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DELICIOUS & HEALTHY RECIPES  +   PLANT-BASED NUTRITION  +   EXPERT TIPS & ADVICE

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B E ST OF

Food & Nutrition 2020 SPECIAL EDITION

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Sharpen Your Knife Skills

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Welcome W

elcome to our ‘Best of IMPACT’ Food & Nutrition Special Edition!

Now more than ever, families are committed to cooking and eating together again, and we want to make sure that your days are full of deliciousness while nourishing your body and soul. We have selected our best recipes and culinary tips from the past five years of IMPACT and squeezed them into this 200+ page special edition! Plus, we have included additional nutrition advice from our top experts. Whether you are following a plant-based lifestyle, or looking for ways to incorporate more flavourful, healthy foods into your meal planning, there is something amazing here for everyone. I would like to acknowledge and thank our Guest Editor, Barb Sheldon-Thomas. Barb is a food literacy educator from Calgary, Alberta and the project manager for Wicked Healthy Food, a global plant-based food production and education company lead by chefs Chad Sarno and Derek Sarno. Barb has taught at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, CSNN, U of C and is currently completing her graduate research around the role of food literacy in the lives of marginalized youth. A special thank you to all of our incredible food contributors for their beautiful creations and passion for healthy food, and to our advertising partners and businesses who share the same core values. I encourage you to check them all out on their professional platforms. We hope that you are inspired to enjoy this issue over and over again, and please pass it along to all of your friends!

Elaine Kupser Publisher elaine@impactmagazine.ca

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  3 


Table of Contents Kitchen Skills

Salads

10

80

Beverages

Mains & Sides

20

106

Snacks

Desserts

38

164

Breakfasts

Nutrition

58

198

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B E ST O F

Food & Nutrition CONTRIBUTORS

Cameron Alksnis, Danielle Arsenault-Ketch, Eka Barnovi-Macnicol, Paula Bellavance, Shelley Boettcher, Brendan Brazier, Jennifer Brazil, Jasmine Briones, Sarah Britton, Brian Buchsdruecker, Tye Carson, Kevin Clark, Sarah Cuff, Julie Daniluk, Dr. Chana Davis, Andy De Santis, Jeannine Elder, Elizabeth Emery, Kelly Anne Erdman, Rip Esselstyn, Zuzana Fajkusova, Jenni Field, Bruce Friedrich, Dr. Joel Fuhrman, Rebecca Garland, Joanne Gerrard Young, Adam Hart, Jessica Hoffman, Andrew Horth, Susan Hoy, Candice Hutchings, Patricia Idus, Erin Ireland, Dr. Ted Jablonski, Joyce Johnson, Arianne Jones, Walker Jordan, Lisa Kitahara, Darina Kopcok, Maria Koutsogiannis, Bridgette Leeson, Nikki Lefler, Gwen Leron, Angela Liddon, Tom Lundteigen, Miranda Malisani, Krystel Marois, Joy McCarthy, Joy McCarthy, Melanie McDonald, Doug McNish, Anne Miles, Ella Mills, Rachel Morrow, Brandy Mudryk, Carrie Mullin Innes, Andrew Olson, Kris Osborne, Alanah Paterson Brown, Chris Petrellese, Julie Piatt, Liana Robberecht, Shayla Roberts, Rich Roll, Amber Romaniuk, Jennifer Rossano, Andrea Saliba, Chad Sarno, Derek Sarno, Jennifer Sebestyen, Angela Simpson, Janice Skoreyko, Kathy Smart, Dr. Ginger Southall, Jennifer Standing, Yvette Styner, Hannah Sunderani, Lauren Toyota, Danijela Unkovich, Kristina Virro, Leia Vita Marasovich, Emily Von Euw, Jordan Wagman, Angela Wallace, Gord Webber, Julie Zeitlhuber

PUBLISHER

Elaine Kupser elaine@impactmagazine.ca GUEST EDITOR

Barb Sheldon-Thomas barb@wickedhealthyfood.com ART DIRECTOR

Logan Johnson design@impactmagazine.ca ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Farra Farrauto farra@impactmagazine.ca Diana Signorile diana@impactmagazine.ca COPY EDITOR

Tom Lundteigen IMPACT MAGAZINE HEAD OFFICE

2007 2 St. SW Calgary, AB T2S 1S4 403.228.0605 info@impactmagazine.ca advertising@impactmagazine.ca

The opinions expressed in IMPACT Magazine are the writers’ and are not intended to provide or replace advice from a health care professional. Please consult your health care professional before making any changes to your diet. All content is the property of IMPACT Productions Inc. and cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent of IMPACT Productions Inc. © 2020 Impact Productions Inc.

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Kitchen Skills

Learn how whole foods and the right tools will improve your health BY B A R B S H E L D O N -T H O M A S – Whole Food Culinary Instructor & IMPACT Magazine's Kitchen Skills chef in Calgary, AB

I

t’s no secret that a diet filled with nutrient-dense, whole foods — one that contains less inflammatory, packaged and processed food — will benefit our health immensely. But in this crazy-busy life, filled with careers, children, training schedules and commitments, is it realistic to think that we can reduce our reliance on easy-to-prepare convenience food and

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shift towards preparing food at home? If cooking our own food from scratch is the answer to more nutrients, more energy and better immunity, can we make room for it in our lives? The short answer is absolutely. Our health, performance and longevity are definitely connected to how we fuel our body, so cooking at home needs to be a priority, regardless of your food

philosophy. Even those who have barely stepped foot in a kitchen can make better food happen with a few fundamental skills and a bit of organization. IMPACT’s Kitchen Skills series will focus on setting you up for success. This article, we start with the basics — getting your kitchen ready to be a place where nutritious, delicious food can actually be created.

IMPACT Magazine

TYE CARSON

REALFOODGODDESS


BUI LD TH E PE RFEC T PANTRY BASIC WHOLE FOODS INGREDIENTS

Your pantry and refrigerator should contain the things that you will use and will contribute to health. In other words, real food. Read your labels and learn to recognize ingredients that your body may not respond well to. Check out Michael Pollan’s book Food Rules for simple whole food tips such as, “Don’t eat anything your grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food.” Your refrigerator should be relatively empty by the end of the week. Take a few hours once a week to chop some veggies, create a dip, make a soup or stew and possibly a protein that you can grab when on the go. Keep your fridge stocked with only the fresh ingredients you will need to make a week’s worth of meals and a few essential condiments such as Dijon mustard, hot sauce, tamari, flax, fresh nuts and seeds. In my kitchen, I keep only what I need in my pantry. Having a few high quality ingredients at the ready helps my family create things such as salad dressings and dips that we would otherwise have to buy. Processed versions of these products often contain congesting, inflammatory ingredients such as high-fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated, rancid oils. But making dips and dressings from scratch in just a few minutes keeps the nasty ingredients out of our diet, while boosting nutrient density and health!

IMPACT Magazine

BA R B ’ S PA NTRY M U S T- H AV E S

NICE TO HAVE IN THE PANTRY

• Organic Virgin Coconut Oil for higher heat cooking and baking. It’s antimicrobial and high in nutrients. • Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil for low heat cooking, salad dressings and finishing sauces. It’s high in skin nourishing, anti-inflammatory omega 9 fatty acids. • A few BPA-free cans of organic beans such as chickpeas or black beans for a quick weeknight dinner over salad or turned into a dip. • Apple cider vinegar and balsamic vinegar. • High quality, organic glass jars of tomatoes and tomato sauce. • A sweetener such as honey, stevia or maple syrup. • Small, sealed batches of spices such as turmeric, cayenne, true cinnamon, sea salt, peppercorns, and cumin. These are anti-inflammatory and very nutrient-dense. • Bouillon cubes or stock free of monosodium glutamate (MSG). • A couple shapes of whole grain or grain-free, gluten-free pasta. • Root vegetables. • Jars of whole grains such as quinoa, brown rice and oats if you are a grain eater. • Superfoods such as spirulina, maca, cacao and chia that can easily be thrown in a smoothie or on a bowl of breakfast oats.

• • • •

Jars of fermented vegetables. Dried fruit. High quality cereal. Curry paste and hot sauces. (Store in fridge after opening.) • Baking ingredients such as organic flours, baking powder and baking soda (aluminum free), vanilla, chocolate chips. • Flavour boosters such as jarred roasted red peppers, capers, olives.

BARB’S PANTRY TIP Store all oils and spices away from heat and light to avoid potential of rancidity, which affects flavor and can be toxic to the body.

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  11 


H E R E ’ S W H AT YO U N E E D T O C R E AT E A FUNC TIONAL KITCH E N PRE P S PACE • Back to basics: One sharp chef knife and one sharp paring knife, a knife sharpener and honing steel, two wood or plastic cutting boards, small glass bowls, three mixing bowls, a good set of pots, a large and a small sauté pan, small utensils such as: measuring spoons, a grater, a microplane and a spatula (no duplicates, one of each), a few serving utensils such as spoons and tongs, a large braising or roasting pan, baking pans. • Make sure your counter is free of anything that doesn’t have an

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immediate application. (You’d never find a ceramic chicken cookie jar on a prep table in a professional kitchen.) • Get rid of fad appliances that take up space, but offer little benefit. Hang onto, or upgrade your blender, food processor and toaster. • Look in second hand stores if you don’t have what you need. These are great places to find things such as cast iron pans and small appliances. • Obtain high-quality storage containers for the food you will make in the week.

IMPACT YOUR NUTRITION When you have the right tools and the right ingredients, perfect meals are around every corner. Gather the essentials, build the perfect pantry and enjoy the whole food recipes on the next page.

IMPACT Magazine


WHOLE FOODS HEALING RECIPES When I teach whole food cooking classes with my partner in nutritional education, Chef Christina Acevedo of HoneyandVanilla.com, we use two of her healing recipes to show that a few simple but nutritionally powerful pantry ingredients can create delicious and versatile flavour boosters. These two dressings help turn salads, stir-fries, proteins, wraps, noodles and more into food that is anti-inflammatory, immune boosting, bone building, tummy soothing and unbelievably delicious.

OMEGA OIL DRESSING INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp. flax oil ¾ tsp. Dijon mustard ½ tsp. fresh grated turmeric (or dry ground turmeric) 1 Tbsp. raw apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. tamari (light) 1 tsp. raw honey 1 clove garlic, minced Sea salt/pepper

DIRECTIONS Combine all ingredients in mason jar, shake and use immediately. Stores in the fridge up to a week!

BRAGG & RED WINE VINEGAR SAUCE FOR EVERYTHING INGREDIENTS • • • • • • •

¼ cup Bragg Liquid Amino acids (natural gluten free soy sauce) or Tamari Light ¼ cup red wine vinegar 6 slices of fresh ginger, sliced very thin 4 slices of fresh garlic, sliced very thin 1 Tbsp. green onion, sliced thin 1 tsp. raw honey 1 medium sized dried chili arbol, crushed

DIRECTIONS Slice and measure ingredients for the sauce and add them to a small container. Set aside to allow the flavours to infuse for an hour or so.

RECIPES COURTESY HONEYANDVANILLA.COM

Kale & Avocado Salad TRY WITH OMEGA OIL DRESSING!

IMPACT Magazine

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • •

Finely chop kale leaves. Halve, slice and dice avocado. Massage avocado cubes into kale for 1-2 minutes or until tender. Add onions herbs and dress salad with omega oil dressing. Sprinkle with hemp seeds and mix well. 

2 heads flat leaf kale 1 avocado ½ onion, finely diced ½ bunch Italian parsley ½ bunch cilantro ¾ cup hemp seeds

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  13 


Knife Skills Learn to use your healthy kitchen’s most important tool BY B A R B S H E L D O N -T H O M A S – Whole Food Culinary Instructor & IMPACT Magazine's Kitchen Skills chef in Calgary, AB REALFOODGODDESS

U

sing a knife properly can be intimidating, but the more you practice, the more confident you become and the more power you have to create healthful, fresh food. Chopping fresh food is a skill that needs to be learned to help you have control over what goes into your body. When you are comfortable with your knife, time in the kitchen becomes pleasurable, good food becomes available and health improves. While there are many basic cooking skills to learn to make cooking something you can fit into your daily routine, getting right with your knife is the first step on your journey.

14  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Cooking is the doorway to health. And picking up a knife is the key. Here’s what you need to know about selecting and using your knife. ESSENTIAL KNIVES

It is not necessary to have a drawer full of knives. A chef’s knife, a paring knife and a serrated bread knife can perform most tasks in the kitchen. Many people find that an 8-inch blade is easiest to manipulate, while others prefer 10. Some people like more delicate Japanese blades, while others prefer heartier German or American styles. Test-drive a variety of knives to see which is the most comfortable for you.

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Sharpen Your


SELECTING & CARING FO R YO U R

CHEF’S KNIFE A knife is an extension of your body and is a very individualized purchase. Here’s what to look for at the knife store: German Blades (left) • Rugged, thicker blade; easy to sharpen • Holds edge well Japanese Blades (right) • Lighter, more delicate • Great for very fine cuts • Extremely sharp BLADE LENGTH The length of blade you choose will depend on your cooking needs and what feels comfortable to you. A 10-inch blade is average for a chef’s knife and suitable for breaking down both plants and proteins, but 8-inch or 12-inch knives are common in kitchens, as well. HANDLE A chef’s knife should feel balanced when you hold it and the grip should feel very comfortable in your hand. High quality knives will have the steel running all the way into the handle. CARING FOR YOUR KNIFE • Never put your chef’s knife in the dishwasher. Clean immediately after use by hand. Abrasive cleaners and dishwasher soap can damage the blade. • Sharpen your knife once a week. • Hone your knife before every use. • Use a knife protector to keep your blade sharp and safely stored. • Have your chef’s knife sharpened professionally once a year. ACCE SSORIE S FOR YOUR KNIFE KIT • Knife protector • Honing rod (steel or ceramic) • Sharpener • Paring knife • Serrated bread knife • Wood or plastic cutting board (glass boards dull the knife). Placing a damp cloth under your cutting board for a slipfree work surface that will help keep you safe.

15 


HOLDING A KNIFE Grasp your knife near the bolster of the blade, where the blade and handle meet. Place your thumb on one side of the blade and your index finger on the other, as if they could touch if there were a hole in the knife. The other fingers relax and gently hook underneath the handle. Stay relaxed. Do not place your index finger on top of the blade. This makes cutting less stable and strains your hand and arm.

CHOPPING HERBS & SMALLER ITEMS Many items benefit from pivoting your knife through them as you chop. Secure the tip of the knife with the palm of your guide hand, and make up and down motions with the rest of the knife as it pivots through the food, in the shape of a fan.

HOLDING YOUR FOOD Fingertips need to stay out of the way when cutting. Make the shape of the letter “e” with your guide (food holding) hand, curling your fingers under your knuckles. Maintain this shape as you hold the food. Your thumb and pinky guide the food forward as you cut. Gently resting the side of the blade on the knuckles of your guide hand helps you understand where the blade is in relation to your fingers. With time and practice, this position will become natural.

CHOPPING AVE R AG E SIZE D, HARDE R ITE MS Make sure the tip of your knife maintains contact with the cutting surface as you move the blade in a circular motion, like the wheels on a train. As you move your hand forward, the blade chops down and through the food. Practice on easy-to-cut items such as celery or carrots.

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IMPACT Magazine


Crunchy Immune Boosting Chopped Salsa INGREDIENTS

PUT YOUR SKILLS TO THE TE ST This salsa is high in the antioxidant beta carotene, which is helpful for warding off illness and supporting healthy tissues. Jicama provides gentle, digestible fibre and onion supports the immune system. Chili powder is a thermogenic spice that revs up metabolism and helps your body detoxify. Cilantro is high in chlorophyll, great for your blood and it naturally detoxifies heavy metals from your body. Lime is alkalizing and stimulates digestion and sea salt contains many necessary trace minerals that the body needs for daily function.

IMPACT Magazine

• • • • • • • •

2 medium sized carrots ½ jicama root 3 ripe tomatoes, red or yellow ½ red onion juice of 1 lime ½ cup cilantro ¼ tsp. arbol or other smoky chili powder sea salt to taste

DIRECTIONS Dice the carrots, jicama, onions and tomatoes into 1 cm square cubes. Place in medium sized bowl. Finely chop cilantro and combine with vegetables. Slice lime in half and squeeze over salsa. Sprinkle in salt and chili powder and combine well, adjusting seasonings as needed. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  17 


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Beverages Homebrewed Kombucha 24

Get Juicing! 26 A Taste of Italy Indian Spiced Cauliflower

Ginger Blueberry Smoothie with Secret Ingredient 29

Iron Pumping Recovery Smoothie 30

Gingerbread Dessert Smoothie 31

Dairy-Free Hot Chocolate 32

6 Patio Cocktails

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  21 


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Crazy for Kombucha

Enzyme-rich tea touted as biochemical powerhouse BY A N N E M I L E S – Natural Health Specialist at Community Natural Foods in Calgary, AB MYCNF 

MYCNFY YC

K

ombucha is definitely not the new kid on the block. It can trace its roots back to the Chinese Qin Dynasty and has been consumed for thousands of years by civilizations all over the world. We are talking about an amino acid and enzyme-rich tea, usually black or green, fermented with lots of wonderful micro-organisms. As a result, we end up with a Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast, more commonly known as a SCOBY. The SCOBY continues to reproduce indefinitely. About this point you might be somewhere between: “Why would I ever drink this stuff?” and “Are you kidding me?” Assuming folks were onto something special 2,000 years ago and knowing that Americans buy close to $450 million of kombucha annually, it makes sense to look at some of the benefits attributed to this tea.

24  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Kombucha is touted to be a biochemical powerhouse of B Vitamins, a glorious cocktail of lactic, hyalauranic and glucuronic acids, probiotics and glucosamine. Health benefits may include everything from increased metabolism and energy levels, improved digestion, lowered glucose levels, reduced blood pressure, migraine headache relief, Candida reduction, constipation relief, mental focus and even weight loss. Chinese medicine suggests that kombucha is able to address these issues because it has the ability to balance the body and, in so doing, enables it to heal and protect its own immune system. Athletes may also find benefits in kombucha. Brendan Brazier, an Ironman triathlete and the co-founder of Vega, a company specializing in nutritional workout products, says you can “increase muscular efficacy, improve cardio, and reduce inflammation” with foods such as kombucha. He talks about “relaxed muscles that perform with grace and increased flexibility” after using kombucha pre or post workout. There have been reports of possible side-effects of drinking kombucha tea, but like everything else, common sense is the name of the game. In 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared kombucha safe to drink, but there are precautions you should take to enjoy it safely. Start by drinking kombucha in small amounts, two to four ounces at a time. By doing this you gradually enable your body to adapt to a new food and new friendly bacteria, avoiding any initial gas or bloating.

There are many homebrew recipes for kombucha, but crucial to them all is taking special care to use clean, non-metal utensils and to work in a clean environment. If you are taking any medications that are sensitive to acidic conditions,

IMPACT Magazine


Homebrewed Kombucha Note: Use non-metal utensils and sterilize tools and jars.

INGREDIENTS

take your kombucha and medications away from one another. Kombucha is becoming more popular as a commercially produced drink. You can find the double fermented carbonated beverages — in flavours such as grape, ginger and raspberry —

in many natural and health food stores. These drinks make a wonderful alternative to sugar-filled sodas.

In a clean environment, gather the following: • 1 gallon glass jar • 8-10 black or green teabags (or loose tea equivalent) • 1 cup organic sugar • 1 SCOBY (you can either grow your own or purchase one from various online sources)

DIRECTIONS Brew 1 gallon of hot water with 8-10 teabags. Add 1 cup organic sugar (organic white actually works best and is mostly eaten up by the bacteria). Make sure you let the tea cool. Pour the brew into the gallon glass jar leaving a ½-inch space at the top. Add your SCOBY to the top of the jar and secure with a coffee filter and rubber band. Let the brew sit and ferment for seven days. It should taste tart and slightly sweet. Second Fermentation: (to achieve the carbonated beverage) Remove the SCOBY to a bowl. Pour 1 litre of your favourite juice into the gallon jar. Pour fermented kombucha into the jar leaving ½ inch of space on top. Set aside ½ cup of kombucha to cover the SCOBY to store for future use. Close lid tightly and leave 2 to 4 days depending on the amount of carbonation desired. Serve chilled. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 54; protein 3 g; fat 0 g; carbs 13 g. 

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  25 


Get Juicing!

Fuel up with a colourburst of energy from a rainbow of vegetables BY D R . G I N G E R S O U T H A L L – Chiropractor, wellness consultant & author of The Rainbow Juice Cleanse in Lowell, MI THEDRGINGER

A

s an athlete (triathlete, runner, mountain climber and Bikram yogi) I am always seeking ways not only to push myself, but to take my strength, vigor and endurance to the next level and I’ve learned how consuming real, unprocessed, whole foods can do just that. I’ve worked with triathletes, runners, bodybuilders and fitness competitors, adding daily fresh-made, organic vegetable juices, experiencing exactly how they maximize resources for their ultimate performance.

26  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Unprocessed, alkaline juices and foods nourish the body from a cellular level, providing critical vitamins and minerals, phytonutrients, amino acids, water and electrolytes all in a very bio-available form that the body can put to quick use, not only in terms of immediate performance and energy, but in terms of recovery and repair as well. If you are an athlete and high performer, consider juicing of vegetables and herbs (not fruit) to take you to your athletic pinnacle. Juicing (not smoothies) is the

most efficient way to get whole-food nutrients into your body. There is no fibre to digest so juice supercharges your body right away. A juice cleanse can help the athlete who aspires to advance their nutrition for peak performance, or the person who has been stuck in a rut, eating unhealthy, processed food and is tired of their toxic body and health challenges. There are more details in my book, along with whole food recipes inspired by the rainbow.

IMPACT Magazine

COURTESY THE RAINBOW JUICE CLEANSE

THEDRGINGER 


THE COLOUR GROUPS FOR RAINBOW JUICING RED Found In: • Tomatoes • Raspberries • Red Cabbage • Cranberries • Red Peppers Benefits: • Supports urinary tract, prostate and DNA health • Protects against heart disease and cancer

ORANGE Found In: • Carrots • Orange Peppers • Sweet Potatoes • Pumpkin • Turmeric • Ginger Benefits: • Supports eye health, immune function and overall health, growth and development

YELLOW Found In: • Spaghetti Squash • Yellow Peppers • Lemons • Pineapple Benefits: • Supports retinal and overall eye health

BLUE/INDIGO/ VIOLET Found In: • Purple Cabbage • Blueberries • Blackberries • Eggplant • Beets

GREEN Found In: • Leafy Greens • Sprouted Grasses and Algae • Cucumber • Zucchini • Peas • Avocado • Asparagus Benefits: • Supports artery and liver function, eye and cell health • Promotes gum health and wound healing • Keeps bones and teeth strong

Benefits: • Supports brain, bone, heart and artery health • Boosts memory • Protects against cancer • Counters aging

W H I T E / TA N / BROWN Found In: • Garlic • Onions • Scallions • Cauliflower • Bananas • Mushrooms • Ginger Benefits: • Anti-cancer and antiinflammatory properties, boosts immunity, helps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  27 


A TASTE OF ITALY Bathe your cells in heart-protective phytonutrients and vitamins A and C, as you savour the flavours and aromas of the Old Country.

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

4 large tomatoes, sliced in half 2 red bell peppers, cored and seeded ½ handful parsley, cilantro and oregano ¼ small onion, peeled 2 garlic cloves (or to taste), peeled Ingredients for after juicing: Dulse and kelp flakes, to taste Stevia, to taste (optional)

DIRECTIONS Juice all the ingredients. Pour into a glass, add the dulse and kelp flakes and stevia (if desired), and “cin cin”!

INDIAN SPICED CAULIFLOWER Loaded with the phytonutrient glucosinolate from cauliflower and potent anti-inflammatory, anticancer properties of turmeric, this natural liver and kidney cleanser is packed with digesting enzymes for excellent cleansing support.

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

1 head cauliflower, cut into chunks ¼ lemon 1 inch fresh ginger root, unpeeled 2 inches turmeric root, unpeeled, or 1 tsp. turmeric powder Ingredients for after juicing: Black pepper to taste. Coriander to taste. Cumin to taste.

DIRECTIONS Juice cauliflower, lemon and ginger root. Add turmeric root, or if using turmeric powder, add it to the finished juice. Pour into a glass and sprinkle black pepper, coriander and cumin.

28  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

DECIPHER THE PLU STICKER You know that little sticker you find on the produce you buy? That’s called the PLU sticker and you need to become an expert at interpreting it. The numbers on the PLU, or “price look up” sticker reveal the most important thing you need to know about your precious food — how it was grown. Here’s what the numbers mean.

4011

3113

Four-digit number usually beginning with a 4 or 3

84011 Five-digit number beginning with an 8

94011 Five-digit number beginning with a 9

=

Conventionally grown, i.e., sprayed with toxic synthetic chemicals, including pesticides, fungicides and herbicides

=

Genetically modified and may also be sprayed with toxic chemicals

=

Organically grown, not genetically modified, so no toxic chemicals were used in its cultivation 

Courtesy of THE RAINBOW JUICE CLEANSE by Dr. Ginger Southall / Running Press, a member of the Perseus Books Group. © 2015. Reprinted with permission.

IMPACT Magazine


Ginger Blueberry Smoothie with Secret Ingredient! Try this satisfying smoothie for a post-workout boost RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E M I LY VO N E U W – Best-selling author & award-winning food blogger at This Rawsome Life in Vancouver, B.C. THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE 

S

RAWSOMEVEGAN 

ometimes, I don't wanna eat my vegetables. That's where secret ingredients come in handy. You'd never know (except now I've told you) that this delicious, sweet, fruity smoothie recipe contains... broccoli! It's hidden amongst the wonderful flavours of grape juice, pineapple, blueberries and ginger.

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • •

Blend it all up and drink it all down. I topped mine with more bloobs and some chopped pistachios cuz why not!

1 frozen banana 1/2 cup frozen blueberries 2 Tbsp. hemp seeds 1 cup broccoli 2 cups grape juice 1 tsp. ginger powder 1/2 tsp. cinnamon powder 1/2 cup pineapple

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 496; protein 13 g; fat 9 g; carbs 101 g. 

OPTIONAL TOPPING

Makes 1 Smoothie

IMPACT Magazine

Small handful of pistachios

January/February 2020  29 


Iron Pumping Recovery Smoothie

Power up your recovery with this iron-rich drink BY A DA M H A R T Author of The Power of Food & creator of poweroffood.com in Vancouver, B.C. ADAMHART 

POWEROFFOOD

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 cup hemp seed 3 cups water ½ cup blueberries ¼ cup chia seeds ¼ cup goji berries 1 banana

DIRECTIONS Place all your ingredients into a blender and blend. It is that easy! Tip: Add 1 Tbsp. of cacao powder to turn this into a powerful chocolate elixir.

KRIS OSBORNE

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 354; protein 18 g; fat 24 g; carbs 19 g. 

30  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


Gingerbread Dessert Smoothie

Run, run, run as fast as you can to blend up this smoothie! BY J OY M c C A R T H Y – Founder of Joyous Health, Certified Holistic Nutritionist & author in Toronto, ON JOYOUSHEALTH 

JOYOUSHEALTH.CA

T

his recipe includes whole food nourishing ingredients you may already have in your kitchen like molasses, ginger, bananas, cinnamon and coconut milk. It is creamy, rich and naturally sweet and yep, it tastes like gingerbread! Serves 2

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • •

1 can (400 mL) of organic full fat coconut milk or nut milk* 2 ripe bananas 2 Tbsp. blackstrap molasses 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 2 thumb-size pieces of fresh ginger coconut flakes (optional)

DIRECTIONS Place all ingredients into blender and whirl. Top with coconut flakes.

NOTES

WALKER JORDAN

If you want to make this recipe into a breakfast smoothie or power it up, simply add 1 scoop of your favourite protein powder and/or fermented greens powder. If it's not creamy enough, add half an avocado. *If you are using nut milk from a carton or tetra-pak just keep in mind it probably won't be as creamy as using full-fat canned coconut milk. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 660; protein 4 g; fat 45 g; carbs 3 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  31 


Dairy-Free Hot Chocolate Festive flavour in minutes!

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY H A N N A H S U N D E R A N I Founder & creator of Two Spoons food blog in Toronto, ON TWOSPOONS.CA 

T

TWOSPOONSDOTCA

his hot chocolate is a little different than the classic as I've used carob powder instead of cocoa. I’ve also topped mine with a swirl of whipped cream, because 'tis the season!

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 cup almond milk or store bought mylk 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. carob or cocoa powder 1 tsp. chaga powder (optional) 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon Maple syrup to taste (I used 1 1/2 Tbsp.)

DIRECTIONS In a saucepan add almond milk and water. Bring to a simmer. Add cocoa powder, chaga powder (optional), ground cinnamon, salt and maple syrup to taste. Stir to combine and heat until ready to serve. Strain through a fine mesh sieve, pour into cups and serve. Option to top with vegan coconut whipped cream (see below).

Whipped Cream Recipe INGREDIENTS • 1 can full-fat coconut milk, chilled • ¼ - ¾ cups organic icing sugar to taste DIRECTIONS Chill a large mixing bowl in freezer for 10 minutes. Remove chilled coconut milk from fridge and scoop out the solid coconut cream, avoiding the coconut water at the bottom. Beat with mixer for 30 seconds, or until creamy. Add powdered sugar in batches, while mixing, until creamy and smooth, then top.

Nutrition facts per serving with whipped cream Calories 321; protein 4 g; fat 30 g; carbs 13 g. 

32  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


6 Patio Cocktails Summer refreshers with a healthy twist BY S H E L L E Y B O E T T C H E R Food, wine & travel writer based in Calgary, AB SHELLEYBOETTCHER 

SHELLEY_WINE

T

here’s nothing like a great cocktail on a patio on a hot summer day. The problem is, many are laden with too much refined sugar or other ingredients that do nothing for your health. But mixologists are creating more tasty alternatives, healthy-ish cocktails that still offer a boozy hit but contain ingredients with antioxidants and a vitamin-packed punch. Here are cocktail recipes from top bartenders, restaurants and purveyors of fine drink in Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto.

1 EQUINEOX BUCHA MULE

Wild Tea Kombucha was started in Calgary by Canadian bobsledder and former Olympian Emily Baadsvik two years ago. This year, Wild Tea has expanded into Saskatchewan, Manitoba and British Columbia. This recipe uses Prickly Pear EquineOx from Eau Claire Distillery. The distillery, located southwest of Calgary in Turner Valley, describes EquineOx as being “a sweet barley-based alternative to gin or vodka.” Kombucha, a naturally fermented beverage, is high in probiotics, which have been linked to gut health and good digestion. It’s very low in calories — 1 cup is about 20 calories — but it’s loaded with flavour, so it’s a great addition to any healthy cocktail recipe.

INGREDIENTS • • • •

1 ½ oz. Eau Claire Distillery Prickly Pear EquineOx Wild Tea Ginger Kombucha Juice from ½ fresh lime Cucumber slice and fresh basil to garnish

DIRECTIONS Fill a copper mug with ice. Add EquineOx and lime juice. Top up with Wild Tea Ginger Kombucha. Garnish with cucumber and basil. Serve. Makes 1 drink.

2 WATER UNDER THE BRIDGE

This refreshing cocktail comes from Dylan Macleod, head bartender at Native Tongues Taqueria in Calgary. Watermelon is great for hydration, plus it contains lycopene, important for cardiovascular health. Lemon juice is high in vitamin C, which helps form collagen and boost the immune system. Lavender can relieve stress.

INGREDIENTS COCKTAIL

• • • • •

1 ½ oz. Beefeater gin 1 oz. fresh watermelon juice ¾ oz. fresh lemon juice ½ oz. Ancho Reyes liqueur ½ oz. lavender honey syrup (see recipe below)

LAVENDER HONEY SYRUP

• •

5 Tbsp. lavender 2 cups water

DIRECTIONS COCKTAIL

Shake all ingredients and, using fine strainer, strain into coupe. Garnish with watermelon slice. Serves one. LAVENDER HONEY SYRUP

Bring water and lavender to a boil. Remove from heat. Add two parts honey to one part lavender tea. Stir until combined. Strain to remove lavender. Store in an airtight container in fridge for up to one month.

LEFT TO RIGHT EquineOx Bucha Mule; Water Under the Bridge.

34  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

IMPACT Magazine


NATIVE TONGUES TAQUERIA

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  35 


This drink comes to IMPACT from Ancora Waterfront Dining and Patio bartender Miriam Willmer in Vancouver. “The bitters used contain Cinchona, a Peruvian bark traditionally used to treat a number of ailments such as digestive issues and malaria,” she says, while rosemary is believed to act as a stimulant, improve memory and boost production of red blood cells. Cantaloupe contains vitamins B and C, and helps with hydration.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 ½ oz. Legends Distilling Black Moon gin ½ oz. Cinzano extra dry vermouth 1 oz. cantaloupe purée 1 dash Ms. Better’s Tonic bitters 3 oz. club soda or sparkling water Cantaloupe balls and rosemary sprig to garnish

DIRECTIONS Add to Collins glass over ice. Top up with club soda or sparkling water. Garnish. Serves one.

36  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

4 ABIES GRANDIS

Julie Sopuck, general manager of the Vancouver restaurant Burdock & Co, is behind this earthy, refreshing drink that features organic apple cider and honey. Organic cider is a source of antioxidants, vitamin C and potassium, while lime juice has vitamin C, too. Make your own honey syrup by combining two parts honey to one part water in a small saucepan. Simmer and stir until honey is dissolved. Cool and store in fridge in an airtight container. Make infused gin by adding 100 grams of Grand Fir tips to a 750 mL bottle of gin. Blend in blender on medium speed for 30 seconds and let infuse in fridge for 24 hours, then strain. The gin will thicken — “It’s a bit slimy,” Sopuck says — and turn green, but once it’s in a cocktail, no one will notice, she adds. Most importantly, you must use just the tips, that first spring growth, not the older branches, for the right flavour. You can use the tips from other fir or spruce trees. Or, if that’s too much work, try a commercial brand such as Stump Coastal Forest Gin from Phillips Fermentorium in Victoria, B.C. And the name Abies Grandis? It refers to a type of fir tree found in the Pacific Northwest.

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

1 ½ oz. grand fir tip-infused gin 1 oz. organic, unfiltered apple cider ½ oz. lime juice ¼ oz. Lifford apricot liqueur ¼ oz. honey syrup

DIRECTIONS Shake and double strain into a coupe. Serves one.

ANCORA WATERFRONT DINING AND PATIO; BURDOCK & CO.

3 SMUGGLER’S TONIC


5 IN LIEU OF REAL LOVE

KRYSTEL MAROIS, THE GOOD SON (INSET); HAWKSWORTH RESTAURANT

From mixologist Connor Scott at The Good Son restaurant in Toronto, this fresh blend contains lime juice (full of vitamin C and antioxidants) and Vams Culture Kombucha from Toronto, “which is just loaded with a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast cells,” says Scott. “These bacteria and yeast cells detoxify our body and regulate our digestive system.”

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 ¾ oz. Maestro Bacardi Rum 1 Tbsp. lime juice ½ oz. Vams Culture Hibiscus + Goji Berry Kombucha ¼ oz. Alvear dry sherry 3 dashes kiwi cordial Lime wheel, for garnish.

6 SNOWBIRD

This refreshing sipper comes from Hawksworth Restaurant’s head bartender Cooper Tardivel in Vancouver. It avoids refined sugars by using agave and verjus as sweeteners.

LEFT TO RIGHT BELOW Smugglers Tonic; Abies Grandis; In Lieu of Real Love; Snowbird.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

1 oz. Viejo Indecente Mezcal ¾ oz. Verjus ½ oz. agave syrup ¾ oz. lime juice 1 dash Scrappy’s Firewater Bitters Cucumber ribbons

DIRECTIONS Shake and top with crushed ice. Garnish with seven cucumber ribbons. Serves one. 

DIRECTIONS Combine in an old-fashioned glass over ice and garnish. Serves one.

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  37 


38  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


Snacks Cashew French Onion Dip 40

Kale & Hemp Hummus 41

Easy Pumpkin Hummus with Roasted Garlic 42

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus 44

Dialed-Up Nachos 45

Vegan Olive Salsa 46

Pink Lime & Sea Salt Avocado Beet Guac-Us 47

Peanut Sauce 48

Presto Pesto 49

Cashew Camembert 50

Matcha Energy Bars 52

Lemon Poppy Seed Oat Bars 53

Raw Superfood Granola Bars 54

DIY Fruit & Nut Birdseed Bars 55

Spiced Orange Maple Granola MARIA KOUTSOGIANNIS

56

Pumpkin Spice Granola Bars 57

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  39 


Cashew French Onion Dip

Nutty twist on a delicious favourite BY M I R A N DA M A L I S A N I RNCP, holistic nutrition expert in Toronto, ON MIRANDAMALISANI 

NUTRITIONISTMIR

I

f you have yet to try vegan cashew cheese, you should. The same richness that makes cashew cheese taste so good also applies to cashew-loaded versions of your favourite dips and spreads made in a high-powered blender. With cashews and fresh lemon, this French onion dip trumps the traditional recipe — and is more gut friendly since it’s non-dairy. It is also packed with essential minerals such as energy-boosting magnesium and copper, which help produce hemoglobin, collagen and elastin; plus immuneboosting zinc and vitamin C.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • •

½ cup (120 ml) water 1 lemon, zested and juiced 2 cups (250 g) cashews, soaked 3 hours, rinsed, drained 2 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 2 tsps. onion flake ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. ground black pepper

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 220; protein 7 g; fat 16 g; carbs 12 g. 

40  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

COURTESY VITAMIX

Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender or food processor in the order listed and secure lid. Turn machine on and slowly increase speed to the highest speed. Blend for 30 seconds. Serve immediately or refrigerate.

NATHAN DREIMILLER, COURTESY VITAMIX

DIRECTIONS


Kale & Hemp Hummus

Green Hummus packed with calcium, fibre, protein & tons of flavour RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY N I K K I L E F L E R & Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

3

#PlantPowered Ingredients

ACTIVEVEG

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Add everything to a food processor or high-powered blender and process until smooth. Enjoy as a dip for raw veggies or crackers, as a spread in a sandwich or wrap or use on top of a fresh salad or Buddha bowl.

• •

• • • • •

1 cup organic kale washed, de-stemmed and torn into pieces 1/2 cup organic hemp hearts 1/2 cup cooked chickpeas (or 14oz canned chickpeas), well-rinsed and drained 1 garlic clove 2 Tbsp. tahini 1 Tbsp. hemp oil Juice and zest of 1 organic lemon Sea salt and black pepper to taste

Tips: Store in the fridge in a glass air-tight container. If you don't have any tahini on hand, substitute using the same amount of raw sesame seeds. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 222; protein 14 g; fat 10 g; carbs 22 g.

1 KALE

Kale packs a ton of nutrition including vitamin K, lutein, vitamin C, betacarotene, and it is even rich in calcium. Kale, like other dark green veggies, may be helpful in preventing various cancers such as colon, prostate and ovarian. Its abundant vitamin K content is important for bone health, preventing the effects of osteoporosis. And the folic acid and B6 provide cardiovascular support and prevent heart disease.

2 HEMP SEEDS

Hemp has been cultivated for millennia for fiber, clothing, paper, building materials, and of course, food. Rich in zinc and magnesium, which may contribute to a healthy immune system and bone health, hemp seeds are also a good source of iron. They consist of 36 per cent protein with all the essential amino acids and have healthy plant fats.

2 CHICKPEAS

Chickpeas may not look like it, but they deliver quite a few health benefits, including the ability to promote growth, protect the heart, improve digestion, build strong bones, prevent chronic disease, lower risk of genetic diseases, avoid diabetes, and help with weight loss. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  41 


Easy Pumpkin Hummus with Roasted Garlic A scrumptious appetizer that's a good post-workout snack too! RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

T

FOODBYMARIA2014

his easy pumpkin hummus recipe with roasted garlic is vegan, and super yummy for your post-workout snack.

Serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS FOR THE ROASTED GARLIC

• •

1 large bulb of garlic 2 Tbsp. olive oil

FOR THE PUMPKIN HUMMUS

• • • • • • • • • •

3-4 cloves roasted garlic 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2/3 cup pumpkin puree, unsweetened 1 heaped Tbsp. tahini 1 Tbsp. maple syrup or honey 1 Tbsp. Lemon juice 1 tsp. finely chopped fresh thyme Season salt to taste 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Tbsp. ice-cold water

FOR THE STUFFED FIGS

• • • • •

10-12 fresh figs 1 tsp. vegan feta per fig 10-12 small walnut chunks Lightly salted snacks, crumbled Drizzle of honey, optional

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400 F and line a baking sheet with parchment. Grab a large bulb of garlic and discard any scrappy bits on the outer layers. Cut 1/4 to 1/2 an inch off the top of the garlic bulb and drizzle 1-2 Tbsp. of good quality olive oil over the top. Cover with foil and place top side up onto the parchment paper. Bake for

42  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

30-40 minutes or until still soft to touch and lightly brown. Cool before pressing and removing garlic cloves. Add the roasted garlic, chickpeas, pumpkin, tahini, maple syrup, lemon juice, thyme and salt into a food processor. Blend until well combined then begin adding olive oil from the top opening of the processor. Do the same with the cold water, 1 Tbsp. at a time till you reach your desired consistency (I used 2 Tbsp.). Enjoy with fresh veggies or pita chips. For the figs, preheat your oven to broil. Trim off stems of figs and cut an ‘X’ in the top of each fig 1/3 way through. Place the figs on a lightly greased, parchment tray or baking sheet. If they are a little wobbly, you can shave a bit off the bottoms of the figs so they stand upright. Stuff each fig with 1 little piece of walnut and 1 tsp vegan feta. Top with crushed chips and broil about 5 minutes or until the cheese looks softer and more gooey. Remove from oven and enjoy hot. You can drizzle with honey but that is completely optional. Enjoy on a platter of veggies and fruit. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 574; protein 18 g; fat 43 g; carbs 36 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  43 


INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

1 large cauliflower 1/4 Cup Tahini 1 Tbsp. + ½ tsp. True Lemon powder 2 Tbsp. Roasted Garlic purée 1 Tbsp. Ginger purée 1 tsp. Cumin 1 Tbsp. Sambal Oelek Chili sauce 1/2 tsp Salt, or to taste 1 Cup Olive oil

DIRECTIONS

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus Blend up some healthy flavour!

Preheat oven to 400 F. Clean and remove leaves from cauliflower, cut into medium size pieces keeping stem. Lightly brush with olive oil and toss onto a non stick or parchment paper lined baking pan. Place into oven for approximately 20-25 minutes, then remove and let cool. In food processor add cauliflower, blend until begins to form “rice” stage , then start adding adding all other ingredients until smooth, adjust seasoning as needed.

NOTES •

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L I A N A R O B B E R E C H T – Executive chef in Calgary, AB

CHEFLIANA

T

his roasted cauliflower hummus is the perfect blend of sophisticated taste and guilt-free snackage. Substituting roasted cauliflower for the traditional chickpeas not only makes it a low-carb option, but also adds a depth of flavour that might just make this your new favourite hummus. The ginger and sambal chilli add a lasting zing that keeps you coming back for more. Healthy? Check. Delicious? Check. What are you waiting for?

44  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

I use one large whole cauliflower, with leaves removed equalling 4 cups. You can use lemon juice and zest instead of True Lemon powder, add to your taste. You can also adjust spice or garlic level to your desire as well.

Nutrition facts per serving (6) Calories 149; protein 5 g; fat 11 g; carbs 9 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Dialed-Up Nachos These are not yo’ regular nachos!

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY R E B E C C A G A R L A N D IMPACT Magazine Canada's Top Trainer 2020, author of the whole-food recipe book Nourish & founder of Elan Performance Inc. in Calgary, AB REBECCASFAVORITEMOMENTS 

REBECCA _GARLAND 

T

hese babies were conceived during a physically-distanced COVID hike with friends, where we daydreamed about the first restaurant food we’d have again with friends. That night, nachos still on our brain, my husband and I created this dialed-up version for a delicious, plant-powered meal! Serves 4-6

ELANPERFORMANCE.INC

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CHIPS

Preheat oven to 350-375F. Toss the sliced/cubed potatoes and yam in a bowl with the olive oil and salt; bake on a lined or greased baking sheet for about 15-20 minutes. Flip about 10 minutes in. Meanwhile, prep the rest of the ingredients. When the yam/potatoes are about 5-6 minutes away from being done, pull from oven and layer them with the garlic, cheese, bell pepper, onion, and jalepeno/serrano pepper. Bake for another 5-10 minutes, or until desired doneness then add the finishing touches by topping with fresh chopped tomato, green onion and basil. Serve with fresh salsa and avocado/ guacamole and salsa, and pair with a side salad topped with seeds/nuts for a nutritious, balanced and healthy meal for the whole family. Buen provecho!

• • • •

2-3 cups yam, cubed or sliced in thin semi-circles to imitate nacho chips 2-3 cups potatoes, cubed or sliced in semicircles to imitate nacho chips 4 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Pinch of salt

NACHO TOPPINGS

• • • •

• • • • • •

1 red bell pepper, diced ½ onion, diced (your choice of yellow, white or red onion) 1-2 cloves garlic, minced 1 jalepeno or serrano pepper, sliced or minced (seeded if you can’t stand the heat) 2 cups, shredded vegan cheese 1 cup tomato, chopped 3 green onions, diced ¼ cup fresh basil, chopped 1 cup fresh salsa 1 cup avocado, chopped or fresh guacamole

PROTEIN OPTION

45  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

1 cup black beans rinsed and drained

Nutrition facts per serving with black beans Calories 564; protein 13 g; fat 25 g; carbs 74 g. 


Vegan Olive Salsa

The perfect healthy snack RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S – Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

W

ho doesn’t love a good salsa? Combining olives, tomatoes, jalapeños, avocados and chickpeas makes for a fresh and nutrientdense salsa. This recipe is super easy to make and I promise, it’ll become your new favourite salsa! Serves 6 - 8

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

1 1/2 cups fresh tomatoes, finely chopped 1/2 cup chickpeas, strained and drained 1/2 cup sweet onion, finely chopped 1/4 cup black botija pitted olives, finely chopped 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp. garlic, minced 1 tsp. – 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh jalapeño Juice of one lemon or one lime Salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS •

Combine all ingredients into a bowl and let the flavours marry for up to one hour before enjoying with toast, chips, wraps, sandwiches and salads!

NOTES •

Lasts up to 3-4 days in the fridge in a tightly sealed container.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 107; protein 1 g; fat 9 g; carbs 6 g. 

46  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

IMPACT Magazine


Pink Lime & Sea Salt Avocado Beet Guac-Us A bright & colourful, creamy & delicious side BY K AT H Y S M A R T Creator of Live The Smart Way in Ottawa, ON K ATHYSMARTRECIPES

Serves 10

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• •

Pulse chickpeas, avocados, olive oil, tahini, lime juice, lime zest, garlic, beet and all spices in a food processor until smooth. Gently cut two ripe avocados in half, take out the pit and fill with nourishing pink hummus. Garnish with calcium rich black sesame seeds and life-giving sprouts for a real masterpiece at any plant-based potluck.

• • • •

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 224; protein 8 g; fat 11 g; carbs 27 g. 

GORD WEBER

1 (15 oz.) can chickpeas, well drained 2 medium ripe avocados, cored and peeled 3 Tbsp. each of olive oil, fresh lime juice and tahini ½ tsp. lime zest 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed ½ tsp. each of sea salt, cumin, cayenne pepper and freshly ground black pepper 1 small pickled beet

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  47 


Peanut Sauce

A savoury-sweet treat! RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A R I A N N E J O N E S Canadian Olympian, chef & Holistic Nutritional Consultant in Calgary, AB JONESARIANNE 

JONESLUGE

N

o more boring dinners, this sauce will turn the “rice, fish and roasted veggies classic” into a drool worthy dinner you'll crave. Pro tip, it makes a crowd pleasing dip for fresh rainbow rolls! Makes 2 cups

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

1 cup peanut butter (unsalted/unsweetened) ¼ cup tamari 2 Tbsp. rice vinegar 2 tsp. Sriracha sauce 1 ½ tsp. maple syrup 2 tsp. toasted sesame oil 2 tsp. lime juice (about 1/2 a lime) 1-2 inch chunk ginger, skinned 3-4 small cloves of garlic* ⅔ cup water **

*Garlic amount depends on your garlic-loving preference. **Every brand of peanut butter varies in consistency. If needed, add more water 1 Tbsp. at a time to thin.

DIRECTIONS Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Use immediately or store in a covered glass jar in the fridge for up to seven days. Bring to room temperature before using and add water to thin if needed. Enjoy! Nutrition facts per Tbsp. Calories 109; protein 4 g; fat 7 g; carbs 5 g. 

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Presto Pesto

Never buy pesto again with this simple & delicious recipe RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A R I A N N E J O N E S – Canadian Olympian, chef & Holistic Nutritional Consultant in Calgary, AB JONESARIANNE 

JONESLUGE

O

nly five minutes and presto, you’ve got pesto! Who knew pesto could taste so delicious without the dairy? Makes about 1 cup

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

2 cups of packed basil 1 cup of kale, without stems 2 Tbsp. of almonds 2 Tbsp. of walnuts 1 tsp. miso paste 1 garlic clove ½ cup olive oil Pinch of sea salt

IMPACT Magazine

DIRECTIONS Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth, scraping down the sides with a spatula as needed. Blend pesto until your desired texture is reached. Do you like your pesto coarse or silky smooth? Presto! It’s up to you! Use immediately or store in a covered glass jar in the fridge for up to seven days. Enjoy! Pro Tip: If you want your pesto to stay bright green, you’ve got to blanche the greens. Blanching refers to very briefly cooking an item in boiling water to preserve or improve colour and then shocking it by plunging the item in ice water to halt cooking.

Bring a pot of salted water to a boil (you can use this water to cook the pasta afterwards) and reduce to simmer. Plunge the basil and kale into the hot water and simmer for 10 seconds. Using a slotted spoon or sieve, remove the greens and plunge them immediately into ice water to stop them from cooking and cool completely. Remove the cooled leaves and squeeze out all the water. Resume the recipe above. Nutrition facts per Tbsp. Calories 36; protein 4 g; fat 2 g; carbs 4 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  49 


Cashew Camembert Delicious cheese without dairy

BY J U L I E P I AT T – Vegan chef, author of This Cheese is Nuts: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home in Malibu, CA SRIMATITK 

SRIMATI

Serves 8

DIRECTIONS

• •

Lightly oil a 4 x 2-inch pan with coconut oil. Drain the cashews. In the pitcher of a Vitamix, place the cashews, aquafaba, salt, coconut oil, and truffle oil. Process first on medium speed, using the plunger to evenly distribute the mixture. Gradually increase the speed, stopping intermittently to redistribute the mixture until the it is smooth. Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan and smooth out the top with a rubber spatula. and cover with a round of parchment paper cut to fit the pan. Dehydrate for 24 hours at 90F. Transfer to the refrigerator for 24 hours.

• • •

2 cups raw cashews 2 Tbsp. unrefined coconut oil, plus more for greasing the pan ¾ cup aquafaba (liquid from canned garbanzo beans) ½ tsp. Celtic sea salt 1 tsp. white truffle oil

Easy Prep: Place the cashews in filtered water in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Courtesy of This Cheese is Nuts: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home by Julie Piatt / Avery, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC © 2017 Reprinted with permission.

50  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Run a sharp knife around the edges of the mold. Turn the cheese out onto a cutting board and remove the sides. Using the wide flat side of a large knife, run the flat edge under the metal round, pressing upwards to separate the round from the cheese. Smooth the cheese surfaces with rubber spatula. If desired, place in a humidifier for 1 to 3 weeks. Rub fine sea salt over your cheese after a few days and then repeat every few days or so to prevent black mold from appearing. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 199; protein 5 g; fat 16 g; carbs 9 g. 

LEIA VITA MARASOVICH

INGREDIENTS


Matcha Energy Balls

A delicious pre or post workout energy boost RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY K AT H Y S M A R T – Creator of Live The Smart Way in Ottawa, ON K ATHYSMARTRECIPES

M

atcha is loaded with antioxidants to help fight off free radicals and it promotes a feeling of calm.

Makes 24 Nutrition facts per ball Calories 60; protein 1.4 g; fat 2.8 g; carbs 8.8 g.

52  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • •

Add dates, pecans, cocoa, vanilla and sea salt to a food processor and process until everything becomes a sticky ball (you may need to add 1-2 Tbsp. water to help). Roll into 24 small balls and dust with more matcha powder. Store in refrigerator for up to two weeks or freeze to enjoy later. 

1 cup fresh Medjool dates 1 cup sunflower seeds 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 Tbsp. matcha powder & 1 tsp. for rolling 1/4 tsp. sea salt

IMPACT Magazine


Lemon Poppy Seed Oat Bars

Get ready to work out after munching this lemony goodness RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L I S A K I TA H A R A – Food photographer & vegan blogger at Okonomi Kitchen in Toronto, ON OKONOMIKITCHEN

T

hese Lemon Poppy Seed Oat Bars are chewy and bursting with bright lemony flavours! Made with just 7 plant-based ingredients, these are the perfect breakfast or snack to prep and take with you on the go! (vegan, gluten-free & oil-free)

Makes 5-6 Bars

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • •

Preheat oven to 350° F. Add 1 1/2 cup of oats into food processor and pulse 6-10 times or until coarsely ground. Add in the other half of the oats, water and lemon juice. Mix with a spoon and let it sit for 3-5 minutes. If your coconut butter is not already runny, melt it down. Then into a large bowl, combine it with the rice malt syrup, cashew butter, lemon zest, vanilla and salt. Add in the oats and poppy seeds, and mix until combined. Transfer the batter into a lined 8x4 inch bread pan or mini loaf pans. Spread evenly so that the top is flat and even.

• • • • •

2 cups gluten-free rolled oats 1/2 cup lemon juice 1/3 cup water 1/3 cup brown rice syrup or maple syrup 1/4 cup coconut butter or coconut oil 2 Tbsp. cashew butter 1 1/2 Tbsp. poppy seeds or chia seeds 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 tsp. salt

OPTIONAL

1/4 cup powdered sugar + 2 tsp. lemon juice for lemon icing drizzle.

Bake for 20-25 minutes, rotating half way. The edges will be slightly firmer and more browned. Once removed from the oven, allow it to cool in the pan for 20 minutes. Carefully remove from the pan and place on cooling rack for another 10 minutes. (In the meantime, prepare the lemon icing by combining the powdered sugar and lemon juice in a small bowl until desired consistency.) Divide into 5-6 bars, drizzle with icing and enjoy! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 260; protein 6 g; fat 13 g; carbs 35 g. 

TIPS & TRICKS FOR M A K I N G OAT B A R S 1. Do not skip out on soaking the oats in the lemon juice and water! This helps with the chewiness of the bars. 2. Press the bars firmly into the pan to prevent them from falling apart. The potato masher is the perfect tool for this! If you don’t have a flat solid potato masher, measuring cups will work too. 3. These bars can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

IMPACT Magazine

January/February 2020  53 


Raw Superfood Granola Bars Delicious & satisfying

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

V

egan, raw, tasty, and oh-so-delicious, these bars are top notch for satisfying your hunger. Enjoy as a snack for a good, healthy boost of protein. Makes 16 Bars

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1/2 cup Medjool dates pitted and packed 1/4 cup water 1/2 cup hemp seed butter or other natural nut butter 2 cups raw oats gluten-free 1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1/4 cup raw hemp seeds 1/4 cup raw cashews 1/2 cup goji berries 2 Tbsp. chia seeds 1/4 cup cocoa nibs or vegan chocolate 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg 1/4 tsp. salt

DIRECTIONS Line an 8x8 baking pan with parchment paper and set aside. Soak pitted dates in 1/4 cup water for at least 30 minutes. Transfer soaked dates and water to a blender and blend until the dates form a smooth paste. Pour date paste into a large bowl. Add the hemp seed butter and mix until well combined. Fold in the remaining ingredients until thoroughly mixed. Transfer to the prepared baking dish and spread evenly. Flatten top. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours until bars set up. Cut into 16 squares and store in the refrigerator or freezer. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 174; protein 6 g; fat 12 g; carbs 17 g. 

54  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


DIY Fruit & Nut Birdseed Bars

Create your own nutritious snack! RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A S I M P S O N – Culinary Nutrition Expert, Holistic Wellness Coach in Vancouver, B.C. MYFRESHPERSPECTIVE 

D

MFPBYANGELA 

MYFRESHPERSPECTIVEBLOG

on’t get caught hangry: These easy DIY Fruit and Nut Birdseed Bars are must-haves on your crazy days. (They’re also healthier and far more delish than store-bought granola bars!)

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

DRY

Line an 8×8" pan with parchment paper hanging over the edges. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients except the dried fruit. In a small saucepan over medium heat, stir together the brown rice syrup, maple syrup and almond butter until warm and smooth. Once the wet mixture is thin, switch off the heat and stir in the vanilla. Slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry bowl, stirring well to coat the dry ingredients. Finally, stir in the dried fruit. Press the granola into the lined baking pan in an even layer, spreading it into all four corners. Set the pan in the freezer for 2-3 hours and allow the mixture to firm up. When semi-frozen, slice with a sharp knife and wrap individually. Store in the fridge, or freeze in a sealed container.

• • •

Yield: 8-10 bars • • • •

1 1/2 cups gluten-free rolled oats 1 1/2 cups brown crispy rice cereal 1/4 cup each raw cashew halves or pieces, slivered almonds and pumpkin seeds 2 Tbsp. each chia seeds, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds 2 tsp. cinnamon pinch of sea salt 1/3 cup chopped dried fruit (cranberries and apricots)

WET

• • • •

1/2 cup brown rice syrup 1 Tbsp. maple syrup (or honey, if not vegan) 1/3 cup natural organic almond butter 1 tsp. vanilla

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 250; protein 6 g; fat 10 g; carbs 39 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  55 


Spiced Orange Maple Granola

A delicious start to your day before your next workout BY E L I Z A B E T H E M E RY – Food blogger at Vancouver with Love in Vancouver, B.C. VANCOUVERWITHLOVE 

VANCOUVERWLOVE

I

love breakfast, but I usually fail when it comes to making elaborate ones. This delicious granola takes 30 minutes to make and you can bake it in advance to feed you for the week. It’s a mix of proteins, complex carbohydrates and good fats, with a small amount of natural sugar. All of which should mean your blood sugar levels don’t crash after eating it. Enjoy! Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • •

½ cup cashews ½ cup almonds ⅓ cup pumpkin seeds ⅓ cup sunflower seeds ⅓ cup buckwheat groats ⅓ cup raisins ½ heaped tsp cinnamon ¼ tsp. allspice ½ tsp. orange oil (optional) 1 Tbsp. avocado oil or grapeseed oil 3 Tbsp. maple syrup Pinch of salt

DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 300° F. Pulse the cashews and almonds very briefly in a blender or food processor until they are chopped. Add them to a large mixing bowl, along with the pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, buckwheat groats, raisins, cinnamon, cloves, orange oil, maple syrup and salt.

56  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Mix well with a spoon until all ingredients are combined. Spread the granola on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes, until the granola is just starting to brown. Remove from the oven and allow to cool, before breaking it into pieces with your hands. TO SERVE

Place ⅔ cup of granola into a bowl. Add ½ cup of your chosen yoghurt and garnish with orange slices. Drizzle over some maple syrup to finish and you’re good to go!

NOTES The granola will keep for up to a week if stored in an airtight container. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 366; protein 10 g; fat 22 g; carbs 38 g. 


Pumpkin Spice Granola Bars More than basic

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY AMBER ROMANIUK Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant & founder of Amber Approved in Calgary, AB AMBERAFFIRMED 

AMBERAPPROVED

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

2 cups gluten-free oats ½ cup canned unsweetened pumpkin ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pecan pieces 1 ½ Tbsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. nutmeg 1 tsp. pumpkin spice ⅔ cup pure maple syrup ¼ cup coconut sugar ¼ tsp. baking soda

DIRECTIONS Pre-heat oven to 350 F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Add oats, coconut, pecans, cinnamon, nutmeg, pumpkin spice, coconut sugar and baking soda to a bowl and mix well. In a separate bowl mix maple syrup and pumpkin together well. Add pumpkin mixture to dry ingredients and mix well so the oat mixture is coating fully. Pour and spread out evenly onto parchment paper. Bake for 22-25 minutes. Let cool before slicing with a sharp knife or pizza cutter. Makes about 24 bars. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 175; protein 2 g; fat 8 g; carbs 25 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  57 


58  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


Breakfasts A Wicked Scramble 60

S'more Overnight Oats 62

Layered Breakfast Parfait 64

Vegan 'Huevos' Rancheros 66

Blueberry Oat Pancakes & Cashew Sauce 67

Blissful Banana-Pecan Muffins 68

Creamy Quinoa Porridge 69

Vegan Crepes with Persimmon & Cashew Whipped Cream 70

Protein Berry Smoothie Bowl 72

Chia Cherry Smoothie Bowl 73

Vegan Breakfast Pizza 74

Grilled PB & Raspberry Sandwich 76

The Ultimate Breakfast Sandwich 77

Tofu Braided Calzone HANNAH SUNDERANI

78

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  59 


60  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


A Wicked Scramble

A delicious idea for a post-workout meal BY W I C K E D H E A LT H Y A plant-based, online community by Derek & Chad Sarno, based in Austin, TX & London, UK WICKEDHEALTHY

T

his is a great choice to fill you up after a long run or workout session. Serve the scramble with this lush, shredded sweet potato and greens combo with a bit of garlic. Serves 2-4

INGREDIENTS FOR THE SCRAMBLE

• • • • • • • • • •

2 blocks firm tofu, rough crumbled, NOT little bits 1/2 head cauliflower, broken to the same size and blanched 3/4 tsp. black pepper 3/4 tsp. turmeric 1/2 tsp. smoked paprika 1/2 tsp. Kala Namak (black salt) 1/2 tsp. granulated onion 1/2 tsp. granulated garlic plant-based cheese (any kind, shredded or finely diced) 2–4 Tbsp. nutritional yeast

FOR THE HASHBROWNS

• • •

Potatoes, shredded, soaked in water, then drained and pressed until dry olive oil salt

FOR THE GREENS

DEREK SARNO

Your choice of greens – kale, spinach, collards etc. A few pinches of salt

DIRECTIONS FOR THE SCRAMBLE

Toss all together in a big bowl. Heat oven to 400 F. Get your pan wicked hot (cast iron is what we use.) Add a dollop of v-butter or oil then add your tofu mix, your choice of greens (spinach, collard, kale, etc.) and a few pinches of salt Finish off in the oven for about 5–10 minutes, then add some of your fave v-cheese at this point. Take it out, add some nutritional yeast if you like, then serve it up with greens and hot potatoes and you’re good to go! FOR THE HASHBROWNS

Add some olive oil to a cast iron pan, get it wicked hot over medium-high heat. Add potato shreds into the pan, form into a little disk by pressing down and making clean edges. Sprinkle with a little salt. Do not stir—allow to brown on one side. Flip when it’s firm enough to keep its shape. Allow to brown on the other side. Transfer to a plate to cool. FOR THE GREENS

Set a steamer basket over a pot filled halfway with water over medium heat. You want it to fit snugly. Add the greens to the steamer basket and allow to slightly wilt, just a minute or two. Season with salt. Serve the scramble, hashbrowns and greens together on one plate and enjoy! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 152; protein 15 g; fat 6 g; carbs 14 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  61 


S'more Overnight Oats Enjoy A sweet morning treat

BY A M B E R R O M A N I U K – Certified Holistic Nutritional Consultant & founder of Amber Approved in Calgary, AB AMBERAFFIRMED 

AMBERAPPROVED

Serves 2

DIRECTIONS

• •

In a medium size jar add bottom layer of crushed graham crackers. Add layers of ¼ cup oats, ¼ cup dark chocolate chips, gluten-free oats, goji berries, marshmallows and coconut yogurt. Finish off by topping with 1 tsp. chocolate chips, marshmallows and leftover graham crackers. Mix and let sit for 10-15 minutes and enjoy! A great treat while camping. Makes 1 medium jar or 2 small jars.

• • • • •

2 crushed gluten-free graham crackers 1 tsp. dark chocolate chips (for the topping) ¼ cup dark chocolate chips ¼ cup goji berries ½ cup Dandies vegan mini marshmallows ¼ cup gluten-free oats ¼ cup unsweetened coconut yogurt (or Vanilla or Chocolate)

62  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 386; protein 5 g; fat 15 g; carbs 64 g. 

JENNIFER BRAZIL

INGREDIENTS


Calgary's first full-service vegan restaurant is open in the historic George Stanley home in the Beltline

Photo: Cottage in the Woods Photography

Vegan Street was born out of a passion for the vegan lifestyle, and a desire to bring plant-based cuisine to the mainstream dining culture in our city. Pull up a seat, enjoy a cocktail, and indulge in the foods you love, made entirely from plants.

Photo: Curiocity Calgary

Photo: Oliva McFarlane


Layered Breakfast Parfait

Prepare this parfait the night before & start your day in a healthy way RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY Y V E T T E S T Y N E R – Sports Nutritionist & CEO/Founder of Mipstick Nutrition in Victoria, BC MIPSTICKY VETTE 

MIPSTICK 

MIPSTICKHOLISTICNUTRITION

T

his mason-jar meal is appealing both visually and to the taste buds. It’s easy to prepare the night before and can be packed with a lid to go. With both slow-release carbohydrates (such as the oats) and fruit (like the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant rich berries), this fills a runner’s energy needs. Serves 1

INGREDIENTS 1ST LAYER

• • • •

½ cup quick oats or previously cooked steel cut oats* ½ cup almond or coconut milk 2 Tbsp. chia or ground flax seeds drizzle of pure maple syrup, if desired for added sweetness

2ND LAYER

• •

2 Tbsp. shredded coconut 2 Tbsp. chopped raw nuts or seeds

3RD LAYER

• •

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¼ - ½ cup fresh or frozen berries A sprig of fresh mint for garnish

*Food prep tip: Steel cut oats are less processed than quick oats, have higher fibre and mineral content, but take longer to cook. Cook a large batch every few days and leave in a sealed container in the fridge for quick use in smoothies and breakfast parfaits. Oat fibre helps stabilize blood sugars and enhance immunity. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 507; protein 18 g; fat 24 g; carbs 24g. 


choose from a wide variety of nutritionally balanced and professionally made meals delivered fresh

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WWW.P2EATS.COM


Vegan 'Huevos' Rancheros A healthy & satisfying breakfast

BY B R I D G E T T E L E E S O N – A Registered Holistic Nutritionist, Certified Raw Foods Chef & Vega Educator, in Vancouver, B.C. VEGA _TEAM 

VEGATEAM 

VEGAFANPAGE

S

unday brunch can be healthy and satisfying with smart fats. These vegan “huevos” rancheros boast healthy fats from coconut oil, avocado and plant-based Omega-3s.

COLESLAW

Serves 4

• • • • • • •

INGREDIENTS

TOPPING

BAKED “HUEVOS”

1 large sweet potato, diced 1 tsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. cumin 1 tsp. coriander salt to taste

• • • •

1 cup black beans, mashed 1-2 cups fresh salsa 2 avocados, diced 4-6 corn tortillas

Preheat oven to 425 F and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Toss sweet potato with spices and coconut oil. Lay a single layer on cookie sheet. Bake 20-25 minutes or until tender and crisp. Combine coleslaw ingredients and set aside. In a dry skillet, heat corn tortillas. Spread beans on tortillas and top with baked sweet potato. Put desired amount of coleslaw, salsa and avocado on top. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 351; protein 10 g; fat 17 g; carbs 50 g. 

COURTESY VEGA

• • • • • •

¼ head purple cabbage, sliced thin ½-1 chilli pepper 1 red onion, sliced ½ bunch cilantro, chopped 1 lime, juiced 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil salt to taste

DIRECTIONS

66  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

IMPACT Magazine


Blueberry Oat Pancakes & Cashew Sauce A delicious start to the day RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAT R I C I A I D U S Healthy food, travel & beauty blogger in Berlin, Germany NOURISHMYBLISS

Makes 4 pancakes

PANCAKE INGREDIENTS PANCAKES

• • • • • • • •

1 cup oats 1 Tbsp. corn starch 1 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1 Tbsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. ground vanilla 1 1/2 cups plant based milk 1 handful of blueberries 1 tsp. coconut oil

CASHEW SAUCE

• • • •

1/4 cup cashews 3/4 cup almond milk 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1/4 tsp vanilla powder

DIRECTIONS Combine ingredients except the blueberries and coconut oil in a blender and process until smooth. Let the batter thicken for approximately 10 minutes. Heat up a pan and grease with coconut oil. Pour in 1/4 cup of the batter to make one pancake. Add a couple of blueberries and fry on medium heat. Blend the cashews, almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla until smooth. Stack pancakes on a plate and serve with the cashew sauce, berries and your favourite jam! Nutrition facts per pancake Calories 220; protein 10 g; fat 6 g; carbs 33 g. Sauce nutrition facts per serving Calories 64; protein 1 g; fat 3 g; carbs 7 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  67 


Blissful Banana–Pecan Muffins A yummy way to start your day

BY M E L A N I E M c D O N A L D –  Vegan recipe developer, food photographer at A Virtual Vegan & cookbook author living in Victoria, B.C. AVIRTUALVEGAN

Y

ou won’t find any mini muffins around here. If you are going to indulge in a banana-pecan muffin for breakfast, it needs to be worth your while. We’re talking big, hearty and satisfying. Perfect as they are, but even better split and smeared with nut butter! Makes 8 large muffins

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 425°F and grease or line 8 wells of a muffin pan. Chop just three-quarters of one of the bananas into small pieces and set aside. Put the rest of the bananas in a mixing bowl and mash them until they are puréed. You can also do this by hand with a fork. Add the nut butter, blackstrap molasses, vanilla, sugar and salt to the puréed bananas and beat well. Add the spelt flour and baking powder and stir everything together by hand. It’s important not to overmix. Stir just enough that you can’t see any dry flour. Add the reserved chopped banana along with the nuts and stir gently to incorporate. Spoon evenly into the prepared muffin pan. Sprinkle a few more nuts and a little sugar onto the top of each muffin if you want. Bake at 425°F for 5 minutes; then lower the oven temperature to 375°F and bake for a further 15 to 18 minutes. The muffins should be well risen, golden and a toothpick inserted into the middle should come out clean.

• •

• • • • • • •

A little vegan butter, coconut oil or any other neutral oil, for pan (optional) 3 medium very ripe and spotty bananas ¼ cup soft, drippy, room-temperature cashew, almond or pecan butter or coconut oil 1 Tbsp. blackstrap molasses 1 tsp. vanilla extract ½ cup cane or granulated white sugar, plus more for sprinkling tops (optional) ½ tsp. salt 2 cups spelt flour 2 tsp. baking powder ½ cup chopped pecans or walnuts, plus more for sprinkling tops (optional)

NOTES

To make these muffins nut-free, use sunflower seed butter, pumpkin seed butter or coconut oil instead of the nut butter and replace the nuts with vegan chocolate chips, pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds. You can bake the batter in a 9 x 5–inch loaf pan at 350°F for around 50 minutes to make banana bread instead of muffins.

Nutrition facts per muffin Calories 246; protein 6 g; fat 5 g; carbs 49 g. 

Courtesy of Vegan Comfort Food by Melanie McDonald / Page Street Publishing Co. © 2019. Reprinted with permission.

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IMPACT Magazine

MELANIE MCDONALD


Creamy Quinoa Porridge Deliciously lush & creamy breakfast bowls

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY H A N N A H S U N D E R A N I – Founder & creator of Two Spoons food blog in Toronto, ON TWOSPOONS.CA 

T

TWOSPOONSDOTCA

ypically when we think ‘porridge’ we think ‘oats.’ But quinoa is a great substitution. It’s a wonderful source of protein, naturally gluten-free and full of fibre. What makes this quinoa porridge bowl so creamy and lush is cooking the quinoa in homemade almond milk. If you can't make your own almond milk, or you don't have the time, I'd recommend using canned coconut milk in these bowls to deliver the same result.

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• •

In a saucepan add your quinoa and homemade almond milk. Bring to boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook quinoa, stirring often, until cooked (approx. 12-15 minutes). While cooking, add cinnamon, coconut flakes and maple syrup. Stir to combine. Add more water if needed to reach desired porridge consistency. Divide porridge between two bowls and top with raspberries and mango. Sprinkle with chopped pecans, and coconut shavings. 

• • • • • • • •

1/2 cup white quinoa uncooked 1 1/2 cups homemade almond milk or canned coconut milk 2 tsp. cinnamon 2 Tbsp. coconut flakes 2 tsp. maple syrup or to taste Splashes of water if needed 1/2 cup frozen raspberries 1/2 cup frozen mango chopped 4 Tbsp. pecans chopped Coconut shavings to sprinkle

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 395; protein 13 g; fat 19 g; carbs 54 g.

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  69 


Vegan Crepes with Persimmon & Cashew Whipped Cream A tasty, fruity wrap for Sunday brunch, breakfast or dessert RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY H A N N A H S U N D E R A N I Founder & creator of Two Spoons food blog in Toronto, ON TWOSPOONS.CA 

TWOSPOONSDOTCA

A

simple and easy classic vegan crepe recipe. Light and pillowy. Topped with ripe persimmon, cashew whipped cream and fresh pomegranate to sprinkle. Try it for brunch! Makes 10 crepes

INGREDIENTS CREPES

• • • • • • • • • •

1 cup all purpose flour 1/4 tsp. sea salt finely ground 1 1/2 cups oat milk or other plant-based milk 3 Tbsp. rapeseed oil or other neutralflavoured oil 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract ~2 Tbsp. filtered water optional to add more 1 persimmon, chopped 1/2 pomegranate maple syrup to drizzle

CASHEW WHIPPED CREAM

• • • • • • • •

1 cup raw cashews soaked overnight and strained 1/4 cup canned coconut milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2 tsp. agave 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar pinch salt 4-6 Tbsp. almond milk

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DIRECTIONS CREPES

In a mixing bowl, add flour and salt. Whisk to combine. Add oat milk, oil, maple syrup and vanilla. Whisk again until well combined and place in the fridge to chill for at least one hour. Lightly oil a non-stick pan and bring to medium heat. Pour 1/4 cup of crepe batter onto the pan and swirl it around until the entire surface is coated (as best you can) and batter takes on a generally circular shape. Cook until edges start to pull away from the pan (1-2 minutes). Then, gently flip and cook the other side for 15-20 seconds. Slide crepe onto a plate. Adjust batter if needed (if it was too thick, add a splash more water. I used 2 Tbsp. water to thin). Repeat step two until you've used all the batter. To serve, fill the crepes with a scoop cashew whipped cream, top with sliced persimmon and pomegranate seeds. Add maple syrup to drizzle. Cashew Whipped Cream In a blender, add soaked cashews (strained), canned coconut milk, vanilla extract, agave, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, and pinch of salt. Blend or pulse to combine. Then, slowly pour in a few tablespoons of almond milk until cashew icing blends into a smooth, creamy and fluffy mixture. (I used 4 Tbsp. almond milk total).

Recipe Notes

Persimmons can be substituted with any seasonal fresh fruit. Crepes can be made 1-2 days ahead. Cover and keep in fridge. When ready to eat, cover in foil and place in the oven at 150 C/300 F for 15-20 minutes or until warm. Cashew Whipped Cream can also be made ahead. It will keep in the fridge for up to three days. It can also be frozen and defrosted. Allow 45 minutes to defrost.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 194; protein 4 g; fat 11 g; carbs 20 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  71 


Protein Berry Smoothie Bowl

Vegan, Gluten-Free and Dairy Free Goodness ready in 5 Minutes BY J U L I E Z E I T L H U B E R – Nutritionist, scientist & foodie at Ready To Nourish in Vancouver, B.C.  READYTONOURISH

S

moothie bowls are great to start out a hot summer day and they make excellent pre- or post-workout fuel. This recipe is packed with protein, healthy fats, antioxidants, fibre, vitamins and minerals. The banana adds potassium, berries and mango are high in antioxidants and fibre. Vegan protein powder and hemp seeds are excellent sources of plant-based protein. The fruits are naturally sweet so you do not need to add honey or syrup.

Serves 1

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SMOOTHIE

Add protein powder, almond milk, frozen banana and frozen berries into a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth or ice cream consistency. Pour into a bowl and add granola, pieces of mango and banana, drizzle with peanut butter and sprinkle hemp seeds and coconut flakes on top.

• • • •

TOPPING

• • • • • •

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3 Tbsp. vegan protein powder (vanilla or berry flavour) 4 oz. unsweetened almond milk 1 cup frozen mixed berries ½ frozen banana

½ banana ½ cup fresh mango 2 Tbsp. gluten free granola 1 Tbsp. unsweetened peanut butter 1 tsp. coconut flakes 1 tsp. hemp seeds

Nutrition facts per bowl Calories 613; protein 40 g; fat 21 g; carbs 74 g. 


Chia Cherry Smoothie Bowl

Get a boost to your immune system with this easy to make bowl BY K AT H Y S M A R T – Creator of Live The Smart Way in Ottawa, ON K ATHYSMARTRECIPES

T GORD WEBER

his smoothie bowl combines antioxidant-rich cherries and pumpkin seeds, a superfood source of zinc, a mineral that boosts your immune system.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • •

Blend smoothie ingredients and pour into a bowl. Top with coconut flakes, chia seeds and pumpkin seeds.

2 cups of dairy free milk 1 cup frozen cherries ⅓ cup pumpkin seeds ⅓ cup oatmeal 1 frozen banana

Serves 2 TOPPINGS

• • •

IMPACT Magazine

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 670; protein 20 g; fat 38 g; carbs 73 g. 

2 Tbsp. coconut flakes 2 Tbsp. chia seeds 2 Tbsp. pumpkin seeds

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Vegan Breakfast Pizza RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

T

his breakfast pizza is perfect pre-workout as it provides you with loads of fuel to crush them weights, thrive through your cardio and leave that place sweating like a champ who knows they made the right, simple and healthy breakfast choice! I initially made this breakfast because I woke up with a mad craving for pizza, but it was 6 a.m. I threw together these ingredients and, to my surprise, it was amazing! A true staple in our home and a real contributor to my glutes and strong Greek legs. This recipe is plant-based, low glycemic, high in good fat and extremely energizing. Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CHIA EGG

Preheat oven to 375F. Line a cast iron pan with parchment and spray it with coconut oil. Prepare chia egg by combining chia seeds and water in a small bowl, stir and set aside. In another bowl, combine the rest of your dough ingredients and stir well. Once your chia egg has taken on the consistency of an egg add it to the mixture and stir till all the dough ingredients are married. Transfer the mixture to the pan, and plop it in the oven for 20-ish minutes! Add the toppings (or substitute your favourites) and enjoy, hot or cold!

• •

1 Tbsp. chia seeds 3 Tbsp. warm water

PIZZA DOUGH

• • • • •

1 banana, mashed 1 tsp. vanilla 2 cups oats 1 cup coconut milk 2 Tbsp. vegan chocolate chips

TOPPINGS

• • • • •

½ cup mashed raspberries 3 strawberries 1 passion fruit 3 Tbsp. dragon fruit 1 Tbsp. dark chocolate, melted! Choose cacao, so it is low in sugar and high in antioxidants

IMPACT Magazine

Nutrition facts per serving without toppings Calories 375; protein 15 g; fat 9 g; carbs 25 g. 

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Grilled PB & Raspberry Sandwich A fired up twist on a nostalgic classic

BY W I C K E D H E A LT H Y – A plant-based, online community by Derek & Chad Sarno, based in Austin, TX & London, UK WICKEDHEALTHY

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • •

Spread peanut butter on bread slices. Layer one bread slice with raspberries. Grate or chop the chocolate into little bits and sprinkle on raspberries. Top with other bread slice. Add butter to med-hot skillet. Fry sandwich and spread butter on top of the sandwich, season with salt.

Peanut butter, enough to spread 4 slices whole-wheat bread 1 clamshell raspberries 1 bar dark chocolate, for grating Plant-based butter, for frying Pinch of coarse sea salt Mint leaves, to garnish

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Flip when browned and cook until both sides meet the same crispiness. Remove sandwich from heat, slice in half and garnish with fresh mint. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 572; protein 20 g; fat 11 g; carbs 58 g. 

DEREK SARNO

Serves 2


The Ultimate Breakfast Sandwich Supercharge the start to your day with this avocado-mushroom meal BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R –  Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

DARINA KOPCOK

F

orget the typical on-the-go breakfast sandwich packed full of empty calories and unhealthy fats that won't do your body any good! Instead, start your day with this wholesome alternative that will keep you satisfied and nourished until lunchtime. If you prefer savory breakfasts, this is the sandwich for you. You can use any kind of mushrooms and herbs for this recipe, and it’ll taste absolutely delicious.

Serves 2

Courtesy of Vegan Weight Loss Manifesto, An 8-Week Plan to Change Your Mindset, Lose Weight and Thrive by Zuzana Fajkusova & Nikki Lefler © 2017 Reprinted with permission.

• •

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 358; protein 9 g; fat 21 g; carbs 37g.

IMPACT Magazine

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • •

Heat a skillet to medium and add the coconut oil. Add the onion and sauté until tender, about 5 to 7 minutes. Mix in chopped garlic and sauté until fragrant, about a minute. Add the chopped tomatoes, sliced mushrooms and oregano, salt and pepper and sauté until they start to caramelize and turn golden brown, about 10 to 15 minutes. Add the chopped cilantro, give it one more stir, turn the heat off and set the skillet aside. Spread the mashed avocado evenly between the toasted English muffin, covering only the bottom side. Top the avocado with half of the mushroom mixture and any additional healthy toppings of your choice (sprouts, fresh tomatoes, homemade ketchup, etc.) Cap it with the remaining half of muffin. 

2 Tbsp. coconut oil ½ large onion, chopped 2 cloves garlic, chopped 1 large tomato, chopped 8 button mushrooms, sliced 1 tsp. oregano Salt and black pepper, to taste Small bunch of chopped cilantro leaves, finely chopped ½ avocado, mashed 2 sprouted-grain English muffins, toasted (can substitute with 4 sproutedgrain bread slices)

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Tofu Braided Calzone

The place where breakfast meets lunch RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J A S M I N E B R I O N E S & C H R I S P E T R E L L E S E – Vegan food bloggers at Sweet Simple Vegan in Los Angeles, CA SWEETSIMPLEVEGAN 

SWEETSIMPLEVEG

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS TOFU SCRAMBLE

GLAZED TEMPEH

CALZONE

• • • • •

• • • •

• •

• • • • • • •

½+ cup water or vegetable broth ½ onion, diced 1 clove garlic, minced ½ medium tomato, diced ½ medium zucchini, halved and thinly sliced 4 ounces firm tofu, drained & pressed 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. cumin ¼ tsp. turmeric ¼ tsp. chili powder ¼ tsp. black pepper

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½ block tempeh, cut into strips 1 clove garlic, minced 1 Tbsp. coconut nectar (or maple syrup) 1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar (or balsamic vinegar) ¾ Tbsp. soy sauce (or tamari)

1 premade pizza dough 3-4 Tbsp. pizza sauce + more to serve for dipping 2 slices vegan cheese, cut in strips


DIRECTIONS Allow premade pizza dough to come to room temperature. Boil a small pot of water. Add tempeh, bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Discard water and transfer tempeh into a bowl. Add remaining ingredients and mix together. Place in the refrigerator and marinate for 1 hour. As tempeh marinates, prepare tofu scramble. In a medium pan over medium heat, add ¼ cup of water or vegetable broth. Add onions and garlic and cook until fragrant. Add zucchini and tomato, cook for another 6-8 minutes, or until zucchini has mostly cooked through. Add more water or broth as necessary to prevent burning. Crumble in tofu, then sprinkle in the remaining spices. Mix until uniform, again adding more water or broth as necessary to prevent burning (about 2-3 Tbsp. at a time). Cook for 8-10 minutes, taste, and adjust

IMPACT Magazine

seasonings as desired. In a medium pan over medium heat, add in the tempeh and all of the marinade. Cook for 8-10 minutes or until golden, being sure to flip to cook each side. Preheat oven to 350F and line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Roll the dough out into a ¼-inch thick rectangle about 8×12 inches. Using a sharp knife, trim edges to be sure each edge is straight. Place dough onto the lined baking sheet. Using a sharp knife, cut strips into the sides of the dough at a downward slope. Spread on pizza sauce, about ¾ of the tofu scramble (or as much as fits), tempeh, and vegan cheese if using. Fold bottom flap up, sealing the sides. Take the first strip of pastry on the right and cross it over, then seal the end by pressing it into the other side. Repeat this on alternating sides until you are left with 2 strips of dough.

Tightly fold top end over as you did on the bottom, tuck the last two strips over, trying your best to seal the end. Brush with almond milk prior to placing in the oven. Place in oven and bake for 45-55 minutes, or until golden. Cool completely, slice and serve with pizza sauce or marinara. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 262; protein 17 g; fat 14 g; carbs 19 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  79 


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Salads, Wraps & Bowls Wild Rice & Hummus Collard Wraps 82

Buffalo Broccoli Bites & Caesar Salad Wraps 83

Salad Rolls with Walnut Beef & Peanut Sauce 84

Black Bean Avocado Fresh Rolls with Mango Salsa 86

Superfood Black Rice Salad 87

Mexican Avocado Black Bean Salad with Lime Vinaigrette 88

Black Bean Taco Salad 90

Kale Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowl 92

Rainbow Bowls with Basil Vinaigrette 94

Czech Style Potato Salad 96

Roasted Potato & Avocado Salad 97

Fresh Dill & Sweet Potato Salad 98

Quinoa & Cabbage Salad 100

Broccoli Pomegranate Salad 101

Miso Tahini Noodle Salad 102

ANGELA LIDDON

Vegan Caesar Salad 104

IMPACT Magazine

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Wild Rice & Hummus Collard Wraps Wrap up a healthy meal full of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants & fibre

BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

T

hese wraps are a great option for anyone who wants to eat healthy and are especially beneficial for those who are active. It’s a great option for after a workout to speed up recovery and help increase athletic performance. They are easy to prepare, ready in 20 minutes and can also be made well in advance. Serves 2

INGREDIENTS • • • • • •

2 collard greens leaves (you can also use chard leaves) 1/4 cup wild rice, cooked 1/3 cup hummus 1 small zucchini cut lengthwise in about 1/2 inch slices 1 red bell pepper sliced 1 orange bell pepper sliced

Pick two medium-sized leaves of collard greens and lay them flat with the backside up. Trim the stem lightly to make it easier to roll. In a large pot bring water to a boil. Dip each leaf* into the water and count to 10. Remove the leaf from water and pat it dry with a tea towel. Place both leaves with the backside up again and set aside. In a bowl mix wild rice and hummus together. In the middle of each leaf spread 1/2 of the wild rice-hummus mixture, top with couple slices of zucchini and a handful of bell peppers. Wrap it up. Using your hands gently fold the top and bottom parts of the leaves inward while you roll the wrap, right to left, (very much like wrapping a burrito). Cut in half. A serrated or very sharp knife works best. Enjoy! *If you prefer to eat the collard greens raw, just skip the second step. Nutrition facts per serving (with basic homemade hummus) Calories 108; protein 5 g; fat 3 g; carbs 19 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine

NIKKI LEFLER

DIRECTIONS


Buffalo Broccoli Bites & Caesar Salad Wraps Cancer-fighting super foods make up this tasty wrap RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

PACHAVEGALIVING

B

oth kale and broccoli are incredibly delicious and nutritious. These two veggies are true, nutrient-dense super foods. Both are loaded with sulphoraphane, an anti-tumor nutrient, making this yummy dish a cancer fighter. Makes 6 wraps

Buffalo Broccoli Bites INGREDIENTS •

5 cups broccoli

BUFFALO SAUCE

• • • • •

3 Tbsp. Frank’s red hot sauce 2 Tbsp. gluten free flour 2 Tbsp. gluten free tamari 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil

DIRECTIONS Place sauce ingredients in a mason jar and shake to mix. Pan fry broccoli until bright green. Pour sauce ingredients into the pan and coat broccoli generously. Continue to stir until all the sauce is absorbed. Remove from heat.

IMPACT Magazine

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SALAD

Blend wrap ingredients in a high speed blender till very smooth. Add more water as needed; you want a thick gelatinous consistency. Spread wrap batter evenly onto Teflexlined dehydrator sheets. Dehydrate at 115 degrees for about 4 hours, or until the tops are firm. Flip your Teflex sheet (with wrap) upside down onto the mesh sheet beneath, and peel back the Teflex till the wrap has been flipped onto its other side. Dehydrate another 1 ½ hours. You want them to be flexible, and not to crack when bent. Cut into triangles or strips and refrigerate in a glass air-right container. (Keeps for 2-3 weeks.) Toss kale with caesar salad dressing. Fill wraps with broccoli bites, kale caesar salad, fresh tomato, cucumber and sprouts.

1-2 big bunches of kale, torn

CAESAR DRESSING

• • • • • • • • • •

1 ½ cups raw cashews, soaked ¾ cup water ½ cup olive oil ½ cup fresh lemon juice 3 Tbsp. tahini 2 Tbsp. dulse flakes (seaweed) 4 cloves garlic 2 Tbsp. gluten free tamari 2 tsp. sage ½ tsp. pink salt

SUNDRIED TOMATO FLA X WRAP

• • • • • •

2 Roma tomatoes ¾ cup flax meal 2 cups water ¼ cup sundried tomatoes (dried) ½ Tbsp. oregano 2 tsp. gluten free tamari

Nutrition facts per wrap Calories 488; protein 15 g; fat 37 g; carbs 26 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  83 


Salad Rolls with Walnut Beef & Peanut Sauce Grab one of these bad boys as you head out the door! RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

A

FOODBYMARIA2014

little twist on a classic salad roll! I mean, come on, how excited are you to try out walnut beef? These rolls are slightly time consuming but when they are made they are the perfect snack to bring along to school, work or on the road. Yum!

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS WALNUT BEEF

SALAD ROLLS

• • • • • • • • •

• •

2 cups crushed walnuts Juice of 1 lime 3 Tbsp. soy sauce 1 Tbsp. coconut sugar ½ tsp. fresh grated fresh ginger 3 cloves garlic, pressed 1 Tbsp. hot sauce 1/4 tsp. 5-spice powder Salt and pepper to taste

• • • • • • •

10 rice paper rolls 3 cups alfalfa sprouts or 3 cups cooked white rice noodles 1 ripe mango, thinly sliced 1 large bunch of mint, thinly sliced 1 large bunch of cilantro, stems removed 1 large yellow pepper, cut into matchsticks 1 ripe avocado, thinly sliced 3 medium carrots, shredded Peanut sauce to taste

DIRECTIONS In a medium-sized bowl, mix the walnuts, lime juice, soy sauce, coconut sugar, ginger, garlic, hot sauce, 5-spice powder and salt and pepper. Give the mixture a good stir and set aside. Bring 4 cups (1 L) of water to a boil. Slice or cut any fillings you will be using. Arrange a preparation station with all your ingredients. Fill a large shallow dish with the boiling water and place a damp cloth next to it on the kitchen counter. Have a plate and another damp dish towel on hand. When you are ready to assemble your rolls, dip the rice paper into the water just long enough to soften, 10 to 20 seconds, then quickly and gently transfer to the damp cloth. Add your desired fillings, then gently roll over once, fold in both sides

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and then roll again to seal the salad roll. Place onto a serving plate and cover with another damp, room temperature kitchen towel. Repeat above steps until you run out of toppings. Store leftovers covered in the refrigerator for 2 days. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 489; protein 10 g; fat 27 g; carbs 54 g. 

Courtesy of Mindful Vegan Meals by Maria Koutsogiannis / Page Street Publishing Co. © 2018. Reprinted with permission.

IMPACT Magazine


Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  85 


Black Bean Avocado Fresh Rolls with Mango Salsa A tangy & fruity wrap to please everyone RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A WA L L AC E , M S C , R D Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in Caledon, ON EATRIGHT_RD 

ANGELAEATRIGHTFEELRIGHT

Makes 4-5 fresh rolls

INGREDIENTS MANGO SALSA

• • • • • • •

1 mango ½ red onion ½ lime, squeezed 1 cup cherry tomatoes ¼ cup cilantro, minced 1 Tbsp. raw honey 1 Tbsp. chili flakes (optional)

BEAN AVOCADO MASH

• • • • • •

1 avocado 1 can black beans (398 ml), drained and rinsed Salt and black pepper to taste 3 cloves minced garlic 1-2 tsp. paprika 4-5 Vietnamese rice paper rolls (for spring rolls)

DIRECTIONS Chop mango, red onion, and cherry tomatoes into small pieces. Add to bowl, sprinkle with salt. Mince cilantro and add to mixture. Add honey, chili flakes, lime juice and mix together well. Set aside. In a separate bowl, add beans and avocado. Mash together with a fork to create a black bean avocado paste. Add salt to taste, paprika and minced garlic. Follow directions on Vietnamese rice paper package, typically suggesting to soak in warm water for 10-20 seconds. Once pliable, place on cutting board. Add bean and avocado mixture, top with mango salsa and roll up and enjoy! Nutrition facts per roll Calories 50; protein 10 g; fat 8 g; carbs 50 g. 

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Superfood Black Rice Salad A tasty boost to your immune health

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY K AT H Y S M A R T – Creator of Live The Smart Way in Ottawa, ON K ATHYSMARTRECIPES

B

lack rice contains vitamin E, an important antioxidant that is useful in maintaining eye, skin and immune health. Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

RICE SALAD

Combine all dressing ingredients then add to black rice salad mixture and toss.

• • • • • •

¾ cup shelled edamame, thawed 2 cups cooked black rice ⅓ cup thinly sliced green onions ¼ cup shredded red cabbage ¼ cup shredded carrots ¼ cup chopped red peppers

Nutrition facts per serving with dressing Calories 382; protein 14 g; fat 6 g; carbs 69 g. 

DRESSING

• • • • •

2 Tbsp. low sodium soya sauce 1 Tbsp. honey 1 Tbsp. sesame oil 1 tsp. red pepper flakes ¼ tsp. sea salt

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Mexican Avocado Black Bean Salad with Lime Vinaigrette This vegan salad covers all the bases RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY K AT H Y S M A R T Creator of Live The Smart Way in Ottawa, ON K ATHYSMARTRECIPES

I

absolutely love avocado! Not only is it a heart-healthy food due to its healthy fat content; it also nourishes the skin. Did you know that avocados are actually a fruit? They are fibre-rich, providing 10 grams of fibre in just one avocado. I make this salad at least once a week. It’s gluten free, dairy free and high in fibre, protein and iron. It’s perfect for vegan (if using agave) or vegetarian guests coming to dinner.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SALAD

SALAD

• •

Mix all of the above in a large bowl. If you need to up the volume a bit, you can easily add another can of black beans or corn.

• • • •

DRESSING

Serves 8 • • • • • •

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1 large bunch of coriander, chopped 1 small square container of cherry tomatoes (halved or quartered) 1 medium red onion, chopped 1 can black beans (355 ml, drained) 1 can sweet corn 2 ripe avocados (peeled, pitted and diced) Zest of 1 lime (grate the peel of the lime on a cheese grater) Juice of 1 lime 1 Tbsp. of lime or lemon juice 4 Tbsp. honey or agave nectar, if vegan 1 tsp. sea salt 1 tsp. pepper ⅓ cup olive oil

DRESSING

Mix the dressing ingredients together, add to the salad ingredients and gently stir. It’s optimal to allow it to sit in the fridge for an hour. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 263; protein 8 g; fat 15 g; carbs 27 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Portobello “Steak Sandwich” with Nona’s Potato Salad N ON A’S POTATO SALAD IN G REDIEN TS • 6 large yellow Potatoes • 1/2 cup olive oil • 1/8 cup vinegar white or balsamic • 2 celery stalks including leaves diced

PLANT BASED MEAL A DAY

• 3 green onions whites & greens diced • 6 radishes diced • Fresh oregano to taste • Salt and pepper

Optimum health through plant-based eating

T

he Plant Based Meal A Day program was created by Rose Serpico and Richelle Love, athletes and owners of Tri-it Multisport and RnR Events.Their passion for all things health and wellness led them to eating a plant-based diet, alongside promoting veganism into the triathlon community.

IN STRUCTION S Boil Potatoes until al dente, soft but still firm,

The ladies also saw a demand for plantbased recipes. Customers wanted information on what the women were eating at home. Rose and Richelle gathered all their tried and true recipes to create a simple navigation meal plan. The recipes are easy, no-fuss meals that pass the family taste test.

If you’ve ever met The Plant We really wanted people to them, you know their Based Meal A Day start looking at how they were zest for life fills the program is now cooking their classic family dishes. set up to send out room. Encouraging their customers, one email a week, For example, there are so many from newbies to the ways to make lasagna plant-based every Sunday, as elite to “Live The a subscription without compromising taste, Dream”. With the service. It aims to time or tradition. women's passion cover 5 meals for in fitness, they were ROSE SERPICO & RICHELLE LOVE the week plus a few constantly reminded special offers. As a of the benefits of eating a plant-based member, you gain access to the members diet. Vegan athletes have proven time only section on their website where you can and time again to perform better, recover find shopping lists, video series, nutritional faster and have a unique advantage over information and even features plant-based their competitors. chefs from around the globe. The transition to become plantbased was an easy decision for both athletes. All products at Tri-It Multisport and at any RnR Event are now vegan. From protein powders to energy bars, this clean fuel swap was a no-brainer.

Signing up with the program is easy. Jump onto plantbasedmealaday.com and you can start receiving all the benefits of being a member today. Build confidence in your lifestyle and start eating more plants. We can't wait for Sunday dinners.

about 20 min. Drain and place hot potatoes in a bowl. Add olive oil while potatoes are hot, this will keep them from drying out. Let potatoes cool, add the rest of the ingredients and mix. Adjust seasoning and oil and vinegar to taste. PORTOB ELLO STEAK SAN DWI C H IN G REDIEN TS • 4 portobellos, stems removed & put aside • 2 Tbsp. olive oil • 1 cup vegan vegetable broth • 1 medium onion diced • 1 garlic clove pressed • 6 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar • 1/2 Tbsp. soy sauce • 6 Tbsp tomato sauce • Salt & pepper to taste IN STRUCTION S Use a deep large frying pan and heat oil. Sauté onion and garlic for about 4 minutes. Add half of the veggie broth. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Add portobello tops and chopped up stems. Pour over top the rest of the broth mixed with balsamic, soy sauce and tomato sauce. Cover and cook for about 8 minutes. Turn over the mushrooms, half way through. Fill the caps with the onion mixture then serve!


Black Bean Taco Salad

A healthy update on an old favourite RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E N N S E B E S T Y E N Award winning plant-based blogger of Veggie Inspired in Chicago, IL VEGGIE_INSPIRED 

VEGGIEINSPIRED

Creamy Cumin Ranch Dressing

his delicious Mexican-inspired salad will bring a little zing to your tastebuds. The spice mixture isn't spicy hot, so it's great for kids too. If you'd like more heat, try adding 1/2 tsp. chipotle powder to the black beans or topping your salad with a drizzle of spicy salsa.

T

Makes about 1 1/2 cups

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CRUNCHY ROASTED CHICKPEAS

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Toss chickpeas with the chili powder, cumin, salt and cinnamon. Place on a baking sheet in one even layer and bake for 20-30 minutes, shaking them around halfway through. Chickpeas should be slightly crunchy... they will continue to crisp up as they cool. Set aside. Toss the black beans with all the spices and warm in a pan over medium heat with 1/4 cup water. Stir occasionally until warmed through, about 5-6 minutes. To assemble the salad, toss the lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, avocado and corn in a large bowl. Plate the lettuce mixture on each individual plate or bowl. Add the black beans to the individual servings and top with the crunchy roasted chickpeas. Drizzle with the Creamy Cumin Ranch Dressing.

• • • • •

1 15 oz can chickpeas (rinsed, drained and dried really well) 1 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. cumin 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. cinnamon

BLACK BEANS

• • • • • • •

1 15 oz can black beans (rinsed and drained, or 1 1/2 cups cooked black beans) 2 tsp. chili powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 1/2 tsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. cumin 1/2 tsp. cayenne (optional) 1/4 cup water

SALAD

• • • • •

1 head green leaf lettuce (chopped) 1-2 chopped tomatoes 1 red bell pepper (diced) 1 avocado (diced) 1 cup fresh corn kernels

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Nutrition facts per serving Calories 332; protein 16 g; fat 7 g; carbs 51 g.

• • • • • • • • • • •

3/4 cup raw cashews (soaked for 1-2 hours if you don't have a high speed blender) 1/2 cup water Juice of 1 lemon (about 2 Tbsp.) 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 clove garlic 1/2 tsp. onion powder 1 tsp. dried dill 1 tsp. snipped chives 1/2 tsp. dried oregano 1/2 tsp. salt (or to taste) 1 tsp. cumin 1/2 tsp. smoked paprika

DIRECTIONS Blend all ingredients in a high speed blender until smooth. Add additional water by the tablespoon if needed to thin. Enjoy!

NOTES Dressing will keep in the fridge for several days. 

IMPACT Magazine


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Kale Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowl

Kale is king in this sweet potato fave RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J OY M c C A R T H Y Founder of Joyous Health, Certified Holistic Nutritionist & author in Toronto, ON JOYOUSHEALTH 

Kale Sweet Potato Quinoa Bowl Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • •

JOYOUSHEALTH.CA

I

f you want to take one step today to getting healthier, then eat kale. It's one of the most nutrient-dense, beautifying, detoxifying foods on mama Earth. Powerful cancer fighter: Proven to lower the risk of bladder, breast, colon, ovary, and prostate cancer. This is due to the volume of carotenoids and flavonoids in kale, two antioxidants. It's anti-inflammatory: Kale takes the heat out of your body because of its omega-3 content. Kale has good fats known as ALA and it's an excellent source of vitamin K. Both of these nutrients are proven to lower inflammation and in doing so, reduce heart conditions. Plus from a vanity standpoint, when you lower inflammation, you lower skin problems such as acne and rosacea. Detoxifying: Kale is a wonderful source of a wide variety of glucosinolates which support phase I and II liver detox pathways. So you will more efficiently rid your body of toxins by eating kale. Sweet potato is not just for your Thanksgiving dinner. It's one of my favourite healthy comfort foods. It's hard to know where to start with this sweet root veggie, but I will give you a snippit to whet your nutrition appetite.

Those orange-hued pigments tell us that it's an abundant source of beta-carotene. Sweet potato is among the highest sources of bioavailable beta-carotene, even more than kale! Beta-carotene has a plethora of health benefits, including: • Cancer prevention; • Protection from free radicals; • Enhancing the immune system; • Helping your reproductive system function properly; • Reduces the risk of macular degeneration; • Prevents skin damage from the sun. Now, let's get right to this bowl of deliciousness!

• • • •

2 sweet potatoes, chopped into bite size chunks Half a red onion, chopped 2 Tbsp. organic coconut oil 6 large kale leaves, washed, removed from stems, cut into chunks ½ cup hemp seeds or cooked quinoa 1 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil Coarse sea salt & ground black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS Preheat your oven to 375F. Place your sweet potato and onion on a large baking dish with coconut oil and season with sea salt and pepper. Bake for 45 minutes to an hour, basically until the potato is fork tender. Check it at 45 minutes to make sure you don’t overcook it. When the sweet potato is done, place the kale on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil and balsamic. Bake it for about 10-15 minutes at 350 F. You can cook it at the same time as the sweet potato if you like, just be aware that you will cook it for less time due to the temperature of your oven. Once all your ingredients are cooked, place them into a large bowl and mix together. Sprinkle with cooked quinoa or hemp seeds. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 297; protein 15 g; fat 20 g; carbs 20 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine


IMPACT Magazine

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Rainbow Bowls with Basil Vinaigrette INGREDIENTS

Rainbow Bowls with Basil Vinaigrette

SALAD BOWL

• •

Variety & colour to nourish your inner self RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I J E L A U N KOV I C H Nutritionist & founder of Healthy Always food blog in New Zealand HEALTHYALWAYS 

HEALTHYALWAYSNZ

W

e know we should be eating more veggies - their goodness cannot be understated. A plethora of vitamins, minerals, diseasefighting antioxidant and gut-loving fibre, they're foods that build great health from the inside out. They're also protective for the body, helping to support a fightingfit immune system that'll ward off the bugs and enhance optimal gut health. Eating veggies helps make us feel good - they're energizing and brimming with nutrients. Fruit and veggies get their colours from a nifty group of chemical compounds called phytochemicals. Different colours indicate different nutrients, which have their own unique set of health properties. For example, orange and yellow veggies and fruits, such as oranges and carrots, are brimming with vitamin C and A, while purple and blue, such as berries and eggplant, are rich in anthocyanin, a powerful disease-fighting antioxidant. When building your rainbow salad bowl, aim to pick at least one veggie

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to tick off each colour in the rainbow (I had to settle for blue edible borage flowers). Arrange them as you please you could do a rainbow gradient like I attempted, or just dice, chop and chuck into a bowl - the colours together will look fabulous! Next, whip up a tasty salad dressing to go along with it. I prepared an easy zingy fresh basil vinaigrette, which is super yummy and pairs perfectly. Recipe is below. Pairing healthy fats (e.g. olive oil in the dressing) with this dish will help you extract all the important fat-soluble vitamins (vitamin D, E, K & A) contained within your veggies, which need dietary fats present to be absorbed. If you're looking at turning this into more of a main meal, serve with your choice of protein (for plant-based go chickpeas, lentils, beans, or otherwise boiled eggs, smoked salmon or grilled chicken would be yummy). You can also bump up the starchy carb content - rice or roasted kumara/potato/pumpkin would be great additions.

A few handful of leafy greens A selection of fresh veggies aim to tick off every colour of the rainbow! Examples: capsicum (green/orange/yellow/ purple/red…), carrot, cabbage (purple/green…), tomatoes and avocado… Extras: 1 Tbsp. sauerkraut, 1 Tbsp. hummus, sprinkle of sesame seeds, fresh herbs…

BASIL VINAIGRETTE

• • • • • •

1 cup fresh basil leaves 8 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar (or white vinegar) Juice of ½ lemon 1 small clove garlic A few turns of the salt & pepper shaker

DIRECTIONS To make your dressing, blitz up all ingredients in a food processor/ stick blender. To make salad bowl, pick your veggies and arrange them in a bowl/plate. Get creative with whatever is in season (or lonely in your fridge waiting to be eaten!) Your goal is variety and colour. Nutrition facts per serving of dressing only Calories 122; protein 0 g; fat 14 g; carbs 1 g. 

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Plant-based & Oil Free Czech Style Potato Salad Chow down on this to refuel after your workout

BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R –  Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

DIRECTIONS

Serves 4-5

INGREDIENTS SALAD

• • • • • • •

3 large Yukon Gold potatoes, unpeeled 2 large carrots diced ½ cup frozen peas 2 celery stalks diced 1 small red onion minced 2 large pickles diced 2 Tbsp. fresh parsley, minced

DRESSING

• • • • • • •

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1 cup cooked white cannellini beans 1/2 cup plant-based milk 1/4 cup hemp hearts 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 2 Tbsp. pickle juice 1 tsp. sea salt fresh ground pepper to taste

NOTE This salad tastes best when refrigerated overnight. You can store any leftovers in the fridge for up to 5 days. If you aren’t into white potatoes, sweet potatoes could easily be used here! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 277; protein 18 g; fat 43 g; carbs 574 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

NIKKI LEFLER

A

classic Czech potato salad made vegan! This creamy salad is easy to make and requires only a few simple ingredients. It is plantbased (dairy-free, egg-free), oil-free (no mayo), nutrient-rich and packed with plant protein!

Place the whole potatoes in a pot with cold water and a pinch of salt. Make sure the water covers the potatoes. Place the pot over high heat and bring the water to boil. Once the potatoes are boiling, lower the heat, but make sure the water keeps bubbling. Boil the potatoes until skins break and they are fork-tender. Drain and set aside until cool enough to handle. Peel skins and cut into cubes. Place in a large bowl. While potatoes are cooling, dice carrots and place in a small pot of boiling water. Add peas and cook until carrots are forktender, about 5 minutes. Drain and add to the bowl with potatoes. Add in remaining chopped veggies (celery, onion, pickles and parsley). The dressing can be prepared while potatoes are boiling. If using canned beans make sure to drain the beans and rinse them well. In a blender mix prepared beans, plant-based milk, hemp hearts, mustard, pickle juice, and sea salt. Blend on high speed and scrape down the sides if needed until the dressing is completely smooth and creamy. Add to potatoes and veggies. Gently toss and serve at room temperature or cold.


Roasted Potato & Avocado Salad Satisfy your craving for a lemony salad full of flavour

BY E R I N I R E L A N D – Founder of It's To Die For food blog one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers from Vancouver, B.C. ERINIRELAND 

EKA BARNOVI-MACNICOL

A

ERINY VR

vocados are nature’s butter, minus the saturated fat and cholesterol. They can immediately take a dish from ‘good’ to ‘amazing‘. That’s the story with this salad. These Greek-inspired potatoes are my absolute favourite, but paired with extralarge cubes of ripe avocado, they are even more delicious. This bright green superfood fruit from Mexico adds so much flavour and richness to every bite — and it’s the perfect pairing for a carb, like the potato. This hearty salad won’t simply satisfy your craving for something delicious, it is dense with fuel that will satiate your hunger for hours. Hope you love it as much as I do! Serves 4

IMPACT Magazine

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

7 medium yellow potatoes 3 ripe avocados (cut into cubes) Zest from two lemons Juice from two lemons 6 thin slices of lemon 1 head of garlic (separated, peeled and minced) 1 1/2 tsp. sea salt 1 tsp. pepper 1/3 cup olive oil

DIRECTIONS Chop potatoes into large chunks and boil a big pot of water on the stove. Flash boil the potatoes for about five minutes so they soften slightly (and are able to absorb more lemon garlicky goodness!). Place them in a ziploc bag. Add all remaining ingredients to the bag, except the avocados and the thin slices of lemon.

Close the bag and remove excess air. With your hands massage the marinade into the potatoes and place in the fridge overnight (12 hours is ideal but the longer the better! … up to three days). Once the potatoes are marinated, preheat oven to 400 F. Dump potatoes onto two pans and spread them out (so they are not touching too much). Roast for about 50 minutes, checking on them at 20 minute intervals, or until golden brown. Once roasted, add potatoes to a large salad bowl along with cubes of avocado and finish with a squeeze of lemon juice, a sprinkle of sea salt and a few thin slices of lemon. No dressing necessary! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 351; protein 0 g; fat 15 g; carbs 52 g. 

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Super Salad

Nutrition-packed ingredients to invigorate your next salad

Fresh Dill & Sweet Potato Salad Serves 4

INGREDIENTS BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, Raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

I

1 CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES

Broccoli (and other cruciferous veggies such as kale, cabbage and cauliflower) have been proven to combat cancer cells. They are economic and loaded with sulforaphane, the active anti-cancer compound. You can buy them pre-grown in most supermarkets, but growing yours at home can be less than five cents a handful. Cabbage is also a member of the cruciferous family. The pigment that is responsible for its purple color comes from anthocyanin, a powerful antioxidant.

2 TUMERIC

Turmeric may be the most beneficial spice known to humans! It’s been used for centuries in Indian cuisine and medicine and should always be accompanied with a pinch of black pepper. Curcumin (the active ingredient in turmeric) is better absorbed when consumed with piperine (a natural compound found in black pepper). This pairing creates a powerful combination that boosts its nutritional value.

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• •

PACHAVEGALIVING

am always selecting the healthiest nutrient-dense, plant-based foods, ones packed with nutrition, antioxidants, phytonutrients and anti-inflammatory compounds. Here are a few common foods loaded with mega nutrition.

SALAD

3 SWEET POTATO

Sweet potatoes are much more nutritious than the regular ol' potato. They are loaded with beta carotene, a precursor for Vitamin A, which is essential for healthy eyesight. Retain the skins as they have more nutrients than the inner flesh.

4 FLAX

Flax seeds are loaded with omega-3 fatty acids, which support cognitive function and healthy nerve transmission. In the standard North American diet, we rarely consume enough omega-3 fatty acids. Instead of reaching for a fish oil supplement, which may be more likely to have heavy metals and other toxins, choose flax. Note: seeds must be ground to extract the omega-3's. If you eat them whole, their mucilaginous properties prevent our bodies from breaking down the little seeds, a blend of whole and ground flax is recommended.

5 ALLIUM

Garlic and red onions, both from the Allium family, are potent foods. Garlic contains manganese, Vitamin C, calcium, and selenium. Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used to prescribe garlic to his patients because it has antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antiparasitic and antifungal properties. Literally every ingredient here has health benefits! Savour them all and trust me, your body will thank you.

• • • •

2 large sweet potatoes, baked or boiled, then mashed
 6 leaves of thinly sliced red cabbage 1 green apple, chopped fine
 1/4 cup fresh dill, chopped
 1/2 cup red onion, chopped fine
 broccoli sprouts, for topping



DRESSING

• • • • • • • • • •

1 cup cashews, soaked overnight, rinsed and drained
 1/4 cup water
 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
 3 cloves garlic
 2 Tbsp. yellow mustard 2 Tbsp. gluten-free tamari 1/2 Tbsp. ground flax seed
 1/2 tsp. turmeric powder
 Pinch of black pepper
 Pinch of salt to taste

DIRECTIONS
 Cook the sweet potato as you wish - either bake for 30 mins at 350 F, or steam until tender. Add them to a large metal bowl and throw in the rest of the chopped veggies and apple. Mash until mixed. For the dressing, place all in a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy. Pour over veggies and mix until coated. Add a pinch more salt to taste and serve. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 365; protein 9 g; fat 18 g; carbs 47 g. 

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Quinoa & Cabbage Salad Easy, delicious & good for you

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S – Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SALAD

DRESSING

• • • • • • •

• •

2 1/2 cups cooked quinoa 1 cup yellow pepper, chopped 1 cup cannellini beans 3/4 cup red cabbage, chopped 1/4 cup sugar snap peas, diced 1/2 cup kale, chopped 1/2 cup parsley

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 342; protein 10 g; fat 17 g; carbs 39 g.

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• • • •

3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) 1 Tbsp. cayenne-infused oil (1 part vinegar + 3 parts EVOO + dash of cayenne) juice from 1 lemon 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. fresh cracked pepper 2 Tbsp. dried oregano

Combine ingredients for dressing in a small jar and shake well then set aside. Prepare, wash and dry your vegetables and begin to chop them all up. Once prepared, add them to a bowl with cooked quinoa and stir. Add dressing and enjoy with your family. This salad will last in the fridge for five days. Tip: If you’re eating it from a jar, first add a bit of the dressing to the bottom and then layer bits of each vegetable and quinoa. Finish off with a tiny bit more dressing before sealing to take on your busy day! 

IMPACT Magazine


Broccoli Pomegranate Salad A crunchy, sweet salad for spring cravings

BY S U S A N H OY A Red Seal chef, nutrition expert & founder of Culinary Skills & Nutrition in Cochrane, AB WHOLEFOODSHOY 

CULINARYSKILLSANDNUTRITION

T

his salad is best served warm but next day leftovers make you excited for lunch. The lure of sweetness with any cruciferous vegetable is enough to leave you wanting more but the combination of pomegranate and broccoli seems to be a match made in heaven. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS SALAD

DRESSING

• • • • •

• • • • •

4 cups broccoli ½ yellow pepper, thinly sliced 3 Tbsp. red onion, finely diced ½ pomegranate, seeded ½ cup almonds, chopped

1 small shallot, minced 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 ½ Tbsp. maple syrup Salt & pepper to taste

EKA BARNOVI-MACNICOL

DIRECTIONS Cut broccoli florets into small bite-sized pieces, peel stems and cut into similar sized pieces. Place broccoli, pepper and onion in a bowl and blanch by pouring boiling water over and allow to soak until bright green and stems are fork tender, about 2 minutes. Drain and pat dry getting all the water out of the florets. Transfer drained and dried broccoli, peppers, onion to a medium sized mixing bowl. Add pomegranate arils. In a separate bowl or jar combine shallot, olive oil, vinegar, maple syrup, and salt & pepper. Shake or whisk to mix together. Pour over the still warm broccoli mixture and toss to evenly coat everything with the dressing. Sprinkle with chopped almonds and serve. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 270; protein 6.8 g; fat 19 g; carbs 62 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

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Miso Tahini Noodle Salad

A fast, flavourful salad for people on the go RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L I S A K I TA H A R A Food photographer & vegan blogger at Okonomi Kitchen in Toronto, ON OKONOMIKITCHEN

A

n easy vegan noodle salad with delicious refreshing vegetables all tossed in a creamy miso tahini dressing that comes together in just 15 minutes.

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

NOODLE SALAD

Cook soba noodles according to directions. Rinse with cold water once finished. Thinly slice all the vegetables and dice the avocado. Toss all the vegetables together in a bowl with the soba noodles. Blend all dressing ingredients together. Toss the salad with the dressing then add the avocado and gently toss the salad once more. Serve with sesame seeds and scallions.

• • • • • •

2 servings 100% buckwheat/ soba noodles 1 cup edamame beans, unshelled 1/2 cup bell pepper, cut into thin strips 1/2 cup julienned carrots 1/2 cup sugar snap peas 1 small avocado, diced

DRESSING

• • • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. tahini 1 Tbsp. miso 1/2 Tbsp. ginger, minced 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 1/2 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 1/2 Tbsp. rice vinegar 1 tsp. sesame oil 4 Tbsp. water

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 755; protein 30 g; fat 40 g; carbs 66 g. 

OPTIONAL TOPPINGS

• • •

Green onions Sesame seeds Red pepper flakes

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Crowd-Pleasing Vegan Caesar Salad RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A L I D D O N – Author of the Oh She Glows cookbooks & plant-based blogger in Oakville, ON OHSHEGLOWS 

OHSHEGLOWSBLOG

T

his is a delicious, creamy vegan Caesar salad that will wow any crowd! To take it over the top, I garnish the salad with a generous amount of crunchy Roasted Chickpea Croutons and a delectable Nut and Seed Parmesan Cheese for the ultimate vegan Caesar salad. The dressing recipe easily doubles for a larger group and it’ll keep in the fridge in a sealed container for a few days so you can make it in advance. Makes 6 small bowls

TIP: The dressing thickens when chilled, so be sure to leave it at room temperature before using.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Soak cashews in a bowl of water overnight, or for at least a few hours. Drain and rinse. Roast chickpea croutons: Preheat oven to 400F. Drain and rinse chickpeas. Place chickpeas in a tea towel and rub dry (it's OK if some skins fall off). Place onto large rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle on oil and roll around to coat. Sprinkle on the garlic powder, salt and optional cayenne. Toss to coat. Roast for 20 minutes at 400F then gently roll the chickpeas around in the baking sheet. Roast for another 10 to 20 minutes until lightly golden. They will firm up as they cool. Prepare the dressing: Add the cashews and all other dressing ingredients (except salt) into a high-speed blender and blend on high until the dressing is super smooth. You can add a splash of water if necessary to get it blending. Add salt to taste and adjust other seasonings, if desired. Set aside. Prepare the Parmesan cheese: Add cashews and garlic into a mini food processor and process until finely chopped. Add the rest of the ingredients and pulse until the mixture is combined. Salt to taste. Prepare the lettuce: Destem the kale then finely chop the leaves. Wash and dry in a salad spinner. Place into extra-large bowl. Chop up the romaine into bite-sized pieces. Rinse and spin dry. Place into bowl along with kale. You should have roughly 5 cups chopped kale and 10 cups chopped romaine. Assemble: Add dressing onto lettuce and toss until fully coated. Season with a pinch of salt and mix again. Sprinkle on the roasted chickpeas and the Parmesan cheese. Serve immediately.

1 small/medium bunch lacinato kale, destemmed (5 cups chopped) 2 small heads romaine lettuce (10 cups chopped)

FOR THE ROASTED CHICKPEA CROUTONS

• • • • •

1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas (or 1 ½ cups cooked), drained and rinsed 1 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil ½ tsp. fine grain sea salt ½ tsp. garlic powder 1/8 to ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper (optional)

FOR THE NUT AND SEED PARMESAN CHEESE

• • • • • • •

1/3 cup raw cashews 2 Tbsp. hulled hemp seeds 1 small garlic clove 1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 tsp. garlic powder fine grain sea salt, to taste

FOR THE CAESAR DRESSING (MAKES 3/4 - 1 CUP):

• • • • • • • • • •

1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight 1/4 cup water 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1/2 Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1/2 tsp. garlic powder 1 small garlic clove (you can add another if you like it super potent) 1/2 Tbsp. vegan Worcestershire sauce 2 tsp. capers 1/2 tsp. fine grain sea salt and pepper, or to taste

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 622; protein 29 g; fat 21 g; carbs 93 g. 

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Mains & Sides Crispy Crabless Cakes

Quick Quinoa Queso Skillet with Chipotle

Pasta with Chickpeas & Kale Tomato Sauce

126

145

Carpaccio with Stuffed Squash Blossoms

Ricotta & Spinach Stuffed Shells

128

146

Tangy Ginger Kelp Noodle Soup

Mac & Cheese

Chickpea Shawarma

129

Red Beet Borscht

112

Raw Sushi Rolls with Ginger Miso Sauce

150

108

Avocado Salad & Baked Butternut Squash 110

Baked Sweet Potato with Tumeric Coconut Sauce 111

Hot Detox Flax Wraps 113

130

Cheeze Fries

Chickpea Tikka Masala with Pineapple

114

Baked Falafel Sliders with Hemp Tabbouleh & Maple Tahini Sauce

132

Crispy Harasa Chickpea Power Bowls

116

134

Philly Cheesesteak

Thai Curry

118

136

High Protein Teriyaki Mushroom Burgers

Thai Drunken Noodles (Pad Kee Mao)

120

138

Portobello Cauliflower Burgers

Thai Basil Tempeh Stir Fry

122

140

Vegan Big Mac Sauce

Fried Rice

123

142

Black Bean Burgers

Quinoa Stuffed Spaghetti Squash

124

Broccoli Potato Tots JASMINE BRIONES

125

143

148

Lentil & Sweet Potato Shepherd's Pie 151

The Best Veggie Chili 152

Portobello Pot Roast 154

Pot Pie 156

Holiday Stuffed Squash 158

Roasted Vegetables with Chimichurri 159

Savory Holiday Sides 160 Gluten-Free Stuffing / Candied Ginger Island Cranberry Sauce Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes

Harvest Veggie Wellington 162

Spicy Tropical Curry Kelp Noodles 144

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  107 


Crispy Crabless Cakes Better than the real thing!

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L AU R E N T OYO TA Author of Vegan Comfort Classics: 101 Recipes To Feed Your Face in Toronto, ON HOTFORFOOD 

HOTFORFOODBLOG

T

here are a lot of vegan crab cake recipes made from artichokes or hearts of palm floating around the internet, and while they’re all pretty delicious, ours has been tried and tested by many former seafood addicts who claim they’d rather eat this than the real thing! Makes 10 cakes

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS CRABLESS CAKES

Place all the Crabless Cake ingredients except the oil and aioli in a large bowl. Combine well with a fork. It’s important that the artichokes, shallots and celery are very small and uniformly chopped so the cakes will stick together while frying. You should have a ½ inch of vegetable oil in a large cast-iron skillet or other heavy-bottomed pan for frying. Heat it to 350 F.

CRABLESS CAKES

• • • • • • • • •

2 cups drained marinated artichoke hearts, finely chopped, plus 2 Tbsp. liquid ¼ cup finely chopped shallot ½ cup finely chopped celery 1 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ cup chickpea flour 2 tsp. coconut sugar or brown sugar 1 tsp. Old Bay seasoning ¼ tsp. sea salt ¼ tsp. ground pepper 1 to 2 cups vegetable oil, for frying

BREADING

• • •

¼ cup chickpea flour 1 ¼ cups multigrain bread crumbs ½ cup unsweetened nondairy milk

BREADING

To make the breading, place the chickpea flour in a wide, shallow dish. Use another shallow dish for the bread crumbs and a bowl for the milk. Take ¼ cup of the crabless cake mixture and press and form it into a thick patty with your hands. Gently place the cake in the chickpea flour and coat all sides evenly. Quickly submerge it in milk and make sure all the flour looks wet. Remove it from the milk and place in the bread crumbs. Using your hands, coat all sides of the cake well in the bread crumbs, then lightly shake off any excess. Set the coated cakes on a plate or baking sheet. Once they’re all assembled, immediately deep-fry in batches. Delicately place 2 or 3 cakes in the hot oil. Fry for about 4 minutes until golden brown, flipping halfway through. Gently remove the cakes with a slotted frying spoon and place on paper towels to absorb any excess oil. Serve immediately with the aioli. Leftovers can be heated over medium heat in a pan lightly coated with vegetable oil.

Horseradish-Dill Aioli Makes about ⅔ cup

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

⅔ cup vegan mayonnaise 1 Tbsp. vegan horseradish 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh dill ¼ tsp. ground pepper

DIRECTIONS Stir all the ingredients in a bowl until well combined.

Nutrition facts per serving (including aioli) Calories 384; protein 6 g; fat 31 g; carbs 23 g. 

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Avocado Salad & Baked Butternut Squash A quick & delicious pick for any night of the week RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• •

Preheat oven to 375F. Cut squash in half (length-wise). Add olive oil to a pan and set squash cut side down. Bake for approximately 35 minutes (baking time will vary depending on size of the squash). Prepare salad by adding all ingredients to a bowl and tossing gently. Add all dressing ingredients to a bowl and stir until well combined. Once squash is cooked, remove from oven and assemble your meal by adding the salad, dressing and pine nuts! Let the squash cool for around 10 minutes prepare plating.

1 medium sized butternut squash 1 Tbsp. Extra-virgin olive oil

SALAD

• • • • • • •

2 avocados, cubed ½ cup cucumber, cubed juice from 1 lemon 2 Tbsp. Extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved handful of microgreens salt and pepper to taste

DRESSING

• • • •

1 Tbsp. vegan mayo 1 tsp. Dijon mustard Dash of lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 310; protein 7 g; fat 14 g; carbs 24 g. 

TOPPINGS

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Pine nuts, toasted in cast iron skillet for 4-5 minutes

IMPACT Magazine


Baked Sweet Potato With Turmeric Coconut Sauce A colourful, delicious dinner for two RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E L L A M I L L S – Creator of Deliciously Ella in London, U.K. DELICIOUSLYELLA 

DELICIOUSLYELLA

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 sweet potatoes 300 g cherry tomatoes 150 g asparagus, woody ends removed 200 g mushrooms 150 g spinach 10 g coriander, finely chopped ½ tsp. chili flakes salt and pepper 2 tsp. Organic virgin coconut oil Drizzle olive oil 1 avocado 2 spring onions

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 634; protein 20 g; fat 42 g; carbs 82 g. 

FOR THE SAUCE

• • • • • • •

15g fresh turmeric 10g fresh ginger 1 clove garlic 1 Tbsp. tamari 1 lime, juiced 50 g cashews 100 ml coconut milk

Preheat oven to 350 F. Rub the sweet potato skins with organic virgin coconut oil, pierce a few times and bake for 1 hour. After 20 minutes, add tomatoes to a tray and cook alongside the sweet potatoes for the remaining 40 minutes. Blend the sauce ingredients until smooth. Slice the mushrooms and asparagus. Heat in a pan with a drizzle of olive oil, salt, pepper and a pinch of chili flakes. Cook for about 3 minutes then add spinach and coriander to the pan and cook for 1 minute until the spinach wilts. Mash avocado and finely slice spring onions. When potatoes are cooked, cut open and stuff with avocado mash, cooked veg and drizzle on the sauce. Sprinkle with spring onions and chili flakes before serving.

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COURTESY NEAL'S YARD REMEDIES

DIRECTIONS


Chickpea Shawarma A dill-icious wrap filled with protein RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY S U S A N H OY Red Seal Chef and creator of Culinary Skills & Nutrition in Cochrane, AB CULINARYSKILLSANDNUTRITION

A

flavorful vegan sandwich with chickpeas and garlic dill sauce wrapped in a warm pita. Topped with fresh lettuce, tomatoes, onion and pickled turnips this wrap is sure to please. Makes 4 pitas

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INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SHAWARMA

Drain and rinse chickpeas. In a large skillet, sauté chickpeas with oil and spices until slightly crispy and golden brown. Set aside to cool slightly. In a small mixing bowl mix hummus, lemon juice, dill, and garlic. Thin with water if necessary and season to taste with salt if needed. The sauce should be pourable but not runny, have a zingy garlic freshness and hint of dill. To serve, warm pita in oven or skillet. Top with a generous amount of lettuce, fresh tomatoes, thinly sliced onion, and pickled turnips. Add a large portion of seasoned chickpeas and garlic dill sauce. Wrap and serve immediately.

• • • • • • • • •

1 Tbsp. grapeseed oil 1 can chickpeas, drained 4 garlic cloves, minced 1 tsp. cumin 1 tsp. coriander 1 tsp. sweet Spanish paprika ¾ tsp. turmeric ½ tsp. cinnamon ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper

GARLIC DILL SAUCE

• • • • •

¼ cup hummus ½ lemon, juiced ¾ tsp. dill (2-3 tsp. fresh) 3 garlic cloves, minced 2-3 tsp. water (to thin)

TO SERVE

• • • • •

Nutrition facts per pita Calories 207; protein 9 g; fat 6 g; carbs 32 g. 

4 pita bread Sliced tomato Sliced red onion Romaine lettuce, chopped Pickled turnip

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Hot Detox Flax Wraps Time to ditch the sandwich bread

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J U L I E DA N I LU K – TV host & nutritionist in Lyndon, ON JULIEDANILUK 

JULIEDANILUKNUTRITION

T

his wrap is perfect as a replacement for sandwich bread. I love it with every filling imaginable. Try sprouts and a pickled vegetable (ideally fermented) with your choice of protein. You may eventually want to double the recipe, especially if you own a larger dehydrator, once you realize you can’t live without these! Flaxseeds are an unparalleled source of lignans, which balance the hormones. They are also an excellent source of omega-3 essential fatty acids and a good source of vitamins and minerals, including selenium, that support detox.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • •

1 ½ cups whole flaxseeds (to make 2 cups ground flaxseeds) 1 ½ cups filtered water 2 cups grated carrots 2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. organic lemon juice 1 Tbsp. dried parsley or cilantro or ¼ cup chopped fresh 1 Tbsp. organic onion flakes or ¼ cup chopped fresh onion 2 tsp. Italian seasoning (basil, oregano, rosemary, sage, savoury and thyme) ½ tsp. ground turmeric ¼ tsp. ground ginger ¼ tsp. unrefined sea salt

DIRECTIONS Grind the flaxseeds in a spice or coffee grinder. If you don’t have a grinder, use pre-ground seeds. Mix the ground flaxseeds with the water in a bowl and put aside. Place the grated carrots in a bowl and switch to the S blade in your food processor. Add the remainder of the ingredients to the processor, including the flax mixture, occasionally scraping the sides so everything gets well blended. At the end, pulse in the carrots to maintain their texture.

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Preheat the oven to 150 F or dehydrator to 125F . Line a few baking sheets or dehydrator trays with parchment paper. With moistened hands, spread ½ cup of the mixture as evenly as possible in a circular motion until it’s spread as thinly as a tortilla (⅛ of an inch). Repeat with the rest of the mixture. You should end up with 6 wraps. Bake in the oven for 5 to 7 hours or dehydrate for 5 to 8 hours, flipping the wraps halfway through the time to ensure even drying. Avoid doing this overnight. If you go too long without checking, the wraps may lose their pliability and resemble a cracker. There is a big variation in cooking times because every oven is different.

Let the wraps cool for 20 minutes, then place in a sealed bag to stay moist and soft. Makes 6 wraps. Will keep in the fridge for 1 week; can also be frozen for up to 4 months. Tip: Freshly grind whole flaxseed whenever possible to ensure the highest amount of omega-3 nutrition. Golden flaxseed is prettier than brown flaxseed for this recipe. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 278; protein 8 g; fat 6 g; carbs 6 g. 

Courtesy of HotDetox by Julie Daniluk RHN / HarperCollins © 2016 Reprinted with permission.


Cheeze Fries

Sinful, delicious, & as comforting as one could imagine RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E R I N I R E L A N D Founder of It's To Die For food blog one of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers from Vancouver, B.C. ERINIRELAND 

ERINY VR

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Preheat oven to 400F and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Chop potatoes into medium-sized ‘fry-like’ strips and divide evenly onto your baking sheets. Sprinkle each sheet of potatoes evenly with garlic, olive oil, chili powder, paprika, salt and pepper. Toss evenly to coat fries. Bake for about 35 minutes or until golden. At the 20 minute mark, give them a flip. Remove from oven and add a third of the fries to a large iron skillet. Sprinkle with vegan cheese. Add another ⅓ of your fries and more cheese. Repeat this step one more time and place skillet back in oven so the cheese can melt (about 10 minutes). Once cheese is melted, remove from oven and garnish with a generous drizzle of mayonnaise, handful of chopped green onions, sprinkle of chili powder, salt and malt vinegar.

7 russet potatoes 4 large garlic cloves (minced) 3 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. Mexican chili powder ½ tsp. paprika 1 ½ tsp. Himalayan salt 1 tsp. fresh-ground pepper ½ cup vegan mayonnaise 1 bunch green onions 1 cup grated vegan cheese ½ cup ketchup (for dipping) Malt vinegar (optional, but highly recommended)

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 600; protein 11 g; fat 16 g; carbs 79 g. 

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Baked Falafel Sliders With Hemp Tabbouleh & Maple Tahini Sauce RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L AU R E N T OYO TA Author of Vegan Comfort Classics: 101 Recipes To Feed Your Face & creator of the hot for food blog in Toronto, ON HOTFORFOOD 

HOTFORFOODBLOG

T

ake a typically un-fun food like falafels and make mini pita sliders that are injected with fresh ingredients and tons of flavour! Adding mushrooms and almond meal make these little morsels moist and the creamy maple tahini sauce might just be your new favourite dip. These gluten-free baked falafels would also be a great proteinpacked lunch without the pita or eaten as a salad with the hemp tabbouleh. Makes 14 sliders

INGREDIENTS BAKED FALAFEL

MAPLE TAHINI SAUCE

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

1 Tbsp. ground flax 3 Tbsp. water 1 cup sliced mushrooms 1/2 cup sliced onion 3 garlic cloves 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 x 398 ml can chickpeas (approx. 1 3/4 cup) 1/4 cup vegetable stock 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1/4 cup curly parsley leaves 1/2 cup almond meal 1/3 cup chickpea flour 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/2 tsp. chili powder 1/2 tsp. sea salt 1/4 tsp. ground pepper

HEMP TABBOULEH

• • • • • • •

2 cup curly parsley 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion 1/4 cup diced tomato 3 Tbsp. hemp hearts 1 Tbsp. olive oil 2 tsp. lemon juice sea salt & ground pepper to taste

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1/4 cup tahini 1/4 cup water 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 tsp. garlic powder 1/4 tsp. sea salt

MINI PITA BREAD

Nutrition facts per falafel Calories 142; protein 7 g; fat 5 g; carbs 19 g.  Nutrition facts per tabbouleh serving Calories 194; protein 8 g; fat 8 g; carbs 25 g.

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine ground flax with water and refrigerate for 10 minutes to allow the mixture to thicken. In a pan heated to medium, sauté mushroom and onion in olive oil for 3-4 minutes then add garlic and cook for another 1-2 minutes. Add this mushroom and onion mixture to a food processor with rinsed and drained chickpeas, the thickened flax and water mixture and remaining falafel ingredients. Process until everything is well combined and the mixture comes together as a thick batter. Take approximately 1 1/2 tablespoons of the mixture and form balls. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 30 minutes, flipping the falafels halfway through. While the falafels are baking prepare hemp tabbouleh and maple tahini sauce. For the tabbouleh, finely chop parsley leaves, add to a bowl along with remaining ingredients and stir to combine. For the maple tahini sauce, place all the ingredients in a high-powered blender and combine until smooth. Warm up the mini pitas in the oven during the last couple minutes of baking the falafels. To assemble the falafel sliders, cut mini pitas in half and spread maple tahini sauce on the inside of the bottom half. Place hemp tabbouleh on top, then a falafel, and dollop with more maple tahini sauce. Serve immediately. 

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Philly Cheesesteak A classic Philadelphia tradition reborn

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L AU R E N T OYO TA Author of Vegan Comfort Classics: 101 Recipes To Feed Your Face & creator of the hot for food blog in Toronto, ON HOTFORFOOD 

HOTFORFOODBLOG

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CHEESESTEAK

SEITAN LOAF:

• • • •

Preheat oven to 350° F. In a large bowl, combine the wheat gluten with the nutritional yeast, spices, herbs. In another bowl, mix together stock, vegetable oil, tamari, vinegar, and tomato paste until well combined. Pour the stock mixture into the wheat gluten mixture. Stir to combine. The mixture should be very moist, but not sticking to your hands. Place the dough on a clean work surface and knead, pulling and stretching it and folding it over itself a few times. Form a large log approximately 10” x 4”. Wrap the log tightly in a large piece of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Tighten and twist the ends of the foil to seal. Place the log on a baking sheet and bake for 90 minutes. It should feel very firm when you take it out of the oven. Allow the log to cool at room temperature. Store in the fridge overnight before using it for sandwiches. Slice very thin with a sharp knife or shave using a mandolin.

• • • • • •

2 cups thin-sliced onions 2 cups thin-sliced green bell peppers 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil ½ Saved by Seitan loaf, thinly sliced or shaved (see recipe below) 2 Tbsp. vegan Worcestershire 2 Tbsp. water Sea salt and ground pepper 6 hoagie-style buns 6 Tbsp. vegan butter Nacho Cheese, warmed (see recipe to right)

SAVED BY SEITAN LOAF

• • • •

• • • •

3 cups vital wheat gluten ¼ cup nutritional yeast 2 tsp. onion powder 1 tsp. each: sea salt, celery salt, smoked paprika, garlic powder, dried thyme, oregano, dried basil, ground mustard, ground pepper 2 vegan beef- or vegetable-flavored bouillon cubes dissolved in 3 cups hot water ¼ cup vegetable oil 2 Tbsp. low-sodium tamari or soy sauce 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. tomato paste

Courtesy of Hot for Food Vegan Comfort Classics by Lauren Toyota / Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited © 2018 Reprinted with permission.

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PHILLY CHEESESTEAK

In a large skillet sauté onions and bell peppers in vegetable oil on medium heat until soft. Add the sliced seitan and brown 3 to 4 minutes. Combine the Worcestershire and water in a small bowl. Pour over the vegetables and seitan and toss to coat with sauce. Continue cooking for 3 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Split, butter and toast the buns. Spread the warm cheese on the inside of both halves of bun. Top with a generous portion of the seitan mixture. Drizzle with more cheese and serve immediately.

Nacho Cheese Makes 1 ½ cups

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 cup peeled, cubed white potato ½ cup peeled, diced carrot ¼ cup vegetable oil ¼ cup non-dairy milk or water 1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 ½ tsp. arrowroot flour 1 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp onion powder ½ tsp. sea salt 2 tsp freshly-squeezed lemon juice 6 pickled jalapeño slices or to taste, plus 3 tablespoons brine 1 Tbsp. tomato paste

DIRECTIONS Boil potato and carrot until forktender, 6 to 8 minutes. Drain the vegetables and immediately place in a blender. Add the remaining ingredients to the blender and whirl until smooth. Serve hot.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 526; protein 10 g; fat 8 g; carbs 43g. 

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High Protein Teriyaki Mushroom Burgers

The perfect addition to a backyard gathering RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY J A S M I N E B R I O N E S Vegan food bloggers at Sweet Simple Vegan in Los Angeles, CA SWEETSIMPLEVEGAN 

W

SWEETSIMPLEVEG

hat better way to celebrate the start of summer than with some good ol’ (veggie) burgers. These are easy to make, require simple ingredients, and are jam-packed with plant protein. Plus, they are bursting with flavor and are perfect for summer!

Makes 6 Burgers

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

Prepare the flax egg by mixing together the flaxseed meal and water in a small bowl and setting it aside for 15 minutes to thicken. Add the mushrooms to a food processor and pulse until broken down into small pieces. Add in the remaining ingredients except for the breadcrumbs and pulse for about 45-60 seconds, or until almost smooth. Make sure that the mixture is still chunky and not smooth or else your burgers will be soggy! Place the mixture into a large bowl and stir in the breadcrumbs. Mix until uniform and then set into the freezer for about 20 minutes to set.* In the meantime, preheat the oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat. Once the mixture has set, fill a 1/2 cup measure with the burger mixture and form it into a thick (1/2" minimum) patty. Add to pan. Repeat to form 6 patties total. Place them on the lined baking sheet and into the oven. Bake for 35 minutes, flipping after 20. Allow the burgers to cool completely before serving and then dig in. *You can skip this step BUT it is beneficial in that it will make the burgers easier to work with.

• • • • • • • • • • •

1 flax egg (1 Tbsp. flaxseed meal + 3 Tbsp. water) 8 oz. Baby Bella mushrooms, roughly chopped 1 cup cooked brown rice 1 cup + 1 Tbsp. plain bread crumbs 1/2 cup raw walnuts 1/2 cup cooked low-sodium black beans, drained 1 scallion, thinly sliced with ends removed 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 Tbsp. vegan teriyaki sauce 3 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 tsp. smoked paprika Salt and pepper, to taste

SERVE WITH

• • • • • •

Burger buns of choice Tomato Avocado Lettuce Teriyaki sauce Red onions

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 297; protein 10.4 g; fat 8.6 g; carbs 45.7 g. 

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Portobello Cauliflower Burgers Ignite your taste buds with delicious portobello ‘buns’ BY R AC H E L M O R R O W – Nutritionist & social media guru for the Food Matters website FOODMATTER 

FOODMATTERSFILM

D

rop the refined white flour bun and add two delicious, nutrient-rich portobello mushrooms instead! Fill them with your favorite fillings, they're sure to satisfy! Burger addicts will be surprised at just how hearty this burger is, even without a big slab of meat or big bun of empty carbs. Makes 6-8

INGREDIENTS SPICY CAULIFLOWER PATTIES

FOR THE ‘BUNS’

• • • • •

• • • • • •

• •

1 cup quinoa cooked in 1 cup broth or water 1/2 head cauliflower or 6 cup florets 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/4 tsp. ground chili 1 cup ground almonds, or almond meal 1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2 chia or flax egg (Mix 1 Tbsp. seeds mixed with 3 Tbsp. water. Allow to sit and absorb water before use.) 1 tsp. Himalayan salt Pinch of black pepper

12-16 Portobello mushrooms 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil ½ Tbsp. tamari 1 tsp. rice wine vinegar 1 tsp. sesame seeds

FOR THE SLAW

• • • • • •

¼ red cabbage, shredded ¼ white cabbage, shredded 1 carrot, grated 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1 tsp. salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar

SMASHED AVOCADO

• • • •

1 avocado Juice of 1/2 a lemon Pinch of Himalayan salt Pinch of black pepper

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Add cooked quinoa, cauliflower, cumin, chili, almond meal, nutritional yeast, chia egg, Himalayan salt and pepper to the food processor. Process until mixture is combined well. Line a baking tray with parchment paper, take 1/4 cup of patty mixture and form into 6-8 patties on the baking tray, aiming to keep them about the same size as your Portobello buns. Bake in the oven for 25-30 minutes or until cooked through and golden. In a small bowl mix together olive oil, tamari and rice wine vinegar. Brush tops of Portobello mushrooms with this and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Place on another lined baking tray and place in the oven for 8-10 minutes. While your buns and patties are baking, put together all of the slaw ingredients (cabbage, carrot, apple cider vinegar, salt and coconut sugar) in a medium bowl and mix well. In another small bowl, smash together avocado, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Once patties are cooked, remove from oven and assemble your burgers!

FOOD MATTERS

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 409; protein 20 g; fat 18 g; carbs 50 g. 

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Vegan Big Mac Sauce

Solve your cravings with this delicious sauce RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

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his sauce has proven to taste amazing on anything… from vegan burgers to salads or even as a perfect dip for veggie platters.

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

1 cup vegan mayo 1/4 cup ketchup 1/4 cup white onions, finely chopped 1/4 cup gherkin, finely chopped dash of lemon dash of olive oil dash of hot sauce 1 tsp salt 1 tsp pepper

DIRECTIONS Combine your ingredients into a large bowl and stir until well combined. Store in air tight container in the fridge for up for a week. Nutrition facts per batch Calories 1,571; protein 5 g; fat 149 g; carbs 24 g. 

ABOVE Vegan Big Mac Sauce on a plant-based burger, as seen on the cover.

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Black Bean Burgers

These tasty burgers will be the star of your party this summer RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S – Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

T

hese Black Bean Burgers are the perfect addition to your next gathering and I promise you that they will be the star of the show.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE PATTY

Preheat your oven to 375°F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment and spray with coconut oil or olive oil – set aside. Add all the ingredients for the burger patties into a food processor. Blend until smooth. The mixture should almost stick together. Using a 1/2 cup mould begin shaping your patties. Add a bit of coconut oil and bread crumbs to the 1/2 cup to avoid sticking, then smack the mould down and release your patty on the baking sheet. Gently pat the patties down to flatten them for even cooking. Cook in the oven for 30-35 minutes and flip halfway through. You want them nice and golden brown. In the meantime, prepare all your fixins, toast your buns and make your dressing.

• • •

Makes 6 Burgers •

Thousand Island Dressing INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

1 cup vegan mayo 1/4 cup ketchup 1/4 cup white onions, finely chopped 1/4 cup gherkins, finely chopped dash of lemon dash of olive oil dash of hot sauce 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper

DIRECTIONS Place ingredients in a large bowl and stir until well combined then serve. 

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• • • • • • •

1/2 white onion 2 cloves garlic 1/2 cup sweet corn fresh or canned (strained and drained) 1 cup black beans, strained and drained 1/2 cup fresh cilantro 1 cup cooked brown rice 1/2 cup panko 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. pepper 1 tsp. Maggi seasoning

DRESS UP YOUR BURGER

• • • • •

seed bun – use what you like! fresh tomato butter lettuce fresh sprouts vegan jalapeno havarti

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 646; protein 21 g; fat 28 g; carbs 77 g. 


Broccoli Potato Tots

Scale up this recipe so no one misses out on these delicious tots RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E A N N I N E E L D E R – Author of The Potato Reset in Cambridge, ON POTATO.WISDOM 

POTATOWISDOM_ 

POTATOWISE

Makes 16 Tots

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

4 medium leftover potatoes 1 cup broccoli, chopped ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 tsp. onion powder ½ tsp. black pepper

DIRECTIONS Separate broccoli into bite-sized pieces, remove stems. Place broccoli florets in a small pot of water, bring to a soft boil and cook for 3 minutes. Drain, set aside and let cool. While the broccoli is cooling, preheat oven to 450F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large mixing bowl grate the potato with a hand-held grater. Finely chop the broccoli, then transfer to mixing bowl along with remaining ingredients. Stir until well combined. Spoon out a heaping tablespoon of the mixture then form into a cylinder using your hands. Place onto the lined baking sheet and repeat. Bake for 15 minutes, flip and bake for another 15-20 minutes or until golden brown.

GREAT WITH THE FOLLOWING SAUCES NO-HONEY MUSTARD DIP

• 2 Tbsp. Dijon or stone ground mustard • 1 tsp. pure maple syrup Stir together and enjoy! UNSWEETENED KETCHUP

• • • • •

¼ cup strained tomatoes 1 Tbsp. white vinegar ½ tsp. onion powder ½ tsp. Italian seasoning Pinch of salt (optional)

Stir until very smooth and enjoy! Nutrition facts per top (without sauce) Calories 48; protein 2 g; fat 0 g; carbs 10 g. 

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Quick Quinoa Queso Skillet with Chipotle

This Mexican-inspired dish will please every palate RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N D R E W O L S O N – Creator of the One Ingredient Chef food blog in Los Angeles, CA ONEINGREDIENT 

ANDREWOLSON

I

n my opinion, quinoa is the perfect food: complete protein, complex carbs, fibre, vitamins and minerals. No wonder the Inca warriors ate quinoa before going into battle and NASA is considering it as a primary crop for long-term space travel. The flavours in this recipe are insane and it’s one seriously tasty meal designed to be made in just one skillet and take less than 25 minutes from start to finish. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Grab a large skillet and throw in jalapeño and garlic. Cook for about 3 minutes to soften. Add quinoa and toast for 30 – 60 seconds. Add 2 cups vegetable broth. Stir, cover and simmer over medium heat. Finely chop 1/4 – ½ cup of the canned chipotle peppers (4 – 8 peppers). Add to skillet along with 1 – 2 Tbsp. of the adobo sauce from the can. Add 1 cup corn kernels, pinto beans (drained and rinsed) and salt if desired. Stir, cover and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir often and add more broth if mixture dries out. Once cooked, add a handful of chopped cilantro, a few chopped green onions, corn tortillas cut into thin strips and a squeeze of lime juice. Drizzle with queso and add slices of avocado.

1 ¼ cups white quinoa 2+ cups vegetable broth 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 jalapeño pepper, minced 1 (7 oz / 190 ml) can chipotles in adobo 1 (15 oz / 400 ml) can pinto beans 1 cup fresh or frozen corn Salt to taste 2 small corn tortillas ¼ cup fresh cilantro 4 green onions 2 limes 1 avocado (optional) ½ cup vegan queso* (see sidebar recipe)

*Queso Recipe

Soak 1/3 cup of raw cashews for 30 – 90 minutes to soften before blending.

INGREDIENTS • 1/3 cup soaked cashews • 1/3 cup water • 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast • ¼ tsp. smoked paprika • Pinch of turmeric • Salt DIRECTIONS Drain cashews and add to blender with all other ingredients. Blend until smooth.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 583; protein 24 g; fat 22 g; carbs 83 g. 

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Summer Carpaccio with Stuffed Squash Blossoms A creative use of your garden fruits & vegetables B A R B S H E L D O N -T H O M A S – Whole Food Culinary Instructor & IMPACT Magazine's Kitchen Skills chef in Calgary, AB REALFOODGODDESS

S

howcase those amazing late summer vegetables in this delicious dish that just screams freshness. This is more of a formula rather than a recipe, so get creative with your summer vegetables, fruits, blossoms and herbs when presenting your garden carpaccio. Finish this platter of freshness with an infused olive oil and flaked sea salt. This recipe is inspired by our Summer Vegetable Carpaccio in the Wicked Healthy Cookbook.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • •

To stuff each squash blossom, gentle tear the side of each blossom and remove the stamen (center of blossom), and fill with about a tablespoon or more of ricotta. Twist end to seal and set aside. Continue with all of the blossoms. In sauté pan, put on medium heat. Add drizzle of oil and vegan butter. Place the stuffed blooms in and cook on each side about 3 minutes. Remove and put on plate. Set aside. Using a mandolin and knife, slice all your vegetables thin and arrange on a plate. Sprinkle fresh herb leaves and shave a bit of onion on top of the vegetables. Place the cooked blossoms around the plate. Drizzle olive oil, followed by sprinkling of sea salt and pepper.

• • • •

10-12 Squash blossoms 1 cup vegan ricotta Knob of vegan butter Your favorite in-season vegetables, such as heirloom tomatoes, zucchini, fennel, beets, peppers, kohlrabi, or other favorites; Sliced thin with a knife or on mandolin Fresh picked herbs of your choice such as parsley, basil, mint, etc.; Torn or just using small leaves Onions, shallot or garlic paper thin sliced Really good olive oil or herb / garlic infused olive oil Flaked sea salt Fresh black pepper

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 160; protein 7 g; fat 12 g; carbs 25 g. 

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Tangy Ginger Kelp Noodle Soup INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

Mega Flu-Fighter

Delicious spicy soup to get you back on your feet RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, Raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

G

PACHAVEGALIVING

arlic, ginger, serrano chili, lime and cilantro all have detoxification properties and can help kick that cold before it even arrives. Here’s why. Garlic is revered due to its anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-viral properties. It has the power to reduce yeast overgrowth, stimulate the production of glutathione, which helps eliminate toxic build-up and strengthen our immune system. Ginger has been used for centuries to stoke digestive fires, calm indigestion, promote circulation and facilitate the assimilation of nutrients. Serrano chillies contain capsacin, a chemical compound found in all

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spicy chilis known to provide relief for irritable bowel disease sufferers (it worked for me!). Capsacin is a potent anti-inflammatory and when ingested or applied topically in a cream, has been proven to reduce pain, headaches and sinus symptoms. Lime gives soup a nice kick and stimulates the digestive system, enhances alkalinity within and increases secretion of digestive juices. Cilantro is known to chelate heavy metals, thus ridding the body of unwanted toxins. Being a strong anti-oxidant, it helps to lower the risk of oxidative stress in cells that may become carcinogenic.

• •

4 cups boiling water 4-6 Tbsp. miso paste (to taste) Half a fresh Serrano chili, seeds removed and minced 1 clove garlic, minced A half thumb of fresh ginger, minced 1 Tbsp. tamari/coconut aminos/nama shoyu 2 handfuls of kelp noodles 1 handful of cilantro 1 handful of chopped green onion Juice of one lime Drizzle of hot sauce

DIRECTIONS Combine chili, garlic and ginger with 1 cup of water in a highspeed blender. In a separate bowl, soak the kelp noodles in boiling water and cut into smaller noodles with kitchen shears. Divide the noodles when softened into separate bowls for each person. In another small bowl, mix miso paste with a couple spoons of the boiling water to dissolve the paste. Add the rest of the water and chili, garlic, ginger liquid. Ladle the miso broth over the noodles and top with freshly chopped cilantro and scallions. Finish with a squeeze of lime and your favorite hot sauce. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 509; protein 18 g; fat 1 g; carbs 100 g. 

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Amazing Raw Sushi Rolls with Ginger Miso Sauce An impressive, nutrient-dense meal BY PAU L A B E L L AVA N C E – Founder of Basic Roots in Calgary, AB BASICROOTS 

BASICROOTSRAW

Makes 9 sushi rolls

DIRECTIONS

PATÉ

Blend all Paté ingredients together in a food processor to make a paste. Make Raw Rice by peeling the outer skin of celery root. Chop into chunks and process in food processor, add lemon juice and pulse a few times to mix in lemon juice. Take one raw nori sheet and spread 3 Tbsp. of the paste onto a sheet of raw nori. This works best with a spatula to avoid ripping the nori sheet. Sprinkle with 4 Tbsp. of raw celery rice. Take your sliced fillings and place at top of nori sheet closest to you. Add hemp or  chia to increase protein if desired. Begin to roll using both hands. Gently but firmly tuck and roll at the same time to create a firm sushi roll. Cut the roll in half and then in half again continue until you have your desired size. 

• • • • • • • • •

1 ½ cups soaked pecans 1 ½ cups soaked walnuts 3 pitted madjool dates 3-4 cloves garlic ½ cup olive oil 1 Tbsp. hemp hearts ¼ cup fresh cilantro 2 Tbsp. parsley ½ tsp. salt or to taste

RAW RICE

• •

1 large head of celery root 2 tsp. lemon juice

FILLING

Choose from a variety of fresh sliced vegetables such as: sweet peppers, hemp seed, sprouts, chia seed, carrots, sesame seed, cucumber, avocado, mushrooms, pickled ginger.

Nutrition facts per roll Calories 235; protein 8 g; fat 18 g; carbs 11 g.

Miso Ginger Dip INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

½ cup olive oil 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil 1-2 cloves of garlic 1 inch slice of peeled ginger 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 2 Tbsp. maple syrup 2 Tbsp. buckwheat miso 1 Tbsp. tamari Pinch of smoked chipotle or cayenne powder (optional)

DIRECTIONS Start food processor, put ginger and garlic through top while blades spin. Add everything else to the ginger and garlic. Blend till smooth in processor. Ginger Miso dressing can be used for dipping vegetables or thinned with water it makes a great salad dressing. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 24; protein 0 g; fat 2 g; carbs 1 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine

BRANDY MUDRYK

INGREDIENTS


HAS REALLY BEEN AROUND… Healthy food that is!

T

he team at Fit Kitchen have been leading Calgary's healthy, convenient movement for 14 years, and are more passionate than ever! Fit Kitchen was founded by food lover, athlete and proprietor, Jason Zaran, who has been fuelling Calgary’s professional athletes, Olympians and the community at large with healthy, restaurant-quality, convenient meals. “Over this time we like to think that we have gotten pretty good at what we do and, like IMPACT, we have helped pave the way for growth in Calgary’s health and wellness business community.” The past three months of staying at home has shaken up our lives, along with the daily routines that we may have relied on. This has further emphasized the importance of taking care of ourselves physically and mentally. Whatever your circumstances, Fit Kitchen is here to support you on your journey. Deliveries are available seven days a week to Calgary, Airdrie, Okotoks, Chestermere, and Cochrane. 

HEALTH & FITNESS TIPS 5 RESET FROM FIT KITCHEN

If you haven’t done so already it is the perfect time to reset your health and wellness goals, getting yourself fitter and stronger than ever! 1. SET GOALS WITH A DEADLINE Tell people your goals and/or sign up for something! 2. GET YOUR HEAD RIGHT Practice a gratitude/intention ritual along with journaling and meditation. 3. BLOW UP BAD ROUTINES TO ESTABLISH NEW EMPOWERING ONES Get up a bit earlier than you normally would, start your day with some light activity such as cardio, stretching or body weight movements! 4. CRUSH YOUR DAILY ACTIVITY Getting after it even when you are struggling builds that mental toughness. 5. MAKE IT EASY TO EAT WELL Fit Kitchen offers convenient meal plans to help you reach your goals; lean plans for weight-loss, performance plans for active lifestyles, and everyday plans for general wellness.

15%F OF

*

PHOTO: Fit Kitchen founder Jason Zaran

SKIP THE MEAL PREP AT FITKITCHEN.CA *Use code: IMPACT15 for 15% off your first order! FREE DELIVERY on orders over $25


132  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


Vegan Chickpea Tikka Masala with Pineapple A rich, flavourful & nutritionally packed dish RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E N N I F E R R O S S A N O – Founder of NeuroticMommy vegan food & lifestyle blog in New Jersey NEUROTICMOMMY 

I

THENEUROTICMOM

am part neurotic and 100 per cent mommy. Like many women, I have struggled with anxiety, depression and lack of self-worth that manifested into rapid, uncontrollable weight gain and self-sabotage. After many years of psychological and physical health issues with no answers from doctors, I decided to take matters into my own hands and transform my life for the sake of myself and my family. This led me to exploring plant-based nutrition and self-healing through food, mindset and self-care. I also became a holistic health coach. My goal is for moms to know that they’re not alone and that it is possible to find balance amidst the chaos. Hope you enjoy my Vegan Chickpea Tikka Masala, a rich, healthy, flavourful and nutritionally packed meal with a fruity, pineapple twist.

Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• •

Prepare the rice first. Place 1 cup of rice, 1 ½ cups water or vegetable broth, and 1 Tbsp. vegan butter in a pot. Bring to a boil. Cover with a tight-fitting lid, reduce heat to low simmer and cook 15 minutes. Remove from heat, with lid on, and let steam for 10 minutes. When ready, fluff with a fork. For the Vegan Chickpea Tikka Masala, start with adding the extra virgin olive oil to a large pan over medium heat. Throw in chopped onions, garlic and a dash of salt. Cook until onions and garlic are translucent and tender. Add all spices, marinara sauce and chickpeas and let marinate for about 2 minutes before adding the coconut milk. In a separate bowl, whisk together coconut milk and cornstarch. Stir this mixture into the pot. Once everything is mixed well together, let it boil, then lower to a simmer for 10-15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste and adjust seasonings if needed. Spoon rice to one side of the pineapple bowl and the chickpea tikka masala to the other side of the pineapple bowl. Top with fresh chunks of pineapple and sprinkle with cilantro.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 cup basmati rice 1 ½ cups water or low sodium vegetable broth 1 Tbsp. vegan butter 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 large yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, sliced thin 1 Tbsp. garam masala 2 tsp. cumin 2 tsp. coriander 2 tsp. tikka masala 1 tsp. ground ginger 2 tsp. paprika 1 ½ tsp. turmeric dash of cayenne pepper salt/pepper to taste 2, 15 oz. cans of organic chickpeas 2 cups marinara sauce 1, 15 oz. can full fat coconut milk 2 tsp. cornstarch or arrowroot powder for thickness 1-2 pineapples, cut lengthwise and meat scooped out fresh cilantro to top

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 293; protein 9 g; fat 10 g; carbs 43 g. 

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  133 


Crispy Harissa Chickpea Power Bowls

North African spices warm this energy packed delight RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A S I M P S O N Culinary Nutrition Expert, Holistic Wellness Coach in Vancouver, B.C. MYFRESHPERSPECTIVE 

MFPBYANGELA 

MYFRESHPERSPECTIVEBLOG

O

ne of my go-to meals is a hearty power bowl, and these Crispy Harissa Chickpea Power Bowls are a perfect example. Harissa is a North African version of hot sauce. It is generally made of paprika, cayenne, sea salt, olive oil, acerola berry, cumin, sumac, garlic, coriander and other spices. The chickpeas are tossed in a saucy mix of olive oil and harissa, then roasted in the oven until golden-crisp. They’re the crunch nestled among warm spiced sweet potatoes, citrusy rice, veggies, pistachios, pepitas, fresh herbs and (for an unexpected sweet twist) finely chopped dates. Don’t be put off by the longish ingredients list – the moment you taste your first bite, I know you’ll agree it was worth the wait!

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CHICKPEAS

Preheat the oven to 400 F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, coat the chickpeas in olive oil and harissa. Scatter them on the baking sheet and roast for 20-30 minutes, shaking occasionally, or until crispy. Toss the sweet potato in olive oil and spices. Scatter them on a second lined baking sheet. Roast for about 30 minutes, shaking occasionally, until lightly crisped on the edges. Boil the rice in water/vegetable stock according to package directions. While the rice cooks, toss everything, except the spinach, together in a large bowl. Whisk together the dressing and use 1-2 Tbsp. to dress the shredded spinach. Divide it among 3-4 bowls. Once the rice is cooked, drain excess liquid off and stir it into the veggies along with 3 Tbsp. dressing. Divide this between the bowls. Finally, arrange the roasted sweet potatoes and chickpeas on top of the rice and spinach. Serve with extra dressing on the side to use as needed.

• • •

2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbsp. harissa paste 2 cups cooked chickpeas

FOR THE ROASTED SWEET POTATOES

• • • • •

3 cups peeled, diced sweet potatoes 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. ground cumin

FOR THE REST

• • • • • • • • • •

¾ cup uncooked rice 1 ½ cups water or low sodium vegetable stock 1 medium carrot, shredded or julienne cut 1 red bell pepper, finely diced ¼ cup finely chopped pitted dates 2 Tbsp. shelled pistachios 2 Tbsp. pepitas (pumpkin seeds) 2 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh parsley and mint 2 Tbsp. finely chopped mint 2 cups shredded baby spinach

FOR THE CITRUS VINAIGRETTE (YOU MAY HAVE LEFTOVERS)

• • • • •

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⅓ cup extra virgin olive oil ⅓ cup freshly squeezed orange juice 1 Tbsp. maple syrup ½ tsp. cumin a few generous pinches of sea salt

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 947; protein 26 g; fat 36 g; carbs 143 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  135 


Same, Same But Different Thai Curry

Boost your metabolism & lose weight — deliciously BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

T

his delicious curry dish comes with several health benefits. First, it’s packed full of wonderful vegetables that are essential for healthy digestion. The next benefit comes from the coconut — both coconut oil and milk are high in medium chain triglycerides, fatty acids that have shown to boost metabolism and promote healthy weight loss. The sweet potatoes and carrots will provide you with the sense of satisfaction and keep your energy at an ideal level. An awesome homemade Thai curry, made entirely from scratch — no packaged curry pastes required! This yellow curry is rich and flavourful. Leftovers make perfect weekday lunches. Serves 2-3

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • •

Heat the oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add the turmeric and cumin seeds and cook until the seeds sizzle, about 30 seconds. Add the onion and cook until caramelized, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and ginger and cook another 2 to 3 minutes, again keeping an eye on it and stirring as needed. Add the cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, cayenne, salt, carrots, potatoes, coconut milk, and water. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes, covered. Add the peas and red pepper. Continue to simmer, covered, for an additional 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Remove from the burner and stir in the tahini and maple syrup. Serve with basic green salad or on a bed of wild rice.

• • • • • •

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 969; protein 25 g; fat 73 g; carbs 50 g. 

Courtesy of Vegan Weight Loss Manifesto, An 8-Week Plan to Change Your Mindset, Lose Weight and Thrive by Zuzana Fajkusova & Nikki Lefler © 2020 Reprinted with permission.

136  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020

DARINA KOPCOK

• • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. (30 ml) coconut oil ¼ tsp. turmeric 1 Tbsp. (5g) cumin seeds 1 large onion, sliced 3 garlic cloves, minced 3-inch (7 cm) piece of ginger, peeled, grated and minced ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ½ tsp. ground cardamom ½ tsp. ground cloves ¼-½ tsp. cayenne pepper ¾ tsp. Himalayan sea salt 2 large carrots, peeled and sliced 2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed 1 (13.5 oz.) can coconut milk 1 cup water 1 cup fresh or frozen green peas 1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped ⅓ cup tahini 1 Tbsp. maple syrup (or stevia to taste)

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138  Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020


Thai Drunken Noodles (Pad Kee Mao) You’ll be swooning over the intense flavour of this spicy dish RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E S S I C A H O F F M A N – Founder & food blogger at Choosing Chia in Montreal, QC CHOOSINGCHIA

T

ake-out Thai noodles can be pricey, greasy and often not so healthy. Once you make this recipe at home you’ll never want to order take-out again! These noodles are loaded with flavour, simple to make and come together in less than 30 minutes for a quick and easy meal everyone will love! There are a few different theories as to why this dish is called drunken noodles. One theory is that the original dish was so spicy it would leave you feeling dizzy and kind of ‘drunk.’ Another theory suggests this is a favourite dish to eat in Thailand after an evening of drinking. You can find most of the ingredients at your local Asian grocery store. Two of the key elements in this dish are Thai basil and fresh chili peppers. Don’t skip out on these ingredients! Thai drunken noodles are also traditionally made with wide rice noodles. You can buy these fresh at the Asian grocery store, or dried at most other food stores. Either will work well. Serves 2-3

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • •

8 oz. wide rice noodles 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil 3 garlic cloves, minced 1-inch cube of ginger, minced 1 Thai chili, finely chopped (or more if you like it really spicy) 1 small onion, chopped 1/2 red pepper, chopped 2 large handfuls of Thai basil leaves 1 green onion, sliced crushed peanuts and a lime wedge to top (optional)

SAUCE

• • • •

1 Tbsp. dark soy sauce 1 Tbsp. soy sauce 2 Tbsp. vegetarian oyster sauce 1 Tbsp. coconut sugar (can sub agave or maple syrup) • 1 Tbsp. water

DIRECTIONS Cook the rice noodles in a pot of hot water for 2-3 minutes until al dente. They should be a bit hard in the center, and not cooked fully through. Heat the vegetable oil in a large pan on medium-high heat. Add the garlic and chili pepper and cook for 1 minute, then add the ginger, onion and pepper and let cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the noodles to the pan tossing together and letting cook for 2 minutes, until the noodles start to brown on the bottom slightly. Reduce the heat to medium and add the sauce and Thai basil leaves mixing everything together. Lastly, fold in the green onion and mix together, letting cook for 1 minute. Serve immediately.

NOTES Make sure to use Thai basil (also known as holy basil) in this recipe! It’s not the same as regular basil and can be found at your local Asian grocery store. Use a large pan to make this recipe to give the ingredients enough space to caramelize. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 300; protein 6 g; fat 9 g; carbs 48 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  139 


Thai Basil Tempeh Stir-Fry

A quick & easy go-to for those busy days RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E S S I C A H O F F M A N Founder & food blogger at Choosing Chia in Montreal, QC CHOOSINGCHIA

B

ring the flavours of Thailand right into your home kitchen! This Thai basil tempeh stir-fry recipe is a healthier vegan version of traditional ‘pad krapow gai’ dish and is loaded with bold Thai flavour.

Serves 3-4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

STIR-FRY

Place the block of tempeh in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil, then cover and let simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the tempeh from the pan. This step is important to remove any bitter flavour the tempeh might have! Add the tempeh to a food processor and pulse until chopped into small bits. Heat the vegetable oil in a non-stick pan on medium-high heat, then add the tempeh and let cook for 2-3 minutes. Move the tempeh around with a wooden spoon so it doesn’t stick. Reduce heat to medium and add the green onions, garlic and Thai basil. Stir together. Add all the sauce ingredients to the pan and mix together. Taste the tempeh after adding the sauce and adjust accordingly. Depending on your tempeh and amount, you may need a little more soy sauce, maple syrup, spice… etc. Serve on top of jasmine rice and top with crushed cashews.

• • • • • • •

1 block of tempeh (approx 200g) 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil 2 green onions, chopped 3 garlic cloves, chopped 1/2 cup Thai basil, finely chopped crushed cashews for topping 1 cup of jasmine rice, cooked according to package directions

SAUCE

• • • • •

2 Tbsp. vegetarian oyster sauce 1 Tbsp. light soy sauce 1 Tbsp. dark soy sauce 1 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 tsp. sambal oelek (or sriracha)

NOTES Sometimes tempeh can have a slightly bitter flavour. Steaming it before cooking helps to get rid of this bitterness. It also softens the tempeh so it can more easily absorb the sauce in this recipe! If you can’t find vegetarian oyster sauce you can substitute hoisin sauce.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 463; protein 23 g; fat 19 g; carbs 54 g. 

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Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  141 


Vegan Fried Rice A versatile choice loaded with protein

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E S S I C A H O F F M A N – Founder & food blogger at Choosing Chia in Montreal, QC CHOOSINGCHIA

T

his vegan fried rice with scrambled tofu is a healthy take on fried rice that is loaded with veggies, edamame beans, and turmeric-scrambled tofu instead of eggs! Enjoy this proteinloaded veggie dish for dinner or as a side. Vegan fried rice is a great one-pan recipe that combines grains, proteins and veggies for a balanced meal that is easy to make.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SCRAMBLED TOFU

Heat the avocado oil in a non-stick pan on medium-high heat. Crumble the tofu with your hands and add to the pan, letting cook for 2-3 minutes on each side. Add the turmeric and soy sauce and toss together. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside. Heat the remaining 2 tsp. avocado oil in a pan, then add the onion and cook for 2 minutes. Add the garlic, carrot and celery and cook for another 4-5 minutes on medium heat, until the carrots are tender. Next, add the peas, brown rice, soy sauce, sesame oil, vegetarian oyster sauce, sriracha and scrambled tofu and mix until combined. Let sit and cook for 1-2 minutes to allow the bottom layer of rice to get a little crispy. Remove from heat and serve.

• • • •

FRIED RICE

Serves 4

NOTES • •

• •

Cook the rice ahead of time to save time prepping this recipe. Make sure not to overcook the rice before adding it to the pan! The rice will continue to cook up a bit once it’s in the pan with the veggies. Use a good quality organic firm tofu. Let the rice cook a bit in the pan without mixing it so the bottom can crisp up.

2 tsp. avocado oil (or vegetable oil) 1/2 pack of medium-firm tofu (about 200 g) 1/4 tsp. turmeric powder 1/4 tsp. soy sauce (gluten-free if needed)

• • • • • • • • • •

1 cup brown rice, cooked according to package directions (can substitute any rice) 2 tsp. avocado oil 1 onion 2 garlic cloves 1 large carrot, cut into cubes 1 celery stalk, cut into cubes 1/2 cup cooked peas 1 Tbsp. soy sauce 1 tsp. sesame oil 1 Tbsp. vegetarian oyster sauce (or hoisin sauce) 1 tsp. sriracha

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 450; protein 17 g; fat 8 g; carbs 70 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine


Quinoa Stuffed Spaghetti Squash A new twist for your taste buds that’s satisfying & tasty

BY J OY M c C A R T H Y – Founder of Joyous Health, Certified Holistic Nutritionist & author in Toronto, ON JOYOUSHEALTH 

JOYOUSHEALTH.CA

Courtesy of The Joyous Cookbook by Joy McCarthy / Penguin Randomhouse © 2019. Reprinted with permission.

T

his is a recipe that can be the main course for two people or a side for four. When I make this for four people, I usually cut the squash in half width-wise once it’s cooked. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

1 large spaghetti squash or 2 small, cut in half lengthwise, seeds removed 1 Tbsp. coconut oil ½ large red onion, finely chopped 1 bunch dino kale, chopped into bite-size pieces 1 1/2 cups quinoa 3 cups water ½ cup fresh parsley, chopped ½ cup pomegranate seeds 1/4 cup pecans, chopped 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/4 tsp. ground allspice 4 Tbsp. green onion, chopped 1-2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil Sea salt and pepper to taste

OPTIONAL

¼ cup crumbled feta or vegan cheese

WALKER JORDAN

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400º F (205º C). Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet with the flesh side down. Add a touch of water, so the squash doesn’t dry out. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until the squash is fork tender. The squash is ready once it easily scrapes away from the skin with a fork. Be careful not to overcook. Add quinoa to a pot of water. Bring to a soft boil and reduce to a simmer for

IMPACT Magazine

15 minutes or until the quinoa is easily fluffed with a fork. Once the quinoa is cooked, transfer to a large bowl. Meanwhile, melt coconut oil in a pan and saute onions until tender. Add kale and cook for only 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat and add to quinoa along with the fresh parsley, pomegranate seeds, pecans and spices. Mix together with green onions, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt

and pepper as you like. Cover bowl to keep warm while you wait for squash to finish cooking. Once the squash is ready, remove from the oven and scoop warm quinoa stuffing into each half. Top with cheese if using. Serve immediately while it's still warm. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 488; protein 13 g; fat 22 g; carbs 64 g. 

March/April 2020  143 


Spicy Tropical Curry Kelp Noodles

A delicious mix, including mixed baby greens, candied citrus walnuts & pecans RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

PACHAVEGALIVING

Serves 4-6

INGREDIENTS SALAD

• • • • • • • • •

1 cup green beans, trim ends and cut into 1 ½-inch segments (steam for 1 minute) 1/2 cup carrots, shredded 1/2 cup beets, shredded 1/2 cup papaya, julienned 1/2 cup mango, julienned 10 cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bag of kelp noodles, rinsed and cut with kitchen shears a handful of mixed baby greens Garnish: cilantro leaves, Thai basil leaves, pea shoots

SPICY PINEAPPLE SAUCE

• • • • • • • •

½ cup fresh pineapple ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp. lime juice 1 Tbsp. tamari ½ Tbsp. Dijon mustard 1 tsp. curry powder 1 garlic clove, minced 1 Thai red chili, seeds removed

CANDIED CITRUS WALNUTS & PECANS

• • •

• • • •

1 cup pecans 1 cup walnuts ¼ cup simple syrup (3 Tbsp. water, 2 Tbsp. succanat or coconut sugar, simmer on low heat, stir until dissolved) 1 tsp. lime zest 1 tsp. orange zest Pinch of cayenne Pinch of pink salt

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 545; protein 8 g; fat 47 g; carbs 31 g.

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DIRECTIONS SALAD

CANDIED CITRUS WALNUTS & PECANS

Toss all ingredients together in a large bowl and coat generously with Spicy Pineapple Sauce. Mix with tongs and serve with a handful of coarsely chopped cilantro, basil, fresh pea shoots and candied citrus walnuts and pecans on top.

Toss nuts in a bowl with the simple syrup and mix in other ingredients, line parchment paper on a baking tray and toast nuts for 15 minutes at 350 F. Flip nuts every 5 minutes until toasted, but not blackened. For truly raw nuts, instead of baking, spread the nuts on Teflex sheets and dehydrate for 12 hours at 115 F, flipping after 4 hours. Whatever you don't eat, store in a mason jar for snacking. 

SPICY PINEAPPLE SAUCE

Add all the above to a high-speed blender and blend until smooth.

IMPACT Magazine


Pasta With Chickpeas + Kale Tomato Sauce RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A  KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

T

FOODBYMARIA2014

his gorgeous pasta recipe is exactly what you need if you are a carbaholic but still want to get in them plant-based protein gains. It is also sugar free, dairy free, nourishing, healthy, filled with warming spices, energizing and adds a twist of Greek!

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

¾ of a box of pasta 4 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) 1 white onion, chopped 2 cloves of garlic, grated 1 can of chickpeas, strained and washed 1 tsp. salt 1 Tbsp. pepper 1 tsp. garlic powder

• • • • • • •

½ tsp. of cloves ½ tsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. basil, dried 1 heaped tsp. tomato paste 1 cup fresh crushed tomatoes 1 ½ cups water 2 cup kale, washed and chopped into chunks

DIRECTIONS Organize and prep all ingredients and set aside. In a medium-sized pot heat olive oil, being careful not let it smoke. Add onions and pop that lid on. Decrease your temp to low and sweat out those onions for 5-10 minutes. Season onions with salt, pepper, cloves, cinnamon and basil. Add the garlic and simmer for another 2 minutes. Keep stirring. Your kitchen smells like heaven at this point. Stir in the chickpeas and cover the pot again for 5 minutes. Into a large jar add your paste, crushed tomatoes and water. Stir well and add to your pot. Let this simmer for 15 minutes, but longer is better! Time to work on our pasta. Boil the water, throw in your pasta, simmer till cooked and strain. I like the pasta al dente in this dish! Add pasta back to pot and add olive oil to keep it from sticking. Back to the sauce pot. Check on your mixture and if it is getting a bit thicker and the chickpeas are soft, it is ready. Remove from heat and stir in the washed kale. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 415; protein 26 g; fat 15 g; carbs 100 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  145 


Easy Vegan Ricotta & Spinach Stuffed Shells

Celebrate a great run with this amazing pasta dish BY C H R I S P E T R E L L E S E – Food blogger at Sweet Simple Vegan in Los Angeles, CA SWEETSIMPLEVEG

L

oaded with vegan ricotta and spinach, and topped with vegan cheese and homemade marinara sauce, these vegan stuffed shells are a yummy entree that everyone will love. Serves 4

INGREDIENTS STUFFED SHELLS

• • • • • • • • • • •

20-25 jumbo pasta shells 1 flax egg (1 Tbsp. flaxseed meal + 3 Tbsp. water) 7 oz. frozen baby spinach leaves 16 oz. vegan ricotta cheese (see ingredients and recipe below) 2 cups shredded vegan mozzarella cheese 2 tsp. finely chopped fresh parsley 2 tsp. finely chopped fresh basil 1 tsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes (optional)

TOFU RICOTTA CHEESE

• • • • • • • • •

14 oz. firm tofu 3 cloves garlic, finely minced Juice of 1/2 small lemon 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 1/2 Tbsp. white miso paste ½–1 tsp. salt, or to taste Black pepper, to taste 1-2 tsp. dried basil, oregano, parsley or Italian seasoning (optional)

TOPPING

• • •

1/2 cup vegan mozzarella cheese 3 cups marinara sauce (see sidebar) Fresh chopped parsley and/or basil, for garnish

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DIRECTIONS TOFU RICOTTA CHEESE

Drain excess liquid from tofu (do not press). Break into small pieces and add to food processor with remaining ricotta ingredients and process until smooth and creamy. Scrape sides as needed. STUFFED SHELLS

Preheat oven to 400°F. Prepare flax egg by mixing flaxseed meal and water in a small bowl and setting it aside for 10-15 minutes to thicken. Cook pasta shells, drain and set aside. Thaw frozen spinach and gently squeeze water out. Add ricotta to a large bowl along with prepared flax egg, spinach, shredded vegan mozzarella, parsley, basil, onion powder, salt, black pepper and red pepper flakes. Mix and set aside for filling. Pour half of the marinara sauce into the bottom of a 9 x 13” baking dish, spreading it evenly. To stuff the shells, either fill them with a spoon or place ricotta filling into a piping bag and pipe into shells. Fill about 24 shells up with roughly 1 1/2 Tbsp. of filling each. Add the rest of the sauce on top of the shells and sprinkle 1/2 cup of vegan mozzarella cheese on top. Cover dish with foil and place in oven. After 20 minutes, remove cover, reduce heat to 375° F and continue cooking for 10-15 minutes. Remove from oven and top with freshly chopped parsley and/or basil. Serve warm. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 430; protein 20 g; fat 28 g; carbs 34 g.

Homemade Marinara Sauce INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • • • •

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 6 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 large onion, finely chopped (1 1/4 cups) 2 (28-ounce) cans whole peeled tomatoes 1 dried bay leaf 3 Tbsp. tomato paste 20 fresh basil leaves, roughly chopped 2 tsp. dried oregano 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper 1 tsp. kosher salt Black pepper, as desired

DIRECTIONS Add olive oil to a large pan over medium heat. Once warmed, add the onion and garlic then sauté until onions are translucent and garlic is fragrant. Next, add canned tomatoes (with juice), and gently break them apart using a wooden spoon or potato masher. Add in all of the remaining ingredients and discard until uniform. Simmer uncovered on low for 20 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat and remove the bay leaf. Taste and adjust seasonings as desired before serving. 

JASMINE BRIONES

SWEETSIMPLEVEGAN 


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Mac & Cheese with Garlic Spinach Garlic spinach brings life to this comfort food staple BY J U L I E P I AT T – Vegan chef, author of This Cheese is Nuts: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home in Malibu, CA SRIMATITK 

SRIMATI

Serves 4

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • •

Wash the spinach in a salad spinner. Heat the olive oil in a cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add the shallot and brown. Add the garlic and stir with a wooden spoon. Add the spinach and sauté until it is wilted and infused with the garlic and onion. Drain the cashews. In the pitcher of a Vitamix, place the cashews, miso, lemon juice, salt, garlic powder, pepper, nutritional yeast, and 1 cup boiling water. Blend on medium for 2 minutes or until thickened and creamy. Adjust the seasonings to taste. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the gluten-free pasta according to the package directions. Drain the pasta in a colander and rinse with hot water. Transfer the pasta to a large serving dish. Pour the cashew cheese sauce over the pasta and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Arrange the spinach in a mound on top. Season with pepper and a pinch of salt.

• • • •

1 cup raw cashews 2 cups fresh spinach 1 Tbsp. olive oil ½ shallot, sliced 1 garlic clove, minced ¼ cup chickpea miso paste 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 tsp. Celtic sea salt, plus more as needed ½ tsp. garlic powder ¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper, plus more for a garnish 1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 1 package gluten-free pasta

Easy Pre-Prep Place the cashews in filtered water in a small bowl. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

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Nutrition facts per serving Calories 579; protein 19 g; fat 18 g; carbs 90 g. 

Courtesy of This Cheese is Nuts: Delicious Vegan Cheese at Home by Julie Piatt / Avery, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC © 2017 Reprinted with permission.

LEIA VITA MARASOVICH

INGREDIENTS

IMPACT Magazine


PA I R CT E

F PE THE

R

PA STA E FAG I OLI Prep Time: 10 Minutes Cook Time: 20 Minutes

4 Servings 6 cups/1.5 L

ingredients

directions

PA STA

1.

1/2 lb (250 g) long noodle pasta (Linguine, Spaghetti, Tagliatelle) 1 tsp (5 mL) salt

2.

SAU C E 1/4 cup (60 mL) olive oil 2 shallots, finely sliced 1 yellow or orange pepper, sliced 1 small or medium zucchini, sliced 1/4 cup (60 mL) sliced sun-dried tomatoes in oil 1/4 cup (60 mL) pitted black olives, halved 1 can (14 oz/398 mL) Great Northern or Cannellini beans, drained & rinsed 1/4 cup (60 mL) prepared basil pesto Grated Parmesan cheese, to taste Fresh chopped parsley, to garnish Fresh ground pepper, to taste

3.

4.

In a large pot boil 8 cups (2 L) water, add pasta and salt, and cook according to package directions. Reserve 1 cup (250 mL) pasta water when draining. In a deep saucepan, gently heat olive oil over medium. Add shallots and pepper and stir fry for about 2 minutes. Add zucchini and cook an additional minute. Stir in sun-dried tomatoes and olives. Drain cooked pasta, reserving 1 cup (250 mL) pasta water. Add pasta and beans to the vegetables and toss with the pesto, adding a little pasta water to keep mixture slightly “saucy�. Serve into individual shallow bowls and top with Parmesan, parsley and pepper.

nutrients PE R SE RVING (1 1/2 cups/375 mL) 560 Calories, 26 g Fat, 4 g Saturated Fat, 3 mg Cholesterol, 67 g Carbohydrate, 8 g Fibre, 5 g Sugar, 17 g Protein, 413 mg Sodium, 760 mg Potassium, 353 mcg Folate, 5 mg Iron

ALBERTA PULSES - GOOD FOR FOOD AND FOR YOU! For more great pulse recipes with beans, peas, lentils and chickpeas, visit www.albertapulse.com.


Red Beet Borscht with Cashew Sour Cream Warming winter soup a boost for your body RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

PACHAVEGALIVING

T

his warming winter soup is a powerhouse of nutrition with intense yet deliciously balanced flavours. The sprouted lentils provide a high concentration of healthy plantbased proteins and vitamin C, much needed during the holiday season. The miso paste and fermented kimchi are loaded with a multitude of probiotics to enhance healthy gut bacteria and keep your immune system functioning at its optimal level. The beets help improve blood circulation and enhance red blood cells because of their high iron content. Add a dollop of cashew sour cream on top to make this dish pop.

Cashew Sour Cream INGREDIENTS • • • •

1 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight and drained ¼ cup water 1 to 2 tsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. lemon juice

DIRECTIONS Blend in a high-speed blender until creamy and smooth. Add more water if necessary.

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INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SALAD

Combine all salad ingredients in a large bowl and mix well with tongs. Mix broth ingredients in 2 cups boiling hot water until dissolved. Divvy out the salad mixture in individual bowls then pour the miso mixture over top of each. Fill the bowls with the rest of the hot water and garnish with a dollop of cashew sour cream, a spoonful of kimchi, green onion and dill. Alternatively, you may blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender for a unique creamy soup. If this is the case, add 2 cups of room-temperature water before blending then blend for 4 minutes until steamy. Once in bowls, add the rest of the hot water and stir by hand. Garnish the same as above.

• • • • • •

3 large red beets, peeled and shredded ½ head Napa cabbage, chiffonade thin (shredded) 2 Fuji/Gala apples, shredded 4 carrots, shredded 1 cup sprouted wild rice 1 cup sprouted lentils

BROTH

• • • • •

6 Tbsp. miso paste 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. gluten-free tamari 1 tsp. allspice powder (Allspice aids circulation and digestion) 8 cups boiling hot water, divided

GARNISH

• • • • •

1 dollop of cashew sour cream ¼ cup minced fresh dill 2 green onions, thinly sliced A spoonful of kimchi Freshly ground pepper to taste

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 256; protein 12 g; fat 2 g; carbs 51 g. 


Lentil & Sweet Potato Shepherd’s Pie Wait lentil you try this legumedary dish

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N D R E W O L S O N – Creator of the One Ingredient Chef food blog in Los Angeles, CA ONEINGREDIENT 

ANDREWOLSON

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • • • •

Peel and chop sweet potatoes into small chunks. Place in a pot of water and boil for 15-20 minutes, depending on size. Chop carrots, onion and celery into small chunks. Add to a large skillet over medium heat with a tablespoon of water and allow to soften. Once veggies are softened, add lentils to the pan. Use any kind of lentils you like — dried (cook them yourself), canned (drained), or pre-made lentils. Preheat oven to 350F. Open cans of diced tomatoes (but do not drain them) and add along with a tablespoon of chopped (or dried) basil leaves, handful of

4 medium sweet potatoes ½ cup diced onions ½ cup diced celery ½ cup diced carrots 4 ½ cups prepared lentils 2 15 oz. cans diced tomatoes 2 Tbsp. soy sauce 1 Tbsp. basil + more for garnish ½ cup chopped spinach 2+ Tbsp. non-dairy milk Sea salt

chopped spinach and a splash of soy sauce. Simmer for 10-15 minutes while flavours mingle. When the sweet potatoes are soft, remove from heat and drain. Mash with a little salt and a splash of non-dairy milk until the consistency is perfect. Add lentil filling to a 9 x 13 pan and top with a layer of sweet potatoes. Bake for about 20 minutes until the topping becomes  slightly browned. Allow to cool before serving. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 360; protein 17 g; fat 7 g; carbs 60 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  151 


The Best Veggie Chili

Beans power pack this dish with protein RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I J E L A U N KOV I C H – Nutritionist & founder of Healthy Always food blog in New Zealand HEALTHYALWAYS 

HEALTHYALWAYSNZ

H

ere's a recipe for a damn tasty, colourful vegetarian/vegan friendly chili that will happily satisfy the tastebuds of even the most carnivorous of omnivores. It's packed full of flavour, while using super economical ingredients, so it’s the perfect plant-based dish for feeding a crowd on a budget. No matter how we choose to nourish ourselves, there's one thing that's for certain, we should all be including more plant-based foods into our diets. This vegetarian chili contains kidney beans and black beans, both of which are great sources of protein and fibre.

A common concern for vegans and vegetarians is protein intake. Protein is an essential macronutrient, needed in large amounts for good health. Certain amino acids (the building block of protein) are unable to be made by the body so we must get them from the foods we eat. Animal sources of food contain all of the essential amino acids and are known as "complete proteins," whereas plant proteins (aside from quinoa and soy) will always be missing at least one amino acid, and so are called "incomplete." This doesn't need to be an issue, as plant-based foods will contain different, yet complimentary, amino acids. When eaten together and in appropriate quantities, you get the full-spectrum of amino acids in your meal. With a well planned, balanced vegan diet you should receive enough protein to cover your needs. Typically when eaten with grain or starchy foods (e.g. brown rice, corn) and legumes (e.g. beans, peas and lentils) you will be eating a full set of amino acids (thus acting like a complete protein), as will nuts and seeds with legumes (e.g. crunchy seeds sprinkled overtop of a lentil salad). Here, I've paired legumes with corn and brown rice for a lovely balanced plant-based meal. Give it a go, it's quite delicious!

THE BEST VEGETARIAN CHILI Serves 6

INGREDIENTS • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

1 Tbsp. oil 1 brown onion 4 garlic cloves 1 1/2 Tbsp. chili seasoning (not chili powder - basic chili seasoning is blend of spices including paprika, cayenne pepper, garlic powder, onion powder) 1/2 Tbsp. ground cumin 1 1/2 tsp. dried oregano 1 red capsicum/pepper 1 carrot 2 x 400 g tin diced tomatoes 1 x 400 g tin kidney beans 1 x 400 g tin black beans 1 x 400 g tin corn kernels 1 tsp. salt, or to taste

DIRECTIONS Prepare your veggies - peel onion and chop finely, peel garlic and chop finely/crush, dice capsicum and grate carrot. Heat oil over a medium-low heat in a large frying pan. Sauté onions and garlic for 10 minutes or until onions are soft. Add chili seasoning, cumin and dried oregano, and sauté for one minute or until fragrant. Add capsicum and carrot, mix well, then sauté for a few minutes. Add tins of tomatoes and mix well. Open tins of beans and corn and drain excess liquid before giving them a good rinse in a sieve under running water. Add to frying pan, along with the salt and mix well. Cover and let simmer for 30 minutes, mixing occasionally. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 213; protein 10 g; fat 4 g; carbs 37 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine


Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  153 


Instant Pot Portobello Pot Roast The ultimate vegan one pot family meal

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY By M E L A N I E M C D O N A L D Vegan recipe developer, food photographer at A Virtual Vegan & cookbook author living in Victoria, B.C. AVIRTUALVEGAN

M

eaty portobello mushrooms, meltingly tender vegetables and a thick, rich and flavourful gravy to devour. This recipe is super quick and easy, tastes amazing and has minimal clean up. A big YES PLEASE on all counts for busy families. If you do not have an Instant Pot… Cook on the stove top instead. Follow the instructions but use a large soup pan and simmer on medium low until the potatoes are soft. Or, cook it in the oven. First, sauté in a pan on the stove top, then put everything (except sautéed mushrooms) into a casserole dish, cover and bake on 350°F for about 1.5 to 2 hours or until potatoes are soft. Thicken gravy as instructed, add mushrooms back and let it thicken in the oven for another 10 minutes before serving.

Serves 5

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

• •

2 Tbsp. olive oil, divided 5 large portobello mushrooms, sliced into chunky pieces 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped 5 large potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks (I cut each potato into about 5 pieces) 4 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1 inch chunks 1 ½ cups red wine

• • • • • • • • • •

¼ cup soy sauce or tamari 2 cups vegetable broth 1 tsp. salt , plus more to taste ½ tsp. black pepper, plus more to taste 1 Tbsp. sugar 4 Tbsp. all purpose flour water, to make a slurry 2 sprigs of fresh thyme 1 large sprig fresh rosemary 3 or 4 fresh sage leaves

LEFT Preparing all of your ingredients first, helps you stay organized and save time.

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IMPACT Magazine


6 QT. INSTANT POT DIRECTIONS *If your Instant Pot is a different size, scale recipe up or down accordingly. Set Instant Pot to sauté and add 1 Tbsp. of olive oil (or use a few tablespoons of water instead if you prefer cooking oil free). Add mushroom slices and cook until golden all over. Remove to a plate or bowl and set aside. Add remaining oil (or more water), and sauté onions until golden. It's important to get good colour on them because that's what adds lots of flavour. Once golden, turn off Instant Pot and immediately add garlic, stirring in and letting cook in residual heat. Add potatoes, carrots, wine, soy sauce, broth, sugar and seasonings then give it all a good stir. Really scrape into the bottom to get the brown mushroomy residue off and into gravy for extra flavour. Place your fresh herbs on top, close lid on the Instant Pot and seal it, then set to Manual (Pressure Cook on newer models), High Pressure for 15 mins. Once done, leave the pressure to release naturally. While waiting, make a slurry with the flour. Add water gradually to make a lump-free paste then add a little more, stirring constantly until pourable like cream. Once pressure has released, turn off Instant Pot, remove the lid and scoop out the herbs to discard. Turn Instant Pot to sauté and pour in slurry, stirring immediately to incorporate. Add mushrooms back in and stir gently again. The potatoes will be really soft and might break a little but that's ok. The potatoes taste best when soft. Give it a couple of minutes for the gravy to thicken a bit and the mushrooms to warm through, then serve. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 411; protein 10.4 g; fat 5 g; carbs 73 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  155 


Pot Pie

Onions, mushrooms & potatoes … oh my! RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M A R I A KO U T S O G I A N N I S Recipe developer & food blogger at FoodByMaria in Calgary, AB FOODBYMARIA 

FOODBYMARIA2014

T

his recipe is the perfect refuel for long distance runners and intense trainers. It is packed full of nutrients and carbs to keep you energized and on top of your training. It's vegan, but I bet you didn't expect these bad boys to have 22 g of protein per portion… well they do! This meal will also be popular at your next family gathering, even for your little ones and those pesky picky eaters. Serves 4

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INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp. vegan butter 1 medium sweet white onion, finely chopped 5 cups mushrooms, thinly sliced (crimini, white button, shittake) 3 garlic cloves, pressed 1 vegetable stock cube 2 sprigs of thyme, removed from stem and finely chopped 1 Tbsp. tamari or soy sauce 1 Tbsp. nutritional yeast

• • • • • • • • • • •

1 Tbsp. onion powder 1 Tbsp. coconut sugar ¼ tsp. cumin ¼ tsp. cloves dash of chili or chili flakes 2-3 Tbsp. lemon juice 2 Tbsp. corn starch or flour 1 ¾ cups coconut cream 2 cups steamed white potatoes, (with skins) cut into chunks 2 sheets puff pastry - thawed in fridge Meltable vegan cheese of choice


DIRECTIONS Start by steaming the potatoes. I like leaving the skins on and cutting them into bit size pieces. Cook until soft. Add oil and butter to a large pot on medium-low heat for about 30 seconds. Add onion and brown for about 5-7 minutes or until golden and soft. Stir occasionally to avoid burning. Add garlic and mushrooms to the pot and cook them down until reduced by ⅓ or until soft. This should take another 5 minutes. Once the mushrooms are cooked can add the stock cube, seasoning, soy sauce, nutritional yeast and spices. Stir this mixture until well combined. Add the lemon juice and corn starch. Using a spatula, stir aggressively to make sure the flour is well combined and coated to the onions and mushrooms. If you spot clumps, use a fork to break them apart. Turn heat to high, add coconut cream and bring this mixture to a boil. Stir often to watch the consistency change and to avoid burning. Once the mixture is bubbling, turn heat to low, add steamed potatoes and simmer for around 5 minutes. Preheat oven to 400 F, line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. Grab your mini dutch oven pots, grease them with oil and set aside. Cut each puff pastry sheet into 4 and place a little sheet on the base of each mini pot. Keep the corner of each sheet pulled over the pot so when filled with with the mixture and covered with the other puffed pastry sheet, it acts as a little pinch pocket. Once all your pots are lined with the pastry, add in the potato-and-mushroom mixture. Fill to the top and grate some of your favourite cheese on top. Cover with the other puff pastry sheet and pinch the sides. Brush with oil or melted butter before cooking on baking sheet for 20 minutes.

O n l i ne P l an t B a s e d N u tr i ti o n C o u r se

Revolutionize Your Health from the Comfort of Your Kitchen Take a deep dive into the holistic and nutritional benefits of the foods we eat while discovering a plethora of delicious recipes! This comprehensive online plant-based nutrition certificate course will guide you through everyday food preparation skills, how to prepare nutritious meals and shift your lifestyle towards abundant health.

Visit us online and register today!

www.pachavegaculinaryinstitute.com

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 962; protein 22 g; fat 51 g; carbs 112 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  157 


Holiday Stuffed Squash Nosh on this dish and make any night a celebration

BY J O R DA N WAG M A N – James Beard-nominated chef & author of five cookbooks based in Toronto, ON CHEFJORDANWAGMAN

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • • •

Buttercup, pumpkin or sugar mama squash, about 2 1/2 -3 lbs, cleaned and dry 2 red peppers, rinsed and dried* 6 shallots, whole, unpeeled 1 lb oyster mushrooms, roughly chopped* 1 lbs chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and cut in half lengthwise* 6 sprigs fresh thyme 6 leaves fresh basil 1 Tbsp. sea salt 3 Tbsp. olive oil, divided

CHEF JORDAN’S TIPS* To save time, you could use quality store-bought roasted red peppers. Any mushroom will work in this recipe but my favorites are chanterelles, morels, oyster and cremini mushrooms.

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DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to (convection bake) 275° F. Place squash on a baking sheet and place in oven. Bake until a knife easily pierces the top of the squash, about one hour. Remove squash from heat and cool to room temperature. Using a sharp knife cut a ‘lid’, about 3 inches in diameter, exposing the inner flesh. Using a spoon, remove and discard the seeds from the inside of the squash and around the lid. Place the cover back onto the squash and set aside. Place red peppers in a sauté pan and drizzle with 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Toss well to coat and heat oven to 400° F. Roast the peppers, turning often, until skins are separating from the flesh, about 35-45 minutes. Remove from heat and transfer to a bowl to cool to room temperature. Place a strainer over a bowl and remove the skins from the flesh. Discard skins and seeds and combine remaining juice with peppers and set aside. Place shallots in an oven-proof pan and cover with a tight fitting lid. Cook at 400° F until soft to the touch, about 35-45 minutes.

Remove from heat and cool. Remove outer skins and set aside. Warm a large sauté pan over high heat. Add remaining olive oil, mushrooms and fresh thyme and toss to coat in oil. Turn heat to medium and sauté mushrooms until soft, about 5 minutes. Season with 1 tsp. of salt and mix. Discard thyme sprigs and set aside. To assemble, place peeled shallots and any residual liquid in the bottom of the squash. Evenly spread the shallots to create a layer, and season with 1 tsp. of salt. Next, evenly spread the roasted peppers to cover the shallots and season with remaining salt. Pour residual juice onto the peppers. Lastly, place mushrooms into the squash and cover with the lid. Place squash in oven at 350° F until warmed through, about 30-40 minutes. Remove lid and garnish with fresh basil. Serve immediately. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 988; protein 64 g; fat 10 g; carbs 137 g. 

ANDREW HIORTH

T

his main course will impress your friends and family during any holiday season. Filling and delicious, this is a satisfying choice.


Seasonal Roasted Vegetables with Chimichurri Enjoy this satisfying veggie-filled dish RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULIE ZEITLHUBER – Nutritionist, scientist & foodie at Ready To Nourish in Vancouver, B.C.  READYTONOURISH

A

utumn has arrived and I couldn't think of a better way to heat my place than with delicious roasted vegetable scents. In fact, roasted vegetables are one of my favorite foods. The chimichurri sauce contains parsley, cilantro, garlic, onion, lime, olive oil, and avocado. Traditionally it doesn't contain avocado, but I wanted it creamier, that's why I substituted half of the olive oil with half of an avocado. You can store it in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. Serves 2

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

ROASTED VEGETABLES

Preheat oven to 400° F Wash and chop vegetables (you can leave the skin of potatoes on.) Add them to a big bowl, drizzle with olive oil, salt, and chopped rosemary and toss to combine. Spread vegetables on two trays lined with baking paper. Bake for 30-40 minutes or until golden brown and tender (halfway through, flip, so that vegetables bake evenly.) Serve on a plate, add toasted nuts and seeds and drizzle chimichurri sauce on top or serve in a separate bowl.

• • • • • • • • • •

CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

• • • • • • • • •

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5 medium carrots 2 potatoes 1 sweet potato 1/4 of a red cabbage 1 yellow onion 1/2 a butternut squash 1 stalk fresh rosemary, chopped 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp. salt 1/2 cup mixed nuts and seeds, toasted 4 garlic cloves 1 serrano or jalapeño pepper, seeds and stems removed 1 cup packed cilantro, thick bottom stems cut off 1 cup (20 g) packed flat-leaf parsley, thick bottom stems removed 1/2 ripe avocado 1/4 tsp. salt, plus more to taste Juice of 1 lime 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil 2-3 Tbsp. water to thin

FOR CHIMICHURRI SAUCE

Add all ingredients into a blender and process until smooth. Scrape down sides as needed. Thin with water until a semi-thick (but pourable) sauce is formed. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 741; protein 14 g; fat 38 g; carbs 97 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Savory Holiday Sides Set your festive table with plant-based goodness RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY R I C H R O L L & J U L I E P I AT T – Vegan athlete & chef, authors of The Plantpower Way in Malibu, CA @RICHROLL / @SRIMATI 

@RICHROLL / @SRIMATI

GLUTEN-FREE STUFFING

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

This stuffing has lively, aromatic notes with fresh herbs, crisp celery, seaweed and hearty mushrooms. It’s an earthy stuffing with textures of the forest and a hint of the sea, buttressed by plenty of antioxidants.

• • •

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Cut the glutenfree bread loaves into ½-inch cubes. Spread them out evenly in a flat rectangular baking dish. Set aside. In a large saucepan, sauté the shallot and garlic in the oil over medium heat for 30 seconds, add the chopped celery and stir until the colour brightens. Add mushrooms and continue to sauté until brown and the juices have made a nice broth in the pan. Squeeze in the lemon, add the tamari and stir again. Turn the sautéed mixture out over the bread cubes. Sprinkle with the fresh herbs and seaweed and mix well. If needed, add the sea salt. Transfer to a large flat casserole dish. Add ½ cup of the filtered water. Cover the dish with aluminum foil or lid and bake for 30 minutes, until moist and heated through. Add the remaining ½ cup water, if needed.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 250; protein 8 g; fat 12 g; carbs 27 g.

• • • • • • • • •

Courtesy of The Plantpower Way by Rich Roll & Julie Piatt / Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company © 2015. Reprinted with permission.

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2 loaves gluten-free bread ½ shallot, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped 1 Tbsp. Macadamia nut oil or olive oil 4 celery stalks, with leaves, chopped 2 cups wild mushrooms, washed and stems removed ½ small lemon 1 Tbsp. gluten-free tamari 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh sage 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh thyme ¼ cup premium Atlantic organic seaweed, finely chopped 1 tsp. large-grain Celtic sea salt (optional) 1 cup filtered water

IMPACT Magazine


CANDIED GINGER ISLAND CRANBERRY SAUCE The aromatic ginger combined with cranberries makes this an exotic, lively twist on the traditional cranberry sauce.

Serves 10

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

2 (12-ounce) packages fresh cranberries ¼ cup filtered water 8 dates, soaked in filtered water for 30 minutes and pitted 1 cup candied ginger cubes Dash cinnamon

CAULIFLOWER MASHED POTATOES Cauliflower is an anti-inflammatory, heart-healthy flowering vegetable, incredibly nutritious, versatile and quite sweet. If you want to eat higher-quality, more nutritionally dense plants, then this is your kind of mashed.

Serves 10

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

In a small saucepan, simmer all the ingredients over medium heat until the cranberries and dates break down to form a sauce. Adjust the sweetness to taste. Cool and serve.

• • •

In a large steamer pot, steam the cauliflower until it’s tender, about 25 minutes. When ready, the colour will become a bit translucent and a knife will easily loosen the florets. You want the cauliflower to be soft enough to mash, so don’t understeam it, or you will have crunchy pieces in your mashed potatoes. While the cauliflower is steaming, boil the potatoes in water until a fork inserted slides in easily. Drain the potatoes and return to the pot. With the heat on low to draw any excess moisture out of potatoes, add the miso paste and start to cut the potatoes with a large knife crosswise repeatedly until all are cut in small sections. Turn off the heat and add the steamed cauliflower. Keep cutting crosswise in all directions until the cauliflower is well incorporated with the potatoes. Fold in the nutritional yeast, salt and pepper. Mix well and adjust for seasoning, adding more miso paste, if needed.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 88; protein 1 g; fat 0 g; carbs 23 g.

• • •

1 head cauliflower 5 pounds red potatoes ¼ cup chickpea, brown rice, or soybased miso paste, plus more if needed ¼ cup nutritional yeast 1 tsp. large-grain Celtic sea salt ⅛ tsp. fresh ground black pepper

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 317; protein 18 g; fat 2 g; carbs 60 g. 

IMPACT Magazine

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Harvest Veggie Wellington

A holiday main to sate your savoury cravings RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY Y V E S V E G G I E C U I S I N E Y VESVEGGIE

W

rapped in homemade vegan pie pastry, this take on a Wellington makes an impressive main dish for any special occasion. Makes 4 servings

INGREDIENTS VEGAN PIE PASTRY

• • •

1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour ¼ tsp. salt ⅔ cup cold vegan butter, cubed

DIRECTIONS FOR THE VEGAN PIE PASTRY

In large bowl, whisk together flour and salt; using a pastry blender or with fingertips, cut in vegan butter until mixture resembles coarse meal. Using fork, stir in ¼ cup cold water until dough comes together, stirring in up to 1 Tbsp. more water if needed. Divide dough into two portions; flatten into disks. Refrigerate in plastic wrap for at least 60 minutes. FOR THE WELLINGTON

WELLINGTON

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. vegan butter 1 onion, finely chopped ½ cup mushrooms, finely chopped 1 stalk celery, finely chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh sage 1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh thyme 1 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary 2 Tbsp. ground flax 1 Pkg. Veggie Ground Round ½ cup bread crumbs 1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard ½ tsp. each salt and pepper ¾ cup cranberry sauce, divided

Preheat oven to 425 F. In a skillet, heat vegan butter over medium heat; cook onion, mushrooms, celery and garlic, stirring occasionally for 5 to 7 minutes or until slightly softened. Stir in sage, thyme and rosemary; cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Let cool completely. In large bowl, mix together flax and 3 Tbsp. water; let stand for 5 minutes. Mix in onion mixture, ground round, bread crumbs, mustard, salt and pepper. On lightly floured work surface, roll each portion of dough into a 12" x 7" rectangle. Transfer each portion to baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Refrigerate for 15 minutes. Mound ground round mixture onto one pastry rectangle, leaving 1-inch border. Brush ⅓ cup cranberry sauce over top. Cap with remaining pastry, pressing together both sheets of pastry at edges to seal; roll and crimp border. Cut vent holes in top. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until pastry is golden brown and crisp. Let stand for 10 minutes before slicing. Serve with remaining cranberry sauce. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 555; protein 22 g; fat 13 g; carbs 82 g. 

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Desserts Almond Butter Cups

166

181

Double Chocolate Black Bean Cookies

A Better Butter Tart

168

182

Coconut Blueberry Baked Crumble

Pumpkin Spice Tarts

169

184

Baked Blueberry Cheesecake

Festive Vegan Mince Pies

170

186

Kiwi Lime Tarts

Snickerdoodles

172

187

Just the Bare Fruit Tarts

No-Bake Nanaimo Bars

173

188

Superfood Ice Cream Parfait

Raw Protein Cookie Balls

174

190

Raspberry Chia Jam Thumbprint Cookies

Raw Cacao Peppermint Bark

176

191

Vegan Chocolate Pudding

Gingerbread Cookies

177

192

No-Bake Double Chocolate Brownie Cake

Chocolate-Covered Turtles

178

194

Chocolate Cherry Dream Bars

Pine Needle Shortbread Cookies

179

195

Raw Afternoon Bliss Balls

Chocolate Christmas Cake

180

196

CANDICE HUTCHINGS

Peanut Butter Jelly Cups

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PEANUT BUTTER JELLY CUPS

Makes 6 regular or 10-12 mini cups

INGREDIENTS JELLY

• • • •

1 cup fresh or frozen raspberries (or any berries you'd like) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup or honey 3 Tbsp. water 1 heaped Tbsp. chia seeds

PEANUT BUTTER CUPS

• • •

⅔ cup smooth peanut butter ½ cup melted coconut oil 2 Tbsp. maple syrup

DIRECTIONS JELLY

Peanut Butter Jelly Time!

Raspberry chia jam adds a fruity burst to this treat BY DA N I J E L A U N KOV I C H Nutritionist & founder of Healthy Always food blog in New Zealand HEALTHYALWAYS 

ALANAH PATERSON BROWN

I

HEALTHYALWAYSNZ

was stuck deciding between making chocolate peanut butter cups or raspberry chia jam, when wha-bamn — I had a glorious peanut butter epiphany. Why not take those peanut butter cups and stuff them with the chia jam to make peanut butter jelly cups. The shell is a simple combination of peanut butter, coconut oil and a little sweetener and the jelly filling is an easy-to-whip-up raspberry chia jam. Preparing the cups are a little fiddly, with a few rounds of setting required for the various layers, but the whole process is very easy. Coconut oil is made of medium-chain fatty acids, which (along with longchain and short-chain fatty acids) serve as the building blocks of dietary fats and oils. Medium-chain fatty acids are

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easy for the body to digest and break down, making them great for those with digestive or malabsorption issues in the small intestines (such as in Crohn's disease). Fats play an imperative role in our health, with whole food sources offering many health benefits — they're an efficient fuel source, they're satiating, they help us absorb the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K, they're important for making hormones, they're great for our skin and hair, and they help protect our organs. My favourite sources are creamy avocados, nuts and seeds, coconut, olive oil, whole eggs, oily fish, chia seeds, butter and the occasional few pieces of dark chocolate … because chocolate = love.

Add raspberries, maple syrup and water to a small saucepan. Stir continuously over a low heat, until the mixture starts to bubble. Take off the heat and mix together with a potato masher. Add the chia seeds and stir well. Leave for a few minutes as the jam sets (or rather the chia seeds begin to swell up). Place jam into a bowl in the fridge to cool – it will continue to thicken. PEANUT BUTTER CUPS

Line a baking tray with mini or normal muffin cups. Mix all ingredients for the peanut butter cup until smooth. Use about half the mixture to fill each muffin cup ⅓ of the way up. Place the tray in the freezer for 10-15 minutes to harden. Spoon a bit of jelly on top of each peanut butter case, leaving a ring of peanut butter around the outside. Flatten the top using the back of a teaspoon. Divide and spoon the rest of the peanut butter mixture on top of the jam, until the jam is completely covered. Place tray in the freezer for 15 minutes or until hard. Enjoy!

NOTES Keep in the freezer as peanut butter and coconut oil will soften at room temperature and turn into a pile of gloop. When you want to eat them, remove from freezer and let them sit for five minutes or so to soften slightly. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 366; protein 7 g; fat 33 g; carbs 16 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  167 


Double Chocolate Black Bean Cookies Chewy treats filled with energy

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY DA N I J E L A U N KOV I C H – Nutritionist & founder of Healthy Always food blog in New Zealand HEALTHYALWAYS 

HEALTHYALWAYSNZ

I

am likely only fuelling the stereotype of weird things health nuts eat, but using black beans (or other beans for that matter) in desserts totally works. Many cultures around the world have been using beans in their desserts for generations with their superb nutritional profile, including fibre (for gut health), iron (for energy), B-vitamins (for stress support), and plant-based protein. When used as a base in baking, black beans create a moist, soft texture, which can be described as fudgey. Instead of a crunchy cookie, you get a lovely soft inside, which is really quite divine. Add all ingredients into a food processor, blitz up and you're good to go! I like to top these with a few chocolate chips/cacao nibs before baking and they're gorgeous with a drizzle of chocolate (They have to get their double chocolate name from somewhere.) So take your pick or, you could be cheeky like me and do both.

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INGREDIENTS • • • • • • • •

1 can (400g ) black beans ½ cup almond meal ⅓ cup cacao powder/ cocoa powder ⅓ cup pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. melted coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla essence 1 egg or flax egg Pinch of salt

OPTIONAL

dark chocolate chips/cacao nibs

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350F. Line baking tray with baking paper. Open can of black beans and drain. Hold under running water, until the water runs clear. Add into a food processor all the ingredients, except chocolate chips. Process until batter is smooth (try not to leave the food processor running for ages - best not to over-process the mixture).

Batter will be thick, with enough consistency to hold together. Remove blade and mix through a small handful of chocolate chips, reserving a few to sprinkle on top. Spoon tablespoons of mixture onto the baking tray - you should get around 10 cookies from the mixture. Drop a few chocolate chips on top. Bake for 12-14 minutes. Keep an eye on them in the last few minutes so they don't burn. Remove from oven and let cool completely - they will harden as they cool. Enjoy! Note: as these cookies are made up of a base of black beans (which are a moist ingredient) they will have a short shelf-life, and so are best eaten and shared on the day they're made. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 147; protein 5 g; fat 7 g; carbs 15 g. 


Coconut Blueberry Baked Crumble Inspire your palate

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N D R E A S A L I B A Holistic Nutritionist, Health Coach & Certification Fitness Instructor in Vancouver, B.C. ANDREA _ SALIBA.NUTRITION 

ANDREASALIBA.NUTRITION

I

am a firm believer in the power of the mind-body connection. Any goal someone has when it comes to their health or weight loss plan first must begin in the mind. Once people believe in their own capabilities and remove limiting beliefs about themselves, this is when a breakthrough can happen. They are more likely to feel motivated and inspired to eat nutritiously and stick to their plan. The body has the innate ability to heal itself and will do so if it is provided with the proper foods and supplements when aligned with a positive mindset. This delicious dessert could be eaten for breakfast. Loaded with quality fats and fibre with a dose of brain boosting properties from the blueberries. Top with vanilla ice cream or yogurt.

COCONUT BLUEBERRY BAKED CRUMBLE Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • • • • •

Place the oats, quinoa, vanilla, cinnamon, maple syrup and coconut oil into a mixing bowl. Combine well using your hands, ensuring the coconut oil is blended well into the mixture. Grease a 9 x 11 inch dish with a touch of coconut oil and spread the oat mixture into the dish until it is smooth and flat. Pour the blueberries, lemon zest and lemon juice into a separate bowl and lightly toss until evenly coated. Pour the blueberries over the oat mix. Bake at 375 F for 18-20 minutes. Top with shredded coconut and serve warm.

2 cups gluten free rolled oats 1 cup cooked quinoa ⅓ cup coconut oil, solid ½ tsp. vanilla extract ½ tsp. cinnamon 2 Tbsp. pure organic maple syrup 1 tsp. lemon zest 2 Tbsp. lemon juice ⅓ cup shredded organic unsweetened coconut 2 cups organic blueberries

Nutrition facts per serving (without ice cream or yogurt) Calories 254; protein 5 g; fat 14 g; carbs 30 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  169 


Baked Blueberry Cheesecake Cherish this dessert made without cheese

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L AU R E N T OYO TA Author of Vegan Comfort Classics: 101 Recipes To Feed Your Face & creator of the hot for food blog in Toronto, ON HOTFORFOOD 

HOTFORFOODBLOG

M

aking a vegan cheesecake that is indistinguishable from a cheese-cake made from actual cheese is no easy feat. But this is The One, guaranteed. Cherish it! I had all the biggest vegan skeptics I know try it just to be sure, and they didn’t even realize it was vegan. You can serve this tangy, creamy cake with any kind of fruit compote you want, but I’ll always have a soft spot for blueberries. Serves 10

INGREDIENTS CRUST

• • • •

1 cup rolled oats (not quick cooking) ½ cup packed brown sugar ½ tsp. sea salt 2 Tbsp. vegan butter, melted

FILLING

• • • • • •

1 cup raw cashews, soaked in hot water for 20 minutes 1 cup soft tofu 1 cup vegan cream cheese 1 cup granulated sugar ¼ tsp. grated lemon zest ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice

BLUEBERRY TOPPING

• • •

2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup granulated sugar

Courtesy of Hot for Food Vegan Comfort Classics by Lauren Toyota / Published by Penguin Canada, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. © 2018 Reprinted with permission.

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DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 350F. To make the crust, in a food processor, pulse the rolled oats into a flour. This should be a very fine mixture with no large pieces of oats. Add the brown sugar, salt, and melted butter and pulse until the mixture comes together. It should press together when you pinch it. Press the mixture in an even layer into the bottom of a 7 or 8-inch springform pan. You can also press it into an 8-inch square baking dish. You can line the dish with parchment paper for easy removal or you can serve the baked cheesecake directly from the dish. To make the filling, drain and rinse the cashews. Place in a high-powered blender with the remaining ingredients and blend until very smooth. Pour the filling on top of the crust. Bake for 45 minutes until the edges of the cheesecake are light golden brown. The centre might look a bit soft, but it will firm up upon cooling. Allow the cheesecake to cool completely. Refrigerate it for at least four hours or overnight. Once the cheesecake has chilled completely, remove the sides of the springform pan. Let the cake sit at room temperature for 30 minutes before serving. To make the topping, combine all the ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat. Simmer for six minutes. Let cool before serving over the cheesecake. There is enough blueberry compote to put a good portion on top of the cheesecake and have some extra to add to individual servings. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 365; protein 9 g; fat 14 g; carbs 52 g. 

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Kiwi Lime Tarts

A little birdie said these were delicious RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY H A N N A H S U N D E R A N I – Founder & creator of Two Spoons food blog in Toronto, ON TWOSPOONS.CA 

TWOSPOONSDOTCA

Makes 7 Tarts

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CRUST

FOR THE FILLING

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

1 cup almond pulp* or store bought almond meal 1 cup gluten-free oats ½ cup coconut oil ½ cup maple syrup 1 tsp. salt ½ tsp. cinnamon *Almond pulp is the leftover from making homemade almond milk.

1 cup soy yogurt 2 kiwis, peeled ½ avocado juice of 1 lime 4 Tbsp. maple syrup pinch salt

FOR THE TOPPING

• • •

more kiwi, chopped almonds, chopped coconut shavings

Preheat oven to 350 F. Blend together oats and almond pulp (or meal) in food processor. In saucepan, melt coconut oil on low heat, add agave syrup, salt and cinnamon, stir to combine. Pour liquid into oat mixture and blend until dough-like Create tart shells by pressing dough into the bottom of tart pans and up the sides. (I use seven 4-inch tart pans with removable bottoms). Make crust approx. ½ cm thick. Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden. Cool completely. In a blender add soy yogurt, kiwis, avocado, lime juice, maple syrup and salt. Blend until smooth. Scoop kiwi lime filling into tart shells. Top with more chopped kiwi, almonds, and coconut shavings. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 380; protein 3 g; fat 24 g; carbs 44 g. 

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Just The Bare Fruit Tarts

A burst of colour, flavour & natural sweetness RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E M I LY VO N E U W Best-selling author & award-winning food blogger at This Rawsome Life in Vancouver, B.C. THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE 

RAWSOMEVEGAN 

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

A

n ideal summer treat, these tarts are indeed mostly fruit, from the crust, to the filling, to the topping. Plus, we’ve got some hazelnutty goodness in there too to round things out. You can add whatever extra toppings you like to make these extra delicious and to suit your mood. I have been known to enjoy these tarts for breakfast and dinner. Let’s eat! Makes 3 tarts, 3-6 servings

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CRUST

CRUST

• • • • •

Line three tart tins with coconut oil, parchment paper, or plastic wrap. Pit the dates, then throw the dates, raisins, coconut oil and sea salt in a food processor. Process until you have a sticky dough, it should end up forming into one ball in the food processor. Just be patient, it can take a few minutes. Add the almond flour. Mix it in until you have a thick, sticky dough. Press evenly into the three lined tart tins. If the dough is too sticky, wet your hands a little to make it easier to work with. Put the tart crusts in the freezer until they are hard enough to take out of their tins. This might take 30-60 minutes.

3/4 cup dates 1/4 cup raisins 1/4 cup almond flour 1-2 Tbsp. coconut oil Pinch sea salt

FILLING

• • • •

2 bananas 2 Tbsp. hazelnut butter ¼ tsp. vanilla extract Pinch sea salt

TOPPING

• • •

1 cup fresh or frozen berries, or whatever fruit is in season 3 Tbsp. hazelnut butter, peanut butter or other nut or seed butter Coconut flakes, cacao nibs etc. as desired

FILLING

Peel the bananas, then mash them together with the rest of the filling ingredients in a bowl with a fork. It should end up being like a hazelnut butter banana pudding. Spread into your crusts. DECORATE

Top your tarts off with your berries, then drizzle on hazelnut butter. Add any other goodies and enjoy. These are best fresh, but can be stored in the freezer for 1-3 days. Nutrition facts per tart Calories 285; protein 4 g; fat 12 g; carbs 45 g. 

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Superfood Ice Cream Parfait

A dairy-free, vegan treat packed with nutrition BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA –  Personal wellness coach & vegan author in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

B

lending frozen bananas with fruits or superfoods of choice is the easiest way to have the creamiest ice cream in just a few minutes. This fruit-based treat is packed with protein, powerful nutrients and healthy fats for long-lasting energy and fullness. If you’ve never made banana ‘ice cream’ or tried chia seed pudding, now is the time! We’re putting them together in this delicious and super filling parfait. Enjoy it for lunch or a mid-day snack and you will be satisfied for hours. It’s also good for breakfast, or even a healthy treat. Don’t let the instructions fool you – it’s not nearly as complicated as it may look, we promise. You will need to freeze your bananas and make the chia seed pudding in advance. After that, everything comes together in 10 minutes.

STEP 1

STEP 3

FREEZE BANANAS

MAKE FRUIT ‘ICE CREAM’

DIRECTIONS

INGREDIENTS

Peel your bananas. For this recipe, we’re using two. Slice them into 1- to 2-inch chunks. Arrange banana chunks in a single layer in a glass container or freezer bag. Freeze for 2 hours or overnight. Frozen bananas are always great to have on hand for smoothies! Banana works in almost any smoothie recipe, and it gives a nice, creamy texture. TIP: The riper your bananas are, the sweeter they’ll be.

Serves 4

DIRECTIONS

PRE PARE CHIA SEE D PUDDING

INGREDIENTS • •

6 Tbsp. chia seeds 2 cups unsweetened almond milk

In a bowl or mason jar, combine seeds and milk. Once the mixture is well combined, let it sit for 5 minutes, give it another stir to break up any clumps of chia seeds, cover and put the mixture in the fridge to set up for 1-2 hours (or overnight).

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DIRECTIONS Place all ingredients in a high-speed blender and blend until smooth and creamy (think soft-serve texture). Use a rubber spatula to scrape down the sides of the blender, as needed.

STEP 4 A SS E MBLE YOUR PARFAIT! Divide the chia pudding between two glasses and top with a layer of the fruit ice cream. Garnish with fresh berries, lemon zest, or other toppings of choice, and enjoy! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 204; protein 5 g; fat 8 g; carbs 27 g.  NIKKI LEFLER

STEP 2

• • • •

2 ripe peeled bananas, cut into chunks and frozen (we did this in step 1) 1/4 cup fresh pineapple, cut into chunks 1/4 cup fresh or frozen mango 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 tsp. spirulina

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Pronut Ice Cream Sandwich 1 FoodGlow "Currently Too Legit" Chocolate Peanut Butter Pronut 1/2 cup non-dairy ice cream 1. Using a bread knife cut the Pronut lengthwise, separating it into halves. 2. Scoop about half a cup of your favorite non-dairy ice cream and spread on the bottom Pronut half. 3. Top with the second Pronut half and gently press down to seal it. 4. Smooth out any ice cream on the sides and place in the freezer for 20 minutes to set.

GLOW TIP: - dip half the sandwich in some melted dark chocolate for a little extra decadence! - bonus points if you make your own protein ice cream for the center (we have one on our instagram page)!

#LIVETHEGLOW WITH US ON INSTAGRAM

@food.glow

SHOP FOODGLOW PRODUCTS www.foodglow.ca Amita Massey Owner, Founder


Raspberry Chia Jam Thumbprint Cookies A berry delicious vegan treat

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E S S I C A H O F F M A N – Founder & food blogger at Choosing Chia in Montreal, QC CHOOSINGCHIA

T

hese vegan thumbprint cookies with raspberry chia jam only use a handful of ingredients and one bowl to make!

INGREDIENTS RASPBERRY CHIA JAM

SHORTBREAD COOKIE

• • •

1 cup fresh raspberries 1 1/2 Tbsp. maple syrup 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Makes 12

BELOW Substitute vanilla extract for almond extract as a flavour variation.

• • • • •

1/2 cup gluten-free oat flour (or 1/2 cup oats, pulsed in a food processor until fine) 1 cup almond flour pinch of salt 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted 3 Tbsp. maple syrup 1/2 tsp. almond extract

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Raspberry chia jam: in a small saucepan, cook down raspberries on medium-high heat for about 5-10 minutes. Once berries begin to bubble, reduce heat to medium-low, allow to cook for another 5 minutes. Add in maple syrup and chia seeds and cook another minute. Remove from heat and let cool. Prepare a baking pan with parchment paper, set aside. Cookies: in a bowl, combine coconut oil, maple syrup, almond extract. Add oat flour and almond flour. Mix until combined. Using hands, roll out small balls of dough and then slightly flatten into a patty onto baking pan. With thumb, press down into the centre of each ball to form a little indent and place a small spoon of jam into each indent. Bake 15-20 minutes, until edges are golden. Let cool and enjoy. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 107; protein 1 g; fat 6 g; carbs 12 g. 

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Vegan Chocolate Pudding with a Secret Ingredient Treat yourself to this scrumptious reward after a race or hard training session RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N D R E W O L S O N – Creator of the One Ingredient Chef food blog in Los Angeles, CA ONEINGREDIENT 

O

ANDREWOLSON

h no, not another one of those vegan chocolate puddings with a ‘secret healthy ingredient’ that is definitely just avocado… Wrong! Then obviously it’s silken tofu… Nope! This pudding has a secret ingredient you would never imagine. Shout out to the One Ingredient Mom for first finding a similar recipe and sharing it with me. She told me it was oil free, sugar free, and made with a secret, healthy ingredient that I would ‘never guess.’ The pudding was chocolatey, rich, the perfect texture and incredibly sweet. I didn’t even believe her when she told me it was made with… sweet potatoes! This pudding is crazy. Six simple ingredients and two minutes of blending is all it takes (once you’ve got some baked sweet potatoes.)

IMPACT Magazine

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • • • • •

Bake some sweet potatoes! You need 2 cups, so that’s at least 3-4 medium-sized potatoes. Bake at about 375 F until they’re super soft. Discard the potato skins and add the flesh to the blender with all the other ingredients. Blend until smooth! Chill mixture for at least an hour (especially if the potatoes are still warm.) You can top the pudding with a bunch of nonsense like I did – coconut whipped cream, chocolate shavings, strawberry, whatever.

2 cups baked orange sweet potatoes 4-5 medjool dates 1/3 cup cocoa powder 1 ¼ cup light coconut milk Pinch of salt 1 tsp. vanilla

NOTES Give the pudding a taste and adjust anything you’d like. If it’s super thick (unlikely,) add more coconut milk. If you want it sweeter, add another date. If you want it more chocolately, add another Tbsp. of cocoa. You can use almond milk to cut down the calories at the expense of a little richness from the coconut.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 369; protein 5.8 g; fat 19 g; carbs 53 g. 

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No-Bake Double Chocolate Brownie Cake This is not a chocolate cake, it’s better!

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J A N I C E S KO R E Y KO – DNA Nutrition expert, author & media personality in Vancouver, B.C. RAWFOUNDATIONCULINARY 

RAWFOUNDATIONCULINARYARTS

T

raining with an insatiable sweet tooth, busy schedule and dietary restrictions can be challenging. As a DNA Sports Nutritionist and functional food formulator to top performers, I am privy to the challenges athletes and C-suite executives face, and the constant pursuit of fuels that result in the best performance and satisfied taste buds. A peak performance favourite is the No-Bake Double Chocolate Cake an energizing, decadent, guilt-free snack

for before, during or after your workout. This recipe will infuse your body with both fast and slow releasing sugars; coupled with a healthy dose of magnesium, to ease sore muscles, balancing acidity in the body. Even more good news: this DoubleChocolate Brownie Cake improves cognition, lifts brain fog and boosts mood thanks to its PEA content. Gluten free, soy and dairy free, paleo, raw vegan-friendly and ready in just 5 minutes!

INGREDIENTS CAKE

• • • • • • •

¾ Cup Cashews 7 Medjool Dates, pitted ¼ Cup Cacao Powder ½ tsp. Vanilla Bean Powder Pinch of Salt 1/8 tsp. Cayenne Pepper (optional) 1 Strawberry Fanned

ICING

• • •

¼ Cup Agave Nectar ¼ Cup Cacao Powder 1 Tbsp. Coconut Oil, melted

DIRECTIONS CAKE

Process the cashews until fine. Add the remaining ingredients and process until smooth. Place the mixture onto a plate and form into a heart. Set aside. ICING

Process until smooth. Nutrition facts per cake Calories 1503; protein 16 g; fat 27 g; carbs 243 g. 

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Chocolate Cherry Dream Bars Reward yourself with these creamy, rich treats post-race or workout

BY D O U G M c N I S H – One of IMPACT Magazine's Canada's Top Plant-based Chefs, author & entrepreneur in Toronto, ON DOUGMCNISH 

CHEFDOUGMCNISH

Courtesy of VEGAN EVERYDAY by Douglas McNish © 2015. Reprinted with permission.

INGREDIENTS CRUST

• • • • • •

2 cups puffed brown rice 1/4 cup raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. raw agave nectar 3 Tbsp. melted coconut oil Dash alcohol-free organic vanilla extract Pinch fine sea salt

FILLING

• • • • • •

1 cup raw cashews, soaked 1 hour or overnight, then drained 1 cup cashew butter 3/4 cup raw agave nectar 1/4 cup melted coconut oil 1/2 tsp. alcohol-free organic vanilla extract 1 cup chopped pitted cherries, divided

TOPPING

Whipped coconut cream (optional)

COLIN ERRICSON

DIRECTIONS

T

hese are the perfect ending to an active day. They are melt-in-your-mouth delicious and will have you begging for second helpings. Share these at your peril because they’ll go even faster. Serve with a big dollop of whipped coconut cream if desired.

Makes 16 Bars

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Crust: In a large bowl, combine puffed rice, cacao powder, agave nectar, coconut oil, vanilla and salt; stir well. Spread evenly in prepared dish, cover and freeze for about 1 hour, until firm. Filling: In blender, combine cashews, cashew butter, agave nectar, coconut oil and vanilla. Blend at high speed until smooth and creamy. Add 1/2 cup (125 mL) cherries and blend until smooth. Transfer mixture to a bowl and stir in remaining 1/2 cup (125 mL) cherries. Spread filling over chilled crust. Cover and return to freezer for 3 hours or overnight. Using parchment liner, lift mixure from dish. Bring to room temperature, then cut into 16 squares. Serve immediately or transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 5 days. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 250; protein 4 g; fat 17 g; carbs 24 g. 

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  179 


Raw, Vegan Afternoon Bliss Balls

These raw, chocolate balls will satisfy your chocolate cravings, guilt-free! BY J U L I E Z E I T L H U B E R – Nutritionist, scientist & foodie at Ready To Nourish in Vancouver, B.C.  READYTONOURISH

T

hese little gems are packed with good fats, fibre (2.5g in a 13g ball) and flavour. Cocoa makes them chocolatey, but they are not too sweet. They are quite filling due to the fat. The sunflower seed butter is high in unsaturated fats, magnesium, zinc, iron and vitamin E. A big plus is that due to the low carb content it doesn't spike your insulin levels. I used to melt dark chocolate to use as a glaze for all kinds of goodies. What I do now is simply combine melted coconut oil and raw cocoa powder, a splash of maple syrup and a pinch of salt and it works just as well. That way you can better control the sweetness.

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Makes 16 balls

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

BALLS

Put ball ingredients into a food processor and blend until combined. Add a splash of water if it doesn't come together. Roll pieces of dough in your hands until balls form (approx. 16 pieces). Set aside. For the glaze, melt coconut oil, add the rest of the ingredients and stir until dissolved and smooth. Dip balls in glaze then roll in coconut shreds or chopped nuts.

• • • • • • • •

2 oz. coconut flour 2 Tbsp. sunflower seed butter 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. maple syrup 1/2 cup raw whole almonds 1 Tbsp. cocoa powder 1 pinch of sea salt coconut shreds for topping

GLAZE

• • • •

2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 Tbsp. raw cocoa powder 1 tsp. maple syrup 1 pinch of sea salt

Nutrition facts per ball Calories 63; protein 2 g; fat 4 g; carbs 5 g. 


Almond Butter Cups A raw, nutrient-dense treat

BY B R E N DA N B R A Z I E R - Founder of Vega, pro triathlete & author of the Thrive book series BRENDANBRAZIER 

BRENDAN_BRAZIER

Makes 12 cups

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

CRUST

Crust: in food processor, combine almonds, walnuts. Process until nuts are very small. Add cacao nibs; pulse until same size as nuts. Add dates and agave; pulse until dough forms. Press dough into bottom and up sides of silicone cupcake molds, keeping dough thin. Set aside. Filling: in blender combine all ingredients. Process until smooth. Divide filling among molds. Refrigerate 1 hour. Spoon topping over molds. Garnish with sliced almonds and cacao nibs.

• • • • •

3 cups almonds 1 cup walnuts ¼ cup cacao nibs 6 Medjool dates, pitted, chopped, and soaked 3 Tbsp. agave, coconut nectar, or maple syrup

FILLING

• • •

KEVIN CLARK

• •

1/3 cup virgin coconut oil, melted 1/3 cup almond butter 1/3 cup agave nectar, maple syrup, or coconut nectar ¼ cup almond milk 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

Courtesy of Thrive Energy Cookbook: 150 Functional, Plant-Based Whole Food Recipes by Brendan Brazier. / Penguin Books,an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. © 2014 Reprinted with permission.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 388; protein 9 g; fat 8 g; carbs 26 g. 

GARNISH

• • •

¼ cup sliced almonds ¼ cup cacao nibs Chocolate sauce if desired

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A Better Butter Tart

Oh Lard! Try this healthier take on a Canadian classic RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY S A R A H B R I T T O N Cookbook author, Holistic Nutritionist, Certified Nutritional Practitioner & creator of My New Roots blog in Toronto, ON MYNEWROOTS

A

ccording to my mom, “Butter tarts are a truly Canadian thing. Like peacekeeping! And Tim Hortons!” This version has replaced the white flour and lard but still retains the ooey, gooey, caramelly goodness. Serves 12

INGREDIENTS CRUST

• • • • •

2 cups rolled oats (gluten-free, if possible) 1 cup brown rice flour 1/2 tsp. sea salt 6 Tbsp. brown rice syrup 5 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted

Tip: the thinner the crust, the better; they puff up when baked. Bake shells for 10 minutes or until edges are a light golden colour. Cool. Filling: melt the ghee in a small saucepan over low heat. Add seeds of one vanilla bean pod. In a medium bowl, measure the brown rice syrup and barley malt. Pour in the melted ghee, whisk to combine with the sweeteners. Sift in the arrowroot and baking powder, add salt (unless you are using salted butter) and whisk until completely smooth. Fold in the raisins. Fill each baked shell to just below the rim of the crust. Bake 20 minutes or until the filling is bubbling and brown around the edges. Remove and let rest, then refrigerate until completely chilled. This is

an important step because it will crystallize the sugars, making removal of the tarts very easy. Using a very sharp knife, insert the tip of the blade down along the side of each tart breaking the sugar seal, if necessary – they should pop out of the mold very easily. If not, pierce the sugar seal in a couple places until you can remove them. If they are stubborn, keep them in the fridge until colder. Once removed from their molds you can keep the tarts at room temperature in a tightly sealed container and warm them a little before serving, if desired. Keeps fresh for a week. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 284; protein 3 g; fat 0 g; carbs 47 g. 

FILLING

• • • • • • • •

1/2 cup brown rice syrup 1/4 cup barley malt 2 Tbsp. arrowroot powder 2 Tbsp. vegan butter, melted (or coconut oil) 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 1/4 tsp. baking powder 2 pinches sea salt 1/3 cup organic raisins (optional)

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 325°F. Crust: in a food processor, blend the rolled oats on high until you have a coarse flour. In a large mixing bowl, combine oat flour with brown rice flour and salt. In a small saucepan, melt the coconut oil and brown rice syrup together, pour it over the dry ingredients and mix with a spoon until everything is incorporated. You may need to use your hands to knead the dough. In a standard muffin pan, press a golf ball-sized amount of dough very firmly into each form, press them high up the sides.

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Pumpkin Spice Tarts Basically delicious & nutritious

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E M I LY VO N E U W Best-selling author & award-winning food blogger at This Rawsome Life in Vancouver, B.C. THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE 

RAWSOMEVEGAN 

THISRAWSOMEVEGANLIFE

T

he Holidays are a popular time for pumpkin spice. This hazelnut-based crust sweetened with dates is balanced and surprising. Each tart is filled with a luscious custard and topped off with whipped coconut cream. For added decadence, drizzle with a low-sugar salted caramel sauce.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

HAZELNUT CRUST

Crust: in a food processor grind the hazelnuts and oats into flour. Add the rest of the ingredients and process until the dough is slightly sticky, crumbly and can hold its shape when pressed between two fingers. If it's too crumbly, add more dates or a splash of water or coconut milk. If it's too moist, add a spoonful or two of ground flax seed or oats. Press the crust evenly into lined or oiled tart tins and cool in the fridge. Filling: blend all ingredients until smooth. Pour evenly into your tart crusts and set in the fridge overnight (minimum 5 hours). Coconut whipped cream: open the can and scoop the solid white fat off the top. Whip the cream with the vanilla and maple syrup in a chilled bowl until it's the consistency of whipped cream. Scoop onto tarts, decorate with extra chopped hazelnuts and coconut shreds.

• • • • • •

3/4 cup hazelnuts 1/4 cup rolled oats 1/3 cup raisins 1/3 cup dates 1 tsp. vanilla extract Pinch sea salt

PUMPKIN FILLING

• • • • • • • • •

1 3/4 cups (1 can) pumpkin purée 1/4 cup melted coconut oil (or cacao butter for firmer results) 1/4 cup coconut milk 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/4 tsp sea salt 1/4 cup dried cranberries 1/4 cup dates 1/4 cup coconut sugar 1 heaping Tbsp. pumpkin pie spice

COCONUT WHIPPED CREAM

• • •

1 can full-fat coconut cream 1/2 tsp. vanilla powder 1 tsp. maple syrup

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Nutrition facts per half cup Calories 155; protein 2 g; fat 6 g; carbs 26 g. 

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Festive Vegan Mince Pies

These plant-based tarts will bring back memories of days gone by RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY E L I Z A B E T H E M E RY – Food blogger at Vancouver with Love in Vancouver, B.C. VANCOUVERWITHLOVE 

VANCOUVERWLOVE

I

really love mince pies and the ones that my mama makes in England are a resounding memory of Christmas from an early age. Since I stopped eating gluten and sugar, I’ve found it difficult to recreate pastry, but I love the texture of these! They don’t taste like your standard English, shop-bought ones, but they are amazingly rich. They also use completely natural sweeteners and don’t have half the preservatives and sugar that regular ones do. Makes 12 mince pies

INGREDIENTS PIE FILLING

• • • • • • • • • •

1 cup orange juice ½ cup raisins ½ cup currants ½ cup dried apricots, chopped into 1 cm pieces 3 small apples, cored and cut into 1 cm wide cubes 1 tsp. cinnamon ½ tsp. ground ginger ¼ tsp. ground cloves ¼ tsp. ground nutmeg 2 Tbsp. coconut oil

PASTRY

• • • • •

2 ⅓ cups ground almonds 1 cup brown rice flour 5 Tbsp. coconut oil 4 Tbsp. cold water 18 dates – blended in a food processor

DIRECTIONS Preheat the oven to 350° F. Lightly grease two, 6-cup muffin tins with coconut oil and set aside. Place all pie filling ingredients into a saucepan on medium-low heat. Stirring frequently, let the mixture bubble gently for 25-30 minutes until the apple is broken down. Set aside.

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For the pastry, add the ground almonds, rice flour, coconut oil, blended dates and water to a food processor and blend until a smooth mixture forms. If you don’t have a food processor, I suggest thoroughly mixing all ingredients by hand in a large bowl until a dough forms (ensure that the dates are blended before you do this.) Spread extra brown rice flour on the worktop and roll out the pastry until it’s about ½ cm thick. Use 9 cm circular cookie cutters to create 12 pie bases. Use a small star-shaped cookie cutter to cut out an equal number of pastry stars (these will be the pie tops).

Push the circular bases into the greased tins. Bake for about 10 minutes, until they look firm and are starting to turn golden. Remove from the oven and fill each pastry base with 2 Tbsp. of the filling and top with a pastry star. Place back into the oven to bake for a further 15 minutes until the stars are golden and cooked. Remove from the oven and allow the pies to rest in the tins for 10 minutes. Transfer to a wire cooling rack and cool for 30 minutes. Enjoy! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 533; protein 13 g; fat 35 g; carbs 45 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Snickerdoodles Cinnamon-y cookie perfection!

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M E L A N I E M c D O N A L D Vegan recipe developer, food photographer at A Virtual Vegan & cookbook author living in Victoria, B.C. AVIRTUALVEGAN

Makes 12 cookies

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

• • •

Preheat oven to 375°F, line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Mix sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside (used for rolling). Make sure your coconut oil is soft (not liquid) but easily scoop-able and not dry. Put coconut oil in a mixing bowl with sugar, maple syrup, aquafaba and vanilla. Whisk until smooth. Add the flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, cinnamon and salt and mix with a spoon until well combined. Roll dough into walnut-size balls and roll in the cinnamon-sugar mixture.

• • • •

• •

¼ cup coconut oil, softened ¼ cup organic cane sugar 3 Tbsp. aquafaba (liquid from a can of chickpeas) 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2 Tbsp. natural maple syrup 1 cup all-purpose flour ¾ tsp. cream of tartar (do not substitute) ¼ tsp. baking soda ¼ tsp. ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. salt

FOR ROLLING

Place gently on cooking tray then using a fork, press on each dough ball twice in a criss-cross pattern. Bake for 9 minutes and rest on tray for 2-3 minutes before cooling. Nutrition facts per cookie Calories 173; protein 2 g; fat 4 g; carbs 26 g. 

¼ cup organic cane sugar 1 tsp. ground cinnamon

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No-Bake Nanaimo Bars A Canadian tradition turned vegan

BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

A

s two proud Canadians, we decided to give the traditional rich B.C. treat a healthy vegan makeover.

DARINA KOPCOK

Makes 12 bars

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IMPACT Magazine


INGREDIENTS BOTTOM LAYER

• • • • •

1 cup shredded coconut 1/2 cup dates 1/2 cup dried cranberries 1/2 cup almonds, soaked for 12 hours or overnight 1/4 cup raw cacao powder, unsweetened

MIDDLE LAYER

• • • • •

2 cups raw cashews, soaked 4 to 6 hours or overnight 1/4 cup maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 4 Tbsp. lemon juice 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

TOP LAYER

• • •

1 80-85 per cent dark vegan chocolate bar (preferably raw) 2 Tbsp. coconut oil 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs

DIRECTIONS Coat a 9" x 9" cake pan with coconut oil or line with parchment paper. Bottom layer: combine all ingredients in a food processor fitted with the S-blade. Process until the mixture is broken down and begins to stick together. Scrape down the sides of the food processor as needed. Press the crust into the bottom of prepared pan using a spatula. Cool in the fridge. Middle layer: rinse the soaked cashews and blend all of the middle layer ingredients in a clean food processor until you have a smooth cream filling (8 to 10 minutes). Spread the cream evenly on the top of the base and return to the fridge. Top layer: place the vegan dark chocolate and coconut oil in a small pot and melt down over low heat. Mix continuously so it doesn’t burn. Pour chocolate layer over the middle layer and sprinkle with cacao nibs. Cool. Allow the chocolate and the bars to firm up for about 3 hours (or overnight) before slicing. Keep bars in the refrigerator for 3 to 5 days. NOTE: These are very rich; eat in moderation. Nutrition facts per bar Calories 405; protein 5 g; fat 35 g; carbs 21g. 

IMPACT Magazine

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ner WinMagazine's

Raw Protein Cookie Balls

nd es t a PACT Cont of I M e l ip a c sion a y Re rofe s P Holid id ! en A nder K i tc h s Ble ie r e S

This delicious treat is an easy, fast option

BY J E N N I F E R S TA N D I N G – Certified Holistic Nutrition Consultant & wellness blogger at Standing Strong Wellness from Calgary, AB STANDINGSTRONGWELLNESS

W

ho doesn't like cookie dough with a hint of festive spirit? Jen's Cookie Balls recipe won IMPACT's Holiday Recipe Contest because it's quick and easy to make, completely customizable and best of all… absolutely delicious! Tried, tested and approved in the IMPACT Test Kitchen! Serves 12

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

COOKIE BALLS

If using protein powder, mix thoroughly with almond flour in a medium size bowl. Next, add cardamom and salt. Slowly mix in melted coconut oil and melted vegan butter. Add vanilla extract, almond extract and maple syrup then mix well. Allow the mixture to set and firm in the fridge or freezer‚ this doesn't take long (no more than 10 minutes). Roll mixture into uniform balls. Finish with your favourite festive toppings, chocolate drizzle, sprinkles or anything else you fancy! Balls will keep in the fridge for up to 3 days.

• • • • • • • •

2 cups almond flour 1/2 cup coconut oil, melted 2 Tbsp. vegan butter, melted 1 1/2 Tbsp. organic maple syrup 1/4 tsp. vanilla extract 1/8 tsp. almond extract pinch of cardamom 1 scoop vanilla protein powder (optional)

TOPPING IDEAS

• • • • •

chocolate drizzle cacao powder crushed nuts / candy canes shredded coconut sprinkles

LOGAN JOHNSON

Nutrition facts per ball without added toppings Calories 209; protein 4 g; fat 20 g; carbs 6 g. 

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IMPACT Magazine


Raw Cacao Peppermint Bark BY B A R B S H E L D O N -T H O M A S Whole Food Culinary Instructor & IMPACT Magazine's Kitchen Skills chef in Calgary, AB REALFOODGODDESS

W

hen it comes time to make your treats, raw cacao is key to creating this can't-miss peppermint bark, full of potent antioxidants.

Serves 8

INGREDIENTS

NOTE

• • •

The amount of sweetener you use depends on your own taste. Begin by pouring the sweetener in the blender as it mixes and taste as you go, until desired flavour is achieved.

MEGAN PETERSON

• • •

½ cup raw, fermented cacao powder ½ cup raw cacao butter ¼ cup favorite sweetener in liquid form (raw honey, liquid coconut sugar, raw agave etc)* 1 tsp. vanilla powder or caviar from one to two vanilla beans 5 drops organic peppermint essential oil Pinch Himalayan rock salt

OPTIONAL

• Handful of finely chopped fresh mint leaves, raw coconut flakes, dried goji berries, raw hemp seeds, etc.

DIRECTIONS In a double boiler, place raw cacao butter in a glass container. Melt over low heat, making sure no water comes in contact with the cacao. While the butter is melting, measure out ingredients. Once butter has melted, place in highspeed blender on low. Add vanilla powder

and blend on low. Add salt and sweetener and continue to blend on low. Once combined, add cacao powder. Finally, add peppermint oil, one drop at a time, tasting as you go to ensure the right amount of oil for your taste. Pour mixture into a flat pan and sprinkle bark with coconut, goji berries etc. Place in freezer for 10 minutes, until chocolate is firm and cracks easily. Store in fridge. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 183; protein 1.2 g; fat 14.9 g; carbs 13.4 g. 

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Vegan Gingerbread Snowflakes

Run, run as fast as you can to make these cookies RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY L AU R E N T OYO TA – Author of Vegan Comfort Classics: 101 Recipes To Feed Your Face & creator of the hot for food blog in Toronto, ON HOTFORFOOD 

HOTFORFOODBLOG

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

GINGERBREAD

GINGERBREAD

ROYAL ICING

• • • • • •

Sift two cups of all-purpose flour with baking soda and spices into a large mixing bowl. Stir with a fork to combine. In a separate mixing bowl cream the vegan butter and brown sugar with a hand mixer until fluffy. Add molasses and non-dairy milk and beat with a hand mixer until well combined. Fold the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix well. Form the dough into a ball and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for one to two hours. Remove dough from the fridge and plastic wrap. Have ⅓ cup of all-purpose flour standing by in a bowl. Flour your rolling surface and rolling pin well and roll out the dough until it’s approx. ⅛-¼-inch thick. Start cutting out your snowflakes or desired cookie shape. Lift the cut-out cookies from the counter with a lightly floured spatula and place on parchmentlined baking sheets. Continue to flour your rolling surface and rolling pin, roll out the excess dough and cut more cookies until there’s none left. Bake the cookies for 6-8 minutes in an oven preheated to 350F. Allow cookies to cook completely before icing them.

Sift powdered sugar into a mixing bowl. Using a hand mixer, beat in the warm water until well combined. This will be your piping icing. Transfer to a piping bag or squeeze bottle and decorate as desired. You can pipe icing as the outline to your cookies then flood the cookies with the icing by adding 1 Tbsp. more of warm water and mixing well. Allow the frosting to dry before placing in cookie tins or containers.

• • • •

2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp. baking soda 3 tsp. ground ginger 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. ground cloves ½ cup vegan butter or margarine (room temperature) ¼ cup unsulphured molasses ¼ cup non-dairy milk 1 cup light brown sugar, packed ⅓ cup all-purpose flour (for rolling out the dough)

ROYAL ICING

• •

2 ¼ cups powdered sugar 3 Tbsp. warm water

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Nutrition facts per serving Calories 229; protein 3 g; fat 10 g; carbs 34 g. 

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Chocolate-Covered Turtles An addictive combination of chocolate-covered dates & roasted pecans RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY C A N D I C E H U T C H I N G S Author of The Edgy Veg: Carnivore-approved Vegan Recipes & creator of the vegan blog The Edgy Veg in Toronto, ON EDGY VEG 

THEEDGY VEG

P

itted dates stuffed with almond butter taste just like the real thing, but without all the crazy dairy and sugar and makes the most amazing base for these vegan chocolate-covered 'turtles'. Makes 12

INGREDIENTS • • • •

1 ½ cups Medjool dates, pitted and tightly packed ½ tsp. Himalayan rock salt 2 cups roasted pecans, whole 2 cups roughly chopped chocolate or chocolate chips, melted

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DIRECTIONS To make caramel: add dates to food processor, pulse until they form a loose and sticky dough. If dates are a bit dry and not quite combining, drizzle warm water one teaspoon at a time. Pulse and scrape down the sides as needed. Once the dough is a ball, add in salt and mix. Taste the caramel and add more salt if desired. Line a bowl with plastic wrap and add caramel dough, place in the freezer for 2-3 hours. To make turtles: once chilled and hardened, roll caramel dough into 1.5-2 inch balls.Press three pecans into each ball of caramel and flatten. Place the turtle morsels on a cooling rack or parchment paper-lined baking sheet, place in the freezer for 30 minutes or until hardened.

To make coating: while you are waiting for the turtles to harden, melt chocolate over a double boiler. Remove flattened caramels from the freezer. Using a spoon, carefully cover each caramel with chocolate; use the back of the spoon to spread the chocolate from the caramel onto the ‘legs’ a little bit, allowing them to peak out. Carefully place the cooling rack or baking sheet in the freezer, cool until the chocolate shells are hardened. Store turtles in the fridge or freezer until ready to serve. Serve chilled.  Nutrition facts per serving Calories 306; protein 4 g; fat 18 g; carbs 35 g. 

IMPACT Magazine


Pine Needle Shortbread Cookies Pining for a new take on a holiday classic

RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY M E L A N I E M c D O N A L D Cookbook author & creator of vegan food blog A Virtual Vegan living in Victoria, B.C. AVIRTUALVEGAN

A

twist on an old favourite with just a hint of piney, citrusy flavour. Delicate, delicious and sure to impress! All varieties of pine needle are edible except Norfolk Island Pine, Ponderosa Pine and Yew trees. Avoid these varieties and be sure to stick to the traditional, short, cylindrical, pointy needles. Makes 25 cookies

INGREDIENTS • • • •

• •

⅓ cup natural powdered sugar ½ cup coconut oil, hard and cold 1/4 - 1/2 tsp. salt (to taste) 1 Tbsp. pine needles (wash gently while attached to the twig, dry, then strip from the twig so only the loose needles remain) 1 cup + 2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour powdered sugar (for sprinkling)

Nutrition facts per cookie Calories 68; protein 1 g; fat 4 g; carbs 6 g.

IMPACT Magazine

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F and prep cookie sheet with parchment paper. Combine flour and pine needles in a blender. Blend until pine needles are uniform pieces throughout the flour. Don't be alarmed by the really strong pine smell. Once cooked it becomes very subtle. Using a blender and flour is the easiest method for chopping the pine needles. Combine the powdered sugar, salt and coconut oil in a bowl. Use a fork to mash together very well until you can no longer see any powdered sugar and batter is light and fluffy. Pour in the flour and pine needle mixture. Mix by hand until everything is combined. Do not over mix or use electric beaters. Too much mixing will affect the texture of the finished shortbread. It should be slightly crumbly but hold together when squeezed in your hand. The drier you can get away with keeping the dough the better the texture of your shortbread; you should not need to add any liquid at all. If the dough is starting to get a bit soft, stop and place in the fridge for 20 minutes before continuing to firm it up again. Lightly dust a surface with flour and shape your dough into a ball. Roll out to about 3-4 mm thick, use a cookie cutter or mason jar lid/rim of a glass to cut into shapes and place gently onto a cookie sheet. Bake for 10-12 minutes. They will turn golden around the edges and on the bottom when done but still slightly soft in the middle. Cool to firm on a cooling rack. 

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A Very Merry Chocolate Christmas Cake A delicious centrepiece for any festive table RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY J E N N I F I E L D – Owner Pastry Chef Online in Garner, NC ONLINEPASTRYCHEF 

PASTRYCHEFONLINE

T

his festive cake will be the hit of your holiday dessert table! I decided to give the naked cake another go, figuring that the dark chocolate cake peeking through the white would make the cake look like a stylized birch stump. Vegans and non-vegans will love it! Serves 10

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

FOR THE CAKE

Line 3, 6" (or 2, 8" or 9") pans with parchment, spray sides with pan spray and set aside. Preheat oven to 350° F. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, cocoa powder, espresso powder, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Set aside. In another bowl, whisk together the coconut milk, margarine, flax meal/water mixture, vanilla and orange oil. Pour the wet into the dry and mix well for about 3 minutes using either a whisk or a large wooden spoon. The batter should be fairly thick and smooth. Pour in the boiling water and stir carefully to combine; it will take a minute for the water to want to mix with the thick batter, so go slowly and don't splash yourself. Scrape the bowl and stir a bit more. Pour the batter evenly into the prepared pans. Bake on the center rack for about 30 minutes for the 6" cakes and maybe 35-40 for 8" or 9" cakes or until the cakes read 200 F on an instant read thermometer and have just started to shrink from the sides of the pans. Cool on racks for 15 minutes before turning out to cool completely. Frost and decorate as desired. 

• • • • • • • • • •

• • •

8 oz. (about 1 3/4 cups) all-purpose flour 14 oz. (2 cups) granulated organic sugar 2 1/4 oz. (3/4 cup) cocoa powder, sifted 1 Tbsp. espresso powder 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. fine sea salt 8 oz. full fat coconut milk, well shaken 4 oz. melted and cooled vegan butter (stick or tub) 2 Tbsp. flax meal, (whiz it up in a blender or food processor to make it as fine as you can) mixed with 5 Tbsp. water 2 tsp. vanilla 3-4 drops orange oil or the zest of an orange and/or 1/2 tsp. orange extract 8 oz. (1 cup) boiling water

FROSTING* (SEE SIDEBAR)

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 741; protein 4 g; fat 34 g; carbs 111 g. 

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*Frosting Recipe INGREDIENTS • 8 oz. vegan butter • 16 oz. (1 pound or 4 cups) • •

vegan powdered sugar 3-4 drops orange oil, (or zest of 1/2 orange and/or 1/4-1/2 tsp. orange extract) 2-3 shakes chocolate bitters, (optional but really lovely)

DIRECTIONS Mix 8 oz. vegan butter and one pound powdered sugar until light and fluffy. Add orange oil and bitters.

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Nutrition Produce: Dirty Dozen vs. Clean Fifteen

Building Muscle on Plants

200

214 Plant Powered Muscle Mylk Quinoa Onigirazu

Immunity 201

Skin Health 202

Mood & Digestion 203

Raw Foods 204

Fighting Inflamation 205

Heart Health 206

Gut Health 207

Fueling With Plants 208

Transitioning to Plant-based

216 Lentil Tacos Blueberry Power Bites

Plant-powered Fitness 218

The X-Factor for Athletes 219

G-BOMBS for Disease Prevention 220

Recovery 221

Hydration 222

Plants & GI Health 223

210

Sprouting

Plants vs. Protein

224 Wasabi Ginger Sprout Salad

211

Why You Should Try Plant-based Protein 212

IMPACT Magazine

Plant-based Family Fuel

Healthy Snacking 226 Mango Walnut Salad Nut Butter-Filled Dates

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Dirty Dozen (Non-organic foods shown to have the most pesticide residue.) 1. Strawberries 6. Pears 11. Sweet Bell 2. Spinach 7. Cherries Peppers 3. Nectarines 8. Grapes 12. Potatoes 4. Apples 9. Celery 5. Peaches 10. Tomatoes

vs. Clean Fifteen (Non-organic foods shown to have the least pesticide residue.) 1. Sweet Corn 6. Sweet Peas 11. Honeydew 2. Avocados 7. Papayas 12. Kiwi 3. Pineapples 8. Asparagus 13. Cantaloupe 4. Cabbage 9. Mangoes 14. Cauliflower 5. Onions 10. Eggplant 15. Grapefruit

Go organic when foods have higher levels of pesticides BY S H AY L A R O B E R T S , B H K , C S C S , C P H C – Peak Performance Coach & founder of Evolution Coaching U in Canmore, AB SHAYLASAYS 

EVOLUTIONCOACHING

I

f you are one of those folks who does the weekly trek through the produce aisles at your local grocer, but can’t decide whether to buy organic or not, one factor to consider is the amount of pesticide residue that lingers on the foods we eat. Consider this annual research from the U.S.-based EWG's Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce.

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Updated every year since 2004, EWG ranks pesticide contamination of 47 popular fruits and vegetables. The guide is based on results of more than 38,800 samples of produce tested by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration. Samples are tested for pesticides after they have been prepared to be eaten. This means the produce is

thoroughly washed and, when applicable, peeled. After these preparations, pesticide residues are still detected on many of the fruits and veggies. If you see your favourite food on the Dirty Dozen list, strongly consider buying organic. If your favourites are on the Clean 15, organic may not be as critical to your healthy food choices. 

IMPACT Magazine

ILLUSTRATION BY LETICIA PLATE

Source: Environmental Working Group www.ewg.org. Used with permission.


Protect Your Body Against Invaders How nutrition & exercise can affect your immune system BY J OYC E J O H N S O N , N D – Naturopathic doctor based in Belle River, ON DRJOYCE_HEALTHANDFITNESS 

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JOYCE_ JOHNSON

t’s cold and flu season and it’s your immune system’s job to protect you against germs, viruses, bacteria and other invaders. A weakened immune system leaves the body vulnerable to virtually every type of illness and disease. Factors that impair immune function include nutrient deficiencies, contaminated air, water and food, unhealthy lifestyles and too much exposure to harmful microbes. Exercise can help boost your immune system, but it can also break it down. Good nutrition is a must for immune system health and nutritional supplements have immune-boosting properties. Research has shown exercise increases the production of macrophages, cells that attack the bacteria that can trigger upper respiratory diseases. Following exercise, there is an increase in circulation of cells that enhance immunity in the body. Within a few hours after exercise these

levels return to normal in the body, however, it is thought regular exercise may extend periods of immunity. On the flip side, too much exercise may have a negative impact on immunity. Two hormones produced during exercise, cortisol and adrenaline, raise blood pressure, elevate cholesterol levels, and temporarily weaken the immune system. According to research, exercising at a moderate intensity at least 40 minutes per day helps the body resist a variety of diseases and conditions. However, high-intensity endurance activities lasting 90 minutes or longer may increase your susceptibility to infection for up to three days. Your body has an amazingly complex and effective system for protecting itself from invaders. Help prevent infections and stay healthy by exercising, eating well and considering supplements.  

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IMMUNITY BOOSTING SUPPLEMENTS

1 ECHINACEA

Echinacea, or purple coneflower, can help fight colds and flu. This herb works by increasing the numbers and activity of white blood cells. It also increases the production of interferon, a chemical that is critical to the immune system response.

2 VITAMIN C

Good dietary sources of the antioxidant vitamin C are citrus fruits, green peppers, cantaloupes and broccoli.

3 PROBIOTICS

These friendly bacteria help keep your digestive tract healthy and boost immunity. Probiotics alter the balance of microflora in the gut by inhibiting the growth of harmful bacteria and favouring those that aid digestion and help fight infection. Use probiotics to reduce the symptoms and duration of the common cold.

4 VITAMIN D

Low levels of vitamin D may put you at risk for upper respiratory diseases. Vitamin D can help your body fight infections.

5 OREGANO OIL

Oregano essential oil fights infections naturally due to its antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and anti-parasite compounds.

6 ZINC

Zinc is a mineral that increases the number of white blood cells to fight infections.

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Get the Glow

Healthy skin begins with the food you eat BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

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uring the summer, we take good care of our skin. Exposed to the world, we soak up much needed vitamin D from the sun and sweat away toxins. Come winter, our skin gets covered, layer upon layer and we tend to forget about the most important layer of all. We are bombarded by advertising that focuses on adding products to the skin to aid in its regeneration, however the most effective way to nourish healthy skin is through a nutrient-dense diet. Many of us miss the connection between what we eat and the way our skin appears. Just as our internal organs receive nutrients from what we eat, so does our skin, the largest organ of all. There are many daily practices that can help improve skin quality. By using mild, natural soaps, ingredient-conscious sunscreens and moisturizers, as well as practicing gentle exfoliation, we can aid the body in the regeneration of skin cells. When combined with a nutrient-dense diet and plenty of hydration, these habits

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help keep skin looking healthy and supple, but none benefit us as profoundly as the food we eat. It's true that healthy skin begins from the inside out. • Here is a list of foods sure to get your skin glowing in no time … • Cilantro and basil chelate heavy metals, helping to rid the body of toxins. • High amounts of enzymes are present in tropical fruits, such as mangoes, papayas and pineapples, allowing our digestive system to function optimally and free up energy that could be used to heal and replenish the skin and other organs. They are rich in antioxidants, which reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. • Dark leafy greens, tropical and citrus fruits are high in vitamin C as well as beta-carotene, which helps generate vitamin A in the body. Vitamin C aids the synthesis of collagen, keeping skin supple and firm and improves the skin’s water retention, which keeps

it softer, and wrinkle-free. Vitamin A regulates cell renewal and skin revitalization, replacing old skin cells with new ones. Kale and spinach contain phytonutrients (plant chemicals) that fight inflammation and protect skin from the sun’s damaging rays. Beets cleanse the blood of impurities and revitalize our red blood cells, supplying fresh oxygen to the body. The health of your blood is reflected in beautiful skin. Walnuts, pecans and other nuts and seeds contain vitamin E and Omega 3 fatty acids that assist in the health of the cell membrane for radiant skin. Kelp and other seaweeds are packed with vitamins, minerals, amino acids and antioxidants. They survive extreme conditions and adapt to changing environments. This resilience and restorative ability makes seaweed pure skin food. And water. Drink plenty of water. 

IMPACT Magazine


Food vs. Mood

5 easy ways to stabilize your moods & improve digestion BY K R I S T I N A V I R R O, H B A , M A , R H N – Registered Holistic Nutritionist & Psychotherapist in Markham, ON FRESHINSIGHTHEALTH 

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any of us do not realize that feelings of exhaustion, stress and irritability can be directly tied to the food choices we make. A survey of more than 2,000 Canadians indicated that while 77% of respondents believed a balanced diet was beneficial for their mental and physical wellbeing, 40% admitted that stress often caused them to make unhealthy food choices. Resisting these negative occurrences and stabilizing our moods are actually easier than one might realize by applying these simple strategies and techniques:

1 EAT/SNACK REGULARLY

Mood swings are often caused by fluctuating blood sugar levels. So, whether you’re someone who feels better eating five small meals a day or three bigger ones, adopt a consistent eating schedule. Do not fall into the trap of fasting during the day only to binge eat in the evening when your digestive system is slowing down. Schedule time to eat breakfast and lunches. Minimize your caffeine intake, which can often be another cause of skipping meals.

2 INCLUDE HEALTHY PROTEINS & FATS IN EVERY MEAL

All carbohydrates inevitably break down into glucose (or sugar). There’s nothing wrong with this given that our bodies use this form of fuel very efficiently, but the slower glucose is broken down and absorbed into our cells, the less mood swings we will likely experience. Ingesting healthy forms of plantbased protein: edamame, lentils, tofu, and tempeh, plus good fats: nuts, seeds, avocados, and coconut oil all assist the breaking down process.

3 UP YOUR FIBRE INTAKE

Fibre is the part of the plant that our bodies cannot digest, which means fibre is great at slowing the rate at which sugar is broken down and absorbed. Beans, broccoli, peas, berries, and avocados are just some of the high-fibre, nutrient-dense foods that make great additions to your diet.

4 SWAP COFFEE FOR MATCHA

Matcha is a potent, powdered form of green tea that not only contains caffeine, but also L-Theanine -- an amino acid that promotes calmness and clarity. Matcha provides a noticeable hit of alertness without the jitters that come with a cup of joe.

5 AVOID SUGAR

You’d be absolutely shocked at the number of foods that sneakily pack a sugar punch. Granola bars, flavoured yogurts, “healthy” cereals, protein bars, condiments, savoury sauces (and so much more) … all contain disastrous amounts of sugar that will inevitably make you feel moody and unbalanced. Your best bet is to eat whole foods that contain as few ingredients as possible and are minimally processed. 

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2 WHO WOULD BENEFIT MOST FROM A RAW FOOD DIET?

Those who are ready for a lifestyle change or who have chronic health conditions would benefit greatly from a raw food diet. Raw foods by nature are naturally anti-inflammatory and can reduce chronic issues over time. Raw foods can also re-balance existing nutrient deficiencies.

3 EMPHASIZE WHOLE, ORGANICALLY GROWN, UNPROCESSED FOODS

Experiment with your food. Start with a diverse variety of raw fruits, veggies, sprouted nuts and seeds, fermented foods, seaweed and sprouted pseudo-grains such as quinoa and buckwheat foods as your staples. There are endless possibilities of flavour and you can even replicate your own favourite comfort foods in a ‘raw food’ style.

4 CHEW CHEW CHEW

A Raw Deal Why a raw food diet might be the real deal for you

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BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

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he first time I heard the raw food diet mentioned, I was perplexed. How could someone eat celery and carrot sticks every day? Even on a plantbased diet you can still eat French fries! And what about refried beans, caramelized onions or pizza!? What if I told you, you could have all these things and more? That the raw food diet will fuel your body with the most nutrient-dense foods our planet has to offer. And that the flavours are complex and bursting with deliciousness.

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1 WHY RAW?

When food is cooked, the enzymes and vitamins within the food are damaged. We need the natural enzymes present in raw, living foods to help boost digestion and fight chronic disease. And although there are many benefits to eating cooked food, it does affect these important nutrients. However, as long as the food is not heated above 45 degrees C, the enzymes and nutrients remain intact.

Incomplete chewing leads to improper digestion and can cause discomfort. Chewing is also the first step of digestion. Our saliva contains amylase, an enzyme that is activated even before we eat. Mixing food with saliva begins to break down carbohydrates into simple sugars.

5 NUTRIENT DENSITY

Many ‘superfoods’ are typically consumed within the raw foods diet, such as kale, blueberries, garlic, fermented foods and sprouts. If you are getting a variety, you will get everything the body needs and more. Brightly coloured foods with the most pigments provide more antioxidants and immune-boosting nutrients. And, raw foods like cacao and blue-green algae contain a chemical called PEA (phenylethylamine), known as ‘the love molecule’ which increases serotonin and dopamine production, contributing to an overall feeling of happiness. You don’t have to be perfect if you decide to try a raw food diet. If you base 50 per cent of your diet on raw, plant-based foods, it will have a huge impact on your life. After all, it’s not about what we do occasionally, it’s about what we do consistently that will make the biggest impact on our happiness and overall feeling of health and wellbeing. 

IMPACT Magazine


5

Foods That Fight Back

Put these on your plate & stop inflammation in its tracks BY S A R A H C U F F, R . H . N . – Holistic Sports Nutritionist in Vancouver, B.C. EAT2RUN 

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s an active person, you likely eat a lot of carbohydrates. Runners in particular often have a high carb diet. And while carbs are important, they shouldn’t dominate your diet to the detriment of healthy fats and antiinflammatory-rich foods. There are a number of things you can easily add to your diet to help modulate inflammation, enabling you to recover from hard workouts faster – and heal injuries faster. These foods also help build healthy brain cells and promote oxygen delivery to working muscles. Here are five foods with powerful anti-inflammatory nutrients.

1 TART CHERRIES

Contain phytonutrients including anthocyanins and ellagic acid that studies repeatedly show help runners to recover faster and feel less sore, as well as perform better during the run. Use ½–1 cup tart cherry juice daily (or 2 Tbsp. concentrate). While tart cherries are most potent, all berries contain various antiinflammatory properties.

2 TURMERIC

Contains over two dozen phytonutrients including curcumin, the strongest and most studied component shown to reduce oxidative damage sustained during exercise as well as assist in healing from inflammatory conditions. Use ¼ tsp. powdered (or 1 cm piece of fresh) turmeric daily for preventative measures, double that to speed healing. While turmeric is the most anti-inflammatory spice, ginger and cinnamon are also highly useful.

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3 LEAFY GREENS

Quite simply, leafy greens are by far the most nutrient-dense food available (that is, they contain the most vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients per calorie). Getting 4-6 cups of leafy greens daily will benefit any runner.

4 CACAO

Rich in flavonoids that studies show can help us run faster, improve brain health and strengthen the cardiovascular system. Plus, it’s a great source of iron and magnesium – two very important minerals for runners. Just 2 Tbsp. cacao powder daily (or 30 g raw dark chocolate) will do the trick.

4 MATCHA

Contains EGCG’s, catechins unique to green tea known to powerfully reduce inflammation, boost recovery, prevent inflammatory conditions and build protective immunity. One cup (½ tsp.) of matcha daily is all you need to get these benefits. 

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Wiping Out Heart Disease

U.S. doctor says plant-based diet can prevent, reverse cardiovascular illness BY T O M LU N DT E I G E N

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r. Caldwell Esselstyn Jr. says he has the answer to ending heart disease. All we have to do is change the way we eat. “Coronary heart disease is nothing more than a toothless paper tiger that need never ever exist and if it does exist it need never ever progress,” Esselstyn tells IMPACT. Heart attack and stroke account for 50 per cent of deaths in Canada. Drugs, stents, bypass surgery are the typical medical interventions but these don’t halt or cure the disease. They merely slow its progression and cost the Canadian health system $22 billion a year. Esselstyn, a surgeon and author of the 2007 book, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, directs the cardiovascular prevention and reversal program at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute in Ohio. He says the secret to eliminating heart disease lies in how we feed ourselves. Since 1985, Esselstyn has been treating patients with cardiovascular disease with a nutrition-based program designed to boost nitric oxide production and lower cholesterol levels. Foods high in nitric oxide help nourish the endothelium, the lining and “guardian of our blood vessels.” Eating animal products, including eggs and dairy, refined grains, caffeinated coffee, sugar, nuts, avocados and oil harm the endothelium and slowly, he says, are killing us. All oils, including olive oil and coconut oil, are nutrient-poor food choices that impair blood flow. Fats naturally occurring in unrefined grains, legumes and vegetables are sufficient to support excellent health, he says. Esselstyn says the foods to eat are whole grains, legumes, fruits and a

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spectrum of vegetables — especially green leafy ones. All are full of fibre, nutrients and antioxidants. Nothing beats the anti-oxidative value of green leafy vegetables. “Whole-food, plant-based diets can restore the ability of endothelial cells to produce nitric oxide,” he says. Esselstyn’s prescription for a healthy heart includes chewing green, leafy vegetables (a fist-sized portion of cooked greens) accompanied by a few drops of balsamic vinegar six times a day. “Cholesterol is not what causes heart disease; it's the foods we eat causing cracks and fissures in the endothelial fortress,” he says. This breakdown allows the benign cholesterol molecule to take root in the arterial wall, spurring “this whole cascade of oxidative inflammation and formation of plaque.” Kate McGoey-Smith, of Calgary, turned to Esselstyn’s teaching after being diagnosed with high blood pressure and Type-2 diabetes. She was blind, on oxygen 24 hours a day and waiting for a lung transplant. After 15 months on Esselstyn’s program, McGoey-Smith’s vision was restored; her oxygen use reduced to nights only and she no longer needs a transplant. Instead of suffering dizziness and fainting spells, she exercises seven days a week and has dropped more than 100 pounds. Her diabetes has reversed — completely. “My whole food plant-based journey is a lifetime commitment,” she says. “Some will say I do it because I was so seriously ill, but do you have to wait until you are that ill to make a change in your life?” McGoey-Smith has launched two notfor-profit gratitude projects: Fork Smart and Heart Calgary and co-founded Food

Inside Heart Disease Coronary heart disease is an inflammatory buildup of blockages in arteries to the heart. In a stroke, the blockages occur in arteries to the brain. These blockages consist of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and inflammatory cells. Blockages, depending on the severity, can cause symptoms such as shortness of breath or chest pain (angina). Nitric oxide keeps the cellular elements in our blood stream flowing smoothly. It’s the strongest blood vessel dilator in the body and keeps the artery wall from becoming stiff, thick or inflamed. It prevents high blood pressure and plaque formation. TOP 10 ACCESSIBLE SOURCES OF NITRIC OXIDE (shown as mg / 100 g) • arugula (480) • rhubarb (281) • cilantro (247) • butter leaf lettuce (200) • spring greens (188) • basil (183) • beet greens (177) • oak leaf lettuce (155) • Swiss chard (151) • beets (110) Source: nutritionfacts.org

As Medicine Canada to help others suffering heart disease. “We're on the cusp of a seismic revolution in health that is not going to come from another pill, another procedure, another operation,” says Esselstyn. “Nutritional literacy will empower the public to annihilate chronic illness.” 

IMPACT Magazine


Gut Feeling

What you can do about stomach pain BY D R . T E D J A B LO N S K I , M D Runner, cyclist, assistant professor University of Calgary UCALGARY 

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astrointestinal (GI) issues are some of the most common complaints of endurance athletes, particularly runners. According to the Canadian Society of Intestinal Research, 60 to 90 per cent of runners have experienced a GI symptom, including diarrhea, nausea, stomach cramping and bloating. The higher the intensity of the workout, the more pronounced the symptoms. While these symptoms do not have long-term consequences, they can still knock you off your game. It’s important to identify your personal triggers for GI issues, and consider how to manage the discomfort.

in protein, fat and/or sugar could lead to pain and discomfort.

Here are three key causes of GI symptoms and solutions to try:

Try this: Control anxiety by following a pre-game routine or chatting with family and fellow athletes. Listening to music, visualization and relaxation techniques can help ease the mind and the stomach.

1 FOOD INTOLERANCES

FODMAPs, or poorly absorbed, shortchain carbohydrates, are found in different types of food, including legumes, grains, alcohol and certain fruits and vegetables. Athletes might be sensitive to food higher in FODMAPS or specific types such as lactose in milk products and fructose in fruits or sports drinks. Sensitivity to FODMAPs can lead to many GI symptoms that can be heightened by anxiety or stress. Try this: Focus on foods with lower FODMAPS such as carrots, kale, spinach, eggplant, sweet potato, blueberries, oranges, strawberries and gluten-free breads. You can find a complete list of high and low FODMAP foods at www.ibsdiets.org.

2 TIMING OF FOOD INTAKE

Some athletes’ GI symptoms might have nothing to do with what they eat and drink, but rather when. Eating food high

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Try this: Adjust your diet in the lead up to your sporting event, or carefully time your intake of these types of food to help manage gut issues.

3 STRESS

Competition is always accompanied by nerves, but extreme anxiety can get the best of athletes and their GI tracts. Anxiety, stress and tension very often cause spasms in the stomach muscles, intestines or colon, resulting in abdominal pain.

If your symptoms are serious, speak with your healthcare provider to identify specific causes and possible solutions. 

Nutrition Tips For Athletes

Stick to tried and true diets and routines that have worked. Use training runs to try new foods – not race day. • Eat real food. Pre-race, ditch the energy bars and gels and go for a moderate meal containing fresh fruit and veggies, protein and a source of carbohydrates for energy. • Read labels. Be wary of sweeteners and fillers used in energy bars, as these may be difficult to break down and digest. • Hydrate. Dehydration can mess with your GI tract and slow the rate that food leaves the stomach. Monitor pre- and post-race weight and note the colour of your urine. 

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Don’t Look Past The Power of Plants Fuelling & recovering on a plant-based diet

BY C A M E R O N A L K S N I S – Nutritionist, triathlete, former pro soccer player & founder of Kapok Naturals K APOKNATURALS 

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s awareness about diet grows, many athletes are moving to a plant-based diet. Especially in endurance events, I see athletes shying away from meat and dairy during their training. Myriad athletes get caught up with how many hours they train while paying little attention to their diet before and after workouts. I recently re-prioritized my focus to getting

5

Best Foods for Boosting Nitric Oxide •

• • • •

Dark leafy greens (arugula, spinach, kale, lettuce, etc…) Beets Strawberries Watermelon Walnuts

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maximum quality from my training fats, amino acids and other important sessions. This requires a conscious effort nutrients that you need without any of on recovery after workouts. A whole food, the added saturated fats, cholesterol plant-based diet has been instrumental and excess animal proteins that are in allowing me to increase volume week inflammatory in nature and harsh on over week while still being able to keep the kidneys and liver. Your body always the quality high. responds better to The three main clean fuel. Like a sources of energy car — the cleaner the for your body are fuel, the cleaner the carbohydrates, engine, the better fats and proteins, the performance. CAMERON ALKSNIS also considered Seeing macronutrients. improvement Carbohydrates are the most in a workout program is about readily available for your body. Try eating creating adaptations to your body during a variety of plant-based unrefined exercise. It’s about breaking down muscle complex carbohydrates such as oats, fibres and rebuilding them so they are brown rice, quinoa, potatoes, yams and stronger and more efficient. If you don’t beans two-to-three hours before activity, eat the right foods within 30-45 minutes especially on race day. Fruits such as after a hard workout, you will notice a berries, bananas and dates are great difference in recovery times and it will carbohydrates quickly digested for a more make a difference in the quality of your immediate source of energy. It’s important next workout. to eat whole foods instead of refined With a plant based diet your body and highly processed foods because the gets everything you need to recover and simple sugar carbohydrates will burn nothing you don’t. There are certain off way too quickly and won’t give you a nutrients essential to recovery and lasting fuel source. performance you can’t get easily from Plants are the cleanest and most animal products. Antioxidants and effective fuel source for our bodies. nitrates can only be found naturally in They contain all the fibre, water, plants. These nutrients are important minerals, vitamins, proteins, carbs, for recovery, and here’s why. ➝

Plants are the cleanest and most effective fuel source for our bodies.

IMPACT Magazine


N I T R AT E S / N I T R I C OX I D E

During exercise nitric oxide is released into your blood stream, which relaxes and widens your blood vessels allowing more blood to flow through. This increase in blood flow is crucial to performance during exercise and recovery. Blood carries oxygen to your muscles to repair the damaged cells. Plants have high amounts of nitrates in them, which your body turns into nitric oxide. You want as much blood flowing to your muscles as possible to delay the onset of

IMPACT Magazine

fatigue and help repair them. An awesome post-workout meal is a spinach and arugula salad with beets, walnuts, oats and berries. Or try steaming a large serving of kale and eat it with a splash of balsamic vinegar. ANTIOXIDANTS

After a workout your body builds up free radicals and oxidative stress. The goal of recovery is to clear out the free radicals and oxidative stress as quickly as possible. Antioxidants are

the best way to fight off oxidative stress. Try eating fresh strawberries, raspberries, blueberries or camu camu powder in a smoothie within 30 minutes of finishing your workout. As an endurance athlete, recovery is very important to me. My next workout is always just around the corner. The most successful athletes are the ones who can recover the fastest and be the freshest for the next workout. Don’t overlook the power of plants! 

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Veering Towards a Vegan Diet How to Make the Swerve & Keep Going Switching to a plant-based diet isn’t as hard as you might think BY E L I Z A B E T H E M E RY – Food blogger at Vancouver with Love in Vancouver, B.C. VANCOUVERWITHLOVE 

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remember the day I went vegan well. It was 2012. I was standing in a well-known food shop looking around for a snack. I remember thinking: ‘Crap, I’m never going to be full again.’ There was literally nothing available that was vegan except hummus and carrot sticks. Thankfully, seven years on (and still vegan) things have changed and there are more vegan options available each day. Despite this, I know how difficult it can be to make the initial switch, from reading labels, to explaining your new diet to friends, to craving cheese! If you’re wondering how to go vegan and make it stick, here’s some advice.

GO SLOW One of the easiest mistakes people make when going vegan is thinking that it has to be done overnight. It’s totally ok to

take it slowly. Taking simple steps like eating meat-free for one day per week, or one meal per day can be much more achievable at first.

DON’T FOCUS ON WHAT YOU CAN’T EAT Instead of thinking about how much you miss cheese, think about what you can replace it with. For every food you’re worried about giving up, take some time to find an alternative that you love. There are a wealth of meat and dairy replacements out there. With a little experimenting, you’ll find new foods to love.

EMBRACE NEW FOODS Try to embrace new foods like tempeh, tofu, nut butters, plant milks, coconut yoghurts and fermented foods which are all delicious and have many varieties. Remember to primarily focus on whole and minimally processed foods.

TRY NEW RESTAURANTS This is one of the best parts about going vegan! If you’re tired of thinking about what to eat for dinner, sometimes going out to eat provides a welcome break and inspiration for your next meal. The easiest way to find vegan-friendly restaurants near you is to download the Happy Cow app. You can search for every vegan, vegetarian or veg-friendly eatery in your area. Perfect.

GET ORGANISED Changing your diet can seem like hard work, but it doesn’t have to be. It sounds boring, but things like meal planning all really help. Plan the meals you’re going to cook ahead of time, and shop intentionally for them with a list.

LEARN A FEW BASIC RECIPES Don’t try to master complicated recipes when you first go vegan. Recipes like chilis and stews all yield lots of portions and are simple to make, requiring just one pot. They’re great as leftovers for lunch or dinner the next day and are packed full of healthy ingredients.

SUPPLEMENTS As with any dietary change, make sure you’re not missing any nutrients. It’s a good idea to check in with a professional nutritionist for advice.

DON’T LOSE HEART Changing your diet is a huge leap, and what you’re doing is amazing. Remember be kind to yourself! You’re bound to fall off the wagon occasionally while you’re still new to this and that’s ok – it will get easier with time. 

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IMPACT Magazine


Plants vs. Protein

Shattering the myth of incomplete plant-based protein BY D R . C H A N A DAV I S – Ph.D in genetics & plant-based blogger at Fueled by Science in Vancouver, B.C. FUELEDBYSCIENCE

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or decades vegans have been fighting the belief that plant-based proteins are ‘incomplete’ because they are ‘missing’ amino acids. Yet, as a biologist, I am highly skeptical of this so-called belief. My skepticism  – and that of my fellow scientists  –  is rooted in these two facts: 1. Plants use the same twenty amino acids that we do to build their proteins (the genetic code is universal). 2. All animals ultimately get their protein from plants (or plant-like phytoplankton) – either directly or indirectly through the food chain. Here are two key concepts: • Proteins are long chains of amino acids made by stringing together the 20 different amino acids. • Nine of the 20 amino acids are considered essential amino acids (or EAAs) because our bodies can’t make them. These must be supplied by your diet. Over the years, numerous scientists have tried to get ‘expert bodies’ to revise their erroneous statements about plant-based proteins. Despite such efforts, the myth of incomplete plant proteins is still going strong. Much of the confusion comes from using language loosely. Plants are not ‘missing’ amino acids. The word ‘missing’ implies zero or very low, whereas all plants include all twenty amino acids  –  in at least moderate amounts. Be informed when using the word ‘complete’ or ‘incomplete’ to describe a protein. We should be thinking about a day’s intake rather than a single serving. It is not necessary to meet your daily needs at every meal.

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The Complete Story About Beans & Rice

You may have heard that you should pair rice with beans to get a ‘complete protein’. The truth is that rice and beans (and all other plants) each contain all nine amino acids, in varying amounts. Yet, there is a kernel of truth to this advice. If rice were my only food, I could fall short of my daily requirements for one amino acid – lysine, because rice only has a small amount of this amino acid. By adding a serving of beans, I shoot up my lysine levels to easily clear 100%. In developing countries where food is scarce and grains are staples, there is a real risk of lysine deficiencies. However, when food is abundant and most of us are eating a varied diet, there is no real risk of failing to meet your amino acid needs.

A complete protein contains all nine amino acids the body can’t produce. Studies have proven that plant-based foods, like seeds, vegetables and whole grains, include all the amino acids in varying amounts. That means if you eat a balanced plant-based diet, you will have eaten more than enough protein by the end of the day. A related, underappreciated fact is that when your body makes a new protein, it uses amino acids from both your latest meal AND from your reservoir ‘pool.’ This pool comes from the amino acids

that are recycled in your body naturally and complements what you are eating, allowing the body to mix and match amino acids to the quantity that is needed. So the next time someone questions whether you’re eating enough protein on your vegan diet, just remind them that all protein ultimately comes from plants, even the protein found in meat. And calling plant-proteins ‘incomplete’ is like calling milk an incomplete source of calcium because it takes more than one glass to meet your daily needs! 

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Why You Should Try Plant-based Protein Power Plant-based clean protein is key to thriving in health

BY B R U C E F R I E D R I C H – Co-Founder of the Good Food Institute & co-author with Kathy Freston of Clean Protein in Washington, D.C.

W

e all need protein, because protein sustains life. Just as bricks and mortar form the foundation of a house, protein helps build the physical structure of our bodies. It is critical to facilitating growth and development, repairing tissue damage, and keeping our cells functioning. Protein makes our hair strong and our skin supple. Simply put: without protein, life would not be possible. In evolutionary times, getting enough protein could be a significant challenge. In the developed world today, though, much more important is ensuring that we are getting the right kind of protein. Today, most people equate protein with animal-derived foods. However, excessive reliance on these sources of protein comes with many downsides. In addition to necessary amino acids, animal-based meat comes with saturated fat and cholesterol, and it may also be tainted with hormones, pathogens, antibiotics, and other contaminants.

Maybe most critically, animal meat is also entirely without fibre. North Americans are fibre-deficient, in part because we rely so heavily on meat for our protein. Fibre can help you avoid developing minor health problems such as hemorrhoids or constipation, while helping to prevent major disease including colon cancer and heart disease. One study published in the journal Stroke finds that increasing your fibre intake by 7 grams a day – the equivalent of a bean burrito – can lower your risk of stroke by 7 per cent. In How Not to Die, Dr. Michael Greger details how Yale researchers found that premenopausal women who eat six or more grams of soluble fibre daily have 62 per cent lower odds of breast cancer compared with women who ate less than 4 grams. “Where do you get your protein?” is a common question for someone who is cutting back on their animal meat intake. But no one ever asks anyone “Where do you get your fibre?” even though a fibre-deficient diet has been linked to

"Where do you get your protein?" is a common question for someone who is cutting back on their animal meat intake.

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heart disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity, and other chronic diseases. Given the downsides of animal meat, more people are working to get more of their protein from plants. According to an October 2017 poll, 54 per cent of Americans are trying to eat less meat and more beans and grains. They are on the right track. Multiple studies have shown that people who eat the most animal protein tend to be more overweight and sick than people who eat mostly plants. The peer-reviewed journal Nutrition reviewed 32 studies – 21 clinical and 11 reviews – and found high meat intake clearly associated with bone deterioration, kidney disorders, increased cancer risk, liver disease, and heart disease. It’s unclear whether the harm from excessive meat consumption is a result of the fat and cholesterol in meat or the lack of fibre and other key nutrients. Regardless, relying on animal meat to meet our protein needs is clearly not wise, given the increased risk of cancer, heart disease, obesity, and other maladies. In 2004, longevity researcher Dan Buettner began studying the healthiest and happiest people. Eventually he identified five Blue Zones where people live especially long and healthy lives. This led to three New York Times bestsellers about the nine key characteristics of the longest-lived and happiest people in the world. Two dietary factors remain constant: all of these populations consumed at least 90 per cent whole plant foods, and they ate at least a cup of beans every single day. Beans are absolutely packed with protein, but without all the saturated fat, cholesterol, toxins, and other harmful ingredients in animal products.

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FREEPIK

BRUCEGFRIEDRICH


T H E B E S T P L A N T- B A S E D PROTEIN SOURCES Food

Protein (g) per 100 g

Dietary Fibre (g) per 100 g

Dietary Fibre (g) per 100 g

Cereal, Grains & Pasta

Beans & Legumes

Because they’re cheap, versatile, and delicious – and high in protein, fibre, iron, and antioxidants – beans have been staples around the world for most of human history. In 2007, the American Institute for Cancer Research published the results of a comprehensive look at every study of diet and cancer ever done. Among their recommendations for prevention of cancer is the consumption of beans at every meal. Beans and legumes aren’t just the optimal source of clean protein in terms of nutrition and disease, they also help us maintain a healthy weight. In one study conducted by scientists at Purdue and Bastyr Universities, with calories held steady, adding three cups of legumes per week (about one half-cup serving per day) more than tripled average weight loss. In another study from the European Journal of Nutrition, calorie-restricted diets that included four servings of beans per week were associated with 50 per cent more weight loss than diets with the same level of restricted calories but no beans. Simply put: participants took in exactly the same number of calories, but the participants who were consuming beans lost a lot more weight. There is just no reason to rely exclusively, or even mostly, on protein from animal sources. We will feel better and be healthier the more we move from animal-based to plant-based proteins. Plenty of clean protein is the key to thriving! 

Protein (g) per 100 g

Food

Brown Lentils

27.08

31.2

Red Lentils

24.44

11.1

Split Peas

22.45

34.7

Pinto Beans

20.83

14.6

Tempeh

20.29

4.8

Tofu

14.4

1.8

Soy Beans

13.1

1.1

Kidney Beans

6.15

Black Beans

Spelt

14.57

10.7

Quinoa

13.33

6.7

Teff

13.3

8

Buckwheat

13.25

10

Steel Cut Oats

12.5

10

Whole Wheat Bread

8.4

6

6.2

Seitan

7

3

5.74

4.9

Whole Wheat Pasta

5.99

3.9

Navy Beans

5.38

5.4

5.8

1.8

Chickpeas

4.92

5.7

Lima Beans

3.2

3.2

Black-eyed Peas

2.96

2.2

Nuts and Seeds Hemp Seeds

33.3

3.3

Pumpkin Seeds

30

10

Peanuts

25.8

8.5

Sesame Seeds

24.1

Chia Seeds

Pasta

Fruit Banana

1.09

2.6

Orange

1.04

2.5

Blueberries

0.74

2.4

Grapefruit

0.63

1.1

Apple

0.26

2.4

Vegetables Kale

4.28

3.6

17.2

Brussels Sprouts

3.38

3.8

23

38.5

White Mushrooms

3.09

1

Sunflower Seeds

23

10

Spinach

2.86

2.2

Pistachios

20.2

10.6

Broccoli

2.82

2.6

Almonds

20

13.3

Asparagus

2.2

2.1

Flax Seeds

20

30

Portbella Mushrooms

2.11

1.3

Cashews

18.2

3.3

2.1

16.6

10

Sweet Red Peppers

0.99

Walnuts Hazelnuts

14.95

9.7

Coconut Meat

6.88

16.3

Source: USDA National Nutrient Database

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Get Shredded on Plants

Think you can’t build muscle on a plant-based diet? Think again . . . BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA & N I K K I L E F L E R Personal wellness coaches & vegan authors in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

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f you are athletic, you might think the idea of going plant-based is absurd. The common belief is that protein (mostly from animals) is the optimal nutrition needed for building muscle and increasing strength (or simply surviving). The reality is that you don't need nearly as much protein as you think and any man or woman, including you, can build a strong, lean body on a whole food plant-based diet. When you eat whole plant foods, you consume fuel (carbohydrates) and amino acids (protein), fatty acids (fat), fibre, water, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytonutrients and other components to support good health. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that

dietary protein derived from plant sources built muscle just as well as protein from meat sources. However meat comes with additional components that are harmful to our health, including antibiotic residue, hormones, saturated fat, trans-fats, endotoxins and contaminants such as high levels of metals including copper and arsenic. The amino acids in fruits and vegetables are sufficient to build muscle and their vitamins, minerals and antioxidants keep us healthy, so we can exercise regularly and turn consistency into results. Here are two muscle-building plantbased recipes fit for any guy or gal who hits the gym on a regular basis and wants to get shredded.

Plant Powered Muscle Mylk Serves 1

INGREDIENTS • • • • •

5 stalks of celery 1 bunch of kale 1/2 bundle of cilantro 1 green apple 1 young coconut water + meat or 1 cup nut milk (coconut or almond milk) 1 medjool date, pit removed

DIRECTIONS Wash celery, kale, cilantro and apple thoroughly and run it through a juicer. If using fresh coconut, crack it open. Empty the coconut water into a blender through a mesh strainer. With a large spoon, scoop out all of the coconut meat and put into the blender with the water. Add one pitted date and blast on high for 30-60 seconds or until smooth and creamy. Add the green juice and blend well until all ingredients are combined — about 30 seconds. Serve immediately. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 346; protein 13 g; fat 4 g; carbs 73 g.

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VEGAN QUINOA ONIGIRAZU Serves 2

INGREDIENTS •

2 organic nori sheets

TURMERIC QUINOA

• • • • •

1/2 cup quinoa 1 cup water 1/2 tsp. turmeric powder pinch of black pepper pinch of salt

FILLING

Veggies of your choice. Be creative. We use: • 1/4 English cucumber sliced • 1 carrot shredded • 1/2 avocado • 1/2 roasted/cooked or pickled beet • 1 leaf of Swiss chard or Romaine lettuce for a nice crunch • Handful of fresh cilantro MISO GINGER SAUCE

• • • • • • • •

2 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. miso 2" fresh ginger root, peeled juice of one lime 1 Tbsp. coconut aminos 2 Tbsp. coconut nectar or maple syrup 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/8 cup water, less or more

DIRECTIONS TUMERIC QUINOA

Pour the quinoa into a fine mesh strainer and rinse under running water for at least 30 seconds. Drain well. Combine the rinsed quinoa and water with turmeric, pepper and salt in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat, then decrease the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Cook until the quinoa has absorbed all of the water, about 10 to 12 minutes. While the quinoa is cooking prep your veggies. Wash, peel, slice, shred, etc. Remove the pot of cooked quinoa from heat, cover, and let the quinoa steam for 5 minutes. Remove the lid and fluff the quinoa with a fork. MISO GINGER SAUCE

Blend all ingredients in a high speed blender until smooth and creamy, adding water as needed.

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ASSEMBLE THE ONIGIRAZU

Place one nori sheet on a length of cling wrap (shiny side down). Drop 1/4 cup of quinoa in the centre and flatten lightly with a fork (should be about the size of your palm). Pile veggies of your choice (chard, avocado, carrot, beet, cucumber, cilantro) over the quinoa (right to the edges of the quinoa). Top with second 1/4 cup of quinoa. Fold the nori as a package, bringing up each corner to meet in the middle, with some overlap. Fold the cling

wrap up, over and seal tightly, then flip over and let sit 5 minutes. Repeat for the second nori wrap. Slice tightly rolled nori wrap in half using a sharp knife. Enjoy warm or cold. Dip in the miso ginger sauce as desired. Nutrition facts per serving (without Miso Ginger Sauce) Calories 367; protein 14 g; fat 9 g; carbs 66 g. 

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Plant-Based Family Fuel

Get your crew on the Green Train RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A WA L L AC E , M S C , R D Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in Caledon, ON EATRIGHT_RD 

ANGELAEATRIGHTFEELRIGHT

T

he health benefits of eating a plant-based diet don’t begin when you are an adult. Children can benefit from eating more fruits and vegetables as well, so why not get the whole family on board. With flavourful fresh fruits, vegetables, beans, legumes and nuts, seeds and grains, you have a basketful of ingredients ready to create delicious meat-free meals. Any balanced meal should include some vegetables/fruit, healthy fats, grains, and protein. Having a balance of these macronutrients will provide you and your family members with the energy and strength needed to be active and feel your best. Children in particular need a variety of nutrients to support growth and development. Having meals that contain healthy fats, protein and carbs will provide them with everything they need to grow and fuel activity. H E R E A R E 5 G R E AT R E A S O N S T O G E T Y O U R F A M I LY O N T H E P L A N T- B A S E D E AT I N G T R A I N :

1 HEALTH BENEFITS

Eating a plant-based diet is associated with reduced risk of chronic disease such as cancer, obesity, diabetes and heart disease, as well as a decrease in fatigue, depression and anxiety.

2 MORE OF THE GOOD STUFF

With a plant-based diet you get more of the nutrients your body needs to stay healthy, happy and energized. You get more phytochemicals, antioxidants, fibre and plant protein. All of these nutrients help fuel activity and support child growth.

3 SAVE MONEY

Plant-based meals typically require less cooking time, which is perfect for the busy and active family. Use canned beans for a quick source of protein in stirfries or tacos (see recipe).

BELOW Lentil Tacos save time and feed your family's Mexican food cravings. RIGHT Blueberry Power Bites make the perfect on-the-go snack for active families.

5 SAVE THE PLANET

Our environment can benefit from more plant-based eating. Increased produce consumption means farmers will grow more fruits and vegetables; decreased meat consumption will help lower livestock emissions. Let your children know how they are making a difference for their planet with a vegetarian or vegan diet.

TK

Feeding a family can get pricey, and plantbased sources of protein are significantly cheaper than meat.

4 SAVE TIME

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F A M I LY F R I E N D LY P L A N T R E C I P E S LENTIL TACOS

BLUEBERRY POWER BITES

INGREDIENTS

INGREDIENTS

• • • • • • •

• • •

Serves 4

2 cups cooked lentils ½ white onion, minced 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil ½ cup salsa 1 cup unsalted vegetable broth 1-2 Tbsp. taco seasoning 4 taco shells

DIRECTIONS In a large pan, heat vegetable oil on medium-high heat, add onion and sauté onions until translucent. Stir taco seasoning into the broth and add to pan along with lentils. Mix together well and let simmer for 2-3 minutes. As mixture begins to thicken, add salsa and any other seasoning you might like. Continue to simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and serve on a soft or hard shell tortilla with any toppings you might like. Get creative and have your children pick their favourites. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 293; protein 12 g; fat 11 g; carbs 41 g.

Makes 15

• •

10 dates (soaked) 1 cup dried blueberries (soaked) 1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut 1/3 cup almond butter (or any nut or seed butter, use a seed butter to keep it school friendly) 1 cup rolled oats 3 Tbsp. hemp seeds

DIRECTIONS Place dates and blueberries in a bowl. Fill with warm water and let soak for 30-60 minutes. Drain and mash mixture. The warm water will help soften the dried fruit leaving you with an easy to mix fruit puree. Mix 1 cup fruit puree with oats, coconut, almond butter and hemp seeds then roll into small balls. Get the little ones involved in rolling these power bites and tasting them too.Store refrigerated in an air tight container for up to 1 week! Nutrition facts per serving Calories 161; protein 3 g; fat 6 g; carbs 26 g.

TIPS TO G ET YOUR F A M I LY E AT I N G M O R E PL A NT- BA S E D M E A L S

Start slow – Begin by upping your fruit & vegetable intake Most people don’t love change, so don’t make too many changes all at once. Start slow, incorporating a new vegetable into meal times each week. Have a meatless Monday, or try a plant-based version of a family favourite, like veggie tacos, veggie pizza, or veggie burgers. Make it fun for the entire family • Try a new recipe together and rate it out of 5 stars • Try a vegetarian restaurant • Let your child pick out new foods to try • Get the kids to help prepare your meal • Try a family cook off – partner up and see who can make the tastiest plantbased meals Grow your own Growing your own fruits or vegetables, even if they are micro versions is a great way to have your child connect to the food they are eating. Kids who grow their own veggies are more likely to eat, or at the very least, try them. It’s a great opportunity to teach your children about healthy eating, compost and our environment. Focus on the benefits Whether you are doing it for health reasons, environmental reasons, to fuel activity, or because you like those flavours more, remind your children why it’s important to eat this way. Knowledge is power, no matter how old you are. 

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Plant-Pow!

6 Fitness Benefits of a diet powered by plants BY J OA N N E G E R R A R D YO U N G – Plant-based chef & holistic nutritionist founder of The Healing Cuisine in Costa Rica THEHEALINGCUISINE

A

growing number of people are choosing to incorporate more plant power into their meals. High performance vegan athletes agree that nutrient-dense diets speed up recovery time and increase athletic endurance. Eating a well-balanced diet is key to the health- and fitness-enhancing benefits of this food regime. This type of diet consists mainly of the following: raw fruits and vegetables, whole food fats, plant proteins, iron and B12. Those who incorporate more plants into their diet may encounter some additional effort to ensure sufficient nutrients are not compromised. Leafy greens, sea vegetables, forest mushrooms, cruciferous and starchy vegetables, whole grains, beans, legumes, fruits, whole food fats (like extra virgin or cold pressed oils), chia seeds, avocados, nuts and seeds - all provide more than adequate amounts of the recommended daily nutrients intake. Plant-based diets may not suit everyone; metabolic requirements, caloric absorption, and macronutrient needs differ from person to person. If you're considering transitioning, you may experience a period of discomfort, possibly some indigestion as putrefied foods are loosened and released from your intestines. Symptoms of detoxification are normal: gas, bloating, headache, nausea, loss of appetite, even diarrhea. Be patient, this too shall pass. With commitment, the rewards will empower you.

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6 TOP BENEFITS OF PLANT NUTRIENTS

1 FASTER RECOVERY TIME

Oxidative stress and inflammation are the biggest challenges to recovery. Nutrients from plant foods increase body repair time by providing an abundance of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients. Plant-based foods are full of phytonutrients - compounds that stifle the free radicals that form during exercise and help support the rebuilding process and alleviate oxidative stress.

2 ANTI-INFLAMMATION

Inflammation is the body’s natural response to protect and heal tissues that are aggravated and inflamed. When we consume animal protein (without adequate amounts of fat) our blood pH increases in acidity, resulting in inflammation. Plantbased diets are more alkaline and contain bioactive compounds that modulate inflammation. Better performance and quicker muscular repair are possible without inflammation.

3 INCREASES ENERGY

Energy is essentially measured in calories from protein, fat and carbs. Vegan athletes may eat nine meals a day to up their caloric intake. Fruits and vegetables contain balanced nutrients (including vitamins, minerals and antioxidants) to help sustain energy throughout exercise. Plant foods are packed with carbs for fuel and/or fibre, plus protein for slow-released energy. The compounds in plant foods contribute to the production of energy, such as Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) - a complex chemical that drives many processes in living cells (e.g. muscle contraction, nerve impulse propagation, chemical synthesis).

4 IMPROVES DIGESTION

Plant nutrition improves digestion and the absorption of nutrients, enhances their processing and storing without overworking the digestive system. By improving your digestion, you'll move easier without inflammation, increase mental clarity and decrease inflammation. Most plant foods are full of insoluble fibre that acts much like a broom to assist in clearing out your intestines. This fibre also increases good gut bacteria while boosting the immune system simultaneously.

5 IMPROVES CARDIO

Plant-based diets are associated with lower blood pressure, reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and may even reverse atherosclerotic plaque build up. Many vegan athletes report their cardio improves drastically and their energy levels soar.

6 CREATES GLOBAL IMPACT

Eating more plants may not immediately change the world, but minimizing meat is a great contribution to improving the environment. Choosing to grow your own food, eat chemical-free, non-GMO foods and support local farmers can implicate a ripple effect amongst our families, friends, and communities throughout the planet. 

IMPACT Magazine


The X-Factor for Athletes Eating whole plant foods to support optimal performance

BY S H AY L A R O B E R T S , B H K , C S C S , C P H C – Peak Performance Coach & founder of Evolution Coaching U in Canmore, AB SHAYLASAYS 

EVOLUTIONCOACHING

WITH R I P E S S E L S T Y N – Former pro triathlete, founder of Plant-Strong By Engine 2, featured in Forks Over Knives & The Game Changers ENGINE2DIET

Y

ou don’t need to look any further than the veggie aisle at your local supermarket to find the key to feeling fit and strong. Plants are nature’s legal performance-enhancing drug according to Rip Esselstyn, a former professional triathlete and firefighter who switched to a plant-strong diet in 1987. Esselstyn is hooked on plants and he’s not the only one. The list of plant-based athletes includes tennis great Venus Williams, heavyweight boxer Bryant Jennings, football linebacker Derrick Morgan, Tour de France cyclist David Zabriske, ultra runner Scott Jurek and more. Esselstyn is an American author of several books on plant-based eating including Plant-Strong, Engine 2 Diet and Engine 2 Seven-Day Rescue Diet. He advocates omitting dairy, eggs, fish, meat and processed foods and focusing on whole plant foods. As an athlete, he understands how plants give you an edge. He also knows that when it comes to diet, athletes can be afraid of change. Yet, all the available evidence supports a plant-based diet for optimal performance.

I N H I S B O O K S , E S S E L S T Y N E X P L A I N S T H AT A PL A NT- S TR O N G D I E T W I LL: •

• •

• •

We have to break free from this notion that the more protein we consume, the better. RIP ESSELSTYN

IMPACT Magazine

Provide an abundance of phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals, protein and water to support your body in its recovery phase after training and racing Give you clean carbohydrates that rapidly replace depleted glycogen stores in muscles and liver and allow you to train harder, adapt and improve Offer high doses of alkaline and antiinflammatory substances to protect you from the stresses of four-to-eight hour training days Improve focus and clear your head Help keep your arteries and vessels youthful and elastic, improve blood flow to working muscles for killer oxygen uptake and enhanced VO2 max Strengthen your immune system to keep you healthy and free from illness Provide healthy fats loaded with unprocessed carbohydrates, our dominant fuel source Provide micronutrients to defend against oxidative stress and inflammation

One of the biggest myths about following a plant-strong diet is that you can’t get enough protein eating this way. As a world-class triathlete training between two and six hours a day for two decades, Esselstyn never, ever worried about getting enough protein. Every time he was asked the question, ‘Where on earth do you get protein?,’ his answer was always the same: BGP. Beautiful Glorious Plants. The standard North American diet provides as much as 30 per cent of its

calories from protein. It is also one of the unhealthiest diets in the world. A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics showed that even with a strict plant-based diet, people still ate 70 per cent more protein in a day than is actually required. People often equate protein with meat. While many athletes credit it as the secret to their strength, the truth is most North Americans eat too much of the stuff, which can lead to dehydration as well as tricking your body into not using the more efficient fuels available to it. In addition, you can’t store protein. If you eat too much, it turns into fat. All those protein shakes and supplements that people use to bulk up are just making them pack on unnecessary pounds. “I challenge you to surrender everything you think you know about nutrition, especially when it comes to the best, safest, and strongest sources of protein,” Esselstyn says. “We have to break free from this notion that the more protein we consume, the better. It isn’t better. More protein is responsible for more chronic Western disease than any one of us can imagine.” Esselstyn believes that to perform at your best you need to think about your body like your car. “If you put in premium fuel, it will run longer and better than on the economy unleaded. Plants have protein, they have plenty of it, and it’s 100 percent healthy. Since you have a choice, why not choose the healthiest option?” 

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G-BOMBS

Power foods that prevent chronic disease & cancer BY D R . J O E L F U H R M A N – Author of the New York Times bestseller: Super Immunity in Flemington, NJ JOELFUHRMANMD 

DRFUHRMAN

G-BOMBS is an acronym you can use to cue yourself to recall the best anti-cancer, health-promoting foods on the planet. These are the foods you should eat every day to make up a significant proportion of your diet. These foods are extremely effective at preventing chronic diseases such as cancer and promoting health and longevity.

G

IS FOR GREENS Leafy greens are the most nutrient-dense of all foods. Greens are excellent for weight loss, protect blood vessels and are associated with reducing the risk of diabetes. Leafy greens (such as kale) and green vegetables (such as bok choy, broccoli, and brussels sprouts) belong to the cruciferous family of vegetables, recognized for their anti-cancer properties.

B

IS FOR BEANS Beans (and other legumes) are super rich in nutrient-dense carbohydrates. Beans act as an anti-diabetes and weight-loss food. They are digested slowly, having a stabilizing effect on blood sugar, which helps to minimize food cravings. Beans are high in fibre thus lowering cholesterol levels. Eating beans, peas or lentils at least twice a week has been found to decrease colon cancer risk by 50 per cent. Legume intake also provides significant protection against oral, larynx, pharynx, stomach and kidney cancers.

O

IS FOR ONIONS Onions (along with leeks, garlic, chives, shallots, and scallions) make up the allium family of vegetables, all of which are beneficial for the cardiovascular and immune systems, as well as having anti-diabetes and anti-cancer effects.

M

IS FOR MUSHROOMS Consuming mushrooms regularly is associated with decreased risk of breast, stomach, and colorectal cancers. White, cremini, portobello, oyster, shiitake, maitake, and reishi mushrooms all have anti-cancer properties — some are anti-inflammatory, stimulate the immune system, prevent DNA damage and slow cancer cell growth. Note: mushrooms should only be eaten cooked: some raw culinarygrade mushrooms contain a potentially carcinogenic substance called agaritine; cooking mushrooms significantly reduces the harmful agaritine content.

B

ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED ON THE EAT TO LIVE BLOG

IS FOR BERRIES Blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries are true superfoods. They are all low in sugar and high in nutrients making them an excellent food for the brain and help improve both motor co-ordination and memory. They are full of antioxidants, including flavonoids, and antioxidants. Antioxidants impart both cardio-protective and anti-cancer effects, such as reducing blood pressure, and inflammation while stimulating the body’s own antioxidant enzymes.

S

IS FOR SEEDS … AND NUTS Seeds and nuts contain healthy fats and are rich in a spectrum of micronutrients, including phytosterols, minerals and antioxidants. Nuts in the diet aid weight maintenance and diabetes prevention. Seeds are similar to nuts, but each kind of seed is nutritionally unique when it comes to healthy fats, minerals and antioxidants; all seeds contain trace minerals and are higher in protein than nuts. Flax, chia and hemp seeds are an extremely rich sources of omega-3 fats; flaxseeds are rich in fibre and lignans (anti-cancer effects). 

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Timing is Everything What to eat before, during & after a workout

BY Z U Z A N A FA J K U S OVA –  Personal wellness coach & vegan author in Vancouver, B.C. ACTIVEVEGETARIAN 

ACTIVEVEG

O

ne of the most common questions we receive from our coaching clients is, ‘What should I eat before and after a workout?’ Often the answer depends more on the athlete and the specific activity and level of intensity. However there are some common truths you can apply for pre-, during and post-workout nutrition, whether you're a weekend warrior or a seasoned veteran.

BEFORE A WORK OUT Why eat? To provide enough energy to sustain your physical efforts during the training session. What to eat? An easily digestible highcarbohydrate snack (with a little protein and fat) such as: • Fresh fruit (banana, pineapple) • Green smoothie • Berry Chia jam on sprouted grain bread • Dates with small amount of nut butter When to eat? 30–60 minutes before exercising.

DURING A WORK OUT

IMMEDIATE POST-WORKOUT REFUEL

Why eat? To replace sweat loss and avoid cramping, and to increase/maintain energy to minimize fatigue, protect muscle tissue from breaking down and decrease recovery time after training.

Why eat? To optimize the recovery of energy stores (glycogen), which is important for repairing muscle and maintaining a healthy immune system.

What to eat? Sip on clean (no artificial colors and refined sugars), electrolyte-rich beverages. The intensity of your workout determines whether you need mid-workout carbs. Examples include: • Coconut water • Chia water • Sport gels that contain glucose and fructose (from dates and agave nectar) When to eat? Every 10 to 15 minutes during exercise, or more, depending on variables like heat, humidity and the intensity of your workout.

What to eat? Consume a 3:1 to 4:1 ratio of carbs-to-protein, in a snack or beverage. Focus on high glycemic, glucose-rich carb sources such as: • Smoothies with berries, banana, spinach, chia seeds and spirulina • Dates • Nut butter with apple and banana slices When to eat? Within 20 minutes after a workout.

1-3 HOURS AFTER A WORKOUT Why eat? To repair damaged tissues, form strong muscles and support long-term health and longevity. What to eat? A high protein meal is needed several hours post-workout, not directly after. Eat a complete, nutrientrich meal consisting of 25–50 grams of high-quality carbohydrates (squash, whole grains, pseudograins), 20-25 grams of easily digestible plant protein (such as hemp), plus omega-3 fatty acids (hemp seeds and flaxseeds), and vitamins and minerals from whole, natural food sources. Suggestions include: • Large salad with plenty of dark leafy greens, high protein seeds, pseudo-grains and legumes • Buddha Bowl • High protein smoothie When to eat? 1-3 hours post-workout 

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IMPACT Magazine


Hydration A Fine Balance Too much or too little water can derail your run & cause real problems BY K E L LY A N N E E R D M A N – 1992 Olympic Cyclist & Sports Dietitian in Calgary, AB & C A R R I E M U L L I N I N N E S – Sports Nutritionist & competitive marathoner in Calgary, AB UCALGARY 

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UNIVERSITYOFCALGARY

unning is thirsty work and water is considered by some to be the most neglected nutrient of runners and athletes in general. Too little water will bring on muscle cramps, over-heating, an elevated heart rate, poor exercise recovery and endurance. Alternatively, too much water can also be a problem as it dilutes essential minerals, such as sodium, leading to potentially deadly hyponatremia. Finding the right balance is the key! During running, fluid losses mainly occur from sweating which dissipates heat from hard working muscles. And you’ll lose even more water when it’s hot and humid, when you’re training at elevations over 2,000 m, have higher body fat or are not acclimatized to the environmental conditions. To start your run well-hydrated, aim to drink 5 - 7 ml of water per kilogram of body weight three to four hours before running, then another 3 - 5 ml of water per kg of body weight within two hours of running. These practices are recommended by studies published in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American College of Sports Medicine. For example, a 70 kg (154 lbs) runner would drink between 350 - 490 ml (approx. 1 ¾ cups) 3 - 4 hours prior and then 210 - 250 ml (about one cup), 1 - 2 hours before running.

Sipping on fluids during runs will help minimize dehydration. Initially try to drink 200 - 400 ml (3/4 - 1 ½ cups) per hour, consumed in two or three smaller doses, every 20 minutes or so. Runners should drink according to thirst but remember, you’ll retain more fluid and may minimize gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort by sipping instead of chugging! In addition, avoid overdrinking during long runs such as marathon or ultra distances since your kidneys can only manage about one litre of fluid in an hour, according to a study published by the American College of Sports Medicine. Sodium is the main mineral lost in sweat and this study also showed that drinking a beverage containing sodium before, during and after runs will help you to retain more fluid, as well as increase palatability and the urge to drink. For ideal rehydration drink more than your exercise fluid losses; experts suggest between 25-50 per cent more. For example, if you lost 1 kg of weight from exercising then drink 1.2 to 1.5 L in your recovery (i.e., 1 kg body weight lost = 1 L fluid by weight). Incorporating hydration within your runs requires trial and error to determine the optimal, personal mix. Sport dietitians are a great resource to help create an effective hydration routine to maximize training runs and races! 

Runners should drink according to thirst…

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IMPACT Magazine


The Holy Grail of Gut Health Will a plant-based diet give you the results you want? BY A N DY D E S A N T I S – Registered Dietitian & nutrition writer in Toronto, ON ANDYTHERD 

ANDYTHARD

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h yes, the ever elusive healthy gut, something that so many of us are in search of. A resilient digestive system is valuable for a plethora of reasons, including the fact that it absolutely sucks dealing with pain, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation on a regular basis. From the bigger picture perspective, the state of a person’s gut is increasingly linked, in research, to a wide array of conditions ranging from depression to diabetes. But what does it even mean to have a healthy gut? It’s not a simple question and has a lot to do with the diversity and quality of the trillions of bacteria in your digestive tract, also known as the gut microbiota.

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VEGANISM AND YOUR GUT There are a number of reasons why someone might move towards a more plant-based style of eating, including ethical concerns, environmental considerations and improved personal health. In 2019, it is well established that vegetarians and vegans are at a reduced risk of a number of health conditions including heart disease and certain types of cancer. Does this style of eating also play a role in maintaining gut health? A recently published study out of the Frontiers in Nutrition medical journal found that vegan and vegetarian diets were particularly effective at promoting diversity in the type of bacteria we want in our guts. The study found specifically that plant-based eaters have higher amounts of the favourable Bacteroidetes family of bacteria compared to omnivores. Vegans and vegetarians with wellbalanced diets also tend to consume

a much higher amount of fiber and anti-oxidants than the average person, which promotes the growth of specific types of other favourable bacteria. This works to restrict the growth of less favourable types, which simply can’t compete for resources and therefore shrink in numbers. When it comes to gut health, the importance of a favourable microbiota profile in your digestive tract cannot be understated. Many of these more favourable bacteria have anti-inflammatory effects on the digestive tract, which perhaps makes it unsurprising that a group of Japanese researchers [M. Chiba et al.] has recently promoted strictly plant-based diets as an effective treatment modality for inflammatory bowel disease – including both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. While it is certainly possible to achieve good gut health with an omnivore diet, recent research continues to point to the fact that vegan and vegetarian diets offer an edge. 

IMPACT Magazine


Sprouting your Nutritional Powerhouse Planting seeds for a healthier you BY DA N I E L L E A R S E N AU LT- K E T C H One of IMPACT Magazine's Top Vegan Influencers, Raw food chef & founder of Pachavega Living Foods Education in Canmore, AB PACHAVEGA 

PACHAVEGALIVING

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you can eat sprouted seeds raw, preserving their nutritional richness. Enzymes in a sprouted seed make it easier for you to digest and absorb its nutrients. Sprouts also have increased fibre, which helps eliminate toxins from the body, assists digestion and regulates bowel movement. Sprouts can also aid in weight loss, increase immunity, improve blood circulation, heart health, cancer prevention and are considered anti-aging. Athletes should note that protein in a sprouted seed or nut is

more easily absorbable, helping to build lean muscle mass. Other nutrients that are significantly made more bioavailable are carbohydrates that are turned into simple sugars, vitamin A (beta-carotene), C, E, K, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, omega 3 fatty acids and antioxidants. All are key nutrients for a healthy, vibrant, thriving life. Plus, you get more bang for your buck with sprouting. A cup of seeds can yield up to 24 times in volume in a matter of days – dependent on the seed chosen!

TK

prouting might seem like a new-age, hippie-food craze that made it to the mainstream along with kale and granola. The truth is, sprouting has existed in the culinary traditions of Asian and European cultures for thousands of years, revered for its immense nutritional value. Sprouts are literally the sprouts of baby plants and there are hundreds of sprouting seeds to try. Sprouts include the germinating seeds of nuts, beans, and grains as well as the ubiquitous alfalfa. All they need is a little water and love. And

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GET SPROUTING Sprouting is simple and doesn't take much time. There is a similar method for most seeds, nuts, grains and beans, though the length of time for soaking and growing may vary. By soaking the seeds and sprouting them, anti-nutrients, otherwise known as enzyme inhibitors that prevent the seeds from releasing their full nutritious potential, are released into the water. When sprouting at home, make sure you drain this unhealthy water and rinse your seeds very well afterwards. By consuming the enzyme inhibitors, your body has to work extra hard to break down the seed. A sprouted almond is much easier to digest than a raw almond. W H AT YO U ’ L L N E E D : • Organic seeds to sprout - be sure to check the expiration date. • A large, wide mouth mason jar, which will be your growing receptacle. • A mesh screen or clean cloth to serve as its cover. • A rubber band to hold the cover in place. Alternately, there are specialized multi-tiered sprouters that allow you to sprout different seeds at the same time and provides the perfect conditions for light exposure, moisture drainage and air circulation for growing sprouts. They sell for about $30.

WASABI GINGER SPROUT SALAD

SOAKING After the soaking period is done, cover the jar with the screen and hold the cover in place with a rubber band. Pour out the seed soaking water and rinse with fresh water. Drain the jar thoroughly by inverting the jar at an angle, letting the water flow through the screen. Do not submerse the seeds. RINSING & DRAINING Repeat the rinse and drain procedures once in the morning and once in the evening until the sprouts are ready for harvest. Upon harvest, put sprouts in a clean covered jar. Enjoy sprouts as a side dish or, for maximum benefit, fresh with salads, sandwiches or alone as a snack. Be cautious in preparing and consuming sprouts. Bacterial growth and risk of salmonella and e-Coli may occur if not prepared properly. This can be a concern when purchasing store-bought sprouts, if jars and materials used are contaminated. It is best to source your seeds from reputable suppliers and ensure cleanliness during preparation.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS WILD ORANGE GINGER SAUCE

• • • • • • • • •

1 cup organic orange, peel and pith removed 1 tsp. orange zest ½ cup water ¼ cup olive oil 2 Tbsp. miso paste 2 Tbsp. tamari 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame oil 2 tsp. fresh ginger root 1 garlic clove

SALAD

A handful of each: • Alflafa sprouts • Broccoli sprouts • Lentil sprouts • Mung bean sprouts • Shredded carrots • Cucumber slices

DIRECTIONS Blend all dressing ingredients in a high speed blender! In a big bowl, mix together a handful of each sprout and shredded carrots. Mix in a drizzle of dressing and toss. Plate and garnish with cucumber and black and white sesame seeds. Nutrition facts per serving Calories 231; protein 11 g; fat 10 g; carbs 28 g. 

SPROUT TYPE

QUANTITY

SOAK

RINSE & DRAIN

Alfalfa seeds

3 Tbsp.

8 to 12 hours

3-6 days

Broccoli seeds

3 Tbsp.

8 hours

3-6 days

French lentils

1 cup

24 hours

1-3 days

Mung beans

1 cup

24-36 hours

1-3 days

IMPACT Magazine

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Go Nuts for Nuts!

Healthy snacking: lowering cholesterol & cravings RECIPE & PHOTOGRAPHY BY A N G E L A WA L L AC E , M S C , R D – Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in Caledon, ON EATRIGHT_RD 

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uts are powerful plant-based nutrition packed with protein, fibre, and healthy fats, all of which help resist pre-meal cravings and keep you satisfied post-meal.

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W H AT M A K E S N U T S SO GOOD FOR YOU?

Nuts are heart healthy – an excellent source of mono- and polyunsaturated fats which have been associated with lowering LDL cholesterol levels, controlling blood sugar, reducing blood pressure, and slowing the development of plaque in your arteries. Their anti-inflammatory properties deem them ‘heart healthy.’ In fact, large research studies have found significantly lower amounts of inflammatory biomarkers (measures in the blood) in adults who consume five (or more) servings of nuts each week.

They are rich in fibre – this equates to regular bowel movements and helps keep you feeling full longer (in turn aiding weight management). The majority of Canadians only get 50% of the fibre they need. This applies to fruits and vegetables as well, so you can eat more of those too. Nuts are rich in antioxidants which align with the prevention of chronic diseases. As plant-based sources of protein, nuts help keep you satiated post meals, since the fat content slows digestion (¼ cup of almonds provides you with 8 grams of protein).


Nut consumption improves sperm quality – two handfuls of mixed nuts a day (almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts) over 14 weeks establishes more viable swimmers and an improved sperm count (this applies to men with no known fertility concerns). ARE YOU ALLE RG IC TO NUTS?

Don’t sweat it: search for seeds! There are some amazing and healthy alternatives for individuals with nut allergies that have similar benefits to nuts: healthy fats, fibre and protein. Sunflower, pumpkin, chia, ground flax, hemp and sesame seeds all have excellent

sources of protein, fibre, and healthy fats. (¼ cup of sunflower seeds has 7 grams of protein). Since seeds act a lot like nuts, sunflower seed butter (it's delicious!) can be used for sandwiches and wraps and seeds themselves can be added to smoothies, salads and yogurt. They can also be roasted (extra nutty!) and added to breads and desserts. Better health is easy and delicious… so, go nuts!

MANGO WALNUT SALAD

5

Simple Ways to Eat More Nuts

Add chopped or slivered nuts to your yogurt, cereal, or oatmeal. Top your salads with chopped or slivered nuts for added boosts of protein and fibre. Nuts, seeds and nut butters make for great additional healthy treats. Add them to your recipes: cookies, muffins, bars. Enhance your favourite smoothie with nuts, seeds or nut butters for healthy fat and a protein boost. Spread fresh fruit with nut or seed butter (e.g., coat an apple with almond butter). Blood sugars spike when you eat fruit, but nut fat counters the spike by slowing down digestion, keeping you feeling fuller longer.

This salad is full of healthy fats, antioxidants, fibre and vitamin C.

NUT BUTTER-FILLED DATES

Serves 2

Satisfy your sweet craving with these chewy morsels. If you're allergic to nuts, any seed butter can be substituted.

INGREDIENTS

DIRECTIONS

SALAD

Mix all dressing ingredients together and set aside. Wash mango, remove skin and slice or cube to your liking. Wash avocado and split in half, remove skin and scoop or slice thinly. In a bowl mix together arugula, Panko breadcrumbs, mango, avocado and walnuts. Drizzle dressing, toss and enjoy.

Serves 2

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 655; protein 11 g; fat 49 g; carbs 45 g.

Nutrition facts per serving Calories 222; protein 5 g; fat 8 g; carbs 36 g. 

• • • • •

1 mango, sliced or cubed (or other favourite fruit) ½ cup walnuts, chopped ½ cup Panko breadcrumbs 2 cups arugula 1 avocado, sliced or cubed

DRESSING

• • • • •

1 tsp. fresh ginger, grated 1 tsp. honey 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar Cracked black pepper

IMPACT Magazine

INGREDIENTS • •

4 dates 2 Tbsp. almond butter

DIRECTIONS Remove pit from the date and spoon ½ Tbsp. of almond or seed butter into your date.

Best of Food & Nutrition Special Edition 2020  227 


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