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CREATIVE ARTS FACILITATOR’S GUIDE Grade 9

A member of the FUTURELEARN group


Creative Arts Facilitator’s guide

CAPS aligned

H Abouchabki H Pelser

1909-E-CRA-FG01

Í3)È-E-CRA-FG01gÎ

Grade 9


Facilitator’s Guide

G09 - Creative Arts

Contents Lesson elements...................................................................................................................................5 Icons.........................................................................................................................................................5 Introduction..........................................................................................................................................5 Time allocation.....................................................................................................................................7 Lesson elements ..................................................................................................................................8 Additional reading..............................................................................................................................8 Resources...............................................................................................................................................8 Content and planning.........................................................................................................................9 Unit 1: Drama: Dramatic skills development; the media and careers.......................... 15 Lesson 1.1: Dramatic skills development: Body and voice (Topic 1) – 15 min........15 Lesson 1.2: The media and careers (Topic 5) – 1 hour.......................................................17 Unit 2: Visual arts: Art elements and design principles used in creating and appreciating art; painting.............................................................................................. 18 Lesson 2.1: Visual literacy: The elements of art and the principles of design (Topic 3) – 1 hour...............................................................................................................................19 Lesson 2.2: Create in 2D: Paint (Topic 1) – 4 hours.............................................................20 Unit 3: Drama: Drama elements in playmaking; appreciation and reflection........... 24 Lesson 3.1: Drama elements in playmaking (Topic 1) – 5,5 hours................................24 Lesson 3.2: Appreciation and reflection on a performance (Topic 4) – 1 hour...............................................................................................................................26 Unit 4: Visual arts and visual literacy: The arts as heritage and the role of the artist in society.............................................................................................................................. 28 Lesson 4.1: Visual literacy: Visual arts disciplines and the arts as heritage (Topic 3) – 1 hour...............................................................................................................................29 Lesson 4.2: Visual literacy: The role of the artist in society (Topic 3) – 2 hours.............................................................................................................................30 Lesson 4.3: Visual literacy: Research findings (Topic 3) – 1 hour.................................31 Unit 5: Drama: Dramatic skills development; the media.................................................. 34 Lesson 5.1: Dramatic skills development: Body and voice (Topic 1) – 15 min..............................................................................................................................34 Lesson 5.2: The media: Stereotypes in film (Topic 5) – 2 hours....................................36 Unit 6: Visual arts: Art elements and design principles used in construction; creating art in 3D.............................................................................................................. 37 Lesson 6.1: Create in 3D: Construction (Topic 2) – 4 hours.............................................37 Unit 7: Drama: Individual interpretation and performance ........................................... 40 Lesson 7.1: Interpretation and performance of dramatic forms (Topic 3) – 5,5 hours.........................................................................................................................40

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G09 - Creative Arts

Facilitator’s Guide

Unit 8: Visual arts: Art elements and design principles used in creating and appreciating art................................................................................................................. 44 Lesson 8.1: Create in 2D: Paint a still-life (Topic 1) – 4 hours.........................................45 Lesson 8.2: Create in 2D: Design a logo (Topic 1) – 2 hours............................................47 Unit 9: Drama: Dramatic skills development; body and voice......................................... 50 Lesson 9.1: Dramatic skills development: Body and voice (Topic 1) – 15 min. ............................................................................................................................50 Unit 10: Visual arts: Visual literacy and creating in 2D; printmaking............................. 53 Lesson 10.1: Visual literacy: Printmaking (Topic 3) – 1 hour.........................................54 Lesson 10.2: Create in 2D: Create a scraperboard (Topic 1) – 4 hours.......................54 Unit 11: Drama: Drama elements in playmaking; appreciation and reflection on a performance....................................................................................................................... 57 Lesson 11.1: Drama elements in playmaking (Topic 2) – 7 hours.................................57 Lesson 11.2: Appreciation and reflection on a performance (Topic 4) – 30 min..............................................................................................................................61 Unit 12: Visual arts: Visual literacy and creating in 2D........................................................ 63 Lesson 12.1: Visual literacy: Popular culture and popular art (Topic 3) – 1 hour...............................................................................................................................64 Lesson 12.2: Create in 2D: Create a pop culture image (Topic 1) – 4 hours..............64 Unit 13: Drama: Dramatic skills development........................................................................ 67 Lesson 13.1: Dramatic skills development: Body and voice (Topic 1) – 15 min..............................................................................................................................67 Unit 14: Visual arts: Visual literacy and creating in 3D........................................................ 70 Lesson 14.1: Visual literacy: Puppets (Topic 3) – 1 hour..................................................70 Lesson 14.2: Create in 3D: Create a puppet (Topic 2) – 4 hours....................................71 Unit 15: Drama: Interpretation and performance: Radio drama...................................... 74 Lesson 15.1: Interpretation and performance: Radio drama (Topic 3) – 7 hours.............................................................................................................................74 Lesson 15.2: Appreciation and reflection on a performance (Topic 4) – 30 min..............................................................................................................................79 Unit 16: Visual arts: Life drawing................................................................................................. 80 Lesson 16.1: Creating in 2D: Life drawing (Topic 1) – 5 hours.......................................80

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Facilitator’s Guide

G09 - Creative Arts

Unit 1

Drama: Dramatic skills development; the media and careers This unit focuses on warm-up and cool-down exercises to prepare the body and voice for performances. The learners should be familiar with the work covered in Grades 7 and 8. These skills are necessary for any actor to ensure mental and physical focus, to prevent injuries, to relieve tension and anxiety, to prepare for performances and ultimately deliver good performances. This unit also explores the soap opera as television genre and how the media uses it as communication channel.

This lesson cannot exist in isolation and must be practised and repeated weekly, especially before any performance. Spend at least 15 minutes per week on this.

Learning objectives

After you have completed this unit, the learners must be able to do the following: yy explain the purpose of warm-up and cool-down exercises yy develop a warm-up routine and complete it yy develop a cool-down routine and complete it yy regulate breathing yy execute body focus exercises yy explain the terms ‘media’ and ‘mass media’ yy identify the soap opera as a genre yy identify stock characters and their stereotypical traits

Lesson 1.1: Dramatic skills development: Body and voice (Topic 1) – 15 min.

Introduction The aim of this lesson is to familiarise the learners with warming up the voice and body before a performance. As with any physical activity, it is necessary to prepare and condition your body to ensure optimal performance.

Warm-up exercises may help to reduce injuries and help actors to focus and prepare for the task ahead. Encourage the learners to warm up with their co-actors to strengthen their bond and improve communication. Cool-down exercises will help your body and voice to recharge. It releases all tension and also helps you to calm down your body and voice, following the heightened emotions associated with performing.

For Creative Arts, as prescribed by the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), Topic 1 refers to dramatic skills development. This lesson should be concluded in 15 minutes, but must be repeated every week and especially before performances. Impaq ©

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G09 - Creative Arts

Facilitator’s Guide

Summary

Actors must always be fully prepared for a performance. They must be familiar with the terms and movements, have good spatial awareness and be focused. Warm-up exercises, both for the body and the voice, help actors to be mentally and physically prepared. These exercises help to sharpen the senses and ensure that the body and voice are ready, to prevent possible injury. The exercises or routines also help to relieve tension and anxiety. It is advisable to release tension and get rid of built-up energy and stress after a performance.

Allow for self-assessment

Determine how the learners’ bodies and voices react to warming up and cooling down exercises. yy yy yy

yy yy

Do a small experiment. Choose a short monologue or poem and present it to the class, a friend, family members or the facilitator without warming up. Keep record of your feelings: షష How was the performance? షష Did you make any mistakes? షష How did your body feel after all the excitement? షష Was your breathing relaxed or rapid? షష Also ask your audience for feedback. On another day, present the same short monologue or poem to the same audience. However, this time you must first warm up for at least 15 minutes. Keep record of your feelings as before. Compare your notes and reflect on whether the warm-up routine made any difference to your delivery, focus, preparedness, diction and anxiety.

Tips for the facilitator Help the learners with the body and voice warming-up and cooling-down exercises. The exercises work best when done with someone else. Watch the videos suggested in the study guide. Encourage the learners to reflect and write down their findings. These need not be in a specific format or too long; a paragraph or two will be sufficient. The feedback from the facilitator or audience should also be recorded.

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Unit

Facilitator’s Guide

1

Solve the challenge LEARNERS HAVE TO SOLVE THE CHALLENGE How do I ensure normal breathing during a performance?

Actors have a multitude of elements to focus on while performing: the performance itself, movements and positioning, various technical elements and remembering their lines. On top of that, they need to be aware of and considerate towards fellow performers and the audience. Breathing should not get in the way of delivering a good performance. It is important that actors be fully prepared in this regard, which makes having a warm-up routine essential. Not only will the exercises increase an actor’s concentration, it will also ensure that the brain gets enough oxygen to function optimally under stress.

Lesson 1.2: The media and careers (Topic 5) – 1 hour

Introduction The aim of this lesson is to familiarise the learners with the soap opera as television genre and how the media uses it as communication channel.

For Creative Arts, as prescribed by the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), Topic 5 refers to media. This lesson should be concluded in one hour, excluding own research time.

For the curious

Watch a few episodes of any South African soap opera or teleserial and see if you can identify the stock characters, stereotypical characters and scenarios. After identifying these characters, see if you can determine why and how these characters are used in the soapie.

Tips for the facilitator Let the learners watch a soap opera and discuss the characters. Use drama terminology, such as stock characters and flat characters. Encourage the learners to identify the types of characters in other media, such as films, or even people they interact with. Impaq ©

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Facilitator’s Guide

Unit 2

Visual arts: Art elements and design principles used in creating and appreciating art; painting The elements of art and the principles of design will be reviewed in this unit. You are familiar with these elements and principles, as they have been discussed and applied in Grades 7 and 8. Familiarise yourself with the terminology and visual components used in creating and appreciating art. This unit also focuses on the application of the elements of art and design principles in the creation of a two-dimensional artwork (painting). You will explore a variety of painting techniques, brush applications, colour-mixing and combine it with personal interpretation and expression.

Tips for the facilitator Creating art takes time. Take this into consideration when planning your term and weekly timetable. Try to work on the practical tasks and theoretical work simultaneously. Practical wrk is time-consuming; allow the learners to work on their painitings regularly.

Learning objectives

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After you have completed this unit, the learners must be able to do the following: yy name and explain the elements of art yy name and explain the principles of design yy identify and discuss the elements of art in a variety of artworks (paintings) yy identify and discuss the principles of design in a variety of artworks (paintings) yy plan, execute and reflect on an own artwork (painting) yy identify and discuss artists and artworks of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood yy identify and discuss Impressionist artists and artworks yy copy the techniques of the Impressionists yy apply knowledge of the elements of art in creating an artwork yy apply knowledge of the principles of design in creating an artwork yy apply knowledge of the elements of art in the appreciation of artworks yy apply knowledge of the principles of design in the appreciation of artworks

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Unit

Facilitator’s Guide

2

Lesson 2.1: Visual literacy: The elements of art and the principles of design (Topic 3) – 1 hour Introduction The aim of this lesson is to familiarise the learners with how the elements of art and principles of design are depicted in artworks, by looking at, analysing and discussing the paintings of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

For Creative Arts, as prescribed by the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), Topic 3 refers to visual literacy. This lesson should be concluded in one hour.

Tips for the facilitator Discuss the elements of art and principles of design. Discuss the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and look at as many examples of their work as possible. Study the Pre-Raphaelite paintings (Fig. 2.13 – 2.15) and try to identify the art elements and principles of design.

For the curious

yy yy yy

Identify the use of line, shape, form, space, value, colour and texture. Remember that there are no specific answers; it is more valuable to talk about this and to see whether these elements are present. It might be that not all of the elements are visible in the paintings. Identify the presence of balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, rhythm and unity/variety. Can you think of a painting where any of the elements of art are very noticeable? You may look for pictures on the internet, in books, or anywhere around you.

Tips for the facilitator Appreciating art is a skill that the learners can acquire. Read the short analysis and discussion on the painting Isabella and the Pot of Basil by William Holman Hunt. It will help them to identify the elements of art and principles of design.

After studying the painting and reading the analysis, go back to the paintings of Rossetti, Millais and Waterhouse to see whether the learners can analyse and discuss the PreRaphaelite paintings against the criteria of elements of art and principles of design. Let the learners have the discussion with a fellow learner, a friend or a family member. Let them ask them for their opinions but remember that an opinion must always be justified and verified by producing evidence and references. Personal taste has no place in effective art discussion and analysis.

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G09 - Creative Arts

Facilitator’s Guide

The learners must make a checklist listing the elements of art and principles of design. Once they get going, they will realise that this type of analysis of an artwork is not that complicated. Intense observation is extremely important as well as an understanding that all of the elements of art and principles of design will not necessarily be present in every artwork. Some works of art only use two or three art elements, but that is exactly what makes it so memorable; think of artworks such as The Scream (1893) by Edvard Munch.

The learners can also discuss artworks using the conceptual framework.

THE CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Let the learners use the conceptual framework to discuss the artworks of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in the study guide. Refer to the example review in the study guide. Use the rubric for reflective writing in this guide to assess the learners’ artwork analysis.

Lesson 2.2: Create in 2D: Paint (Topic 1) – 4 hours Introduction This lesson will look at how the artistic factors (art elements and design principles) can be incorporated in creating a 2D artwork using paint.

The aim of this lesson is to familiarise the learners with various painting techniques. This will include a variety of materials (paints) and tools (brushes). They may experiment with various painting techniques until they find a method that they feel comfortable with. This artwork will draw its inspiration from the artistic outputs of the Impressionist painters.

For Creative Arts, as prescribed by the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), Topic 1 refers to creating in 2D. This lesson should be concluded in 4 hours. 20

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Unit

Facilitator’s Guide

2

Tips for the facilitator Encourage the learners to study the Impressionists’ methods and techniques. Provide the learners with the necessary materials, tools and space to create the artworks. Meticulously plan the process, allowing time for the learners to experiment with various types of paints, methods and techniques. Create a painting The learners must create an Impressionist painting.

Process Do not rush this process. Set aside some time each week for the learners to experiment with various paints, methods and techniques. Allow at least five weeks for the pre-painting process. The learners are not required to paint anything in particular (an object). Let them experiment with the paint and brushes and try out a few techniques, with specific reference to impressionism.

Let them assess their work by critically looking at the final result (dried paint) and let them decide what they can do to improve the final product. They must keep these testers in their art portfolio for future reference. Allow at least four weeks for the completion of the final artwork. Create an Impressionist painting The learners lightly sketch their desired subject matter on an A3 sheet of paper.

The proposed themes are yy A tree yy A human figure

The learners may use a life model or a real tree, but they may also work from a photograph. Encourage them to look for interesting angles and let them take a few pictures with their mobile phones. The final composition does not have to include the entire object but can only be a part thereof. Remind the learners to include the elements of art in their composition as well as the principles of design. Remember that not all of these need to be present. They must refer to their paint samples and start painting. There is no specific process or method, meaning every individual will approach this in their own way. Remind them that they are not colouring in but creating a painting. They must be creative and not afraid of making mistakes!

The learners must take pictures of their progress and include these in their portfolios. Take pictures of the final product (close-ups and the artwork in its entirety) and also include these in the portfolio. Use the rubric for visual arts in this guide for an informal evaluation of the painting.

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G09 - Creative Arts

Facilitator’s Guide

Summary

Art elements and design principles may be applied in various ways to create and critique artworks. Often, we are not even aware of these factors, but can see or sense if an artwork is easy or nice to look at. Painting is a skill that must be practised, and the final outcome depends on a multitude of factors, such as the choice of paint, surface, tools, subject matter, skill level, techniques and methods. Go back to the paintings of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the Impressionists and critically assess their painting techniques.

Allow for self-assessment

Put your painting up against a wall and assess the following: yy Stand at a distance of 5 metres and look at your painting. yy Now, step closer, to about 2 metres from your painting. yy Stand even closer, at 50 cm, from your painting and see how it changes. yy Step back again and keep looking at your artwork. Repeat this a few times. yy Ask fellow learners, friends or your facilitator to do the same and give you feedback on what they see. yy Critically look at your painting and reflect on the presence of the elements of art. yy Do the same for the presence of the principles of design. yy Ask fellow learners, friends or your facilitator to do the same and give you feedback on what they see.

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Unit

Facilitator’s Guide

2

Solve the challenge LEARNERS HAVE TO SOLVE THE CHALLENGE How do I recognise a good work of art?

Tips for the facilitator

Learners must gain confidence to talk about and analyse art. Engage with the learners and use the proposed model (conceptual framework) when discussing and analysing artworks. This will help the learners to get started. It is important to provide the opportunity for the learners to form views of their own. We all have preferences, personal tastes, social context and frames of reference, but these should never influence our interpretation of art. Use the proposed model to analyse and assess artworks. Pay attention to the beauty of the artword, skill and technique, intent, uniquiness, inherent meaning and more. These are discussed in full in the study guide. Use the rubric in this guide to informally assess the written reflective essay.

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G09 - Creative Arts

Facilitator’s Guide

Unit 3

Drama: Drama elements in playmaking; appreciation and reflection In this unit, the learners will review the drama elements covered in Grades 7 and 8. They will also focus on the drama elements used in playmaking, as well as the creation and execution of a drama that reflects cultural practices. It is important that they master the necessary skills to devise and perform a classroom drama. This unit also focuses on the appreciation of drama and mindful reflection on playmaking and performance. It is important to do physical and vocal warm-up exercises (unit 1) before any rehearsal or performance.

Learning objectives

After you have completed this unit, the learners must be able to do the following: yy identify and describe the elements of drama yy identify cultural practices yy display respect and sensitivity towards different cultures yy use cultural practices in devising a classroom drama yy use physical and vocal warm-up exercises in preparation of a performance yy perform the classroom drama yy communicate feedback on the performance, using drama terminology yy articulate appreciation of the performance, using drama terminology yy reflect on the performance, using drama terminology and reference to the elements of drama

Lesson 3.1: Drama elements in playmaking (Topic 1) – 5,5 hours

Introduction The aim of this lesson is to create a classroom drama that reflects cultural practices. Firstly, the learners will need to decide which cultural practice they want to base their drama on. The performance must be an adaptation of the cultural practice and must not be a mere reenactment. The performance may take the form of a monologue, a dialogue or an ensemble piece.

For Creative Arts, as prescribed by the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS), Topic 2 refers to drama elements in playmaking. This lesson should be concluded in five and a half hours, excluding rehearsal time.

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Unit

Facilitator’s Guide

3

Tips for the facilitator The learners must know the elements of drama. It is discussed in the study guide and comprises literary elements, technical elements and performance elements. Discuss the elements with the learners and use examples from films, television programmes and live theatre performances. Watching television provides the opportunity for teachable moments

LEARNERS HAVE TO SOLVE THE CHALLENGE How does non-verbal expression support the narrative?

The narrative or storyline relies on how actors use verbal and non-verbal communication to portray the characters.

Non-verbal communication entails getting across ideas using emotions and information without words. Facial expressions, eye contact (or the lack of it), body language, gestures, posture, timing, pace, intensity and proximity are part of non-verbal communication. These are important elements to consider when telling a story. It gives vital information about the characters, their relationship and the development of the story.

Tips for the facilitator Assist the learners by providing ideas for the activity and helping them to streamline their ideas to write short drama. Encourage the learners to focus on the creative process and to engage with the theme. Help them to source appropriate costumes and props. Devise a short drama The learners must research a cultural practice, activity or event and devise a short drama production. This may be in the form of a monologue, a dialogue or an ensemble piece.

Theme The theme of the drama: A family dinner. The family dinner is a cultural practice known to all people but celebrated in various ways. It can be a joyous occasion or a difficult social situation, filled with expectations, conventions and complicated formalities and obligations.

Re-read the section about cultural practices at the beginning of this lesson. Identify elements such as the religious, spiritual and culinary practices as well as leadership, artistic expression, everyday activities and events. Use the elements as a basis to devise a short drama about a difficult or challenging situation, e.g., a child rebelling against their parents’ preconceived ideas and ideals.

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Gr 9-Creative Arts-Facilitator's Guide  
Gr 9-Creative Arts-Facilitator's Guide