeted lower glutes, along with arms and abs. Using the row handles and foot straps, there were added oblique techniques and core training. Of course, the next day I mostly felt a soreness in my back and shoulder muscles, but I recommend this class to all levels and all fitness types.

“Trust your trainer,” Rogers explained a common misconception seen quite often. “Know that they’re correcting your form or modifying your workout for a reason to benefit you most. Sometimes the best workout is very slow, but proper movements.” East End Row opened up a location on East 74th Street in Manhattan in October 2016 with a brand new East Hampton location opening Memorial Day Weekend on 460 Pantigo Road. This colocation will be with Nomad East and is expected to be open seven days a week come late June. Visit www.eastendrow.com. You can follow more from Nicole Teitler on Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram as Nikki On The Daily.


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Independent / Richard Lewin

Emergency Drills

On Wednesday, the Montauk Fire Department continued its series of emergency drills, this time joining East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue, East Hampton Town Marine Patrol and East Hampton Village Mobile Command. Three drowning "victims" were successfully rescued at North Bar at Montauk Lighthouse. Supervising the drill were MFD Chief Vincent Franzone, MFD First Assistant Chief David Ryan, MFD Second Assistant Chief Mickey Valcich, Ed Michels, Chief of the East Hampton Town Marine Patrol, and Theodore "T.J." Calabrese, Chief of the East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue. The East Hampton Village Mobile Command unit took the opportunity to fine tune its new emergency dispatching app. Sports Sponsored by

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Traveler Watchman 1826

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Phone: 631-765-6849 • Fax: 631-765-6847 email: HvyResQ1@aol.com 51


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School Days

Submitted by local schools

Independent / Courtesy Riverhead School District About 40 young women (and one young man) from three school districts (Riverhead, Eastport-South Manor, and Center Moriches) participated in a global event called “Girls Power Tech Day,” an extension of the “Million Women Mentors” program.

Independent / Courtesy Westhampton Beach School District Westhampton Beach Elementary School students are learning about local waterways and their inhabitants through Cornell Cooperative Extension’s discovery fish tank program.

The East End’s Leading Pool Company Independent / Courtesy Hampton Bays School District The Hampton Bays Middle School Student Council is giving back to the community by sponsoring the Airborne Tri-Team in its July 5K race.

631-878-7796 | Licensed & Insured We offer All Inclusive Service from opening to closing and the most reasonable rates on Long Island.

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We install heaters, filter systems and salt chlorination systems.

We also build pools, do renovations and install liners

We are owner operated. That means the service technician at your home each week will be familiar with your pool…not some stranger.

Tuckahoe School Tuckahoe’s students, faculty and staff cordially invite veterans, active service personnel and their families to join us for a Memorial Day Breakfast on Thursday, May 25th at 8:30-9:30 AM in the Tuckahoe School cafeteria; RSVP kterry@tuckahoecommonsd.com. Spring Concert will be held for Grades 4 to 8 on Thursday, May

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18th at 6:30 PM.

If you haven’t registered your child for school year 2017-18, you can still do so! Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten registration is continuing for residents of the Tuckahoe Common School District between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. To be eligible for Kindergarten, a child must have a birthdate between 12-01-2011 and 11-30-2012. To be eligible for PreKindergarten, a child must have a birthdate between 12-01-2012 and 11-30-2013. If you know of a neighbor or friend who lives in the Tuckahoe school district and has a child eligible, please make them aware of registration.


i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

the Independent

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Goodies For Mom

A craft fair at St. Michael’s in Amagansett featured an array of yummy baked goods, personal beauty products, plants and specialty décor – all perfect gifts for mom. Independent / Kitty Merrill

Shelter Tails

The Town of East Hampton will conduct a S.T.O.P. (Stop Throwing Out Pollutants) Day on

Saturday, May 20, 2017 at the East Hampton Recycling Center, 260 Springs Fireplace Road from 10:00am to 3:00pm Residents are encouraged to bring hazardous waste items such as:

May is National Adoption Month Meet Murphy! You can come & see Murphy, his littermates & other strutting mutts at Paws In The Park on Saturday, May 20th. Murphy came from Puerto Rico to find a home! We are offering $15 off microchips at our In House Clinic this month!

Adopt a Patient Pet and get a $50 Hampton Coffee Gift Card!

Please call 728-PETS(7387) or visit our website at www.southamptonanimalshelter.com. Please patronize our Thrift Shop located at 30 Jagger Lane in Southampton Village!

Oil Based Paints Pesticides Stale Fuel Chemical Aerosols

Thinners Urethanes Engine Coolant Flammable Materials

A reminder, this program is open to Town of East Hampton residents only, and will not accept waste materials from residents living outside the boundaries of the Town of East Hampton. East Hampton residents desiring to participate in this program are encouraged to bring their hazardous waste to the East Hampton Recycling Center. Hazardous waste will not be accepted prior to this event. This event is for residential use only. Need additional Information? Call the folks at the East Hampton Recycling Center at 324-7191 for further details. 53


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Real Estate

Jimenez Joins Douglas Elliman Team

By Rick Murphy

Alexander (Alex) Jimenez, a longtime member of the East End community, has joined the Brendan Skislock Team at Douglas Elliman in Bridgehampton. Jimenez, who lives in Amagansett, also holds a degree in architecture from Saint Bonaventure University, Columbia. Through his 15 years of experience in property management in The Hamptons, Jimenez has gleaned a comprehensive skill set in negotiating with builders and contractors as well as the ability to foresee his client’s needs to ensure seamless transactions from start to completion. His contractor’s eye provides a unique perspective for his clients as he understands not just what is on the surface, but all mechanical systems of a home. 54

For this reason, Jimenez is the goto guy for homeowners, investors, and builders who want to be certain they are making a great long-term buy. He has developed a keen sense of elevated customer service and a broad network of clients during his tenure as an estate property manager. He is fluent in Spanish to service clients globally. His high degree of professionalism and discerning eye for detail have landed Jimenez a rolodex of high net worth clients in the art and finance worlds who require the utmost in service.

During his free time Jimenez enjoys biking, cooking, painting and sculpting, as well as spending time at the beach with his wife and daughter.


the Independent

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THE INDEPENDENT Min Date = 4/8/2017 Max Date = 4/14/2017

Source: Suffolk Research Service, Inc., Hampton Bays, NY 11946 * -- Vacant Land East Hampton Town ZIPCODE 11930 - AMAGANSETT ZIPCODE 11937 - EAST HAMPTON ZIPCODE 11954 - MONTAUK Riverhead Town ZIPCODE 11792 - WADING RIVER ZIPCODE 11901 - RIVERHEAD ZIPCODE 11931 - AQUEBOGUE ZIPCODE 11933 - CALVERTON ZIPCODE 11947 - JAMESPORT Shelter Island Town ZIPCODE 11964 - SHELTER ISLAND Southampton Town ZIPCODE 11901 - RIVERHEAD ZIPCODE 11932 - BRIDGEHAMPTON ZIPCODE 11941 - EASTPORT ZIPCODE 11942 - EAST QUOGUE ZIPCODE 11946 - HAMPTON BAYS ZIPCODE 11959 - QUOGUE ZIPCODE 11963 - SAG HARBOR ZIPCODE 11968 - SOUTHAMPTON ZIPCODE 11976 - WATER MILL ZIPCODE 11978 - WESTHAMPTON BEACH Southold Town ZIPCODE 11944 - GREENPORT ZIPCODE 11952 - MATTITUCK ZIPCODE 11971 - SOUTHOLD

BUY

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Real Estate SELL

PRICE

DEEDS LOCATION

Bacchi, M Walton, R & A 14 Golf Club Drive Hathaway, L & C

Bacchi, A & J Ronson, M Stitt, B HappyAcresAmagansett

500,000 1,450,000 1,490,000 3,300,000

49 Mulford Ln 3 Osprey Rd 14 Golf Club Dr Montauk Hwy

Davenport, D Demma, K & A King, A & Foley, K Cahill, C Alarcon, J & Diaz, R Town of East Hampton Yaraghi, K & N Quiros&ContrerasSaga Loncar, T Hirschhorn, W & A J.L. Farrell RealEst JG Farrell III RE Todorov,T & Guzzo,R Lynch, J & S Roth, E Freeman, D Strauss, J Alexander, A

Dollinger,H&Dominy,S Hishon, C Sykes, A & K Gorgone, D Digiovanna, L & D Seaman, J & Allen, I EmmersonResidnceTrst Leon, J Dyrenforth,J&Respini Esch, J & Maqsudi, M D.L. Talmage Inc D.L. Talmage Inc Breault,M & Hoppe,G Linder, S Cohen,D & Johann,S 154 Oakview Highway Bation, R & L Trusts Duffield, J & T

930,000 931,500 543,000 760,000 627,000 1,750,000* 1,975,000 650,000 600,000 1,500,000 1,125,000* 1,125,000* 655,000 1,357,500 706,250 1,275,000* 670,000 860,000

86 Runnymede Dr 24 Thanet Way 122 Tyrone Dr 23 Isle Of Wight Rd 600 Three Mile Harbor Hog 247 Gerard Dr 6 Terry's Trail 119 Fort Pond Blvd &lot 4 19 Lotus Ave 8 Chatfields Ln 4 Sherrill Foster Path 6 Sherrill Fosters Path 175 Three Mile Harbor Rd 216 Bull Path 102 Montauk Blvd 154 Oak View Hwy 7 Farm Ln 48 Accabonac Rd

Stern, Z Kramer,S&Scannevin,C Valle, E

Seiffer-Spacek, A Ettlinger, E by Exr D'Agostino, N

3,250,000 585,000 465,000

7 Deforest Rd 100 Deforest Rd, Unit 613 55 S Euclid Ave, Unit 1A

Peters, D Hansen, M Long Island's MrCash

Prussick, M & D Fannie Mae US Bank National As

118,500 245,000 370,000

6 Wildwood Rd 86 Gerald St 4 Indianwood Ct

Doumeng R & C Roner, A Rosten, P De Fio, A & G Bank of America NA

Precht, C & E Lewin, B Higgins, B Kanas, M & B DiMarco, R by Ref

550,000 170,000 225,000 275,000 322,578

9 Wigeon Ct 1212 Northville Tpke 630 Northville Tpke 637 Northville Tpke 424 Sweezy Ave

Nadeau, M

Pollock/Vidivici, J

400,000

55 Promenade Dr

Kenna, J Fuhrmann, W & I Jellett, A & G WB Properties

Marshall, J 171 Freeman Avenue Sclafani, J & L Kasyanov, Y

246,500 430,000 425,000 162,000

110 Fox Hill Dr 517 Fox Hill Dr 25 Marge Ln 26 Calverton Ct

Eastern Bays Company

Lessard, D & T

37,000

Oyster Lts In Peconic Bay

Needham, S & L Casey, E

Needham Associates Cote,M & Frangella,A

300,000 350,000*

8 Hudson Ave 3 Robin Ln

Thorner, J & T

Preikschat, L & K

253,000

225 Elm Ave

Madorsky, E

Birchwood Lane Lot 9

2,054,703

55 Birchwood Ln

Jaffe, D & M

Washwick, K

1,060,000

33 River Ave

Dial, O Reilly Properties

Jemcap SD LLC Kronimus, W by Heirs

600,000 540,000

4 Laura Ct 72 Eisenhower Dr

Deutsche Bank Nat Downs, D Naiman, K DeCarlo, A & L Deutsche Bank Nat Springville Managmnt Bertram III&Sanatkar

Mendez, L by Ref JZ Hamptons LLC Klinge, J HBL Enterprises LLC Rus, P by Ref Internal RevenueSrvc Breslin, A & T

479,081 750,000 484,000 650,000 500 140,000 697,000

176 Washington Heights Av 1A Rolling Woods 29A Squiretown Rd &11.001 22 Sherwood Rd 98 West Tiana Rd 159 Springville Rd 5 Mill Race

Salzberg, B & E Garufi, C & D

Pratyusha IV, LLC 13 Barker LaneRealty

6,450,000 1,125,000

5 Sandacres Ln 13 Barker Ln

Wilson, D Halpern, S

Peterson, D Cardone, A

1,450,000 2,225,000

11 Goodwood Rd 130 Madison St

Bederman, J & J Ramirez, A PaulPorcoCustomHomes Globalserv Property La Mandragore West 11 Allen Court LLC

Friedman, Z Trust McDonald, R Wintersteller, G 168 West Prospect St Gould, G BBSV North Main LLC

1,662,000 585,000 610,000* 2,198,000 4,000,000 3,300,000

17 Millicent Dr 92 Rose Ave 32 White Oak Ln 168 W Prospect St 97 Coopers Farm Rd,Unit 8 11 Allen Ct

Gottesman, L Trokel, M

Arnott/Raffo Inc Rosenzweig, R & L

3,750,000 7,030,000

511 Little Noyack Path 316 Deerfield Rd

Hammer,Zivian&Lettie SKL Realty Holdings

40 Old RiverheadRoad 115 Main Co. by Ref

365,000* 2,200,000

34 Old Riverhead Rd 115 Main St

Sampogna, J Walsh, D & H

McFerran, D & E Friedmann, M

815,000 700,000

837 Main St 171 Fifth St

McHale, J & A Woodhull, T & L

Ryan, C Harvey Bagshaw, Inc

610,000 1,100,000

5825 Westphalia Rd 7255 Route 25

BlakeStone&Ni-CoHldg Burrascano Jr, J & D Chamale&SicajauTezen Falcon CrestHoldings FloridaDreamsCapital

Serbes, M & C by Ref MTAD Studio LLC Kokkinos, G & M McNamee,J&Erdman,M Wells Fargo Bank

436,001 489,000* 325,000 300,000 352,464

630 N Sea Dr 2120 N Sea Dr 1865 Youngs Ave 2555 Youngs Ave 625 Corey Creek Ln

Source: Suffolk Research Service, Inc., Hampton Bays, NY 11946 * -- Vacant Land

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Traveler Watchman

Independent / Courtesy CE’s office A bevy of elected officials and community members came out for the ceremonial “first flush” at Sylvestor Manor.

By Kitty Merrill

First Flush: A Win Win

Sylvester Manor Educational Farm’s Clean Water Project is a revolutionary undertaking that represents the first step in the renovation of the property’s historic Manor House on Shelter Island. This innovative project serves as Suffolk County’s first installation of an alternative onsite “constructed wetlands” wastewater treatment system that is designed to greatly reduce the nitrogen that flows into surrounding waters. Last Thursday Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone led the ceremonial “First Flush” as the latest effort in his Reclaim Our Water initiative to combat nitrogen pollution and restore water quality.

"We are incredibly excited to be at the forefront of this technology that melds two critical imperatives,” Sylvester Manor Educational 56

Farm’s executive director Jo-Ann Robotti said. “We are able to significantly reduce the wear and tear on our historic Manor house while at the same time helping to improve the quality of the waters that surround us. It's a win-win situation for Sylvester Manor, the Town of Shelter Island and the Peconic Estuary System!"

The educational farm, which hosts residential farm staff each year, was challenged by overuse of its historic Manor house. By "upcycling" former shipping containers into temporary kitchen and restrooms, the organization was able to take much of the burden off the house. At the same time it provided an opportunity to install this stateof-the-art wastewater treatment system to improve ground and surface water quality. The restroom units will also be a much-needed

addition to Shelter Island's public toilet facilities.

“Clean water should be the birthright of every Long Islander, and in the past three years, we have taken significant strides to address our region’s decline of our waterways, particularly here on the East End,” said Bellone. The “first flush,” he said, “exemplifies our commitment to reclaim our water by utilizing the most advanced waste water technology available in order to reduce nitrogen pollution and clean our waterways for future generations.”

The constructed wetland installation, designed as a nonproprietary vegetated gravel recirculating filter (VRGF) system by Natural Systems Utilities of New Jersey and built by Peder

Larsen of Shelter Island Sand, Gravel & Contracting, takes advantage of natural processes. As wastewater passes through the shallow root zone and upper gravel layer, it consumes air as ammonium is nitrified and microorganisms attached to the gravel and roots help process the waste, which then enters a saturated layer where denitrification can occur.

This natural filter is insulated with a layer of peat mulch and planted with wetland and wetland meadow species. Plants and grasses support local habitat as they uptake the excess nutrients and help purify the water. And it will be beautiful – a 21st century landscape aligned with one of the oldest formal gardens in America. Assemblyman Fred Thiele was also on hand for the first flush.“I

Continued On Page 58.


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the Independent

Wilson Honored

By Kitty Merrill

The East End Women’s Network has named Felecia Wilson, the 2017 Woman of the Year. She’s the manager of the Riverhead office of Judicial Title Insurance Agency, a board member of Riverhead Community Awareness Program, and the Family Community Life Center, First Baptist Church. EEWN describes her as “a living and breathing example of finding success after rising above the adversity life dishes out.”

According to a release extolling Wilson’s achievements, at 17 she was an unwed mother subsisting on social services. A mentor helped her turn her life around and she parlayed a file clerk position into a top-earning sales career. Wilson “paid it forward” by mentoring another young woman and serving as a role model to disadvantaged children in the local

school, church and community. She is a frequent benefactor to Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Long Island where she was recently named woman of the year. In 2015, the Town of Riverhead designated October 1st “Felecia Wilson Day” to honor her community service for the local Riverhead area.



The East End Women’s Network was founded in 1981. The purpose of this organization is to bring together women of diverse accomplishment and experience, directing women into policymaking positions through the dissemination and sharing of career opportunities; to educate members and the public on issues affecting women on the East End; and to promote the interests, conditions and positions of women in science, business, industry, labor, government, the arts, education and public service.

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The Network has approximately 150 members, with 40 to 60 members regularly attending the monthly meetings. Nonmembers are welcome. Dinner meetings take place at a different restaurant each month, alternating from the North to the South Fork, from September through June.

EEWN will honor Wilson on Wednesday, May 24. Held at 
Stonewalls Restaurant at Cherry Creek Golf Course,
967 Reeves Avenue, Riverhead, the event runs from 
5:30 to 8 PM. Tickets are $45 for Felecia Wilson has been named the 2017 Woman of the Year by the East End Women’s Network. members with an RSVP by 4pm on May Price includes sit-down dinner.

 22, 
$50 for nonFor tickets, visit www.eewn.org. members and those without RSVP.


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Farming, Family, Old Friends & Flight

Compiled by Kitty Merrill

This week on the North Fork, spring is in the air. Check out outdoorsy and unusual events on the scene. And don’t forget to email news@indyeastend. com with your tidbits of Twin Forks happenings. Wickham History The Wickham family can boast 375 years of continuous farming in the town of Southold. This Saturday at 10 AM, siblings Thomas and Parnel Wickham are your hosts for a morning entitled, “Farming History of the Wickhams on the North Fork.” The event includes a tour of the family orchard. Meet at the Wickham Fruit Stand on Main Road in Cutchogue. Suggested donation: $5. German Genealogy Want to learn more about your family history but don’t know where to start? The Suffolk County Historical Society in Riverhead presents a workshop: Locating the Birthplaces of Your German Ancestors with Accredited Genealogist Dr. Richard Haberstroh on Saturday at 1 PM.

Dr. Haberstroh will focus on how to collect clues to an ancestor’s birthplace and access records from German towns, the roots of German names and naming conventions, German script, vital records and church records, and Internet sources for German genealogy. Fee includes workshop, handouts, and museum exhibit admission. Members $15; NonMembers $20. Registration Required. Call now to reserve your spot: 631-727-2881 x100. All Class Reunion

A group of people are working hard to plan a Mattituck High School All Class Reunion for the weekend of July 21. The first Mattituck High School All-Class Reunion will start on Friday, July 21, at Crazy Fork, Main Road, Mattituck from 6 to 10 PM with a pig roast and DJ. The cost will be $10 a person. On Saturday, July 22, there will be a family beach BBQ at Veteran's Beach in Mattituck. The beach BBQ will start at noon and go until 6 PM. There will be a tent, a great band, as well as games and

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entertainment for kids and adults. There will be multiple raffles throughout the day in order to raise money for scholarships for the school. If organizers get enough donations they hope to be able to provide the BBQ at no cost. For anyone interested in making a donation to help support this event, they can be made to the MHS All-Class Reunion bank account at Chase Bank. Help is needed to make this event a success. If you are able to help, contact Denise Goehringer-Geis at ggenterprise@yahoo.com or 516 527-3318.

Win Win

Continued From Page 56.

was pleased to provide funding from the State of New York for the installation of an onsite wastewater treatment system at Sylvester Manor Educational Farm,” he said, adding, “This innovative project is the first in Suffolk County and will greatly reduce contaminants that have been identified as significant threats to Long Island’s water quality, especially nitrogen.”  Legislator Bridget Fleming said she believes the project will serve as a model for installations throughout the county and moves our community forward toward an environmentally sustainable future. “Ineffective and outdated conventional septic systems continue to threaten the East End’s fragile environment by discharging nitrogen into groundwater and surface water at

Hallockville Birding

Eastern Long Island Audubon Society gathers with birds of a feather on Saturday morning at 9 AM to tour Hallockville and Hallock State Park.  

The Hallockville Farm Museum and State Park is located at 163 Sound Ave, in Riverhead. During peak migration, there is a good chance to see thrushes, vireos, warblers and more. Expect to walk past farm fields into the woods leading up to views of Long Island Sound. There is a $6 per person charge for this walk, which benefits the Hallockville Farm Museum Educational Program. Call the Museum for information and a reservation at 631-298-5292. levels that are harmful to marine ecosystems and can pose a human health concern,” said Long Island Community Foundation’s executive director David Okorn. “Sylvester Manor’s pilot wetland treatment system project is designed to develop a cost-effective, replicable approach to reduce nitrogen loading in Suffolk County’s ground and surface waters, and as such we are proud to provide funding for a public education and outreach campaign to inform and inspire others.” Shelter Island Sylvester Manor Educational Farm is a nonprofit entity whose mission is to preserve, cultivate and share its lands, buildings and stories. The magnificent 240-acre property, comprising a working educational farm, livestock operations, youth and cultural programs, seeks to model best practices that can benefit the East End and beyond.

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Sweet Charities Continued From Page 33.

www.easthamptonoysterparty. eventbrite.com. Planned Parenthood Planned Parenthood Hudson Peconic presents its 29th Annual East End Benefit on Sunday, May 28, from 5 to 7 PM, at a private home in Bridgehampton. Enjoy cocktails and hors d’oeuvres and a private screening of the virtual reality documentary Across the Line. Proceeds support PPHP’s programs and services in Suffolk County. Tickets are $200 per person. Sponsorships start at $500. For tickets contact Jenifer Van Deinse Director, Development at 631-240-1128 or jenifer. vandeinse@pphp.org. Insider’s View From a secluded, spacious and spectacularly chic oceanfront home to a traditional dwelling in the heart of the village, the Southampton Historical Museum’s eighth annual “Insider’s View” house tour will be held on Saturday, June 3. It will offer a unique opportunity to enter and admire a few of Southampton’s most extraordinary architectural gems. Houses are open from 1 to 4 PM, after which attendees are invited to a champagne reception, catered by Sant Ambroeus restaurant, beginning at 4:30 PM in the beautiful Rogers Mansion. 

the Independent

dance companies in performance at the second annual ”Dancers for Good” benefit at the Ross School in East Hampton on Saturday, June 3, at 7:30 PM. Hosted by Bebe Neuwirth.
Eryc Taylor’s work, Song for Cello and Piano, with a commissioned original score by Daniel Tobias, will be presented on invitation from Michael Apuzzo, co-founder of the Dancers for Good Foundation and current Paul Taylor Dance Company member. ETD, one of the first companies approached to participate in this year’s Dancers for Good, will join principal dancers from New York City Ballet, American Ballet Theater, Complexions Contemporary Ballet and more. Tickets are $200. Visit www.dancersforgood.com.
 Give A Kid A Summer The “Give A Kid A Summer” tag sale is hosted by Hampton Racquet to benefit Project Most. The family event will be filled with fun, food, beverages, activities for kids and a big tag sale. On Saturday, June 3, from 9 AM to 1 PM. Visit www.hamptonracquet. com for more info.

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North Fork Waiter Race The 6th Annual North Fork Waiter Race hosted by The Market will be held on Saturday, June 3, beginning at 10 AM. Waiters and spectators welcome. Entrants will balance a beverage-filled stemmed wine glass on a serving tray and race to the finish line without spilling the beverage. Meet on Main Street in Greenport at the Opportunity Shop. Entry fee is $50. Prizes for first, second and third place. For more information or to sponsor a waiter, contact The Market at 631-477-8803. Dancers For Good

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Eryc Taylor Dance will join Paul Taylor Dance and seven other 59


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Sports

The Incredible Journey Continues For Southold

By Rick Murphy

The Southold Settlers made history Thursday by bludgeoning Stony Brook and thus completing the regular season undefeated.

The Settlers, competing in League IX, ran their record to 20-0 by traveling to Stony Brook and upending the Bears 15-1. A day earlier, playing at home, the Settlers coasted by Greenport, 8-1.

Luke Hanson, the tall lefthander who has emerged as one of Suffolk’s most dominant pitchers, cruised through Thursday’s encounter, allowing a single hit in six plus innings while striking out 13. As was so often the case this season, the Settlers provided plenty of offensive power, with Suffolk Player of the Year candidate Dylan Clausen in the forefront. The senior laced five hits in as many at bats, scored three times and batted in two more runs. Hansen helped his own cause by going 3-5, against Greenport. Clausen was on the bump and once again had his good stuff working. He walked only one batter, allowed a scant three hits and punched out 11 batters. Doug Fielder and Shane Zimmer led a balanced scoring attack, combining for five hits, three ribbies and three runs scored.

Southold, the only unbeaten team in the county and the first team in memory to accomplish the feat, is after a New York State Class C Championship, and the road is going to be a rocky one from the get go.

The Settlers must play Pierson/ Bridgehampton in a best of three for the Suffolk Class C title, and the Whalers gave the locals all they could handle on May 4 before succumbing 2-0.

The first two games will have been played after this newspaper went to press unless bad weather forces a postponement.

The rubber match, should it prove to be necessary, will be tomorrow afternoon in Southold. Pierson finished second in League IX with a 15-5 mark and lost all four encounters with Southold during the regular season. Southold is the defending county champ; Pierson won the Class C title back in 2013.

Mattituck (15-5) earned the top seed and a bye in the County Class B playoffs. The Tuckers will play the winner of the Center Moriches/ Babylon encounter that took place after press time. The Tuckers won the title in 2014 and 2015. One team Mattituck thankfully

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won’t have to play is Southampton, and vice-versa. The Mariners finished tied in League VIII with the Tuckers, both with identical 15-5 records. On Thursday the two teams faced off for the league title, went home at dark tied, and started up where they left off Friday. In the 19th inning, Bryce Grathwol homered to finally end the thing. He also pitched the last six innings for the winners without allowing a run.

Southampton is seeded fifth in the Suffolk Class A double-elimination playoffs and were to play Mount Sinai, the fourth seed, yesterday.

The winner of that game will play the winner of the Shoreham/ Wading River (8 seed) Harborfields (number one seed) game scheduled for today. The loser of Tuesday's game will play the loser of the Sayville (2)/

Bayport/Blue Point (7) game today.

The Southold softball team, after a 20-year lapse, has not only earned a berth in the County Class C playoffs – the Lady Settlers earned the title as the only qualifying team in that classification. They await the New York State tournament. First up will be a regional semifinal game against the Section VIII winner on June 1 at Hofstra. Westhampton Beach is in. The Lady Hurricanes (12-6 League IX) earned the sixth seed in the Class A tournament and play at Miller Place (3) today. The winner of that game will play the winner of No. 2 Shoreham/Wading River/ No. 7 Comsewogue on Saturday. The loser will play the loser of Shoreham/Comsewogue on Friday. All games are played on the home field of the team with the highest standing.

McEnroe Coming To SPORTIME

Patrick McEnroe will be overseeing summer tennis training at the Jon McEnroe Training Academy at SPORTIME in Amagansett this summer. McEnroe, premier television tennis commentator, was the long-time USA Davis Cup Captain and, for many years, General Manager of Player Development for the USTA. He was also a French Open Doubles Champion, with careerhigh rankings of World No. 28 in singles and World No. 3 in doubles,

and played professionally for 10 year.

His older brother, Jon, was the world’s top ranked player who won seven Grand Slam events.

“As Patrick has settled into his role as JMTA Co-Director, his active engagement, his obvious dedication, and his impressive wealth of tennis know-how, have been embraced by all,” said SPORTIME’s CEO, Claude Okin. R.M.

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New Summer Fluke Regulations Take Effect

By Rick Murphy

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation announced that new recreational fishing regulations are now effective for summer flounder (fluke). These regulations are required to meet the more restrictive rules put in place by the National Marine Fisheries Service, and include changes to the minimum size and possession limits. The state led efforts to successfully challenge National Marine Fisheries Service’s data in order to minimize reductions and ensure a viable fishery for New York and other East Coast states.

New York’s 2017 regulations should result in an approximate 30 percent reduction in harvest to meet the federal requirements. Coast-wide recreational harvest of summer flounder was originally expected to be cut by 41 percent, and under state-by-state recreational allocations, New York was facing a 70 percent reduction.

The state challenged marine fisheries data to minimize reductions to 30 percent and ensure a viable fishery for New Yorkers. The open season for fluke has not changed. The new regulations include a three-fish possession

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limit, a 19-inch size limit, and an open season from May 17 through September 21.

This regulatory change reflects the coast wide decline in the number of summer flounder documented in the most recent surveys. Consistent below-average reproductive success for the last five years may be one cause for the decline. The catch limits set by the National Marine Fisheries Service for both the recreational and commercial fisheries in 2017 are the lowest in the history of the fishery management plan, which began in 1993. New York State worked

cooperatively with other members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to reduce recreational summer flounder harvest along the coast in an equitable manner. As part of this effort, most states from Massachusetts through Virginia are expected to increase their size limit by one inch and lower their possession limits.   More information on marine fishing regulations can be found on the DEC’s website. Anglers age 16 and over are required to register. There is no cost and more information can be found on the website, www.dec.ny.gov.

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Coast Guard Auxiliary News i n dy e a s t e n d . c o m

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Coast Guard News By Vincent Pica

by Vincent Pica

Safety First - In 10 ict Captain, Sector Long Island South, D1SR Steps UnitedEasy States Coast Guard Auxiliary

hip of this column is available. All fees raised will be The United States Coast Guard the safety of life at sea. This nated bycharacterizes The Independent tocorps Division 18column of is about that. its auxiliary as “force multiplier,” enabling the e USCGa Auxilliary for use in boating safety. The Ten Commandments active-duty and reserves corps to

mationdocall Mackin @ 631.324.2500 Well, that might be a bit of more Jim with the budgeted dollars allocated by the US Congress. USCG Auxiliarists donate 100 percent of their time to the tasks authorized by the Commandant of the United States Coast Guard. And no task is more important than promulgating and expanding

an overstatement (these are hardly divinely inspired) and an understatement (there are a lot more than 10 things you can do to enhance safety for you and your crew.) However, the numbers associated with these 10 steps that any skipper can do, or insist is done, are compelling. #1 - Thou Shalt Wear a Life Jacket – If 16 mariners go into the water without a life jacket, only 1 comes out. Conversely, if they fall overboard wearing a life jacket, 15 will survive. Which cadre do you want to be in? Always have an adequate supply of personal flotation devices aboard. Make sure that children are wearing life jackets that fit correctly. Federal and State law requires that they have one on. Only you, the skipper, can insure that it fits them properly.

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#2 – Never Shalt Thou Drink and Drive – Whether a car or a boat, it is just plain crazy – and illegal – to drink and drive. Individual years vary but I have never seen alcohol account for less than 25 percent of boating accidents in a given year.

#3 – Taketh a Boating Safety Course – Yes, something as simple as an eight-hour boating safety class can make all the difference. Seventy percent of boating accidents involve skippers who have never taken a boating safety course. If you haven’t, start here http:// www.cgaux.org/boatinged/ or email me below and we’ll get you squared away. #4 – Safety Begins With Thou – Adults between the ages of 40 and 49 account for the highest rate of boating fatalities. You set the tone for safety for the entire crew and her passengers. Come on, Bunky, get that life jacket on.

#5 – Thou Shalt Know The Rules of Navigation – Can you imagine giving the keys to the family car to one of your children – and they have never opened the book of driving regulations, much less taken a course. (See #3 above, Bunky.) You can get them online at the US Coast Guard’s Navigation Center (http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/). You can also get them from prior columns here. #6 – Thou Shalt Keep A Good Look-Out, While Driving Safely – You are required by law to always maintain a look-out. You are also required to use all available means to do so. Have radar? Turn it on, Skipper. Speed is another matter because, like driving a car, speed should always be reduced if visibility and/or weather demands it.

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#7 – Knoweth Thy Weather – Clearly, if you’ve ever left the dock under beautiful skies and then came home under heavy weather, you know how important is to know – before you go – what to expect during the course of your journey. Particularly for skippers of open boats, this can be all the difference, even between life and death.

#8 – Haveth Thy Boat Meet Federal Standards – Can there be any an easier way to ensure that your boat meets USCG requirements than getting a FREE vessel safety check? This is not a regulatory event – if the boat is missing some requirement, the examiner is very likely to give you his or her cell phone number and the advise to, “fix this and then give me a call – I’ll come right down, complete the safety check and affix the safety sticker to your windshield.” Go to http:// safetyseal.net/GetVSC/, put in your zip code and a vessel examiner will contact you directly. #9 – Useth a Carbon Monoxide Detector – If you have an enclosed cabin, equip it with a Carbon Monoxide detector. Nothing else will protect you from the odorless, tasteless gas that can kill you and yours.

#10 – Thy Shalt File a Float Plan – The US Coast Guard recommends that you always tell a friend or family member where you plan to go and when you’ll be back. Make it a habit before leaving on any boat trip. BTW, if you are interested in being part of USCG Forces, email me at JoinUSCGAux@aol.com or go directly to the D1SR Human Resources department, which is in charge of new members matters, and we will help you “get in this thing.”


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